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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Tag: UT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5/all en Hosting foreign educators 5/all en Hosting foreign educators http://www.y12.doe.gov/partnerships/y-12ut-collaboration/hosting-foreign-educators

2

Cko.rtef' -, CtIOr4rt...tt. G~P:s (ITfS'rHO) u.t A,8,C,D~Jisf."c{ por..f,s  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,)t. (..-) ~\\1\\Ct. (hfo{'" rt.. -....1. O.Ms Wt ,et1'"" (b-s),+ (t"1.--i:\\t... rr..'t ·...( s",,"(r,··d= fit. Stl~ Cko.rtef' -, CtIOr4rt...tt. G~P:s ~~~1 (ITfS'rHO) u.t A,8,C,D~Jisf."c{ por..f,s 011\\" ';f\\f. I i ~"o\\ ""'"",t...&. "",... r. I. ,_ . ...J... Urdc. ""~~"t lUi""~A .J- ..:v.(~ ·· c...e.t e't.."'

Li, Kin-Yin

3

Category:Elkins, WV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Elkins, WV Elkins, WV Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Elkins, WV" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Elkins WV Harrison Rural Elec Assn Inc.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 59 KB SVQuickServiceRestaurant Elkins WV Harrison Rural Elec Assn Inc.png SVQuickServiceRestaura... 60 KB SVHospital Elkins WV Harrison Rural Elec Assn Inc.png SVHospital Elkins WV H... 57 KB SVLargeHotel Elkins WV Harrison Rural Elec Assn Inc.png SVLargeHotel Elkins WV... 57 KB SVLargeOffice Elkins WV Harrison Rural Elec Assn Inc.png SVLargeOffice Elkins W... 58 KB SVMediumOffice Elkins WV Harrison Rural Elec Assn Inc.png SVMediumOffice Elkins ... 59 KB SVMidriseApartment Elkins WV Harrison Rural Elec Assn Inc.png

4

Category:Charleston, WV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

WV WV Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Charleston, WV" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Charleston WV Harrison Rural Elec Assn Inc.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 59 KB SVQuickServiceRestaurant Charleston WV Harrison Rural Elec Assn Inc.png SVQuickServiceRestaura... 60 KB SVHospital Charleston WV Harrison Rural Elec Assn Inc.png SVHospital Charleston ... 57 KB SVLargeHotel Charleston WV Harrison Rural Elec Assn Inc.png SVLargeHotel Charlesto... 57 KB SVLargeOffice Charleston WV Harrison Rural Elec Assn Inc.png SVLargeOffice Charlest... 58 KB SVMediumOffice Charleston WV Harrison Rural Elec Assn Inc.png SVMediumOffice Charles... 60 KB SVMidriseApartment Charleston WV Harrison Rural Elec Assn Inc.png

5

West Virginia Smart Grid Implementation Plan (WV SGIP) Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WV DoE-NRCCE-APERC DRAFT February 16, 2009 1 West Virginia Smart Grid Implementation Plan (WV SGIP) Project APERC Report on Customer Complaints to WV PSC about Electric Power...

6

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Reduction Pilot Plant - WV 01  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Reduction Pilot Plant - WV 01 Reduction Pilot Plant - WV 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: REDUCTION PILOT PLANT (WV.01 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: International Nickel Company WV.01-1 Location: Cole Street at Alterizer Ave. , Huntington , West Virginia WV.01-2 Evaluation Year: 1987 WV.01-1 Site Operations: Manufactured powdered Nickel for use at Paducah and Portsmouth gaseous diffusion plants and Nickel plated a small quantity of Uranium slugs. WV.01-2 WV.01-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Limited quantities of radioactive material used on the site. Potential for residual radioactive material from AEC operations conducted at the site considered remote - confirmed by radiological survey. WV.01-1 WV.01-3

7

UtLA^S^/^'S/^^^  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UtLA^S^/^'S/^^^ UtLA^S^/^'S/^^^ r^J Secor^ Progress Report for AEC Contract AT(04-3)34, P. A. 218 MULTIHETEROMACROCYCLES THAT C O M P L E X METAL IONS {^Cl PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Donald J. Cram, Professor of Chemistry INSTITUTIONAL AFFILIATION: Department of Chemistry University of California at Los Angeles 405 Hilgard Avenue Los Angeles, California 90024 REPORTING PERIOD: DATE OF THIS REPORT: 1 May 1975 - 30 April 1976 15 January 1976 Prepared for the ERDA, Division of Physical Research, under Contract No. .^T(04-3)34, Project Agreement No. 218. - NOTICE - Thi5 report was prepared as an account of work jponiored by the United State* Government Neither the United States nor the United States Energy Research and Development Administration, nor any of their employees, nor any of Iheir contractors,

8

UT-TRIBE-NORTHWESTERN BAND OF SHOSHONE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Project Title UT-TRIBE-NORTHWESTERN BAND OF SHOSHONE Location: Tribe UT-TRIBE- NORTHWESTERN BAND OF SHOSHONE UT American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Northwestern Band of Shoshone Nation of Utah proposes to perform energy efficiency improvements

9

NETL: 2010 WV Science Bowl Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2010 WV Science Bowl 2010 WV Science Bowl The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) invites you to participate in one of the premier scientific events for high school students, the West Virginia High School Science Bowl 2010 on February 6, 2010. This will be NETL's 19th year sponsoring the high school competition. There is a change this year in the registration process from past years, all teams who are registering to complete, must do so through the National Science Bowl website. For those who are not familiar with the West Virginia Science Bowl here are some highlights: The competition is open to high school students (school, scouts, home school) from West Virginia. Complete eligibility requirements are located at the National Science Bowl website.

10

West Virginia Smart Grid Implementation Plan (WV SGIP) Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WV DoE-NRCCE-APERC DRAFT February 16, 2009 WV DoE-NRCCE-APERC DRAFT February 16, 2009 1 West Virginia Smart Grid Implementation Plan (WV SGIP) Project APERC Report on Customer Complaints to WV PSC about Electric Power Service Ali Feliachi, Muhammad Choudhry, John Saymansky and Ed Sneckenberger February 16, 2009 Introduction APERC has appreciated that one of the most important sources for data on the consumer perspective of the current electric power grid in West Virginia would be the WV Public Service Commission (WV PSC). Thus, an email request was sent on December 19, 2008 to Byron Harris at the WV PSC to request any advice or approaches to determine customer and regulatory perspectives of the current electric power grid in WV. Customer Complaint Data Bryon Harris was able to provide a spreadsheet of customer complaints in West Virginia for

11

Tag: UT | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hosting foreign educators We recently welcomed a group of professors from Indonesia. More... Category: News Grad Assistants Make Their Mark UT students work with the...

12

U.T.: Telnet Reference Manual  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UT is a user telnet program designed to run under the ITS time sharing system. It implements the relatively recent ARPA network negotiating protocol for telnet connections.

Eastlake, Donald E.

1974-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

science.uts.edu.au think.change.do  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

science.uts.edu.au think.change.do UTS: Science UndeRgRadUatecoURSeSgUide2014 #12;contactUS Tel: 1300 ASK UTS (1300 275 887) Email: science@uts.edu.au science.uts.edu.au contentS Why Science at UTS? 01 World Class Facilities 02 Careers in Science and Mathematics 04 UTS: Science Courses 05 Bache

University of Technology, Sydney

14

w.uts.edu.au/international ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy agency (united nations), International Institute for applied Systems analysis, oecd, and world), Faculty of engineering and Information technology at utS. He is also the director of the centre for energy policy themes ­ in national and global contexts. Such themes include energy market deregulation

University of Technology, Sydney

15

Microsoft PowerPoint - NETL Morgantown, WV to Washington, DC...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Morgantown, WV Site to Washington, DC Headquarters 1. Take I-68 EAST toward CUMBERLAND, MD. 2 M t I 70 EASTUS 40 EUS 522 S E it EXIT 82AB t d HAGERSTOWN 2. Merge onto I-70 EAST...

16

Microsoft Word - Parkersburg High School Claims 2013 WV Science...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Parkersburg High School Claims 2013 WV Science Bowl Regional Win Parkersburg High School demonstrated its academic prowess as it defeated 12 other teams to capture the 22 nd Annual...

17

Category:Cedar City, UT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

City, UT City, UT Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Cedar City, UT" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Cedar City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVFullServiceRestauran... 58 KB SVLargeOffice Cedar City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVLargeOffice Cedar Ci... 57 KB SVMediumOffice Cedar City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVMediumOffice Cedar C... 62 KB SVMidriseApartment Cedar City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVMidriseApartment Ced... 60 KB SVPrimarySchool Cedar City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVPrimarySchool Cedar ... 60 KB SVQuickServiceRestaurant Cedar City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVQuickServiceRestaura...

18

Category:Salt Lake City, UT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UT UT Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Salt Lake City, UT" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Salt Lake City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVFullServiceRestauran... 57 KB SVHospital Salt Lake City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVHospital Salt Lake C... 57 KB SVLargeHotel Salt Lake City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVLargeHotel Salt Lake... 55 KB SVLargeOffice Salt Lake City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVLargeOffice Salt Lak... 57 KB SVMediumOffice Salt Lake City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVMediumOffice Salt La... 62 KB SVMidriseApartment Salt Lake City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png

19

UT-Battelle Department of Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for neutron scattering · Leadership in computational science and engineering at scale · Leadership Precision Engineering Contracting Services Spectrum, Inc. Brandan Enterprises #12;13 UT-Battelle Department Upcoming procurements RFP Estimated value Contact 4000 substation reconfiguration Summer 2007 $1M­$2M

20

UT-Battelle Department of Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the billion- dollar U.S. ITER project #12;4 UT-Battelle Department of Energy The University of Tennessee Fossil fuels are the source of most of the nation's energy Total U.S. energy consumption, 2006: ~100 capacity U.S. energy infrastructure Energy productivity Cost-effectively improve the energy efficiency

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ut ct wv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Insights from UT Austin Energy Poll  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Insights from UT Austin Energy Insights from UT Austin Energy Poll on U.S. Consumer Attitudes July 24, 2013 Sheril Kirshenbaum Director of The Energy Poll Page 2 Source: University of Texas at Austin Energy Poll Impartial and authoritative source of public perspectives on energy to inform and guide discussion, business planning and policy development Page 3 Source: University of Texas at Austin Energy Poll Background * First questionnaire developed in 2010 (Inaugural launch Oct. 2011) * Collaborative effort with representatives from academic institutions, polling companies, non-governmental organizations, energy producers and energy consumers Fall 2012 - Third Release * Online survey conducted September 6-17, 2012 * 2,092 respondents, weighted to reflect U.S. Census demographics

22

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- The Carborundum Co Inc - WV 02  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

The Carborundum Co Inc - WV 02 The Carborundum Co Inc - WV 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: THE CARBORUNDUM CO., INC (WV.02 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: AMAX Inc WV.02-1 Location: Wood County , West Virginia WV.02-1 Evaluation Year: 1982 WV.02-1 Site Operations: Produced high-grade Zirconium metal for use in construction of nuclear reactors for the Navy circa late-1950s and 1960s; Conducted small scale Zirconium and Uranium testing in the mid-1970s. WV.02-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - AEC/NRC licensed site. No Authority for cleanup under FUSRAP WV.02-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Thorium, Uranium WV.02-2 Radiological Survey(s): Yes WV.02-3 Site Status: Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP

23

West Virginia Smart Grid Implementation Plan (WV SGIP) Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

West Virginia Smart Grid Implementation Plan (WV SGIP) Project West Virginia Smart Grid Implementation Plan (WV SGIP) Project APERC Report on Assessment of As-Is Grid by Non-Utility Stakeholders Introduction One goal of this grid modernization project is to assess the current status of the electric power grid in West Virginia in order to define the potential to implement smart grid technologies. Thus, an initial task of this project was to define the current state or "As-Is" grid in West Virginia. Financial and time constraints prohibited the development and execution of formal surveys to solicit input from the various stakeholders. However attempts were made to obtain their input through informal questionnaires and meeting with focus groups. list of stakeholders which

24

RECIPIENT:Utah County STATE: UT PROJECT TITLE:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utah County STATE: UT PROJECT TITLE: EECBG - Utah County Energy Efficiency Retrofits Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number cm...

25

Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;2 3 Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy MSTD/CD-Apr-08 Energy Storage Energy conversion Energy Source Input Energy Carrier A Multiple Energy Conversions Losses: Storage Conversion Hydrogen Electricity Storage: Chemical Electrochemical #12;3 5 Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department

Pennycook, Steve

26

Presented by the UT Dallas Career Center UT Dallas Fall Career Expo Employer Profile September 19, 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineer Computer Engineering, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Software Engineering Full-time Job, Internship/Co- op: Summer CPT, OPT Ambit Energy ambitenergy.com Software Developer, Business CoordinatorPresented by the UT Dallas Career Center UT Dallas Fall Career Expo Employer Profile September 19

O'Toole, Alice J.

27

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Monticello Mill Site - UT 03  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mill Site - UT 03 Mill Site - UT 03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Monticello Mill Site (UT.03) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Monticello, Utah, Disposal and Processing Sites Documents Related to Monticello Mill Site Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Interim Remedial Action Progress Report July 1999-July 2000. GJO-2000-163-TAR. September 2000 U.S. Department of Energy at Grand Junction 2003 Annual Inspection Monticello, Utah November 2003 2005 Annual Inspection of the Monticello Mill Tailings (USDOE) and Monticello Radioactively Contaminated Properties Sites December 2005 Office

28

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- U S Bureau of Mines - UT 01  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

UT 01 UT 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: U. S. BUREAU OF MINES (UT.01) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Salt Lake City , Utah UT.01-2 Evaluation Year: 1987 UT.01-1 Site Operations: Research and development on uranium recovery from ore in the late 1940s. UT.01-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Radiation levels below criteria UT.01-1 UT.01-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium UT.01-2 Radiological Survey(s): Yes UT.01-2 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to U. S. BUREAU OF MINES UT.01-1 - DOE Letter; Fiore to Schiager; Subject: Elimination of Bureau of Mines and University of Utah Sites from FUSRAP Consideration;

29

Columbia River Peoples Ut Dist | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Columbia River Peoples Ut Dist Columbia River Peoples Ut Dist Jump to: navigation, search Name Columbia River Peoples Ut Dist Place Oregon Utility Id 40438 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Drainage Pumping and Farm Irrigation Service Commercial Experimental Rate Schedule - General Service - Greater than 400 Amp Service Industrial General Service - Greater Than 400 Amp Service Commercial

30

NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0.00-1.99 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 18. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Onsystem Industrial Consumers, 1996 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure 19. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Electric Utilities, 1996 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure Sources: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Form FERC-423, "Monthly Report of Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants," and Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Note: In 1996, consumption of natural gas for agricultural use

31

ORNL 2011-G00219/jcn UT-B ID 201002414  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ORNL 2011-G00219/jcn UT-B ID 201002414 08.2011 Catalytic Conversion of Bioethanol to Hydrocarbons dilute bio-mass produced alcohols, such as those found in a biomass fermentation reactor. Conventional of traditional ethanol fermentation into fungible fuel applications Potential Applications · Hydrocarbon products

Pennycook, Steve

32

ORNL 2010-G00390/jcn UT-B ID 200802041  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from Water Technology Summary Developing the technology to generate energy from waste and renewableORNL 2010-G00390/jcn UT-B ID 200802041 Microbial Fuel Cells Generate Energy While Clearing Biowaste materials is becoming an increasingly important priority in the United States, as energy derived from fossil

Pennycook, Steve

33

ORNL 2011-G00218/jcn UT-B ID 200701859  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be wasted energy inside a hybrid electric vehicle engine. The invention, a mechanical flywheel coupledORNL 2011-G00218/jcn UT-B ID 200701859 07.2011 Flywheel Energy Storage Device for Hybrid to a rotor inside the engine, stores rotational energy during engine performance, subsequently feeding

Pennycook, Steve

34

ORNL 2010-G00385/jcn UT-B ID 200301297  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

billion annually in lost productivity. Waste energy from deceleration could be captured and storedORNL 2010-G00385/jcn UT-B ID 200301297 Nanostructured Carbon Shows Promise for Energy Storage energy storage demands of modern supercapacitors. Short power interruptions cost U.S. industry $80

Pennycook, Steve

35

ORNL 2010-G00405 UT-B ID 200902330  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial Effluents Technology Summary A vast amount of energy is wasted in the United States from of such previously wasted energy from relatively low temperature (ORNL 2010-G00405 UT-B ID 200902330 Novel Nanopore Membrane Technology Recovers Energy from

Pennycook, Steve

36

Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;8 Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy Schwidder_SAM_SC08 Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Notebooks The electronic notebook software for the SNS is being developed based on the research done under control of proposal PI. Layered access control for SNS users and groups: ­ Personal notebooks

37

Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

&M University · Jackson State University (3) · Kentucky State University · Morehouse College · Prairie View A professors Date: October 28-29, 2007 Attendees: 1,483 Institutions: 127 Colleges and Universities HBCU/MEIs: 41 Colleges and Universities DOE Labs 11 #12;9 Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy

38

Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

require extensive support facilities. 1. Mercury Containment 2. Hot Cell / Remote Handling 3. Ventilation change-out and process equipment maintenance is designed to be fully remote. Thus, · The SNS hot cell by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy NF-IDS Meeting 15 Dec 08 4. Waste Handling · All hot cell

McDonald, Kirk

39

If you reside in WASHINGTON, DC - MD -VA - WV your salary will...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

If you are employed in the WASHINGTON, DC Metropolitan Area (D.C., Baltimore, Northern VA, Eastern WV, and Southern PA) your salary will range from: Pay Band Pay Plan(s) Minimum...

40

ADFAC home dedicated with help from UT-Battelle | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fred Strohl 865.574.4165 ADFAC home dedicated with help from UT-Battelle (hi-res image) Listen to the audio OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Sept. 24, 2013 -- UT-Battelle has made it possible for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ut ct wv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

RECIPIENT:Utah County STATE: UT PROJECT TITLE:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utah County STATE: UT Utah County STATE: UT PROJECT TITLE: EECBG - Utah County Energy Efficiency Retrofits Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number cm Number DE-FOA-OOOOO13 EEOOOO889 GFO-O000889-002 EEO Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: Cx, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A11 Technical advice and planning assistance to international, national, state, and local organizations. A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, Inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply

42

Ventilation Effectiveness Research at UT-Typer Lab Houses  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ventilation Effectiveness Research Ventilation Effectiveness Research at UT-Tyler Lab Houses Source Of Outside Air, Distribution, Filtration Armin Rudd Twin (almost) Lab Houses at UT-Tyler House 2: Unvented attic, House 1: Vented attic lower loads + PV Ventilation Effectiveness Research 30 April 2013 2 * 1475 ft 2 , 3-bedroom houses * House 2 was mirrored plan * 45 cfm 62.2 ventilation rate * Garage connected to house on only one wall * Access to attic via pull-down stairs in garage * Further access to House 2 unvented attic through gasket sealed door Ventilation Effectiveness Research 30 April 2013 3 Testing Approach  Building enclosure and building mechanical systems characterization by measurement of building enclosure air leakage, central air distribution system airflows, and ventilation system airflows.

43

File:Ut geothermal0104.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ut geothermal0104.pdf Ut geothermal0104.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:Ut geothermal0104.pdf Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,500 × 1,125 pixels, file size: 3.53 MB, MIME type: application/pdf, 14 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 11:17, 14 November 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 11:17, 14 November 2012 1,500 × 1,125, 14 pages (3.53 MB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup instructions for more information) File usage There are no pages that link to this file.

44

DOI-BLM-UT-C010-????-????-CX | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

C010-????-????-CX C010-????-????-CX Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-UT-C010-????-????-CX CX at Cove Fort Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration {{{NEPA_Name}}} General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type CX Applicant ENEL Green Power North America Geothermal Area Cove Fort Geothermal Area Project Location Utah, Utah Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Time Frame (days) Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office BLM Color Country District Office Managing Field Office BLM Cedar City Field Office Funding Agencies none provided Surface Manager BLM, USFS Mineral Manager none provided Selected Dates Relevant Numbers

45

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CONTACTS Joseph Stoffa Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-0285 joseph.stoffa@netl.doe.gov Xingbo Liu Principal Investigator Dept. MechanaWest Virginia University P.O. Box 6106 Morgantown, WV 26506-6106 304-293-3339 xingbo.liu@mail.wvu.edu Shailesh D. Vora Technology Manager, Fuel Cells National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-7515 shailesh.vora@netl.doe.gov PARTNERS None PROJECT DURATION Start Date End Date 08/31/2012 09/30/2015 COST Total Project Value $634,839 DOE/Non-DOE Share $499,953 / $134,886 AWARD NUMBER FE0009675 Fundamental Understanding of Oxygen Reduction and Reaction Behavior and Developing High Performance and Stable

46

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Traci Rodosta Traci Rodosta Carbon Storage Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road PO Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-1345 traci.rodosta@netl.doe.gov Joshua Hull Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-0906 joshua.hull@netl.doe.gov Erik Westman Principal Investigator Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University 100 Holden Hall Blacksburg, VA 24061 540-0231-7510 Fax: 540-231-4070 ewestman@vt.edu PROJECT DURATION Start Date End Date 12/01/2009 12/31/2012 COST Total Project Value $257,818 DOE/Non-DOE Share $248,441 / $9,377 Government funding for this project is provided in whole or in part through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. P R OJ E C T FAC T

47

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Technology Program Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-1345 traci.rodosta@netl.doe.gov Dawn Deel Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4133 dawn.deel@netl.doe.gov Sherry Mediati Business Contact California Energy Commission 1516 9th Street, MS 1 Sacramento, CA 95814 916-654-4204 smediati@energy.state.ca.us Mike Gravely Principal Investigator California Energy Commission 1516 Ninth Street, MS 43 Sacramento, CA 95814 916-327-1370 mgravely@energy.state.ca.us Elizabeth Burton Technical Director Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 90-1116 Berkeley, CA 94720 925-899-6397 eburton@lbl.gov West Coast Regional Carbon

48

File:EIA-Appalach6-WV-VA-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Appalach6-WV-VA-BOE.pdf Appalach6-WV-VA-BOE.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Appalachian Basin, Southern West Virginia and Southwestern Virginia By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(6,600 × 5,100 pixels, file size: 17.02 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Appalachian Basin, Southern West Virginia and Southwestern Virginia By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States West Virginia, Virginia File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time.

49

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Turbines Hydrogen Turbines CONTACTS Richard A. Dennis Technology Manager, Turbines National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4515 richard.dennis@netl.doe.gov Travis Shultz Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road PO Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-1370 travis.shultz@netl.doe.gov Jacob A. Mills Principal Investigator Florida Turbine Technologies, Inc 1701 Military Trail Suite 110 Jupiter, FL 33458-7887 561-427-6349 jmills@fttinc.com PARTNERS None PROJECT DURATION Start Date End Date 06/28/2012 08/13/2015 COST Total Project Value $1,149,847 DOE/Non-DOE Share $1,149,847 / $0 AWARD NUMBER SC0008218 Air-Riding Seal Technology for Advanced Gas Turbine Engines-Florida Turbine

50

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rodosta Rodosta Carbon Storage Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-1345 traci.rodosta@netl.doe.gov Darin Damiani Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4398 darin.damiani@netl.doe.gov Vivak Malhotra Principal Investigator Southern Illinois University Neckers 483A Mailcode: 4401 Carbondale, IL 62901 618-453-2643 Fax: 618-453-1056 vmalhotra@physics.siu.edu PARTNERS None Risk Assessment and Monitoring of Stored CO2 in Organic Rock under Non-Equilibrium Conditions Background Fundamental and applied research on carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS)

51

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PO Box 880 PO Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-1345 traci.rodosta@netl.doe.gov Andrea McNemar Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road PO Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-2024 andrea.mcnemar@netl.doe.gov Charles D. Gorecki Technical Contact Senior Research Manager Energy & Environmental Research Center University of North Dakota 15 North 23 rd Street, Stop 9018 Grand Forks, ND 58202-9018 701-777-5355 cgorecki@undeerc.org Edward N. Steadman Deputy Associate Director for Research Energy & Environmental Research Center University of North Dakota 15 North 23 rd Street, Stop 9018 Grand Forks, ND 58202-9018 701-777-5279 esteadman@undeerc.org John A. Harju Associate Director for Research Energy & Environmental Research Center University of North Dakota

52

Scoping Study for Demand Respose DFT II Project in Morgantown, WV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This scoping study describes the underlying data resources and an analysis tool for a demand response assessment specifically tailored toward the needs of the Modern Grid Initiatives Demonstration Field Test in Phase II in Morgantown, WV. To develop demand response strategies as part of more general distribution automation, automated islanding and feeder reconfiguration schemes, an assessment of the demand response resource potential is required. This report provides the data for the resource assessment for residential customers and describes a tool that allows the analyst to estimate demand response in kW for each hour of the day, by end-use, season, day type (weekday versus weekend) with specific saturation rates of residential appliances valid for the Morgantown, WV area.

Lu, Shuai; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

2008-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

53

File:EIA-Appalach6-WV-VA-GAS.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Appalach6-WV-VA-GAS.pdf Appalach6-WV-VA-GAS.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Appalachian Basin, Southern West Virginia and Southwestern Virginia By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(6,600 × 5,100 pixels, file size: 18.09 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Appalachian Basin, Southern West Virginia and Southwestern Virginia By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States West Virginia, Virginia File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time.

54

File:EIA-Appalach5-eastWV-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Appalach5-eastWV-BOE.pdf Appalach5-eastWV-BOE.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Appalachian Basin, Eastern West Virginia and Western Maryland By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(6,600 × 5,100 pixels, file size: 17.26 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Appalachian Basin, Eastern West Virginia and Western Maryland By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States West Virginia, Maryland File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time.

55

1 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy 1 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy 5/27/2011 Systems Biology and Biotechnology Brian Davison, Chief Scientist Applied

56

1 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Structure and Conformational Dynamics trajectories of Hg(II)-MerR #12;2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Scientists at Oak

57

UT tower goes dark to conserve energy by KVUE.com  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UT tower goes dark to conserve energy by KVUE.com Posted on November 22, 2013 at 5:12 PM Updated, but the first time the tower turned off its lights for the initiative. In previous initiatives, the UT Energy) assisted with turning off lights and electronics across campus to conserve energy. While the clock faces

58

Computed Tomography (CT) Scanning For Petrophysical Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R&D Fac R&D Fac ts Carbon Sequestration ContaCtS David Wildman Division Director Geosciences Division National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4913 david.wildman@netl.doe.gov T. Robert McLendon Geosciences Division National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-2008 t.mclen@netl.doe.gov Duane H. Smith Geosciences Division

59

Albany, OR * Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Romanosky Romanosky Crosscutting Research Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-4721 robert.romanosky@netl.doe.gov Richard Dunst Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-6694 richard.dunst@netl.doe.gov Shizhong Yang Principal Investigator Southern University

60

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R R &D FAC T S Natural Gas & Oil R&D CONTACTS George Guthrie Focus Area Lead Office of Research and Development National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-6571 george.guthrie@netl.doe.gov Kelly Rose Technical Coordinator Office of Research and Development National Energy Technology Laboratory 1450 Queen Avenue SW Albany, OR 97321-2152 541-967-5883 kelly.rose@netl.doe.gov PARTNERS Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA Oregon State University Corvallis, OR Pennsylvania State University State College, PA University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA URS Corporation Pittsburgh, PA Virginia Tech Blacksburg, VA West Virginia University Morgantown, WV

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ut ct wv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

SBOT WEST VIRGINIA NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LAB -WV POC Larry Sullivan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WEST VIRGINIA WEST VIRGINIA NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LAB -WV POC Larry Sullivan Telephone (412) 386-6115 Email larry.sullivan@netl.doe.gov ADMINISTATIVE / WASTE / REMEDIATION Facilities Support Services 561210 Employment Placement Agencies 561311 Temporary Help Services 561320 Professional Employer Organizations 561330 Document Preparation Services 561410 Security Guards and Patrol Services 561612 Security Systems Services (except Locksmiths) 561621 Janitorial Services 561720 Landscaping Services 561730 Hazardous Waste Treatment and Disposal 562211 Remediation Services 562910 Materials Recovery Facilities 562920 All Other Miscellaneous Waste Management Services 562998 CONSTRUCTION Industrial Building Construction 236210 Commercial and Institutional Building Construction 236220 Power and Communication Line and Related Structures Construction

62

Preliminary Notice of Violation, UT-Battelle, LLC - EA-2003-10 | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UT-Battelle, LLC - EA-2003-10 UT-Battelle, LLC - EA-2003-10 Preliminary Notice of Violation, UT-Battelle, LLC - EA-2003-10 November 18, 2003 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to UT-Battelle, LLC, related to Work Control Issues at the High Flux Isotope Reactor and Radiochemical Engineering Development Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory This letter refers to the Department of Energy's Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) investigation of the facts and circumstances surrounding nuclear safety work control issues at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC). Our office initiated this investigation in response to a manual reactor shutdown due to a control cylinder maintenance safety deficiency and operation of a radiological [ ] without required containment, as well as additional

63

1 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Institutional Veterinarian Joan Richerson, DVM Energy and Environmental Sciences Directorate OBER Programs Martin Keller Environmental Joint Genome Institute Jerry Tuskan Energy Programs Martin Keller Energy Efficiency

64

1 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy For the first time information-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Between 1950 and 1963 approximately 11 million kilograms of mercury (Hg

65

Preliminary Notice of Violation, UT-Battelle, LLC - EA-2004-09...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

18, 2004 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to UT-Battelle, LLC, related to a Hot Cell Radiological Spill Event at Oak Ridge National Laboratory This letter refers to...

66

GRR/Section 14-UT-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-UT-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification GRR/Section 14-UT-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-UT-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification 14-UT-d - Section 401 Water Quality Certification.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Section 401 of the Clean Water Act (CWA) requires a Water Quality Certification for any federal license or permit that is issued to construct or operate a facility, which may result in any fill or discharge into the navigable waters of the United States. The Utah Division of Water Quality oversees the 401 Water Quality Certification process in the state of Utah. The director of the Utah Division of Water Quality ("director") handles

67

Microsoft Word - 2014 WVSB - WV HS letter (generic for PDF).docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

610 Collins Ferry Road, P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 626 Cochrans Mill Road, P.O. Box 10940, Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 610 Collins Ferry Road, P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 626 Cochrans Mill Road, P.O. Box 10940, Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 REPLY TO: Morgantown Office  steven.woodruff@netl.doe.gov  Voice (304) 285-4175  Fax (304) 285-0903  www.netl.doe.gov September 23, 2013 Dear Science Chair or Principal: On behalf of the Secretary of Energy, I am pleased to announce the opening of the 2014 National Science Bowl, a tournament-style academic competition challenging students in the fields of science and mathematics. In support of the National Science Bowl, the U.S. Dept of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory is once again proud to host the West Virginia Regional Science Bowl. The WVSB is one of many regional competitions held for high school teams across

68

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PROJEC PROJEC T FAC TS Carbon Storage - ARRA - GSRA CONTACTS Traci Rodosta Carbon Storage Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-1345 traci.rodosta@netl.doe.gov Robert Noll Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-7597 robert.noll@netl.doe.gov Gordon Bierwagen Principal Investigator North Dakota State University P.O. Box 6050 Department 2760 Fargo, ND 58108-6050 701-231-8294 gordon.bierwagen@ndsu.edu PARTNERS None PROJECT DURATION Start Date 12/01/2009 End Date 11/30/2011 COST Total Project Value $298,949 DOE/Non-DOE Share $298,949 / $0 PROJECT NUMBER DE-FE0002054 Government funding for this project is provided in whole or in part through the

69

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARRA - GSRA CONTACTS Traci Rodosta Carbon Storage Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road PO Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-1345 traci.rodosta@netl.doe.gov Andrea Dunn Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-7594 andrea.dunn@netl.doe.gov Jose Castillo Principal Investigator San Diego State University 5500 Campanile Drive San Diego, CA 92122 619-594-7205 castillo@myth.sdsu.edu PARTNERS Sienna Geodynamics and Consulting, Inc. PROJECT DURATION Start Date End Date 12/01/2009 11/30/2012 COST Total Project Value $299,993 DOE/Non-DOE Share $299,993 / $0 PROJECT NUMBER DE-FE0002069 Government funding for this project is provided in whole or in part through the

70

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Briggs White Briggs White Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-5437 briggs.white@netl.doe.gov Jeff Stevenson Principal Investigator Pacific Northwest National Laboratory P.O. Box 999, MS K2-44 Richland, WA 99352 509-372-4697 jeff.stevenson@pnl.com PARTNERS Oak Ridge National Laboratory University of Connecticut PROJECT DURATION Start Date End Date 10/01/1999 09/30/2013 (annual continuations) COST Total Project Value $52,889,667 DOE/Non-DOE Share $52,889,667 / $0 AWARD NUMBER FWP40552 PR OJ E C T FAC T S Fuel Cells Low Cost Modular SOFC Development- Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has a mission to advance energy options to fuel our economy, strengthen our security,

71

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Traci Rodosta Traci Rodosta Carbon Storage Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road PO Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-1345 traci.rodosta@netl.doe.gov Karen Kluger Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-6667 karen.kluger@netl.doe.gov Gary Mavko Principal Investigator Stanford University 397 Panama Mall Stanford, CA 94305-2215 650-723-9438 Fax: 650-723-1188 mavko@stanford.edu PROJECT DURATION Start Date 12/01/2009 End Date 06/30/2013 COST Total Project Value $385,276 DOE/Non-DOE Share $295,777/ $89,499 Government funding for this project is provided in whole or in part through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Rock Physics of Geologic Carbon Sequestration/Storage

72

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maira Reidpath Maira Reidpath Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304- 285-4140 maria.reidpath@netl.doe.gov Steven S.C. Chuang Principal Investigator The University of Akron Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering 230 E. Buchtel Commons Akron, OH 44325 330-972-6993 schuang@uakron.edu PARTNERS None PROJECT DURATION Start Date End Date 09/01/2009 08/31/2013 COST Total Project Value $1,713,961 DOE/Non-DOE Share $1,370,977/$342,984 AWARD NUMBER Techno-Economic Analysis of Scalable Coal-Based Fuel Cells-University of Akron Background In this congressionally directed project, the University of Akron (UA) will develop a scalable coal fuel cell manufacturing process to a megawatt scale. UA has demonstrated the

73

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maria Reidpath Maria Reidpath Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304- 285-4140 maria.reidpath@netl.doe.gov Bogdan Gurau Principal Investigator NuVant Systems, Inc. 130 N West Street Crown Point, IN 46307 219-644-3232 b.gurau@nuvant.com PARTNERS None PROJECT DURATION Start Date End Date 08/01/2009 05/31/2013 COST Total Project Value $1,142,481 DOE/Non-DOE Share $913,985 / $228,496 AWARD NUMBER Improved Flow-field Structures for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells-NuVant Systems, Inc. Background In this congressionally directed project, NuVant Systems, Inc. (NuVant) will improve the performance of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) by designing anode flow-fields specifically for the delivery of liquid methanol. The goal is to deliver concentrated

74

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FACTS FACTS Carbon Storage - ARRA - GSRA CONTACTS Traci Rodosta Carbon Storage Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-1345 traci.rodosta@netl.doe.gov Robert Noll Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-7597 robert.noll@netl.doe.gov Joseph Labuz Principal Investigator University of Minnesota 500 Pillsbury Drive SE Room 122 CivE 0851 Minneapolis, MN 55455 612-625-9060 jlabuz@umn.edu PARTNERS None PROJECT DURATION Start Date End Date 12/01/2009 11/30/2012 COST Total Project Value $299,568 DOE/Non-DOE Share $299,568 / $0 PROJECT NUMBER DE-FE0002020 Government funding for this project is provided in whole or in part through the

75

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R& R& D FAC T S Natural Gas & Oil R&D CONTACTS George Guthrie Focus Area Lead Office of Research and Development National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-6571 george.guthrie@netl.doe.gov Kelly Rose Technical Coordinator Office of Research and Development National Energy Technology Laboratory 1450 Queen Avenue SW Albany, OR 97321-2152 541-967-5883 kelly.rose@netl.doe.gov PARTNERS Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA Oregon State University Corvallis, OR Pennsylvania State University State College, PA University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA URS Corporation Pittsburgh, PA Virginia Tech Blacksburg, VA West Virginia University Morgantown, WV

76

Real-time 3-D SAFT-UT system evaluation and validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SAFT-UT technology is shown to provide significant enhancements to the inspection of materials used in US nuclear power plants. This report provides guidelines for the implementation of SAFT-UT technology and shows the results from its application. An overview of the development of SAFT-UT is provided so that the reader may become familiar with the technology. Then the basic fundamentals are presented with an extensive list of references. A comprehensive operating procedure, which is used in conjunction with the SAFT-UT field system developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), provides the recipe for both SAFT data acquisition and analysis. The specification for the hardware implementation is provided for the SAFT-UT system along with a description of the subsequent developments and improvements. One development of technical interest is the SAFT real time processor. Performance of the real-time processor is impressive and comparison is made of this dedicated parallel processor to a conventional computer and to the newer high-speed computer architectures designed for image processing. Descriptions of other improvements, including a robotic scanner, are provided. Laboratory parametric and application studies, performed by PNL and not previously reported, are discussed followed by a section on field application work in which SAFT was used during inservice inspections of operating reactors.

Doctor, S.R.; Schuster, G.J.; Reid, L.D.; Hall, T.E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

DOI-BLM-UT-W020-2010-042-EA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UT-W020-2010-042-EA UT-W020-2010-042-EA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-UT-W020-2010-042-EA EA at Drum Mountain Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration {{{NEPA_Name}}} General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type EA Applicant Ormat Technologies Inc Consultant JBR Geothermal Area Drum Mountain Geothermal Area Project Location Delta, Utah, Delta, Utah Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Development Drilling, Exploration Drilling Time Frame (days) Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office BLM West Desert District Office Managing Field Office Fillmore Field Office Funding Agencies none provided Surface Manager BLM,

78

GRR/Section 4-UT-a - State Exploration Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4-UT-a - State Exploration Process 4-UT-a - State Exploration Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 4-UT-a - State Exploration Process 04UTAStateExplorationProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Division of Water Rights Regulations & Policies Utah Geothermal Resource Conservation Act UC 73-22-6 NOI R655-1-1.1 Overview Information R655-1-2.1.2 Plan of Operations R655-1-2.1.6 Notice to other Agencies R655-1-4: Records Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 04UTAStateExplorationProcess.pdf 04UTAStateExplorationProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative

79

GRR/Section 14-UT-d - UPDES Antidegradation Review | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4-UT-d - UPDES Antidegradation Review 4-UT-d - UPDES Antidegradation Review < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-UT-d - UPDES Antidegradation Review 14UTFUPDESAntidegradationReview.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Division of Water Quality Utah Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies R317-2-3 Antidegradation Policy R317-8 Utah Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (UPDES) Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14UTFUPDESAntidegradationReview.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Clean Water Act and the Utah Water Quality Act are designed to

80

GRR/Section 14-UT-c - Underground Injection Control Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-UT-c - Underground Injection Control Permit GRR/Section 14-UT-c - Underground Injection Control Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-UT-c - Underground Injection Control Permit 14UTCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies Utah Administrative Code R317-7 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content Potential Roadblocks If the permit application does not adequately demonstrate that geothermal re-injection wells will be constructed and operated to be protective of any USDWs the issuance of a permit may be denied or delayed. 14UTCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit.pdf 14UTCUndergroundInjectionControlPermit.pdf

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ut ct wv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Green River Mill Site - UT 0-01  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Green River Mill Site - UT 0-01 Green River Mill Site - UT 0-01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Green River Mill Site (UT.0-01 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Green River, Utah, Disposal Site Documents Related to Green River Mill Site Data Validation Package for the June 2009 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Green River, Utah, Disposal Site; LMS/GRN/S0609; October 2009 2012 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites-Green River, Utah, Disposal Site. LMS/S09461. February 2013 Historic Fact Sheet: Green River Disposal Site Uranium ore was

82

GRR/Section 8-UT-a - State Transmission Siting | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 8-UT-a - State Transmission Siting GRR/Section 8-UT-a - State Transmission Siting < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 8-UT-a - State Transmission Siting 08UTAStateTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Utah Public Service Commission Regulations & Policies Utah Code Title 54 - Public Utilities Siting of High Voltage Power Line Act Utah Code 10-9a-508 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 08UTAStateTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative

83

GRR/Section 14-UT-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UT-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution UT-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-UT-a - Nonpoint Source Pollution 14UTANonpointSourcePollution.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies Clean Water Act Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14UTANonpointSourcePollution.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative In Utah, nonpoint source pollution is now handled though the watershed approach. "Adding a watershed approach has been a logical step in the

84

GRR/Section 11-UT-a - State Cultural Considerations | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1-UT-a - State Cultural Considerations 1-UT-a - State Cultural Considerations < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 11-UT-a - State Cultural Considerations 11UTAStateCulturalConsiderations (3).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah State Historic Preservation Office Utah Antiquities Section Utah Public Lands Policy Coordination Office Regulations & Policies UC 9-8-309: Human Remains UC 9-8-304: Antiquities Section UC 9-8-404: State Compliance UC 9-9-403: Native American Remains UC 76-9-404: Criminal Penalties for Abuse of Dead Human Body Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 11UTAStateCulturalConsiderations (3).pdf 11UTAStateCulturalConsiderations (3).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

85

GRR/Section 3-UT-d - Geothermal Steam Lease (Utah Non-Trust Lands) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 3-UT-d - Geothermal Steam Lease (Utah Non-Trust Lands) GRR/Section 3-UT-d - Geothermal Steam Lease (Utah Non-Trust Lands) < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-UT-d - Geothermal Steam Lease (Utah Non-Trust Lands) 03UTDGeothermalSteamLeaseUtahNonTrustLands.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Division of Forestry, Fire and State Lands Utah Department of Natural Resources Utah Division of Water Rights Utah School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration Regulations & Policies UC 65A-2-2 Mineral Leases - Division to Prescribe Rules R652-20 Mineral Resources Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03UTDGeothermalSteamLeaseUtahNonTrustLands.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

86

GRR/Section 18-UT-b - Hazardous Waste Permit Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UT-b - Hazardous Waste Permit Process UT-b - Hazardous Waste Permit Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-UT-b - Hazardous Waste Permit Process 18UTBHazardousWastePermitProcess (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies Hazardous Waste Rules R315-1 et seq Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18UTBHazardousWastePermitProcess (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative A hazardous waste is specifically listed by the Utah Solid and Hazardous Waste Rules or exhibits a characteristic such as ignitability, corrosivity,

87

GRR/Section 15-UT-a - Utah Air Permit Approval Order | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5-UT-a - Utah Air Permit Approval Order 5-UT-a - Utah Air Permit Approval Order < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 15-UT-a - Utah Air Permit Approval Order 15UTAUtahAirPermitApprovalOrder.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies UAC R307-300 UAC R307-400 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 15UTAUtahAirPermitApprovalOrder.pdf 15UTAUtahAirPermitApprovalOrder.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Utah Department of Environmental Quality Division of Air Quality (DEQ) issues permits for operations that emit contaminants into the air. Most new

88

GRR/Section 6-UT-b - Storm Water Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6-UT-b - Storm Water Permit 6-UT-b - Storm Water Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 6-UT-b - Storm Water Permit 06UTBStormWaterPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Division of Water Quality Regulations & Policies Utah Water Quality Act Clean Water Act Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 06UTBStormWaterPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The construction storm water permit process is required to prevent storm water pollution. The permits are administered by the Utah Division of Water

89

GRR/Section 7-UT-a - Power Plant Siting | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 7-UT-a - Power Plant Siting GRR/Section 7-UT-a - Power Plant Siting < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 7-UT-a - Power Plant Siting Flowchart Narrative There is no single Utah State government agency with primary responsibility for electric generation plant siting. The following State government agencies that could have some jurisdiction involving electric generation plant siting requirements (list may not be exhaustive) : Department of Commerce Division of Public Utilities (utility certification issues) Public Service Commission of Utah (utility certification issues) Department of Environmental Quality Division of Air Quality Division of Solid & Hazardous Waste Division of Water Quality Department of Natural Resources

90

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Salt Lake City Vitro Chemical - UT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vitro Chemical - UT Vitro Chemical - UT 0-04 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Salt Lake City Vitro Chemical (UT.0-04 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Salt Lake City, Utah, Processing Site Documents Related to Salt Lake City Vitro Chemical 2012 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites-Salt Lake City, Utah, Disposal Site. LMS/S09461. February 2013 Annual Inspection Report - U.S. Department of Energy 2008 UMTRCA Title I Annual Report January 2009 Salt Lake City, Utah 2006 Annual Status Report for the Salt Lake City, Utah, UMTRCA Title

91

GRR/Section 14-UT-e - Ground Water Quality Protection Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-UT-e - Ground Water Quality Protection Permit GRR/Section 14-UT-e - Ground Water Quality Protection Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-UT-e - Ground Water Quality Protection Permit 14UTEGroundWaterQualityProtectionPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies UAC R317-6 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14UTEGroundWaterQualityProtectionPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Utah Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) regulates discharges

92

GRR/Section 6-UT-c - Drinking Water Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6-UT-c - Drinking Water Permit 6-UT-c - Drinking Water Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 6-UT-c - Drinking Water Permit 06UTCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies R309-100 Administration: Drinking Water Program Utah Water Well Rules R655-4 Safe Drinking Water Act Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 06UTCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Public water systems are responsible for drinking water infastructure,

93

GRR/Section 3-UT-b - State Easement Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-UT-b - State Easement Process 3-UT-b - State Easement Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-UT-b - State Easement Process 03UTBStateEasementProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Division of Forestry, Fire and State Lands Utah Department of Natural Resources Regulations & Policies UC 65A-7-8 Easements on State Lands R652-40 Easements Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03UTBStateEasementProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Utah Division of Forestry, Fire and State Lands (UFFSL) administers the

94

GRR/Section 14-UT-f - UPDES Antidegradation Review | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-UT-f - UPDES Antidegradation Review GRR/Section 14-UT-f - UPDES Antidegradation Review < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-UT-f - UPDES Antidegradation Review 14UTFUPDESAntidegradationReview.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Division of Water Quality Utah Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies R317-2-3 Antidegradation Policy R317-8 Utah Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (UPDES) Triggers None specified The Clean Water Act and the Utah Water Quality Act are designed to protect,maintain, and restore the quality of Utah's waters. Utah's water quality standards achieve this through: Designated uses (e.g., aquatic life, drinking water, recreation) Water quality criteria (both numeric and narrative)

95

GRR/Section 18-UT-a - Underground Storage Tank | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 18-UT-a - Underground Storage Tank GRR/Section 18-UT-a - Underground Storage Tank < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-UT-a - Underground Storage Tank 18UTAUndergroundStorageTank (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies Utah Underground Storage Tank Act Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18UTAUndergroundStorageTank (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Utah Department of Environmental Quality Division of Environmental Response and Remediation oversees the underground storage tank (UST) program in

96

GRR/Section 3-UT-g - Grant of Access Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-UT-g - Grant of Access Permit 3-UT-g - Grant of Access Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-UT-g - Grant of Access Permit 03UTGGrantOfAccessPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Department of Transportation Regulations & Policies R930-6 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03UTGGrantOfAccessPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative A grant of access permit is required from the Utah Department of Transportation whenever a new driveway, other curb cut, or local street connection is required on a State Highway. This applies to permission to

97

GRR/Section 14-UT-b - Utah Pollutant Discharge Elimination System | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-UT-b - Utah Pollutant Discharge Elimination System GRR/Section 14-UT-b - Utah Pollutant Discharge Elimination System < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-UT-b - Utah Pollutant Discharge Elimination System 14UTBUtahPollutantDischargeEliminationSystemPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Division of Water Quality Utah Department of Environmental Quality United States Environmental Protection Agency Regulations & Policies R317-2-3 Antidegradation Policy R317-8 Utah Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (UPDES) Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14UTBUtahPollutantDischargeEliminationSystemPermit.pdf 14UTBUtahPollutantDischargeEliminationSystemPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

98

GRR/Section 3-UT-e - Geothermal Steam Lease (Utah Trust Lands) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-UT-e - Geothermal Steam Lease (Utah Trust Lands) 3-UT-e - Geothermal Steam Lease (Utah Trust Lands) < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-UT-e - Geothermal Steam Lease (Utah Trust Lands) 03UTEGeothermalSteamLeaseUtahTrustLands.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration Utah Division of Water Rights Regulations & Policies UC 53C-4-102 UTLA Lease and Permit Covenants R850-27 UTLA Geothermal Steam Regulations Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03UTEGeothermalSteamLeaseUtahTrustLands.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

99

GRR/Section 3-UT-a - State Geothermal Resource Leasing | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UT-a - State Geothermal Resource Leasing UT-a - State Geothermal Resource Leasing < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-UT-a - State Geothermal Resource Leasing 03UTAStateGeothermalResourceLeasing.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Department of Natural Resources Regulations & Policies UC 73-22 Utah Geothermal Resources Conservation Act Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03UTAStateGeothermalResourceLeasing.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative In 1981, the Utah Geothermal Resource Conservation Act established the

100

GRR/Section 7-UT-c - Utah Public Service Commission | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7-UT-c - Utah Public Service Commission 7-UT-c - Utah Public Service Commission < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 7-UT-c - Utah Public Service Commission 07UTCUtahPublicServiceCommissionProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Public Service Commission Regulations & Policies Utah Code Title 54 Public Utilities Utah Code 11-13-304 Certificate of public convenience and necessity required --Exceptions Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 07UTCUtahPublicServiceCommissionProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ut ct wv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

GRR/Section 3-UT-c - State Encroachment Overview | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 3-UT-c - State Encroachment Overview GRR/Section 3-UT-c - State Encroachment Overview < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-UT-c - State Encroachment Overview 03UTCStateEncroachmentOverview.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Department of Transportation Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03UTCStateEncroachmentOverview.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Utah Department of Transportation's Region Permits Offices protect the State's right-of-way and facilitate and coordinate other highway users and provide for safe and efficient operation of Utah's highways. The

102

GRR/Section 12-UT-a - Flora & Fauna Considerations | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 12-UT-a - Flora & Fauna Considerations GRR/Section 12-UT-a - Flora & Fauna Considerations < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 12-UT-a - Flora & Fauna Considerations 12UTAFloraFaunaConsiderations (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Division of Wildlife Resources Regulations & Policies Utah Sensitive Species List Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 12UTAFloraFaunaConsiderations (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Utah does not have an incidental take permit process. Typically, the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources becomes involved during the pre-design

103

GRR/Section 5-UT-a - Drilling and Well Development | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 5-UT-a - Drilling and Well Development GRR/Section 5-UT-a - Drilling and Well Development < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 5-UT-a - Drilling and Well Development 05UTADrillingAndWellDevelopment.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Division of Water Rights Regulations & Policies Utah Geothermal Resource Conservation Act Utah Administrative Code Section R655-1 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 05UTADrillingAndWellDevelopment.pdf 05UTADrillingAndWellDevelopment.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Although not regulated under the Administrative Rules for Water Wells,

104

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving Durability of Turbine Components through Trenched Film Cooling and Contoured Endwalls-University of Texas at Austin Background Gas turbine operation utilizing coal-derived high hydrogen fuels (synthesis gas, or syngas) requires new cooling configurations for turbine components. The use of syngas is likely to lead to degraded cooling performance resulting from rougher surfaces and partial blockage of film cooling holes. In this project the University of Texas at Austin (UT) in cooperation with The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) will investigate the development of new film cooling and endwall cooling designs for maximum performance when subjected to high levels of contaminant depositions. This project was competitively selected under the University Turbine Systems Research

105

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Large Eddy Simulation Modeling of Large Eddy Simulation Modeling of Flashback and Flame Stabilization in Hydrogen-Rich Gas Turbines using a Hierarchical Validation Approach- University of Texas at Austin Background The focus of this project is the development of advanced large eddy simulation (LES)-based combustion modeling tools that can be used to design low emissions combustors burning high hydrogen content fuels. The University of Texas at Austin (UT) will develop models for two key topics: (1) flame stabilization, lift- off, and blowout when fuel-containing jets are introduced into a crossflow at high pressure, and (2) flashback dynamics of lean premixed flames with detailed description of flame propagation in turbulent core and near-wall flows. The jet- in-crossflow (JICF) configuration is widely used for rapid mixing of reactants

106

Microsoft Word - Ct121R1.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Innovative Applications Innovative Applications of Technology for the CT-121 FGD Process A DOE Assessment DOE/NETL-2002/1177 September 2002 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 880, 3610 Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 P.O. Box 10940, 626 Cochrans Mill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 West Third Street, Suite 1400 Tulsa, OK 74103-3519 website: www.netl.doe.gov 2 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents

107

TEXAS GRANT Statement of Student Eligibility Last Name First Name UT Arlington Student ID  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TEXAS GRANT Statement of Student Eligibility 2012-2013 Last Name First Name UT Arlington Student ID Effective September 1, 2010, all institutions are required to collect a statement from each TEXAS Grant. TEXAS Grant funds will not disburse to your student account until the statement below is signed

Huang, Haiying

108

TEXAS GRANT Statement of Student Eligibility Last Name First Name UT Arlington Student ID  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TEXAS GRANT Statement of Student Eligibility 2010-2011 Last Name First Name UT Arlington Student ID Effective September 1, 2010, all institutions are required to collect a statement from each TEXAS Grant. TEXAS Grant funds will not disburse to your student account until the statement below is signed

Corley, Bill

109

TEXAS GRANT Statement of Student Eligibility Last Name First Name UT Arlington Student ID  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TEXAS GRANT Statement of Student Eligibility 2011-2012 Last Name First Name UT Arlington Student ID Effective September 1, 2010, all institutions are required to collect a statement from each TEXAS Grant. TEXAS Grant funds will not disburse to your student account until the statement below is signed

Corley, Bill

110

1 Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy D0001432  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's Office Nuclear Fuel Materials G. L. BELL Corrosion Science and Technology B. A. PINTE. P. GEORGE H. T1 Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy D0001432 Materials Science & Technology. MORE Materials Joining Z. FENG Materials Processing W. H. PETER Nuclear Materials Science & Technology

111

Sample Invoice TM/LH UT-B Contracts Div September 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BILLING PERIOD Beginning/End Date Shipped Via Customer Number Element Description Current Amount-Battelle, LLC for the Department of Energy Comments or Special Instructions: UT-Battelle Subcontract Number-B or other Company Approved Format) LABOR ­ OVERTIME* (itemize on attached statements ­ as shown on Appendix

112

1 Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reactor Oak Ridge National Laboratory evolved from the Manhattan Project 2 Managed by UT · Integrated Facilities Disposition Project ­ Cleanup of ORNL Central Campus ­ CD-0 approved · Oak Ridge · Service subcontracts for pollution prevention planning and project implementation · Subcontract

113

1 Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

evolved from the Manhattan Project 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy #12;3 Managed for laboratories in Building 4500 ­ CD-0 approved · Integrated Facilities Disposition Project ­ Cleanup of ORNL prevention planning and project implementation · Subcontract for operation & development of Lab-wide waste

114

1 Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-574-5361, hansonpj@ornl.gov Funding: DOE Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research Garten CT Jr. (2011

115

GRR/Section 19-UT-a - Water Access and Water Rights Issues | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 19-UT-a - Water Access and Water Rights Issues < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-UT-a - Water Access and Water Rights Issues 19UTAWaterAccessWaterRightsIssues (8).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Division of Water Rights Regulations & Policies Utah Geothermal Resource Conservation Act Utah Code Title 73, Chapter 3 Appropriation Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 19UTAWaterAccessWaterRightsIssues (8).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

116

UT-Battelle, ATLC project cited by Tennessee Labor Management Foundation |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jennifer Brouner Jennifer Brouner Communications 865.241.0709 UT-Battelle, ATLC project cited by Tennessee Labor Management Foundation Volunteers were on hand to receive the Horizon Award from the Tennessee Labor Management Foundation. (From left) Angela Galyon; Dale McBee; Oak Ridge ATLC President Steve Jones; Mike Day; team captain Ann Weaver; Jeff Reasor Volunteers were on hand to receive the Horizon Award from the Tennessee Labor Management Foundation. (From left) Angela Galyon; Dale McBee; Oak Ridge ATLC President Steve Jones; Mike Day; team captain Ann Weaver; Jeff Reasor (hi-res image) OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Aug. 16, 2013 - Team UT-Battelle's all-volunteer project to build homes for Aid to Distressed Families of Appalachian Counties (ADFAC) has earned the 2013 Horizon Award from the Tennessee Labor

117

TO UT ICA METAIS DIVISIONOF THEUTICADROPFORGEQ TOOT, CORP. NATIONAL LEAD COMPANY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

UT ICA METAIS DIVISIONOF THEUTICADROPFORGEQ TOOT, CORP. UT ICA METAIS DIVISIONOF THEUTICADROPFORGEQ TOOT, CORP. NATIONAL LEAD COMPANY OF OHIO P. 0. BOX 18% MT. HEALTHY WATION CINCINNATI 51. OHIO December 9, 1955 FROM Herbert Davis REFERENCE OBJECTIVEOFlRIF This visit was made to observe the physical equipment and the personnel at Utica Metals Division as a possible source for development work i'n vacuum melting and casting. CONCLU!3IOZG AND RECOMMENDATIOlYS The prime business of this Division of the Utica Drop Forge & Tool Corp. is the production of ingots and fabricated shapes from hia temperature alloys for the aircraft, automotive and electronics industries. This company has no apparent interest In development work but would be interested in providing facilities for a long range production program.

118

GRR/Section 9-UT-a - Energy Pre-Design Meeting Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 9-UT-a - Energy Pre-Design Meeting Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 9-UT-a - Energy Pre-Design Meeting Process 09UTAEnergyPreDesignMeetingProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Department of Environmental Quality Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 09UTAEnergyPreDesignMeetingProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

119

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Marysville AEC Ore Buying Station - UT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marysville AEC Ore Buying Station - Marysville AEC Ore Buying Station - UT 05 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Marysville AEC Ore Buying Station (UT.05 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The history of domestic uranium procurement under U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) contracts identifies a number of ore buying stations (sampling and storage sites) that were operated during the period late-1949 through the mid-1960s. During this period the AEC established ore-buying stations in new uranium producing areas where it appeared that ore production would be sufficient to support a uranium milling operation. The

120

GRR/Section 3-UT-f - Encroachment Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 3-UT-f - Encroachment Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-UT-f - Encroachment Permit 03UTFEncroachmentPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Department of Transportation Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03UTFEncroachmentPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ut ct wv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Monticello AEC Ore Buying Station - UT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monticello AEC Ore Buying Station - Monticello AEC Ore Buying Station - UT 03A FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Monticello AEC Ore Buying Station (UT.03A ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The history of domestic uranium procurement under U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) contracts identifies a number of ore buying stations (sampling and storage sites) that were operated during the period late-1949 through the mid-1960s. During this period the AEC established ore-buying stations in new uranium producing areas where it appeared that ore production would be sufficient to support a uranium milling operation. The

122

GRR/Section 6-UT-a - Transportation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 6-UT-a - Transportation < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 6-UT-a - Transportation 06UTATransportation.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Department of Transportation Regulations & Policies Permit Provisions 49 CFR Parts 171-180: Hazardous Material Regulations 49 CFR 387: Financial Responsibility Obligations 49 CFR Parts 382-399: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations UCA 41-1a-101: Utah Motor Vehicle Act UCA 41-6a-702: Left Lane Restrictions UAC R909-1: Safety Regulations for Motor Carriers Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 06UTATransportation.pdf

123

Van Berkel receives top Science and Technology honor at UT-Battelle's  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fred Strohl Fred Strohl Communications 865.574.4165 Van Berkel receives top Science and Technology honor at UT-Battelle's 2013 Awards Night Gary J. Van Berkel, David Fowler and Donald Cross Gary J. Van Berkel, David Fowler and Donald Cross (hi-res image) OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Nov. 18, 2013 - Gary J. Van Berkel of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Chemical Sciences Division has earned the ORNL Director's Award for Outstanding Individual Accomplishment in Science and Technology. Van Berkel was honored Friday night during the annual Awards Night event hosted by UT-Battelle, the management and operating contractor of ORNL. The award recognizes Van Berkel's sustained leadership and innovation in the development of disruptive sampling systems for mass spectrometry, resulting in multiple commercial licenses and new product offerings. He was earlier

124

U.S. DEP.utTM ENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

utTM utTM ENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DE TEInITNATION RECIPIENT:City of North Little Rock Page 1 of3 STATE: AR PROJECT TITLE: Recovery Act: Hydroelectric Facility Improvement Project - Replacement of Current Mechanical Seal System with Rope Packing System Funding Opportunity Announcement Number DE·FOA.()()()()I20 Procu~ment Instrument Number DE·EEOOO2674 NEPA Control Number em Number GF0-0002674-003 G02674 Based on my review ortbe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authOrized under DOE Order 4Sl.IA),1 have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Dewription: 85.1 (a) Actions to conserve energy or water, demonstrate potential energy or water conservation, and promote energy

125

Complete Update of Ultrasonic (UT) Level I and Level II Training Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the final steps in the technology transfer process is training of personnel who will use the technology. The training course materials must be periodically updated to address the regulatory, Code, and technological changes. The report describes the process for updating the Ultrasonic Testing (UT) Level I and Level II training course materials developed to support the electric utilities and their service providers. These materials have been updated to incorporate the later regulatory, Code and tech...

2003-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

126

Drug-Free Workplace Program UT-B Contracts Page 1 of 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Drug-Free Workplace Program UT-B Contracts Sep 2012 Page 1 of 1 drug-free-workplace-ext-sep12 DRUG-FREE, the Seller and its subcontractors working on the project site must maintain a drug-free workplace program. (B) If the Seller is an out-of-state entity, the Company may upon request allow a drug-free workplace

Pennycook, Steve

127

U.S. DOE Industrial Technologies Program Technology Delivery Plant-Wide Assessment at PPG Industries, Natrium, WV  

SciTech Connect

PPG and West Virginia University performed a plantwide energy assessment at the PPGs Natrium, WV chemical plant, an energy-intensive manufacturing facility producing chlor-alkali and related products. Implementation of all the assessment recommendations contained in this report could reduce plant energy consumption by 8.7%, saving an estimated 10,023,192 kWh/yr in electricity, 6,113 MM Btu/yr in Natural Gas, 401,156 M lb/yr in steam and 23,494 tons/yr in coal and reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 241 mm lb/yr. The total cost savings would amount to approximately $2.9 mm/yr. Projects being actively implemented will save $1.7 mm/yr; the remainder are undergoing more detailed engineering study.

Lester, Stephen R.; Wiethe, Jeff; Green, Russell; Guice, Christina; Gopalakrishnan, Bhaskaran; Turton, Richard

2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

128

DOI-BLM-UT-W020-2009-0028-EA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

20-2009-0028-EA 20-2009-0028-EA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-UT-W020-2009-0028-EA EA at Drum Mountain Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration Drum Mountain Temperature Gradient Exploration Project General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type EA Applicant Standard Steam Trust LLC Consultant EMPSi Geothermal Area Drum Mountain Geothermal Area Project Location Delta, Utah, Delta, Utah Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Thermal Gradient Holes Time Frame (days) Application Time 460 NEPA Process Time 292 Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office BLM West Desert District Office Managing Field Office

129

Recipient: County ut Pinal, AZ ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANTS NEPA COMPLIANCE FORM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 Recipient: County ut Pinal, AZ ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANTS NEPA COMPLIANCE FORM Activities Determination/ Categorical Exclusion Reviewer's Specific Instructions and Rationale (Restrictions and Allowable Activity) Activity 1 - Energy Efficiency Audits A9, All This NEPA determination is limited to conducting audits/compiling the results of the audits/and making recommendations only. (see Activity 4 for audit implementation activities) Activity 2 - Energy Efficiency Municipal Partnership A9, All, B5.1 Waste Stream Clause Historic Preservation Clause Engineering clause Activity 3 - Ironwood-Gantzel Roadway Traffic Lights Synchronization A9 None Activity 4 - Energy Efficiency Corrective Measures Implementation A9, All, B5.1 Waste Stream Clause Historic Preservation Clause

130

Proton Conductor based Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Ceramatec, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT 84119  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

based Solid Oxide Fuel Cells based Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Ceramatec, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT 84119 S. (Elango) Elangovan, Joseph Hartvigsen, Insoo Bay, and Feng Zhao High efficiency operation is one of the primary attractions to use solid oxide fuel cells as the energy conversion device. High efficiency requires maximizing of the product of operating voltage and fuel utilization. The maximum possible operating voltage however is limited by the Nernst potential near the fuel exhaust. In oxygen conducting electrolyte based fuel cells (O-SOFC) as the fuel utilization increases, the Nernst potential continues to decrease with the dilution of fuel by the reaction products. In contrast, in a proton conducting electrolyte based fuel cell (P-SOFC) the reaction product is formed on the cathode side allowing for high operating voltage at high fuel

131

l!Jm~~Ut~'1CV GrandChalienge",regardiessexl,'Cpt  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

,;,,,,,..<:,,) ,;,,,,,..<:,,) l!Jm~~Ut~'1CV GrandChalienge",regardiessexl,'Cpt tiide'rnJtlrsuant toP.,L 96-511,'asamended, and Natiunal i11lcnsifi.catiol1 capabHffies which yield.amatic cn~gf to a wide range chemical producti()n~ iB) High,. of stich inod refining, non.cmctallic.materials ·IKi[tHtle!tm4;ti. l't.~"<.4 u.an'~:1:;f:) .1.'<1 conventi onal hi gh jeat.!,\iltnillnl·l'AiJ1l~illl~t!l Recvvery - .... ,·"", :l~IWtlra.,;:c~ftjcjtl\tl'tsteaJn.PJtlfYd!uctio}jti!hilgh perr~lanceJllmacesand 5ustainability7 reduced ""liter and a carbQn t(lOtprint li)f indt.t,'}try; (D) Sustainable Manufacturing

132

DOI-BLM-UT-W020-2010-0042-EA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

20-2010-0042-EA 20-2010-0042-EA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-UT-W020-2010-0042-EA EA at {{{GeothermalArea}}} for Geothermal/Exploration, Geothermal/Well Field Drum Mountains and Whirlwind Valley Geothermal Exploration Projects General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type EA Applicant Ormat Technologies Inc Geothermal Area {{{GeothermalArea}}}"{{{GeothermalArea}}}" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki. Project Location Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration, Geothermal/Well Field Techniques Thermal Gradient Holes Time Frame (days) Application Time 250 NEPA Process Time 126 Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office BLM West Desert District Office

133

DOE Challenge Home Case Study, Garbett Homes, Herriman, UT, Production Home  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Garbett Garbett Homes Herriman, UT BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE DOE Challenge Home builders are in the top 1% of builders in the country meeting the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specifi ed by the U.S. Department of Energy. Every DOE Challenge Home starts with ENERGY STAR for Homes Version 3 for an energy-effi cient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Then, even more advanced technologies are designed in for a home that goes above and beyond current code to give you the superior quality construction, HVAC, appliances, indoor air quality, safety, durability, comfort, and solar-ready components along with ultra-low or no utility bills. This provides homeowners with a quality home that will last for generations to come.

134

DOI-BLM-UT-W019-2011-0006-CX | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

W019-2011-0006-CX W019-2011-0006-CX Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-UT-W019-2011-0006-CX CX at {{{GeothermalArea}}} for Geothermal/Exploration {{{NEPA_Name}}} General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type CX Applicant Utah Geological Survey Geothermal Area {{{GeothermalArea}}}"{{{GeothermalArea}}}" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki. Project Location Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Comments Utah Geological Survey Temperature Gradient Wells at Pavant Valley, Millard County Time Frame (days) Application Time Expression error: Unexpected < operator. Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office BLM West Desert District Office

135

DOI-BLM-UT-W019-2011-0007-CX | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

19-2011-0007-CX 19-2011-0007-CX Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-UT-W019-2011-0007-CX CX at {{{GeothermalArea}}} for Geothermal/Exploration, {{{NEPA_Name}}} General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type CX Applicant Utah Geological Survey Geothermal Area {{{GeothermalArea}}}"{{{GeothermalArea}}}" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki. Project Location Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Thermal Gradient Holes Comments Utah Geological Survey Temperature Gradient Wells at Crater Bench, Juab County Time Frame (days) Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM -Utah Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office none provided Managing Field Office

136

DOI-BLM-UT-C010-2010-0042-EA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

10-0042-EA 10-0042-EA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-UT-C010-2010-0042-EA EA at Cove Fort Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Power Plant Cove Fort/Sulphurdale Geothermal Utilization Plan General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type EA Applicant ENEL Green Power North America Consultant Western Land Services Geothermal Area Cove Fort Geothermal Area Project Location Utah, Utah Project Phase Geothermal/Power Plant Techniques Comments BLM LR2000 Case Number UTU-083422: Geothermal Utilization Site Time Frame (days) Application Time 927 NEPA Process Time 946 Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office BLM Color Country District Office

137

Nuclear Medicine CT Angiography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Medicine CT Angiography Stress Testing Rotation The Nuclear Medicine/CT angiography. Understand the indications for exercise treadmill testing and specific nuclear cardiology tests, safe use patient and learn the importance of physical and pharmacologic stress in nuclear cardiology 3. Interpret

Ford, James

138

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Regional maps Figure F6. Coal supply regions WA ID OR CA NV UT TX OK AR MO LA MS AL GA FL TN SC NC KY VA WV WY CO SD ND MI MN WI IL IN OH MD PA NJ DE CT...

139

C:\\ANNUAL\\VENTCHAP.V8\\NGA.VP  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99...

140

C:\\ANNUAL\\VENTCHAP.V8\\NGAla1109.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Sources: Energy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ut ct wv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

NGA98fin5.vp  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99...

142

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3 Regional maps Figure F6. Coal supply regions WA ID OR CA NV UT TX OK AR MO LA MS AL GA FL TN SC NC KY VA WV WY CO SD ND MI MN WI IL IN OH MD PA NJ DE CT MA NH VT NY ME RI MT NE...

143

Reconstruction of CT Images from Parsimonious Angular ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

internal human organs in a non-invasive manner. Any CT scan ...... Relative reconstruction error results for CT data without measurement error types of noisy CT...

144

SOFC Anode Interaction with Trace Coal Syngas Species U.S. Dept of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SOFC Anode Interaction with Trace Coal Syngas Species SOFC Anode Interaction with Trace Coal Syngas Species U.S. Dept of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507 Gregory Hackett, Kirk Gerdes, Randall Gemmen Phone: (304)285-5279, Gregory.Hackett@NETL.DOE.GOV Utilization of coal as a fuel source for highly efficient integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) power generation facilities is technologically and environmentally attractive. IGFC plants are expected to offer the highest efficiency coal gasification processes, even when carbon capture and storage systems are included in the design. One element of IGFC research at the National Energy Technology Laboratory is the investigation of syngas cleanup processes for these integrated systems. Of particular interest are the effects of trace elements naturally contained in

145

Record of Decision and Floodplain Statement of Findings: Western Greenbrier Co-Production Demonstration Project, Rainelle, Greenbrier County, WV (DOE/EIS-0361) (04/29/08)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

14 Federal Register 14 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 83 / Tuesday, April 29, 2008 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Record of Decision and Floodplain Statement of Findings: Western Greenbrier Co-Production Demonstration Project, Rainelle, Greenbrier County, WV AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). ACTION: Record of Decision (ROD) and Floodplain Statement of Findings. SUMMARY: DOE has decided to implement the Proposed Action alternative, identified as the preferred alternative, in the Western Greenbrier Co-Production Demonstration Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0361; November 2007) (FEIS). That alternative is to provide approximately $107.5 million (up to 50% of the development costs) to Western Greenbrier Co-Generation, LLC

146

Projected Regional Impacts of Appliance Efficiency Standards for the U.S. Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TX UT VA VT WA WI WV WY US Primary Energy Savings PetajoulesTX UT VA VT WA WI WV WY US Primary Energy Savings PetajoulcsTX UT VA VT WA WI wv WY US Primary Energy Savings Petaioules

Koomey, J.G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

To be presented at the Eighth Topical Meeting on Technology of Fusion Energy, Salt Lake City, UT,October 9-13, 1988.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To be presented at the Eighth Topical Meeting on Technology of Fusion Energy, Salt Lake City, UT fc rt,^ O U. S. Government purposes. *Work supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Fusion few microns (2 2 microns) to avoid sticking problems on the cold surfaces of the heat exchanger

Harilal, S. S.

148

Sub-terahertz, microwaves and high energy emissions during the December 6, 2006 flare, at 18:40 UT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The presence of a solar burst spectral component with flux density increasing with frequency in the sub-terahertz range, spectrally separated from the well-known microwave spectral component, bring new possibilities to explore the flaring physical processes, both observational and theoretical. The solar event of 6 December 2006, starting at about 18:30 UT, exhibited a particularly well-defined double spectral structure, with the sub-THz spectral component detected at 212 and 405 GHz by SST and microwaves (1-18 GHz) observed by the Owens Valley Solar Array (OVSA). Emissions obtained by instruments in satellites are discussed with emphasis to ultra-violet (UV) obtained by the Transition Region And Coronal Explorer (TRACE), soft X-rays from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) and X- and gamma-rays from the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). The sub-THz impulsive component had its closer temporal counterpart only in the higher energy X- and gamma-rays ranges. The spatial positions of the centers of emission at 212 GHz for the first flux enhancement were clearly displaced by more than one arc-minute from positions at the following phases. The observed sub-THz fluxes and burst source plasma parameters were found difficult to be reconciled to a purely thermal emission component. We discuss possible mechanisms to explain the double spectral components at microwaves and in the THz ranges.

Pierre Kaufmann; Gerard Trottet; C. Guillermo Gimenez de Castro; Jean-Pierre Raulin; Sam Krucker; Albert Y. Shih; Hugo Levato

2008-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

149

CT NC0  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

x-L* d! x-L* d! CT NC0 - i , ,. i, .' i :.:(e.!' ,A\~, L.,t, - (iI :i' , . y- 2 .L i ._ 1 c\ :- i;! Ii $ 4. Ci:lc:i.nnati. 39, t>:::i.f> (J&l3 q-1 -3 sui3 Jrn T3 FRCM .I iirz 1 ?j ~ 1.3 bL1 T:' IP !REFOI?T TC 5YC?CZCiC~ :EWllIFl;j",tsSS L' I"JIsIc:;. .:;xli3;. iCAN !fA(=;-fL,yg-j L' sc,, E. $.iCLX:i?, -iIJ,x:q()Is. ON hL4X 24 - 25 ) 1.9tic ;i. A. Quiglel;, A.3, 3, M. ChenauEt gpxrIvB OF TP.~ The purpose of t3is trip was tc observe a proposed method for the dchy- dratim of green salt md to determine that all health and safety measures were being xrried out, SurveiU.ance of this nature provided protection against excessi3z personnel exposure, insured compliance with ICC shipping regulaticns, tion of the equ'~ and determined when adequate decontamira-

150

Category:Bridgeport, CT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bridgeport, CT Bridgeport, CT Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Bridgeport, CT" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Bridgeport CT Connecticut Light & Power Co.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 64 KB SVQuickServiceRestaurant Bridgeport CT Connecticut Light & Power Co.png SVQuickServiceRestaura... 63 KB SVHospital Bridgeport CT Connecticut Light & Power Co.png SVHospital Bridgeport ... 71 KB SVLargeHotel Bridgeport CT Connecticut Light & Power Co.png SVLargeHotel Bridgepor... 67 KB SVLargeOffice Bridgeport CT Connecticut Light & Power Co.png SVLargeOffice Bridgepo... 72 KB SVMediumOffice Bridgeport CT Connecticut Light & Power Co.png SVMediumOffice Bridgep...

151

Practical CT technology and techniques  

SciTech Connect

This handbook equips both radiologists and radiologists in training with a thorough working knowledge of the mechanisms and processes of computed tomography (CT) image generation, the common causes of image artifacts, and useful examination protocols for each area of the body. The author explains the fundamental technological principles of CT, focusing on those concepts crucial to successful CT examinations. The first part of the book succinctly reviews the fundamentals of CT technology. It begins with a methodical introduction to key principles of X-ray physics and technology, in which topics such as the modulation transfer function, magnification, and the X-ray tube are discussed in understandable, nonmathematical terms. The author then explains the basic technology of CT scanners, the principles of scan projection radiography, and the essential rules for radiation dosage determination and radiation protection. Careful attention is given to selectable scan factors in both routine and dynamic scanning, as well as to the processes involved in image creation and refinement and the chief determinants of image quality. Basic and specialized program features and the technology of image display, recording, and storage are also thoroughly described.

Berland, L.L.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Albany, OR * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership-Validation Phase Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected seven partnerships, through its Regional Carbon Sequestration...

153

CT Investment Partners LLP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CT Investment Partners LLP Jump to: navigation, search Name CT Investment Partners LLP Place London, United Kingdom Zip WC2A 2AZ Sector Carbon Product Venture capital arm of the...

154

CT Offshore | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CT Offshore CT Offshore Place Otterup, Denmark Zip 5450 Sector Wind energy Product Denmark-based consultancy which provides assistance for project management, damage assessment and stabilization as well as other activities related to wind farms and subsea maintenance. Coordinates 55.543228°, 10.40294° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":55.543228,"lon":10.40294,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

155

Siemens Corporate Technology CT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Siemens Corporate Technology (CT) Place Erlangan, Germany Sector Solar Product R&D lab for Siemens AG. Currently researching buckyballs and conductive plastic for solar...

156

CT Solar Loan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

a pilot loan program, CT Solar Loan, to provide homeowners with 15-year loans for solar PV equipment. The loans are administered through Sungage. Interested residents must...

157

CT Solar Loan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CT Solar Loan CT Solar Loan CT Solar Loan < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Connecticut Program Type State Loan Program Provider Sungage, Inc. The Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority is offering a pilot loan program, CT Solar Loan, to provide homeowners with 15-year loans for solar PV equipment. The loans are administered through Sungage. Interested residents must apply online to be pre-qualified for the loan. Once the loan is in place, an approved installer files permits, order equipment, and installs the system on behalf of the resident. See the program web site for application materials. Source http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=CT101F

158

Ion Stopping Powers and CT Numbers  

SciTech Connect

One of the advantages of ion beam therapy is the steep dose gradient produced near the ion's range. Use of this advantage makes knowledge of the stopping powers for all materials through which the beam passes critical. Most treatment planning systems calculate dose distributions using depth dose data measured in water and an algorithm that converts the kilovoltage X-ray computed tomography (CT) number of a given material to its linear stopping power relative to water. Some materials present in kilovoltage scans of patients and simulation phantoms do not lie on the standard tissue conversion curve. The relative linear stopping powers (RLSPs) of 21 different tissue substitutes and positioning, registration, immobilization, and beamline materials were measured in beams of protons accelerated to energies of 155, 200, and 250 MeV; carbon ions accelerated to 290 MeV/n; and iron ions accelerated to 970 MeV/n. These same materials were scanned with both kilovoltage and megavoltage CT scanners to obtain their CT numbers. Measured RLSPs and CT numbers were compared with calculated and/or literature values. Relationships of RLSPs to physical densities, electronic densities, kilovoltage CT numbers, megavoltage CT numbers, and water equivalence values converted by a treatment planning system are given. Usage of CT numbers and substitution of measured values into treatment plans to provide accurate patient and phantom simulations are discussed.

Moyers, Michael F., E-mail: MFMoyers@roadrunner.co [Department of Proton Therapy, Inc., Colton, CA (United States); Sardesai, Milind [Department of Long Beach Memorial Medical Center, Long Beach, CA (United States); Sun, Sean [Department of City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States); Miller, Daniel W. [Department of Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA (United States)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area (Redirected from New York Area - NY NJ CT PA) Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Clean Energy Clusters in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.1 Products and Services in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.2 Research and Development Institutions in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.3 Networking Organizations in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.4 Investors and Financial Organizations in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.5 Policy Organizations in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Clean Energy Clusters in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Products and Services in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":500,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

160

Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation - Seventh Quarterly Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Laboratory-WV National Renewable Energy Laboratory Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves CO, UT, WY Nevada Site Office Nevada Test Site Oak Ridge Institute for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ut ct wv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Seventh Quarterly Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Laboratory-WV National Renewable Energy Laboratory Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves CO, UT, WY Nevada Site Office Nevada Test Site Oak Ridge Institute for...

162

Notice of Intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Western Greenbrier Co-Production Demonstration Project, Rainelle, WV and Notice of Floodplain/Wetlands Involvement (6/3/03)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 11 Federal Register / Vol. 68, No. 106 / Tuesday, June 3, 2003 / Notices Dated: May 27, 2003. Judge Eric Andell, Deputy Under Secretary for Safe and Drug- Free Schools. [FR Doc. 03-13836 Filed 6-2-03; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4000-01-P DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Western Greenbrier Co-Production Demonstration Project, Rainelle, WV and Notice of Floodplain/Wetlands Involvement AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of Intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement and Notice of Floodplain/Wetlands Involvement. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announces its intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the

163

Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Clean Energy Clusters in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.1 Products and Services in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.2 Research and Development Institutions in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.3 Networking Organizations in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.4 Investors and Financial Organizations in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area 1.5 Policy Organizations in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Clean Energy Clusters in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Products and Services in the Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":500,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

164

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- American Brass Co - CT 01  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Brass Co - CT 01 Brass Co - CT 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: American Brass Co (CT.01 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Anaconda Company Brass Division CT.01-1 Location: 414 Meadow Street , Waterbury , Connecticut CT.01-1 Evaluation Year: 1986 CT.01-2 Site Operations: Limited work with copper clad uranium billets during the 1950s. CT.01-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based upon the limited scope of activities at the site CT.01-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium CT.01-3 Radiological Survey(s): Yes - health and safety monitoring during operations only CT.01-3 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP

165

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Fenn Machinery Co - CT 11  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Fenn Machinery Co - CT 11 Fenn Machinery Co - CT 11 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Fenn Machinery Co. (CT.11 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: New Britain , Connecticut CT.11-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CT.11-1 Site Operations: Performed short-term tests on small quantities of uranium metal to explore potential for swaging, circa mid-1950 CT.11-1 CT.11-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to limited scope of activities and relatively small quantities of radioactive material used CT.11-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium CT.11-3 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP CT.11-2

166

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Sperry Products Inc - CT 07  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sperry Products Inc - CT 07 Sperry Products Inc - CT 07 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: SPERRY PRODUCTS, INC. (CT.07) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Danbury , Connecticut CT.07-1 Evaluation Year: 1994 CT.07-2 Site Operations: Performed tests involving non-destructive inspection techniques in the 1950s. CT.07-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on the limited scope of activities performed at the site CT.07-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium CT.07-3 Radiological Survey(s): No Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to SPERRY PRODUCTS, INC. CT.07-1 - Sperry Products Letter; VanValkenburg to DeRenzis;

167

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- American Cyanamid Co - CT 13  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cyanamid Co - CT 13 Cyanamid Co - CT 13 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: American Cyanamid Co (CT.13 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Stamford , Connecticut CT.13-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CT.13-1 Site Operations: Produced boron and possibly handled small amounts of refined radioactive source material circa 1940's. Also possibly performed research work on irradiated "J" slugs in 1952 and 1953. CT.13-1 CT.13-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to the limited scope of activities involving radioactive material performed at this site CT.13-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium CT.13-1 Radiological Survey(s): No

168

Materials Reliability Program: Technical Basis for Change to American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Section XI Appendix VIII Root- Mean-Square Error Requirement for Qualification of Depth-Sizing for Ultrasonic Testing (UT) Performed from the In  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides the technical basis for a modification of the ultrasonic testing (UT) qualification requirements of Appendix VIII of ASME Section XI. A recommended change to the requirement for flaw depth-sizing uncertainty is presented on the basis of deterministic and probabilistic evaluation approaches.BackgroundCompliance with the 0.125" depth-sizing root-mean-square error (RMSE) required by ASME Code Section XI Appendix VIII (Supplements 2, 10, ...

2013-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

169

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Wesleyan University - CT 12  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wesleyan University - CT 12 Wesleyan University - CT 12 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Wesleyan University (CT.12 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Middletown , Connecticut CT.12-1 Evaluation Year: 1995 CT.12-2 Site Operations: Spectrographic research on small quantities of uranium wire (several inches in length) in Physics Department circa late 1950. CT.12-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to the limited scope of activities performed CT.12-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium CT.12-1 Radiological Survey(s): No Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to Wesleyan University

170

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New Canaan Site - CT 08  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Year: 1985 CT.08-2 Site Operations: None; Investigation of area prompted by public query; no site found in New Canaan. CT.08-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No AEC site...

171

wvBLACK DIAMONDS table of contents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

County Coal Corporation, presented the annual William Poundstone Lecture entitled, "My Last (and Best) 23 Years in Coal." Bradbury's 42-year coal mining career included a number of senior-level positions in engineering and management. He was president of Martin County Coal during his last 18 years in the industry

Mohaghegh, Shahab

172

wvBLACK DIAMONDS table of contents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

......................12 Chris Hamilton, senior vice president of the West Virginia Coal Association (WVCA), presented a speech on "Coal, Energy, and Mountaintop Development," as part West Virginia University's College experience in the coal mining industry, 25 with the WVCA. He is responsible for legislative, regulatory

Mohaghegh, Shahab

173

wvBLACK DIAMONDS Engineering and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Robert E. Murray is president of Murray Energy Corp., the largest privately owned coal mining company father's paralysis from a mining accident. He worked for the North American Coal Corp. for 31 years president ­ mining services for International Coal Group (ICG), presented the William Poundstone Lecture

Mohaghegh, Shahab

174

Oil-shale utilization at Morgantown, WV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fully aware of the nation's need to develop high-risk and long-term research in eastern oil-shale and low-grade oil-shale utilization in general, the US DOE/METC initiated an eastern oil-shale characterization program. In less than 3 months, METC produced shale oil from a selected eastern-US oil shale with a Fischer assay of 8.0 gallons/ton. In view of the relatively low oil yield from this particular oil shale, efforts were directed to determine the process conditions which give the highest oil yield. A 2-inch-diameter electrically heated fluidized-bed retort was constructed, and Celina oil shale from Tennessee was selected to be used as a representative eastern oil shale. After more than 50 runs, the retorting data were analyzed and reviewed and the best oil-yield operating condition was determined. In addition, while conducting the oil-shale retorting experiments, a number of technical problems were identified, addressed, and overcome. Owing to the inherent high rates of heat and mass transfers inside the fluidized bed, the fluidized-bed combustor and retorting appear to be a desirable process technology for an effective and efficient means for oil-shale utilization. The fluidized-bed operation is a time-tested, process-proven, high-throughput, solid-processing operation which may contribute to the efficient utilization of oil-shale energy.

Shang, J.Y.; Notestein, J.E.; Mei, J.S.; Romanosky, R.R.; King, J.A.; Zeng, L.W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Automated size-specific CT dose monitoring program: Assessing variability in CT dose  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The potential health risks associated with low levels of ionizing radiation have created a movement in the radiology community to optimize computed tomography (CT) imaging protocols to use the lowest radiation dose possible without compromising the diagnostic usefulness of the images. Despite efforts to use appropriate and consistent radiation doses, studies suggest that a great deal of variability in radiation dose exists both within and between institutions for CT imaging. In this context, the authors have developed an automated size-specific radiation dose monitoring program for CT and used this program to assess variability in size-adjusted effective dose from CT imaging. Methods: The authors radiation dose monitoring program operates on an independent health insurance portability and accountability act compliant dosimetry server. Digital imaging and communication in medicine routing software is used to isolate dose report screen captures and scout images for all incoming CT studies. Effective dose conversion factors (k-factors) are determined based on the protocol and optical character recognition is used to extract the CT dose index and dose-length product. The patient's thickness is obtained by applying an adaptive thresholding algorithm to the scout images and is used to calculate the size-adjusted effective dose (ED{sub adj}). The radiation dose monitoring program was used to collect data on 6351 CT studies from three scanner models (GE Lightspeed Pro 16, GE Lightspeed VCT, and GE Definition CT750 HD) and two institutions over a one-month period and to analyze the variability in ED{sub adj} between scanner models and across institutions. Results: No significant difference was found between computer measurements of patient thickness and observer measurements (p= 0.17), and the average difference between the two methods was less than 4%. Applying the size correction resulted in ED{sub adj} that differed by up to 44% from effective dose estimates that were not adjusted by patient size. Additionally, considerable differences were noted in ED{sub adj} distributions between scanners, with scanners employing iterative reconstruction exhibiting significantly lower ED{sub adj} (range: 9%-64%). Finally, a significant difference (up to 59%) in ED{sub adj} distributions was observed between institutions, indicating the potential for dose reduction. Conclusions: The authors developed a robust automated size-specific radiation dose monitoring program for CT. Using this program, significant differences in ED{sub adj} were observed between scanner models and across institutions. This new dose monitoring program offers a unique tool for improving quality assurance and standardization both within and across institutions.

Christianson, Olav; Li Xiang; Frush, Donald; Samei, Ehsan [Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States) and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

CT-121_cover.p65  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INNOVATIVE APPLICATIONS INNOVATIVE APPLICATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY FOR THE CT-121 FGD PROCESS PROJECT PERFORMANCE SUMMARY CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM AUGUST 2002 SOUTHERN COMPANY SERVICES, INC. DOE/FE-0449 Disclaimer This report was prepared using publicly available information, including the Final Technical Report and other reports prepared pursuant to a cooperative agreement partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. Neither the United States Government nor any agency, employee, contractor, or representative thereof, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe upon privately

177

CT detection of occult pneumothorax in head trauma  

SciTech Connect

A prospective evaluation for occult pneumothorax was performed in 25 consecutive patients with serious head trauma by combining a limited chest CT examination with the emergency head CT examination. Of 21 pneuomothoraces present in 15 patients, 11 (52%) were found only by chest CT and were not identified clinically or by supine chest radiograph. Because of pending therapeutic measures, chest tubes were placed in nine of the 11 occult pneumothoraces, regardless of the volume. Chest CT proved itself as the most sensitive method for detection of occult pneumothorax, permitting early chest tube placement to prevent transition to a tension pneumothorax during subsequent mechanical ventilation or emergency surgery under general anesthesia.

Tocino, I.M.; Miller, M.H.; Frederick, P.R.; Bahr, A.L.; Thomas, F.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Table CT1. Energy Consumption Estimates for Major Energy Sources ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

R A D O. U.S. Energy Information Administration State Energy Data 2011: Consumption 89 Table CT6. Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, Selected Years, 1960 ...

179

Simultaneous CT and SPECT tomography using CZT detectors - Energy ...  

A method for simultaneous transmission x-ray computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) comprises the steps of: injecting a subject with a ...

180

Table CT1. Energy Consumption Estimates for Major Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration State Energy Data 2011: Consumption 365 Table CT2. Primary Energy Consumption Estimates, Selected Years, 1960-2011, North ...

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181

Piecewise structural diffusion defined on shape index for noise reduction in dual-energy CT images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increasing radiation dose in dual-energy CT (DE-CT) scanning due to the double exposures at 80 kVp and 140 kVp is a major concern in the application of DE-CT. This paper presents a novel image-space denoising method, called piecewise structural ... Keywords: dual-energy CT, dual-energy CT colonography, noise reduction

Wenli Cai; June-Goo Lee; Da Zhang; Christina Piel; Hiroyuki Yoshida

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

CT reconstruction from limited projection angles  

SciTech Connect

When the available CT projection data are incomplete, there exists a null space in the space of possible reconstructions about which the data provide no information. Deterministic CT reconstructions are impotent in regard to this null space. Furthermore, it is shown that consistency conditions based on projection moments do not provide the missing projections. When the projection data consist of a set of parallel projections that do not encompass a complete 180/sup 0/ rotation, the null space corresponds to a missing sector in the Fourier transform of the original 2-D function. The long-range streak artifacts created by the missing sector can be reduced by attenuating the Fourier transform of the reconstruction smoothly to zero at the sector boundary. It is shown that the Fourier transform of a reconstruction obtained under a maximum entropy constraint is nearly zero in the missing sector. Hence, maximum entropy does not overcome the basic lack of information. It is suggested that some portion of the null space might be filled in by use of a priori knowledge of the type of image expected.

Hanson, K.M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Electronic cleansing in CT colonography: past, present, and future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fecal tagging is a means of marking' fecal residues (stool and fluid) in a colon by use of the oral administration of a positive contrast agent (barium or iodine) in CT Colonography (CTC). Electronic cleansing (EC) is an emerging technique for ... Keywords: CT colonography, bowel preparation, electronic cleansing, fecal tagging

Wenli Cai; Hiroyuki Yoshida

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Former Worker Program - Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of radiation emitted during CT scans. Chest CT, in general, requires less radiation exposure than other CT procedures because the air-filled tissues of the lungs are not as dense...

185

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 18. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Onsystem Industrial Consumers, 1999 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure 19. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Electric Utilities, 1999 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure Sources: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Form FERC-423, "Monthly Report of Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants," and Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental

186

C:\ANNUAL\VENTCHAP.V8\NGAla1109.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2000 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Note: Commercial prices include natural gas delivered for use as vehicle fuel. Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." 0.00-1.99 2.00-3.99 4.00-5.99 6.00-7.99 8.00-9.99 10.00-11.99 12.00+ 0.00-1.99 2.00-3.99 4.00-5.99 6.00-7.99 8.00-9.99 10.00-11.99 12.00+ 17. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Residential

187

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 18. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Onsystem Industrial Consumers, 1998 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure 19. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Electric Utilities, 1998 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure Sources: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Form FERC-423, "Monthly Report of Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants," and Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental

188

C:\ANNUAL\VENTCHAP.V8\NGAla1109.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2000 2000 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-3.99 4.00-5.99 6.00-7.99 8.00-9.99 10.00-11.99 12.00+ NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-3.99 4.00-5.99 6.00-7.99 8.00-99.99 10.00-11.99 12.00+ 19. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Onsystem Industrial Consumers, 2000 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure 20. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Electric Utilities, 2000 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure Sources: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Form FERC-423, "Monthly Report of Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants," and Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural

189

Microsoft Word - Figure_18_19.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 0.00-2.49 2.50-4.49 4.50-6.49 6.50-8.49 8.50-10.49 10.50+ WA ID MT OR CA NV UT AZ NM CO WY ND SD MN WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN WV VA KY PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DE DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK MD 0.00-2.49 2.50-4.49 4.50-6.49 6.50-8.49 8.50-10.49 10.50+ WA ID MT OR CA NV UT AZ NM CO WY ND SD MN WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN WV VA KY MD PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DE DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK Figure 18. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Onsystem Industrial Consumers, 2004 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure 19. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Electric Power Consumers, 2004 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Note: States where the electric power price has been withheld (see Table 23) are included in the $0.00-$2.49 price category.

190

Microsoft Word - NGAMaster_State_TablesNov12.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

49 49 0.00-1.99 2.00-3.99 4.00-5.99 6.00-7.99 8.00-9.99 10.00-11.99 12.00+ WA ID MT OR CA NV UT AZ NM CO WY ND SD MN WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN WV VA KY PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DE DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK MD 0.00-1.99 2.00-3.99 4.00-5.99 6.00-7.99 8.00-9.99 10.00-11.99 12.00+ WA ID MT OR CA NV UT AZ NM CO WY ND SD MN WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN WV VA KY MD PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DE DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK Figure 18. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Onsystem Industrial Consumers, 2003 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure 19. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Electric Power Consumers, 2003 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Note: States where the electric power price has been withheld (see Table 23) are included in the $0.00-$1.99 price category.

191

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Note: Commercial prices include natural gas delivered for use as vehicle fuel. Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 16. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Residential Consumers, 1999 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure

192

C:\ANNUAL\VENTCHAP.V8\NGA.VP  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Note: Commercial prices include natural gas delivered for use as vehicle fuel. Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 16. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Residential Consumers, 1997 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure

193

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1998 1998 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Note: Commercial prices include natural gas delivered for use as vehicle fuel. Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 16. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Residential Consumers, 1998 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure

194

MicroCT: Automated Analysis of CT Reconstructed Data of Home Made Explosive Materials Using the Matlab MicroCT Analysis GUI  

SciTech Connect

This Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) provides the specific procedural steps for analyzing reconstructed CT images obtained under the IDD Standard Operating Procedures for data acquisition [1] and MicroCT image reconstruction [2], per the IDD Quality Assurance Plan for MicroCT Scanning [3]. Although intended to apply primarily to MicroCT data acquired in the HEAFCAT Facility at LLNL, these procedures may also be applied to data acquired at Tyndall from the YXLON cabinet and at TSL from the HEXCAT system. This SOP also provides the procedural steps for preparing the tables and graphs to be used in the reporting of analytical results. This SOP applies to production work - for R and D there are two other semi-automated methods as given in [4, 5].

Seetho, I M; Brown, W D; Kallman, J S; Martz, H E; White, W T

2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

195

MicroCT: Semi-Automated Analysis of CT Reconstructed Data of Home Made Explosive Materials Using the Matlab MicroCT Analysis GUI  

SciTech Connect

This Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) provides the specific procedural steps for analyzing reconstructed CT images obtained under the IDD Standard Operating Procedures for data acquisition [1] and MicroCT image reconstruction [2], per the IDD Quality Assurance Plan for MicroCT Scanning [3]. Although intended to apply primarily to MicroCT data acquired in the HEAFCAT Facility at LLNL, these procedures may also be applied to data acquired at Tyndall from the YXLON cabinet and at TSL from the HEXCAT system. This SOP also provides the procedural steps for preparing the tables and graphs to be used in the reporting of analytical results. This SOP applies to R and D work - for production applications, use [4].

Seetho, I M; Brown, W D; Kallman, J S; Martz, H E; White, W T

2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

196

CT Solar Loan | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Loan Solar Loan No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Summary Last modified on March 29, 2013. Financial Incentive Program Place Connecticut Name CT Solar Loan Incentive Type State Loan Program Applicable Sector Multi-Family Residential, Residential Eligible Technologies Photovoltaics Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector State/Territory Energy Category Renewable Energy Incentive Programs Terms 15 years Program Administrator The Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority Website http://www.energizect.com/residents/programs/ctsolarloan Last DSIRE Review 03/29/2013 References Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency[1] Summary The Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority is offering a pilot loan

197

CT113-53 Cape Wind Report_  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

M M Report of the Effect on Radar Performance of the Proposed Cape Wind Project and Advance Copy of USCG Findings and Mitigation U.S. Department of the Interior Minerals Management Service MMS Cape Wind Energy Project January 2009 Final EIS Appendix M Report of the Effect on Radar Performance of the Proposed Cape Wind Project and Advance Copy of USCG Findings and Mitigation Technology Service Corporation an employee-owned company 55 Corporate Drive 3rd Floor, Trumbull, Connecticut 06611 Phone: (203) 268-1249 Fax: (203) 452-0260 www.tsc.com Ref: TSC-CT113-53 Report of the Effect on Radar Performance of the Proposed Cape Wind Project Submitted to the United States Coast Guard December 16, 2008 USCG Order #HSCG24-08-F-16A248

198

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Dorr Corp - CT 14  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

to D. Arnold; Subject: Description of work and associated costs for tests; October 19, 1954 CT.14-2 - US NRC Letter; R. Bellamy to J. Russo; Subject: NRC Safety Inspection and...

199

Composite structure development decisions using X-ray CT measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

X-ray computed tomography (CT) provides measurement data useful for making composite manufacturing development decisions. X-ray CT measurements of material characteristics are quantitative in terms of the dimensions, density, and composition. The CT data on internal conditions, such as consolidation, gaps, delaminations, cracks, porosity and detail placement can be applied to the refinement of production techniques for composite manufacture. The key item of interest is the effect of variations in pressure loading, temperature, mold shape, material surface preparation, and bond layer thickness on the resulting consolidation or bondline quality in new composite manufacturing processes. X-ray CT measurements of densification and defect presence as a function of technique parameters are of critical importance to processes such as resin transfer molding, injection molding, composite welding, composite layup and advanced bonding methods.

Bossi, R.H.; Georgeson, G.E. [Boeing Defense and Space Group, Seattle, WA (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Microsoft Word - CT for NETL Final rev4.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Display 32 Fig. 25. Sensor Side of 64-Element Array 33 Fig. 26. Integral Surface Mount Support Electronics 33 Fig. 27. Screen Shot of 64-Element Display 34 Fig. 28. 16-Element CT...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ut ct wv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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201

Supervised probabilistic segmentation of pulmonary nodules in CT scans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automatic method for lung nodule segmentation from computed tomography (CT) data is presented that is different from previous work in several respects. Firstly, it is supervised; it learns how to obtain a reliable segmentation from examples in a training ...

Bram van Ginneken

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Segmentation of airway trees from multislice CT using fuzzy logic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The segmentation and reconstruction of the human airway tree from volumetric computed tomography (CT) images facilitates many clinical applications and physiological investigations. The main problem with standard automated region-growing segmentation ...

Tan Kok Liang; Toshiyuki Tanaka; Hidetoshi Nakamura; Toru Shirahata; Hiroaki Sugiura

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Case studies - combinatorial and pairwise testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Rich Web Applications. Logan, UT: Utah State Univ (2012). Compared exhaustive (discretized values) w/ CT. 2-way tests ...

204

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Olin Mathieson - CT 0-02  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Olin Mathieson - CT 0-02 Olin Mathieson - CT 0-02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: OLIN MATHIESON (CT.0-02 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: United Nuclear Corporation CT.0-02-1 Location: New Haven , Connecticut CT.0-02-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CT.0-02-1 Site Operations: Began fabrication of nuclear reactor fuel elements for AEC circa late-1950s. Later became part of a group forming United Nuclear Corp. and were then licensed by AEC. Performed work for U.S. Navy and commercial applications. CT.0-02-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - AEC licensed CT.0-02-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes CT.0-02-1 Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium CT.0-02-1 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated

205

Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection Low-dose spiral computed tomography (CT) scanning is a noninvasive medical imaging test that has been used for the early detection of lung cancer for over 16 years (Sone et al. 1998; Henschke et.al. 1999). A low-dose spiral chest CT differs from a full-dose conventional chest CT scan primarily in the amount of radiation emitted during CT scans. Chest CT, in general, requires less radiation exposure than other CT procedures because the air-filled tissues of the lungs are not as dense as the tissues of other organs (i.e., less x-ray radiation is needed to penetrate the lung). Radiation dose can be further reduced with lung cancer screening due to the

206

A Compact Torus Fusion Reactor Utilizing a Continuously Generated Strings of CT's. The CT String Reactor, CTSR.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fusion reactor is described in which a moving string of mutually repelling compact toruses (alternating helicity, unidirectional Btheta) is generated by repetitive injection using a magnetized coaxial gun driven by continuous gun current with alternating poloidal field. An injected CT relaxes to a minimum magnetic energy equilibrium, moves into a compression cone, and enters a conducting cylinder where the plasma is heated to fusion-producing temperature. The CT then passes into a blanketed region where fusion energy is produced and, on emergence from the fusion region, the CT undergoes controlled expansion in an exit cone where an alternating poloidal field opens the flux surfaces to directly recover the CT magnetic energy as current which is returned to the formation gun. The CT String Reactor (CTSTR) reactor satisfies all the necessary MHD stability requirements and is based on extrapolation of experimentally achieved formation, stability, and plasma confinement. It is supported by extensive 2D, MHD calculations. CTSTR employs minimal external fields supplied by normal conductors, and can produce high fusion power density with uniform wall loading. The geometric simplicity of CTSTR acts to minimize initial and maintenance costs, including periodic replacement of the reactor first wall.

Hartman, C W; Reisman, D B; McLean, H S; Thomas, J

2007-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

207

UT cert 2012-2013_Certificates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Commerce National Institute of Standards and Technology Utah 2012 - 2013 a participant in the NIST Weights and Measures ...

2012-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

208

UT-Battelle Department of Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Forrestala 1996 Night audit The U.S. Department of Energy's Forrestal Building, Washington DC CADDET (1999) 1996 Day and night audits Ministry of Environment and Energy, Toronto, Canada, 1 building Arney & Frey audited by business type. Company names have been omitted for privacy reasons. Several companies declined

209

UT-Battelle Department of Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the Nuclear Nonproliferation Office February 2008 $20M Jack Liles 865-576-1525 lilesm@ornl.gov IT Support

210

Insights from UT Austin Energy Poll  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

weighted data Page 27 Source: University of Texas at Austin Energy Poll Energy Efficient Light Bulbs March 2013 Base: 2113. All results based on weighted data 48% 44% 0% 10% 20%...

211

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Yale Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator - CT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Yale Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator - Yale Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator - CT 05 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Yale Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator (CT.05) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: New Haven , Connecticut CT.05-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CT.05-3 Site Operations: Research and development with solvents. CT.05-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote based on limited amount of materials handled CT.05-3 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium, Radium CT.05-1 Radiological Survey(s): No Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to Yale Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator CT.05-1 - MED Memorandum; To the Files, Thru Ruhoff, et. al.;

212

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Metals Selling Corp - CT 0-01  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Selling Corp - CT 0-01 Selling Corp - CT 0-01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: METALS SELLING CORP. (CT.0-01 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Putnam , Connecticut CT.0-01-1 Evaluation Year: 1986 CT.0-01-1 Site Operations: Performed grinding of (non-radioactive) magnesium circa 1950 -1952 as a sub-contractor to Mallinckrodt Corp. CT.0-01-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No indication that radioactive materials were handled at this location CT.0-01-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: No Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None Radiological Survey(s): No Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to METALS SELLING CORP. CT.0-01-1 - DOE Memorandum/Checklist D. Levine to File; Subject -

213

Surface-Layer Fluxes Measured Using the CT2-Profile Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first experimental test of obtaining heat and momentum fluxes from measurements of the profile of the temperature structure parameter CT2 is performed. The parameter CT2 is obtained from resistance-wire thermometers as well as from optical-...

Reginald J. Hill; Gerard R. Ochs; James J. Wilson

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

A New Approach in Metal Artifact Reduction for CT 3D Reconstruction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 3D representation of CT scans is widely used in medical application such as virtual endoscopy, plastic reconstructive surgery, dental implant planning systems and more. Metallic objects present in CT studies cause strong artifacts like beam hardening ...

Valery Naranjo; Roberto Llorens; Patricia Paniagua; Mariano Alcaiz; Salvador Albalat

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Test of 3D CT reconstructions by EM + TV algorithm from undersampled data  

SciTech Connect

Computerized tomography (CT) plays an important role in medical imaging for diagnosis and therapy. However, CT imaging is connected with ionization radiation exposure of patients. Therefore, the dose reduction is an essential issue in CT. In 2011, the Expectation Maximization and Total Variation Based Model for CT Reconstruction (EM+TV) was proposed. This method can reconstruct a better image using less CT projections in comparison with the usual filtered back projection (FBP) technique. Thus, it could significantly reduce the overall dose of radiation in CT. This work reports the results of an independent numerical simulation for cone beam CT geometry with alternative virtual phantoms. As in the original report, the 3D CT images of 128 Multiplication-Sign 128 Multiplication-Sign 128 virtual phantoms were reconstructed. It was not possible to implement phantoms with lager dimensions because of the slowness of code execution even by the CORE i7 CPU.

Evseev, Ivan; Ahmann, Francielle; Silva, Hamilton P. da [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana - UTFPR/FB, 85601-970, Caixa Postal 135, Francisco Beltrao - PR (Brazil); Schelin, Hugo R. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana-UTFPR/FB,85601-970,Caixa Postal 135,Francisco Beltrao-PR (Brazil) and Faculdades Pequeno Principe-FPP, Av. Iguacu, 333, Rebou (Brazil); Yevseyeva, Olga [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina - UFSC/ARA, 88900-000, Rua Pedro Joao Pereira, 150, Ararangua - SC (Brazil); Klock, Margio C. L. [Universidade Federal do Parana - UFPR Litoral, 80230-901, Rua Jaguaraiva 512, Caioba, Matinhos - PR (Brazil)

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

216

Matter Matters: Unphysical Properties of the Rh = ct Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is generally agreed that there is matter in the universe and, in this paper, we show that the existence of matter is extremely problematic for the proposed Rh = ct universe. Considering a dark energy component with an equation of state of w=-1/3, it is shown that the presence of matter destroys the strict expansion properties that define the evolution of Rh = ct cosmologies, distorting the observational properties that are touted as its success. We further examine whether an evolving dark energy component can save this form of cosmological expansion in the presence of matter by resulting in an expansion consistent with a mean value of = -1/3, finding that the presence of mass requires unphysical forms of the dark energy component in the early universe. We conclude that matter in the universe significantly limits the fundamental properties of the Rh = ct cosmology, and that novel, and unphysical, evolution of the matter component would be required to save it. Given this, Rh = ct cosmology is not simpler or...

Lewis, Geraint F

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Assessment of Summer RBOB Supply for NY & CT  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Update of Summer Reformulated Gasoline Supply Update of Summer Reformulated Gasoline Supply Assessment for New York and Connecticut May 5, 2004 In October 2003, EIA published a review of the status of the methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) ban transition in New York (NY) and Connecticut (CT) 1 that noted significant uncertainties in gasoline supply for those States for the summer of 2004. To obtain updated information, EIA spoke to major suppliers to the two States over the past several months as the petroleum industry began the switch from winter- to summer-grade gasoline. As discussed on our earlier report, the NY and CT bans on MTBE mainly affect reformulated gasoline (RFG), which in recent years has been provided by domestic refineries on the East Coast (PADD 1) and imports. Our recent findings indicate that

218

Wind Program: Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Outreach Outreach Printable Version Bookmark and Share The Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach initiative of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Program is designed to educate, engage, and enable critical stakeholders to make informed decisions about how wind energy contributes to the U.S. electricity supply. Highlights Resources Wind Resource Maps State Activities What activities are happening in my state? AK AL AR AZ CA CO CT DC DE FL GA HI IA ID IL IN KS KY LA MA MD ME MI MN MO MS MT NC ND NE NH NJ NM NV NY OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VA VT WA WI WV WY Installed wind capacity maps. Features A image of a house with a residential-scale small wind turbine. Small Wind for Homeowners, Farmers, and Businesses Stakeholder Engagement & Outreach Projects

219

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Analysis. U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2010 213 Appendix F Regional Maps Figure F1. United States Census Divisions Pacific East South Central South Atlantic Middle Atlantic New England West South Central West North Central East North Central Mountain AK WA MT WY ID NV UT CO AZ NM TX OK IA KS MO IL IN KY TN MS AL FL GA SC NC WV PA NJ MD DE NY CT VT ME RI MA NH VA WI MI OH NE SD MN ND AR LA OR CA HI Middle Atlantic New England East North Central West North Central Pacific West South Central East South Central South Atlantic Mountain Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. Appendix F Regional Maps Figure F1. United States Census Divisions U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2012

220

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

clothes drying, ceiling fans, coffee makers, spas, home security clothes drying, ceiling fans, coffee makers, spas, home security systems, microwave ovens, set-top boxes, home audio equipment, rechargeable electronics, and VCR/DVDs. In addition to the major equipment-driven end-uses, the average energy consumption per household is projected for other electric and nonelectric appliances. The module's output includes number Energy Information Administration/Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 19 Pacific East South Central South Atlantic Middle Atlantic New England West South Central West North Central East North Central Mountain AK WA MT WY ID NV UT CO AZ NM TX OK IA KS MO IL IN KY TN MS AL FL GA SC NC WV PA NJ MD DE NY CT VT ME RI MA NH VA WI MI OH NE SD MN ND AR LA OR CA HI Middle Atlantic New England East North Central West North Central Pacific West South Central East South Central

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ut ct wv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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221

Microsoft Word - figure_13.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Egypt Figure 13. Net Interstate Movements, Imports, and Exports of Natural Gas in the United States, 2007 (Million Cubic Feet) Nigeria Algeria 37,483 WA M T I D OR W Y ND SD C A N V UT CO NE KS AZ NM OK TX MN WI MI IA I L IN OH MO AR MS AL GA TN KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI AK Mexico C a n a d a C a n a d a Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Algeria Canada Canada i i N g e r a Gulf of Mexico Gulf o f M e x i c o Gulf of Mexico Canada Gulf of Mexico Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," and the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports.

222

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Regional maps Figure F6. Coal supply regions Figure F6. Coal Supply Regions WA ID OR CA NV UT TX OK AR MO LA MS AL GA FL TN SC NC KY VA WV WY CO SD ND MI MN WI IL IN OH MD PA NJ DE CT MA NH VT NY ME RI MT NE IA KS MI AZ NM 500 0 SCALE IN MILES APPALACHIA Northern Appalachia Central Appalachia Southern Appalachia INTERIOR NORTHERN GREAT PLAINS Eastern Interior Western Interior Gulf Lignite Dakota Lignite Western Montana Wyoming, Northern Powder River Basin Wyoming, Southern Powder River Basin Western Wyoming OTHER WEST Rocky Mountain Southwest Northwest KY AK 1000 0 SCALE IN MILES Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office

223

Artifacts in Conventional Computed Tomography (CT) and Free Breathing Four-Dimensional CT Induce Uncertainty in Gross Tumor Volume Determination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Artifacts impacting the imaged tumor volume can be seen in conventional three-dimensional CT (3DCT) scans for planning of lung cancer radiotherapy but can be reduced with the use of respiration-correlated imaging, i.e., 4DCT or breathhold CT (BHCT) scans. The aim of this study was to compare delineated gross tumor volume (GTV) sizes in 3DCT, 4DCT, and BHCT scans of patients with lung tumors. Methods and Materials: A total of 36 patients with 46 tumors referred for stereotactic radiotherapy of lung tumors were included. All patients underwent positron emission tomography (PET)/CT, 4DCT, and BHCT scans. GTVs in all CT scans of individual patients were delineated during one session by a single physician to minimize systematic delineation uncertainty. The GTV size from the BHCT was considered the closest to true tumor volume and was chosen as the reference. The reference GTV size was compared to GTV sizes in 3DCT, at midventilation (MidV), at end-inspiration (Insp), and at end-expiration (Exp) bins from the 4DCT scan. Results: The median BHCT GTV size was 4.9 cm{sup 3} (0.1-53.3 cm{sup 3}). Median deviation between 3DCT and BHCT GTV size was 0.3 cm{sup 3} (-3.3 to 30.0 cm{sup 3}), between MidV and BHCT size was 0.2 cm{sup 3} (-5.7 to 19.7 cm{sup 3}), between Insp and BHCT size was 0.3 cm{sup 3} (-4.7 to 24.8 cm{sup 3}), and between Exp and BHCT size was 0.3 cm{sup 3} (-4.8 to 25.5 cm{sup 3}). The 3DCT, MidV, Insp, and Exp median GTV sizes were all significantly larger than the BHCT median GTV size. Conclusions: In the present study, the choice of CT method significantly influenced the delineated GTV size, on average, leading to an increase in GTV size compared to the reference BHCT. The uncertainty caused by artifacts is estimated to be in the same magnitude as delineation uncertainty and should be considered in the design of margins for radiotherapy.

Fredberg Persson, Gitte, E-mail: gitte.persson@rh.regionh.dk [Department of Radiation Oncology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Nygaard, Ditte Eklund; Munch af Rosenschoeld, Per; Richter Vogelius, Ivan; Josipovic, Mirjana [Department of Radiation Oncology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Specht, Lena [Department of Radiation Oncology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Korreman, Stine Sofia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Niels Bohr Institute, Faculty of Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Non-medical Uses of Computed Tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Non-medical Uses of Computed Tomography (CT) Non-medical Uses of Computed Tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Resources with Additional Information Computed Tomography (CT) Scanner CT Scanner - Courtesy Stanford University Department of Energy Resources Engineering Computed tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) have been used to resolve industrial problems, for materials characterizations, and to provide non-destructive evaluations for discovering flaws in parts before their use, resulting in greater reliability and greater safety for workers; to identify the presence and facilitate the recovery/extraction of oil, water, coal, and/or gas; and to provide non-destructive testing and quality control of fresh fruits and vegetables, enhancing the safety of food. These benefits of non-medical uses of CT and NMR contribute to the economy and improve people's lives.

225

Albany, OR * Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Houston, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NETL R&D Tackles Technological NETL R&D Tackles Technological Challenges of the Williston Basin's Bakken Formation Recent development of the Bakken Formation in the Williston Basin of western North Dakota and eastern Montana is a good example of persistent analysis of geologic data and adaptation of new completion technologies overcoming the challenges posed by unconventional reservoirs. However, as with most unconventional plays, as Bakken development continues, questions regarding

226

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Engine Technology Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOENETL) Carbon Capture Program is to develop innovative...

227

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing of Rapid PSA for CO 2 Capture Background The mission of the U.S. Department of EnergyNational Energy Technology Laboratory (DOENETL) Carbon Capture Research &...

228

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

including lignite and sub-bituminous coal, make up about half of U.S. coal production and reserves. They have lower energy and sulfur contents than bituminous coal, but higher...

229

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Institute Background The mission of the U.S. Department of EnergyNational Energy Technology Laboratory (DOENETL) Carbon Capture Program is to develop innovative...

230

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of filter elements to remove ash from the syngas prior to it being utilized in a gas turbine or fuel cell. The elements are arranged in columns called "candles" and contained...

231

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computational Facilities Description Scientists at NETL's laboratories use the Geoscience Analysis, Interpretation, and Assessments (GAIA) Computational Facilities for...

232

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigation on Pyroelectric Ceramic Temperature Sensors for Energy System Applications Background There is an increasing need to monitor processing parameters such as...

233

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO 2 -Binding Organic Liquids Gas Capture with Polarity-Swing-Assisted Regeneration Background The mission of the U.S. Department of EnergyNational Energy Technology Laboratory...

234

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and are also stringent in order to avoid poisoning catalysts utilized in making liquids from fuel gas, electrodes in fuel cells, and selective catalytic reduction...

235

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

modeling, laboratory experiments, and industry input to develop physics-based methods, models, and tools to support the development and deployment of advanced...

236

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of clean energy systems. Accomplishments The AVESTAR team successfully deployed 3-D virtual IGCC immersive training systems at NETL and West Virginia University that allow...

237

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of implementation, and prepare for widespread commercial deployment between 2020 and 2030. Research conducted to develop these technologies will ensure safe and permanent...

238

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

volatilization from interconnect alloys using solution conductivity. Schematic of a SOFC highlighting potential degradation mechanisms. The GEGR project assists the SOFCs...

239

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

project phases focused on cell and stack research and development with emphasis on SOFC performance enhancement (power density, fuel utilization, and degradation), cost...

240

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

chemical state of pulse laser deposited thin-film cathodes were measured. * A symmetric SOFC cell for ultra-small angle X-ray scattering studies was designed and constructed. The...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ut ct wv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

coatingscale durability through thermal cycling. * Drew the interest of a major SOFC manufacturer and specialty SOFC metals producer. Benefits nGimat's SBIR project...

242

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

assists the SOFCs program in meeting its cost and performance targets by ensuring that SOFC seals can achieve reliable operation over an extended operating life. The program...

243

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

methods developed in this ONR program can now be applied to the testing of a Delphi Gen 4 SOFC stack in the DOE research program. Benefits This NUWC project assists the SOFCs...

244

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

region or matching oxygen vacancy concen- trations. * Demonstrated that periodic reverse SOFC operation serves to prolong SOFC lifetimes. * Demonstrated elemental surface valence...

245

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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Unique Low Thermal Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Architectures-UES Background Gas turbine engines used in integrated gasification combined cycle power plants require...

246

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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a novel catalyzed wall heat exchanger, and a network of heat exchangers to support thermal self-sufficiency. * Completed test stand modifications at UTC Power to support...

247

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

diverse number of systems and chemical processes ranging from catalysts developments for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis applications, nanoscience, development of dense membrane systems...

248

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and unknown samples. Analyses are used to characterize the fundamental properties of unconventional natural gas and oil reservoirs, ultra-deepwater and frontier-region...

249

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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of the plant. Calera's process reduces carbon dioxide and pollutant emissions by using waste streams to make useable products. In the Sub-phase 2a, Calera completed the detailed...

250

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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WGS National Carbon Capture Center - Water-Gas Shift Tests to Reduce Steam Use Background In cooperation with Southern Company Services, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)...

251

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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* Conduct bench-scale testing of the complete ICES incorporating the selected particle growth method with the optimized capture duct and diffuser systems to enable the...

252

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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can contribute to the reduction of overall greenhouse gas emissions from fossil power plants. One area of research is the development and characterization of multiple...

253

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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Vito Cedro III Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-7406 vito.cedro@netl.doe.gov Jason S....

254

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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Archer Daniels Midland Company: CO 2 Capture from Biofuels Production and Storage into the Mt. Simon Sandstone Background Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions from industrial...

255

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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Transport Membrane (ITM) Oxygen Technology for Integration in IGCC and Other Advanced Power Generation Systems Background Oxygen is among the top five chemicals produced worldwide...

256

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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materials requirements for all fossil energy systems, including materials for advanced power generation technologies, such as coal gasification, heat engines, such as turbines,...

257

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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Aerodynamics and Heat Transfer Studies of Parameters Specific to the IGCC- Requirements: High Mass Flow Endwall Contouring, Leading Edge Filleting and Blade Tip Ejection under...

258

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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Effects of Hot Streak and Phantom Cooling on Heat Transfer in a Cooled Turbine Stage Including Particulate Deposition-The Ohio State University Background Sophisticated...

259

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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FutureGen 2.0 Background The combustion of fossil fuels for electricity generation is one of the largest contributors to carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions in the United States and...

260

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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(3) improving efficiency of storage operations; and (4) developing Best Practices Manuals. Deploying these technologies in commercial-scale applications will require a...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ut ct wv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

main bulk phases, the Nb solid solution, and Nb silicides will be developed. Formation energies of the undoped and doped Nb-Si-Cr will be calculated and compared. Interfacial...

262

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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of Technology (Georgia Tech) will obtain data and develop models of the turbulent burning rate of HHC fuels at realistic conditions and in inhomo- geneous conditions such as...

263

West Virginia Smart Grid Implementation Plan (WV SGIP) Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

operating and asset health data deeply integrated with operating and asset management applications, dramatic improvement in enterprise wide processes - GIS, system...

264

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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Gasifier; hot gas filtration; continuous ash depressurization systems; and various instrumentation, sampling, and controls systems. After only eight years from the time of...

265

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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gasifier; hot gas filtration; continuous ash depressurization systems; and various instrumentation, sampling, and controls systems. Only eight years after construction and...

266

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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capture technologies developed by the DOE program may also be applied to natural gas power plants after addressing the R&D challenges associated with the relatively low...

267

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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correspond to reflected-shock temperature (1180 K) and pressure (13.06 atm) for a stoichiometric H 2 -O 2 mixture in argon. Comparison with chemical kinetics mechanisms is good...

268

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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oil recovery (EOR) application. The industrial source of CO 2 will be a petroleum-coke-to-chemicals (methanol and other by-products) gasification plant being developed by...

269

Microsoft PowerPoint - WV SGIP 101810 rev1.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Smart Grid Implementation Plan - Roadmap Framework GridWeek 2010 Steve Pullins October 18, 2010, Washington, DC This material is based upon work supported by the Department of...

270

UTS Design Guidelines P-PO.01.09 UTS DESIGN GUIDELINES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-of-Custody ..................................................................................................................11 6.1.2 Sample Labels and Custody Seals-of-custody forms, EPA-certified clean containers, coolers, preservatives, and custody seals. The following provides the sampling effort. 6.1.2 Sample Labels and Custody Seals A sample label will be affixed to each sample

University of Technology, Sydney

271

Dedicated breast CT: Fibroglandular volume measurements in a diagnostic population  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the mean and range of volumetric glandular fraction (VGF) of the breast in a diagnostic population using a high-resolution flat-panel cone-beam dedicated breast CT system. This information is important for Monte Carlo-based estimation of normalized glandular dose coefficients and for investigating the dependence of VGF on breast dimensions, race, and pathology. Methods: Image data from a clinical trial investigating the role of dedicated breast CT that enrolled 150 women were retrospectively analyzed to determine the VGF. The study was conducted in adherence to a protocol approved by the institutional human subjects review boards and written informed consent was obtained from all study participants. All participants in the study were assigned BI-RADS{sup Registered-Sign} 4 or 5 as per the American College of Radiology assessment categories after standard diagnostic work-up and underwent dedicated breast CT exam prior to biopsy. A Gaussian-kernel based fuzzy c-means algorithm was used to partition the breast CT images into adipose and fibroglandular tissue after segmenting the skin. Upon determination of the accuracy of the algorithm with a phantom, it was applied to 137 breast CT volumes from 136 women. VGF was determined for each breast and the mean and range were determined. Pathology results with classification as benign, malignant, and hyperplasia were available for 132 women, and were used to investigate if the distributions of VGF varied with pathology. Results: The algorithm was accurate to within {+-}1.9% in determining the volume of an irregular shaped phantom. The study mean ({+-} inter-breast SD) for the VGF was 0.172 {+-} 0.142 (range: 0.012-0.719). VGF was found to be negatively correlated with age, breast dimensions (chest-wall to nipple length, pectoralis to nipple length, and effective diameter at chest-wall), and total breast volume, and positively correlated with fibroglandular volume. Based on pathology, pairwise statistical analysis (Mann-Whitney test) indicated that at the 0.05 significance level, there was no significant difference in distributions of VGF without adjustment for age between malignant and nonmalignant breasts (p= 0.41). Pairwise comparisons of the distributions of VGF in increasing order of mammographic breast density indicated all comparisons were statistically significant (p < 0.002). Conclusions: This study used a different clinical prototype breast CT system than that in previous studies to image subjects from a different geographical region, and used a different algorithm for analysis of image data. The mean VGF estimated from this study is within the range reported in previous studies, indicating that the choice of 50% glandular weight fraction to represent an average breast for Monte Carlo-based estimation of normalized glandular dose coefficients in mammography needs revising. In the study, the distributions of VGF did not differ significantly with pathology.

Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shi Linxi; Karellas, Andrew; O'Connell, Avice M. [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States); Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Regional maps Figure F7. Coal demand regions Figure F7. Coal Demand Regions CT,MA,ME,NH,RI,VT OH 1. NE 3. S1 4. S2 5. GF 6. OH 7. EN AL,MS MN,ND,SD IA,NE,MO,KS TX,LA,OK,AR MT,WY,ID CO,UT,NV AZ,NM 9. AM 11. C2 12. WS 13. MT 14. CU 15. ZN WV,MD,DC,DE 2. YP Region Content Region Code NY,PA,NJ VA,NC,SC GA,FL IN,IL,MI,WI Region Content Region Code 14. CU 13. MT 16. PC 15. ZN 12. WS 11. C2 9. AM 5. GF 8. KT 4. S2 7. EN 6. OH 2. YP 1. NE 3. S1 10. C1 KY,TN 8. KT 16. PC AK,HI,WA,OR,CA 10. C1 CT,MA,ME,NH,RI,VT OH 1. NE 3. S1 4. S2 5. GF 6. OH 7. EN AL,MS MN,ND,SD IA,NE,MO,KS TX,LA,OK,AR MT,WY,ID CO,UT,NV AZ,NM 9. AM 11. C2 12. WS 13. MT 14. CU 15. ZN WV,MD,DC,DE 2. YP Region Content Region Code NY,PA,NJ VA,NC,SC GA,FL IN,IL,MI,WI Region Content Region Code 14. CU 13. MT

273

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Regional maps Figure F7. Coal demand regions Figure F7. Coal Demand Regions CT,MA,ME,NH,RI,VT OH 1. NE 3. S1 4. S2 5. GF 6. OH 7. EN AL,MS MN,ND,SD IA,NE,MO,KS TX,LA,OK,AR MT,WY,ID CO,UT,NV AZ,NM 9. AM 11. C2 12. WS 13. MT 14. CU 15. ZN WV,MD,DC,DE 2. YP Region Content Region Code NY,PA,NJ VA,NC,SC GA,FL IN,IL,MI,WI Region Content Region Code 14. CU 13. MT 16. PC 15. ZN 12. WS 11. C2 9. AM 5. GF 8. KT 4. S2 7. EN 6. OH 2. YP 1. NE 3. S1 10. C1 KY,TN 8. KT 16. PC AK,HI,WA,OR,CA 10. C1 CT,MA,ME,NH,RI,VT OH 1. NE 3. S1 4. S2 5. GF 6. OH 7. EN AL,MS MN,ND,SD IA,NE,MO,KS TX,LA,OK,AR MT,WY,ID CO,UT,NV AZ,NM 9. AM 11. C2 12. WS 13. MT 14. CU 15. ZN WV,MD,DC,DE 2. YP Region Content Region Code NY,PA,NJ VA,NC,SC GA,FL IN,IL,MI,WI Region Content Region Code 14. CU 13. MT

274

Patient-specific dose estimation for pediatric chest CT  

SciTech Connect

Current methods for organ and effective dose estimations in pediatric CT are largely patient generic. Physical phantoms and computer models have only been developed for standard/limited patient sizes at discrete ages (e.g., 0, 1, 5, 10, 15 years old) and do not reflect the variability of patient anatomy and body habitus within the same size/age group. In this investigation, full-body computer models of seven pediatric patients in the same size/protocol group (weight: 11.9-18.2 kg) were created based on the patients' actual multi-detector array CT (MDCT) data. Organs and structures in the scan coverage were individually segmented. Other organs and structures were created by morphing existing adult models (developed from visible human data) to match the framework defined by the segmented organs, referencing the organ volume and anthropometry data in ICRP Publication 89. Organ and effective dose of these patients from a chest MDCT scan protocol (64 slice LightSpeed VCT scanner, 120 kVp, 70 or 75 mA, 0.4 s gantry rotation period, pitch of 1.375, 20 mm beam collimation, and small body scan field-of-view) was calculated using a Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated to simulate radiation transport in the same CT system. The seven patients had normalized effective dose of 3.7-5.3 mSv/100 mAs (coefficient of variation: 10.8%). Normalized lung dose and heart dose were 10.4-12.6 mGy/100 mAs and 11.2-13.3 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. Organ dose variations across the patients were generally small for large organs in the scan coverage (<7%), but large for small organs in the scan coverage (9%-18%) and for partially or indirectly exposed organs (11%-77%). Normalized effective dose correlated weakly with body weight (correlation coefficient: r=-0.80). Normalized lung dose and heart dose correlated strongly with mid-chest equivalent diameter (lung: r=-0.99, heart: r=-0.93); these strong correlation relationships can be used to estimate patient-specific organ dose for any other patient in the same size/protocol group who undergoes the chest scan. In summary, this work reported the first assessment of dose variations across pediatric CT patients in the same size/protocol group due to the variability of patient anatomy and body habitus and provided a previously unavailable method for patient-specific organ dose estimation, which will help in assessing patient risk and optimizing dose reduction strategies, including the development of scan protocols.

Li Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Frush, Donald P. [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Global Applied Science Laboratory, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham North Carolina 27710 (United States)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

MIEDER, WOLFGANG. Proverbs: A Handbook. Westport, CT: Greenwood, 2004. 304 pp.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

selecta bibliografa, Proverbs: A Handbook interesado en unWOLFGANG. Proverbs: A Handbook. Westport, CT: Greenwood,libros de referencia de Handbooks" publicado en el nueva la

Lee, Alejandro

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

10 A.M. CT TODAY: On-the Record Conference Call for Obama Administrati...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

White House Rural Economic Council Promotes Production of Next Generation Biofuels, Job Creation and Economic Opportunity WASHINGTON, Aug. 16, 2011 - Today at 10 a.m. CT (11...

277

Simultaneous CT and SPECT tomography using CZT detectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for simultaneous transmission x-ray computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) comprises the steps of: injecting a subject with a tracer compound tagged with a .gamma.-ray emitting nuclide; directing an x-ray source toward the subject; rotating the x-ray source around the subject; emitting x-rays during the rotating step; rotating a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) two-sided detector on an opposite side of the subject from the source; simultaneously detecting the position and energy of each pulsed x-ray and each emitted .gamma.-ray captured by the CZT detector; recording data for each position and each energy of each the captured x-ray and .gamma.-ray; and, creating CT and SPECT images from the recorded data. The transmitted energy levels of the x-rays lower are biased lower than energy levels of the .gamma.-rays. The x-ray source is operated in a continuous mode. The method can be implemented at ambient temperatures.

Paulus, Michael J. (Knoxville, TN); Sari-Sarraf, Hamed (Lubbock, TX); Simpson, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Britton, Jr., Charles L. (Alcoa, TN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Resolution and noise trade-off analysis for volumetric CT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Until recently, most studies addressing the trade-off between spatial resolution and quantum noise were performed in the context of single-slice CT. In this study, we extend the theoretical framework of previous works to volumetric CT and further extend it by taking into account the actual shapes of the preferred reconstruction kernels. In the experimental study, we also attempt to explore a three-dimensional approach for spatial resolution measurement, as opposed to the conventional two-dimensional approaches that were widely adopted in previously published studies. By scanning a finite-sized sphere phantom, the MTF was measured from the edge profile along the spherical surface. Cases of different resolutions (and noise levels) were generated by adjusting the reconstruction kernel. To reduce bias, the total photon fluxes were matched: 120 kVp, 200 mA, and 1 s per gantry rotation. All data sets were reconstructed using a modified FDK algorithm under the same condition: Scan field-of-view (SFOV)=10 cm, and slice thickness=0.625 mm. The theoretical analysis indicated that the variance of noise is proportional to >4th power of the spatial resolution. Our experimental results supported this conclusion by showing the relationship is 4.6th (helical) or 5th (axial) power.

Li Baojun; Avinash, Gopal B.; Hsieh, Jiang [Applied Science Laboratory, General Electric Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188 (United States)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

279

Metal artifact reduction in dental CT images using polar mathematical morphology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract: Most dental implant planning systems use a 3D representation of the CT scan of the patient under study as it provides a more intuitive view of the human jaw. The presence of metallic objects in human jaws, such as amalgam or gold fillings, ... Keywords: Artifact reduction, Dental CT, Polar morphology

Valery Naranjo; Roberto Llorns; Mariano Alcaiz; Fernando Lpez-Mir

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Five Years of Cyclotron Radioisotope Production Experiences at the First PET-CT in Venezuela  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Five years operation of a compact cyclotron installed at PET-CT facility in Caracas, Venezuela is given. Production rate of {sup 18}F labeled FDG, operation and radiation monitoring experience are included. We conclude that {sup 18}FDG CT-PET is the most effective technique for patient diagnosis.

Colmenter, L.; Coelho, D.; Esteves, L. M.; Ruiz, N.; Morales, L.; Lugo, I. [Centro Diagnostico Docente, Las Mercedes, Caracas (Venezuela); Sajo-Bohus, L.; Liendo, J. A.; Greaves, E. D.; Barros, H. [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Seccion de Fisica Nuclear, Caracas (Venezuela); Castillo, J. [University of Applied Science of Aachen (Germany)

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ut ct wv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

AUTOMATIC HEART ISOLATION FOR CT CORONARY VISUALIZATION USING G. Funka-Lea1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AUTOMATIC HEART ISOLATION FOR CT CORONARY VISUALIZATION USING GRAPH-CUTS G. Funka-Lea1 , Y. Boykov3 isolate the outer surface of the entire heart in Computer Tomogra- phy (CT) cardiac scans. Isolating the entire heart allows the coronary vessels on the surface of the heart to be easily visu- alized despite

Boykov, Yuri

282

ECG-correlated image reconstruction from subsecond multi-slice spiral CT scans of the heart  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subsecond spiral computed tomography(CT) offers great potential for improving heartimaging. The new multi-row detector technology adds significantly to this potential. We therefore developed and validated dedicated cardiacreconstruction algorithms for imaging the heart with subsecond multi-slice spiral CT utilizing electrocardiogram (ECG) information. The single-slice cardiacz-interpolation algorithms 180CI and 180CD [Med. Phys. 25

Marc Kachelrie; Stefan Ulzheimer; Willi A. Kalender

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Non-medical Uses of Computed Tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Non-medical Uses of Computed Tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Resources with Additional Information Computed Tomography (CT) Scanner CT Scanner - Courtesy Stanford University Department of Energy Resources Engineering Computed tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) have been used to resolve industrial problems, for materials characterizations, and to provide non-destructive evaluations for discovering flaws in parts before their use, resulting in greater reliability and greater safety for workers; to identify the presence and facilitate the recovery/extraction of oil, water, coal, and/or gas; and to provide non-destructive testing and quality control of fresh fruits and vegetables, enhancing the safety of food. These benefits of non-medical uses of CT and NMR contribute to the economy and improve people's lives.

284

Temporal and spectral imaging with micro-CT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Micro-CT is widely used for small animal imaging in preclinical studies of cardiopulmonary disease, but further development is needed to improve spatial resolution, temporal resolution, and material contrast. We present a technique for visualizing the changing distribution of iodine in the cardiac cycle with dual source micro-CT. Methods: The approach entails a retrospectively gated dual energy scan with optimized filters and voltages, and a series of computational operations to reconstruct the data. Projection interpolation and five-dimensional bilateral filtration (three spatial dimensions + time + energy) are used to reduce noise and artifacts associated with retrospective gating. We reconstruct separate volumes corresponding to different cardiac phases and apply a linear transformation to decompose these volumes into components representing concentrations of water and iodine. Since the resulting material images are still compromised by noise, we improve their quality in an iterative process that minimizes the discrepancy between the original acquired projections and the projections predicted by the reconstructed volumes. The values in the voxels of each of the reconstructed volumes represent the coefficients of linear combinations of basis functions over time and energy. We have implemented the reconstruction algorithm on a graphics processing unit (GPU) with CUDA. We tested the utility of the technique in simulations and applied the technique in an in vivo scan of a C57BL/6 mouse injected with blood pool contrast agent at a dose of 0.01 ml/g body weight. Postreconstruction, at each cardiac phase in the iodine images, we segmented the left ventricle and computed its volume. Using the maximum and minimum volumes in the left ventricle, we calculated the stroke volume, the ejection fraction, and the cardiac output. Results: Our proposed method produces five-dimensional volumetric images that distinguish different materials at different points in time, and can be used to segment regions containing iodinated blood and compute measures of cardiac function. Conclusions: We believe this combined spectral and temporal imaging technique will be useful for future studies of cardiopulmonary disease in small animals.

Johnston, Samuel M.; Johnson, G. Allan; Badea, Cristian T. [Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

285

Precios de Gasolina  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Precios de Gasolina para Ciudades en EEUU Pulse en el mapa para ver los precios de la gasolina en diferentes ciudades de su estado. AK VT ME NH NH MA MA RI CT CT DC NJ DE DE NY WV...

286

American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility Facility American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location New London County, Connecticut Coordinates 41.5185189°, -72.0468164° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.5185189,"lon":-72.0468164,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

287

10 A.M. CT TODAY: On-the Record Conference Call for Obama Administration to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A.M. CT TODAY: On-the Record Conference Call for Obama A.M. CT TODAY: On-the Record Conference Call for Obama Administration to Announce Major Initiative to Enhance America's Energy Security 10 A.M. CT TODAY: On-the Record Conference Call for Obama Administration to Announce Major Initiative to Enhance America's Energy Security August 16, 2011 - 9:52am Addthis White House Rural Economic Council Promotes Production of Next Generation Biofuels, Job Creation and Economic Opportunity WASHINGTON, Aug. 16, 2011 - Today at 10 a.m. CT (11 a.m. ET), the Obama Administration will advance a major initiative to produce next generation aviation and marine biofuels to power military and commercial transportation. The initiative responds to a directive from President Obama issued in March as part of his Blueprint for a Secure Energy Future, the

288

A Fossilized Opal A To Opal C-T Transformation On The Northeast Atlantic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fossilized Opal A To Opal C-T Transformation On The Northeast Atlantic Fossilized Opal A To Opal C-T Transformation On The Northeast Atlantic Margin- Support For A Significantly Elevated Palaeogeothermal Gradient During The Neogene? Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Fossilized Opal A To Opal C-T Transformation On The Northeast Atlantic Margin- Support For A Significantly Elevated Palaeogeothermal Gradient During The Neogene? Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Rock samples-collected from a recent deep-water exploration well drilled in the Faeroe-Shetland Channel, northwest of the UK-confirm that a distinctive high-amplitude seismic reflector that crosscuts the Upper Palaeogene and Neogene succession and covers an area of 10 000 km(2) is an example of a fossilized Opal A to Opal C/T (Cristobalite/Tridymite)

289

Microsoft Word - NGAMaster_State_TablesNov12.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

WA WA MT ID OR WY ND SD CA NV UT CO NE KS AZ NM OK TX MN WI MI IA IL IN OH MO AR MS AL GA TN KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI AK Japan Mexico Mexico Algeria Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Algeria Mexico Trinidad Canada Canada Nigeria Oman Qatar Trinidad Gulf of Mexico Gulf of Mexico Gulf of Mexico Canada Trinidad Trinidad Gulf of Mexico Malaysia 13,623 Figure 8. Interstate Movements of Natural Gas in the United States, 2003 (Million Cubic Feet) Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2003 Supplemental Data From Volume To From Volume To CT RI RI MA MA CT VA DC MD DC 366,224 655,731 666,614 633,960 144,284 43,869 536,776 63,133 36,848

290

Microsoft Word - figure_13.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Egypt Figure 13. Net Interstate Movements, Imports, and Exports of Natural Gas in the United States, 2008 (Million Cubic Feet) Norway Trinidad/ Tobago Interstate Movements Not Shown on Map From Volume To From Volume To CT RI RI MA MA CT VA DC MD DC 45,772 WA M T I D OR W Y ND SD C A N V UT CO NE KS AZ NM OK TX MN WI MI IA I L IN OH MO AR MS AL GA TN KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI AK Mexico C a n a d a C a n a d a Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada i i N g e r a Gulf of Mexico Gulf o f M e x i c o Gulf of Mexico Canada Gulf of Mexico Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports, and EIA estimates.

291

Microsoft Word - figure_13.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,833 ,833 35 Egypt Figure 13. Net Interstate Movements, Imports, and Exports of Natural Gas in the United States, 2009 (Million Cubic Feet) Norway Trinidad/ Tobago Trinidad/ Tobago Egypt Interstate Movements Not Shown on Map From Volume To From Volume To CT RI RI MA MA CT VA DC MD DC 111,144 WA M T I D OR W Y ND SD C A N V UT CO NE KS AZ NM OK TX MN WI MI IA I L IN OH MO AR MS AL GA TN KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI AK Mexico C a n a d a C a n a d a Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada i i N g e r a Gulf of Mexico Gulf o f M e x i c o Gulf of Mexico Canada Gulf of Mexico Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports, and EIA estimates

292

Microsoft Word - figure_13.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 (Million Cubic Feet) Supplemental Data From Volume To From Volume To CT RI RI MA MA CT VA DC MD DC 42,411 WA M T I D OR W Y ND SD C A N V UT CO NE KS AZ NM OK TX MN WI MI IA I L IN OH MO AR MS AL GA TN KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI AK Mexico C a n a d a C a n a d a Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Algeria Canada Canada i i N g e r a Gulf of Mexico Gulf o f M e x i c o Gulf of Mexico Canada Gulf of Mexico Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," and the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports. Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 253,214 690,780 634,185 658,523 134,764 63,063 526,726 121,049 34,531 492,655 101,101 23,154 40,113 1,496,283 68,601

293

DOE/EIA-0131(96) Distribution Category/UC-960 Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

ID ID OR WY ND SD CA NV UT CO NE KS AZ NM OK TX MN WI MI IA IL IN OH MO AR MS AL GA TN KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI AK Japan Mexico Mexico Algeria Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Algeria Canada United Arab Emirates Interstate Movements of Natural Gas in the United States, 1996 (Volumes Reported in Million Cubic Feet) Supplemental Data From Volume To From Volume To (T) AL KY (T) MA ME (T) AL LA MA NH (T) AL MO (T) MA NJ (T) AL SC MD DC CT RI RI MA DE MD VA DC MA CT (T) Trucked Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." E I A NERGY NFORMATION DMINISTRATION 906,407 355,260 243,866 220 384,311 576,420 823,799 842,114 27,271 126,012 133 602,841 266 579,598 16,837 268,138 48,442 182,511 219,242 86,897 643,401 619,703 8,157 937,806 292,711 869,951 12,316 590,493 118,256

294

Microsoft Word - figure_14.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Egypt Figure 14. Net Interstate Movements, Imports, and Exports of Natural Gas in the United States, 2010 (Million Cubic Feet) Norway India Trinidad/ Tobago Egypt Yemen Japan Interstate Movements Not Shown on Map From Volume To From Volume To CT RI RI MA MA CT VA DC MD DC 53,122 WA M T I D OR W Y ND SD C A N V UT CO NE KS AZ NM OK TX MN WI MI IA I L IN OH MO AR MS AL GA TN KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI AK Mexico C a n a d a C a n a d a Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Gulf of Mexico Canada Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports, and EIA estimates based on historical data. Energy Information

295

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

WA WA MT ID OR WY ND SD CA NV UT CO NE KS AZ NM OK TX MN WI MI IA IL IN OH MO AR MS AL GA TN KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI AK Japan Mexico Mexico Algeria Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Algeria Canada United Arab Emirates Australia Australia Trinidad Qatar Malaysia Canada Mexico Interstate Movements of Natural Gas in the United States, 1999 (Volumes Reported in Million Cubic Feet) Supplemental Data From Volume To From Volume To (T) AL TX MA NH CT RI MD DC DE MD RI MA MA CT VA DC (T) Trucked Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." E I A NERGY NFORMATION DMINISTRATION 837,902 415,636 225,138 232 308,214 805,614 803,034 800,345 685 147 628,589 9,786 790,088 17,369 278,302 40,727 214,076 275,629 51,935 843,280 826,638 9,988 998,603 553,440 896,187 11,817 629,551 98,423

296

Microsoft Word - figure_13.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 (Million Cubic Feet) 24,891 2,895 Nigeria WA M T I D OR W Y ND SD C A N V UT CO NE KS AZ NM OK TX MN WI MI IA I L IN OH MO AR MS AL GA TN KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI AK Mexico Algeria C a n a d a C a n a d a Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Algeria Canada Canada N i g e r i a O m a n Qatar Gulf of Mexico Gulf o f M e x i c o Gulf of Mexico Canada Gulf of Mexico Malaysia 2,986 Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," and the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports. Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 Supplemental Data From Volume To From Volume To CT RI RI MA MA CT VA DC MD DC 335,380 634,982 664,318 612,297 125,202 33,223 531,868 103,624

297

Patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk estimation in CT: Part II. Application to patients  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Current methods for estimating and reporting radiation dose from CT examinations are largely patient-generic; the body size and hence dose variation from patient to patient is not reflected. Furthermore, the current protocol designs rely on dose as a surrogate for the risk of cancer incidence, neglecting the strong dependence of risk on age and gender. The purpose of this study was to develop a method for estimating patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk from CT examinations. Methods: The study included two patients (a 5-week-old female patient and a 12-year-old male patient), who underwent 64-slice CT examinations (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare) of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis at our institution in 2006. For each patient, a nonuniform rational B-spine (NURBS) based full-body computer model was created based on the patient's clinical CT data. Large organs and structures inside the image volume were individually segmented and modeled. Other organs were created by transforming an existing adult male or female full-body computer model (developed from visible human data) to match the framework defined by the segmented organs, referencing the organ volume and anthropometry data in ICRP Publication 89. A Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated for dose simulation on the LightSpeed VCT scanner was used to estimate patient-specific organ dose, from which effective dose and risks of cancer incidence were derived. Patient-specific organ dose and effective dose were compared with patient-generic CT dose quantities in current clinical use: the volume-weighted CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) and the effective dose derived from the dose-length product (DLP). Results: The effective dose for the CT examination of the newborn patient (5.7 mSv) was higher but comparable to that for the CT examination of the teenager patient (4.9 mSv) due to the size-based clinical CT protocols at our institution, which employ lower scan techniques for smaller patients. However, the overall risk of cancer incidence attributable to the CT examination was much higher for the newborn (2.4 in 1000) than for the teenager (0.7 in 1000). For the two pediatric-aged patients in our study, CTDI{sub vol} underestimated dose to large organs in the scan coverage by 30%-48%. The effective dose derived from DLP using published conversion coefficients differed from that calculated using patient-specific organ dose values by -57% to 13%, when the tissue weighting factors of ICRP 60 were used, and by -63% to 28%, when the tissue weighting factors of ICRP 103 were used. Conclusions: It is possible to estimate patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk from CT examinations by combining a validated Monte Carlo program with patient-specific anatomical models that are derived from the patients' clinical CT data and supplemented by transformed models of reference adults. With the construction of a large library of patient-specific computer models encompassing patients of all ages and weight percentiles, dose and risk can be estimated for any patient prior to or after a CT examination. Such information may aid in decisions for image utilization and can further guide the design and optimization of CT technologies and scan protocols.

Li Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Toncheva, Greta; Yoshizumi, Terry T.; Frush, Donald P. [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Department of Physics, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Duke Radiation Dosimetry Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Duke Radiation Dosimetry Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Division of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

A phantom for testing of 4D-CT for radiotherapy of small lesions  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The use of time-resolved four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) in radiotherapy requires strict quality assurance to ensure the accuracy of motion management protocols. The aim of this work was to design and test a phantom capable of large amplitude motion for use in 4D-CT, with particular interest in small lesions typical for stereotactic body radiotherapy. Methods: The phantom of 'see-saw' design is light weight, capable of including various sample materials and compatible with several surrogate marker signal acquisition systems. It is constructed of polymethylmethacrylate (Perspex) and its movement is controlled via a dc motor and drive wheel. It was tested using two CT scanners with different 4D acquisition methods: the Philips Brilliance Big Bore CT (helical scan, pressure belt) and a General Electric Discovery STE PET/CT (axial scan, infrared marker). Amplitudes ranging from 1.5 to 6.0 cm and frequencies of up to 40 cycles per minute were used to study the effect of motion on image quality. Maximum intensity projections (MIPs), as well as average intensity projections (AIPs) of moving objects were investigated and their quality dependence on the number of phase reconstruction bins assessed. Results: CT number discrepancies between moving and stationary objects were found to have no systematic dependence on amplitude, frequency, or specific interphase variability. MIP-delineated amplitudes of motion were found to match physical phantom amplitudes to within 2 mm for all motion scenarios tested. Objects undergoing large amplitude motions (>3.0 cm) were shown to cause artefacts in MIP and AIP projections when ten phase bins were assigned. This problem can be mitigated by increasing the number of phase bins in a 4D-CT scan. Conclusions: The phantom was found to be a suitable tool for evaluating the image quality of 4D-CT motion management technology, as well as providing a quality assurance tool for intercenter/intervendor testing of commercial 4D-CT systems. When imaging objects with large amplitudes, the completeness criterion described here indicates the number of phase bins required to prevent missing data in MIPs and AIPs. This is most relevant for small lesions undergoing large motions.

Dunn, L.; Kron, T.; Taylor, M. L.; Callahan, J.; Franich, R. D. [School of Applied Sciences and Health Innovations Research Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne 3000 (Australia); School of Applied Sciences and Health Innovations Research Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne 3000 (Australia) and Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne 3002 (Australia); School of Applied Sciences and Health Innovations Research Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne 3000 (Australia); Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); School of Applied Sciences and Health Innovations Research Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne 3000 (Australia)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

299

Improved image quality for x-ray CT imaging of gel dosimeters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: This study provides a simple method for improving precision of x-ray computed tomography (CT) scans of irradiated polymer gel dosimetry. The noise affecting CT scans of irradiated gels has been an impediment to the use of clinical CT scanners for gel dosimetry studies. Methods: In this study, it is shown that multiple scans of a single PAGAT gel dosimeter can be used to extrapolate a ''zero-scan'' image which displays a similar level of precision to an image obtained by averaging multiple CT images, without the compromised dose measurement resulting from the exposure of the gel to radiation from the CT scanner. Results: When extrapolating the zero-scan image, it is shown that exponential and simple linear fits to the relationship between Hounsfield unit and scan number, for each pixel in the image, provide an accurate indication of gel density. Conclusions: It is expected that this work will be utilized in the analysis of three-dimensional gel volumes irradiated using complex radiotherapy treatments.

Kakakhel, M. B.; Kairn, T.; Kenny, J.; Trapp, J. V. [Faculty of Science and Technology, Queensland University of Technology, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, Queesland 4001, Australia and Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics, DPAM, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, PO Nilore, Islamabad 45450 (Pakistan); Premion, The Wesley Medical Centre, Suite 1, 40 Chasely St, Auchenflower, Queensland 4066 (Australia); Premion, The Wesley Medical Centre, Suite 1, 40 Chasely St, Auchenflower, Queensland 4066, Australia and Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, ARPANSA, Yallambie, Vic 3085 (Australia); Faculty of Science and Technology, Queensland University of Technology, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, Ql d 4001 (Australia)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

Dynamic cone beam CT angiography of carotid and cerebral arteries using canine model  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This research is designed to develop and evaluate a flat-panel detector-based dynamic cone beam CT system for dynamic angiography imaging, which is able to provide both dynamic functional information and dynamic anatomic information from one multirevolution cone beam CT scan. Methods: A dynamic cone beam CT scan acquired projections over four revolutions within a time window of 40 s after contrast agent injection through a femoral vein to cover the entire wash-in and wash-out phases. A dynamic cone beam CT reconstruction algorithm was utilized and a novel recovery method was developed to correct the time-enhancement curve of contrast flow. From the same data set, both projection-based subtraction and reconstruction-based subtraction approaches were utilized and compared to remove the background tissues and visualize the 3D vascular structure to provide the dynamic anatomic information. Results: Through computer simulations, the new recovery algorithm for dynamic time-enhancement curves was optimized and showed excellent accuracy to recover the actual contrast flow. Canine model experiments also indicated that the recovered time-enhancement curves from dynamic cone beam CT imaging agreed well with that of an IV-digital subtraction angiography (DSA) study. The dynamic vascular structures reconstructed using both projection-based subtraction and reconstruction-based subtraction were almost identical as the differences between them were comparable to the background noise level. At the enhancement peak, all the major carotid and cerebral arteries and the Circle of Willis could be clearly observed. Conclusions: The proposed dynamic cone beam CT approach can accurately recover the actual contrast flow, and dynamic anatomic imaging can be obtained with high isotropic 3D resolution. This approach is promising for diagnosis and treatment planning of vascular diseases and strokes.

Cai Weixing; Zhao Binghui; Conover, David; Liu Jiangkun; Ning Ruola [Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States); Department of Radiology, Shanghai 6th People's Hospital, 600 Yishan Road, Xuhui, Shanghai (China); Koning Corporation, Lennox Tech Enterprise Center, 150 Lucius Gordon Drive Suite 112, West Henrietta, New York 14586 (United States); Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States); Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States) and Koning Corporation, Lennox Tech Enterprise Center, 150 Lucius Gordon Drive Suite 112, West Henrietta, New York 14586 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

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301

Classification of the Colonic Polyps in CT-Colonography Using Region Covariance as Descriptor Features of Suspicious Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an algorithm to classify polyps in CT colonography images utilizing covariance matrices as object descriptors. Since these descriptors do not lie on a vector space, they cannot simply be fed to traditional machine learning tools such as support ... Keywords: CT colonography, Colonic polyp detection, Covariance descriptor

Niyazi Kilic; Olcay Kursun; Osman Nuri Ucan

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Concurrent segmentation of the prostate on MRI and CT via linked statistical shape models for radiotherapy planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Prostate gland segmentation is a critical step in prostate radiotherapy planning, where dose plans are typically formulated on CT. Pretreatment MRI is now beginning to be acquired at several medical centers. Delineation of the prostate on MRI is acknowledged as being significantly simpler to perform, compared to delineation on CT. In this work, the authors present a novel framework for building a linked statistical shape model (LSSM), a statistical shape model (SSM) that links the shape variation of a structure of interest (SOI) across multiple imaging modalities. This framework is particularly relevant in scenarios where accurate boundary delineations of the SOI on one of the modalities may not be readily available, or difficult to obtain, for training a SSM. In this work the authors apply the LSSM in the context of multimodal prostate segmentation for radiotherapy planning, where the prostate is concurrently segmented on MRI and CT. Methods: The framework comprises a number of logically connected steps. The first step utilizes multimodal registration of MRI and CT to map 2D boundary delineations of the prostate from MRI onto corresponding CT images, for a set of training studies. Hence, the scheme obviates the need for expert delineations of the gland on CT for explicitly constructing a SSM for prostate segmentation on CT. The delineations of the prostate gland on MRI and CT allows for 3D reconstruction of the prostate shape which facilitates the building of the LSSM. In order to perform concurrent prostate MRI and CT segmentation using the LSSM, the authors employ a region-based level set approach where the authors deform the evolving prostate boundary to simultaneously fit to MRI and CT images in which voxels are classified to be either part of the prostate or outside the prostate. The classification is facilitated by using a combination of MRI-CT probabilistic spatial atlases and a random forest classifier, driven by gradient and Haar features. Results: The authors acquire a total of 20 MRI-CT patient studies and use the leave-one-out strategy to train and evaluate four different LSSMs. First, a fusion-based LSSM (fLSSM) is built using expert ground truth delineations of the prostate on MRI alone, where the ground truth for the gland on CT is obtained via coregistration of the corresponding MRI and CT slices. The authors compare the fLSSM against another LSSM (xLSSM), where expert delineations of the gland on both MRI and CT are employed in the model building; xLSSM representing the idealized LSSM. The authors also compare the fLSSM against an exclusive CT-based SSM (ctSSM), built from expert delineations of the gland on CT alone. In addition, two LSSMs trained using trainee delineations (tLSSM) on CT are compared with the fLSSM. The results indicate that the xLSSM, tLSSMs, and the fLSSM perform equivalently, all of them out-performing the ctSSM. Conclusions: The fLSSM provides an accurate alternative to SSMs that require careful expert delineations of the SOI that may be difficult or laborious to obtain. Additionally, the fLSSM has the added benefit of providing concurrent segmentations of the SOI on multiple imaging modalities.

Chowdhury, Najeeb; Toth, Robert; Chappelow, Jonathan; Kim, Sung; Motwani, Sabin; Punekar, Salman; Lin Haibo; Both, Stefan; Vapiwala, Neha; Hahn, Stephen; Madabhushi, Anant

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

A PET/CT directed, 3D ultrasound-guided biopsy system for prostate cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prostate cancer affects 1 in 6 men in the USA. Systematic transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided biopsy is the standard method for a definitive diagnosis of prostate cancer. However, this "blind" biopsy approach can miss at least 20% of prostate cancers. ... Keywords: 3D ultrasound imaging, PET/CT, image segmentation, imageguided biopsy, molecular imaging, nonrigid image registration, prostate cancer, wavelet transform

Baowei Fei; Viraj Master; Peter Nieh; Hamed Akbari; Xiaofeng Yang; Aaron Fenster; David Schuster

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Louisiana oyster CuLtCh ProjeCt General Project DescriPtion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

secondary production. estiMateD cost The estimated cost to implement the Louisiana Oyster Cultch Project is $15,582,600. (Estimated costs for some of the projects were updated from those provided in the DERPLouisiana oyster CuLtCh ProjeCt General Project DescriPtion The Louisiana Oyster Cultch Project

305

Department of History, Yale University New Haven, CT 06520-8324  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dilemma': Making a Place for Historians in the Climate Change and Energy Debates," Environmental History History (undergraduate lecture) Energy in American History (undergraduate seminar) United States GlobalPaul Sabin Department of History, Yale University New Haven, CT 06520-8324 Telephone: (203) 436

306

The feasibility of head motion tracking in helical CT: A step toward motion correction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To establish a practical and accurate motion tracking method for the development of rigid motion correction methods in helical x-ray computed tomography (CT). Methods: A commercially available optical motion tracking system provided 6 degrees of freedom pose measurements at 60 Hz. A 4 Multiplication-Sign 4 calibration matrix was determined to convert raw pose data acquired in tracker coordinates to a fixed CT coordinate system with origin at the isocenter of the scanner. Two calibration methods, absolute orientation (AO), and a new method based on image registration (IR), were compared by means of landmark analysis and correlation coefficient in phantom images coregistered using the derived motion transformations. Results: Transformations calculated using the IR-derived calibration matrix were found to be more accurate, with positional errors less than 0.5 mm (mean RMS), and highly correlated image voxel intensities. The AO-derived calibration matrix yielded larger mean RMS positional errors ( Asymptotically-Equal-To 1.0 mm), and poorer correlation coefficients. Conclusions: The authors have demonstrated the feasibility of accurate motion tracking for retrospective motion correction in helical CT. Their new IR-based calibration method based on image registration and function minimization was simpler to perform and delivered more accurate calibration matrices. This technique is a useful tool for future work on rigid motion correction in helical CT and potentially also other imaging modalities.

Kim, Jung-Ha [Medical Radiation Sciences, University of Sydney, NSW 2141 (Australia); Nuyts, Johan [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Katholieke Universiteit, Leuven, Belgium and Medical Imaging Research Center, Katholieke Universiteit, Leuven (Belgium); Kuncic, Zdenka [School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Fulton, Roger [Medical Radiation Sciences, University of Sydney, NSW 2141 (Australia); School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Department of Medical Physics, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, NSW 2145 (Australia)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

307

Robust Segmentation and Anatomical Labeling of the Airway Tree from Thoracic CT Scans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for automatic extraction and labeling of the airway tree from thoracic CT scans is presented and extensively evaluated on 150 scans of clinical dose, low dose and ultra-low dose data, in inspiration and expiration from both relatively healthy ...

Bram Ginneken; Wouter Baggerman; Eva M. Rikxoort

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

The noise power spectrum in CT with direct fan beam reconstruction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The noise power spectrum (NPS) is a useful metric for understanding the noise content in images. To examine some unique properties of the NPS of fan beam CT, the authors derived an analytical expression for the NPS of fan beam CT and validated it with computer simulations. The nonstationary noise behavior of fan beam CT was examined by analyzing local regions and the entire field-of-view (FOV). This was performed for cases with uniform as well as nonuniform noise across the detector cells and across views. The simulated NPS from the entire FOV and local regions showed good agreement with the analytically derived NPS. The analysis shows that whereas the NPS of a large FOV in parallel beam CT (using a ramp filter) is proportional to frequency, the NPS with direct fan beam FBP reconstruction shows a high frequency roll off. Even in small regions, the fan beam NPS can show a sharp transition (discontinuity) at high frequencies. These effects are due to the variable magnification and therefore are more pronounced as the fan angle increases. For cases with nonuniform noise, the NPS can show the directional dependence and additional effects.

Baek, Jongduk; Pelc, Norbert J. [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States) and Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

CT-Guided Fiducial Placement for CyberKnife Stereotactic Radiosurgery: An Initial Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CyberKnife frameless image-guided radiosurgery has become a widely used system for parenchymal extracranial lesions. Gold fiducials are required for the planning and aiming of CyberKnife therapy. We report our initial experience and describe the technique of positioning tumor markers, under CT guidance. We conducted a retrospective review of 105 patients who were referred for CyberKnife stereotactic radiosurgery at Iatropolis CyberKnife Center in Athens. All patients underwent percutaneous fiducial placement via CT guidance. At the desired location, the 18-G needle was advanced into or near the tumor. Data collected included number and locations of fiducials placed and complications experienced to date. One hundred five patients underwent fiducial placement under CT guidance and a total number of 319 gold seeds were implanted. We experienced one episode of pneumothorax that required drainage, one mild pneumothorax, and three episodes of perifocal pulmonary hemorrhage. In conclusion, fiducial implantation under CT guidance appears to be a safe and efficient procedure, as long as it is performed by an experienced interventional radiologist.

Sotiropoulou, Evangelia ['Sotiria' General Hospital of Chest Diseases (Greece); Stathochristopoulou, Irene [Iatropolis CyberKnife Center (Greece); Stathopoulos, Konstantinos ['Sotiria' General Hospital of Chest Diseases (Greece); Verigos, Kosmas; Salvaras, Nikolaos [Iatropolis CyberKnife Center (Greece); Thanos, Loukas, E-mail: loutharad@yahoo.co ['Sotiria' General Hospital of Chest Diseases (Greece)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Business opportunities: Support Services Upcoming procurements RFP Estimated value Contact For the ORNL FDD Shillings 865-576-1552 shillingsag@ornl.gov For the ORNL FDD and SNS provide Architect- Engineering services

311

ORNL 2012-G00206/tcc UT-B ID 200802034  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as light-emitting displays, solar panels, optoelectronic sensing and imaging spectroscopy, and fiber-optic Applications · Electroluminescent systems for use in light-emitting displays, solar panels, or optoelectronic Systems Technology Summary Nanomaterials have attracted much attention recently because of their unique

Pennycook, Steve

312

Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the recovered Pu from spent uranium fuel with thorium instead of depleted uranium (DU), i.e. using Th þ RGPu-grade plutonium and depleted uranium (MOX). Hence, it can be expected that the introduction of Th þ RGPu fuel of life BWR Boiling-water reactor CVC Coolant void coefficient CZP Cold zero power DU Depleted uranium EOL

Pennycook, Steve

313

Gbadebo (`Debo) Oladosu UT Dept. of Agricultural Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global Indirect Land Use Implications of U.S. Biofuel Policies: A Review of the EvidenceMartinez, Laurence Eaton *This research was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under the Office-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Outline U.S. Biofuel Market & Policy Developments EthanolRelated Issues

Tennessee, University of

314

Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

scenarios. Workshop Length: 3 hours The Ohio State University at Lima Business Programs for Professionals Campus Price: $195 Advanced Internal Audit Program Management This course provides an introduction to different types of audits including: process audits, layered process audits, compliance audits, quality

315

Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

efficient and durable aftertreatment will enable more fuel efficient engine calibrations · Accelerated aging of petroleum displacement ­ Efficient, durable aftertreatment needed to enable fuel efficient engine Fuel and Lube Effects on Diesel Aftertreatment (Agreement 13415) Bruce Bunting, Todd Toops, and Scott

Pennycook, Steve

316

UTS Biogastechnik GmbH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sector Services Product Bavaria-based specialist consultancy in the construction of biogas plants as well as selling related components and services. Coordinates 48.27304,...

317

UT-Battelle Launches Privately Funded Tech Transfer Program  

John Bates, Bernd Neudecker, and Chris Luck Dr. Liby co-founded Manufacturing Sciences Corporation and relocated the company to Oak Ridge in 1984.

318

Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mechanisms and Their Temporal Evolution Seal provides effective permeability and capillary barrier to upward concentration is > 13% in air. CO2 is buoyant (density=0.5-0.8 gm per ml) and reactive in solution resulting is acceptable Aquifer and USDW Atmosphere Biosphere Vadose zone & soil Seal Seal CO2 plume Pressure monitoring

319

ORNL 2011-G00230/jcn UT-B ID 201002431  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

volumes of water · Supercapacitor electrode material, separations material, battery electrode material

Pennycook, Steve

320

Michael Holland (DOE) UT Colloquium October 10, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

crude, biofuels, CTL/CTL/CBTL/... sold at oil price Go beyond "energy independence" to "price, 2011www.energy.gov/QTR Steven Koonin Under Secretary for Science US Department of Energy Report Logic Flow 5 Energy context Supply/demand Energy essentials Energy challenges Energy Security US

Dai, Pengcheng

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321

Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

growth (doubling) in NRC (41) and NASA (46) funding. May level off in FY 11 · Sharp (59%) increase/alloy processing] ($7M) and Strategic Materials (~$2M) programs. Program ($K) 41 - NRC 42 - Non- DOE 43-45- DOD 46 Foreign Advance Payment $2,889,936 15 41 NRC $2,021,909 10 42 USGS $27,111 1 43 DOD $910,790 3 44 DOD $9

322

Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are the primary remote handling tools 2541 610 1760 3560 Z=0 SECTION C-C Shield CRANE HALL 50 Ton #12;7 Managed channel (tunnel) is shielded to meet ground water protection requirements · Remote handling systems were, Mercury Jet Target ­ Included descriptions of targets, expected radiation, required shielding, remote

McDonald, Kirk

323

Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuels, Isotopes, and Nuclear Materials Bob Wham Thermal Hydraulics and Irradiation Engineering Grady Nuclear Data Mike Dunn Fuels, Isotopes, and Nuclear Materials Bob Wham Thermal Hydraulics and Irradiation

Pennycook, Steve

324

Team UT-Battelle Advisory Committee | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Battelle Advisory Committee Committee Members Joe Herndon (herndonjn@ornl.gov, 865.241.1550) Teresa Ferguson (fergusontd@ornl.gov, 865.576.0541) Cindy Mayfield (mayfieldc@ornl.gov,...

325

Team UT-Battelle: Team Project Descriptions and Captains | ornl...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Anniversary Home Build Captain: Ann Bryant, 865.576.8689 Captain: Leigha Edwards, 865.241.9309 Alzheimer's Tennessee Walk Teresa Cochran, 865.241.9670 cochrantj@ornl.gov Angel...

326

ORNL 2010-G00965 UT-B ID 200802055  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biochar and Carbon Sequestration: A Regional Perspective A report prepared for East of England #12;Low Carbon Innovation Centre Report for EEDA Biochar and Carbon Sequestration: A Regional Perspective 20/04/2009 ii Biochar and Carbon Sequestration: A Regional Perspective A report prepared for East

327

UT Austin in the TREC 2012 Crowdsourcing Track's Image ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... self-reported judgment confidence scores reported by workers ... worker comments on the error report mentioned earlier ... Turk: Gold mine or coal mine ...

2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

328

ORNL 2011-G00249/jcn UT-B ID 201002505  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

integration by simply placing separate motor and inverter components in the same housing. A permanent magnet Inverter Drive System Technology Summary This technology is a drive system that includes a permanent magnet-less (PM-L) electric motor combined with a current source inverter (CSI). This integration of these two

Pennycook, Steve

329

ORNL 2010-G00988/jcn UT-B ID 200902227  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for a permanent magnet. Currently, permanent magnet motors are the choice for hybrid, plug-in, and fuel lighter weight and has a smaller motor volume than permanent magnet motors. This synchronous system has-Machine) Technology Summary A U-machine invented at ORNL offers a new motor design that eliminates the need

330

STANDARD USER AGREEMENT PROPRIETARY No. UF- THIS AGREEMENT UT ...  

the UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (hereinafter called "DOE"), and ... networks, all Participants must comply with the ORNL Computer Use Policy. The use of

331

STANDARD USER AGREEMENT NONPROPRIETARY NO THIS AGREEMENT UT ...  

networks, all Participants must comply with the ORNL Computer Use Policy. ... nuclear incident as defined and provided for in the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as

332

ORNL 2011-G00248/jcn UT-B ID 201102588  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

repair methods restore performance. Two different, commercially available, split-system, residential results were obtained for the second condenser tested. INTRODUCTION The performance of residential commercially available condensers with different manufactures were tested. Each condenser tested had a rated

Pennycook, Steve

333

ORNL 2010-G00627/jcn UT-B ID 200601740  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, this system reduces component cost. The system also remedies problems such as inadequate battery capacity and other uses. The technology integrates the battery-charging function into the electrical motor drive, for driving the vehicle; charging mode, for charging the battery; or sourcing mode, for supplying power

334

ORNL 2010-G00993/jcn UT-B ID 200902230  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and cost ·· Reduces battery losses and improves battery operating conditions by eliminating battery ripple direct current (DC) bus capacitors are needed to absorb ripple currents and protect the battery the size and cost of high performance capacitors and eliminates the need for liquid cooling. This inverter

335

Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.2.1 Rule Set Conflict Evaluation FortNOX first performs alias set rule reduction on the candidate rule rule conflict analysis using the alias set rule reduction algorithm. FortNOX was hosted on an Intel for invariant prop- erty violations [12]. The alias set rule reduction algorithm of Fort- NOX is complementary

Pennycook, Steve

336

ORNL 2010-G00614/jcn UT-B ID 200902219  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Acetate Technology Summary Efficient conversion of lignocellulose to alternative fuels is hindered process; but during pretreatment, chemicals such as acetate form and inhibit or even stop fermentation improve production rates for alternative biofuels. The inventors genetically modified the microorganism

337

Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concerns Estimating land-use change (LUC) effects of biofuels Uncertainty Models and science: FOOD versus FUEL GHG emissions: Could biofuels cause higher emissions than fossil fuels? LAND underlies both issues: Is land available for agricultural expansion AND biofuels (AND without deforestation)? #12

338

Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Conference of Ecosystem Services 2010 December 9, 2010 Phoenix, Arizona The economic effects of biofuel is the relationship between fish richness and fishing privilege and activity? in Biofuels Policy in Landscapes Forecasting Preliminary POLYSYS scenarios of biofuels market for perennial biomass crops production Highest

339

Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(36 appm He) 10B-doped F82H (330 appm He) HFIR irradiation at 400°C to 51 dpa #12;Potential New Weave Composite ~ 1 dpa, HFIR irradiation ORNL / Kyoto U. Development of Radiation-Resistant Si

340

Nondestructive Evaluation: Procedure for Manual Phased Array UT of Piping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Piping joints in nuclear power plants must be examined periodically using ultrasonic examination technology. Phased array ultrasonic technology has recently become available in a handheld, portable configuration. This technology could increase the speed of the examinations, save costs, reduce radiation exposure, and decrease the cost and difficulty of qualifying personnel to perform the examination. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) recently developed ultrasonic phased array inspection methodo...

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ut ct wv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

ORNL 2010-G00992/jcn UT-B ID 200501535  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

geological deposits, such as oil shale, to extract hydrocarbons for energy needs. The apparatus provides more. The apparatus allows the liquid metal to distribute heat evenly throughout the oil shale. This reduces by providing more even heat distribution ·· Reduces costs associated with in situ heat extraction of oil shale

342

CIRE Graduate Fellowships at UT/ORNL | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CIRE Graduate Fellowships at UTORNL CIRE Graduate Fellowships NScD recognizes a special imperative of contributing towards and augmenting strength and excellence in science and...

343

Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Approach to Dynamic Energy Minimization in Wireless Transceivers", A. Iranli, H. Fatemi, M. Pedram, Int;17 Optimization problem · Minimize total energy consumption for a link ­ (A) Minimize energy at transmitter ­ (B of SNR and mod. level Vector upper bound on overall Energy consumption #12;20 Some performance results

Pennycook, Steve

344

ORNL 2011-G000209/jcn UT-B ID 200201215  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Fission Physics Review: neutron interactions, cross sections, flux, energy loss in scatteringEEE 562 Nuclear Reactor Theory and Design (3 hrs) Catalog Description: Principles of neutron chain reacting systems. Neutron diffusion and moderation. One, two and multi group diffusion equation solution

Pennycook, Steve

345

Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ Tuscaloosa Auburn University Clemson University University of Kentucky Mississippi State University The Automotive Research Alliance is one significant way in which we have linked university researchers to ORNL scientists Oak Ridge National Laboratory University of Alabama ­ Birmingham University of Alabama

346

UMass Amherst and UT Austin @ The TREC 2009 Relevance ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... expensive as query and collection sizes increase, we desire an efficient learning al- gorithm minimizing the number of such iter- ations required. ...

2010-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

347

ORNL 2010-G01022/jcn UT-B ID 200601819  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

petroleum coke particles with a pitch binder, extruding the mix through a die, and graphitizing them

348

Clinical evaluation of a commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction tool for CT simulations in radiation therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Severe artifacts in kilovoltage-CT simulation images caused by large metallic implants can significantly degrade the conspicuity and apparent CT Hounsfield number of targets and anatomic structures, jeopardize the confidence of anatomical segmentation, and introduce inaccuracies into the radiation therapy treatment planning process. This study evaluated the performance of the first commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction function (O-MAR) for radiation therapy, and investigated its clinical applications in treatment planning. Methods: Both phantom and clinical data were used for the evaluation. The CIRS electron density phantom with known physical (and electron) density plugs and removable titanium implants was scanned on a Philips Brilliance Big Bore 16-slice CT simulator. The CT Hounsfield numbers of density plugs on both uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images were compared. Treatment planning accuracy was evaluated by comparing simulated dose distributions computed using the true density images, uncorrected images, and O-MAR corrected images. Ten CT image sets of patients with large hip implants were processed with the O-MAR function and evaluated by two radiation oncologists using a five-point score for overall image quality, anatomical conspicuity, and CT Hounsfield number accuracy. By utilizing the same structure contours delineated from the O-MAR corrected images, clinical IMRT treatment plans for five patients were computed on the uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images, respectively, and compared. Results: Results of the phantom study indicated that CT Hounsfield number accuracy and noise were improved on the O-MAR corrected images, especially for images with bilateral metal implants. The {gamma} pass rates of the simulated dose distributions computed on the uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images referenced to those of the true densities were higher than 99.9% (even when using 1% and 3 mm distance-to-agreement criterion), suggesting that dose distributions were clinically identical. In all patient cases, radiation oncologists rated O-MAR corrected images as higher quality. Formerly obscured critical structures were able to be visualized. The overall image quality and the conspicuity in critical organs were significantly improved compared with the uncorrected images: overall quality score (1.35 vs 3.25, P= 0.0022); bladder (2.15 vs 3.7, P= 0.0023); prostate and seminal vesicles/vagina (1.3 vs 3.275, P= 0.0020); rectum (2.8 vs 3.9, P= 0.0021). The noise levels of the selected ROIs were reduced from 93.7 to 38.2 HU. On most cases (8/10), the average CT Hounsfield numbers of the prostate/vagina on the O-MAR corrected images were closer to the referenced value (41.2 HU, an average measured from patients without metal implants) than those on the uncorrected images. High {gamma} pass rates of the five IMRT dose distribution pairs indicated that the dose distributions were not significantly affected by the CT image improvements. Conclusions: Overall, this study indicated that the O-MAR function can remarkably reduce metal artifacts and improve both CT Hounsfield number accuracy and target and critical structure visualization. Although there was no significant impact of the O-MAR algorithm on the calculated dose distributions, we suggest that O-MAR corrected images are more suitable for the entire treatment planning process by offering better anatomical structure visualization, improving radiation oncologists' confidence in target delineation, and by avoiding subjective density overrides of artifact regions on uncorrected images.

Li Hua; Noel, Camille; Chen, Haijian; Harold Li, H.; Low, Daniel; Moore, Kevin; Klahr, Paul; Michalski, Jeff; Gay, Hiram A.; Thorstad, Wade; Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Philips Healthcare System, Cleveland, Ohio 44143 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

349

Enlarged longitudinal dose profiles in cone-beam CT and the need for modified dosimetry  

SciTech Connect

In order to examine phantom length necessary to assess radiation dose delivered to patients in cone-beam CT with an enlarged beamwidth, we measured dose profiles in cylindrical phantoms of sufficient length using a prototype 256-slice CT-scanner developed at our institute. Dose profiles parallel to the rotation axis were measured at the central and peripheral positions in PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) phantoms of 160 or 320 mm diameter and 900 mm length. For practical application, we joined unit cylinders (150 mm long) together to provide phantoms of 900 mm length. Dose profiles were measured with a pin photodiode sensor having a sensitive region of approximately 2.8x2.8 mm{sup 2} and 2.7 mm thickness. Beamwidths of the scanner were varied from 20 to 138 mm. Dose profile integrals (DPI) were calculated using the measured dose profiles for various beamwidths and integration ranges. For the body phantom (320-mm-diam phantom), 76% of the DPI was represented for a 20 mm beamwidth and 60% was represented for a 138 mm beamwidth if dose profiles were integrated over a 100 mm range, while more than 90% of the DPI was represented for beamwidths between 20 and 138 mm if integration was carried out over a 300 mm range. The phantom length and integration range for dosimetry of cone-beam CT needed to be more than 300 mm to represent more than 90% of the DPI for the body phantom with the beamwidth of more than 20 mm. Although we reached this conclusion using the prototype 256-slice CT-scanner, it may be applied to other multislice CT-scanners as well.

Mori, Shinichiro; Endo, Masahiro; Nishizawa, Kanae; Tsunoo, Takanori; Aoyama, Takahiko; Fujiwara, Hideaki; Murase, Kenya [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); School of Health Sciences, Nagoya University, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan); School of Allied Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Development of a dynamic flow imaging phantom for dynamic contrast-enhanced CT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Dynamic contrast enhanced CT (DCE-CT) studies with modeling of blood flow and tissue perfusion are becoming more prevalent in the clinic, with advances in wide volume CT scanners allowing the imaging of an entire organ with sub-second image frequency and sub-millimeter accuracy. Wide-spread implementation of perfusion DCE-CT, however, is pending fundamental validation of the quantitative parameters that result from dynamic contrast imaging and perfusion modeling. Therefore, the goal of this work was to design and construct a novel dynamic flow imaging phantom capable of producing typical clinical time-attenuation curves (TACs) with the purpose of developing a framework for the quantification and validation of DCE-CT measurements and kinetic modeling under realistic flow conditions. Methods: The phantom is based on a simple two-compartment model and was printed using a 3D printer. Initial analysis of the phantom involved simple flow measurements and progressed to DCE-CT experiments in order to test the phantoms range and reproducibility. The phantom was then utilized to generate realistic input TACs. A phantom prediction model was developed to compute the input and output TACs based on a given set of five experimental (control) parameters: pump flow rate, injection pump flow rate, injection contrast concentration, and both control valve positions. The prediction model is then inversely applied to determine the control parameters necessary to generate a set of desired input and output TACs. A protocol was developed and performed using the phantom to investigate image noise, partial volume effects and CT number accuracy under realistic flow conditionsResults: This phantom and its surrounding flow system are capable of creating a wide range of physiologically relevant TACs, which are reproducible with minimal error between experiments ({sigma}/{mu} < 5% for all metrics investigated). The dynamic flow phantom was capable of producing input and output TACs using either step function based or typical clinical arterial input function (AIF) inputs. The measured TACs were in excellent agreement with predictions across all comparison metrics with goodness of fit (R{sup 2}) for the input function between 0.95 and 0.98, while the maximum enhancement differed by no more than 3.3%. The predicted output functions were similarly accurate producing R{sup 2} values between 0.92 and 0.99 and maximum enhancement to within 9.0%. The effect of ROI size on the arterial input function (AIF) was investigated in order to determine an operating range of ROI sizes which were minimally affected by noise for small dimensions and partial volume effects for large dimensions. It was possible to establish the measurement sensitivity of both the Toshiba (ROI radius range from 1.5 to 3.2 mm ''low dose'', 1.4 to 3.0 mm ''high dose'') and GE scanner (1.5 to 2.6 mm ''low dose'', 1.1 to 3.4 mm ''high dose''). This application of the phantom also provides the ability to evaluate the effect of the AIF error on kinetic model parameter predictions. Conclusions: The dynamic flow imaging phantom is capable of producing accurate and reproducible results which can be predicted and quantified. This results in a unique tool for perfusion DCE-CT validation under realistic flow conditions which can be applied not only to compare different CT scanners and imaging protocols but also to provide a ground truth across multimodality dynamic imaging given its MRI and PET compatibility.

Driscoll, B.; Keller, H.; Coolens, C. [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

Value of PET/CT and MR Lymphography in Treatment of Prostate Cancer Patients With Lymph Node Metastases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the clinical value of two novel molecular imaging techniques: {sup 11}C-choline positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and ferumoxtran-10 enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (magnetic resonance lymphography [MRL]) for lymph node (LN) treatment in prostate cancer (PCa) patients. Therefore, we evaluated the ability of PET/CT and MRL to assess the number, size, and location of LN metastases in patients with primary or recurrent PCa. Methods and Materials: A total of 29 patients underwent MRL and PET/CT for LN evaluation. The MRL and PET/CT data were analyzed independently. The number, size, and location of the LN metastases were determined. The location was described as within or outside the standard clinical target volume for elective pelvic irradiation as defined by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group. Subsequently, the results from MRL and PET/CT were compared. Results: Of the 738 LNs visible on MRL, 151 were positive in 23 of 29 patients. Of the 132 LNs visible on PET/CT, 34 were positive in 13 of 29 patients. MRL detected significantly more positive LNs (p < 0.001) in more patients than PET/CT (p = 0.002). The mean diameter of the detected suspicious LNs on MRL was significantly smaller than those detected by PET/CT, 4.9 mm and 8.4 mm, respectively (p < 0.0001). In 14 (61%) of 23 patients, suspicious LNs were found outside the clinical target volume with MRL and in 4 (31%) of 13 patients with PET/CT. Conclusion: In patients with PCa, both molecular imaging techniques, MRL and {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT, can detect LNs suspicious for metastasis, irrespective of the existing size and shape criteria for CT and conventional magnetic resonance imaging. On MRL and PET/CT, 61% and 31% of the suspicious LNs were located outside the conventional clinical target volume. Therefore, these techniques could help to individualize treatment selection and enable image-guided radiotherapy for patients with PCa LN metastases.

Fortuin, Ansje S., E-mail: A.Fortuin@rad.umcn.nl [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Deserno, Willem M.L.L.G. [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Meijer, Hanneke J.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Jager, Gerrit J. [Department of Radiology, Jeroen Bosch Hospital's, Hertogenbosch (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiology, Jeroen Bosch Hospital's, Hertogenbosch (Netherlands); Takahashi, Satoru; Debats, Oscar A. [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Reske, Sven N.; Schick, Christian [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Krause, Bernd J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Muenchen (Germany)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Muenchen (Germany); Oort, Inge van; Witjes, Alfred J. [Department of Urology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Urology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Hoogeveen, Yvonne L. [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Lin, Emile N.J.Th. van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Barentsz, Jelle O. [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Comprehensive study of LASL Well C/T-2 Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA, Utah, and applications to geothermal well logging  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Utah State Geothermal Well 9-1 in the Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA, Beaver County, Utah, has been donated by Phillips Petroleum Company for calibration and testing of well-logging equipment in the hot, corrosive, geothermal environment. It is the second Calibration/Test Well (C/T-2) in the Geothermal Log Interpretation Program. A study of cuttings and well logs from Well C/T-2 was completed. This synthesis and data presentation contains most of the subsurface geologic information needed to effect the total evaluation of geophysical logs acquired in this geothermal calibration/test well, C/T-2.

Glenn, W.E.; Hulen, J.B.; Nielson, D.L.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Estimation of the weighted CTDI{sub {infinity}} for multislice CT examinations  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the variations of CT dose index (CTDI) efficiencies, {epsilon}(CTDI{sub 100})=CTDI{sub 100}/CTDI{sub {infinity}}, with bowtie filters and CT scanner types. Methods: This was an extension of our previous study [Li, Zhang, and Liu, Phys. Med. Biol. 56, 5789-5803 (2011)]. A validated Monte Carlo program was used to calculate {epsilon}(CTDI{sub 100}) on a Siemens Somatom Definition scanner. The {epsilon}(CTDI{sub 100}) dependencies on tube voltages and beam widths were tested in previous studies. The influences of different bowtie filters and CT scanner types were examined in this work. The authors tested the variations of {epsilon}(CTDI{sub 100}) with bowtie filters on the Siemens Definition scanner. The authors also analyzed the published CTDI measurements of four independent studies on five scanners of four models from three manufacturers. Results: On the Siemens Definition scanner, the difference in {epsilon}(CTDI{sub W}) between using the head and body bowtie filters was 2.5% (maximum) in the CT scans of the 32-cm phantom, and 1.7% (maximum) in the CT scans of the 16-cm phantom. Compared with CTDI{sub W}, the weighted CTDI{sub {infinity}} increased by 30.5% (on average) in the 32-cm phantom, and by 20.0% (on average) in the 16-cm phantom. These results were approximately the same for 80-140 kV and 1-40 mm beam widths (4.2% maximum deviation). The differences in {epsilon}(CTDI{sub 100}) between the simulations and the direct measurements of four previous studies were 1.3%-5.0% at the center/periphery of the 16-cm/32-cm phantom (on average). Conclusions: Compared with CTDI{sub vol}, the equilibrium dose for large scan lengths is 30.5% higher in the 32-cm phantom, and is 20.0% higher in the 16-cm phantom. The relative increases are practically independent of tube voltages (80-140 kV), beam widths (up to 4 cm), and the CT scanners covered in this study.

Li Xinhua; Zhang Da; Liu, Bob [Division of Diagnostic Imaging Physics, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

Attenuation-based estimation of patient size for the purpose of size specific dose estimation in CT. Part II. Implementation on abdomen and thorax phantoms using cross sectional CT images and scanned projection radiograph images  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To estimate attenuation using cross sectional CT images and scanned projection radiograph (SPR) images in a series of thorax and abdomen phantoms. Methods: Attenuation was quantified in terms of a water cylinder with cross sectional area of A{sub w} from both the CT and SPR images of abdomen and thorax phantoms, where A{sub w} is the area of a water cylinder that would absorb the same dose as the specified phantom. SPR and axial CT images were acquired using a dual-source CT scanner operated at 120 kV in single-source mode. To use the SPR image for estimating A{sub w}, the pixel values of a SPR image were calibrated to physical water attenuation using a series of water phantoms. A{sub w} and the corresponding diameter D{sub w} were calculated using the derived attenuation-based methods (from either CT or SPR image). A{sub w} was also calculated using only geometrical dimensions of the phantoms (anterior-posterior and lateral dimensions or cross sectional area). Results: For abdomen phantoms, the geometry-based and attenuation-based methods gave similar results for D{sub w}. Using only geometric parameters, an overestimation of D{sub w} ranging from 4.3% to 21.5% was found for thorax phantoms. Results for D{sub w} using the CT image and SPR based methods agreed with each other within 4% on average in both thorax and abdomen phantoms. Conclusions: Either the cross sectional CT or SPR images can be used to estimate patient attenuation in CT. Both are more accurate than use of only geometrical information for the task of quantifying patient attenuation. The SPR based method requires calibration of SPR pixel values to physical water attenuation and this calibration would be best performed by the scanner manufacturer.

Wang Jia; Christner, Jodie A.; Duan Xinhui; Leng Shuai; Yu Lifeng; McCollough, Cynthia H. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

355

Anatomical database generation for radiation transport modeling from computed tomography (CT) scan data  

SciTech Connect

Geometric models of the anatomy are used routinely in calculations of the radiation dose in organs and tissues of the body. Development of such models has been hampered by lack of detailed anatomical information on children, and models themselves have been limited to quadratic conic sections. This summary reviews the development of an image processing workstation used to extract anatomical information from routine diagnostic CT procedure. A standard IBM PC/AT microcomputer has been augmented with an automatically loading 9-track magnetic tape drive, an 8-bit 1024 {times} 1024 pixel graphics adapter/monitor/film recording package, a mouse/trackball assembly, dual 20 MB removable cartridge media, a 72 MB disk drive, and a printer. Software utilized by the workstation includes a Geographic Information System (modified for manipulation of CT images), CAD software, imaging software, and various modules to ease data transfer among the software packages. 5 refs., 3 figs.

Margle, S.M.; Tinnel, E.P.; Till, L.E.; Eckerman, K.F.; Durfee, R.C.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Dosimetry of Y-90 Liquid Brachytherapy in a Dog with Osteosarcoma Using PET/CT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A novel Y-90 liquid brachytherapy strategy is currently being studied for the treatment of osteosarcoma using a preclinical translational model in dogs to assess its potential efficacy and toxicity. In this study, dosimetry calculations are performed for Y-90 liquid brachytherapy in a dog with osteosarcoma using the Geant4 Monte Carlo code. A total of 611.83 MBq Y-90 radiopharmaceutical is administered via direct injections, and the in vivo distribution of Y-90 is assessed using a time-of-flight (TOF) PET/CT scanner. A patient-specific geometry is built using anatomical data obtained from CT images. The material properties of tumor and surrounding tissues are calculated based on a CT number - electron density calibration. The Y-90 distribution is sampled in Geant4 from PET images using a collapsing 3-D rejection technique to determine the decay sites. Dose distributions in the tumor bed and surrounding tissues are calculated demonstrating significant heterogeneity with multiple hot spots at the injection sites. Dose volume histograms show about 33.9 percent of bone and tumor and 70.2 percent of bone marrow and trabecular bone receive a total dose over 200 Gy; about 3.2 percent of bone and tumor and 31.0 percent of bone marrow and trabecular bone receive a total dose of over 1000 Gy. Y-90 liquid brachytherapy has the potential to be used as an adjuvant therapy or for palliation purposes. Future work includes evaluation of pharmacokinetics of the Y-90 radiopharmaceutical, calibration of PET/CT scanners for the direct quantitative assessment of Y-90 activity concentration, and assessment of efficacy of the Y-90 liquid brachytherapy strategy.

Zhou, Jingjie

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

x???N*A**? ZDK(mP?IH z *?CT"Hh?x*4* *??C*? ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

x???N*A**? ZDK(mP?IH?z?*?CT"Hh?x*4*?*??C*???;G@ PBJ}???????IUu????`o?1\\?*N????x

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

358

CT based computerized identification and analysis of human airways: A review  

SciTech Connect

As one of the most prevalent chronic disorders, airway disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In order to understand its underlying mechanisms and to enable assessment of therapeutic efficacy of a variety of possible interventions, noninvasive investigation of the airways in a large number of subjects is of great research interest. Due to its high resolution in temporal and spatial domains, computed tomography (CT) has been widely used in clinical practices for studying the normal and abnormal manifestations of lung diseases, albeit there is a need to clearly demonstrate the benefits in light of the cost and radiation dose associated with CT examinations performed for the purpose of airway analysis. Whereas a single CT examination consists of a large number of images, manually identifying airway morphological characteristics and computing features to enable thorough investigations of airway and other lung diseases is very time-consuming and susceptible to errors. Hence, automated and semiautomated computerized analysis of human airways is becoming an important research area in medical imaging. A number of computerized techniques have been developed to date for the analysis of lung airways. In this review, we present a summary of the primary methods developed for computerized analysis of human airways, including airway segmentation, airway labeling, and airway morphometry, as well as a number of computer-aided clinical applications, such as virtual bronchoscopy. Both successes and underlying limitations of these approaches are discussed, while highlighting areas that may require additional work.

Pu Jiantao; Gu Suicheng; Liu Shusen; Zhu Shaocheng; Wilson, David; Siegfried, Jill M.; Gur, David [Imaging Research Center, Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, 3362 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); School of Computing, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Department of Radiology, Henan Provincial People's Hospital, Zhengzhou 450003 (China); Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, 580 S. Aiken Avenue, Suite 400, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15232 (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology, Hillman Cancer Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Imaging Research Center, Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, 3362 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

359

Detection sensitivity of x-ray CT imaging for NDE of green-state ceramics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Improved ceramic-processing methods that use pressure slip-casting and injection molding are being developed at Norton Advanced Ceramics, with a goal of producing reliable structural ceramics for advanced heat engines. Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of ceramic parts at different stages of processing can provide useful diagnostic information to help improve processing techniques. For example, an evaluation of density gradients in as-cast green-body samples can be used to judge mold performance and make changes in mold design. Also, the ability to detect minute flaws (20 to 50 {mu}m), such as agglomerates, inclusions, and voids, in green-body, presintered, and densified parts is important in ensuring structural reliability of the final parts, because these flaws, above certain critical sizes, can lead to catastrophic failure. Three-dimensional microfocus X-ray computed tomography (CT) and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems have been developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for application to quantitative NDE evaluation of ceramics. This paper evaluates the detection sensitivity of the ANL X-ray CT system when used to determine density gradients, inclusions, and voids in green-state Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramics. A theoretical account of key system- and sample-related parameters affecting X-ray CT detection sensitivity is given, and results of experimental evaluation are presented. Density calibration phantoms and net-shape-formed tensile rods with seeded defects were used in the experimental evaluation of detection limits. 6 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Gopalsami, N.; Rizo, P.; Ellingson, W.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Tracey, D.M. (Norton Co., Northboro, MA (United States). Advanced Ceramics Div.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Coronary artery wall imaging in mice using osmium tetroxide and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT)  

SciTech Connect

The high spatial resolution of micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is ideal for 3D imaging of coronary arteries in intact mouse heart specimens. Previously, micro-CT of mouse heart specimens utilized intravascular contrast agents that hardened within the vessel lumen and allowed a vascular cast to be made. However, for mouse coronary artery disease models, it is highly desirable to image coronary artery walls and highlight plaques. For this purpose, we describe an ex vivo contrast-enhanced micro-CT imaging technique based on tissue staining with osmium tetroxide (OsO{sub 4}) solution. As a tissue-staining contrast agent, OsO{sub 4} is retained in the vessel wall and surrounding tissue during the fixation process and cleared from the vessel lumens. Its high X-ray attenuation makes the artery wall visible in CT. Additionally, since OsO{sub 4} preferentially binds to lipids, it highlights lipid deposition in the artery wall. We performed micro-CT of heart specimens of 5- to 25-week-old C57BL/6 wild-type mice and 5- to 13-week-old apolipoprotein E knockout (apoE{sup -/-}) mice at 10 {mu}m resolution. The results show that walls of coronary arteries as small as 45 {mu}m in diameter are visible using a table-top micro-CT scanner. Similar image clarity was achieved with 1/2000th the scan time using a synchrotron CT scanner. In 13-week-old apoE mice, lipid-rich plaques are visible in the aorta. Our study shows that the combination of OsO{sub 4} and micro-CT permits the visualization of the coronary artery wall in intact mouse hearts.

Pai, Vinay M.; Kozlowski, Megan; Donahue, Danielle; Miller, Elishiah; Xiao, Xianghui; Chen, Marcus Y.; Yu, Zu-Xi; Connelly, Patricia; Jeffries, Kenneth; Wen, Han (NIH)

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ut ct wv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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361

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY U.S. Number of states in which marketer is licensed ... Service Tech & Research Corp

362

Carol Giffin Lance Clampitt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; HI-Acting) Diane Eldridge (VA; PA-Acting) Craig Neidig (WV; NY, PA-Acting) Hawaii Alaska USGS Miles 100 Miles Dick Vraga (Acting), Federal Liaison (Reston, VA) Dave Vincent, US Forest Service (Salt Lake City, UT) Becci Anderson Sheri Schneider Pacific Basin Legend New Region & HI Associate: Derek

363

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TX2","N3035UT2","N3035VT2","N3035VA2","N3035WA2","N3035WV2","N3035WI2","N3035WY2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (MMcf)","Alabama Natural Gas Industrial...

364

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TX2","N3010UT2","N3010VT2","N3010VA2","N3010WA2","N3010WV2","N3010WI2","N3010WY2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)","Alabama Natural Gas Residential...

365

Virtual monochromatic imaging in dual-source dual-energy CT: Radiation dose and image quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the image quality of virtual monochromatic images synthesized from dual-source dual-energy computed tomography (CT) in comparison with conventional polychromatic single-energy CT for the same radiation dose. Methods: In dual-energy CT, besides the material-specific information, one may also synthesize monochromatic images at different energies, which can be used for routine diagnosis similar to conventional polychromatic single-energy images. In this work, the authors assessed whether virtual monochromatic images generated from dual-source CT scanners had an image quality similar to that of polychromatic single-energy images for the same radiation dose. First, the authors provided a theoretical analysis of the optimal monochromatic energy for either the minimum noise level or the highest iodine contrast to noise ratio (CNR) for a given patient size and dose partitioning between the low- and high-energy scans. Second, the authors performed an experimental study on a dual-source CT scanner to evaluate the noise and iodine CNR in monochromatic images. A thoracic phantom with three sizes of attenuating rings was used to represent four adult sizes. For each phantom size, three dose partitionings between the low-energy (80 kV) and the high-energy (140 kV) scans were used in the dual-energy scan. Monochromatic images at eight energies (40 to 110 keV) were generated for each scan. Phantoms were also scanned at each of the four polychromatic single energy (80, 100, 120, and 140 kV) with the same radiation dose. Results: The optimal virtual monochromatic energy depends on several factors: phantom size, partitioning of the radiation dose between low- and high-energy scans, and the image quality metrics to be optimized. With the increase of phantom size, the optimal monochromatic energy increased. With the increased percentage of radiation dose on the low energy scan, the optimal monochromatic energy decreased. When maximizing the iodine CNR in monochromatic images, the optimal energy was lower than that when minimizing noise level. When the total radiation dose was equally distributed between low and high energy in dual-energy scans, for minimum noise, the optimal energies were 68, 71, 74, and 77 keV for small, medium, large, and extra-large (xlarge) phantoms, respectively; for maximum iodine CNR, the optimal energies were 66, 68, 70, 72 keV. With the optimal monochromatic energy, the noise level was similar to and the CNR was better than that in a single-energy scan at 120 kV for the same radiation dose. Compared to an 80 kV scan, however, the iodine CNR in monochromatic images was lower for the small, medium, and large phantoms. Conclusions: In dual-source dual-energy CT, optimal virtual monochromatic energy depends on patient size, dose partitioning, and the image quality metric optimized. With the optimal monochromatic energy, the noise level was similar to and the iodine CNR was better than that in 120 kV images for the same radiation dose. Compared to single-energy 80 kV images, the iodine CNR in virtual monochromatic images was lower for small to large phantom sizes.

Yu Lifeng; Christner, Jodie A.; Leng Shuai; Wang Jia; Fletcher, Joel G.; McCollough, Cynthia H. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

366

Reference-free ground truth metric for metal artifact evaluation in CT images  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: In computed tomography (CT), metal objects in the region of interest introduce data inconsistencies during acquisition. Reconstructing these data results in an image with star shaped artifacts induced by the metal inconsistencies. To enhance image quality, the influence of the metal objects can be reduced by different metal artifact reduction (MAR) strategies. For an adequate evaluation of new MAR approaches a ground truth reference data set is needed. In technical evaluations, where phantoms can be measured with and without metal inserts, ground truth data can easily be obtained by a second reference data acquisition. Obviously, this is not possible for clinical data. Here, an alternative evaluation method is presented without the need of an additionally acquired reference data set. Methods: The proposed metric is based on an inherent ground truth for metal artifacts as well as MAR methods comparison, where no reference information in terms of a second acquisition is needed. The method is based on the forward projection of a reconstructed image, which is compared to the actually measured projection data. Results: The new evaluation technique is performed on phantom and on clinical CT data with and without MAR. The metric results are then compared with methods using a reference data set as well as an expert-based classification. It is shown that the new approach is an adequate quantification technique for artifact strength in reconstructed metal or MAR CT images. Conclusions: The presented method works solely on the original projection data itself, which yields some advantages compared to distance measures in image domain using two data sets. Beside this, no parameters have to be manually chosen. The new metric is a useful evaluation alternative when no reference data are available.

Kratz, Baerbel; Ens, Svitlana; Mueller, Jan; Buzug, Thorsten M. [Institute of Medical Engineering, University of Luebeck, 23538 Luebeck (Germany)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

367

A robust geometry estimation method for spiral, sequential and circular cone-beam micro-CT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The authors propose a novel method for misalignment estimation of micro-CT scanners using an adaptive genetic algorithm. Methods: The proposed algorithm is able to estimate the rotational geometry, the direction vector of table movement and the displacement between different imaging threads of a dual source or even multisource scanner. The calibration procedure does not rely on dedicated calibration phantoms and a sequence scan of a single metal bead is sufficient to geometrically calibrate the whole imaging system for spiral, sequential, and circular scan protocols. Dual source spiral and sequential scan protocols in micro-computed tomography result in projection data that-besides the source and detector positions and orientations-also require a precise knowledge of the table direction vector to be reconstructed properly. If those geometric parameters are not known accurately severe artifacts and a loss in spatial resolution appear in the reconstructed images as long as no geometry calibration is performed. The table direction vector is further required to ensure that consecutive volumes of a sequence scan can be stitched together and to allow the reconstruction of spiral data at all. Results: The algorithm's performance is evaluated using simulations of a micro-CT system with known geometry and misalignment. To assess the quality of the algorithm in a real world scenario the calibration of a micro-CT scanner is performed and several reconstructions with and without geometry estimation are presented. Conclusions: The results indicate that the algorithm successfully estimates all geometry parameters, misalignment artifacts in the reconstructed volumes vanish, and the spatial resolution is increased as can be shown by the evaluation of modulation transfer function measurements.

Sawall, Stefan; Knaup, Michael; Kachelriess, Marc [Institute of Medical Physics (IMP), University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Institute of Medical Physics (IMP), University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, 91052 Erlangen (Germany) and Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

368

Solid Sorbents for CO2 Capture from Precombustion Gas Streams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4458 george.richards@netl.doe.gov PROjeCT PARTNeRS Sd-Chemie Inc. (Louisville, KY) Carnegie Melon University (Pittsburgh, PA) COST Total estimated...

369

Figure 23. Average price of natural gas delivered to U.S. commercial...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," and Form EIA-910, "Monthly Natural Gas Marketer Survey." IN OH TN WV VA KY MD PA NY VT NH MA CT ME RI DE DC NC SC GA FL NJ AL...

370

Microsoft Word - figure_22.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," and Form EIA-910, "Monthly Natural Gas Marketer Survey." IN OH TN WV VA KY MD PA NY VT NH MA CT ME RI DE DC NC SC GA FL NJ AL...

371

Microsoft Word - figure_21.doc  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," and Form EIA-910, "Monthly Natural Gas Marketer Survey." IN OH TN WV VA KY MD PA NY VT NH MA CT ME RI DE DC NC SC GA...

372

CT calorimetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... reactions can alter the temperature in various ways, producing a ... The four black items at right below the centimeter rule are ... That way, the immediate ...

2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

373

Improving best-phase image quality in cardiac CT by motion correction with MAM optimization  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Research in image reconstruction for cardiac CT aims at using motion correction algorithms to improve the image quality of the coronary arteries. The key to those algorithms is motion estimation, which is currently based on 3-D/3-D registration to align the structures of interest in images acquired in multiple heart phases. The need for an extended scan data range covering several heart phases is critical in terms of radiation dose to the patient and limits the clinical potential of the method. Furthermore, literature reports only slight quality improvements of the motion corrected images when compared to the most quiet phase (best-phase) that was actually used for motion estimation. In this paper a motion estimation algorithm is proposed which does not require an extended scan range but works with a short scan data interval, and which markedly improves the best-phase image quality. Methods: Motion estimation is based on the definition of motion artifact metrics (MAM) to quantify motion artifacts in a 3-D reconstructed image volume. The authors use two different MAMs, entropy, and positivity. By adjusting the motion field parameters, the MAM of the resulting motion-compensated reconstruction is optimized using a gradient descent procedure. In this way motion artifacts are minimized. For a fast and practical implementation, only analytical methods are used for motion estimation and compensation. Both the MAM-optimization and a 3-D/3-D registration-based motion estimation algorithm were investigated by means of a computer-simulated vessel with a cardiac motion profile. Image quality was evaluated using normalized cross-correlation (NCC) with the ground truth template and root-mean-square deviation (RMSD). Four coronary CT angiography patient cases were reconstructed to evaluate the clinical performance of the proposed method. Results: For the MAM-approach, the best-phase image quality could be improved for all investigated heart phases, with a maximum improvement of the NCC value by 100% and of the RMSD value by 81%. The corresponding maximum improvements for the registration-based approach were 20% and 40%. In phases with very rapid motion the registration-based algorithm obtained better image quality, while the image quality of the MAM algorithm was superior in phases with less motion. The image quality improvement of the MAM optimization was visually confirmed for the different clinical cases. Conclusions: The proposed method allows a software-based best-phase image quality improvement in coronary CT angiography. A short scan data interval at the target heart phase is sufficient, no additional scan data in other cardiac phases are required. The algorithm is therefore directly applicable to any standard cardiac CT acquisition protocol.

Rohkohl, Christopher; Bruder, Herbert; Stierstorfer, Karl [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstrasse 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Flohr, Thomas [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstrasse 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard Karls University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

374

On proton CT reconstruction using MVCT-converted virtual proton projections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To describe a novel methodology of converting megavoltage x-ray projections into virtual proton projections that are otherwise missing due to the proton range limit. These converted virtual proton projections can be used in the reconstruction of proton computed tomography (pCT). Methods: Relations exist between proton projections and multispectral megavoltage x-ray projections for human tissue. Based on these relations, these tissues can be categorized into: (a) adipose tissue; (b) nonadipose soft tissues; and (c) bone. These three tissue categories can be visibly identified on a regular megavoltage x-ray computed tomography (MVCT) image. With an MVCT image and its projection data available, the x-ray projections through heterogeneous anatomy can be converted to the corresponding proton projections using predetermined calibration curves for individual materials, aided by a coarse segmentation on the x-ray CT image. To show the feasibility of this approach, mathematical simulations were carried out. The converted proton projections, plotted on a proton sinogram, were compared to the simulated ground truth. Proton stopping power images were reconstructed using either the virtual proton projections only or a blend of physically available proton projections and virtual proton projections that make up for those missing due to the range limit. These images were compared to a reference image reconstructed from theoretically calculated proton projections. Results: The converted virtual projections had an uncertainty of {+-}0.8% compared to the calculated ground truth. Proton stopping power images reconstructed using a blend of converted virtual projections (48%) and physically available projections (52%) had an uncertainty of {+-}0.86% compared with that reconstructed from theoretically calculated projections. Reconstruction solely from converted virtual proton projections had an uncertainty of {+-}1.1% compared with that reconstructed from theoretical projections. If these images are used for treatment planning, the average proton range uncertainty is estimated to be less than 1.5% for an imaging dose in the milligray range. Conclusions: The proposed method can be used to convert x-ray projections into virtual proton projections. The converted proton projections can be blended with existing proton projections or can be used solely for pCT reconstruction, addressing the range limit problem of pCT using current therapeutic proton machines.

Wang Dongxu; Mackie, T. Rockwell; Tome, Wolfgang A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Morgridge Institute of Research, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53715 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Oncophysics Institute, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Yeshiva University, Bronx, New York 10461 (United States)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

Quantitative comparison of noise texture across CT scanners from different manufacturers  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To quantitatively compare noise texture across computed tomography (CT) scanners from different manufacturers using the noise power spectrum (NPS). Methods: The American College of Radiology CT accreditation phantom (Gammex 464, Gammex, Inc., Middleton, WI) was imaged on two scanners: Discovery CT 750HD (GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI), and SOMATOM Definition Flash (Siemens Healthcare, Germany), using a consistent acquisition protocol (120 kVp, 0.625/0.6 mm slice thickness, 250 mAs, and 22 cm field of view). Images were reconstructed using filtered backprojection and a wide selection of reconstruction kernels. For each image set, the 2D NPS were estimated from the uniform section of the phantom. The 2D spectra were normalized by their integral value, radially averaged, and filtered by the human visual response function. A systematic kernel-by-kernel comparison across manufacturers was performed by computing the root mean square difference (RMSD) and the peak frequency difference (PFD) between the NPS from different kernels. GE and Siemens kernels were compared and kernel pairs that minimized the RMSD and |PFD| were identified. Results: The RMSD (|PFD|) values between the NPS of GE and Siemens kernels varied from 0.01 mm{sup 2} (0.002 mm{sup -1}) to 0.29 mm{sup 2} (0.74 mm{sup -1}). The GE kernels 'Soft,''Standard,''Chest,' and 'Lung' closely matched the Siemens kernels 'B35f,''B43f,''B41f,' and 'B80f' (RMSD < 0.05 mm{sup 2}, |PFD| < 0.02 mm{sup -1}, respectively). The GE 'Bone,''Bone+,' and 'Edge' kernels all matched most closely with Siemens 'B75f' kernel but with sizeable RMSD and |PFD| values up to 0.18 mm{sup 2} and 0.41 mm{sup -1}, respectively. These sizeable RMSD and |PFD| values corresponded to visually perceivable differences in the noise texture of the images. Conclusions: It is possible to use the NPS to quantitatively compare noise texture across CT systems. The degree to which similar texture across scanners could be achieved varies and is limited by the kernels available on each scanner.

Solomon, Justin B.; Christianson, Olav; Samei, Ehsan [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories and Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories and Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories and Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Departments of Radiology, Physics, Biomedical Engineering, and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

Contribution of the PALB2 c.2323C>T [p. Q775X] Founder mutation in well-defined breast and/or ovarian cancer families and unselected ovarian cancer cases of French Canadian descent  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

] mutation carrier fam carrier in family F1469. Abbreviations: bilateral breast cancer (Bi Br), cerebra melanoma (Mel), stomach cancer (Sto), and uterine cancer (Ut). Age at asce diagnosis of cancer. Tischkowitz et al. BMC Medical Genetics 2013, 14:5 Page 4...

Tischkowitz, Marc; Sabbaghian, Nelly; Hamel, Nancy; Pouchet, Carly; Foulkes, William D; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie; Provencher, Diane M; Tonin, Patricia N

2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

377

AAPM Task Group 108: PET and PET/CT Shielding Requirements  

SciTech Connect

The shielding of positron emission tomography (PET) and PET/CT (computed tomography) facilities presents special challenges. The 0.511 MeV annihilation photons associated with positron decay are much higher energy than other diagnostic radiations. As a result, barrier shielding may be required in floors and ceilings as well as adjacent walls. Since the patient becomes the radioactive source after the radiopharmaceutical has been administered, one has to consider the entire time that the subject remains in the clinic. In this report we present methods for estimating the shielding requirements for PET and PET/CT facilities. Information about the physical properties of the most commonly used clinical PET radionuclides is summarized, although the report primarily refers to fluorine-18. Typical PET imaging protocols are reviewed and exposure rates from patients are estimated including self-attenuation by body tissues and physical decay of the radionuclide. Examples of barrier calculations are presented for controlled and noncontrolled areas. Shielding for adjacent rooms with scintillation cameras is also discussed. Tables and graphs of estimated transmission factors for lead, steel, and concrete at 0.511 MeV are also included. Meeting the regulatory limits for uncontrolled areas can be an expensive proposition. Careful planning with the equipment vendor, facility architect, and a qualified medical physicist is necessary to produce a cost effective design while maintaining radiation safety standards.

Madsen, Mark T.; Anderson, Jon A.; Halama, James R. [Radiology, University of Iowa (United States)] (and others)

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

Percutaneous Extraction of Cement Leakage After Vertebroplasty Under CT and Fluoroscopy Guidance: A New Technique  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: We report a new minimally invasive technique of extraction of cement leakage following percutaneous vertebroplasty in adults. Methods: Seven adult patients (five women, two men; mean age: 81 years) treated for vertebral compression fractures by percutaneous vertebroplasty had cement leakage into perivertebral soft tissues along the needle route. Immediately after vertebroplasty, the procedure of extraction was performed under computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopy guidance: a Chiba needle was first inserted using the same route as the vertebroplasty until contact was obtained with the cement fragment. This needle was then used as a guide for an 11-gauge Trocar t'am (Thiebaud, France). After needle withdrawal, a 13-gauge endoscopy clamp was inserted through the cannula to extract the cement fragments. The whole procedure was performed under local anesthesia. Results: In each patient, all cement fragments were withdrawn within 10 min, without complication. Conclusions: This report suggests that this CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous technique of extraction could reduce the rate of cement leakage-related complications.

Amoretti, Nicolas, E-mail: amorettinicolas@yahoo.fr; Huwart, Laurent, E-mail: huwart.laurent@wanadoo.fr [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Nice, Department of Radiology (France)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

Detective quantum efficiency of CT reconstruction: the detection of small objects  

SciTech Connect

The loss of detection sensitivity incurred by any stage of image processing may normally be characterized by the frequency dependence of the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of that stage of processing, provided the image is represented in continuous coordinates. However, limitations to the DQE concept arise when discretely sampled projection data are used to obtain discretely sampled computed tomographic (CT) reconstructions. The source of these limitations is the aliasing produced by the discrete sampling which mixes contributions from various frequencies. An associated problem is that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for the detection of an object can depend upon the position of the object relative to the discrete reconstruction pixels. The effective SNR for discrete images must take into account this variation. While there may be no loss in the detection SNR for reconstructions in continuous coordinates (DQE = 100%), a reduction in the SNR will result from aliasing for discrete reconstructions. A simple one-dimensional model elucidates the characteristics of discrete CT reconstruction.

Hanson, K.M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

CT-Guided Percutaneous Fine-Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Inferior Vena Cava Wall: A Posterior Coaxial Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 72-year-old man was referred to our department with an incidentally diagnosed bronchogenic carcinoma of the right upper lobe. Positron emission tomography (PET) combined with computed tomography (PET-CT) revealed an unexpected hot spot in the ventral wall of the infrarenal segment of the inferior vena cava (IVC). Diagnostic biopsy of this lesion was performed under CT guidance with semiautomated 20G fine-needle aspiration (FNA) through a 19G coaxial needle. Cytology revealed few carcinoma cells, which led to the remarkable diagnosis of a distant metastasis to the IVC wall. Both the immediate postinterventional CT control and the further surveillance period of the patient were unremarkable; in particular, no signs of bleeding complications were detected. We conclude that coaxial FNA of an IVC wall lesion is technically feasible and may even help diagnose distant metastasis.

Kos, Sebastian, E-mail: skos@gmx.de; Bilecen, Deniz [University Hospital Basel, Institute of Radiology (Switzerland); Baumhoer, Daniel [University Hospital Basel, Institute of Pathology (Switzerland); Guillaume, Nicolas [University Hospital Basel, Institute of Nuclear Medicine (Switzerland); Jacob, Augustinus L. [University Hospital Basel, Institute of Radiology (Switzerland)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ut ct wv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Welcome to the Efficient Windows Collaborative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Window Selection Tool: New Construction Windows Window Selection Tool: New Construction Windows The Window Selection Tool will take you through a series of design conditions pertaining to your design and location. It is a step-by-step decision-making tool to help determine the most energy efficient window for your house. SELECT LOCATION: AK Anchorage AK Fairbanks AL Birmingham AL Mobile AR Little Rock AZ Flagstaff AZ Phoenix AZ Tucson CA Arcata CA Bakersfield CA Daggett CA Fresno CA Los Angeles CA Red Bluff CA Sacramento CA San Diego CA San Francisco CO Denver CO Grand Junction CT Hartford DC Washington DE Wilmington FL Daytona Beach FL Jacksonville FL Miami FL Tallahassee FL Tampa GA Atlanta GA Savannah HI Honolulu IA Des Moines ID Boise IL Chicago IL Springfield IN Indianapolis KS Wichita KY Lexington KY Louisville LA Lake Charles LA New Orleans LA Shreveport MA Boston MD Baltimore ME Portland MI Detroit MI Grand Rapids MI Houghton MN Duluth MN Minneapolis MO Kansas City MO St. Louis MS Jackson MT Billings MT Great Falls NC Raleigh ND Bismarck NE Omaha NH Concord NJ Atlantic City NM Albuquerque NV Las Vegas NV Reno NY Albany NY Buffalo NY New York OH Cleveland OH Dayton OK Oklahoma City OR Medford OR Portland PA Philadelphia PA Pittsburgh PA Williamsport RI Providence SC Charleston SC Greenville SD Pierre TN Memphis TN Nashville TX Brownsville TX El Paso TX Fort Worth TX Houston TX Lubbock TX San Antonio UT Cedar City UT Salt Lake City VA Richmond VT Burlington WA Seattle WA Spokane WI Madison WV Charleston WY Cheyenne AB Edmonton MB Winnipeg ON Toronto PQ Montreal SELECT HOUSE TYPE:

382

Segmenting CT prostate images using population and patient-specific statistics for radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: In the segmentation of sequential treatment-time CT prostate images acquired in image-guided radiotherapy, accurately capturing the intrapatient variation of the patient under therapy is more important than capturing interpatient variation. However, using the traditional deformable-model-based segmentation methods, it is difficult to capture intrapatient variation when the number of samples from the same patient is limited. This article presents a new deformable model, designed specifically for segmenting sequential CT images of the prostate, which leverages both population and patient-specific statistics to accurately capture the intrapatient variation of the patient under therapy. Methods: The novelty of the proposed method is twofold: First, a weighted combination of gradient and probability distribution function (PDF) features is used to build the appearance model to guide model deformation. The strengths of each feature type are emphasized by dynamically adjusting the weight between the profile-based gradient features and the local-region-based PDF features during the optimization process. An additional novel aspect of the gradient-based features is that, to alleviate the effect of feature inconsistency in the regions of gas and bone adjacent to the prostate, the optimal profile length at each landmark is calculated by statistically investigating the intensity profile in the training set. The resulting gradient-PDF combined feature produces more accurate and robust segmentations than general gradient features. Second, an online learning mechanism is used to build shape and appearance statistics for accurately capturing intrapatient variation. Results: The performance of the proposed method was evaluated on 306 images of the 24 patients. Compared to traditional gradient features, the proposed gradient-PDF combination features brought 5.2% increment in the success ratio of segmentation (from 94.1% to 99.3%). To evaluate the effectiveness of online learning mechanism, the authors carried out a comparison between partial online update strategy and full online update strategy. Using the full online update strategy, the mean DSC was improved from 86.6% to 89.3% with 2.8% gain. On the basis of full online update strategy, the manual modification before online update strategy was introduced and tested, the best performance was obtained; here, the mean DSC and the mean ASD achieved 92.4% and 1.47 mm, respectively. Conclusions: The proposed prostate segmentation method provided accurate and robust segmentation results for CT images even under the situation where the samples of patient under radiotherapy were limited. A conclusion that the proposed method is suitable for clinical application can be drawn.

Feng, Qianjin; Foskey, Mark; Chen Wufan; Shen Dinggang [Biomedical Engineering College, South Medical University, Guangzhou (China) and Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27510 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Biomedical Engineering College, South Medical University, Guangzhou 510510 (China); Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27510 (United States)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

Predicting the fidelity of JPEG2000 compressed CT images using DICOM header information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To propose multiple logistic regression (MLR) and artificial neural network (ANN) models constructed using digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) header information in predicting the fidelity of Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) 2000 compressed abdomen computed tomography (CT) images. Methods: Our institutional review board approved this study and waived informed patient consent. Using a JPEG2000 algorithm, 360 abdomen CT images were compressed reversibly (n = 48, as negative control) or irreversibly (n = 312) to one of different compression ratios (CRs) ranging from 4:1 to 10:1. Five radiologists independently determined whether the original and compressed images were distinguishable or indistinguishable. The 312 irreversibly compressed images were divided randomly into training (n = 156) and testing (n = 156) sets. The MLR and ANN models were constructed regarding the DICOM header information as independent variables and the pooled radiologists' responses as dependent variable. As independent variables, we selected the CR (DICOM tag number: 0028, 2112), effective tube current-time product (0018, 9332), section thickness (0018, 0050), and field of view (0018, 0090) among the DICOM tags. Using the training set, an optimal subset of independent variables was determined by backward stepwise selection in a four-fold cross-validation scheme. The MLR and ANN models were constructed with the determined independent variables using the training set. The models were then evaluated on the testing set by using receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) analysis regarding the radiologists' pooled responses as the reference standard and by measuring Spearman rank correlation between the model prediction and the number of radiologists who rated the two images as distinguishable. Results: The CR and section thickness were determined as the optimal independent variables. The areas under the ROC curve for the MLR and ANN predictions were 0.91 (95% CI; 0.86, 0.95) and 0.92 (0.87, 0.96), respectively. The correlation coefficients of the MLR and ANN predictions with the number of radiologists who responded as distinguishable were 0.76 (0.69, 0.82, p < 0.001) and 0.78 (0.71, 0.83, p < 0.001), respectively. Conclusions: The MLR and ANN models constructed using the DICOM header information offer promise in predicting the fidelity of JPEG2000 compressed abdomen CT images.

Kim, Kil Joong; Kim, Bohyoung; Lee, Hyunna; Choi, Hosik; Jeon, Jong-June; Ahn, Jeong-Hwan; Lee, Kyoung Ho [Department of Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul, 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); School of Computer Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Kwanak-Ro, Kwanak-Gu, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Informational Statistics, Hoseo University, 165, Sechul-ri, Baebang-myeon, Asan-si, Chungcheongnam-do, 336-795 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Statistics, Seoul National University, 599 Kwanak-Ro, Kwanak-Gu, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Korean Intellectual Property Office, Government Complex-Daejeon, 139 Seonsa-ro, Seo-gu, Daejeon, 302-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, and Seoul National University Medical Research Center, 300 Gumi-dong, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do, 463-707 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.9 Educational Facilities  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 2010 Regional New Construction and Renovations Expenditures for Public K-12 Schools ($Million) Region New Schools Additions Renovation Total Region 1 (CT, MA, ME, NH, RI, VT) Region 2 (NJ, NY, PA) Region 3 (DE, MD, VA, WV) Region 4 (KY, NC, SC, TN) Region 5 (AL, FL, GA, MS) Region 6 (IN, MI, OH) Region 7 (IL, MN, WI) Region 8 (IA, KS, MO, NE) Region 9 (AR, LA, OK, TX) Region 10 (CO, MT, ND, NM, SD, UT, WY) Region 11 (AZ, CA, HI, NV) Region 12 (AK, ID, OR, WA) Total Source(s): School Planning & Management, 16th Annual School Construction Report, Feb. 2011 p. CR3 8,669.5 3,074.1 2,796.8 14,540.4 1,605.4 407.3 275.2 2,287.9 258.2 181.8 158.1 598.1 1,653.9 479.6 387.8 2,521.2 548.2 130.9 93.3 772.4 309.3 206.1 135.3 650.7 217.6 231.4 187.8 636.8 1,338.0 327.6 175.9 1,841.4 359.6 286.3 278.9 924.8

385

regionalmaps  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

LNG Imports LNG Imports Pacifi c (9) Moun tain (8) CA (12) AZ/N M (11) W. North Centr al (4) W. South Centr al (7) E. South Centr al (6) E. North Centr al (3) S. Atlan tic (5) FL (10) Mid. Atlan tic (2) New Engl. (1) W. Cana da E. Cana da MacK enzie Alask a Cana da Offsh ore and LNG Mexic o Baha mas Primary Flows Secondary Flows Pipeline Border Crossing Figure 6. Coal Supply Regions Source: Energy Information Administration. Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting WA ID OR CA NV UT TX OK AR MO LA MS AL GA FL TN SC NC KY VA WV WY CO SD ND MI MN WI IL IN OH MD PA NJ DE CT MA NH VT NY ME RI MT NE IA KS MI AZ NM 500 0 SCALE IN MILES APPALACHIA Northern Appalachia Central Appalachia Southern Appalachia INTERIOR NORTHERN GREAT PLAINS Eastern Interior Western Interior Gulf Lignite Dakota Lignite Western Montana Wyoming, Northern Powder River Basin Wyoming, Southern Powder River Basin Western Wyoming

386

Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and clothes drying. In addition to the major equipment-driven and clothes drying. In addition to the major equipment-driven end-uses, the average energy consumption per household is projected for other electric and nonelectric Energy Information Administration/Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 19 Pacific East South Central South Atlantic Middle Atlantic New England West South Central West North Central East North Central Mountain AK WA MT WY ID NV UT CO AZ NM TX OK IA KS MO IL IN KY TN MS AL FL GA SC NC WV PA NJ MD DE NY CT VT ME RI MA NH VA WI MI OH NE SD MN ND AR LA OR CA HI Middle Atlantic New England East North Central West North Central Pacific West South Central East South Central South Atlantic Mountain Figure 5. United States Census Divisions Source:Energy Information Administration,Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. Report #:DOE/EIA-0554(2006) Release date: March 2006

387

AEOSup ltr to Dear Customer  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

WA WA OR CA ID NV UT AZ NM CO WY MT ND SD NE KS OK TX MN IA MO AR LA WI IL KY IN OH WV TN MS AL GA SC NC VA PA NY VT ME NH MA RI CT NJ DE MD D.C. FL MI Electricity Supply Regions 1 ECAR 2 ERCOT 3 MAAC 4 MAIN 5 MAPP 6 NY 7 NE 8 FL 9 STV 10 SPP 11 NWP 12 RA 13 CNV 13 11 12 2 10 5 9 8 1 6 7 3 AK 15 14 H I 14 AK 15 H I Figure 2. Electricity Market Module (EMM) Regions 1. ECAR = East Central Area Reliability Coordination Agreement 2. ERCOT = Electric Reliability Council of Texas 3. MACC = Mid-Atlantic Area Council 4. MAIN = Mid-America Interconnected Network 5. MAPP = Mid-Continent Area Power Pool 6. NY = Northeast Power Coordinating Council/ New York 7. NE = Northeast Power Coordinating Council/ New England 8. FL = Southeastern Electric Reliability Council/ Florida 9. STV = Southeastern Electric Reliability Council /excluding Florida 10. SPP

388

regionalmaps  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Specific LNG Terminals Specific LNG Terminals Generic LNG Terminals Pacifi c (9) Moun tain (8) CA (12) AZ/N M (11) W. North Centr al (4) W. South Centr al (7) E. South Centr al (6) E. North Centr al (3) S. Atlan tic (5) FL (10) Mid. Atlan tic (2) New Engl. (1) W. Cana da E. Cana da MacK enzie Alask a Cana da Offsh ore and LNG Mexic o Baha mas Primary Flows Secondary Flows Pipeline Border Crossing Specific LNG Terminals Generic LNG Terminals Figure 6. Coal Supply Regions Source: Energy Information Administration. Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting WA ID OR CA NV UT TX OK AR MO LA MS AL GA FL TN SC NC KY VA WV WY CO SD ND MI MN WI IL IN OH MD PA NJ DE CT MA NH VT NY ME RI MT NE IA KS MI AZ NM 500 0 SCALE IN MILES APPALACHIA Northern Appalachia Central Appalachia Southern Appalachia INTERIOR NORTHERN GREAT PLAINS Eastern Interior Western Interior Gulf Lignite Dakota Lignite Western Montana

389

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Analysis. U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2010 213 Appendix F Regional Maps Figure F1. United States Census Divisions Pacific East South Central South Atlantic Middle Atlantic New England West South Central West North Central East North Central Mountain AK WA MT WY ID NV UT CO AZ NM TX OK IA KS MO IL IN KY TN MS AL FL GA SC NC WV PA NJ MD DE NY CT VT ME RI MA NH VA WI MI OH NE SD MN ND AR LA OR CA HI Middle Atlantic New England East North Central West North Central Pacific West South Central East South Central South Atlantic Mountain Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. Appendix F Regional Maps Figure F1. United States Census Divisions U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013

390

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1999 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-895, "Monthly Quantity and Value of Natural Gas Report," and the United States Minerals Management Service. None 1-15,000 15,001-100,000 100,001-200,000 200,001-500,000 500,001 and over 4. Marketed Production of Natural Gas in the United States, 1999 (Million Cubic Feet) Figure 5. Marketed Production of Natural Gas in Selected States, 1995-1999 Figure T e x a s L o u i s i a n a O k l a h o m a N e w M e x i c o W y o m i n g C o l o r a d o K a n s a s A l a b a m a A l a s k a C a l i f o r n i a A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Trillion Cubic Feet Billion Cubic Meters 95 96 97 98 99 Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-895, "Monthly Quantity and Value

391

Microsoft Word - Figure_14_15.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 0.00-2.49 2.50-4.49 4.50-6.49 6.50-8.49 8.50-10.49 10.50+ WA ID MT OR CA NV UT AZ NM CO WY ND SD MN WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN WV VA KY MD PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK DE 0 2 4 6 8 10 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 360 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Constant Dollars Nominal Dollars Figure 14. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers, 1980-2004 Figure 15. Average City Gate Price of Natural Gas in the United States, 2004 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Sources: Nominal dollars: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," and Form EIA-910, "Monthly Natural Gas Marketer Survey." Constant dollars: Prices were converted to 2004 dollars using the chain-type price indexes for Gross Domestic Product

392

Slide 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Inventory map reflects the non-federally owned SNF and HLW covered by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act Inventory map reflects the non-federally owned SNF and HLW covered by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act 2 Metric Tons Heavy Metal (MTHM) 3 Based on actual data through 2002 , as provided in the RW-859, and projected discharges for 2003-2010 which are rounded to two significant digits. Reflects trans-shipments as of end-2002. End of Year 2010 SNF & HLW Inventories 1 Approximately 64,000 MTHM 2 of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) 3 & 275 High-Level Radioactive Waste (HLW) Canisters CT 1,900 TX 2,000 MD 1,200 VT 610 RI MT WY NE 790 SD ND OK KS 600 TX 2,000 LA 1,200 AR 1,200 IA 480 MN 1,100 WI 1,300 KY TN 1,500 MS 780 AL 3,000 GA 2,400 FL 2,900 NC 3,400 VA 2,400 WV OH 1,100 PA 5,800 ME 540 NJ 2,400 DE MI 2,500 MA 650 NH 480 IN SC 3,900 CO MO 670 IL 8,400 NY 3,300 CA 2,800 AZ 1,900 NM OR 360 NV UT WA 600 ID < 1 Commercial HLW 275 Canisters (~640 MTHM)

393

Green Power Network: Can I Buy Green Power in My State?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Can I Buy Green Power in my State? Community Renewable Energy Development Consumer Protection Large Purchasers of Green Power Can I Buy Green Power in My State? Click on your state below to find out which organizations offer green power in your state. The results will include utility green pricing programs, retail green power products offered in competitive electricity markets, and renewable energy certificate (REC) products sold separate from electricity. For additional information about these distinct products, see our Overview of Green Power Markets. Map of the United States. AK AL AR AZ CA CO CT DC DE FL GA HI IA ID IL IN KS KY LA MA MD ME MI MN MO MS MT NC ND NE NH NJ NM NV NY OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VA VT WA WI WV WY Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Connecticut Delaware Delaware Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Maryland Massachusetts Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Hampshire New Jersey New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Washington, DC

394

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Supply Supply 17 Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1999 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-895, "Monthly Quantity and Value of Natural Gas Report," and the United States Minerals Management Service. None 1-15,000 15,001-100,000 100,001-200,000 200,001-500,000 500,001 and over 4. Marketed Production of Natural Gas in the United States, 1999 (Million Cubic Feet) Figure 5. Marketed Production of Natural Gas in Selected States, 1995-1999 Figure T e x a s L o u i s i a n a O k l a h o m a N e w M e x i c o W y o m i n g C o l o r a d o K a n s a s A l a b a m a A l a s k a C a l i f o r n i a A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Trillion Cubic Feet Billion Cubic Meters 95 96 97 98 99 Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-895, "Monthly Quantity

395

Accuracy of volume measurement using 3D ultrasound and development of CT-3D US image fusion algorithm for prostate cancer radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of measuring volumes using three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US), and to verify the feasibility of the replacement of CT-MR fusion images with CT-3D US in radiotherapy treatment planning. Methods: Phantoms, consisting of water, contrast agent, and agarose, were manufactured. The volume was measured using 3D US, CT, and MR devices. A CT-3D US and MR-3D US image fusion software was developed using the Insight Toolkit library in order to acquire three-dimensional fusion images. The quality of the image fusion was evaluated using metric value and fusion images. Results: Volume measurement, using 3D US, shows a 2.8 {+-} 1.5% error, 4.4 {+-} 3.0% error for CT, and 3.1 {+-} 2.0% error for MR. The results imply that volume measurement using the 3D US devices has a similar accuracy level to that of CT and MR. Three-dimensional image fusion of CT-3D US and MR-3D US was successfully performed using phantom images. Moreover, MR-3D US image fusion was performed using human bladder images. Conclusions: 3D US could be used in the volume measurement of human bladders and prostates. CT-3D US image fusion could be used in monitoring the target position in each fraction of external beam radiation therapy. Moreover, the feasibility of replacing the CT-MR image fusion to the CT-3D US in radiotherapy treatment planning was verified.

Baek, Jihye; Huh, Jangyoung; Hyun An, So; Oh, Yoonjin [Department of Medical Sciences, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myungsoo; Kim, DongYoung; Chung, Kwangzoo; Cho, Sungho; Lee, Rena [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

396

DOE Challenge Home Case Study, Preferred Builders, Old Greenwhich, CT, Custom  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Preferred Preferred Builders, Inc. Old Greenwich, CT BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE DOE Challenge Home builders are in the top 1% of builders in the country meeting the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specifi ed by the U.S. Department of Energy. Every DOE Challenge Home starts with ENERGY STAR for Homes Version 3 for an energy-effi cient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Then, even more advanced technologies are designed in for a home that goes above and beyond current code to give you the superior quality construction, HVAC, appliances, indoor air quality, safety, durability, comfort, and solar-ready components along with ultra-low or no utility bills. This provides homeowners with a quality home that will last for generations to come.

397

DOE Challenge Home Case Study, BPC Green Builders, Custom Home, New Fairfield, CT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BPC Green BPC Green Builders New Fairfi eld, CT BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE DOE Challenge Home builders are in the top 1% of builders in the country meeting the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specifi ed by the U.S. Department of Energy. Every DOE Challenge Home starts with ENERGY STAR for Homes Version 3 for an energy-effi cient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Then, even more advanced technologies are designed in for a home that goes above and beyond current code to give you the superior quality construction, HVAC, appliances, indoor air quality, safety, durability, comfort, and solar-ready components along with ultra-low or no utility bills. This provides homeowners with a quality home that will last for generations to come.

398

Automatic heart isolation for CT coronary visualization using graph-cuts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a means to automatically and efficiently isolate the outer surface of the entire heart in Computer Tomography (CT) cardiac scans. Isolating the entire heart allows the coronary vessels on the surface of the heart to be easily visualized despite the proximity of surrounding organs such as the ribs and pulmonary blood vessels. Numerous techniques have been described for segmenting the left ventricle of the heart in images from various types of medical scanners but rarely has the entire heart been segmented. We make use of graphcuts to do the segmentation and introduce a novel means of initiating and constraining the graph-cut technique for heart isolation. The technique has been tested on 70 patient data sets. Results are compares with hand labeled results. 1.

G. Funka-lea; Y. Boykov; C. Florin; M. -p. Jolly; R. Moreau-gobard; R. Ramaraj; D. Rinck

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Multi-organ segmentation from multi-phase abdominal CT via 4D graphs using enhancement, shape and location optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interpretation of medical images benefits from anatomical and physiological priors to optimize computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) applications. Diagnosis also relies on the comprehensive analysis of multiple organs and quantitative measures of soft tissue. ... Keywords: 4D graph, enhancement, multi-phase CT, segmentation, shape

Marius George Linguraru; John A. Pura; Ananda S. Chowdhury; Ronald M. Summers

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Circle plus partial helical scan scheme for a flat panel detector-based cone beam breast X-ray CT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flat panel detector-based cone beam breast CT (CBBCT) can provide 3D image of the scanned breast with 3D isotropic spatial resolution, overcoming the disadvantage of the structure superimposition associated with X-ray projection mammography. It is very ...

Dong Yang; Ruola Ning; Weixing Cai

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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401

NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY...

402

Quantification of tc-99m sestamibi distribution in normal breast tissue using dedicated breast SPECT-CT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of Tc-99m-Sestamibi in molecular breast imaging is common due to its preferential uptake in malignant tissue. However, quantification of the baseline uptake in normal, healthy breast tissue is not possible using planar-imaging devices. Using ... Keywords: CT, SPECT, breast cancer, breast imaging, quantification, sestamibi

Steve D. Mann; Kristy L. Perez; Emily K. E. McCracken; Jainil P. Shah; Kingshuk R. Choudhury; Terence Z. Wong; Martin P. Tornai

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Validation of mutual information-based registration of CT and bone SPECT images in dual-isotope studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The registration of computed tomography (CT) and nuclear medicine (NM) images can substantially enhance patient diagnosis as it allows for the fusion of anatomical and functional information, as well as the attenuation correction of NM images. However, ... Keywords: Accuracy, Bone SPECT, Dual-isotope studies, Multi-modality registration, Multi-resolution, Mutual information, Precision, Qualitative evaluation, Quantitative validation, Reproducibility, Robustness, Sensitivity

Lisa Tang; Ghassan Hamarneh; Anna Celler

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Hagit P. Affek Yale University, Dept. of Geology & Geophysics, 210 Whitney Ave. New Haven, CT 06520-8109  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Geophysics. · Caltech, Pasadena, CA. 2003-2007. Posdoc in Isotope geochemistry. Department of GeologicalHagit P. Affek Yale University, Dept. of Geology & Geophysics, 210 Whitney Ave. New Haven, CT 06520 Plants: Physiological Role and Isotopic Composition. Adviser: Dan Yakir. Professional experience · Yale

405

Detecting Radiation-Induced Injury Using Rapid 3D Variogram Analysis of CT Images of Rat Lungs  

SciTech Connect

A new heterogeneity analysis approach to discern radiation-induced lung damage was tested on CT images of irradiated rats. The method, combining octree decomposition with variogram analysis, demonstrated a significant correlation with radiation exposure levels, whereas conventional measurements and pulmonary function tests did not. The results suggest the new approach may be highly sensitive for assessing even subtle radiation-induced changes

Jacob, Rick E.; Murphy, Mark K.; Creim, Jeffrey A.; Carson, James P.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Patient radiation dose in prospectively gated axial CT coronary angiography and retrospectively gated helical technique with a 320-detector row CT scanner  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate radiation dose to patients undergoing computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) for prospectively gated axial (PGA) technique and retrospectively gated helical (RGH) technique. Methods: Radiation doses were measured for a 320-detector row CT scanner (Toshiba Aquilion ONE) using small sized silicon-photodiode dosimeters, which were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within an anthropomorphic phantom for a standard Japanese adult male. Output signals from photodiode dosimeters were read out on a personal computer, from which organ and effective doses were computed according to guidelines published in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 103. Results: Organs that received high doses were breast, followed by lung, esophagus, and liver. Breast doses obtained with PGA technique and a phase window width of 16% at a simulated heart rate of 60 beats per minute were 13 mGy compared to 53 mGy with RGH technique using electrocardiographically dependent dose modulation at the same phase window width as that in PGA technique. Effective doses obtained in this case were 4.7 and 20 mSv for the PGA and RGH techniques, respectively. Conversion factors of dose length product to the effective dose in PGA and RGH were 0.022 and 0.025 mSv mGy{sup -1} cm{sup -1} with a scan length of 140 mm. Conclusions: CTCA performed with PGA technique provided a substantial effective dose reduction, i.e., 70%-76%, compared to RGH technique using the dose modulation at the same phase windows as those in PGA technique. Though radiation doses in CTCA with RGH technique were the same level as, or some higher than, those in conventional coronary angiography (CCA), the use of PGA technique reduced organ and effective doses to levels less than CCA except for breast dose.

Seguchi, Shigenobu; Aoyama, Takahiko; Koyama, Shuji; Fujii, Keisuke; Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo [Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan) and Department of Medical Technology, Nagoya Daini Red Cross Hospital, Myouken-chou, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8650 (Japan); Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan); Section of Radiological Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

407

Automatic tracking of implanted fiducial markers in cone beam CT projection images  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This paper describes a novel method for simultaneous intrafraction tracking of multiple fiducial markers. Although the proposed method is generic and can be adopted for a number of applications including fluoroscopy based patient position monitoring and gated radiotherapy, the tracking results presented in this paper are specific to tracking fiducial markers in a sequence of cone beam CT projection images. Methods: The proposed method is accurate and robust thanks to utilizing the mean shift and random sampling principles, respectively. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated with qualitative and quantitative methods, using data from two pancreatic and one prostate cancer patients and a moving phantom. The ground truth, for quantitative evaluation, was calculated based on manual tracking preformed by three observers. Results: The average dispersion of marker position error calculated from the tracking results for pancreas data (six markers tracked over 640 frames, 3840 marker identifications) was 0.25 mm (at iscoenter), compared with an average dispersion for the manual ground truth estimated at 0.22 mm. For prostate data (three markers tracked over 366 frames, 1098 marker identifications), the average error was 0.34 mm. The estimated tracking error in the pancreas data was < 1 mm (2 pixels) in 97.6% of cases where nearby image clutter was detected and in 100.0% of cases with no nearby image clutter. Conclusions: The proposed method has accuracy comparable to that of manual tracking and, in combination with the proposed batch postprocessing, superior robustness. Marker tracking in cone beam CT (CBCT) projections is useful for a variety of purposes, such as providing data for assessment of intrafraction motion, target tracking during rotational treatment delivery, motion correction of CBCT, and phase sorting for 4D CBCT.

Marchant, T. E.; Skalski, A.; Matuszewski, B. J. [Christie Medical Physics and Engineering, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester M20 4BX, United Kingdom and Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester M20 4BX (United Kingdom); AGH University of Science and Technology, al. A. Mickiewicza 30, Krakow 30-059 (Poland); School of Computing, Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

Novel ultrahigh resolution data acquisition and image reconstruction for multi-detector row CT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present and evaluate a special ultrahigh resolution mode providing considerably enhanced spatial resolution both in the scan plane and in the z-axis direction for a routine medical multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) system. Data acquisition is performed by using a flying focal spot both in the scan plane and in the z-axis direction in combination with tantalum grids that are inserted in front of the multi-row detector to reduce the aperture of the detector elements both in-plane and in the z-axis direction. The dose utilization of the system for standard applications is not affected, since the grids are moved into place only when needed and are removed for standard scanning. By means of this technique, image slices with a nominal section width of 0.4 mm (measured full width at half maximum=0.45 mm) can be reconstructed in spiral mode on a CT system with a detector configuration of 32x0.6 mm. The measured 2% value of the in-plane modulation transfer function (MTF) is 20.4 lp/cm, the measured 2% value of the longitudinal (z axis) MTF is 21.5 lp/cm. In a resolution phantom with metal line pair test patterns, spatial resolution of 20 lp/cm can be demonstrated both in the scan plane and along the z axis. This corresponds to an object size of 0.25 mm that can be resolved. The new mode is intended for ultrahigh resolution bone imaging, in particular for wrists, joints, and inner ear studies, where a higher level of image noise due to the reduced aperture is an acceptable trade-off for the clinical benefit brought about by the improved spatial resolution.

Flohr, T. G.; Stierstorfer, K.; Suess, C.; Schmidt, B.; Primak, A. N.; McCollough, C. H. [Siemens Medical Solutions, Computed Tomography CTE PA Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany) and Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany); Siemens Medical Solutions, Computed Tomography CTE PA Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

409

Adaptive planning using megavoltage fan-beam CT for radiation therapy with testicular shielding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study highlights the use of adaptive planning to accommodate testicular shielding in helical tomotherapy for malignancies of the proximal thigh. Two cases of young men with large soft tissue sarcomas of the proximal thigh are presented. After multidisciplinary evaluation, preoperative radiation therapy was recommended. Both patients were referred for sperm banking and lead shields were used to minimize testicular dose during radiation therapy. To minimize imaging artifacts, kilovoltage CT (kVCT) treatment planning was conducted without shielding. Generous hypothetical contours were generated on each 'planning scan' to estimate the location of the lead shield and generate a directionally blocked helical tomotherapy plan. To ensure the accuracy of each plan, megavoltage fan-beam CT (MVCT) scans were obtained at the first treatment and adaptive planning was performed to account for lead shield placement. Two important regions of interest in these cases were femurs and femoral heads. During adaptive planning for the first patient, it was observed that the virtual lead shield contour on kVCT planning images was significantly larger than the actual lead shield used for treatment. However, for the second patient, it was noted that the size of the virtual lead shield contoured on the kVCT image was significantly smaller than the actual shield size. Thus, new adaptive plans based on MVCT images were generated and used for treatment. The planning target volume was underdosed up to 2% and had higher maximum doses without adaptive planning. In conclusion, the treatment of the upper thigh, particularly in young men, presents several clinical challenges, including preservation of gonadal function. In such circumstances, adaptive planning using MVCT can ensure accurate dose delivery even in the presence of high-density testicular shields.

Yadav, Poonam [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); School of Advance Sciences, Vellore Institue of Technology University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu (India); Kozak, Kevin [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Tolakanahalli, Ranjini [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Ramasubramanian, V. [School of Advance Sciences, Vellore Institue of Technology University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu (India); Paliwal, Bhudatt R. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin, Riverview Cancer Centre, Wisconsin Rapids, WI (United States); Welsh, James S. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Rong, Yi, E-mail: rong@humonc.wisc.edu [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin, Riverview Cancer Centre, Wisconsin Rapids, WI (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Reactive Transport Models with Reactive Transport Models with Geomechanics to Mitigate Risks of CO2 Utilization and Storage Background The overall goal of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Storage Program is to develop and advance technologies that will significantly improve the effectiveness of geologic carbon storage, reduce the cost of implementation, and prepare for widespread commercial deployment between 2020 and 2030. Research conducted to develop these technologies will ensure safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions without adversely affecting energy use or hindering economic growth. Geologic carbon storage involves the injection of CO2 into underground formations that have the ability to securely contain the CO2 permanently. Technologies being

411

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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a Prototype Commercial a Prototype Commercial Gasifier Sensor Background Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology has the potential to improve the efficiency and environmental performance of fossil fuel based electric power production. During the IGCC process, coal and/or biomass is gasified at high temperature and pressure to form synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and small amounts of contaminants such as hydrogen sulfide. The syngas can be used to produce power, chemicals, and/or fuels. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Gasification Technologies Program is focused on enhancing the performance of gasification systems, thus enabling U.S. industry to improve the competitiveness of

412

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Phase III Xlerator Program: Rapid Phase III Xlerator Program: Rapid Commercialization of Advanced Turbine Blades for IGCC Power Plants-Mikro Systems Background Mikro Systems, Inc. is developing their proprietary TOMO SM manufacturing technology to produce turbine blades with significantly improved internal cooling geometries that are beyond current manufacturing state-of-the-art, thus enabling higher operating temperatures. Funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) under the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase III Xlerator Program will be directed towards accelerating commercial adoption of TOMO SM technology by leading turbine manufacturers through the demonstration of superior manufacturability, cost, and performance. Ultimately, this technology will lead to improved efficiency

413

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Non-Thermal Plasma for Fossil Energy Non-Thermal Plasma for Fossil Energy Related Applications Background The U.S. Department of Energy is investigating various non-thermal plasma tech- nologies for their catalytic properties related to fossil energy conversion and carbon dioxide decomposition. Non-thermal plasma is an ionized gas comprised of a mixture of charged particles (electrons, ions), active chemical radicals (O 3 , O, OH), and highly excited species that are known to accelerate reforming reactions in

414

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Training Toward Advanced 3-D Seismic Training Toward Advanced 3-D Seismic Methods for CO 2 Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting Background The overall goal of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Storage Program is to develop and advance technologies that will significantly improve the effective- ness of geologic carbon storage, reduce the cost of implementation, and prepare for widespread commercial deployment between 2020 and 2030. Research conducted to develop these technologies will ensure safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions without adversely af fecting energy use or hindering economic grow th. Geologic carbon storage involves the injection of CO 2 into underground formations that have the ability to securely contain the CO

415

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Cathode Surface Chemistry and Cathode Surface Chemistry and Optimization Studies-Carnegie Mellon University Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is to advance energy options to fuel our economy, strengthen our security, and improve our environment. With the Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) program and systems coordination from the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA), DOE/NETL is leading the research, development, and demonstration of SOFCs for both domestic coal and natural gas fueled power systems that enable low cost, high efficiency, near-zero emissions and water usage, and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture. Carnegie Mellon University's (CMU) project was selected to acquire the fundamental knowledge and understanding that will facilitate research and development to enhance

416

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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a Coal-Biomass to Liquids a Coal-Biomass to Liquids Plant in Southern West Virginia Background Concerns regarding global supplies of oil, energy security, and climate change have generated renewed interest in alternative energy sources. The production of liquid fuels from coal provides an option for reducing petroleum use in the U.S. transportation sector and enhancing national and economic security by decreasing the nation's reliance on foreign oil. Two basic methods can be employed to produce liquid fuels

417

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Creep-Fatigue-Environment Creep-Fatigue-Environment Interactions in Steam Turbine Rotor Materials for Advanced Ultrasupercritical Coal Power Plants Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) promotes the advancement of computational capabilities to develop materials for advanced fossil energy power systems. The DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Advanced Research (AR) Program is working to enable the next generation of Fossil Energy (FE) power systems. One goal of the AR Materials Program is to conduct research leading to a scientific understanding of high-performance materials capable of service in the hostile environments associated with advanced ultrasupercritical (A-USC) coal-fired power plants. A-USC plants will increase coal-fired power plant efficiency by allowing operation

418

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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NETL's Fluid Chemistry Analysis NETL's Fluid Chemistry Analysis Capacity Background Establishing the geochemistry of surface and ground waters requires an arsenal of techniques devoted to determining the constituents these waters contain and the environment in which they exist. Many standard techniques have been developed over the years, and new ones continue to be explored as more complex matrices and harsher environments are encountered. Deep geologic storage of carbon dioxide and the development of unconventional oil and gas resourses are two areas of current concern where the study of geochemical processes is challenging due to the complex nature of the natural samples, and where routine analytical techniques are being pushed to their limits. The facilities at NETL include both conventional and cutting-edge instrumentation

419

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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29,759 29,759 PROJECT NUMBER FWP-2012.03.03 Task 3 Conversion and Fouling Background Coal and biomass gasification is an approach to cleaner power generation and other uses of these resources. Currently, the service life of gasifiers does not meet the performance needs of users. Gasifiers fail to achieve on-line availability of 85-95 percent in utility applications and 95 percent in applications such as chemical production. The inability to meet these goals has created a potential roadblock to widespread acceptance and commercialization of advanced gasification technologies. Gasifier output is a hot gas mixture consisting primarily of hydrogen and carbon monoxide (CO), known as synthesis gas (syngas). The syngas cooler is one of the key components identified as negatively impacting gasifier availability. Ash originating from impurities

420

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Compact Eye-safe Scanning Differential Compact Eye-safe Scanning Differential Absorption LIDAR (DIAL) for Spatial Mapping of Carbon Dioxide for MVA at Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites Background The overall goal of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Storage Program is to develop and advance technologies that will significantly improve the effectiveness of geologic carbon storage, reduce the cost of implementation, and prepare for widespread commercial deployment between 2020 and 2030. Research conducted to develop these technologies will ensure safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions without adversely affecting energy use or hindering economic growth. Geologic carbon storage involves the injection of CO2 into underground formations that

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421

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Hydrogen Energy California Project Hydrogen Energy California Project Background A need exists to further develop carbon management technologies that capture and store or beneficially reuse carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) that would otherwise be emitted into the atmosphere from coal-based electric power generating facilities. Carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies offer great potential for reducing CO 2 emissions and mitigating global climate change, while minimizing the economic impacts of the solution. Under the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) Round 3 program, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is providing financial assistance, including funding under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009, to industry to demonstrate the commercial viability of technologies that will capture CO

422

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Simulation of CO Simulation of CO 2 Leakage and Caprock Remediation Background Through its core research and development program administered by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) emphasizes monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA), as well as computer simulation and risk assessment, of possible carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) leakage at CO 2 geologic storage sites. MVA efforts focus on the development and deployment of technologies that can provide an accurate accounting of stored CO 2 , with a high level of confidence that the CO 2 will remain stored underground permanently. Effective application of these MVA technologies will ensure the safety of geologic storage projects with respect to both human health and the environment, and can provide the basis for establishing carbon credit trading markets

423

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Pressure Membrane Contactors for Pressure Membrane Contactors for CO 2 Capture Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Carbon Capture Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current fleet of coal-fired power plants to comply with existing and emerging environmental regulations. The Carbon Capture R&D Program portfolio of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions control technologies and CO 2 compression is focused on advancing technological options for new and existing coal- fired power plants in the event of carbon constraints. Post-combustion separation and capture of CO

424

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Shizhong Yang Shizhong Yang Principal Investigator Department of computer science/LoNI southern University and a&M college Baton rouge, Louisiana 70813 225-771-2060 shizhong_yang@subr.edu PROJECT DURATION Start Date End Date 06/01/2012 05/31/2015 COST Total Project Value $200,000 DOE/Non-DOE Share $200,000 / $0 Novel Nano-Size Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steels Development through Computational and Experimental Study Background Ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened (oDs) steel alloys show promise for use at higher temperatures than conventional alloys due to their high-temperature oxidation resistance and dislocation creep properties. the development of oDs alloys with nanoscale powders of transition metal oxides (yttrium and chromium) dispersed in

425

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI 3) Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI 3) NRG Energy: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project Background Additional development and demonstration is needed to improve the cost and efficiency of carbon management technologies that capture and store carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) that would otherwise be emitted from coal-based electric power generating facilities. Carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies offer great potential for reducing CO 2 emissions and mitigating global climate change, while minimizing the economic impacts of the solution. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is providing financial assistance through the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) Round 3, which includes funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), to demonstrate the commercial viability

426

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiocarbon as a Reactive Tracer for Radiocarbon as a Reactive Tracer for Tracking Permanent CO2 Storage in Basaltic Rocks Background The overall goal of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Storage Program is to develop and advance technologies that will significantly improve the effectiveness of geologic carbon storage, reduce the cost of implementation, and prepare for widespread commercial deployment between 2020 and 2030. Research conducted to develop these technologies will ensure safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions without adversely affecting energy use or hindering economic growth. Geologic carbon storage involves the injection of CO2 into underground formations that have the ability to securely contain the CO2 permanently. Technologies being

427

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Degradation of TBC Systems in Degradation of TBC Systems in Environments Relevant to Advanced Gas Turbines for IGCC Systems- University of Pittsburgh Background The conditions inside integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems, such as high steam levels from hydrogen firing, high carbon dioxide steam mixtures in oxy- fired systems, and different types of contaminants, introduce complexities associated with thermal barrier coating (TBC) durability that are currently unresolved. In this work the University of Pittsburgh will team with Praxair Surface Technologies (PST) to deter- mine the degradation mechanisms of current state-of-the-art TBCs in environments consisting of deposits and gas mixtures that are representative of gas turbines using coal-derived synthesis gas (syngas).

428

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Low-Cost Alloys for High-Temperature Low-Cost Alloys for High-Temperature SOFC Systems Components - QuesTek Innovations Background One of the key opportunities for cost reduction in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system is the set of balance of plant (BOP) components supporting the fuel cell itself, including the heat exchanger and air/fuel piping. These represent about half of the overall cost of the system. A major enabling technological breakthrough is to replace incumbent nickel-based superalloys in high-temperature BOP components with low-cost ferritic stainless steel. However, the ferritic alloys are unsuitable for SOFC application without additional coatings due to the inherent volatile nature of the alloy's chromium oxide (Cr2O3) element, which tends to poison the fuel cell's cathode

429

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Southwestern United States Carbon Southwestern United States Carbon Sequestration Training Center Background Carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) technologies offer great potential for mitigating carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions emitted into the atmosphere without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Deploying these technologies in commercial-scale applications will require a drastically expanded workforce trained in CCUS related disciplines, including geologists, engineers, scientists, and technicians. Training to enhance the existing CCUS workforce and to develop new professionals can be accomplished through focused educational initiatives in the CCUS technology area. Key educational topics include simulation and risk assessment; monitoring, verification,

430

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Beneficial Use of CO2 in Precast Beneficial Use of CO2 in Precast Concrete Products Background The Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Storage Program encompasses five Technology Areas: (1) Geologic Storage and Simulation and Risk Assessment (GSRA), (2) Monitoring, Verification, Accounting and Assessment (MVAA), (3) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Use and Re-Use, (4) Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP), and (5) Focus Areas for Sequestration Science. The first three Technology Areas comprise the Core Research and Development (R&D), which includes studies ranging from applied laboratory to pilot-scale research focused on developing new technologies and systems for greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation through carbon storage. This project is part of the Core R&D CO2 Use and Re-use Technology Area and focuses on developing pathways

431

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Thermal Barrier Coatings for Thermal Barrier Coatings for Operation in High Hydrogen Content Fueled Gas Turbines-Stony Brook University Background Traditional thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) based on yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) will likely not be suitable in gas turbines used in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants. This is due to higher operating temperatures that will not only affect phase stability and sintering but will accelerate corrosive degradation phenomena. Coatings provide a framework to combat degradation issues and provide performance improvements needed for higher temperature environments. The Center for Thermal Spray Research (CTSR) at Stony Brook University, in partnership with its industrial Consortium for Thermal Spray Technology, is investigating science and

432

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Cooling for IGCC Turbine Cooling for IGCC Turbine Blades-Mikro Systems Background Turbine blade and vane survivability at higher operating temperatures is the key to improving turbine engine performance for integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants. Innovative cooling approaches are a critical enabling technology to meet this need. Mikro Systems, Inc. is applying their patented Tomo-Lithographic Molding (TOMO) manufacturing technology to produce turbine blades with significantly improved internal cooling geometries that go beyond the current manufacturing state-of-the-art to enable higher operating temperatures. This project addresses two important aspects. First is the need to increase the quality and reliability of the core manufacturing process capability to

433

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Combustion Dynamics in Multi-Nozzle Combustion Dynamics in Multi-Nozzle Combustors Operating on High- Hydrogen Fuels-Pennsylvania State University Background Combustion dynamics is a major technical challenge to the development of efficient, low emission gas turbines. Current information is limited to single-nozzle combustors operating on natural gas and neglects combustors with configurations expected to meet operability requirements using a range of gaseous fuels such as coal derived synthesis gas (syngas). In this project, Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) in collaboration with Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) will use multiple-nozzle research facilities to recreate flow conditions in an actual gas turbine to study complicated interactions between flames that can aggravate the combustion dynamics in syngas-

434

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Summit Texas Clean Energy, LLC: Texas Summit Texas Clean Energy, LLC: Texas Clean Energy Project: Pre-Combustion CO 2 Capture and Sequestration Background A need exists to further develop carbon management technologies that capture and store, or beneficially reuse, carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) that would otherwise be emitted into the atmosphere from coal-based electric power generating facilities. Carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies offer the potential to significantly reduce CO 2 emissions and mitigate the anthropogenic contribution to global climate change, while substantially reducing or minimizing the economic impacts of the solution. Under Round 3 of the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is providing up to $450 million in co-funded financial assistance to industry,

435

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Efficiency Solar-Based Catalytic Efficiency Solar-Based Catalytic Structure for CO2 Reforming Background The Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Storage Program encompasses five Technology Areas: (1) Geologic Storage and Simulation and Risk Assessment (GSRA), (2) Monitoring, Verification, Accounting and Assessment (MVAA), (3) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Use and Re-Use, (4) Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP), and (5) Focus Areas for Sequestration Science. The first three Technology Areas comprise the Core Research and Development (R&D), which includes studies ranging from applied laboratory to pilot-scale research focused on developing new technologies and systems for greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation through carbon storage. This project is part of the Core R&D CO2 Use and Re-use Technology Area and focuses on developing pathways

436

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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DOE-WRI Cooperative Research and DOE-WRI Cooperative Research and Development Program for Fossil Energy- Related Resources Background Our nation's demand for cleaner and more efficient fossil energy production will increase during the coming decades, necessitating the development of new energy technologies to achieve energy independence in an environmentally responsible manner. The University of Wyoming (UW) Research Corporation's Western Research Institute (WRI) has been supporting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE) and its mission of developing fossil energy and related environmental technologies for over two decades. Federal funding for these research efforts has usually been provided through congressionally mandated cooperative agreements, with cost share

437

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Unconventional Resources Unconventional Resources Background Natural gas and crude oil provide two-thirds of our Nation's primary energy supply and will continue to do so for at least the next several decades, as the Nation transitions to a more sustainable energy future. The natural gas resource estimated to exist within the United States has expanded significantly, but because this resource is increasingly harder to locate and produce, new technologies are required to extract it. Under the Energy Policy Act of 2005, the National Energy Technology Laboratory is charged with developing a complementary research program supportive of improving safety and minimizing the environmental impacts of activities related to unconventional natural gas and other petroleum resource exploration and production technology

438

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Staged, High-Pressure Oxy-Combustion Staged, High-Pressure Oxy-Combustion Technology: Development and Scale-up Background The Advanced Combustion Systems (ACS) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy/ National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) is aiming to develop advanced oxy- combustion systems that have the potential to improve the efficiency and environmental impact of coal-based power generation systems. Currently available CO2 capture and storage significantly reduces efficiency of the power cycle. The aim of the ACS program is to develop advanced oxy-combustion systems capable of achieving power plant efficiencies approaching those of air-fired systems without CO2 capture. Additionally, the program looks to accomplish this while maintaining near zero emissions of other flue gas pollutants.

439

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Operating on Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Operating on Alternative and Renewable Fuels- Pennsylvania State University Background In this congressionally directed project, the Earth and Mineral Science (EMS) Energy Institute at Pennsylvania State University (PSU) focuses on the development of fuel processors, reforming catalysts, and chemical sorbents to support the production of electricity from anaerobic digester gas (ADG) and ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) via solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). PSU will use the fuel processors, reforming catalysts, and chemical sorbents developed under this work to transform and clean ADG and ULSD into a syngas stream suitable as a feedstock for SOFCs. This project is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), whose mission is to advance energy options to fuel

440

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathode Enhancement Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathode Enhancement Through a Vacuum-assisted Infiltration- Materials and Systems Research, Inc. Background Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology promises to provide an efficient method to generate electricity from coal-derived synthesis gas (syngas), biofuels, and natural gas. The typical SOFC composite cathode (current source) possesses excellent performance characteristics but is subject to chemical stability issues at elevated temperatures both during manufacturing and power generation. Costs attributed to the cathode and its long-term stability issues are a current limitation of SOFC technologies. These must be addressed before commercial SOFC power generation can be realized. Materials and Systems Research, Inc. (MSRI) will develop a vacuum-assisted infiltration

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ut ct wv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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441

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Study of the Durability of Doped Study of the Durability of Doped Lanthanum Manganite and Cobaltite Based Cathode Materials under "Real World" Air Exposure Atmospheres- University of Connecticut Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is to advance energy options to fuel our economy, strengthen our security, and improve our environment. With the Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) program and systems coordination from the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA), DOE/NETL is leading the research, development, and demonstration of SOFCs for both domestic coal and natural gas fueled central generation power systems that enable low cost, high efficiency, near-zero emissions and water usage, and carbon dioxide (CO

442

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Comprehensive Comprehensive Monitoring Techniques to Verify the Integrity of Geological Storage Reservoirs Containing Carbon Dioxide Background Research aimed at monitoring the long-term storage stability and integrity of carbon dioxide (CO2) stored in geologic formations is one of the most pressing areas of need if geological storage is to become a significant factor in meeting the United States' stated objectives to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The most promising geologic formations under consideration for CO2 storage are active and depleted oil and gas formations, brine formations, and deep, unmineable coal seams. Unfortunately, the long-term CO2 storage capabilities of these formations are not yet well understood. Primary Project Goal The goal of this effort is to develop

443

Albany, OR * Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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SO SO 2 -Resistent Immobilized Amine Sorbents for CO 2 Capture Background Fundamental and applied research on carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies is necessary to allow the current fleet of coal-fired power plants to comply with existing and emerging environmental regulations. These technologies offer great potential for mitigating carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions into the atmosphere without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Deploying these technologies in commercial-scale applications requires a significantly expanded workforce trained in various CCS technical and non-technical disciplines that are currently under-represented in the United States. Education and training activities are needed to develop a future generation of geologists, scientists, and engineers who

444

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Technologies for Monitoring Technologies for Monitoring CO 2 Saturation and Pore Pressure in Geologic Formations: Linking the Chemical and Physical Effects to Elastic and Transport Properties Background Through its core research and development program administered by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) emphasizes monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA), as well as computer simulation and risk assessment, of possible carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) leakage at CO 2 geologic storage sites. MVA efforts focus on the development and deployment of technologies that can provide an accurate accounting of stored CO 2 , with a high level of confidence that the CO 2 will remain stored underground permanently. Effective application of these MVA technologies will ensure the safety of geologic

445

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Monitoring and Numerical Modeling of Monitoring and Numerical Modeling of Shallow CO 2 Injection, Greene County, Missouri Background Increased attention is being placed on research into technologies that capture and store carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). Carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies offer great potential for reducing CO 2 emissions and, in turn, mitigating global climate change without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Deploying these technologies in commercial-scale applications requires a significantly expanded workforce trained in various CCS specialties that are currently under- represented in the United States. Education and training activities are needed to develop a future generation of geologists, scientists, and engineers who possess the

446

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Tagging Carbon Dioxide to Enable Tagging Carbon Dioxide to Enable Quantitative Inventories of Geological Carbon Storage Background Through its core research and development program administered by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) emphasizes monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA), as well as computer simulation and risk assessment, of possible carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) leakage at CO 2 geologic storage sites. MVA efforts focus on the development and deployment of technologies that can provide an accurate accounting of stored CO 2 , with a high level of confidence that the CO 2 will remain stored underground permanently. Effective application of these MVA technologies will ensure the safety of geologic storage projects with respect to both

447

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Nanoporous, Metal Carbide, Surface Nanoporous, Metal Carbide, Surface Diffusion Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen Separations Background Both coal and biomass are readily available in the U.S. and can be thermally processed to produce hydrogen and/or power. The produced hydrogen can be sent directly to a fuel cell or hydrogen turbines for efficient and environmentally clean power generation. More efficient hydrogen production processes need to be developed before coal and biomass can become economically viable sources of hydrogen. To meet this need, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is partnering with the Colorado School of Mines and Pall Corporation to develop nanoporous metal carbide surface diffusion membranes for use in high temperature

448

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Investigation on Flame Characteristics Investigation on Flame Characteristics and Burner Operability Issues of Oxy-Fuel Combustion Background Fundamental and applied research on carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies is necessary to allow the current fleet of coal-fired power plants to comply with existing and emerging environmental regulations. These technologies offer great potential for mitigating carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions into the atmosphere without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Deploying these technologies in commercial-scale applications requires a significantly expanded workforce trained in various CCS technical and non-technical disciplines that are currently underrepresented in the United States. Education and training activities

449

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Object Optimization Approaches Object Optimization Approaches for the Design of Carbon Geological Sequestration Systems Background Increased attention is being placed on research into technologies that capture and store carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). Carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies offer great potential for reducing CO 2 emissions and, in turn, mitigating global climate change without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Deploying these technologies in commercial-scale applications requires a significantly expanded workforce trained in various CCS specialties that are currently under- represented in the United States. Education and training activities are needed to develop a future generation of geologists, scientists, and engineers who possess

450

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Sensors and Control Sensors and Control CONTACTS Ben Chorpening Sensors & Controls Technical Team Coordinator 304-285-4673 benjamin.chorpening@netl.doe.gov Steven Woodruff Principal Investigator 304-285-4175 steven.woodruff@netl.doe.gov Michael Buric Co-Principal Investigator 304-285-2052 michael.buric@netl.doe.gov Raman Gas Composition Sensor System for Natural Gas and Syngas Applications Goal The goal of this project is to develop and test a Raman laser spectroscopy system for responsive gas composition monitoring, and to transfer the technology to industry for commercial implementation. The instrument provides state-of-the-art improvement of reduced size and increased sensitivity and sample rate to facilitate the process control

451

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Joining of Advanced Joining of Advanced High-Temperature Materials Background To remain economically competitive, the coal-fired power generation industry needs to increase system efficiency, improve component and system reliability, and meet ever tightening environmental standards. In particular, cost-effective improvements in thermal efficiency are particularly attractive because they offer two potential benefits: (1) lower variable operating cost via increased fuel utilization (fuel costs represent over 70 percent of the variable operating cost of a fossil fuel-fired power plant) and (2) an economical means of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) and other emissions. To achieve meaningful gains, steam pressure and temperature must be increased to

452

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Basin-Scale Leakage Risks from Geologic Basin-Scale Leakage Risks from Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Impact on Carbon Capture and Storage Energy Market Competitiveness Background Through its core research and development program administered by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) emphasizes monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA), as well as computer simulation and risk assessment, of possible carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) leakage at CO 2 geologic storage sites. MVA efforts focus on the development and deployment of technologies that can provide an accurate accounting of stored CO 2 , with a high level of confidence that the CO 2 will remain stored underground permanently. Effective application of these MVA technologies will ensure the safety of geologic storage projects with respect to both human health and the

453

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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on Local and Regional Air on Local and Regional Air Quality Impacts of Oil and Natural Gas Development Goal The NETL research effort in improving the assessment of impacts to air quality from oil and gas exploration and production activities has the following goals: (1) using NETL's mobile air monitoring laboratory, conduct targeted on-site measurements of emissions from oil and gas production activities that may impact the environment and (2) use collected data in atmospheric chemistry and transport models to further understanding of local and regional air quality impacts. Background The development of shale gas and shale oil resources requires horizontal drilling and multi-stage hydraulic fracturing, two processes that have been known for many years but have only recently become common practice. In addition, fugitive atmospheric

454

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins Background Carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies offer the potential for reducing CO 2 emissions without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Deploying these technologies in commercial-scale applications requires adequate geologic formations capable of (1) storing large volumes of CO 2 , (2) receiving injected CO 2 at efficient and economic rates, and (3) retaining CO 2 safely over extended periods. Research efforts are currently focused on conventional and unconventional storage formations within depositional environments such as: deltaic, fluvial, alluvial, strand- plain, turbidite, eolian, lacustrine, clastic shelf, carbonate shallow shelf, and reef.

455

Albany, OR * Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Air Products and Chemicals, Inc.: Air Products and Chemicals, Inc.: Demonstration of CO2 Capture and Sequestration of Steam Methane Reforming Process Gas Used for Large-Scale Hydrogen Production Background Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from industrial processes, among other sources, are linked to global climate change. Advancing development of technologies that capture and store or beneficially reuse CO2 that would otherwise reside in the atmosphere for extended periods is of great importance. Advanced carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technologies offer significant potential for reducing CO2 emissions and mitigating global climate change, while minimizing the economic impacts of the solution. Under the Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage (ICCS) program, the U.S. Department

456

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Filtration to Improve Single Filtration to Improve Single Crystal Casting Yield-Mikro Systems Background Single crystal (SX) nickel superalloys are a primary material choice for gas turbine hot gas path component castings because of their high resistance to deformation at elevated temperatures. However, the casting yields of these components need to be improved in order to reduce costs and encourage more widespread use within the gas turbine industry. Low yields have been associated with a number of process-related defects common to the conventional casting of SX components. One innovative improvement, advanced casting filter designs, has been identified as a potential path toward increasing the yield rates of SX castings for high-temperature gas turbine applications. Mikro Systems, Inc. (Mikro) proposes to increase SX casting yields by developing

457

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Siemens Energy Siemens Energy Background Siemens Energy, along with numerous partners, has an ongoing U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program to develop hydrogen turbines for coal-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power generation that will improve efficiency, reduce emissions, lower costs, and allow for carbon capture and storage (CCS). Siemens Energy is expanding this program for industrial applications such as cement, chemical, steel, and aluminum plants, refineries, manufacturing facilities, etc., under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). ARRA funding will be utilized to facilitate a set of gas turbine technology advancements that will improve the efficiency, emissions, and cost performance of turbines for industrial CCS. ARRA industrial technology acceleration,

458

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Engineering Design of Advanced Engineering Design of Advanced Hydrogen-Carbon Dioxide Palladium and Palladium/Alloy Composite Membrane Separations and Process Intensification Background Technologies for pre-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and economical hydrogen (H2) production will contribute to the development of a stable and sustainable U.S. energy sector. The integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) system can produce synthesis gas (syngas) that can be used to produce electricity, hydrogen, fuels, and/or chemicals from coal and coal/biomass-mixtures in an environmentally responsible manner. The water-gas shift (WGS) reaction is a key part of this process for production of H2. The application of H2 separation technology can facilitate the production of high-purity H2 from gasification-based systems, as well as allow for process

459

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Enhancement of SOFC Cathode Electro- Enhancement of SOFC Cathode Electro- chemical Performance Using Multi-Phase Interfaces- University of Wisconsin Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is to advance energy options to fuel our economy, strengthen our security, and improve our environment. With the Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) program and systems coordination from the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA), NETL is leading the research, development, and demonstration of SOFCs for both domestic coal and natural gas fueled central generation power systems that enable low cost, high efficiency, near-zero emissions and water usage, and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture. The electrochemical performance of SOFCs can be substantially influenced by

460

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Computational Materials Design of Computational Materials Design of Castable SX Ni-based Superalloys for IGT Blade Components-QuesTek Innovations Background Higher inlet gas temperatures in industrial gas turbines (IGTs) enable improved thermal efficiencies, but creep-the tendency of materials to deform gradually under stress-becomes more pronounced with increasing temperature. In order to raise inlet temperatures of IGTs, turbine blade materials are required to have superior creep rupture resistance. Nickel (Ni)-based single crystal (SX) blades have higher creep strength in comparison with directionally solidified blades and are widely used in aerospace engines. However, their use in IGTs, which require larger-size castings (two to three times the size needed in aerospace applications), is limited

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ut ct wv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combined Pressure, Temperature Combined Pressure, Temperature Contrast, and Surface-Enhanced Separation of Carbon Dioxide (CO 2 ) for Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Carbon Capture Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current fleet of coal-fired power plants to comply with existing and emerging environmental regulations. The Carbon Capture R&D Program portfolio of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions control tech- nologies and CO 2 compression is focused on advancing technological options for new and existing coal-fired

462

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Thermal Conductivity, High Thermal Conductivity, High Durability Thermal Barrier Coatings for IGCC Environments-University of Connecticut Background Improved turbine materials are needed to withstand higher component surface temperatures and water vapor content for successful development and deployment of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants. Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) in particular are required to have higher surface temperature capability, lower thermal conductivity, and resistance to attack at high temperature by contaminants such as calcium-magnesium-alumina-silicate (CMAS) and water vapor. There is also a concurrent need to address cost and availability issues associated with rare earth elements used in all low thermal conductivity TBCs.

463

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Reducing Uncertainties in Model Reducing Uncertainties in Model Predictions via History Matching of CO2 Migration and Reactive Transport Modeling of CO2 Fate at the Sleipner Project, Norwegian North Sea Background The overall goal of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Storage Program is todevelop and advance technologies that will significantly improve the effectiveness of geologic carbon storage, reduce the cost of implementation, and prepare for widespread commercial deployment between 2020 and 2030. Research conducted to develop these technologies will ensure safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions without adversely affecting energy use or hindering economic growth. Geologic carbon storage involves the injection of CO2 into underground formations

464

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Molecular Separations Using Micro- Molecular Separations Using Micro- Defect Free Ultra-Thin Films Background Current methods for separating carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from methane (CH 4 ) in fuel gas streams are energy and cost-intensive. Molecular sieve membrane development for carbon capture has been pursued for several decades because of the potential these membranes have for high selectivity while using less energy than cryogenic separation methods and greater flux (permselectivity) than is possible from polymeric membranes. However, the adoption of molecular sieve membrane technology has been hindered by high production costs and the micro-defect fissures that always accompany this type of membrane when fabricated using conventional techniques. The Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), has

465

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Characterization of the South Characterization of the South Georgia Rift Basin for Source Proximal CO 2 Storage Background Carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technologies offer the potential for reducing CO 2 emissions without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Deploying these technologies in commercial-scale applications requires adequate geologic formations capable of (1) storing large volumes of CO 2 , (2) receiving injected CO 2 at efficient and economic rates, and (3) retaining CO 2 safely over extended periods. Research efforts are currently focused on conventional and unconventional storage formations within depositional environments such as: deltaic, fluvial, alluvial, strandplain, turbidite, eolian, lacustrine, clastic shelf, carbonate shallow shelf, and reef. Conventional

466

File:EIA-Appalach5-eastWV-LIQ.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eastern West Virginia and Western Maryland By 2001 Liquids Reserve Class Eastern West Virginia and Western Maryland By 2001 Liquids Reserve Class Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(6,600 × 5,100 pixels, file size: 18.6 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Appalachian Basin, Eastern West Virginia and Western Maryland By 2001 Liquids Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States West Virginia, Maryland File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 17:41, 20 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 17:41, 20 December 2010 6,600 × 5,100 (18.6 MB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated bot upload

467

File:EIA-Appalach6-WV-VA-LIQ.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LIQ.pdf LIQ.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Appalachian Basin, Southern West Virginia and Southwestern Virginia By 2001 Liquids Reserve Class Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(6,600 × 5,100 pixels, file size: 18.77 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Appalachian Basin, Southern West Virginia and Southwestern Virginia By 2001 Liquids Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States West Virginia, Virginia File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time.

468

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Laboratory Scale Liquids Production Laboratory Scale Liquids Production and Assessment: Coal and Biomass to Drop-In Fuels Background A major problem with the production of liquid fuels from coal is that the production process and subsequent combustion of the fuel generate excessive greenhouse gases over the entire production and usage lifecycle. Adding lignocellulosic biomass (as a raw feed material) along with coal has the potential to reduce lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions to below those of petroleum products. Altex Technologies Corporation (Altex) has developed an innovative thermo-chemical process capable of converting coal and biomass to transportation fuel ready for blending. The Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has partnered with Altex to

469

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Capture and Storage Training Carbon Capture and Storage Training Background Carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) technologies offer great potential for mitigating carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions emitted into the atmosphere without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Deploying these technologies in commercial-scale applications will require a drastically expanded workforce trained in CCUS related disciplines, including geologists, engineers, scientists, and technicians. Training to enhance the existing CCUS workforce and to develop new professionals can be accomplished through focused educational initiatives in the CCUS technology area. Key educational topics include simulation and risk assessment; monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA); geology-related

470

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Andrea Dunn Andrea Dunn Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-7594 andrea.dunn@netl.doe.gov Marte Gutierrez Principal Investigator Colorado School of Mines 1600 Illinois Street Golden, CO 80401 303-273-3468 Fax: 303-273-3602 mgutierr@mines.edu PROJECT DURATION Start Date 12/01/2009 End Date 5/31/2013 COST Total Project Value $297,505 DOE/Non-DOE Share $297,505 / $0 Government funding for this project is provided in whole or in part through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Training and Research on Probabilistic Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Geological Sequestration in Fractured Porous Rocks Background Fundamental and applied research on carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS)

471

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficiency Efficiency Molten Bed Oxy- Coal Combustion with Low Flue Gas Recirculation Background The Advanced Combustion Systems (ACS) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy/ National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) is aiming to develop advanced oxy- combustion systems that have the potential to improve the efficiency and environmental impact of coal-based power generation systems. Currently available carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture and storage technologies significantly reduce the efficiency of the power cycle. The ACS Program is focused on developing advanced oxy-combustion systems capable of achieving power plant efficiencies approaching those of air-fired systems without CO 2 capture. Additionally, the program looks to accomplish this while maintaining near

472

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Characteristics of Gasification Characteristics of Coal/Biomass Mixed Fuels Background Domestically abundant coal is a primary energy source and when mixed with optimum levels of biomass during the production of liquid fuels may have lower carbon footprints compared to petroleum fuel baselines. Coal and biomass mixtures are converted via gasification into synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of predominantly carbon monoxide and hydrogen, which can be subsequently converted to liquid fuels by Fischer-Tropsch chemistry. The Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting research focused on using coal and biomass to produce clean and affordable power, fuels and chemicals. The DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is partnering with Leland Stanford Junior

473

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbonaceous Chemistry for Carbonaceous Chemistry for Computational Modeling (C3M) Description C3M is chemistry management software focused on computational modeling of reacting systems. The primary function of C3M is to provide direct links between r e l i a b l e s o u r c e s o f k i n e t i c information (kinetic modeling soft- ware, databases, and literature) and commonly used CFD software su ch as M FIX , FLUEN T, an d BARRACUDA with minimal effort from the user. C3M also acts as a virtual kinetic laboratory to allow a CFD practitioner or researcher to evaluate complex, large sets of kinetic expressions for reliability and suitability and can interact with spreadsheet and process models. Once the chemical model is built within C3M, the software also allows the user to directly export

474

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phase III Xlerator Program: Electro-deposited Phase III Xlerator Program: Electro-deposited Mn-Co Alloy Coating for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Interconnects-Faraday Technology Background Based on preliminary cost analysis estimates, Faraday Technology has shown that its FARADAYIC TM electrodeposition process for coating interconnects is cost competitive. Funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) under the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase III Xlerator Program will be directed toward developing, optimizing, and validating the FARADAYIC process as an effective and economical manufacturing method for coating interconnect materials with a manganese-cobalt (Mn-Co) alloy for use in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks. This project is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy

475

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology to Mitigate Syngas Technology to Mitigate Syngas Cooler Fouling Background Coal gasification, in conjunction with integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power production, is under development to increase efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions associated with coal-based power production. However, coal gasification plants have not achieved their full potential for superior performance and economics due to challenges with reliability and availability. In particular, performance of the syngas cooler located downstream of the gasifier has been an issue. The syngas cooler is a fire tube heat exchanger located between the gasifier and the gas turbine. The purpose of the syngas cooler is to cool the raw syngas from the gasifier and recover heat. Although

476

Albany, OR * Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Processing and Evaluation of Next Processing and Evaluation of Next Generation Oxygen Carrier Materials for Chemical Looping Combustion Background The Department of Energy (DOE) supports research towards the development of efficient and inexpensive CO 2 capture technologies for fossil fuel based power generation. The Department of Energy Crosscutting Research Program (CCR) serves as a bridge between basic and applied research. Projects supported by the Crosscutting Research Program conduct a range of pre-competitive research focused on opening new avenues to gains in power plant efficiency, reliability, and environmental quality by research in materials and processes, coal utilization science, sensors and controls, and computational energy science. Within the CCR, the University Coal Research (UCR) Program sponsors

477

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Studies to Enable Robust, Studies to Enable Robust, Reliable, Low Emission Gas Turbine Combustion of High Hydrogen Content Fuels-University of Michigan Background The University of Michigan will perform experimental and computational studies which can provide an improved and robust understanding of the reaction kinetics and other fundamental characteristics of combustion of high hydrogen content (HHC) fuels that are vital to advancing HHC turbine design and to making coal gasification power plants environmentally sustainable and cost- competitive. The scope of work includes Rapid Compression Facility (RCF) studies of HHC ignition delay times and hydroxyl radical (OH) time-histories, flame speeds, and flammability limits. A range of temperatures, pressures, and test gas mixture compositions will

478

Albany, OR * Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rick Dunst Rick Dunst Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 MS 922-273C Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-6694 richard.dunst@netl.doe.gov Felicia Manciu Principal Investigator University of Texas at El Paso 500 West University Avenue El Paso, TX 79968-8900 915-747-5715 fsmanciu@utep.edu PROJECT DURATION Start Date 01/15/2009 End Date 12/15/2013 COST Total Project Value $249,546 DOE/Non-DOE Share $249,546 / $0

479

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Considerations and Environmental Considerations and Cooling Strategies for Vane Leading Edges in a Syngas Environment- University of North Dakota Background Cooling airfoil leading edges of modern first stage gas turbine vanes presents a con- siderable challenge due to the aggressive heat transfer environment and efficiency penalties related to turbine hot gas path cooling. This environment is made more complex when natural gas is replaced by high hydrogen fuels (HHF) such as synthesis gas (syngas) derived from coal gasification with higher expected levels of impurities. In this project the University of North Dakota (UND) and The Ohio State University (OSU) will explore technology opportunities to improve the reliability of HHF gas turbines by analyzing the effects

480

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alternative Low-Cost Process for Alternative Low-Cost Process for Deposition of MCrAlY Bond Coats for Advanced Syngas/Hydrogen Turbine Applications-Tennessee Technological University Background One of the material needs for the advancement of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants is the development of low-cost effective manufacturing processes for application of coating architectures with enhanced performance and durability in coal derived synthesis gas (syngas)/hydrogen environments. Thermal spray technologies such as air plasma spray (APS) and high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) are currently used to fabricate thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems for large land- based turbine components. In this research Tennessee Technological University (TTU) will develop metal chromium-aluminum-yttrium (MCrAlY; where M = nickel [Ni], cobalt

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