National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for uses-total nonprocess

  1. Product Binding Varies Dramatically between Processive and Nonprocessive Cellulase Enzymes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bu, L.; Nimlos, M. R.; Shirts, M. R.; Stahlberg, J.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.; Beckham, G. T.

    2012-07-13

    Cellulases hydrolyze {beta}-1,4 glycosidic linkages in cellulose, which are among the most prevalent and stable bonds in Nature. Cellulases comprise many glycoside hydrolase families and exist as processive or nonprocessive enzymes. Product inhibition negatively impacts cellulase action, but experimental measurements of product-binding constants vary significantly, and there is little consensus on the importance of this phenomenon. To provide molecular level insights into cellulase product inhibition, we examine the impact of product binding on processive and nonprocessive cellulases by calculating the binding free energy of cellobiose to the product sites of catalytic domains of processive and nonprocessive enzymes from glycoside hydrolase families 6 and 7. The results suggest that cellobiose binds to processive cellulases much more strongly than nonprocessive cellulases. We also predict that the presence of a cellodextrin bound in the reactant site of the catalytic domain, which is present during enzymatic catalysis, has no effect on product binding in nonprocessive cellulases, whereas it significantly increases product binding to processive cellulases. This difference in product binding correlates with hydrogen bonding between the substrate-side ligand and the cellobiose product in processive cellulase tunnels and the additional stabilization from the longer tunnel-forming loops. The hydrogen bonds between the substrate- and product-side ligands are disrupted by water in nonprocessive cellulase clefts, and the lack of long tunnel-forming loops results in lower affinity of the product ligand. These findings provide new insights into the large discrepancies reported for binding constants for cellulases and suggest that product inhibition will vary significantly based on the amount of productive binding for processive cellulases on cellulose.

  2. Static Sankey Diagram of Nonprocess Energy in U.S. Manufacturing Sector |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Nonprocess Energy in U.S. Manufacturing Sector Static Sankey Diagram of Nonprocess Energy in U.S. Manufacturing Sector The Nonprocess Energy Static Sankey diagram shows how energy is used for supporting functions by U.S. manufacturing plants. Click on the Full Sector, Onsite Generation, and Process Energy thumbnails below the diagram to see further detail on energy flows in manufacturing. Also, see the Dynamic Manufacturing Energy Sankey Tool to pan, zoom, and customize

  3. Stochastic dynamics of small ensembles of non-processive molecular motors: The parallel cluster model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erdmann, Thorsten; Albert, Philipp J.; Schwarz, Ulrich S.

    2013-11-07

    Non-processive molecular motors have to work together in ensembles in order to generate appreciable levels of force or movement. In skeletal muscle, for example, hundreds of myosin II molecules cooperate in thick filaments. In non-muscle cells, by contrast, small groups with few tens of non-muscle myosin II motors contribute to essential cellular processes such as transport, shape changes, or mechanosensing. Here we introduce a detailed and analytically tractable model for this important situation. Using a three-state crossbridge model for the myosin II motor cycle and exploiting the assumptions of fast power stroke kinetics and equal load sharing between motors in equivalent states, we reduce the stochastic reaction network to a one-step master equation for the binding and unbinding dynamics (parallel cluster model) and derive the rules for ensemble movement. We find that for constant external load, ensemble dynamics is strongly shaped by the catch bond character of myosin II, which leads to an increase of the fraction of bound motors under load and thus to firm attachment even for small ensembles. This adaptation to load results in a concave force-velocity relation described by a Hill relation. For external load provided by a linear spring, myosin II ensembles dynamically adjust themselves towards an isometric state with constant average position and load. The dynamics of the ensembles is now determined mainly by the distribution of motors over the different kinds of bound states. For increasing stiffness of the external spring, there is a sharp transition beyond which myosin II can no longer perform the power stroke. Slow unbinding from the pre-power-stroke state protects the ensembles against detachment.

  4. Engineering evaluation/cost analysis for the proposed management of 15 nonprocess buildings (15 series) at the Weldon Spring Site Chemical Plant, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacDonell, M M; Peterson, J M

    1989-05-01

    The US Department of Energy, under its Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP), is responsible for cleanup activities at the Weldon-Spring site, located near Weldon Spring, Missouri. The site consists of two noncontiguous areas: (1) a raffinate pits and chemical plant area and (2) a quarry. This engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) report has been prepared to support a proposed removal action to manage 15 nonprocess buildings, identified as the 15 Series buildings, at the chemical plant on the Weldon Spring site. These buildings have been nonoperational for more than 20 years, and the deterioration that has occurred during this time has resulted in a potential threat to site workers, the general public, and the environment. The EE/CA documentation of this proposed action is consistent with guidance from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) that addresses removal actions at sites subject to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986. Actions at the Weldon Spring site are subject to CERCLA requirements because the site is on the EPA`s National Priorities List. The objectives of this report are to (1) identify alternatives for management of the nonprocess buildings; (2) document the selection of response activities that will mitigate the potential threat to workers, the public, and the environment associated with these buildings; and (3) address environmental impacts associated with the proposed action.

  5. Determination of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) Using Total Carbon Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    2002-05-10

    Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon(TM)-extraction method to determine total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content. For reasons of cost, sensitivity, precision, or simplicity, none of the replacement methods are feasible for analysis of radioactive samples at our facility. We have developed a method to measure total petroleum hydrocarbon content in aqueous sample matrixes using total organic carbon (total carbon) determination. The total carbon content (TC1) of the sample is measured using a total organic carbon analyzer. The sample is then contacted with a small volume of non-pokar solvent to extract the total petroleum hydrocarbons. The total carbon content of the resultant aqueous phase of the extracted sample (TC2) is measured. Total petroleum hydrocarbon content is calculated (TPH = TC1-TC2). The resultant data are consistent with results obtained using Freon(TM) extraction followed by infrared absorbance.

  6. Lens testing using total internal reflection holography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hildebrand, Bernard P.

    1976-12-14

    Accurate, rapid and inexpensive testing and inspecting of lens surfaces tugh holographic means requiring no beamsplitters, mirrors or overpower optics, and wherein a hologram formed in accordance with one aspect of the invention contains the entire interferometer and serves as both a master and illuminating source for both concave and convex surfaces to be so tested.

  7. Proposed Management of 15 Nonprocess Buildings at the Chemical Plant. IR-1000-1003-1.01.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  8. Management of the Sump Waters and Sediment Contained in Process and Non-Process Buildings at the Chemical Plant Area.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  9. Management of Sump Waters Sediment Contained in Process and Non-Process Buildings at the Chemical Plant Area (CPA). IR-1300-1305-1.01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  10. Removal Action Decision Document for the Management of 15 Nonprocess Buildings (15 Series) at the Weldon Spring Site (WSS) Chemical Plant, DOE/OR/21548-151.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  11. EPA has reviewed the Engineering Evaluation and Cost Analysis for the Proposed Management of 15 Nonprocess Buildings (15 Series) at the WSS Chemical Plant dated May 1989.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  12. "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,,"Distillate" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS",,,"Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End ...

  13. "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    for Table 5.6;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End ...

  14. Combined iterative reconstruction and image-domain decomposition for dual energy CT using total-variation regularization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Xue; Niu, Tianye; Zhu, Lei

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Dual-energy CT (DECT) is being increasingly used for its capability of material decomposition and energy-selective imaging. A generic problem of DECT, however, is that the decomposition process is unstable in the sense that the relative magnitude of decomposed signals is reduced due to signal cancellation while the image noise is accumulating from the two CT images of independent scans. Direct image decomposition, therefore, leads to severe degradation of signal-to-noise ratio on the resultant images. Existing noise suppression techniques are typically implemented in DECT with the procedures of reconstruction and decomposition performed independently, which do not explore the statistical properties of decomposed images during the reconstruction for noise reduction. In this work, the authors propose an iterative approach that combines the reconstruction and the signal decomposition procedures to minimize the DECT image noise without noticeable loss of resolution. Methods: The proposed algorithm is formulated as an optimization problem, which balances the data fidelity and total variation of decomposed images in one framework, and the decomposition step is carried out iteratively together with reconstruction. The noise in the CT images from the proposed algorithm becomes well correlated even though the noise of the raw projections is independent on the two CT scans. Due to this feature, the proposed algorithm avoids noise accumulation during the decomposition process. The authors evaluate the method performance on noise suppression and spatial resolution using phantom studies and compare the algorithm with conventional denoising approaches as well as combined iterative reconstruction methods with different forms of regularization. Results: On the Catphan©600 phantom, the proposed method outperforms the existing denoising methods on preserving spatial resolution at the same level of noise suppression, i.e., a reduction of noise standard deviation by one order of magnitude. This improvement is mainly attributed to the high noise correlation in the CT images reconstructed by the proposed algorithm. Iterative reconstruction using different regularization, including quadratic orq-generalized Gaussian Markov random field regularization, achieves similar noise suppression from high noise correlation. However, the proposed TV regularization obtains a better edge preserving performance. Studies of electron density measurement also show that our method reduces the average estimation error from 9.5% to 7.1%. On the anthropomorphic head phantom, the proposed method suppresses the noise standard deviation of the decomposed images by a factor of ?14 without blurring the fine structures in the sinus area. Conclusions: The authors propose a practical method for DECT imaging reconstruction, which combines the image reconstruction and material decomposition into one optimization framework. Compared to the existing approaches, our method achieves a superior performance on DECT imaging with respect to decomposition accuracy, noise reduction, and spatial resolution.

  15. Exploring the prominence-corona connection and its expansion into the outer corona using total solar eclipse observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habbal, Shadia Rifai; Morgan, Huw; Druckmüller, Miloslav

    2014-10-01

    Prominences constitute the most complex magnetic structures in the solar corona. The ubiquitous presence of their seemingly confined dense and cool plasma in an otherwise million-degree environment remains a puzzle. Using a decade of white light total solar eclipse observations, we show how these images reveal an intricate relationship between prominences and coronal structures both in their immediate vicinity, known as coronal cavities, and in the extended corona out to several solar radii. Observations of suspended prominences and twisted helical structures spanning several solar radii are central to these findings. The different manifestations of the prominence-corona interface that emerge from this study underscore the fundamental role played by prominences in defining and controlling the complex expansion and dynamic behavior of the solar magnetic field in the neighborhood of magnetic polarity reversal regions. This study suggests that the unraveling of prominences and the outward expansion of the helical twisted field lines linked to them could be the solar origin of twisted magnetic flux ropes detected in interplanetary space, and of the mechanism by which the Sun sheds its magnetic helicity. This work also underscores the likely role of the prominence-corona interface as a source of the slow solar wind.

  16. Control of the Accumulation of Non-Process Elements in Pulp Mills with Bleach Filtrate Reuse: A Chemical Equilibrium Approach to Predicting the Partitioning of Metals in Pulp Mill and Bleach Plant Streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frederick, W.J. Jr.; Rudie, A.W.; Schmidl, G.W.; Sinquefield, S.A.; Rorrer, G.L.; Laver, M.L.; Yantasee, W.; Ming, D.

    2000-08-01

    The overall goal of this project was to develop fundamental, experimentally based methods for predicting the solubility or organic and inorganic matter and their interactions in recycled effluent from kraft pulp mills and bleach plants. This included: characterizing the capacity of wood pulp and dissolved organic matter to bind metal ions, developing a thermodynamic database of properties needed to describe the solubility of inorganic matter in pulp mill streams, incorporation of the database into equilibrium calculation software for predicting the solubility of the metals of interest, and evaluating its capability to predict the distribution of the metals between pulp fibers, inorganic precipitates, and solution.

  17. Static Sankey Diagram of Process Energy in U.S. Manufacturing Sector |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Nonprocess Energy in U.S. Manufacturing Sector Static Sankey Diagram of Nonprocess Energy in U.S. Manufacturing Sector The Nonprocess Energy Static Sankey diagram shows how energy is used for supporting functions by U.S. manufacturing plants. Click on the Full Sector, Onsite Generation, and Process Energy thumbnails below the diagram to see further detail on energy flows in manufacturing. Also, see the Dynamic Manufacturing Energy Sankey Tool to pan, zoom, and customize

  18. Improvement in Thermal-Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) using Total Flash Evaporation (TFE) method for lanthanides isotope ratio measurements in transmutation targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mialle, S.; Gourgiotis, A.; Aubert, M.; Stadelmann, G.; Gautier, C.; Isnard, H.

    2011-07-01

    The experiments involved in the PHENIX french nuclear reactor to obtain precise and accurate data on the total capture cross sections of the heavy isotopes and fission products require isotopic ratios measurements with uncertainty of a few per mil. These accurate isotopic ratio measurements are performed with mass spectrometer equipped with multi-collector system. The major difficulty for the analyses of these actinides and fission products is the low quantity of the initial powder enclosed in steel container (3 to 5 mg) and the very low quantities of products formed (several {mu}g) after irradiation. Specific analytical developments are performed by Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) to be able to analyse several nanograms of elements with this technique. A specific method of acquisition named Total Flash Evaporation was adapted in this study in the case of lanthanide measurements for quantity deposited on the filament in the order of 2 ng and applied on irradiated fuel. To validate the analytical approach and discuss about the accuracy of the data, the isotopic ratios obtained by TIMS are compared with other mass spectrometric techniques such as Multiple-Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (MC-ICPMS). (authors)

  19. The Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MDNR) has reviewed the Engineering Evaluation and Cost Analysis (EE / CA) for the Proposed Management of 15 Nonprocess Buildings (15 Series) at the Weldon Spring Site Chemical Plant (DOE/OR/21548-071), May 1989.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  20. Adoption of the Engineering Evaluation and Cost Analysis for the Management of Contaminated Structures, 15 Non-Process Buildings (15 Series), and the 15 Series Addendum at the Weldon Spring Chemical Plant, as an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA/-0549) for Interim Actions at the WSS

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  1. Adoption of the Engineering Evaluation and Cost Analysis for the Management of Contaminated Structures, 15 Non-Process Buildings (15 Series), and the 15 Series Addendum at the Weldon Spring Chemical Plant, as an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA/-0549) for Interim Actions at the WSS.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  2. EE / CA and Letter: Adoption of the Engineering Evaluation and Cost Analysis for the Management of Contaminated Structures, 15 Non-Process Buildings (15 Series), and the 15 Series Addendum at the Weldon Spring Chemical Plant, Weldon Spring, Missouri as an Environmental Assessment (EA) for Interim Actions at the WSS. DOE determined that the EE / CAs adequately satisfy the NEPA requirements for an EA. The documents adopted as the EA include the EE / CAs for the Management of Contaminated Structures, 15 Non-Process Buildings (15 Series), and the 15 Series Addendum. DOE has also determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, as defined by NEPA. IR-1000-1003-1.04. Attached document: Engineering Evaluation and Cost Analysis for the Management of Contaminated Structures, 15 Non-Process Buildings (15 Series), and the 15 Series Addendum at the Weldon Spring Chemical Plant, Weldon Spring, Missouri - Environmental Assessment, DOE/ EA/-0549. November 1991.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  3. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Alumina and Aluminum (NAICS 3313), January 2014 (MECS 2010)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Alumina and Aluminum (NAICS 3313) Process Energy Electricity and Steam Generation Losses Process Losses 3 Nonprocess Losses 456 105 Steam Distribution Losses 3 7 Nonprocess Energy 99 Electricity Generation Steam Generation 456 5 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Advanced Manufacturing Office by Energetics Incorporated 16 198 116 Generation and Transmission Losses Generation and Transmission Losses 2 234 214 207 13 220 351 7 10 0.4 20.3 20.8 4.2 24.0 1.3 26 5.3 26.1 0.4 Fuel Total

  4. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Cement (NAICS 327310), January 2014 (MECS 2010)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Cement (NAICS 327310) Process Energy Electricity and Steam Generation Losses Process Losses 1 Nonprocess Losses 307 101 Steam Distribution Losses 1 3 Nonprocess Energy 214 Electricity Generation Steam Generation 307 0 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Advanced Manufacturing Office by Energetics Incorporated 6 237 31 Generation and Transmission Losses Generation and Transmission Losses 0 62 243 240 5 245 93 0 4 0.0 5.4 5.4 18.5 23.5 0.6 25 19.1 24.6 0.2 Fuel Total Primary Energy, 2010

  5. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Chemicals (NAICS 325), January 2014 (MECS 2010)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Chemicals (NAICS 325) Process Energy Electricity and Steam Generation Losses Process Losses 381 Nonprocess Losses 4,252 871 Steam Distribution Losses 247 86 Nonprocess Energy 2,447 Electricity Generation Steam Generation 4,252 324 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Advanced Manufacturing Office by Energetics Incorporated 229 2,364 450 Generation and Transmission Losses Generation and Transmission Losses 126 905 2,594 1,745 1,476 3,221 1,355 450 1,095 28.5 78.6 107.2 52.4 145.9 15.4 252

  6. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Computer, Electronics and Appliances (NAICS 334, 335), January 2014 (MECS 2010)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Computers, Electronics and Electrical Equipment (NAICS 334, 335) Process Energy Electricity and Steam Generation Losses Process Losses 5 Nonprocess Losses 493 46 Steam Distribution Losses 4 41 Nonprocess Energy 80 Electricity Generation Steam Generation 493 0 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Advanced Manufacturing Office by Energetics Incorporated 103 105 137 Generation and Transmission Losses Generation and Transmission Losses 0 276 208 193 24 217 413 0 19 0.0 23.9 23.9 1.4 14.4 12.4

  7. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Fabricated Metals (NAICS 332), January 2014 (MECS 2010)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Fabricated Metals (NAICS 332) Process Energy Electricity and Steam Generation Losses Process Losses 6 Nonprocess Losses 557 90 Steam Distribution Losses 4 35 Nonprocess Energy 174 Electricity Generation Steam Generation 557 0 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Advanced Manufacturing Office by Energetics Incorporated 80 211 127 Generation and Transmission Losses Generation and Transmission Losses 0 255 291 275 26 301 382 1 20 0.0 22.2 22.2 5.6 22.4 7.7 32 9.3 31.5 2.3 Fuel Total Primary

  8. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Food and Beverage (NAICS 311, 312), January 2014 (MECS 2010)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Food and Beverage (NAICS 311, 312) Process Energy Electricity and Steam Generation Losses Process Losses 128 Nonprocess Losses 1,836 455 Steam Distribution Losses 104 72 Nonprocess Energy 919 Electricity Generation Steam Generation 1,836 41 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Advanced Manufacturing Office by Energetics Incorporated 178 835 285 Generation and Transmission Losses Generation and Transmission Losses 16 574 1,014 620 625 1,245 860 57 497 3.6 50.0 53.6 13.5 55.8 13.7 109 55.5

  9. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Forest Products (NAICS 321, 322), January 2014 (MECS 2010)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Forest Products (NAICS 321, 322) Process Energy Electricity and Steam Generation Losses Process Losses 530 Nonprocess Losses 3,152 1,016 Steam Distribution Losses 287 87 Nonprocess Energy 2,135 Electricity Generation Steam Generation 3,152 186 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Advanced Manufacturing Office by Energetics Incorporated 224 1,538 252 Generation and Transmission Losses Generation and Transmission Losses 72 507 1,762 656 1,917 2,573 759 258 1,393 16.4 45.1 61.5 10.6 64.2 9.2

  10. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Foundries (NAICS 3315), January 2014 (MECS 2010)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Foundries (NAICS 3315) Process Energy Electricity and Steam Generation Losses Process Losses 1 Nonprocess Losses 173 34 Steam Distribution Losses 0 8 Nonprocess Energy 59 Electricity Generation Steam Generation 173 0 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Advanced Manufacturing Office by Energetics Incorporated 19 77 38 Generation and Transmission Losses Generation and Transmission Losses 0 76 96 95 2 97 114 0 2 0.0 6.6 6.6 1.8 7.2 1.9 9 2.6 9.2 0.6 Fuel Total Primary Energy, 2010 Total

  11. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Glass (NAICS 3272, 327993), January 2014 (MECS 2010)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Glass and Glass Products (NAICS 3272, 327993) Process Energy Electricity and Steam Generation Losses Process Losses 1 Nonprocess Losses 294 100 Steam Distribution Losses 0 7 Nonprocess Energy 149 Electricity Generation Steam Generation 294 0 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Advanced Manufacturing Office by Energetics Incorporated 16 180 48 Generation and Transmission Losses Generation and Transmission Losses 0 97 196 195 2 197 145 0 1 0.0 8.4 8.4 7.3 14.3 1.7 16 7.7 16.1 0.4 Fuel

  12. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Machinery (NAICS 333), January 2014 (MECS 2010)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Machinery (NAICS 333) Process Energy Electricity and Steam Generation Losses Process Losses 1 Nonprocess Losses 288 37 Steam Distribution Losses 1 27 Nonprocess Energy 77 Electricity Generation Steam Generation 288 0 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Advanced Manufacturing Office by Energetics Incorporated 67 78 70 Generation and Transmission Losses Generation and Transmission Losses 0 141 144 139 8 147 211 1 7 0.0 12.2 12.3 1.8 8.9 6.9 16 4.2 16.4 2.0 Fuel Total Primary Energy, 2010

  13. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Petroleum Refining (NAICS 324110), January 2014 (MECS 2010)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Petroleum Refining (NAICS 324110) Process Energy Electricity and Steam Generation Losses Process Losses 234 Nonprocess Losses 3,542 689 Steam Distribution Losses 150 22 Nonprocess Energy 2,873 Electricity Generation Steam Generation 3,542 150 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Advanced Manufacturing Office by Energetics Incorporated 59 2,734 153 Generation and Transmission Losses Generation and Transmission Losses 58 308 2,793 2,285 891 3,176 461 208 657 13.2 26.7 40.0 139.2 176.3 3.2

  14. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Plastics (NAICS 326), January 2014 (MECS 2010)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Plastics and Rubber Products (NAICS 326) Process Energy Electricity and Steam Generation Losses Process Losses 12 Nonprocess Losses 586 72 Steam Distribution Losses 8 28 Nonprocess Energy 115 Electricity Generation Steam Generation 586 1 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Advanced Manufacturing Office by Energetics Incorporated 64 187 156 Generation and Transmission Losses Generation and Transmission Losses 1 314 251 218 54 272 470 2 42 0.1 27.3 27.4 1.9 23.5 7.0 34 6.4 33.8 1.3 Fuel

  15. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Textiles (NAICS 313-316), January 2014 (MECS 2010)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Textiles (NAICS 313-316) Process Energy Electricity and Steam Generation Losses Process Losses 6 Nonprocess Losses 242 47 Steam Distribution Losses 6 12 Nonprocess Energy 59 Electricity Generation Steam Generation 242 6 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Advanced Manufacturing Office by Energetics Incorporated 26 84 58 Generation and Transmission Losses Generation and Transmission Losses 2 117 111 91 32 123 175 8 27 0.5 10.1 10.7 1.4 9.1 3.1 14 3.7 14.3 0.3 Fuel Total Primary Energy,

  16. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Transportation Equipment (NAICS 336), January 2014 (MECS 2010)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Transportation Equipment (NAICS 336) Process Energy Electricity and Steam Generation Losses Process Losses 10 Nonprocess Losses 541 68 Steam Distribution Losses 6 48 Nonprocess Energy 143 Electricity Generation Steam Generation 541 0 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Advanced Manufacturing Office by Energetics Incorporated 115 145 132 Generation and Transmission Losses Generation and Transmission Losses 0 266 259 234 41 275 398 0 32 0.0 23.1 23.1 3.0 16.6 11.9 31 7.9 31.0 2.6 Fuel

  17. Static Sankey Diagram Full Sector Manufacturing | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Full Sector Manufacturing Static Sankey Diagram Full Sector Manufacturing The U.S. Manufacturing Sector Static Sankey diagram shows how total primary energy is used by U.S. manufacturing plants. Click on the Onsite Generation, Process Energy or Nonprocess Energy thumbnails below the diagram to see further detail on energy flows in manufacturing. Also, see the Dynamic Manufacturing Energy Sankey Tool to pan, zoom, and customize the manufacturing Sankey data and compare energy consumption across

  18. Station-based Surface Data Value-Added Product

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Static Sankey Diagram Full Sector Manufacturing Static Sankey Diagram Full Sector Manufacturing The U.S. Manufacturing Sector Static Sankey diagram shows how total primary energy is used by U.S. manufacturing plants. Click on the Onsite Generation, Process Energy or Nonprocess Energy thumbnails below the diagram to see further detail on energy flows in manufacturing. Also, see the Dynamic Manufacturing Energy Sankey Tool to pan, zoom, and customize the manufacturing Sankey data and compare

  19. Computational Investigations of Trichoderma Reesei Cel7A Suggest New Routes for Enzyme Activity Improvements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beckham, G. T.; Payne, C. M.; Bu, L.; Taylor, C. B.; McCabe, C.; Chu, J. W.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.

    2012-01-01

    The Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellulase (Cel7A) is a key industrial enzyme in the production of biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass. It is a multi-modular enzyme with a Family 1 carbohydrate-binding module, a flexible O-glycosylated linker, and a large catalytic domain. We have used simulation to elucidate new functions for the 3 sub-domains, which suggests new routes to increase the activity of this central enzyme. These findings include new roles for glycosylation, which we have shown can be used to tune the binding affinity. We have also examined the structures of the catalytically-active complex of Cel7A and its non-processive counterpart, Cel7B, engaged on cellulose, which suggests allosteric mechanisms involved in chain binding when these cellulases are complexed on cellulose. Our computational results also suggest that product inhibition varies significantly between Cel7A and Cel7B, and we offer a molecular-level explanation for this observation. Finally, we discuss simulations of the absolute and relative binding free energy of cellulose ligands and various mutations along the CD tunnel, which will affect processivity and the ability of Cel7A (and related enzymes) to digest cellulose. These results highlight new considerations in protein engineering for processive and non-processive cellulases for production of lignocellulosic biofuels.

  20. System Description for the K-25/K-27 D&D Project Polyurethane Foam Delivery System, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boris, G.

    2008-02-21

    The Foam Delivery System used in the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) project for the K-25/K-27 Buildings at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) is comprised of a trailer-mounted Gusmer{reg_sign} H20/35 Pro-TEC Proportioning Unit and the associated equipment to convey electrical power, air, and foam component material to the unit. This high-pressure, plural-component polyurethane foam pouring system will be used to fill process gas and non-process equipment/piping (PGE/P) within the K-25/K-27 Buildings with polyurethane foam to immobilize contaminants prior to removal. The system creates foam by mixing isocyanate and polyol resin (Resin) component materials. Currently, the project plans to utilize up to six foaming units simultaneously during peak foaming activities. Also included in this system description are the foam component material storage containers that will be used for storage of the component material drums in a staging area outside of the K-25/K-27 Buildings. The Foam Delivery System and foam component material storage enclosures (i.e., Foaming Component Protective Enclosures) used to store polymeric methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (PMDI) component material are identified as Safety Significant (SS) Structures, Systems and Components (SSC) in the Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) for the project, Documented Safety Analysis for the K-25 and K-27 Facilities at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, DSA-ET-K-25/K-27-0001.

  1. Workshop proceeding of the industrial building energy use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, H.; Gadgil, A.

    1988-01-01

    California has a large number of small and medium sized industries which have a major impact on the demand growth of California utilities. Energy use in building services (lighting, HVAC, office equipment, computers, etc.). These industries constitute an important but largely neglected fraction of the total site energy use. The ratio of energy use in building service to the total site energy use is a function of the industrial activity, its size, and the climate at the site of the facility. Also, energy use in building services is more responsive to weather and occupant schedules than the traditional base-load'' industrial process energy. Industrial energy use is considered as a base-load'' by utility companies because it helps to increase the utilities' load factor. To increase this further, utilities often market energy at lower rates to industrial facilities. Presently, the energy use in the building services of the industrial sector is often clubbed together with industrial process load. Data on non-process industrial energy use are not readily available in the literature. In cases where the major portion of the energy is used in the building services (with daily and seasonal load profiles that in fact peak at the same time as systemwide load peaks), the utility may be selling below cost at peak power times. These cases frequently happen with electric utilities. 30 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. Analysis of energy use in building services of the industrial sector in California: A literature review and a preliminary characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, H.; Borgers, T.; Gadgil, A.; Sezgen, O.

    1991-04-01

    Energy use patterns in many of California's fastest-growing industries are not typical of those in the mix of industries elsewhere in the US. Many California firms operate small and medium-sized facilities, often in buildings used simultaneously or interchangeably for commercial (office, retail, warehouse) and industrial activities. In these industrial subsectors, the energy required for building services'' to provide occupant comfort and necessities (lighting, HVAC, office equipment, computers, etc.) may be at least as important as the more familiar process energy requirements -- especially for electricity and on-peak demand. In this report, published or unpublished information on energy use for building services in the industrial sector have been compiled and analyzed. Seven different sources of information and data relevant to California have been identified. Most of these are studies and/or projects sponsored by the Department of Energy, the California Energy Commission, and local utilities. The objectives of these studies were diverse: most focused on industrial energy use in general, and, in one case, the objective was to analyze energy use in commercial buildings. Only one of these studies focused directly on non-process energy use in industrial buildings. Our analysis of Northern California data for five selected industries shows that the contribution of total electricity consumption for lighting ranges from 9.5% in frozen fruits to 29.1% in instruments; for air-conditioning, it ranges from nonexistent in frozen fruits to 35% in instrument manufacturing. None of the five industries selected had significant electrical space heating. Gas space heating ranges from 5% in motor vehicles facilities to more than 58% in the instrument manufacturing industry. 15 refs., 15 figs., 9 tabs.

  3. Proteomic and Functional Analysis of the Cellulase System Expressed by Postia placenta during Brown Rot of Solid Wood

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryu, Jae San; Shary, Semarjit; Houtman, Carl J.; Panisko, Ellen A.; Korripally, Premsagar; St John, Franz J.; Crooks, Casey; Siika-aho, Matti; Magnuson, Jon K.; Hammel, Ken

    2011-11-01

    Abstract Brown rot basidiomycetes have an important ecological role in lignocellulose recycling and are notable for their rapid degradation of wood polymers via oxidative and hydrolytic mechanisms. However, most of these fungi apparently lack processive (exo-acting) cellulases, such as cellobiohydrolases, which are generally required for efficient cellulolysis. The recent sequencing of the Postia placenta genome now permits a proteomic approach to this longstanding conundrum. We grew P. placenta on solid aspen wood, extracted proteins from the biodegrading substrate, and analyzed tryptic digests by shotgun liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Comparison of the data with the predicted P. placenta proteome revealed the presence of 34 likely glycoside hydrolases, but only four of these-two in glycoside hydrolase family 5, one in family 10, and one in family 12-have sequences that suggested possible activity on cellulose. We expressed these enzymes heterologously and determined that they all exhibited endoglucanase activity on phosphoric acid-swollen cellulose. They also slowly hydrolyzed filter paper, a more crystalline substrate, but the soluble/insoluble reducing sugar ratios they produced classify them as nonprocessive. Computer simulations indicated that these enzymes produced soluble/insoluble ratios on reduced phosphoric acid-swollen cellulose that were higher than expected for random hydrolysis, which suggests that they could possess limited exo activity, but they are at best 10-fold less processive than cellobiohydrolases. It appears likely that P. placenta employs a combination of oxidative mechanisms and endo-acting cellulases to degrade cellulose efficiently in the absence of a significant processive component.

  4. Compare All CBECS Activities: Electricity Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity Use Compare Activities by ... Electricity Use Total Electricity Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 908 billion...

  5. Section 41

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Figure 1. WSI cloud fraction for algorithm identified clear sky from April 1994 IOP. Detection of Clear Skies Using Total and Diffuse Shortwave Irradiance: Calculations of...

  6. Macro Industrial Working Group

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2025 * What you'll see today - Shipments - Industrial energy use (total and excluding both refining and lease &plant fuel) * AEO2015 Reference and selected side cases * AEO2015 v. ...

  7. Untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8. Number of Lights by Room by Hours Used, 1993 Hours Used Total Bathroom Bedroom Dining Room Den Family Rec Room Hallway Stairs Kitchen Living Room Laundry Room Other Total...

  8. Untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Fluorescent Other Hours Used Total Low Medium High Unknown Short Long Compact Halogen Other Unknown Total 4,196 431 2,811 409 14 159 173 34 24 141 Unknown 104 11 58 19 0...

  9. OpenEI:Projects/Geographic Pages | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and per square foot: Total Electricity Use Total heating fuel use (or broken down by gasoil) Total building square footage HeatingCooling degree-days - This would allow us to...

  10. Compare All CBECS Activities: Fuel Oil Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Fuel Oil Use Compare Activities by ... Fuel Oil Use Total Fuel Oil Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 1.3 billion gallons...

  11. Compare All CBECS Activities: District Heat Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District Heat Use Compare Activities by ... District Heat Use Total District Heat Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 433...

  12. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Computer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Generation and Transmission Losses 0 276 208 193 24 217 413 0 19 0.0 23.9 23.9 1.4 14.4 12.4 28 4.3 28.2 1.7 Fuel Total Primary Energy, 2010 Total Primary Energy Use: Total ...

  13. Numerical Differentiation of Noisy, Nonsmooth Data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chartrand, Rick

    2011-01-01

    We consider the problem of differentiating a function specified by noisy data. Regularizing the differentiation process avoids the noise amplification of finite-difference methods. We use total-variation regularization, which allows for discontinuous solutions. The resulting simple algorithm accurately differentiates noisy functions, including those which have a discontinuous derivative.

  14. Table 1.5 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    .5 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010; Level: National Data; Row: Energy Sources and Shipments, including Further Classification of 'Other' Energy Sources; Column: First Use per Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Trillion Btu. Total Energy Source First Use Total United States Coal 1,328 Natural Gas 5,725 Net Electricity 2,437 Purchases 2,510 Transfers In 33 Onsite Generation from Noncombustible Renewable Energy 7 Sales and Transfers Offsite 113 Coke and Breeze 374

  15. Level: National Data;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    .5 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006; Level: National Data; Row: Energy Sources and Shipments, including Further Classification of 'Other' Energy Sources; Column: First Use per Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Trillion Btu. Total Energy Source First Use Total United States Coal 1,433 Natural Gas 5,911 Net Electricity 2,851 Purchases 2,894 Transfers In 20 Onsite Generation from Noncombustible Renewable Energy 4 Sales and Transfers Offsite 67 Coke and Breeze 272

  16. Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Data - U.S. Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Information Administration (EIA) 1 MECS Survey Data 2010 | 2006 | 2002 | 1998 | 1994 | 1991 | Archive Data Methodology & Forms + EXPAND ALL Consumption of Energy for All Purposes (First Use) Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991: Part 1 (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units) XLS Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991: Part 2 (Estimates

  17. Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Data - U.S. Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Information Administration (EIA) 4 MECS Survey Data 2010 | 2006 | 2002 | 1998 | 1994 | 1991 | Archive Data Methodology & Forms + EXPAND ALL Consumption of Energy for All Purposes (First Use) Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994: Part 1 (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units) XLS Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes by Census Region,

  18. 1127i.pmk

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    127-I (8/06) Page 1 of 3 CFO-1, Travel MS P234 P.O. Box 1663 Los Alamos, NM 87545 Interviewee Travel Authorization and Expense Worksheet Name SS Number Phone Mailstop Group Cost Center Program Code Cost Acct Work Package Voucher ID 1. Dates of Official Business Official City Purpose from: to: 2. Airfare airline: from: to: LANL Issued? Yes No Airfare airline: from: to: LANL Issued? Yes No Airfare airline: from: to: LANL Issued? Yes No Airfare Refund Private Plane Used Total Airfare $ 3. Gasoline:

  19. Total Adjusted Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Oil Company Farm Electric Power Railroad Vessel Bunkering On-Highway Military Off-Highway All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History U.S. 55,664,448 58,258,830 59,769,444 57,512,994 58,675,008 61,890,990 1984-2014 East Coast (PADD 1) 18,219,180 17,965,794 17,864,868 16,754,388

  20. Total Adjusted Sales of Residual Fuel Oil

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    End Use: Total Commercial Industrial Oil Company Electric Power Vessel Bunkering Military All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History U.S. 7,835,436 8,203,062 7,068,306 5,668,530 4,883,466 3,942,750 1984-2014 East Coast (PADD 1) 3,339,162 3,359,265 2,667,576 1,906,700 1,699,418 1,393,068 1984-2014 New England (PADD 1A) 318,184

  1. Total Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Oil Company Farm Electric Power Railroad Vessel Bunkering On-Highway Military Off-Highway All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History U.S. 54,100,092 56,093,645 57,082,558 57,020,840 58,107,155 60,827,930 1984-2014 East Coast (PADD 1) 17,821,973 18,136,965 17,757,005 17,382,566

  2. Total Sales of Residual Fuel Oil

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    End Use: Total Commercial Industrial Oil Company Electric Power Vessel Bunkering Military All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History U.S. 6,908,028 7,233,765 6,358,120 6,022,115 5,283,350 4,919,255 1984-2014 East Coast (PADD 1) 2,972,575 2,994,245 2,397,932 2,019,294 1,839,237 1,724,167 1984-2014 New England (PADD 1A) 281,895

  3. Word Pro - Untitled1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Table 10.7 Solar Thermal Collector Shipments by Market Sector, End Use, and Type, 2001-2009 (Thousand Square Feet) Year and Type By Market Sector By End Use Total Residential Commercial 1 Industrial 2 Electric Power 3 Other 4 Pool Heating Water Heating Space Heating Space Cooling Combined Heating 5 Process Heating Electricity Generation Total Shipments 6 2001 Total .... 10,125 1,012 17 1 35 10,797 274 70 0 12 34 2 11,189 Low 7 .......... 9,885 987 12 0 34 10,782 42 61 0 0 34 0 10,919 Medium 8

  4. Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel --

  5. Level: National Data; Row: Specific Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Next MECS will be fielded in 2015 Table 8.4 Number of Establishments by Participation in Specific Energy-Management Activities, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: Specific Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes; Column: Participation; Unit: Establishment Counts. NAICS Code(a) Energy-Management Activity No Participation Participation(b) Don't Know No Steam Used Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES Full-Time Energy Manager (c) 142,267 12,536 15,365 -- Set Goals for

  6. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fue -- 41 133 23 2,119 8 547 -- Conventional Boiler Use 41 71 17

  7. Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrell, Ernst; Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Harnisch, Jochen

    2009-02-02

    Industry contributes directly and indirectly (through consumed electricity) about 37% of the global greenhouse gas emissions, of which over 80% is from energy use. Total energy-related emissions, which were 9.9 GtCO2 in 2004, have grown by 65% since 1971. Even so, industry has almost continuously improved its energy efficiency over the past decades. In the near future, energy efficiency is potentially the most important and cost-effective means for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions from industry. This paper discusses the potential contribution of industrial energy efficiency technologies and policies to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions to 2030.

  8. table5.2_02

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal RSE NAICS Net Residual and Natural LPG and (excluding Coal Row Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Factors Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES RSE Column Factors: 0.3 1 1 2.4 1.1 1.3 1 NF TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 16,273 2,840

  9. table5.6_02

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal RSE Net Residual and Natural LPG and (excluding Coal Row End Use Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 1 1 2.4 1.1 1.3 1 0 0 TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 16,273 2,840 208 141 5,794 103 1,182 6,006 3.3 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel

  10. Total Adjusted Sales of Kerosene

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History U.S. 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 79,674 137,928 1984-2014 East Coast (PADD 1) 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 61,327 106,995 1984-2014 New England (PADD 1A) 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 15,991 27,500 1984-2014 Connecticut 8,800 7,437

  11. Total Sales of Kerosene

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History U.S. 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 79,674 137,928 1984-2014 East Coast (PADD 1) 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 61,327 106,995 1984-2014 New England (PADD 1A) 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 15,991 27,500 1984-2014 Connecticut 8,800 7,437

  12. Table 10.9 Photovoltaic Cell and Module Shipments by Sector and End Use, 1989-2010 (Peak Kilowatts )

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Photovoltaic Cell and Module Shipments by Sector and End Use, 1989-2010 (Peak Kilowatts 1 ) Year By Sector By End Use Total Residential Commercial 3 Industrial 4 Electric Power 5 Other 6 Grid-Connected 2 Off-Grid 2 Centralized 7 Distributed 8 Domestic 9 Non-Domestic 10 Total Shipments of Photovoltaic Cells and Modules 11<//td> 1989 1,439 6,057 [R] 3,993 785 551 [12] 1,251 [12] 2,620 8,954 12,825 1990 1,701 8,062 [R] 2,817 826 432 [12] 469 [12] 3,097 10,271 13,837 1991 3,624 5,715 [R] 3,947

  13. Word Pro - Untitled1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 Table 10.9 Photovoltaic Cell and Module Shipments by Sector and End Use, 1989-2010 (Peak Kilowatts 1 ) Year By Sector By End Use Total Residential Commercial 3 Industrial 4 Electric Power 5 Other 6 Grid-Connected 2 Off-Grid 2 Centralized 7 Distributed 8 Domestic 9 Non-Domestic 10 Total Shipments of Photovoltaic Cells and Modules 11 1989 1,439 R 6,057 3,993 785 551 12 ( ) 12 1,251 2,620 8,954 12,825 1990 1,701 R 8,062 2,817 826 432 12 ( ) 12 469 3,097 10,271 13,837 1991 3,624 R 5,715 3,947

  14. ACTION CONCENTRATION FOR MIXTURES OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS (VOC) & METHANE & HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MARUSICH, R.M.

    2006-07-10

    Waste containers may contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs), methane, hydrogen and possibly propane. These constituents may occur individually or in mixtures. Determining if a waste container contains a flammable concentration of flammable gases and vapors (from VOCs) is important to the safety of the handling, repackaging and shipping activities. This report provides the basis for determining the flammability of mixtures of flammable gases and vapors. The concentration of a mixture that is at the lowest flammability limit for that mixture is called the action concentration. The action concentration can be determined using total VOC concentrations or actual concentration of each individual VOC. The concentrations of hydrogen and methane are included with the total VOC or individual VOC concentration to determine the action concentration. Concentrations below this point are not flammable. Waste containers with gas/vapor concentrations at or above the action concentration are considered flammable.

  15. Flow field computation of the NREL S809 airfoil using various turbulence models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Y.L.; Yang, S.L.; Arici, O. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States). Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics Dept.

    1996-10-01

    Performance comparison of three popular turbulence models, namely Baldwin-Lomas algebraic model, Chien`s Low-Reynolds-Number {kappa}-{epsilon} model, and Wilcox`s Low-Reynolds-Number {kappa}-{omega} model, is given. These models were applied to calculate the flow field around the National Renewable Energy Laboratory S809 airfoil using Total Variational Diminishing scheme. Numerical results of C{sub P}, C{sub L}, and C{sub D} are presented along with the Delft experimental data. It is shown that all three models perform well for attached flow, i.e., no flow separation at low angles of attack. However, at high angles of attack with flow separation, convergence characteristics show Wilcox`s model outperforms the other models. Results of this study will be used to guide the authors in their dynamic stall research.

  16. The uranium cylinder assay system for enrichment plant safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Karen A; Swinhoe, Martyn T; Marlow, Johnna B; Menlove, Howard O; Rael, Carlos D; Iwamoto, Tomonori; Tamura, Takayuki; Aiuchi, Syun

    2010-01-01

    Safeguarding sensitive fuel cycle technology such as uranium enrichment is a critical component in preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. A useful tool for the nuclear materials accountancy of such a plant would be an instrument that measured the uranium content of UF{sub 6} cylinders. The Uranium Cylinder Assay System (UCAS) was designed for Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited (JNFL) for use in the Rokkasho Enrichment Plant in Japan for this purpose. It uses total neutron counting to determine uranium mass in UF{sub 6} cylinders given a known enrichment. This paper describes the design of UCAS, which includes features to allow for unattended operation. It can be used on 30B and 48Y cylinders to measure depleted, natural, and enriched uranium. It can also be used to assess the amount of uranium in decommissioned equipment and waste containers. Experimental measurements have been carried out in the laboratory and these are in good agreement with the Monte Carlo modeling results.

  17. Computerized simulation of fuel consumption in the agriculture industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fontana, C.; Rotz, C.A.

    1982-07-01

    A computer model was developed to simulate conventional and ethanol fuel consumption for crop production. The model was validated by obtaining a close comparison between simulated and actual diesel requirements for farms in Michigan. Parameters for ethanol consumption were obtained from laboratory tests using total fueling of spark-ignition engines and dual-fueling of diesel engines with ethanol. Ethanol fuel will always be more economically used in spark-ignition engines than in dual-fueled diesel engines. The price of gasoline must inflate at least 14 percent/yr greater than that of ethanol and diesel must inflate at least 23 percent/yr more than ethanol to allow economic use of ethanol as tractor fuel within the next 5 years.

  18. Economics of ethanol fuel for crop production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fontana, C.; Rotz, C.A.

    1982-07-01

    A computer model was developed to simulate conventional and ethanol fuel consumption for crop production. The model was validated by obtaining a close comparison between simulated and actual diesel requirements for farms in Michigan. Parameters for ethanol consumption were obtained from laboratory tests using total fueling of spark-ignition engines and dual-fueling of diesel engines with ethanol. Ethanol fuel will always be more economically used in spark-ignition engines than in dual-fueled diesel engines. The price of gasoline must inflate at least 14 percent/year greater than that of ethanol and diesel must inflate at least 23 percent/year more than ethanol to allow economic use of ethanol as tractor fuel within the next 5 years. (Refs. 13).

  19. Tunable, diode side-pumped Er:YAG laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamilton, C.E.; Furu, L.H.

    1997-04-22

    A discrete-element Er:YAG laser, side pumped by a 220 Watt peak-power InGaAs diode array, generates >500 mWatts at 2.94 {micro}m, and is tunable over a 6 nm range near about 2.936 {micro}m. The oscillator is a plano-concave resonator consisting of a concave high reflector, a flat output coupler, a Er:YAG crystal and a YAG intracavity etalon, which serves as the tuning element. The cavity length is variable from 3 cm to 4 cm. The oscillator uses total internal reflection in the Er:YAG crystal to allow efficient coupling of the diode emission into the resonating modes of the oscillator. With the tuning element removed, the oscillator produces up to 1.3 Watts of average power at 2.94 {micro}m. The duty factor of the laser is 6.5% and the repetition rate is variable up to 1 kHz. This laser is useful for tuning to an atmospheric transmission window at 2.935 {micro}m (air wavelength). The laser is also useful as a spectroscopic tool because it can access several infrared water vapor transitions, as well as transitions in organic compounds. Other uses include medical applications (e.g., for tissue ablation and uses with fiber optic laser scalpels) and as part of industrial effluent monitoring systems. 4 figs.

  20. Tunable, diode side-pumped Er: YAG laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Charles E.; Furu, Laurence H.

    1997-01-01

    A discrete-element Er:YAG laser, side pumped by a 220 Watt peak-power InGaAs diode array, generates >500 mWatts at 2.94 .mu.m, and is tunable over a 6 nm range near about 2.936 .mu.m. The oscillator is a plano-concave resonator consisting of a concave high reflector, a flat output coupler, a Er:YAG crystal and a YAG intracavity etalon, which serves as the tuning element. The cavity length is variable from 3 cm to 4 cm. The oscillator uses total internal reflection in the Er:YAG crystal to allow efficient coupling of the diode emission into the resonating modes of the oscillator. With the tuning element removed, the oscillator produces up to 1.3 Watts of average power at 2.94 .mu.m. The duty factor of the laser is 6.5% and the repetition rate is variable up to 1 kHz. This laser is useful for tuning to an atmospheric transmission window at 2.935 .mu.m (air wavelength). The laser is also useful as a spectroscopic tool because it can access several infrared water vapor transitions, as well as transitions in organic compounds. Other uses include medical applications (e.g., for tissue ablation and uses with fiber optic laser scalpels) and as part of industrial effluent monitoring systems.

  1. NO EVIDENCE FOR EVOLUTION IN THE FAR-INFRARED-RADIO CORRELATION OUT TO z {approx} 2 IN THE EXTENDED CHANDRA DEEP FIELD SOUTH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, Minnie Y.; Huynh, Minh T.; Helou, George; Norris, Ray P.; Dickinson, Mark; Frayer, Dave; Monkiewicz, Jacqueline A.

    2011-04-20

    We investigate the 70 {mu}m far-infrared-radio correlation (FRC) of star-forming galaxies in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS) out to z > 2. We use 70 {mu}m data from the Far-Infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (FIDEL), which comprises the most sensitive ({approx}0.8 mJy rms) and extensive far-infrared deep field observations using MIPS on the Spitzer Space Telescope, and 1.4 GHz radio data ({approx}8 {mu}Jy beam{sup -1} rms) from the Very Large Array. In order to quantify the evolution of the FRC, we use both survival analysis and stacking techniques, which we find give similar results. We also calculate the FRC using total infrared luminosity and rest-frame radio luminosity, q{sub TIR}, and find that q{sub TIR} is constant (within 0.22) over the redshift range 0-2. We see no evidence for evolution in the FRC at 70 {mu}m, which is surprising given the many factors that are expected to change this ratio at high redshifts.

  2. Report on the workshop "Decay spectroscopy at CARIBU: advanced fuel cycle applications, nuclear structure and astrophysics". 14-16 April 2011, Argonne National Laboratory, USA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kondev, F.; Carpenter, M.P.; Chowdhury, P.; Clark, J.A.; Lister, C.J.; Nichols, A.L.; Swewryniak, D.

    2011-10-06

    A workshop on 'Decay Spectroscopy at CARIBU: Advanced Fuel Cycle Applications, Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics' will be held at Argonne National Laboratory on April 14-16, 2011. The aim of the workshop is to discuss opportunities for decay studies at the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) of the ATLAS facility with emphasis on advanced fuel cycle (AFC) applications, nuclear structure and astrophysics research. The workshop will consist of review and contributed talks. Presentations by members of the local groups, outlining the status of relevant in-house projects and availabile equipment, will also be organized. time will also be set aside to discuss and develop working collaborations for future decay studies at CARIBU. Topics of interest include: (1) Decay data of relevance to AFC applications with emphasis on reactor decay heat; (2) Discrete high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy following radioactive decya and related topics; (3) Calorimetric studies of neutron-rich fission framgents using Total ABsorption Gamma-Ray Spectrometry (TAGS) technique; (4) Beta-delayed neutron emissions and related topics; and (5) Decay data needs for nuclear astrophysics.

  3. Impacts of Water Quality on Residential Water Heating Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widder, Sarah H.; Baechler, Michael C.

    2013-11-01

    Water heating is a ubiquitous energy use in all residential housing, accounting for 17.7% of residential energy use (EIA 2012). Today, there are many efficient water heating options available for every fuel type, from electric and gas to more unconventional fuel types like propane, solar, and fuel oil. Which water heating option is the best choice for a given household will depend on a number of factors, including average daily hot water use (total gallons per day), hot water draw patterns (close together or spread out), the hot water distribution system (compact or distributed), installation constraints (such as space, electrical service, or venting accommodations) and fuel-type availability and cost. While in general more efficient water heaters are more expensive than conventional water heating technologies, the savings in energy use and, thus, utility bills can recoup the additional upfront investment and make an efficient water heater a good investment over time in most situations, although the specific payback period for a given installation will vary widely. However, the expected lifetime of a water heater in a given installation can dramatically influence the cost effectiveness and savings potential of a water heater and should be considered, along with water use characteristics, fuel availability and cost, and specific home characteristics when selecting the optimum water heating equipment for a particular installation. This report provides recommendations for selecting and maintaining water heating equipment based on local water quality characteristics.

  4. Chip-Scale Bioassays Based on Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering: Fundamentals and Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hye-Young Park

    2005-12-17

    This work explores the development and application of chip-scale bioassays based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for high throughput and high sensitivity analysis of biomolecules. The size effect of gold nanoparticles on the intensity of SERS is first presented. A sandwich immunoassay was performed using Raman-labeled immunogold nanoparticles with various sizes. The SERS responses were correlated to particle densities, which were obtained by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The response of individual particles was also investigated using Raman-microscope and an array of gold islands on a silicon substrate. The location and the size of individual particles were mapped using AFM. The next study describes a low-level detection of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 and simulants of biological warfare agents in a sandwich immunoassay format using SERS labels, which have been termed Extrinsic Raman labels (ERLs). A new ERL scheme based on a mixed monolayer is also introduced. The mixed monolayer ERLs were created by covering the gold nanoparticles with a mixture of two thiolates, one thiolate for covalently binding antibody to the particle and the other thiolate for producing a strong Raman signal. An assay platform based on mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold is then presented. The mixed SAMs were prepared from dithiobis(succinimidyl undecanoate) (DSU) to covalently bind antibodies on gold substrate and oligo(ethylene glycol)-terminated thiol to prevent nonspecific adsorption of antibodies. After the mixed SAMs surfaces, formed from various mole fraction of DSU were incubated with antibodies, AFM was used to image individual antibodies on the surface. The final study presents a collaborative work on the single molecule adsorption of YOYO-I labeled {lambda}-DNA at compositionally patterned SAMs using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. The role of solution pH, {lambda}-DNA concentration, and domain size was investigated. This work also revealed the potential importance of structural defects.

  5. The atomic level journey from aqueous polyoxometalate to metal oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, Yu; Fast, Dylan B.; Ruther, Rose E.; Amador, Jenn M.; Fullmer, Lauren B.; Decker, Shawn R.; Zakharov, Lev N.; Dolgos, Michelle R. Nyman, May

    2015-01-15

    Aqueous precursors tailored for the deposition of thin film materials are desirable for sustainable, simple, low energy production of advanced materials. Yet the simple practice of using aqueous precursors is complicated by the multitude of interactions that occur between ions and water during dehydration. Here we use lithium polyoxoniobate salts to investigate the fundamental interactions in the transition from precursor cluster to oxide film. Small-angle X-ray scattering of solutions, total X-ray scattering of intermediate gels, and morphological and structural characterization of the lithium niobate thin films reveal the atomic level transitions between these states. The studies show that (1) lithium–[H{sub 2}Nb{sub 6}O{sub 19}]{sup 6−} has drastically different solution behaviour than lithium–[Nb{sub 6}O{sub 19}]{sup 8−}, linked to the precursor salt structure (2) in both compositions, the intermediate gel preserves the polyoxoniobate clusters and show similar local order and (3) the morphology and phases of deposited films reflect the ions behaviour throughout the journey from cluster solution to metal oxide. - Graphical abstract: Aqueous lithium polyoxoniobate salts were used to prepare lithium niobate (LiNbO{sub 3}) thin films. Fundamental studies were performed to investigate the interactions in the transition from precursor cluster to the oxide film. It was found that acid–base and ion-association chemistries of the aqueous and gel systems significantly affect the key processes in this atom-level journey. - Highlights: • Lithium polyoxoniobate clusters were synthesized with control over Li:Nb ratio as precursors for LiNbO{sub 3} films. • X-ray scattering studies in solution and the solid-state revealed differences controlled by Li:Nb ratio. • Film deposition studies revealed phase, composition and morphology is controlled by Li:Nb ratio. • Cluster to film transformation was revealed using total X-ray scattering and TGA.

  6. SU-E-T-501: Normal Tissue Toxicities of Pulsed Low Dose Rate Radiotherapy and Conventional Radiotherapy: An in Vivo Total Body Irradiation Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cvetkovic, D; Zhang, P; Wang, B; Chen, L; Ma, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Pulsed low dose rate radiotherapy (PLDR) is a re-irradiation technique for therapy of recurrent cancers. We have previously shown a significant difference in the weight and survival time between the mice treated with conventional radiotherapy (CRT) and PLDR using total body irradiation (TBI). The purpose of this study was to investigate the in vivo effects of PLDR on normal mouse tissues.Materials and Methods: Twenty two male BALB/c nude mice, 4 months of age, were randomly assigned into a PLDR group (n=10), a CRT group (n=10), and a non-irradiated control group (n=2). The Siemens Artiste accelerator with 6 MV photon beams was used. The mice received a total of 18Gy in 3 fractions with a 20day interval. The CRT group received the 6Gy dose continuously at a dose rate of 300 MU/min. The PLDR group was irradiated with 0.2Gyx20 pulses with a 3min interval between the pulses. The mice were weighed thrice weekly and sacrificed 2 weeks after the last treatment. Brain, heart, lung, liver, spleen, gastrointestinal, urinary and reproductive organs, and sternal bone marrow were removed, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded and stained with H and E. Morphological changes were observed under a microscope. Results: Histopathological examination revealed atrophy in several irradiated organs. The degree of atrophy was mild to moderate in the PLDR group, but severe in the CRT group. The most pronounced morphological abnormalities were in the immune and hematopoietic systems, namely spleen and bone marrow. Brain hemorrhage was seen in the CRT group, but not in the PLDR group. Conclusions: Our results showed that PLDR induced less toxicity in the normal mouse tissues than conventional radiotherapy for the same dose and regimen. Considering that PLDR produces equivalent tumor control as conventional radiotherapy, it would be a good modality for treatment of recurrent cancers.

  7. Status Report on the Passive Neutron Enrichment Meter (PNEM) for UF6 Cylinder Assay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Karen A.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Menlove, Howard O.; Marlow, Johnna B.

    2012-05-02

    The Passive Neutron Enrichment Meter (PNEM) is a nondestructive assay (NDA) system being developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). It was designed to determine {sup 235}U mass and enrichment of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) in product, feed, and tails cylinders (i.e., 30B and 48Y cylinders). These cylinders are found in the nuclear fuel cycle at uranium conversion, enrichment, and fuel fabrication facilities. The PNEM is a {sup 3}He-based neutron detection system that consists of two briefcase-sized detector pods. A photograph of the system during characterization at LANL is shown in Fig. 1. Several signatures are currently being studied to determine the most effective measurement and data reduction technique for unfolding {sup 235}U mass and enrichment. The system collects total neutron and coincidence data for both bare and cadmium-covered detector pods. The measurement concept grew out of the success of the Uranium Cylinder Assay System (UCAS), which is an operator system at Rokkasho Enrichment Plant (REP) that uses total neutron counting to determine {sup 235}U mass in UF{sub 6} cylinders. The PNEM system was designed with higher efficiency than the UCAS in order to add coincidence counting functionality for the enrichment determination. A photograph of the UCAS with a 48Y cylinder at REP is shown in Fig. 2, and the calibration measurement data for 30B product and 48Y feed and tails cylinders is shown in Fig. 3. The data was collected in a low-background environment, meaning there is very little scatter in the data. The PNEM measurement concept was first presented at the 2010 Institute of Nuclear Materials Management (INMM) Annual Meeting. The physics design and uncertainty analysis were presented at the 2010 International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards Symposium, and the mechanical and electrical designs and characterization measurements were published in the ESARDA Bulletin in 2011.

  8. Life-cycle analysis of alternative aviation fuels in GREET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elgowainy, A.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Carter, N.; Stratton, R.; Hileman, J.; Malwitz, A.; Balasubramanian, S.

    2012-07-23

    The Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, has been expanded to include well-to-wake (WTWa) analysis of aviation fuels and aircraft. This report documents the key WTWa stages and assumptions for fuels that represent alternatives to petroleum jet fuel. The aviation module in GREET consists of three spreadsheets that present detailed characterizations of well-to-pump and pump-to-wake parameters and WTWa results. By using the expanded GREET version (GREET1{_}2011), we estimate WTWa results for energy use (total, fossil, and petroleum energy) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide) for (1) each unit of energy (lower heating value) consumed by the aircraft or (2) each unit of distance traveled/ payload carried by the aircraft. The fuel pathways considered in this analysis include petroleum-based jet fuel from conventional and unconventional sources (i.e., oil sands); Fisher-Tropsch (FT) jet fuel from natural gas, coal, and biomass; bio-jet fuel from fast pyrolysis of cellulosic biomass; and bio-jet fuel from vegetable and algal oils, which falls under the American Society for Testing and Materials category of hydroprocessed esters and fatty acids. For aircraft operation, we considered six passenger aircraft classes and four freight aircraft classes in this analysis. Our analysis revealed that, depending on the feedstock source, the fuel conversion technology, and the allocation or displacement credit methodology applied to co-products, alternative bio-jet fuel pathways have the potential to reduce life-cycle GHG emissions by 55-85 percent compared with conventional (petroleum-based) jet fuel. Although producing FT jet fuel from fossil feedstock sources - such as natural gas and coal - could greatly reduce dependence on crude oil, production from such sources (especially coal) produces greater WTWa GHG emissions compared with petroleum jet fuel production unless carbon management practices, such as carbon capture and storage, are used.

  9. Development of an energy-use estimation methodology for the revised Navy Manual MO-303

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richman, E.E.; Keller, J.M.; Wood, A.G.; Dittmer, A.L.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Navy commissioned Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to revise and/or update the Navy Utilities Targets Manual, NAVFAC MO-303 (U.S. Navy 1972b). The purpose of the project was to produce a current, applicable, and easy-to-use version of the manual for use by energy and facility engineers and staff at all Navy Public Works Centers (PWCs), Public Works Departments (PWDs), Engineering Field Divisions (EFDs), and other related organizations. The revision of the MO-303 manual involved developing a methodology for estimating energy consumption in buildings and ships. This methodology can account for, and equitably allocate, energy consumption within Navy installations. The analyses used to develop this methodology included developing end-use intensities (EUIs) from a vast collection of Navy base metering and billing data. A statistical analysis of the metering data, weather data, and building energy-use characteristics was used to develop appropriate EUI values for use at all Navy bases. A complete Navy base energy reconciliation process was also created for use in allocating all known energy consumption. Initial attempts to use total Navy base consumption values did not produce usable results. A parallel effort using individual building consumption data provided an estimating method that incorporated weather effects. This method produced a set of building EUI values and weather adjustments for use in estimating building energy use. A method of reconciling total site energy consumption was developed based on a {open_quotes}zero-sum{close_quotes} principle. This method provides a way to account for all energy use and apportion part or all of it to buildings and other energy uses when actual consumption is not known. The entire text of the manual was also revised to present a more easily read understood and usable document.

  10. SU-E-T-125: Dosimetric Comparison of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Using Robotic Versus Traditional Linac Platform in Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, T; Rella, J; Yang, J; Sims, C; Fung, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Recent development of an MLC for robotic external beam radiotherapy has the potential of new clinical application in conventionally fractionated radiation therapy. This study offers a dosimetric comparison of IMRT plans using Cyberknife with MLC versus conventional linac plans. Methods: Ten prostate cancer patients treated on a traditional linac with IMRT to 7920cGy at 180cGy/fraction were randomly selected. GTVs were defined as prostate plus proximal seminal vesicles. PTVs were defined as GTV+8mm in all directions except 5mm posteriorly. Conventional IMRT planning was performed on Philips Pinnacle and delivered on a standard linac with CBCT and 10mm collimator leaf width. For each case a Cyberknife plan was created using Accuray Multiplan with same CT data set, contours, and dose constraints. All dosimetric data was transferred to third party software for independent computation of contour volumes and DVH. Delivery efficiency was evaluated using total MU, treatment time, number of beams, and number of segments. Results: Evaluation criteria including percent target coverage, homogeneity index, and conformity index were found to be comparable. All dose constraints from QUANTEC were found to be statistically similar except rectum V50Gy and bladder V65Gy. Average rectum V50Gy was lower for robotic IMRT (30.07%±6.57) versus traditional (34.73%±3.62, p=0.0130). Average bladder V65Gy was lower for robotic (17.87%±12.74) versus traditional (21.03%±11.93, p=0.0405). Linac plans utilized 9 coplanar beams, 48.9±3.8 segments, and 19381±2399MU. Robotic plans utilized 38.4±9.0 non-coplanar beams, 85.5±21.0 segments and 42554.71±16381.54 MU. The average treatment was 15.02±0.60 minutes for traditional versus 20.90±2.51 for robotic. Conclusion: The robotic IMRT plans were comparable to the traditional IMRT plans in meeting the target volume dose objectives. Critical structure dose constraints were largely comparable although statistically significant differences were found in favor of the robotic platform in terms of rectum V50Gy and bladder V65Gy at a cost of 25% longer treatment time.

  11. Alpha image reconstruction (AIR): A new iterative CT image reconstruction approach using voxel-wise alpha blending

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hofmann, Christian; Sawall, Stefan; Knaup, Michael; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Iterative image reconstruction gains more and more interest in clinical routine, as it promises to reduce image noise (and thereby patient dose), to reduce artifacts, or to improve spatial resolution. Among vendors and researchers, however, there is no consensus of how to best achieve these aims. The general approach is to incorporatea priori knowledge into iterative image reconstruction, for example, by adding additional constraints to the cost function, which penalize variations between neighboring voxels. However, this approach to regularization in general poses a resolution noise trade-off because the stronger the regularization, and thus the noise reduction, the stronger the loss of spatial resolution and thus loss of anatomical detail. The authors propose a method which tries to improve this trade-off. The proposed reconstruction algorithm is called alpha image reconstruction (AIR). One starts with generating basis images, which emphasize certain desired image properties, like high resolution or low noise. The AIR algorithm reconstructs voxel-specific weighting coefficients that are applied to combine the basis images. By combining the desired properties of each basis image, one can generate an image with lower noise and maintained high contrast resolution thus improving the resolution noise trade-off. Methods: All simulations and reconstructions are performed in native fan-beam geometry. A water phantom with resolution bar patterns and low contrast disks is simulated. A filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction with a Ram-Lak kernel is used as a reference reconstruction. The results of AIR are compared against the FBP results and against a penalized weighted least squares reconstruction which uses total variation as regularization. The simulations are based on the geometry of the Siemens Somatom Definition Flash scanner. To quantitatively assess image quality, the authors analyze line profiles through resolution patterns to define a contrast factor for contrast-resolution plots. Furthermore, the authors calculate the contrast-to-noise ratio with the low contrast disks and the authors compare the agreement of the reconstructions with the ground truth by calculating the normalized cross-correlation and the root-mean-square deviation. To evaluate the clinical performance of the proposed method, the authors reconstruct patient data acquired with a Somatom Definition Flash dual source CT scanner (Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany). Results: The results of the simulation study show that among the compared algorithms AIR achieves the highest resolution and the highest agreement with the ground truth. Compared to the reference FBP reconstruction AIR is able to reduce the relative pixel noise by up to 50% and at the same time achieve a higher resolution by maintaining the edge information from the basis images. These results can be confirmed with the patient data. Conclusions: To evaluate the AIR algorithm simulated and measured patient data of a state-of-the-art clinical CT system were processed. It is shown, that generating CT images through the reconstruction of weighting coefficients has the potential to improve the resolution noise trade-off and thus to improve the dose usage in clinical CT.

  12. The development of optical microscopy techniques for the advancement of single-particle studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchuk, Kyle

    2013-05-15

    Single particle orientation and rotational tracking (SPORT) has recently become a powerful optical microscopy tool that can expose many molecular motions. Unfortunately, there is not yet a single microscopy technique that can decipher all particle motions in all environmental conditions, thus there are limitations to current technologies. Within, the two powerful microscopy tools of total internal reflection and interferometry are advanced to determine the position, orientation, and optical properties of metallic nanoparticles in a variety of environments. Total internal reflection is an optical phenomenon that has been applied to microscopy to produce either fluorescent or scattered light. The non-invasive far-field imaging technique is coupled with a near-field illumination scheme that allows for better axial resolution than confocal microscopy and epi-fluorescence microscopy. By controlling the incident illumination angle using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, a new type of imaging probe called “non-blinking” quantum dots (NBQDs) were super-localized in the axial direction to sub-10-nm precision. These particles were also used to study the rotational motion of microtubules being propelled by the motor protein kinesin across the substrate surface. The same instrument was modified to function under total internal reflection scattering (TIRS) microscopy to study metallic anisotropic nanoparticles and their dynamic interactions with synthetic lipid bilayers. Utilizing two illumination lasers with opposite polarization directions at wavelengths corresponding to the short and long axis surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the nanoparticles, both the in-plane and out-of-plane movements of many particles could be tracked simultaneously. When combined with Gaussian point spread function (PSF) fitting for particle super-localization, the binding status and rotational movement could be resolved without degeneracy. TIRS microscopy was also used to find the 3D orientation of stationary metallic anisotropic nanoparticles utilizing only long-axis SPR enhancement. The polarization direction of the illuminating light was rotated causing the relative intensity of p-polarized and s-polarized light within the evanescent field to change. The interaction of the evanescent field with the particles is dependent on the orientation of the particle producing an intensity curve. This curve and the in-plane angle can be compared with simulations to accurately determine the 3D orientation. Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy is another non-invasive far-field technique based upon interferometry that does not rely on staining or other contrast enhancing techniques. In addition, high numerical aperture condensers and objectives can be used to give a very narrow depth of field allowing for the optical tomography of samples, which makes it an ideal candidate to study biological systems. DIC microscopy has also proven itself in determining the orientation of gold nanorods in both engineered environments and within cells. Many types of nanoparticles and nanostructures have been synthesized using lithographic techniques on silicon wafer substrates. Traditionally, reflective mode DIC microscopes have been developed and applied to the topographical study of reflective substrates and the imaging of chips on silicon wafers. Herein, a laser-illuminated reflected-mode DIC was developed for studying nanoparticles on reflective surfaces.