National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for usda global agricultural

  1. USDA Agricultural Conservation Easement Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA's) Agricultural Conservation Easement Program (ACEP) provides financial and technical assistance to help conserve agricultural lands, wetlands, and their related benefits.

  2. USDA Agricultural Conservation Easement Program Webinar for Tribes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the American Indian Higher Education Consortium, this webinar will cover details on the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA's) new Agricultural Conservation Easement Program (ACEP)...

  3. USDA Agricultural Conservation Easement Program Webinar for Tribes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the American Indian Higher Education Consortium, this webinar will cover details on the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA's) new Agricultural Conservation Easement Program (ACEP) established in the 2014 Farm Bill. It will specifically discuss the implications of ACEP for Tribes and tribal owners.

  4. United States Department of The USDA Forest Service in Hawaii:Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of The USDA Forest Service in Hawaii:Agriculture Forest Service The First Technical Report PSW-111 #12;Nelson, Robert E. 1989. The USDA Forest Service in Hawaii: the first 20 years Service activities in Hawaii is from the vantage point of an author who during his two decades

  5. Global trends in agriculture and food systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    development * Corresponding author: Danish Research Centre for Organic Food and Farming (DARCOF), P.O. Box 501 Global trends in agriculture and food systems Marie Trydeman Knudsen*, Niels Halberg, Jørgen E .................................................................................16 Global trends in organic agriculture

  6. Global Climate Change and Agriculture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.

    2009-01-01

    The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released in 2007 significantly increased our confidence about the role that humans play in forcing climate change. There is now a high degree of confidence that the (a) current atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) far exceed those of the pre-industrial era, (b) global increases in CO2 arise mainly from fossil fuel use and land use change while those of CH4 and N2O originate primarily from agricultural activities, and (c) the net effect of human activities since 1750 has led to a warming of the lower layers of the atmosphere, with an increased radiative forcing of 1.6 W m-2. Depending on the scenario of human population growth and global development, mean global temperatures could rise between 1.8 and 4.0 °C by the end of the 21st century.

  7. USDA Global Agricultural Information Network (GAIN) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, New York: EnergyU.S. EPA RegionforUSto

  8. Agriculture, Free Trade, and Global Development: Some Personal Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Head, John W.

    2005-01-01

    Agriculture, Free Trade, and Global Development: Some Personal Observations John W. Head* I am very pleased to have been invited to offer some luncheon remarks for the Law School's Symposium on Agriculture, Free Trade, and Global Development. My..., or at least a light break from the weighty papers being presented at the symposium, if I were to offer some of my own personal observations about the three subject areas that combine to give this symposium its title: agriculture, free trade, and global...

  9. Developing Livestock Facility Type Information from USDA Agricultural Census Data for Use in Epidemiological and Economic Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melius, C; Robertson, A; Hullinger, P

    2006-10-24

    The epidemiological and economic modeling of livestock diseases requires knowing the size, location, and operational type of each livestock facility within the US. At the present time, the only national database of livestock facilities that is available to the general public is the USDA's 2002 Agricultural Census data, published by the National Agricultural Statistics Service, herein referred to as the 'NASS data.' The NASS data provides facility data at the county level for various livestock types (i.e., beef cows, milk cows, cattle on feed, other cattle, total hogs and pigs, sheep and lambs, milk goats, and angora goats). However, the number and sizes of facilities for the various livestock types are not independent since some facilities have more than one type of livestock, and some livestock are of more than one type (e.g., 'other cattle' that are being fed for slaughter are also 'cattle on feed'). In addition, any data tabulated by NASS that could identify numbers of animals or other data reported by an individual respondent is suppressed by NASS and coded with a 'D.'. To be useful for epidemiological and economic modeling, the NASS data must be converted into a unique set of facility types (farms having similar operational characteristics). The unique set must not double count facilities or animals. At the same time, it must account for all the animals, including those for which the data has been suppressed. Therefore, several data processing steps are required to work back from the published NASS data to obtain a consistent database for individual livestock operations. This technical report documents data processing steps that were used to convert the NASS data into a national livestock facility database with twenty-eight facility types. The process involves two major steps. The first step defines the rules used to estimate the data that is suppressed within the NASS database. The second step converts the NASS livestock types into the operational facility types used by the epidemiological and economic model. Comparison of the resulting database with an independent survey of farms in central California shows excellent agreement between the numbers of farms for the various facility types. This suggests that the NASS data are well suited for providing a consistent set of county-level information on facility numbers and sizes that can be used in epidemiological and economic models.

  10. Obtaining and Using USDA Market and Production Reports 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bevers, Stan; Amosson, Stephen H.; Smith, Jackie; O'Brien, Daniel

    2008-10-07

    is commonly available from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and land grant universities. USDA is responsible for collecting and reporting to the public a vast array of information on virtually every agricultural commodity produced...

  11. Will U.S. Agriculture Really Benefit from Global Warming? Accounting for Irrigation in the Hedonic Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlenker, Wolfram; Hanemann, W. Michael; Fisher, Anthony C.

    2004-01-01

    Really Benefit from Global Warming? Accounting forR. , “The Impact of Global Warming on Agriculture: Comment,”371–411. , “The Impact of Global Warming on Agriculture: A

  12. FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing Countries AgencyCompany Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture...

  13. Increasing global agricultural production by reducing ozone damages via methane emission controls and ozone-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauzerall, Denise

    Increasing global agricultural production by reducing ozone damages via methane emission controls demonstrate the significant potential to sustainably improve global agricultural production by decreasing O3 degradation poses a major challenge for agricultural production. Because surface ozone (O3) has a significant

  14. Climate change and agriculture : global and regional effects using an economic model of international trade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, John M.

    1993-01-01

    Empirical estimates of the economic welfare implications of the impact of climate change on global agricultural production are made. Agricultural yield changes resulting from climate scenarios associated with a doubling ...

  15. Plant genetics, sustainable agriculture and global food security.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronald, Pamela

    2011-01-01

    effects have resulted from commercialization of ge- netically engineered crops (Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources,

  16. Joint USDA/DOE meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    This documents contains the details from the USDA/USDOE meeting on April 11--12, 1994. Topics discussed include: genetic research, environmental research, renewable energy sources, food supply, improved fertilizers, new pesticides, research programs combining the efforts of the two agencies to develop new products for use in the agriculture industry, environmentally safe products, getting more with less money, and various other subjects dealing with how cooperation among these agencies can improve the agriculture industry.

  17. PURDUE UNIVERSITY ANNOUNCES USDA NATIONAL NEEDS FELLOWSHIPS IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PURDUE UNIVERSITY ANNOUNCES USDA NATIONAL NEEDS FELLOWSHIPS IN THE ECONOMICS OF ALTERNATIVE ENERGY in agricultural and applied economics Dissertation research in alternative energy Involvement in high OF ALTERNATIVE ENERGY DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS, PURDUE UNIVERSITY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The Department

  18. The Impact of Global Warming on U.S. Agriculture: An Econometric Analysis of Optimal Growing Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlenker, Wolfram; Hanemann, W. Michael; Fisher, Anthony C.

    2004-01-01

    Really Bene?t From Global Warming? Accounting for IrrigationR. , The Economics of Global Warming, Washington, D.C. :1992. , “The Impact of Global Warming on Agriculture:

  19. FAO Global Inventory of Agricultural Mitigation Projects in Developing

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdisto Electric Coop,Erosion FlumeEventFAO Climate-Smart Agriculture

  20. The contribution of future agricultural trends in the US Midwest to global climate change mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, Allison M.; Kyle, G. Page; Zhang, Xuesong; Bandaru, Varaprasad; West, Tristram O.; Wise, Marshall A.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2014-01-19

    Land use change is a complex response to changing environmental and socioeconomic systems. Historical drivers of land use change include changes in the natural resource availability of a region, changes in economic conditions for production of certain products and changing policies. Most recently, introduction of policy incentives for biofuel production have influenced land use change in the US Midwest, leading to concerns that bioenergy production systems may compete with food production and land conservation. Here we explore how land use may be impacted by future climate mitigation measures by nesting a high resolution agricultural model (EPIC – Environmental Policy Indicator Climate) for the US Midwest within a global integrated assessment model (GCAM – Global Change Assessment Model). This approach is designed to provide greater spatial resolution and detailed agricultural practice information by focusing on the climate mitigation potential of agriculture and land use in a specific region, while retaining the global economic context necessary to understand the far ranging effects of climate mitigation targets. We find that until the simulated carbon prices are very high, the US Midwest has a comparative advantage in producing traditional food and feed crops over bioenergy crops. Overall, the model responds to multiple pressures by adopting a mix of future responses. We also find that the GCAM model is capable of simulations at multiple spatial scales and agricultural technology resolution, which provides the capability to examine regional response to global policy and economic conditions in the context of climate mitigation.

  1. USDA BioPreferred Program Public Meeting for Stakeholders

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) BioPreferred® program will host a public meeting for interested stakeholders to discuss the issue of incorporating previously excluded mature market...

  2. Agriculture and Climate Change in Global Scenarios: Why Don't the Models Agree

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Gerald; van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique; Ahammad, Helal; Blanc, Elodie; Calvin, Katherine V.; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Havlik, Petr; Heyhoe, Edwina; Kyle, G. Page; Lotze-Campen, Hermann; von Lampe, Martin; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; van Meijl, Hans; Mueller, C.; Reilly, J. M.; Robertson, Richard; Sands, Ronald; Schmitz, Christoph; Tabeau, Andrzej; Takahashi, Kiyoshi; Valin, Hugo; Willenbockel, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Agriculture is unique among economic sectors in the nature of impacts from climate change. The production activity that transforms inputs into agricultural outputs makes direct use of weather inputs. Previous studies of the impacts of climate change on agriculture have reported substantial differences in outcomes of key variables such as prices, production, and trade. These divergent outcomes arise from differences in model inputs and model specification. The goal of this paper is to review climate change results and underlying determinants from a model comparison exercise with 10 of the leading global economic models that include significant representation of agriculture. By providing common productivity drivers that include climate change effects, differences in model outcomes are reduced. All models show higher prices in 2050 because of negative productivity shocks from climate change. The magnitude of the price increases, and the adaptation responses, differ significantly across the various models. Substantial differences exist in the structural parameters affecting demand, area, and yield, and should be a topic for future research.

  3. Agricultural

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TA I N P A T T E R N A NABPA'sDepositAgricultural Sign

  4. Agricultural

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TA I N P A T T E R N A NABPA'sDepositAgricultural

  5. ORISE: Multiple research appointments available through Agricultural...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Multiple research appointments available through Agricultural Research Service Postdoctoral Research Program Selected candidates participate in USDA research for one to four years...

  6. PPPL and USDA engineers win patent for pasteurizing eggs in the...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). The award marks the 27th patent granted to PPPL inventors since 1994. "This is a unique...

  7. United States Department of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    United States Department of Agriculture Keys to Soil Taxonomy Ninth Edition, 2003 #12;#12;Keys to Soil Taxonomy By Soil Survey Staff United States Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service Ninth Edition, 2003 #12;The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits

  8. NETL, USDA design coal-stabilized biomass gasification unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-09-30

    Coal, poultry litter, contaminated corn, rice hulls, moldly hay, manure sludge - these are representative materials that could be tested as fuel feedstocks in a hybrid gasification/combustion concept studied in a recent US Department of Energy (DOE) design project. DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) collaborated to develop a design concept of a power system that incorporates Hybrid Biomass Gasification. This system would explore the use of a wide range of biomass and agricultural waste products as gasifier feedstocks. The plant, if built, would supply one-third of electrical and steam heating needs at the USDA's Beltsville (Maryland) Agricultural Research Center. 1 fig., 1 photo.

  9. Global Agricultural Supply and Demand: Factors Contributing to the Recent Increase in Food Commodity Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2008-05-01

    This report discusses the factors that have led to global food commodity price inflaction and addresses the resulting implications.

  10. The economic impact of global climate and tropospheric oxone on world agricultural production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaodu

    2005-01-01

    The objective of my thesis is to analyze the economic impact on agriculture production from changes in climate and tropospheric ozone, and related policy interventions. The analysis makes use of the Emissions Prediction ...

  11. Assessing human health risk in the USDA forest service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamel, D.R.

    1990-12-31

    This paper identifies the kinds of risk assessments being done by or for the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service. Summaries of data sources currently in use and the pesticide risk assessments completed by the agency or its contractors are discussed. An overview is provided of the agency`s standard operating procedures for the conduct of toxicological, ecological, environmental fate, and human health risk assessments.

  12. USDA Finances Wind for Rural Economic Development (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newcomb, C.; Walters, T.

    2005-05-01

    To foster rural economic development and growth, Congress passed the Renewable Energy Systems and Energy Efficiency Improvements Program as Section 9006 of the 2002 Farm Bill. This program provides financial assistance to farmers, ranchers, and rural small businesses to purchase renewable energy systems or make energy efficiency improvements. The Rural Business and Cooperative Services of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) administers this program. This conference poster provides an overview of Section 9006.

  13. July 26, 2010 The Global Supply and Demand for Agricultural Land in 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of slowing yield growth for key staple crops. And public opposition to genetically modified crops has slowed and food system and its contributions to feeding the world's population as well as to ensuring of the global food system to shocks from extreme weather events, energy and financial markets, as well

  14. Impacts of Global Change on Diseases of Agricultural Crops and Forest Trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Plant Pathology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506-5502, USA. 5 Natural Resources on Climate Change projects rising levels of greenhouse gas and global temperature. The well-known dependence on pathogens have recently been shown in literature linking pathogen abundance to atmospheric composition. Past

  15. Storing Carbon in Agricultural Soils to Help Head-Off Global Warming and to Combat Desertification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, Norman J.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.

    2001-12-31

    We know for sure that addition of organic matter to soil increases water-holding capacity, imparts fertility with the addition of nutrients, increases soil aggregation and improves tilth. Depeing on it's type, organic matter contains between 40 and 60% carbon. Using agricultural management practices to increase the amount of organic matter and carbon in soils can be an effective strategy to offset carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere as well as to improve the quality of the soil and slow or prevent desertification.

  16. Agriculture, Land Use, Energy and Carbon Emission Impacts of Global Biofuel Mandates to Mid-Century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.; Luckow, Patrick; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page

    2014-02-01

    Three potential future scenarios of expanded global biofuel production are presented here utilizing the GCAM integrated assessment model. These scenarios span a range that encompasses on the low end a continuation of existing biofuel production policies to two scenarios that would require an expansion of current targets as well as an extension of biofuels targets to other regions of the world. Conventional oil use is reduced by 4-8% in the expanded biofuel scenarios, which results in a decrease of in CO2 emissions on the order of 1-2 GtCO2/year by mid-century from the global transportation sector. The regional distribution of crop production is relatively unaffected, but the biofuels targets do result in a marked increase in the production of conventional crops used for energy. Producer prices of sugar and corn reach levels about 12% and 7% above year 2005 levels, while the increased competition for land causes the price of food crops such as wheat, although not used for bioenergy in this study, to increase by 1 to 2%. The amount of land devoted to growing all food crops and dedicated bioenergy crops is increased by about 10% by 2050 in the High biofuel case, with concurrent decreases in other uses of land such as forest and pasture. In both of the expanded biofuels cases studied, there is an increase in net cumulative carbon emissions for the first couple of decades due to these induced land use changes. However, the difference in net cumulative emissions from the biofuels expansion decline by about 2035 as the reductions in energy system emissions exceed further increases in emissions from land use change. Even in the absence of a policy that would limit emissions from land use change, the differences in net cumulative emissions from the biofuels scenarios reach zero by 2050, and are decreasing further over time in both cases.

  17. Final work plan : investigation of potential contamination at the former USDA facility in Powhattan, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-02-02

    This Work Plan outlines the scope of work to be conducted to investigate the subsurface contaminant conditions at the property formerly leased by the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) in Powhattan, Kansas (Figure 1.1). Data obtained during this event will be used to (1) evaluate potential contaminant source areas on the property; (2) determine the vertical and horizontal extent of potential contamination; and (3) provide recommendations for future action, with the ultimate goal of assigning this site No Further Action status. The planned investigation includes groundwater monitoring requested by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), in accordance with Section V of the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Farm Service Agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). The work is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. A nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy, Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities. Argonne issued a Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002) that has been approved by the KDHE. The Master Work Plan describes the general scope of all investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas and provides guidance for these investigations. It should be consulted for the complete details of plans for work associated with the former CCC/USDA facility at Powhattan.

  18. UnitedStates of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of tropical forests for products and energy; forest and wildlife management, the South Pacific Forestry, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; 88 p. The 17 of the USDA Forest Service's tropical forestry research, forestry research in Asia and the Pacific, management

  19. Energy Department and USDA Partner to Support Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    USDA Partner to Support Energy Efficiency in Rural Communities Energy Department and USDA Partner to Support Energy Efficiency in Rural Communities February 28, 2013 - 9:45am...

  20. USDA Offers Renewable Energy Feasibility Studies for Rural Businesses...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    USDA Offers Renewable Energy Feasibility Studies for Rural Businesses USDA Offers Renewable Energy Feasibility Studies for Rural Businesses September 22, 2010 - 10:43am Addthis The...

  1. USDA, DOE Announce $18 Million Solicitation for Biomass Research...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    USDA, DOE Announce 18 Million Solicitation for Biomass Research and Development USDA, DOE Announce 18 Million Solicitation for Biomass Research and Development June 11, 2007 -...

  2. USDA Community Connect Program Grants

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture is accepting applications to serve rural communities where broadband service is least likely to be available. The projects funded by the Community Connect Grants...

  3. USDA Regional Conservation Partnership Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture is accepting applications for the Regional Conservation Partnership Program to identify and address natural resource objectives in balance with operational goals in order to benefit soil, water, wildlife, and related natural resources locally, regionally, and nationally.

  4. Oklahoma Agriculture Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    Oklahoma Agriculture Agriculture #12;Oklahoma Agriculture 2011Oklahoma Agriculture 2011 Oklahoma well-being of our communities and the counties in which they are located. Oklahoma State University Resources Oklahoma State University #12;Farm Operations · 86,600 farms; 4th in the nation · Average age

  5. Final work plan : investigation of potential contamination at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Hanover, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-11-19

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), operated a grain storage facility at the northeastern edge of the city of Hanover, Kansas, from 1950 until the early 1970s. During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were in common use by the grain storage industry to preserve grain in their facilities. In February 1998, trace to low levels of carbon tetrachloride (below the maximum contaminant level [MCL] of 5.0 {micro}g/L) were detected in two private wells near the former grain storage facility at Hanover, as part of a statewide USDA private well sampling program that was implemented by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) near former CCC/USDA facilities. In April 2007, the CCC/USDA collected near-surface soil samples at 1.8-2 ft BGL (below ground level) at 61 locations across the former CCC/USDA facility. All soil samples were analyzed by the rigorous gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer analytical method (purge-and-trap method). No contamination was found in soil samples above the reporting limit of 10 {micro}g/kg. In July 2007, the CCC/USDA sampled indoor air at nine residences on or adjacent to its former facility to address the residents concerns regarding vapor intrusion. Low levels of carbon tetrachloride were detected at four of the nine homes. Because carbon tetrachloride found in private wells and indoor air at the site might be linked to historical use of fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride at its former grain storage facility, the CCC/USDA is proposing to conduct an investigation to determine the source and extent of the carbon tetrachloride contamination associated with the former facility. This investigation will be conducted in accordance with the intergovernmental agreement between the KDHE and the Farm Service Agency (FSA) of the USDA. The investigation at Hanover will be performed, on behalf of the CCC/USDA, by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The CCC/USDA has entered into an interagency agreement with DOE, under which Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at its former grain storage facilities. Seven technical objectives have been proposed for the Hanover investigation. They are as follows: (1) Identify the sources and extent of soil contamination beneath the former CCC/USDA facility; (2) Characterize groundwater contamination beneath the former CCC/USDA facility; (3) Determine groundwater flow patterns; (4) Define the vertical and lateral extent of the groundwater plume outside the former CCC/USDA facility; (5) Evaluate the aquifer and monitor the groundwater system; (6) Identify any other potential sources of contamination that are not related to activities of the CCC/USDA; and (7) Determine whether there is a vapor intrusion problem at the site attributable to the former CCC/USDA facility. The technical objectives will be accomplished in a phased approached. Data collected during each phase will be evaluated to determine whether the subsequent phase is necessary. The KDHE project manager and the CCC/USDA will be contacted during each phase and kept apprised of the results. Whether implementation of each phase of work is necessary will be discussed and mutually agreed upon by the CCC/USDA and KDHE project managers.

  6. Final work plan : investigation of potential contamination at the former USDA facility in Ramona, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2006-01-27

    This Work Plan outlines the scope of work that will be conducted to investigate the subsurface contaminant conditions at the property formerly leased by the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) in Ramona, Kansas (Figure 1.1). Data obtained during this event will be used to (1) evaluate potential source areas on the property, (2) determine the vertical and horizontal extent of potential contamination, and (3) provide recommendations for future actions, with the ultimate goal of assigning this site No Further Action status. The planned investigation includes groundwater monitoring requested by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), in accordance with Section V of the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Farm Service Agency of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). The work is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Research Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy. Under the Intergovernmental Agreement, Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities. Argonne has issued a Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002) that describes the general scope of all investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas and provides guidance for these investigations. The Master Work Plan was approved by the KDHE. It contains materials common to investigations at locations in Kansas and should be consulted for the complete details of plans for work associated with the former CCC/USDA facility at Ramona.

  7. How USDA Forecasts Production and Supply/Demand 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, David P.; O'Brien, Daniel; Welch, Mark

    2009-06-01

    USDA publishes crop supply and demand estimates for each month. Producers, merchandisers, processors, traders and other market participants rely on this information when making their buying and selling decisions. This leaflet explains how USDA makes...

  8. USDA Biofuels Strategic Production Report June 23, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USDA Biofuels Strategic Production Report June 23, 2010 1 A USDA Regional Roadmap to Meeting the field that can enhance various models for biofuel production, identify challenges and opportunities;USDA Biofuels Strategic Production Report June 23, 2010 2 Over the last 60 years, the percentage

  9. Global

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Low LETUseful LinksGlass Stronger thanGlenn T.4Global

  10. USDA and DOE Biomass Research And Development Technical Advisory...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Biomass Research And Development Technical Advisory Committee Members USDA and DOE Biomass Research And Development Technical Advisory Committee Members January 15, 2008 - 10:23am...

  11. Final corrective action study for the former CCC/USDA facility in Ramona, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2011-04-20

    Past operations at a grain storage facility formerly leased and operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in Ramona, Kansas, resulted in low concentrations of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater that slightly exceed the regulatory standard in only one location. As requested by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, the CCC/USDA has prepared a Corrective Action Study (CAS) for the facility. The CAS examines corrective actions to address groundwater impacted by the former CCC/USDA facility but not releases caused by other potential groundwater contamination sources in Ramona. Four remedial alternatives were considered in the CAS. The recommended remedial alternative in the CAS consists of Environmental Use Control to prevent the inadvertent use of groundwater as a water supply source, coupled with groundwater monitoring to verify the continued natural improvement in groundwater quality. The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) has directed Argonne National Laboratory to prepare a Corrective Action Study (CAS), consistent with guidance from the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2001a), for the CCC/USDA grain storage facility formerly located in Ramona, Kansas. This effort is pursuant to a KDHE (2007a) request. Although carbon tetrachloride levels at the Ramona site are low, they remain above the Kansas Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5 {micro}g/L (Kansas 2003, 2004). In its request for the CAS, the KDHE (2007a) stated that, because of these levels, risk is associated with potential future exposure to contaminated groundwater. The KDHE therefore determined that additional measures are warranted to limit future use of the property and/or exposure to contaminated media as part of site closure. The KDHE further requested comparison of at least two corrective action alternatives to the 'no-action' alternative, as the basis for the Draft Corrective Action Decision for the site. The history and nature of the contamination and previous investigations are summarized in Section 2. Also included in Section 2 is an evaluation of human and environmental targets and potential exposure pathways. Section 3 describes the corrective action goals and applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs). Section 4 describes four alternatives, Section 5 analyzes the alternatives in detail, and Section 6 compares the alternatives. Section 6 also includes a summary and a recommended corrective action.

  12. Biosolids for Biodiesel USDA SBIR 2003-000450

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    Biosolids for Biodiesel USDA SBIR 2003-000450 Phase I Final Report Prepared by Emerald Ranches #12;Biosolids for Biodiesel USDA SBIR 2003-000450 Phase I Final Report Background The goal of this Phase I for the production of biodiesel fuel. It is desirable to use biosolids as a fertilizer for canola for two reasons

  13. USDA, DOE to Invest up to $18.4 million for Biomass Research...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    More Documents & Publications DOE and USDA Select Projects for more than 24 Million in Biomass Research and Development Grants USDA Biofuels R&D Growing Energy - How Biofuels...

  14. USDA Rural Development Washington State Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture is hosting a Washington Rural Development Workshop. Speakers will cover local and regional broadband initiatives program and broadband success stories,...

  15. Forecasting Agriculturally Driven Global Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    production doubled, greatly reducing food shortages, but at high environ- mental cost (1­5). In addition climate change in environ- mental and societal impacts (2, 8). Population size and per capita consumption capita 1 Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior, Uni- versity of Minnesota, 1987 Upper Buford

  16. USDA, DOE Announce $18 Million Solicitation for Biomass Research...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Biomass Research and Development USDA, DOE Announce 18 Million Solicitation for Biomass Research and Development June 11, 2007 - 1:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON - The U.S....

  17. Engineering the global ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stringfellow, William T.; Jain, Ravi

    2010-01-01

    of humans deliberately engineering agricultural landscapes.010-0302-8 EDITORIAL Engineering the global ecosystemtale about human explorers engineering the ecosystem of Mars

  18. Students' Perceptions of International Agriculture After an International Agricultural Experience 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Kasey Lynn

    2012-02-14

    Study abroad and internship experiences are the best ways for students to globalize their education. The purpose of this study was to identify students' perceptions of international agriculture before and after they ...

  19. Invited Paper, Conference on Global Change: Economic Issues in Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources. Washington, D.C. November 19-21, 1990.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    of these economic evaluations, while preliminary, suggest that climate change is not a food security issue, #12 and control" strategies. Objectives There are few economic evaluations of the costs to agricultural producers is to perform a preliminary economic evaluation of the social costs of selected strategies to reduce trace gas

  20. DOE and USDA Select Projects for more than $24 Million in Biomass...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE and USDA Select Projects for more than 24 Million in Biomass Research and Development Grants DOE and USDA Select Projects for more than 24 Million in Biomass Research and...

  1. USDA, DOE Announce Up to $25 Million in Funding for Biomass Research...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    USDA, DOE Announce Up to 25 Million in Funding for Biomass Research and Development Initiative USDA, DOE Announce Up to 25 Million in Funding for Biomass Research and Development...

  2. Basic Marketing of Texas Cotton: Forward Contracts, Cash Sales, Marketing Pools, and the USDA Loan Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, John; Park, John; Smith, Jackie; Anderson, Carl

    2006-10-10

    This publication explains basic marketing alternatives for cotton producers, including forward contracts, cash sales, marketing pools and USDA loan programs....

  3. 149USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-158. 1995. POSTER SESSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    149USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-158. 1995. POSTER SESSION #12;150 USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-158. 1995. #12;151USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-158. 1995. Current and historical high resolution aerial photography is available at various scales and film

  4. In partnership with http://www.nrcs.usda.gov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    bits of granola in a breakfast bowl (Figure 2). The top of ground water is called the water table). In most California regions, the water table is between 10 and 100 feet below the land surface (in someIn partnership with http://www.nrcs.usda.gov Farm Water Quality Planning A Water Quality

  5. In partnership with http://www.nrcs.usda.gov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    In partnership with http://www.nrcs.usda.gov Farm Water Quality Planning A Water Quality is part of the Farm Water Quality Planning (FWQP) series, developed for a short course that provides training for grow- ers of irrigated crops who are interested in implementing water quality protection prac

  6. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kershen, Drew; Martin, Philip L.; Sexton, Steven

    2012-01-01

    entific studies on the safety of GMO crops and their foodto the existence of the Non-GMO label and the USDA-Organicengineered content. These Non-GMO and USDA-Organic labels

  7. Final report : phase I investigation at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Savannah, Missouri.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-08-05

    From approximately 1949 until 1970, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility on federally owned property approximately 0.25 mi northwest of Savannah, Missouri (Figure 1.1). During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were commonly used by the CCC/USDA and the private grain storage industry to preserve grain in their facilities. In November 1998, carbon tetrachloride was detected in a private well (Morgan) roughly 50 ft south of the former CCC/USDA facility, as a result of state-wide screening of private wells near former CCC/USDA facilities, conducted in Missouri by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1999). The 1998 and subsequent investigations by the EPA and the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MoDNR) confirmed the presence of carbon tetrachloride in the Morgan well, as well as in a second well (on property currently owned and occupied by the Missouri Department of Transportation [MoDOT]), described as being approximately 400 ft east of the former CCC/USDA facility. The identified concentrations in these two wells were above the EPA maximum contaminant level (MCL) and the default target level (DTL) values of 5.0 {micro}g/L for carbon tetrachloride in water used for domestic purposes (EPA 1999; MoDNR 2000a,b, 2006). (The DTL is defined in Section 4.) Because the observed contamination in the Morgan and MoDOT wells might be linked to the past use of carbon tetrachloride-based fumigants at its former grain storage facility, the CCC/USDA is conducting an investigation to (1) characterize the source(s), extent, and factors controlling the subsurface distribution and movement of carbon tetrachloride at Savannah and (2) evaluate the potential risks to human health, public welfare, and the environment posed by the contamination. This work is being performed in accord with the Intergovernmental Agreement established between the Farm Service Agency of the USDA and the MoDNR, to address carbon tetrachloride contamination potentially associated with a number of former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities in Missouri. The site characterization at Savannah is being conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. A phased approach is being employed by the CCC/USDA and Argonne, with the approval of the MoDNR, so that information obtained and interpretations developed during each incremental stage of the study can be used most effectively to guide subsequent aspects of the program. This report presents the technical findings of Phase I of Argonne's studies. The Phase I investigation was undertaken in accord with the final site-specific Phase I Work Plan for Savannah (Argonne 2007), as well as with the Master Work Plan (MWPK) for CCC/USDAArgonne operations in the state of Kansas (Argonne 2002), which the MoDNR reviewed and approved (with minor revisions) for temporary use in Missouri to facilitate the start-up of the CCC/USDA's activities at Savannah. (Argonne is developing a similar Master Work Plan for operations in Missouri that is based on the existing MWPK, with the approval of the MoDNR. The Missouri document has not been finalized, however, at this time.) The site-specific Savannah Work Plan (Argonne 2007; approved by the MoDNR [2007a]) (1) summarized the pre-existing knowledge base for the Savannah investigation site compiled by Argonne and (2) described the site-specific technical objectives and the intended scope of work developed for this phase of the investigation. Four primary technical objectives were identified for the Phase I studies, as follows: (1) Update the previous (MoDNR 2000a,b) inventory and status of private wells in the immediate vicinity of the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility, and sample the identified wells for analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and geochemical constituents. (2) Investigate for possible evidence of a soil source of carbon tetrachloride contamination to groundwater beneath the former CCC/USDA fa

  8. Agricultural Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -17 1Blackland Research and Extension Center 720 East Blackland Road Temple, Texas 76502 2Joint Global............................................................................................................................. 11 Air Temperature and Solar Radiation................................................................................................................................................ 28 Potential Evaporation

  9. Agricultural Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    East Blackland Road Temple, Texas 76502 2Joint Global Change Research Institute Pacific Northwest............................................................................................................................. 11 Air Temperature and Solar Radiation................................................................................................................................................ 28 Potential Evaporation.....................................................................................................................

  10. Photos credits for front cover: Top photos Comstock and Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and the role of research. 1. Biomass energy--Economic aspects--United States. 2. Biomass energy--Research--United States. 3. Feedstock--United States--Costs. 4. Corn--Yields--United States. 5. Forest biomass--United States. 6. Alcohol as fuel. 7. Biodiesel fuels--United States. I. Biomass Research and Development Board

  11. Individuals Agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    , with the highest density in the first year, and no obvious differences between the second and the third year. We in the first year, and the lowest in the third year Though taxa diversity was lower in the third year Yards Mesic Yards Year Yea r 321 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 Agricultural Desert Parks Desert Remnants

  12. USDA, DOE Announce $18 Million Solicitation for Biomass Research and

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLEStatutoryin the Nation's,USDA & DOE

  13. Final work plan : phase II investigation of potential contamination at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Savannah, Missouri.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-08-16

    From approximately 1949 until 1970, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility on federally owned property approximately 0.25 mi northwest of Savannah, Missouri (Figure 1.1). During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were commonly used by the CCC/USDA and the private grain storage industry to preserve grain in their facilities. In November 1998, carbon tetrachloride was detected in a private well (Morgan) roughly 50 ft south of the former CCC/USDA facility, as a result of statewide screening of private wells near former CCC/USDA facilities, conducted in Missouri by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1999). The 1998 and subsequent investigations by the EPA and the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MoDNR) confirmed the presence of carbon tetrachloride in the Morgan well, as well as in a second well (on property currently occupied by the Missouri Department of Transportation [MoDOT]) described as being approximately 400 ft east of the former CCC/USDA facility. The identified concentrations in these two wells were above the EPA maximum contaminant level (MCL) and the Missouri risk-based corrective action default target level (MRBCA DTL) values of 5.0 {micro}g/L for carbon tetrachloride in water used for domestic purposes (EPA 1999; MoDNR 2000a,b, 2006). Because the observed contamination in the Morgan and MoDOT wells might be linked to the past use of carbon tetrachloride-based fumigants at its former grain storage facility, the CCC/USDA is conducting an investigation to (1) characterize the source(s), extent, and factors controlling the subsurface distribution and movement of carbon tetrachloride at Savannah and (2) evaluate the potential risks to human health, public welfare, and the environment posed by the contamination. This work is being performed in accord with the Intergovernmental Agreement established between the Farm Service Agency of the USDA and the MoDNR, to address carbon tetrachloride contamination potentially associated with a number of former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities in Missouri. The site characterization at Savannah is being conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The investigation at Savannah is being conducted in phases. This approach is being used by the CCC/USDA and Argonne, with the approval of the MoDNR, so that information obtained and interpretations developed during each incremental stage of the investigation can be used most effectively to guide subsequent phases of the program. Phase I of the Savannah program was conducted in October-November 2007 and January 2008 (Argonne 2007a, 2008). This site-specific Work Plan provides a brief summary of the Phase I findings and the results of groundwater level monitoring that has been ongoing since completion of the Phase I study and also outlines technical objectives, investigation tasks, and investigation methods for Phase II of the site characterization at Savannah.

  14. Genetic Engineering for Modern Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blumwald, Eduardo

    reserved 1543-5008/10/0602-0443$20.00 Key Words abiotic stress, climate change, field conditions, global warming, stress combination, stress tolerance, transgenic crops Abstract Abiotic stress conditions such as drought, heat, or salinity cause exten- sive losses to agricultural production worldwide. Progress

  15. USDA Seeks Applications for Grants to Assist Rural Communities with Extremely High Energy Costs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Applications are due July 30, 2012, for USDA Rural Development grants to assist communities where expenditures for home energy exceed 275% of the national average.

  16. Factors affecting agricultural journalists and agricultural communicators 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chenault, Edith Anne

    2009-05-15

    Agricultural journalism and agricultural communication have been researched in depth, identifying job skills, job satisfaction, educational backgrounds, and curriculum issues. However, a study examining the spheres ...

  17. USDA Biofuels R&D | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics And Statistics » USAJobs Search USAJobs Search The jobs listed belowPlanned for Pine RidgeUSDA

  18. USDA and DOE Announce National Renewable Energy Conference for October |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLEStatutoryin the Nation's,USDA & DOE Release

  19. USDA and DOE Fund Genomics Projects For Bioenergy Fuels Research |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLEStatutoryin the Nation's,USDA & DOE ReleaseProduction and

  20. Wood products trade and foreign markets: Asian market profile issue, November 1993. Foreign agriculture circular

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    Contents: trade summary; significant developments; status of usda/ccc export credit guarantees for wood products; US global export status; trends in US exports to the pacific rim; market profiles for wood products; pacific rim; europe; commodity/country trade tables; US exports, 1988 - 1st half 1993; US imports, 1988 - 1st half 1993.

  1. USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-187. 2003. 333 VIII. Conclusions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-187. 2003. 333 VIII. Conclusions The challenges (along with New York), Asian Pacific American, Native American (second to Oklahoma) and Hispanic American 1999) but also differences #12;USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-187. 2003. SectionVIII 334

  2. Final work plan : Phase I investigation of potential contamination at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Savannah, Missouri.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-10-12

    From approximately 1949 until 1970, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility on federally owned property approximately 0.25 mi northwest of Savannah, Missouri. During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were commonly used by the CCC/USDA and the private grain storage industry to preserve grain in their facilities. In November 1998, carbon tetrachloride was detected in a private well (Morgan) roughly 50 ft south of the former CCC/USDA facility, as a result of state-wide screening of private wells near former CCC/USDA facilities, conducted in Missouri by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1999). The 1998 and subsequent investigations by the EPA and the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MoDNR) confirmed the presence of carbon tetrachloride in the Morgan well, as well as in a second well (on property currently occupied by the Missouri Department of Transportation [MoDOT]), approximately 400 ft east of the former CCC/USDA facility. Carbon tetrachloride concentrations in the Morgan well have ranged from the initial value of 29 {micro}g/L in 1998, up to a maximum of 61 {micro}g/L in 1999, and back down to 22 {micro}g/L in 2005. The carbon tetrachloride concentration in the MoDOT well in 2000 (the only time it was sampled) was 321 {micro}g/L. The concentrations for the two wells are above the EPA maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5 {micro}g/L for carbon tetrachloride (EPA 1999; MoDNR 2000a,b). Because the observed contamination in the Morgan and MoDOT wells might be linked to the past use of carbon tetrachloride-based grain fumigants at its former grain storage facility, the CCC/USDA will conduct investigations to (1) characterize the source(s), extent, and factors controlling the subsurface distribution and movement of carbon tetrachloride at Savannah and (2) evaluate the health and environmental threats potentially posed by the contamination. This work will be performed in accord with the Intergovernmental Agreement established between the Farm Service Agency of the USDA and MoDNR, to address carbon tetrachloride contamination potentially associated with a number of former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities in Missouri. The investigative activities at Savannah will be conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The CCC/USDA has entered into an agreement with the DOE, under which Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at its former grain storage facilities. The site characterization at Savannah will take place in phases. This approach is recommended by the CCC/USDA and Argonne, so that information obtained and interpretations developed during each incremental stage of the investigation can be used most effectively to guide subsequent phases of the program. This site-specific Work Plan outlines the specific technical objectives and scope of work proposed for Phase I of the Savannah investigation. This Work Plan also includes the community relations plan to be followed throughout the CCC/USDA program at the Savannah site. Argonne is developing a Master Work Plan specific to operations in the state of Missouri. In the meantime, Argonne will issue a Provisional Master Work Plan (PMWP; Argonne 2007) that will be submitted to the MoDNR for review and approval. The agency has already reviewed and approved (with minor changes) the present Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002) under which Argonne currently operates in Kansas. The PMWP (Argonne 2007) will provide detailed information and guidance on the investigative technologies, analytical methodologies, quality assurance-quality control measures, and general health and safety policies to be employed by Argonne for all investigations at former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities in Missouri. Both the PMWP

  3. 79USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-158. 1995. CONCURRENT SESSION II--Urban Interface Topics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    79USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-158. 1995. CONCURRENT SESSION II--Urban Interface Topics #12;80 USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-158. 1995. #12;81USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech be generated in low-, me- dium-, and high-expansion forms. Class A foam can be applied from pump

  4. Agricultural and Food Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) #12;86 Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) Undergraduate Catalogue 2014­15 Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) Officers in agriculture was initiated in 1956. #12;87Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) Undergraduate

  5. Agriculture, technology, and conflict 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zilverberg, Cody John

    2009-05-15

    Conflict and agriculture have a long, shared history. The purpose of this research is to look at the relationships between agriculture, agricultural technologies, and conflict during current and recent conflicts, large scale and localized...

  6. 1. AGRICULTURE BUILDING 2. AGRICULTURE GREENHOUSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Keith

    1. AGRICULTURE BUILDING 2. AGRICULTURE GREENHOUSE 3. AGRICULTURE MECHANICS SHOP 4. ALUMNI ASSOCIATION (TRACIE D. PEARMAN) 5. APARTMENTS (UNIVERSITY WOODS) 6. ART BUILDING 7. ART STUDIO 8. AUSTIN BUILDING 9. BIOLOGY GREENHOUSE 10. BOYNTON BUILDING 11. BUSINESS BUILDING (R. E. MCGEE) 12. CHEMISTRY

  7. In partnership with http://www.nrcs.usda.gov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    in present-day Iran. Some wells are used for purposes other than obtaining ground water. Oil and gas wells SHEET 11.3 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources http

  8. USDA and DOE Award Biomass Research and Development Grants to...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    - As part of the Obama Administration's comprehensive plan to address rising gas prices, U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today...

  9. Energy Department and USDA Partner to Support Energy Efficiency in Rural Communities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Partnering with USDA, the Energy Department has created the State Energy Extension Partnership to equip America’s farm families and rural small businesses with the efficiency tools, resources and training needed to reduce energy costs.

  10. Roadmap for Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckel, Jeffrey A.

    A Science Roadmap for Food and Agriculture A Science Roadmap for Food and Agriculture Prepared and Policy (ESCOP)-- Science and Technology Committee November 2010 #12;2 pA Science Roadmap for Food and Agriculture #12;A Science Roadmap for Food and Agriculture p i About this Publication To reference

  11. Global warming debates: the reading course

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huybers, Peter

    Global warming debates: the reading course spring 2012 Instructors: Eli Tziperman and Peter Huybers Hurricanes due to global warming? Apr 7: Stratospheric cooling: Why is the stratosphere cooling? Apr 14: Mid will be the impact of global warming on agriculture? Apr 28: Final Debate: Take sides! Should we act to curb global

  12. Global warming debates: the reading course

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huybers, Peter

    Global warming debates: the reading course spring 2010 Instructors: Eli Tziperman and Peter Huybers Hurricanes due to global warming? Apr 7: Stratospheric cooling: Why is the stratosphere cooling? Apr 14: Mid will be the impact of global warming on agriculture? Apr 28: Final Debate: Take sides! Should we act to curb global

  13. Final work plan : phase I investigation of potential contamination at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Montgomery City, Missouri.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-08-16

    From September 1949 until September 1966, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) leased property at the southeastern end of Montgomery City, Missouri, for the operation of a grain storage facility. During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were commonly used by the CCC/USDA and the private grain storage industry to preserve grain in their facilities. In January 2000, carbon tetrachloride was detected in a soil sample (220 {micro}g/kg) and two soil gas samples (58 {micro}g/m{sup 3} and 550 {micro}g/m{sup 3}) collected at the former CCC/USDA facility, as a result of a pre-CERCLIS site screening investigation (SSI) performed by TN & Associates, Inc., on behalf of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region VII (MoDNR 2001). In June 2001, the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MoDNR) conducted further sampling of the soils and groundwater at the former CCC/USDA facility as part of a preliminary assessment/site inspection (PA/SI). The MoDNR confirmed the presence of carbon tetrachloride (at a maximum identified concentration of 2,810 {micro}g/kg) and chloroform (maximum 82 {micro}g/kg) in the soils and also detected carbon tetrachloride and chloroform (42.2 {micro}g/L and 58.4 {micro}g/L, respectively) in a groundwater sample collected at the former facility (MoDNR 2001). The carbon tetrachloride levels identified in the soils and groundwater are above the default target level (DTL) values established by the MoDNR for this contaminant in soils of all types (79.6 {micro}g/kg) and in groundwater (5.0 {micro}g/L), as outlined in Missouri Risk-Based Corrective Action (MRBCA): Departmental Technical Guidance (MoDNR 2006a). The corresponding MRBCA DTL values for chloroform are 76.6 {micro}g/kg in soils of all types and 80 {micro}g/L in groundwater. Because the observed contamination at Montgomery City might be linked to the past use of carbon tetrachloride-based fumigants at its former grain storage facility, the CCC/USDA will conduct investigations to (1) characterize the source(s), extent, and factors controlling the possible subsurface distribution and movement of carbon tetrachloride at the Montgomery City site and (2) evaluate the health and environmental threats potentially represented by the contamination. This work will be performed in accord with the Intergovernmental Agreement established between the Farm Service Agency of the USDA and the MoDNR, to address carbon tetrachloride contamination potentially associated with a number of former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities in Missouri. The investigations at Montgomery City will be conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The CCC/USDA has entered into an agreement with DOE, under which Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at its former grain storage facilities. The site characterization at Montgomery City will take place in phases. This approach is recommended by the CCC/USDA and Argonne, so that information obtained and interpretations developed during each incremental stage of the investigation can be used most effectively to guide subsequent phases of the program. This site-specific Work Plan outlines the specific technical objectives and scope of work proposed for Phase I of the Montgomery City investigation. This Work Plan also includes the community relations plan to be followed throughout the CCC/USDA program at the Montgomery City site. Argonne is developing a Master Work Plan specific to operations in the state of Missouri. In the meantime, Argonne has issued a Provisional Master Work Plan (PMWP; Argonne 2007) that has been reviewed and approved by the MoDNR for current use. The PMWP (Argonne 2007) provides detailed information and guidance on the investigative technologies, analytical methodologies, qua

  14. Roadmap for Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    A Science Roadmap for Agriculture Prepared by the National Association of State Universities Force on Building a Science Roadmap #12;#12;A Science Roadmap for Agriculture Prepared by the National on Organization and Policy (ESCOP) Task Force on Building a Science Roadmap for Agriculture NOVEMBER 2001 #12

  15. The Internationalization of Alternative Food Networks: Farmers' Markets, Community Gardens, and Agricultural Exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cody, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    M. Kneafsey (Eds. ), Alternative Food Geographies:markets. American Journal of Alternative Agriculture, 18(1),Goldstein L. (2011). Alternative food in the global south:

  16. Soil erosion and agricultural sustainability David R. Montgomery*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, David R.

    Soil erosion and agricultural sustainability David R. Montgomery* Department of Earth and Space conventionally plowed agricultural fields average 1­2 orders of magnitude greater than rates of soil production indicates that, considered globally, hill- slope soil production and erosion evolve to balance geologic

  17. Global Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crow, Ben D

    2006-01-01

    of Globalization: Statistics Weiss, L. (1997). "of Globalization: Statistics Milanovic, B. (1999). Truethe focus of global statistics, particularly in relation to

  18. USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-187. 2003. 249 VI. The Association of Bay Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of leaders in the high-tech industry, in writing a report designed to address the problem of housingUSDA Forest Service Gen.Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-187. 2003. 249 VI. The Association of Bay Area in the region. #12;USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-187. 2003. SectionVI 250 THE ASSOCIATION OF BAY

  19. USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-187. 2003. 17 II. The San Diego Association of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-187. 2003. 17 II. The San Diego Association law by a formal agreement signed by each local government member (www.sandag.cog.ca.us/whats_new of Governments 2001). #12;USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-187. 2003. Section II 18 THE SAN DIEGO

  20. PacificSouthwestResearchStationPrograms Air Pollution and Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PacificSouthwestResearchStationPrograms Air Pollution and Global Change Impacts on Western Forest branch of the USDA Forest Service in the states of California and Hawaii and the U.S.-affiliat- ed economy in the world) and Hawaii (a strategic location in the Pacific Rim economies and tourism). We

  1. PacificSouthwestResearchStationPrograms Air Pollution and Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PacificSouthwestResearchStationPrograms Air Pollution and Global Change Impacts on Western Forest of the USDA Forest Service in the states of California and Hawaii and the U.S.-affiliat- ed Pacific Islands in the world) and Hawaii (a strategic location in the Pacific Rim economies and tourism). We develop

  2. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station General scientist with the Station's Wildland Recreation and Urban Cultures Research Unit, 4955 Canyon Crest Drive

  3. Current Research on Wood Decay in the USDA Forest Service1 Harold H. Burdsall, Jr.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Current Research on Wood Decay in the USDA Forest Service1 Harold H. Burdsall, Jr.2 Abstract, Biodeterioration Research, concentrates on studying the basic mechanism of wood decay. Most of the Forest Service's work on wood decay is being done in two work units in Forest Insect and Disease Research (FIDR) housed

  4. USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-181. 2002. 863 British Columbia's Dangerous Tree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-181. 2002. 863 British Columbia's Dangerous Tree Guy7 Abstract New dangerous tree assessment guidelines have recently been developed by the Wildlife snag was replaced with "dangerous tree." According to section 26.1 of these regulations, a dangerous

  5. USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-152. 1995. 313 Marbled Murrelet Populations of Washington--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-152. 1995. 313 Marbled Murrelet Populations of Washington Eldridge, Bellingham, Washington 98225 Abstract: Marbled Murrelets occur in Puget Sound marine habitats. Such long-term information is unavailable for Marbled Murrelets along the Pacific Ocean coast of Washington

  6. Biofuels and Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Biofuels and Agriculture Biofuels and Agriculture A Factsheet for Farmers American farmers have "biofuels" like ethanol and biodiesel mean that new markets are opening up. These can provide extra farm as growing markets for other biofuels like biodiesel. What are biofuels? Biofuels (short for "biomass fuels

  7. Globalization Nationalized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazlish, Bruce

    Globalism and globalization have been seen as competitors to other allegiances, namely regionalism and nationalism. A look at recent efforts at reconceptualizing global history in China, Korea and the U.S., however, suggests ...

  8. Progress report and technical evaluation of the ISCR pilot test conducted at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Centralia, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-01-14

    In October, 2007, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) presented the document Interim Measure Conceptual Design (Argonne 2007a) to the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, Bureau of Environmental Remediation (KDHE/BER), for a proposed non-emergency Interim Measure (IM) at the site of the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Centralia, Kansas (Figure 1.1). The IM was recommended to mitigate existing levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the vadose zone soils beneath the former facility and in the groundwater beneath and in the vicinity of the former facility, as well as to moderate or decrease the potential future concentrations of carbon tetrachloride in the groundwater. The Interim Measure Conceptual Design (Argonne 2007a) was developed in accordance with the KDHE/BER Policy No.BERRS-029, Policy and Scope of Work: Interim Measures (KDHE 1996). The hydrogeologic, geochemical, and contaminant distribution characteristics of the Centralia site, as identified by the CCC/USDA, factored into the development of the nonemergency IM proposal. These characteristics were summarized in the Interim Measure Conceptual Design (Argonne 2007a) and were discussed in detail in previous Argonne reports (Argonne 2002a, 2003, 2004, 2005a,b,c, 2006a,b, 2007b). The identified remedial goals of the proposed IM were as follows: (1) To reduce the existing concentrations of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater in three 'hot spot' areas identified at the site (at SB01, SB05, and SB12-MW02; Figure 1.2) to levels acceptable to the KDHE. (2) To reduce carbon tetrachloride concentrations in the soils near the location of former soil boring SB12 and existing monitoring well MW02 (Figure 1.2) to levels below the KDHE Tier 2 Risk-Based Screening Level (RBSL) of 200 {micro}g/kg for this contaminant. To address these goals, the potential application of an in situ chemical reduction (ISCR) treatment technology, employing the use of the EHC{reg_sign} treatment materials marketed by Adventus Americas, Inc. (Freeport, Illinois), was recommended. The EHC materials are proprietary mixtures of food-grade organic carbon and zero-valent iron that are injected into the subsurface as a slurry (EHC) or in dissolved form (EHC-A) and subsequently released slowly into the formation. The materials are designed to create highly reducing geochemical conditions in the vadose and saturated zones that foster both thermodynamic and biological reductive dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride.

  9. CORNELL QUARTERLY Agricultural Wastes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    on fossil fuels, points out Donald R. Price, associate professor of agricultural engineering. Natural petroleum, and for the use of ethanol as liquid fuel, are discussed by Robert K. Finn, professor of chemical

  10. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture DESIGN: A Program to Create Data Forest Service Entry Research Work Unit at the Station's Forest Fire Laboratory, 4955 Canyon Crest Drive, Riverside, CA 92507

  11. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station General Observatory in Stinson Beach, Calif. Thomas E. Martin is Assistant Unit Leader--Wildlife at the U.S. Fish

  12. Overshooting of agricultural prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stamoulis, Kostas G.; Rausser, Gordon C.

    1987-01-01

    Rotenberg, Julio J. , "Sticky Prices in the United States,"Monetary Policy on United States Agriculture. A Fix-Price,Flex-Price Approach," Unpublished Ph.D. Disser- tation,

  13. Avoiding the Haircut: Potential Ways to Enhance the Value of theUSDA's Section 9006 Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark

    2006-07-13

    Section 9006 of Title IX of The Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002 (the '2002 Farm Bill') established the Renewable Energy Systems and Energy Efficiency Improvements Program (the 'Section 9006 program'). Administered by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), the Section 9006 program provides grants, loan guarantees, and - perhaps in the future - direct loans to farmers, ranchers, and rural small businesses for assistance with purchasing renewable energy systems and making energy efficiency improvements. In the three rounds of Section 9006 funding to date (FY03-FY05), roughly 40% of all grant dollars in aggregate have been awarded to 'large' (defined as > 100 kW) wind projects. Such projects are also typically eligible for the Federal Production Tax Credit (PTC) codified in Section 45 of the US tax code. Because the PTC provides a significant amount of value to a wind project, most 'large wind' applicants to the Section 9006 program have also tried to take advantage of the PTC. Through what are known as 'anti-double-dipping' or, more colloquially, 'haircut' provisions, however, the size of the PTC is reduced if a project receives certain other forms of governmental support. Specifically, Section 45(b)(3) of the US tax code reduces the size of the PTC in proportion to the aggregate amount of government grants, tax-exempt or subsidized financing, or other Federal tax credits that a project receives over time, relative to its overall capital cost (with the proportion not to exceed 50%). The legislative and regulatory history surrounding the PTC's haircut provisions suggests that grants and direct loans (but not loan guarantees) provided under the Section 9006 program will cause a PTC haircut. Focusing exclusively on 'large wind' projects, this report demonstrates that the magnitude of the haircut can be significant: Section 9006 grants lose between 11% and 46% of their face value (depending on the wind project's capital cost and capacity factor) to PTC haircuts. And because Section 9006 grants are most likely considered taxable income, an additional 20%-37% (depending on tax bracket) is lost to income tax payments on the grant. In combination, depending on the specific combination of tax bracket, capital cost, and capacity factor that pertain to a given wind project, the percentage of a Section 9006 grant lost to both income tax payments and the PTC haircut can range from 31% to 83% of the dollar value of the grant. Our base-case scenario falls in the middle of that range, at a combined loss of 58% (37% due to income tax payments, and 21% due to PTC haircut). Add to this the transaction costs of applying for a Section 9006 grant, as well as the possibility of an unsuccessful application, and some might be left with relatively little motivation to apply.

  14. Observations on European Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1911-01-01

    AS ACKICUL-I-uRAL EXPE RIMENT STATIONS bLLETIN No. 14-1 DECEMBER, 1911 Division of Chemistry Observations on European Agriculture BY G. S. FRAPS, Chemist 0 Postoffice : CULLEGE STATION; TEXAS AUSTIN. TEXAS I AUSTIN PRINTING CO:. PRINTERS... ............................................... and Conclusions 35 [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] rrvations on European Agriculture By C. S. FRAPS ie object of this Bulletin is to present such abservadons on :ulture in Europe as may offer suggestions of value to Texas - :ulturists. The writer...

  15. FDP Prior Approval and Other Requirements Matrix AFOSR ARO AMRMC DOE EPA NASA NIH NSF ONR USDA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroll, Kristen L.

    FDP Prior Approval and Other Requirements Matrix April 2004 AFOSR ARO AMRMC DOE EPA NASA NIH NSF Requirements Matrix April 2004 AFOSR ARO AMRMC DOE EPA NASA NIH NSF ONR USDA Inclusion of unrecovered F&A costs

  16. CONCURRENT SESSION I--Wildland Ecosystem Topics 48 USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-158. 1995.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    -GTR-158. 1995. #12;49USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-158. 1995. Tom Nichols2 More than 25. PSW-GTR-158. 1995. #12;

  17. Nutrient Content of Beef Steaks as Influenced by USDA Quality Grade and Degree of Doneness 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Amanda M.

    2010-07-14

    for the designation as UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SCHOLAR A Senior Scholars Thesis by AMANDA MARIAN SMITH Approved by: Co-Research Advisors: Jeffrey W. Savell Kerri B. Harris Associate Dean for Undergraduate Research: Robert C. Webb Major: Animal... QUALITY GRADE AND DEGREE OF DONENESS A Senior Scholars Thesis by AMANDA MARIAN SMITH iii ABSTRACT Nutrient Content of Beef Steaks as Influenced by USDA Quality Grade and Degree of Doneness. (April 2010) Amanda Marian Smith Department...

  18. Faculty of Agricultural Sciences Department of Agricultural Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krivobokova, Tatyana

    Faculty of Agricultural Sciences Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development Platz-4823 Doctoral researcher in Agricultural and Experimental Economics The Collaborative Research Center (CRC to join the Chair of International Agricultural Economics (Jun.Prof. Dr. M. Wollni) of the University

  19. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , evaluation, monitoring, point counts, sampling of populations, standards of censusing Technical Editors: C Technical Report PSW-GTR-149 #12;Publisher: Albany, California Mailing address: PO Box 245. Berkeley CA 9470 of Agriculture Abstract Ralph, C. John; Sauer, John R.; Droege, Sam, technical editors. 1995. Monitoring Bird

  20. Agriculture and Environmental Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    and organic wastes, bioenergy, pesticides, and wetlands. Course Description and Statement of General Education to minimize agricultural pollution and sustain food production adequate for the world's population topics include point and nonpoint source pollution, the Clean Water Act, wetlands, bioenergy, food waste

  1. ADDRESS SERVICE REQUESTED AGRICULTURAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    much of the state's manufacturing, shipping and tourism offerings. Water is necessary for life -- every Endowed Chair in Water Research, said that access to safe drinking water is one of the most serious public is a vital component of so many industries -- agriculture, manufac- turing and tourism, just to name a few

  2. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Intermountain Research Station Research Research Station's Riparian-Stream Ecology and Management Research Work Unit at Boise, ID. He re- ceived with the Intermountain Research Station's Riparian-Stream Ecology and Man- agement Research Work Unit at the Forestry

  3. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station General,000 xylem resin samples of pine (Pinus) species and hybrids--largely from the western United States locations in the eastern and southern United States. Cover Image: Chapter 6, Figure 6-2. #12;Xylem

  4. AGRICULTURAL SUMMER 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MICHIGAN AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION SUMMER 2005 VOL. 23 NO. 2 futures #12;2 | FUTURES Asthma, cystic fibrosis, Lyme disease, pre- mature birth, campylobacteriosis and dis- eases caused by West Nile research projects is searching for the genes responsi- ble for human asthma. Her long-term goal

  5. Agriculture and Life Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Responsibility 7 Virginia Tech Principles of Community 7 STUDENTS ARE ~ 8 University/College Policy and Procedures 9 Absences 9 Personal Illness: 9 Death/Illness in the Family 9 Attendance of a Professional of Agriculture and Life Sciences that advising is a collaborative effort between the student and faculty advisor

  6. USDA & DOE Release National Biofuels Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLEStatutoryin the Nation's,USDA & DOE Release National Biofuels

  7. USDA Helps Reduce High Energy Costs in Tribal Lands | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLEStatutoryin the Nation's,USDA & DOE Release National

  8. USDA and DOE Fund 10 Research Projects to Accelerate Bioenergy Crop

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLEStatutoryin the Nation's,USDA & DOE ReleaseProduction and Spur

  9. USDA and DOE Partnership Seeks to Develop Better Plants for Bioenergy |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLEStatutoryin the Nation's,USDA & DOE ReleaseProduction

  10. USDA and DOE to Coordinate Research of Plant and Microbial Genomics |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLEStatutoryin the Nation's,USDA & DOE ReleaseProductionDepartment

  11. USDA, DOE Announce Up to $25 Million in Funding for Biomass Research and

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLEStatutoryin the Nation's,USDA & DOEDevelopment Initiative |

  12. USDA, DOE to Invest up to $18.4 million for Biomass Research, Development

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLEStatutoryin the Nation's,USDA & DOEDevelopment Initiative |and

  13. Agricultural biotechnology and Indian newspapers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sivakumar, Gayathri

    2004-11-15

    This study is designed to look into how agricultural biotechnology is covered by Indian newspapers. A through study of the literature showed that agricultural biotechnology is a much debated topic and there is a vast difference between the concerns...

  14. 173Bailey: Design ofEcologicalNetworksfor Monitoring Global Change Designof Ecological Networks for Monitoring Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environment Monitoring System (GEMS) of the United Nations Environment Programme, and the US Global Change173Bailey: Design ofEcologicalNetworksfor Monitoring Global Change Designof Ecological Networks for Monitoring Global Change World-wide monitoring of agricultural and other natural-resource ecosystems

  15. Important driving forces in livestock production and agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archer, Steven R.

    global shifts in consumption, marketing, production and trade: Rising incomes. Demographic shifts#12;Important driving forces in livestock production and agriculture are responsible for major the past four decades, but increasing trends due to changes in land use and crop production shifting from

  16. AGRICULTURAL INVENTORY LOWER FRASER VALLEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inventory Estimates 8 #12;- ii - LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1 Agricultural Waste Management Zones 2 Figure 2 4 Livestock Mass Distribution by Waste Management Zone 10 Figure 5 Agricultural Land Distribution by Waste Management Zone 10 Figure 6 Livestock Mass to Agricultural Land Ratio by Waste Management Zone 11

  17. Global Predictions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swyden, Courtney

    2006-01-01

    stream_source_info Global Predictions.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 7503 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Global Predictions.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Every morning... drought index is based on a daily water balance, where a drought factor is calculated with precipitation and soil moisture,? Srinivasan said. Global Predictions Story by Courtney Swyden Global Predictions Lab uses advanced technologies to forecast...

  18. Agriculture and Trade Opportunities for Tanzania: Past Volatility and Future Climate Changerode_672 429..447

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agriculture and Trade Opportunities for Tanzania: Past Volatility and Future Climate Changerode_672 global heterogeneity in climate-induced agricultural variability,Tanzania has the potential to substan owing to supply shocks in major exporting regions, Tanzania may be able to export more maize at higher

  19. USDA Energy Audit and Renewable Energy Development Assistance Grants Informational Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Learn about the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Energy Audit and Renewable Energy Development Assistance Grants. Attendees will hear about the program purposes and eligibility requirements.

  20. Global change: Acronyms and abbreviations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodard, C.T.; Stoss, F.W.

    1995-05-01

    This list of acronyms and abbreviations is compiled to provide the user with a ready reference to dicipher the linguistic initialisms and abridgements for the study of global change. The terms included in this first edition were selected from a wide variety of sources: technical reports, policy documents, global change program announcements, newsletters, and other periodicals. The disciplinary interests covered by this document include agriculture, atmospheric science, ecology, environmental science, oceanography, policy science, and other fields. In addition to its availability in hard copy, the list of acronyms and abbreviations is available in DOS-formatted diskettes and through CDIAC`s anonymous File Transfer Protocol (FTP) area on the Internet.

  1. REVIEW Open Access Climate-smart agriculture global research agenda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    , climate risk management and energy and biofuels (theme 1); and modelling adaptation and uncertainty; (4) reductions in the risk that can present formidable barriers for farmers during adoption of new technology and practices; and (5) an understanding of how climate affects the rural labour force, land tenure

  2. ARM - Possible Benefits of Global Warming on Agriculture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska OutreachCalendar NSAProductsMergedProductsVaisala

  3. Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:ofEniaElectric JumpAtlas for SolarInvestorsInformation

  4. Agricultural Biomass and Landfill Diversion Incentive (Texas...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Landfill Diversion Incentive (Texas) Agricultural Biomass and Landfill Diversion Incentive (Texas) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor...

  5. College of Agricultural Sciences College of Agricultural Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horticulture Environmental Horticulture Organic Agriculture Plant Health Soil Resources and Conservation Soil and applied research; production and utilization of food and related products; resource use and conservation

  6. Simulating land use change in China from a global perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Paul

    drivers of population growth and socio-economic development to agricultural yield changes and alternative productivity and stable relationships with global food suppliers are important determinants of food security

  7. Global energy and global precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Global energy and global precipitation or Why doesn't precipitation increase as Clausias expect precipitation to increase at the same rate. · Rest of this brief talk is to show you why Heat Flux (S) 20 W/m2 Atmospheric heating from precipitation LP Atmosphere has small heat capacity. So

  8. USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-193. 2004. 93 Linking Vegetation Patterns to Potential Smoke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to compare fuel loading, modeled fuel consumption, smoke production, fire behavior, and susceptibility and Alvarado USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-193. 2004.94 consumption, smoke production, fire Smoke Production and Fire Hazard1 Roger D. Ottmar2 and Ernesto Alvarado3 During the past 80 years

  9. 65USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997. Soil Characteristics of Blue Oak and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    65USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997. Soil Characteristics of Blue Oak and Coast, California, soils associated with blue oaks (Quercus douglasii) are slightly more acidic, have finer textures are richer in organic matter than those associated with blue oaks. Blue oaks seem to grow more frequently

  10. USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-203. 2007. 35 Fuels Planning: Science Synthesis and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-203. 2007. 35 Fuels Planning: Science Synthesis and Integration1 Rachel White2 and Sarah McCaffrey3 Abstract A century of fire suppression has created heavy fuel will require widespread fuels treatments, yet fuels treatment planners do not always have access to the current

  11. 2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 1 THE MOUNTAIN PINE BEETLE: CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 1 THE MOUNTAIN PINE BEETLE: CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES OF AN UNPRECEDENTED OUTBREAK Allan L. Carroll University of British Columbia, Department of Forest carbon dynamics. The loss of carbon uptake and the increased emissions from decaying trees have converted

  12. FIVE-YEAR STRATEGIC PLAN 2003-2007 USDA FOREST SERVICE NORTHEAST CENTER FOR URBAN & COMMUNITY FORESTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    FIVE-YEAR STRATEGIC PLAN 2003-2007 USDA FOREST SERVICE NORTHEAST CENTER FOR URBAN & COMMUNITY in the appropriate strategic plans of each participating agency. As outlined in the Forest Services most recent Strategic Plan, "in the next mil- lennium, choosing the path of innovation, integration, and expanded

  13. USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-181. 2002. 71 Modeling the Delivery of Large Wood to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-181. 2002. 71 Modeling the Delivery of Large Wood forest structure and predict the delivery of wood to over 55 stream kilometers in a 28-square kilometer = 0.45). The model predicted that 83 percent of wood delivered to streams originated within 20 meters

  14. USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-181. 2002. 527 DecAID: A Decaying Wood Advisory Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-181. 2002. 527 DecAID: A Decaying Wood Advisory Model and decaying wood (dead and partially dead trees and down wood) necessary to maintain wildlife habitat in Washington and Oregon. Whereas the relationship of dead and decaying wood to wildlife habitat is a major

  15. USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-181. 2002. 535 Regional Patterns of Dead Wood in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-181. 2002. 535 Regional Patterns of Dead Wood regional patterns of variation in dead wood across 20 million ha of upland forests of all ownerships in Oregon and Washington, based on an analysis of data on snags and down wood collected on over 16,000 field

  16. USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-181. 2002. 649 Snags and Down Wood in the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-181. 2002. 649 Snags and Down Wood in the Interior and Rebecca A. Gravenmier5 Abstract Snags and down wood are major ecosystem and wildlife habitat components Advisory Group of the Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project modeled snag and down wood

  17. USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-168. 1998. 35 The Summer Flow and Water Yield Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-168. 1998. 35 The Summer Flow and Water Yield Response to Timber Harvest1 Elizabeth T. Keppeler2 Abstract:Abstract:Abstract:Abstract:Abstract: Continuous harvest methods (selection and clearcut) on summer flows and annual yield. Although all Caspar Creek

  18. 267USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997. Rehabilitation of a Blue Oak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    267USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997. Rehabilitation of a Blue Oak Restoration. Results indicate treeshelters release stunted seedlings and could rehabilitate poorly performing projects attempted to rehabilitate our original planting, in order to evaluate readily available measures applicable

  19. 347USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997. Influence of Supplemental Feeding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    347USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997. Influence of Supplemental Feeding Sites recommended amounts of residual dry matter (RDM). By relocating supplemental feeding sites away from supplemental feeding locations resulted in 54 percent and 35 percent of the riparian areas being left with low

  20. USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-203. 2007. 79 Reintroducing Fire in Regenerated Dry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-203. 2007. 79 Reintroducing Fire in Regenerated Dry for increasing fire resilience in young coniferous forests by reducing surface fuels, modifying overstory stand, about when and how to reintroduce fire in regenerated forests, and to what end. We studied the effects

  1. USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-42-vol. 3. 2012 157 Effects of Fire on Intangible Cultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-42-vol. 3. 2012 157 Chapter 8: Effects of Fire to unfold, we are learning about how we value, view, and treat publiclands,forests,fire,archaeologicalandhistorical sites, and associated human communities. The forest and fire management reorientation underway

  2. 327USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997. The Influence of Cattle Grazing on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    327USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997. The Influence of Cattle Grazing of grazing leads to disappearance of squirrels. I compared moderate cattle grazing and grazing removal year-round by cattle but had not been grazed for 3 years before the study because of an extended

  3. USDA Ag in the Classroom-www.agclassroom.org Exploring Soils -Grades 9-12: T-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Scott

    USDA ­ Ag in the Classroom-www.agclassroom.org Exploring Soils - Grades 9-12: T-1 Exploring Soils Overview Students will investigate soils and learn about soil texture, soil water-holding capacity, and other properties of soils. Suggested Grade Level 9 - 12 Estimated Time 90 minutes Objectives Students

  4. 3USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech.Rep. PSW-GTR-166. 1998. Biochemical Reactions of Ozone in Plants1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    3USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech.Rep. PSW-GTR-166. 1998. Biochemical Reactions of Ozone in Plants1 Abstract Plants react biochemically to ozone in three phases: with constitutive chemicals in the apoplastic, plant reactions with ozone result in constitutive molecules such as the ozonolysis of ethylene

  5. 83USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997. Woody Root Biomass of 40-to 90-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    83USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997. Woody Root Biomass of 40- to 90- Year. Bledsoe2 Jerry Tecklin3 Abstract: This research examined biomass of blue oak (Quercus douglasii Hook root biomass outside the root ball. Root ball mass ranged from 7 to 184 kg, and estimated total root

  6. USDA Ag in the Classroom-www.agclassroom.org Weaving the Web-Grades 2-5: T-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Scott

    and blooms. All living things get energy from food. Green plants use energy from the sun to make their food. The Sun is the Source The energy in living things originates from the sun. Green plants are the only living organisms that can use the energy from the sun make food. #12;USDA ­ Ag in the Classroom

  7. USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-181. 2002. 257 The Pileated Woodpecker as a Keystone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-181. 2002. 257 The Pileated Woodpecker as a Keystone that the pileated woodpecker (Dryocopus pileatus) is a keystone habitat modifier in the Pacific Northwest insect outbreaks. Because of the potential keystone role of pileated woodpeckers in Pacific Northwest

  8. Agriculture and Energy Departments Announce New Investments to...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on the Biomass Development and Research Initiative is available HERE. Leveraging Genomics for More Efficient, Cost-Effective Bioenergy Today, the Energy Department and USDA...

  9. Memorandum of Understanding Between the Department of Agriculture...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of International Cooperation. NDRC plans to coordinate the participation of other Chinese Government ministries under this MOU. The USDA and DOE plan to coordinate the...

  10. IRRIGATION WATER QUALITY FOR AGRICULTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radcliffe, David

    IRRIGATION WATER QUALITY FOR AGRICULTURE Irrigation Water Background In the past, there were minor of irrigation water in Georgia. This is because only a small amount of acreage under irrigated agriculture utilized potable (suitable for drinking) quality water. Thus, quality of irrigation water was not closely

  11. AGRICULTURAL WINTER/SPRING 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    animal agriculture and the impact of air and water quality on human health. Powers also heads the new MSU agriculture on air quality through a number of projects. "The manure won't go away," Powers says regulations to ensure that air and water quality are preserved." In her air quality research, Powers

  12. Global warming, global research, and global governing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preining, O.

    1997-12-31

    The anticipated dangers of Global Warming can be mitigated by reducing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations, especially CO{sub 2}. To reach acceptable, constant levels within the next couple of centuries it might be necessary to accept stabilization levels higher than present ones, The annual CO{sub 2} emissions must be reduced far below today`s values. This is a very important result of the models discussed in the 1995 IPCC report. However, any even very modest scenario for the future must take into account a substantial increase in the world population which might double during the 21st century, There is a considerable emission reduction potential of the industrialized world due to efficiency increase, However, the demand for energy services by the growing world population will, inspite of the availability of alternative energy resources, possibly lead to a net increase in fossil fuel consumption. If the climate models are right, and the science community believes they are, we will experience a global warming of the order of a couple of degrees over the next century; we have to live with it. To be prepared for the future it is essential for us to use new research techniques embracing not only the familiar fields of hard sciences but also social, educational, ethical and economic aspects, We must find a way to build up the essential intellectual capacities needed to deal with these kinds of general problems within all nations and all societies. But this is not Although, we also have to find the necessary dynamical and highly flexible structures for a global governing using tools such as the environmental regime. The first step was the Framework Convention On Climate Change, UN 1992; for resolution of questions regarding implementations the Conference of the Parties was established.

  13. Economic value of global weather measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canavan, G.; Butterworth, J.

    1999-02-19

    Global sensor networks could support increased activity in a number of economic sectors. Potential benefits and the predicted time scales required to realize them are estimated. Benefits are particular compelling for fundamental reasons for aviation, hotels and restaurants, natural disasters, construction, agriculture, and apparel. These benefits can be captured by simple logistic approximations.

  14. Global Solutions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you not findGeoscience/EnvironmentGlobal Security Global Security

  15. Global Warming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Low LETUseful LinksGlass StrongerGlobalOn1 Global

  16. Agricultural Waste Management System Component Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    Agricultural Waste Management System Component Design Chapter 10 Part 651 Agricultural Waste Management Field Handbook 10­1(210-vi-AWMFH, rev. 1, July 1996) Chapter 10 Agricultural Waste Management....................................................................................................10­70 10­i #12;Chapter 10 Agricultural Waste Management System Component Design Part 651 Agricultural

  17. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    global commodity prices, oil price shocks, wages, and pricesof fuel. A continued rise in the price of oil combined with

  18. United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the USDA Forest Service, Tahoe Regional Planning Agency, University of California at Davis, University at Davis, the University of Nevada at Reno, and the Desert Research Institute, Reno, Nevada. #12;Lake Tahoe Senator Harry Reid, President Bill Clinton and Vice President Al Gore

  19. Emissions Of Greenhouse Gases From Rice Agriculture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Aslam K. Khalil

    2009-07-16

    This project produced detailed data on the processes that affect methane and nitrous oxide emissions from rice agriculture and their inter-relationships. It defines the shifting roles and potential future of these gases in causing global warming and the benefits and tradeoffs of reducing emissions. The major results include: 1). Mechanisms and Processes Leading to Methane Emissions are Delineated. Our experiments have tested the standard model of methane emissions from rice fields and found new results on the processes that control the flux. A mathematical mass balance model was used to unravel the production, oxidation and transport of methane from rice. The results suggested that when large amounts of organic matter are applied, the additional flux that is observed is due to both greater production and reduced oxidation of methane. 2). Methane Emissions From China Have Been Decreasing Over the Last Two Decades. We have calculated that methane emissions from rice fields have been falling in recent decades. This decrease is particularly large in China. While some of this is due to reduced area of rice agriculture, the bigger effect is from the reduction in the emission factor which is the annual amount of methane emitted per hectare of rice. The two most important changes that cause this decreasing emission from China are the reduced use of organic amendments which have been replaced by commercial nitrogen fertilizers, and the increased practice of intermittent flooding as greater demands are placed on water resources. 3). Global Methane Emissions Have Been Constant For More Than 20 Years. While the concentrations of methane in the atmosphere have been leveling off in recent years, our studies show that this is caused by a near constant total global source of methane for the last 20 years or more. This is probably because as some anthropogenic sources have increased, others, such as the rice agriculture source, have fallen. Changes in natural emissions appear small. 4). Nitrous Oxide Emissions From Rice Fields Increase as Methane Emissions Drop. Inundated conditions favor anaerobic methane production with high emission rates and de-nitrification resulting in modest nitrous oxide emissions. Under drier conditions such as intermittent flooding, methane emissions fall and nitrous oxide emissions increase. Increased nitrogen fertilizer use increases nitrous oxide emissions and is usually accompanied by reduced organic matter applications which decreases methane emissions. These mechanisms cause a generally inverse relationship between methane and nitrous oxide emissions. Reduction of methane from rice agriculture to control global warming comes with tradeoffs with increased nitrous oxide emissions. 5). High Spatial Resolution Maps of Emissions Produced. Maps of methane and nitrous oxide emissions at a resolution of 5 min × 5 min have been produced based on the composite results of this research. These maps are necessary for both scientific and policy uses.

  20. The concept of a sustainable agriculture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kriewaldt, David Mark

    1993-01-01

    The concept of a sustainable agriculture varies much with writers: some see it as the preservation of agricultural resources or as the reduction of agricultural contamination of the environment or both. Other authors focus on economic viability...

  1. Adding Value to Agricultural Products 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, David P.; Hanselka, Daniel

    2009-06-01

    You can significantly increase farm income by adding value to agricultural products and marketing those products effectively. This publication explains how to design a value-added product based on consumer preferences and how to build a business...

  2. Multiplex detection of agricultural pathogens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McBride, Mary Teresa (Brentwood, CA); Slezak, Thomas Richard (Livermore, CA); Messenger, Sharon Lee (Kensington, CA)

    2010-09-14

    Described are kits and methods useful for detection of seven agricultural pathogens (BPSV; BHV; BVD; FMDV; BTV; SVD; and VESV) in a sample. Genomic sequence information from 7 agricultural pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

  3. Multiplex detection of agricultural pathogens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siezak, Thomas R.; Gardner, Shea; Torres, Clinton; Vitalis, Elizabeth; Lenhoff, Raymond J.

    2013-01-15

    Described are kits and methods useful for detection of agricultural pathogens in a sample. Genomic sequence information from agricultural pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay and/or an array assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

  4. Press Conference Call Tomorrow: Agriculture Secretary Vilsack...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Press Conference Call Tomorrow: Agriculture Secretary Vilsack and Energy Secretary Chu to Discuss Efforts to Reduce U.S. Oil Dependence Press Conference Call Tomorrow: Agriculture...

  5. Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature...

  6. Climate policy implications for agricultural water demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2013-03-28

    Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of two alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy options—one which taxes terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which only taxes fossil fuel and industrial emissions but places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to almost triple demand for water for agricultural systems across the century even in the absence of climate policy. In general policies to mitigate climate change increase agricultural demands for water still further, though the largest changes occur in the second half of the century, under both policy regimes. The two policies examined profoundly affected both the sources and magnitudes of the increase in irrigation water demands. The largest increases in agricultural irrigation water demand occurred in scenarios where only fossil fuel emissions were priced (but not land-use change emission) and were primarily driven by rapid expansion in bioenergy production. In these scenarios water demands were large relative to present-day total available water, calling into question whether it would be physically possible to produce the associated biomass energy. We explored the potential of improved water delivery and irrigation system efficiencies. These could potentially reduce demands substantially. However, overall demands remained high under our fossil-fuel-only tax policy. In contrast, when all carbon was priced, increases in agricultural water demands were smaller than under the fossil-fuel-only policy and were driven primarily by increased demands for water by non-biomass crops such as rice. Finally we estimate the geospatial pattern of water demands and find that regions such as China, India and other countries in south and east Asia might be expected to experience greatest increases in water demands.?

  7. Review: Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    introduction to global climate change, the greenhouseReview: Global Climate Change: A Primer By Orrin H PilkeyPilkey, Keith C. Global Climate Change: a primer. Durham,

  8. 1USDA Forest Service Research Note. PSW-RN-426. 2004. Wooster, John; Hilton, Sue.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - partment of Agriculture; 16 p. Large woody debris (LWD) was inventoried in 1999 in five streams where LWD was removed in the early 1980s, and no LWD has been artificially in- troduced since. All study sites.); three streams have old- and second-growth study reaches and two streams are entirely second growth. LWD

  9. The effects of potential changes in United States beef production on global grazing systems and greenhouse gas emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    and greenhouse gas emissions Jerome Dumortier1 , Dermot J Hayes2 , Miguel Carriquiry2 , Fengxia Dong3 , Xiaodong in the U.S. causes a net increase in GHG emissions on a global scale. We couple a global agricultural production in the United States. The effects on emissions from agricultural production (i.e., methane

  10. Reinventing Africa into a Global Supplier of Food Goods: An Analysis of Agri-business Development, Sustainability, Supply Chain Integration and Export in Developing Economies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chisholm, Lisa M.

    2011-01-01

    March 30). Transforming Africa’s Role in the Global Food11, 2011, from AGRA Growing Africa's Agriculture: http://e. (1988). Satisfying Africa's Food Needs: Food Production

  11. Greenhouse gas emissions from Scottish arable agriculture and the potential for biochar to be used as an agricultural greenhouse gas mitigation option 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winning, Nicola Jane

    2015-06-30

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a powerful greenhouse gas (GHG) which has a global warming potential 296 times greater than that of carbon dioxide (CO2). Agriculture is a major source of N2O and in the UK approximately 71 % of ...

  12. Agricultural and Biological Engineering College of Agricultural Sciences Cooperative Extension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    solar energy or "green sunshine" derived from the solar- powered photosynthesis process during the growth and development phases of plant materials. Utilizing Biomass Energy The four methods in which, and Pennsylvania Counties Cooperating Biomass Energy Dennis E. Buffington, Professor, Agricultural and Biological

  13. Teaching Organic Farming and Gardening: Resources for Instructors, 3rd Edition. Part 1 - Skills and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    Access to National Agricultural Library to research journalas selected by the National Agricultural Library, Land-GrantPart of USDA’s National Agricultural Library, the AFSIC site

  14. Agricultural pathogen decontamination technology-reducing the threat of infectious agent spread.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Betty, Rita G.; Bieker, Jill Marie; Tucker, Mark David

    2005-10-01

    Outbreaks of infectious agricultural diseases, whether natural occurring or introduced intentionally, could have catastrophic impacts on the U.S. economy. Examples of such agricultural pathogens include foot and mouth disease (FMD), avian influenza (AI), citrus canker, wheat and soy rust, etc. Current approaches to mitigate the spread of agricultural pathogens include quarantine, development of vaccines for animal diseases, and development of pathogen resistant crop strains in the case of plant diseases. None of these approaches is rapid, and none address the potential persistence of the pathogen in the environment, which could lead to further spread of the agent and damage after quarantine is lifted. Pathogen spread in agricultural environments commonly occurs via transfer on agricultural equipment (transportation trailers, tractors, trucks, combines, etc.), having components made from a broad range of materials (galvanized and painted steel, rubber tires, glass and Plexiglas shields, etc), and under conditions of heavy organic load (mud, soil, feces, litter, etc). A key element of stemming the spread of an outbreak is to ensure complete inactivation of the pathogens in the agricultural environment and on the equipment used in those environments. Through the combination of enhanced agricultural pathogen decontamination chemistry and a validated inactivation verification methodology, important technologies for incorporation as components of a robust response capability will be enabled. Because of the potentially devastating economic impact that could result from the spread of infectious agricultural diseases, the proposed capability components will promote critical infrastructure protection and greater border and food supply security. We investigated and developed agricultural pathogen decontamination technologies to reduce the threat of infectious-agent spread, and thus enhance agricultural biosecurity. Specifically, enhanced detergency versions of the patented Sandia decontamination chemistry were developed and tested against a few surrogate pathogens under conditions of relatively heavy organic load. Tests were conducted on surfaces commonly found in agricultural environments. Wide spectrum decontamination efficacy, low corrosivity, and biodegradability issues were addressed in developing an enhanced detergency formulation. A method for rapid assessment of loss of pathogenic activity (inactivation) was also assessed. This enhanced technology will enable rapid assessment of contamination following an intentional event, and will also be extremely useful in routine assessment of agricultural environments. The primary effort during the second year was progress towards a demonstration of both decontamination and viral inactivation technologies of Foot and Mouth virus (FMDv) using the modified SNL chemistry developed through this project. Lab studies using a surrogate virus (bovine enterovirus) were conducted using DF200, modified DF200 chemistry, and decontaminants currently recommended for use in heavily loaded organic, agricultural environments (VirkonS, 10% bleach, sodium hydroxide and citric acid). Tests using actual FMD virus will be performed at the Department of Homeland Security's Plum Island facilities in the fall of 2005. Success and the insight gained from this project will lead to enhanced response capability, which will benefit agencies such as USDA, DHS, DOD, and the agricultural industry.

  15. FISHING PERMIT Eastern Shore Agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHING PERMIT Eastern Shore Agricultural Research and Extension Center If all fields are not filled out, you do NOT have permission to fish! Name: ____________________________________________ Fishing Permit is valid for ONE YEAR. In return for this privilege, I agree to: 1. ABSOLVE the Eastern

  16. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    examination. Global production of olive oil increased fromon country of production of the oil (for example, if it is1. World Production and Exports of Olive Oil (1,000 tons),

  17. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hyunok; Sumner, Daniel A.; Martin, Philip; Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak; Zilberman, David

    2011-01-01

    is how responsive the demand of oil from OPEC in the oil-caused the import demand of oil from OPEC coun- tries toincrease in global demand for crude oil from 2000 to 2008,

  18. Agricultural and Resource Economics Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hyunok; Sumner, Daniel A.; Martin, Philip; Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak; Zilberman, David

    2011-01-01

    countries increased while crude-oil prices grew by more thanproduce 42% of the crude-oil production. The organizationin global demand for crude oil from 2000 to 2008, associated

  19. University College Dublin Agriculture, Food Science and Human Nutrition AgriculturAl Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    250 Agricultural Science Dn250AeS Agri-environmental Sciences Dn250AcP Animal and crop Production DnAES Agri-Environmental Sciences DN250ACP Animal and Crop Production DN250ASC Animal Science DN250ENT Agri-Environmental Sciences DN250 AES 2 Animal and Crop Production DN250 ACP 3 Animal Science DN250 ASC

  20. Climate change effects on agriculture: Economic responses to biophysical shocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Gerald; Valin, Hugo; Sands, Ronald; Havlik, Petr; Ahammad, Helal; Deryng, Delphine; Elliott, Joshua; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Heyhoe, Edwina; Kyle, G. Page; von Lampe, Martin; Lotze-Campen, Hermann; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; van Meijl, Hans; van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique; Mueller, C.; Popp, Alexander; Robertson, Richard; Robinson, Sherman; Schmid, E.; Schmitz, Christoph; Tabeau, Andrzej; Willenbockel, Dirk

    2013-12-16

    Agricultural production is sensitive to weather and will thus be directly affected by climate change. Plausible estimates of these climate change impacts require combined use of climate, crop, and economic models. Results from previous studies vary substantially due to differences in models, scenarios, and data. This paper is part of a collective effort to systematically integrate these three types of models. We focus on the economic component of the assessment, investigating how nine global economic models of agriculture represent endogenous responses to seven standardized climate change scenarios produced by two climate and five crop models. These responses include adjustments in yields, area, consumption, and international trade. We apply biophysical shocks derived from the IPCC’s Representative Concentration Pathway that result in end-of-century radiative forcing of 8.5 watts per square meter. The mean biophysical impact on crop yield with no incremental CO2 fertilization is a 17 percent reduction globally by 2050 relative to a scenario with unchanging climate. Endogenous economic responses reduce yield loss to 11 percent, increase area of major crops by 12 percent, and reduce consumption by 2 percent. Agricultural production, cropland area, trade, and prices show the greatest degree of variability in response to climate change, and consumption the lowest. The sources of these differences includes model structure and specification; in particular, model assumptions about ease of land use conversion, intensification, and trade. This study identifies where models disagree on the relative responses to climate shocks and highlights research activities needed to improve the representation of agricultural adaptation responses to climate change.

  1. USDA Projections of Bioenergy-Related Corn and Soyoil Use for 2010-2019

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    through 2019 period included estimates of world and U.S. energy prices, ethanol and biodiesel production the sector. Expansion of biodiesel use in the EU raises demand for vegetable oils in global markets." Key.S. and World economic growth, b) the value of the U.S. dollar, c) oil prices, d) domestic and international

  2. Global hydrological cycle response to rapid and slow global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuang, Zhiming

    Global hydrological cycle response to rapid and slow global warming and Jiaxu Zhang #12;· Anthropogenic global warming causes "robust" changes in the global in the global hydrological cycle due to anthropogenic global warming Atmospheric radiative

  3. Global niche markets and local development : clientelism and fairtrade farmer organizations in Paraguay's sugar industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Setrini, Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    Globalization has transformed the markets in which agricultural goods are traded, placing new demands on farmers around the world. In developing countries, smallholder and peasant farmers lack many of the resources needed ...

  4. Recent Agricultural Ergonomics Research at UC Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Davis, Berkeley and San Francisco · Focus on labor-intensive agriculture Agricultural Ergonomics effects of prolonged exposure to musculoskeletal disorders risk factors- Manual weeding Focus on basic exposure to musculoskeletal disorders risk factors- Manual weeding Recent Research Projects Fatigue

  5. Randolph EMC- Agricultural Efficient Lighting Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Agricultural members of Randolph EMC (REMC) who upgrade to energy-efficient CFL bulbs in agricultural facilities are eligible for an incentive to help cover the initial cost of installation. The...

  6. Child Labor in Texas Agriculture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, David

    2005-04-28

    percent of all work fatalities. Farm hazards include machinery, confined spaces, animals and live- stock, chemicals, respiratory irritants, toxic gases and extreme environmental conditions. Children working in agriculture may be hired employees, labor... contractor employees or farm family members. Child labor laws exist to ensure that a child is not employed in an occupation or manner that can harm him or her. However, these laws do not cover workers under age 16 who work on their parent?s or guardian?s...

  7. OTEC- Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oregon Trail Electric Consumers Cooperative (OTEC) offers programs to agricultural customers.  Interested customers should contact a local OTEC office.

  8. UF in Brazil Urban, Medical, & Agricultural Entomology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    UF in Brazil Urban, Medical, & Agricultural Entomology Summer B: August 9 - 21, 2015 Explore aspects in Brazil and the United States. Course Information College of Agricultural and Life Sciences: Urban, Medical and Agricultural Entomology in Brazil Total Number of Credits Offered: 3 About

  9. Agricultural & Environmental Sciences eap.ucop.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernes, Peter J.

    Agricultural & Environmental Sciences eap.ucop.edu #12;UC Education Abroad Program Special Focus Pilot Program in Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Wageningen University and Research Centre This special-focus pilot program is available only to UC Davis College of Agricultural and Environmental

  10. MANAGEMENT OF AGRICULTURAL WASTES LOWER FRASER VALLEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;MANAGEMENT OF AGRICULTURAL WASTES IN THE LOWER FRASER VALLEY SUMMARY REPORT - A WORKING DOCUMENT Presented on Behalf of: The Management of Agricultural Wastes in the Lower Fraser Valley Program of the Agricultural Nutrient Management in the Lower Fraser Valley program. The ideas and opinions expressed herein do

  11. Utilization of Agricultural WasteUtilization of Agricultural Waste for Composite Panelsfor Composite Panels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utilization of Agricultural WasteUtilization of Agricultural Waste for Composite Panelsfor. The benefits of utilizing agricultural residues for woodbenefits of utilizing agricultural residues for wood a fiber source that is currentlyadded product from a fiber source that is currently not well utilized

  12. Determine metrics and set targets for soil quality on agriculture residue and energy crop pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian Bonner; David Muth

    2013-09-01

    There are three objectives for this project: 1) support OBP in meeting MYPP stated performance goals for the Sustainability Platform, 2) develop integrated feedstock production system designs that increase total productivity of the land, decrease delivered feedstock cost to the conversion facilities, and increase environmental performance of the production system, and 3) deliver to the bioenergy community robust datasets and flexible analysis tools for establishing sustainable and viable use of agricultural residues and dedicated energy crops. The key project outcome to date has been the development and deployment of a sustainable agricultural residue removal decision support framework. The modeling framework has been used to produce a revised national assessment of sustainable residue removal potential. The national assessment datasets are being used to update national resource assessment supply curves using POLYSIS. The residue removal modeling framework has also been enhanced to support high fidelity sub-field scale sustainable removal analyses. The framework has been deployed through a web application and a mobile application. The mobile application is being used extensively in the field with industry, research, and USDA NRCS partners to support and validate sustainable residue removal decisions. The results detailed in this report have set targets for increasing soil sustainability by focusing on primary soil quality indicators (total organic carbon and erosion) in two agricultural residue management pathways and a dedicated energy crop pathway. The two residue pathway targets were set to, 1) increase residue removal by 50% while maintaining soil quality, and 2) increase soil quality by 5% as measured by Soil Management Assessment Framework indicators. The energy crop pathway was set to increase soil quality by 10% using these same indicators. To demonstrate the feasibility and impact of each of these targets, seven case studies spanning the US are presented. The analysis has shown that the feedstock production systems are capable of simultaneously increasing productivity and soil sustainability.

  13. 105USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech.Rep. PSW-GTR-166. 1998. Nitrogenous (N) air pollutant concentrations and surface deposition of nitrate (NO3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    105USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech.Rep. PSW-GTR-166. 1998. Abstract Nitrogenous (N) air pollutant results of a study that monitored concentrations of gaseous and particulate N air pollutants; measured was presented at the International Symposium on Air Pollution and Climate Change Effects on Forest Ecosystems

  14. 259USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech.Rep. PSW-GTR-166. 1998. Air Pollution and Forest Health Studies along a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    259USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech.Rep. PSW-GTR-166. 1998. Air Pollution and Forest Health Studies of Indus- trial Areas, Kossutha 6, 40-833 Katowice, Poland. Abstract Air pollution, bulk deposition dioxide (SO2 ) air pollution acting directly or indirectly has been one of the major causes for poor

  15. 29USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-155. 1996. Statistical Considerations for Plot Design, Sampling Procedures, Analysis... Arbaugh and Bednar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    composition and exposure patterns will likely alter sample design and analysis needs for other forest types. 1996. Statistical Considerations for Plot Design, Sampling Procedures, Analysis... Arbaugh and Bednar29USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-155. 1996. Statistical Considerations for Plot Design

  16. Published in 2009 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd Correspondence to: David A. Laird, USDA, ARS, National Soil Tilth Laboratory, 2110 University Blvd., Ames IA 50011-3120, USA.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Johannes

    of the pyrolysis platform for coproducing bio-oil and biochar David A. Laird, USDA-ARS-National Soil Tilth Soil Tilth Laboratory, 2110 University Blvd., Ames IA 50011-3120, USA. E-mail: david:547­562 (2009) Abstract: Pyrolysis is a relatively simple, inexpensive, and robust thermochemical technology

  17. Session I--Communication of GIS Data in Fire Management--Boykin and others USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-189. 2008. 209

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Session I-- Communication of GIS Data in Fire Management--Boykin and others USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-189. 2008. 209 Communication and Implementation of GIS Data in Fire Management Remotely sensed data and Geographical Information Systems (GIS) can be an effective tool in fire management

  18. USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-168. 1998. 45 Effects of Forest Harvest on Stream-Water Quality and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-168. 1998. 45 Effects of Forest Harvest on Stream-Water:Abstract:Abstract:Abstract:Abstract: The effects of forest harvest on stream-water quality and nitrogen cycling were examined for a redwood to gain insights into changes in nitrogen cycling after harvesting activities. Stream-water nitrate

  19. Poster Session--Stereo Photo Series for Quantifying Natural Fuels--Ottmar, Vihnanek, Wright USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-189. 2008. 351

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poster Session--Stereo Photo Series for Quantifying Natural Fuels--Ottmar, Vihnanek, Wright USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-189. 2008. 351 Stereo Photo Series for Quantifying Natural Fuels in the Americas1 Roger D. Ottmar,2 Robert E. Vihnanek,2 and Clinton S. Wright2 Introduction Photo series

  20. Session J--Relative Impact of Weather vs. Fuels--Keeley USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-189. 2008. 263

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and southern California. Data from the Statewide Fire History Data Base, California Department of ForestrySession J--Relative Impact of Weather vs. Fuels--Keeley USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-189. 2008. 263 Relative Impact of Weather vs. Fuels on Fire Regimes in Coastal California1 Jon E

  1. AREERA Section 406 established a competitive grants process for USDA-NIFA water program funding, and is composed of three major

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AREERA Section 406 established a competitive grants process for USDA-NIFA water program funding, and Education Projects Extension Projects Education Projects ·National Water Resources Projects Program Goals The NIFA National Water Program is working through a coordinated regional structure to: ·Provide leadership

  2. Session B--Small-Diameter Timber Alchemy--Fried, Barbour, Fight, Christensen, Pinjuv USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-189. 2008. 29

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Session B--Small-Diameter Timber Alchemy--Fried, Barbour, Fight, Christensen, Pinjuv USDA Forest Toward Fire-Resistant Forests?1 Jeremy S. Fried, R. Jamie Barbour, Roger D. Fight, Glenn Christensen- mail: Jeremy.Fried@fs.fed.us. #12;Session B--Small-Diameter Timber Alchemy--Fried, Barbour, Fight

  3. Session K--Estimating Forest Fuels--Gebert, Schuster, Woudenberg, O'Brien USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-189. 2008. 285

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-189. 2008. 285 Estimating Forest Fuels in the Southwest Using Forest Inventory Data1 objective of this study was to demonstrate the linkages between forest inventory data and hazardous fuelSession K--Estimating Forest Fuels--Gebert, Schuster, Woudenberg, O'Brien USDA Forest Service Gen

  4. Session B--Maintenance of Key Biodiversity Attributes--Gray, Blackwell USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-189. 2008. 49

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Session B--Maintenance of Key Biodiversity Attributes--Gray, Blackwell USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-189. 2008. 49 The Maintenance of Key Biodiversity Attributes Through Ecosystem Restoration Operations1 Robert W. Gray2 and Bruce A. Blackwell3 Abstract The requirement to manage for key

  5. Session D--Geographic Variation in Mixed Conifer Fire Regimes--Beaty, Taylor USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-189. 2008. 123

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Alan

    in California1 R. Matthew Beaty2 and Alan H. Taylor3 Abstract This paper reviews recent research from CaliforniaSession D--Geographic Variation in Mixed Conifer Fire Regimes--Beaty, Taylor USDA Forest Service.g., Spies and Franklin 1989, Veblen and others 1992, Shinneman and Baker 1997, Taylor and Skinner 1998). Yet

  6. THIS REPORT CONTAINS ASSESSMENTS OF COMMODITY AND TRADE ISSUES MADE BY USDA STAFF AND NOT NECESSARILY STATEMENTS OF OFFICIAL U.S. GOVERNMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 THIS REPORT CONTAINS ASSESSMENTS OF COMMODITY AND TRADE ISSUES MADE BY USDA STAFF (Free On Board basis) to the UK in 2014, and this is likely to increase over the following few years expansion and less feasible to trade. Since trade between the United States and the United Kingdom is mainly

  7. Poster Session--Predicting Patterns of Alien Plant Invasion--Underwood, Klinger, Moore USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-189. 2008. 361

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poster Session--Predicting Patterns of Alien Plant Invasion--Underwood, Klinger, Moore USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-189. 2008. 361 Predicting Patterns of Alien Plant Invasions in Areas of alien plant species. This is particularly problematic in areas which have experienced disturbances

  8. Poster Session--Fuel Consumption During Prescribed Fires in Big Sage--Wright, Ottmar USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-189. 2008. 363

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poster Session--Fuel Consumption During Prescribed Fires in Big Sage--Wright, Ottmar USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-189. 2008. 363 Fuel Consumption During Prescribed Fires in Big Sage Ecosystems1 Clinton S. Wright2 and Roger D. Ottmar2 Introduction Fuel consumption was evaluated for a series

  9. Global climate change and international security.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karas, Thomas H.

    2003-11-01

    This report originates in a workshop held at Sandia National Laboratories, bringing together a variety of external experts with Sandia personnel to discuss 'The Implications of Global Climate Change for International Security.' Whatever the future of the current global warming trend, paleoclimatic history shows that climate change happens, sometimes abruptly. These changes can severely impact human water supplies, agriculture, migration patterns, infrastructure, financial flows, disease prevalence, and economic activity. Those impacts, in turn, can lead to national or international security problems stemming from aggravation of internal conflicts, increased poverty and inequality, exacerbation of existing international conflicts, diversion of national and international resources from international security programs (military or non-military), contribution to global economic decline or collapse, or international realignments based on climate change mitigation policies. After reviewing these potential problems, the report concludes with a brief listing of some research, technology, and policy measures that might mitigate them.

  10. Global Warming Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schofield, Jeremy

    Global Warming Observations: 1. Global temperature has been gradually rising in recent years #15 in range 8000 12000 nm { CFC's, methane and N 2 O important for global warming even though concentra- tions in concentration of \\greenhouse gases" like CO 2 What determines global temperature? Energy budget of earth: 1

  11. Global Health Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Ophir

    Bay Area Global Health Seminar Series Moving beyond millennium targets in global health: The challenges of investing in health and universal health coverage Although targets can help to focus global health efforts, they can also detract attention from deeper underlying challenges in global health

  12. GLOBAL SOURCES OF METHANE AND THE BENEFITS OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Ian J.

    ; the flaring of natural gas in oil production; in industrial processes and by the inefficient combustion (ESRC). ISSN 0967-8875 #12;Abstract Methane is an important greenhouse gas, the abatement of which-benefit analysis, such as the discount rate, the future trends in agricultural prices and the value of global

  13. GEOGRAPHY 4: GLOBALIZATION: REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND THE WORLD ECONOMY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and merchant capitalism Knox et al., Chapter 4 4. The Industrial Revolution The Industrial Revolution manufacturing industries, agriculture, and services are located. In this way it provides an introduction globalization lie in the past: in the growth of worldwide trading networks, colonialism, the Industrial

  14. Global climate change is currently affecting many ecological systems and may have large impacts on agri-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Articles Global climate change is currently affecting many ecological systems and may have large (Dunbar et al.1994).Such changes in global climate patterns portend potentially large effects on both be crucial in the tropics, where most agriculture is in rain-fed systems and climate change has a potentially

  15. Faculty of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that global warming and climate change might pose to the environment and humankind. REDD+ has emerged

  16. Global biosurveillance: enabling science and technology. Workshop background and motivation: international scientific engagement for global security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, Helen H

    2011-01-18

    Through discussion the conference aims to: (1) Identify core components of a comprehensive global biosurveillance capability; (2) Determine the scientific and technical bases to support such a program; (3) Explore the improvement in biosurveillance to enhance regional and global disease outbreak prediction; (4) Recommend an engagement approach to establishing an effective international community and regional or global network; (5) Propose implementation strategies and the measures of effectiveness; and (6) Identify the challenges that must be overcome in the next 3-5 years in order to establish an initial global biosurveillance capability that will have significant positive impact on BioNP as well as public health and/or agriculture. There is also a look back at the First Biothreat Nonproliferation Conference from December 2007. Whereas the first conference was an opportunity for problem solving to enhance and identify new paradigms for biothreat nonproliferation, this conference is moving towards integrated comprehensive global biosurveillance. Main reasons for global biosurveillance are: (1) Rapid assessment of unusual disease outbreak; (2) Early warning of emerging, re-emerging and engineered biothreat enabling reduced morbidity and mortality; (3) Enhanced crop and livestock management; (4) Increase understanding of host-pathogen interactions and epidemiology; (5) Enhanced international transparency for infectious disease research supporting BWC goals; and (6) Greater sharing of technology and knowledge to improve global health.

  17. Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tool (EX-ACT) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Brazil-Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an Application of the...

  18. ALTERNATIVE AGRICULTURAL ENTERPRISES PRODUCTION, MANAGEMENT & MARKETING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Laughlin, Jay

    ALTERNATIVE AGRICULTURAL ENTERPRISES PRODUCTION, MANAGEMENT & MARKETING Cooperative Extension directly. Otherwise, backtrack to their suppliers, in person or by telephone. For the first few years

  19. WINDExchange: Agricultural and Rural Resources and Tools

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    Rural Communities Printable Version Bookmark and Share Wind for Homeowners, Farmers, & Businesses Resources & Tools Agricultural and Rural Resources and Tools This page lists...

  20. Global Focus Microscope The Global Health Challenge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . To address this need, we developed the Global Focus Microscope (GFM): a portable, battery- powered, inverted digi- tal images, the Global Focus Microscope comes with shelf for an iPhone 4. Figure 1. From left to right: Malaria parasites imaged at 1000x in bright field mode, tuberculosis imaged at 400x in bright

  1. USDA- Rural Energy for America Program (REAP) Energy Audit and Renewable Energy Development Assistance (EA/REDA) Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Note: The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Rural Development periodically issues Notices of Solicitation of Applications for the Rural Energy for America Program (REAP) in the Federal Registry. The...

  2. The Global Brain is Neither Global nor a Brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocha, Luis

    The Global Brain is Neither Global nor a Brain Adaptive Webs for Heterarchies Luis Mateus Rocha-organism or a global brain? The Global Brain Is Neither Global nor a Brain #12;!Disembodied Brain Disembodied brains on symbol-matter requirements for open-ended evolution) The Global Brain Is Neither Global Nor a Brain #12

  3. Perceptions Of Texas Agricultural Education Teachers Regarding Diversity Inclusion In Secondary Agricultural Education Programs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lavergne, Douglas D.

    2010-01-14

    of this study was to explore and analyze Texas secondary agricultural education teachers' attitudes toward diversity inclusion in Texas secondary agricultural education programs. Using a web-based questionnaire, the researcher employed a nonproportional...

  4. Energy-conserving perennial agriculture for marginal land in southern Appalachia. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, G.

    1982-01-30

    USDA economists predict the end of surplus farm production in the US within this decade. More and more marginal land will be cropped to provide feed for the growing world population and to produce energy. Much of this potential cropland in Southern Appalachia is poorly suited to annual crops, such as corn. Perennial crops are much better suited to steep, rocky, and wet sites. Research was undertaken on the theoretical potentials of perennial species with high predicted yields of protein, carbohydrates, or oils. Several candidate staple perennial crops for marginal land in Southern Appalachia were identified, and estimates were made of their yields, energy input requirements, and general suitabilities. Cropping systems incorporating honeylocust, persimmon, mulberry, jujube, and beech were compared with corn cropping systems. It appears that these candidate staple perennials show distinct advantages for energy conservation and environmental preservation. Detailed economic analyses must await actual demonstration trials, but preliminary indications for ethanol conversion systems with honeylocust are encouraging. It is suggested that short-term loans to farmers undertaking this new type of agriculture would be appropriate to solve cash-flow problems.

  5. Before House Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    House Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights, and International Organizations, Committee on Foreign Affairs Before House Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health,...

  6. Cows Causing Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi

    2008-08-06

    Broadcast Transcript: Remember when President Reagan blamed trees for air pollution? Well now the Japanese are blaming cows for global warming. Apparently, the methane emissions from burping cows account for 5% of all global greenhouse gases. Simple...

  7. Review: Globalization of Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennant, Matthew Aaron

    2009-01-01

    Review: Globalization of Water: Sharing the Planet’sAshok K. Globalization of Water: Sharing the Planet’s140) liters of virtual water (p. 15). This is one of the

  8. Globalization of biopharmaceutical manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pande, Rachna

    2011-01-01

    The biomanufacturing industry is changing due to increasing globalization. However, it is changing differently from other high tech industries like software/ semiconductor/ automobiles. In this study we use global ...

  9. Agricultural Management, Water Quality and Phosphorus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agricultural Management, Water Quality and Phosphorus: The Long and Winding Road Andrew Sharpley #12;In the beginning Agriculture and water quality Targeted watershed P management Linking ecosystem Adaptive management How can our research help farmers ? #12;Discovery Farms concept Core farms

  10. Agriculture, Forest Products and Commercial Fishing ECONOMICENGINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Agriculture, Forest Products and Commercial Fishing ECONOMICENGINE NORTHEAST #12;Dear Reader, We and Commercial Fishing. This report confirms what we all know, but sometimes take for granted. Agriculture, commercial fishing and the forest products industries are all important contributors to the Northeast economy

  11. Public Parking Lots > Agriculture Building Parkade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Farm Residences Crop Science Seed Barn Rayner Dairy Research & Teaching Facility Poultry Centre Engineering Poultry Science Kirk Hall Agriculture Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada SCIENCE PLACE VETERINARY PerformanceCentre Environment Canada Canadian Wildlife Service CANADIANWILDLIFECRT Field #9 Field #10 Tennis

  12. Public Parking Lots > Agriculture Building Parkade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Farm Residences Crop Science Seed Barn Rayner Dairy Research & Teaching Facility Poultry Centre Spinks Engineering Poultry Science Kirk Hall Agriculture Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada SCIENCE PLACE PerformanceCentre Environment Canada Canadian Wildlife Service CANADIANWILDLIFECRT Field #9 Field #10 Tennis

  13. Agricultural Opportunities in the Pacific Rim

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todd, Brian

    Agricultural Opportunities in the Pacific Rim American Society of Farm Managers and Rural and objectives · Objective: Better understand how agricultural export opportunities in the Pacific Rim and Mexico) are top export destinations and they count as Pacific Rim · Of course, we also import from Canada

  14. Climate Change and Agriculture in Vermont INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Climate Change and Agriculture in Vermont INTRODUCTION Climate change is impacting Northeastern trends in Vermont, 2) the most up-to-date modeled projections available, and 3) potential impacts on Vermont agriculture. OBSERVED It is getting wetter. There has been a 9" increase in average annual

  15. Meeting the Radiative Forcing Targets of the Representative Concentration Pathways in a World with Agricultural Climate Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyle, G. Page; Mueller, C.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-02-28

    This study assesses how climate impacts on agriculture may change the evolution of the agricultural and energy systems in meeting the end-of-century radiative forcing targets of the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). We build on the recently completed ISI-MIP exercise that has produced global gridded estimates of future crop yields for major agricultural crops using climate model projections of the RCPs from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). For this study we use the bias-corrected outputs of the HadGEM2-ES climate model as inputs to the LPJmL crop growth model, and the outputs of LPJmL to modify inputs to the GCAM integrated assessment model. Our results indicate that agricultural climate impacts generally lead to an increase in global cropland, as compared with corresponding emissions scenarios that do not consider climate impacts on agricultural productivity. This is driven mostly by negative impacts on wheat, rice, other grains, and oil crops. Still, including agricultural climate impacts does not significantly increase the costs or change the technological strategies of global, whole-system emissions mitigation. In fact, to meet the most aggressive climate change mitigation target (2.6 W/m2 in 2100), the net mitigation costs are slightly lower when agricultural climate impacts are considered. Key contributing factors to these results are (a) low levels of climate change in the low-forcing scenarios, (b) adaptation to climate impacts, simulated in GCAM through inter-regional shifting in the production of agricultural goods, and (c) positive average climate impacts on bioenergy crop yields.

  16. CHILLING CONSIDERATIONS GLOBAL WARMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    CHILLING CONSIDERATIONS REGARDING GLOBAL WARMING Stephen E. Schwartz http IS INCREASING Global carbon dioxide concentration over the last thousand years Polar ice cores #12;Mann et al 1000-1850) 1998 THE TEMPERATURE'S RISING #12;GLOBAL ANNUAL TEMPERATURE ANOMALY, 1880-2008 0.8 0.6 0.4 0

  17. SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE GLOBAL WARMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE FOR GLOBAL WARMING Stephen E. Schwartz Jefferson's Ferry Public Affairs century. The warmest year of the millennium was 1998. #12;EVIDENCE OF GLOBAL WARMING OTHER THAN SURFACE TEMPERATURE ANOMALY The global ocean has warmed significantly since the late 1940s: more than half

  18. Carbon Dioxide & Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Carbon Dioxide & Global Warming University of MiaMi rosenstiel sChool of Marine anD atMospheriC s , organic carbon, and other chemicals that contribute to global warming in a variety of studies. DownCienCe 4600 rickenbacker Causeway Miami, florida 33149 http://www.rsmas.miami.edu the Chemistry of Global

  19. Global Information Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keromytis, Angelos D.

    Global Information Technologies: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications Felix B. Tan in the United States of America by Information Science Reference (an imprint of IGI Global) 701 E. Chocolate (an imprint of IGI Global) 3 Henrietta Street Covent Garden London WC2E 8LU Tel: 44 20 7240 0856 Fax

  20. Meteorology as Infrastructural Globalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Paul N.

    the history of a global governance institution, the World Me- teorological Organization (WMO), from its (from the 1967 inauguration of the Intelsat system) and global environmental monitoring (from the UN Confer- ence on the Human Environment, 1972). Throughout, Hewson sees global governance institutions

  1. GLOBAL TAXONOMY INITIATIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Taran

    #12;THE GLOBAL TAXONOMY INITIATIVE: Using Systematic Inventories to Meet Country and Regional Needs (COP) to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) has endorsed a GlobalTaxonomy Initiative (GTI workshop, The Global Taxonomy Initiative: Shortening the Distance between Discovery and Delivery, made

  2. Report on Abatement Activities Related to Agriculture and Waste Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Report on Abatement Activities Related to Agriculture and Waste Management in the Lower Fraser Guidelines for Producers 9 2.3 Best Agricultural Waste Management Plans (BAWMPs) 9 3.0 AGRICULTURAL PRACTICES Agricultural Waste management Zones Used in the management of Agricultural Wastes in the Lower Fraser Valley

  3. Engineering the global ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stringfellow, William T.; Jain, Ravi

    2010-01-01

    Manage- ment Plan Schemel LE, Sommer TR, Muller-Solger AB,ts to engineered systems (Sommer et al. 2001; Schemel et al.or agricultural productivity (Sommer et al. 2001; Schemel et

  4. Global climate change and international security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, M.

    1991-01-01

    On May 8--10, 1991, the Midwest Consortium of International Security Studies (MCISS) and Argonne National Laboratory cosponsored a conference on Global Climate Change and International Security. The aim was to bring together natural and social scientists to examine the economic, sociopolitical, and security implications of the climate changes predicted by the general circulation models developed by natural scientists. Five themes emerged from the papers and discussions: (1) general circulation models and predicted climate change; (2) the effects of climate change on agriculture, especially in the Third World; (3) economic implications of policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions; (4) the sociopolitical consequences of climate change; and (5) the effect of climate change on global security.

  5. t w o t h o u s a n d n i n e a n n u a l r e p o r t michigan agricultural experiment station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boosting Oil Production in Plants using a New "Wrinkle" . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 25 Secure, the nation and the world. The mission, supported by more than 300 scientists working in agriculture, natural . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Branching Out to Fight Poverty and Slow Global Warming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

  6. Communication among Agricultural Policy Influencers: A Delphi Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salazar, Victor Kingsley

    2015-05-12

    Agricultural policy affects the agricultural industry in its entirety. It affects everything from the type of food that is grown to how it is processed and distributed. Agricultural policy influencers impact the development of the policy...

  7. Elementary School Teachers' Perception of Agricultural-Related Literature 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leventini, Alexa Marie

    2013-04-24

    and a need was established for accurate, realistic and representative materials of American agriculture for the classroom. This issue of agricultural literacy has become an imminent concern in today’s agricultural industry. With these rising concerns...

  8. The National Institute of Food and Agriculture was established by the 2008 Farm Bill to serve the nation's needs by supporting exemplary research, education, and extension that addresses many challenges facing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Background The National Institute of Food and Agriculture was established by the 2008 Farm Bill to the people who need it most--in the United States and around the world. Factsheet NAtIoNAl INstItute oF Food ANd AgrIculture u.s. depArtmeNt oF AgrIculture Priority science areas global Food security and Hunger NIFA

  9. Sustainable Energy Utility (SEU)- Agricultural Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Delaware Sustainable Energy Utility (DESEU) offers customized loans for agricultural customer as a part of DESEU’s revolving loan program. Program applications are accepted on a rolling basis, and...

  10. Quantifying the parameters of successful agricultural producers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaase, Gregory Herman

    2006-08-16

    The primary purpose of the study was to quantify the parameters of successful agricultural producers. Through the use of the Financial and Risk Management (FARM) Assistance database, this study evaluated economic measures ...

  11. Irrigation Training Program For Texas Agricultural Producers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, B.L.

    2010-01-01

    The Irrigation Training Program, funded by the Texas Water Development Board (TWDB) through an Agricultural Water Conservation Grant, began in 2006. Administered by the Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI), the Texas State ...

  12. U.S. Agriculture and International Trade 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCorkle, Dean; Benson, Geoffrey A.; Marchant, Mary; Rosson, C. Parr

    1999-06-23

    International markets are important for many U.S. farm products and greatly affect U.S. agriculture. This publication discusses the causes of import change, the export product mix, major markets, and markets of the future....

  13. An Analysis on Agricultural Market Behavior 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Chul

    2010-10-12

    This dissertation is concerned with (i) how to model an agricultural market, (ii) how to analyze the impacts of a certain event (i.e. animal disease outbreak) on the market, and (iii) what are the relationships between ...

  14. Impacts of Tighter Credit in Agriculture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klose, Steven; Klinefelter, Danny A.; Hogan, Robert J.

    2009-03-26

    The availability of credit is critical to agricultural production. In the current tight credit situation, it is important for borrowers to understand the sources of credit and the nature of credit markets. This publications examines various sources...

  15. Three Essays In Environmental And Agricultural Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poudel, Biswo Nath

    2010-01-01

    Environmental and Re- source Economics 32(2005):495-508.Journal of Agricultural Economics 86(2004):1315–1321. Barro,Quarterly Journal of Economics 106 (1991):407-443. Barro,

  16. The Greening of Capitalist Agriculture in Nigeria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunmoye, R. Ayo

    1982-01-01

    Shehu Shagari to the U. S. /Nigeria Joint Agricultural1975, pp. 245-261. 25 Nigeria: lJ'he 'l'hird NationalP. Olinger, "The World Bank in Nigeria," RAPE, No. 13, 1978,

  17. Analysis of Impacts on Prime or Unique Agricultural Lands in...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    on Analysis of Impacts on Prime or Unique Agricultural Lands in Implementing the National Environmental Policy Act was developed in cooperation with the Department of Agriculture....

  18. Before the Committee on Agriculture Subcommittee on General Farm...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Agriculture Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and Risk Management Before the Committee on Agriculture Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and Risk Management Before the...

  19. Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities for Mitigation in Agricultural Landscapes using Integrated Assessment Modeling and Scenarios Jump to:...

  20. Climate Change and China's Agricultural Sector: An Overview of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Change and China's Agricultural Sector: An Overview of Impacts, Adaptation and Mitigation Jump to: navigation, search Name Climate Change and China's Agricultural Sector:...

  1. Argentina-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Inter-American Development Bank, The Regional Fund for Agricultural Technology, Government of New Zealand Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics...

  2. Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy...

  3. Department of Agriculture and Energy Department Announce Up to...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Agriculture and Energy Department Announce Up to 8.7 Million through the Interagency Biomass Research and Development Initiative Department of Agriculture and Energy Department...

  4. Cornell Chronicle December 13, 2001 5 $1.2 million USDA grant helps create CU-managed organic farm network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferwerda, James A.

    for Fu- ture Agriculture and Food Systems hasawardeda $1.2milliongrantfor the creation of a new organic organizations. It will examine ways to enhance produc- tion and consumption of locally grown organic foodNortheastorganiccommunity,landgrant universitiesandagriculturalexperimentstations,aswellas the public and private sectors, to determine how organic food production will improve

  5. ALS Global Agroecosystems 2014 -page 1 Global Agroecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    . House. 2010. Sustainable agroecosystem management: Integrating ecology, economics, and society. CRC Crop Production (AGR 4214C), and Agricultural Ecology (ALS 3153), or equivalents, or approval of topics that integrate ecological with agricultural principles to optimize resource conservation

  6. Global Change Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Global Change and Sustainability Center The GCSC is an inclusionary and interdisciplinary hub that promotes, coordinates, and conducts local to global environmental- and sustainability-related research to complex environmental and sustainability issues and challenges. 2012 Annual Report #12;1GCSC 2012 ANNUAL

  7. Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Agriculture Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Ontario, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, Saskatchewan Keywords (Subject): Land Use, Soils, Agriculture

  8. A threshold area ratio of organic to conventional agriculture causes recurrent pathogen outbreaks in organic agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolokolnikov, Theodore

    A threshold area ratio of organic to conventional agriculture causes recurrent pathogen outbreaks in organic agriculture S. Adl a, , D. Iron b , T. Kolokolnikov b a Department of Biology, Dalhousie 2011 Available online 21 March 2011 Keywords: Allodeposition Diffusive logistic equations Food security

  9. This article was downloaded by:[Danish Veterinary and Agricultural Library] [Danish Veterinary and Agricultural Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Rasmus

    doses should be independently verified with primary sources. The publisher shall not be liable for anyThis article was downloaded by:[Danish Veterinary and Agricultural Library] [Danish Veterinary and Agricultural Library] On: 10 May 2007 Access Details: [subscription number 773444395] Publisher: Taylor

  10. This article was downloaded by:[Danish Veterinary and Agricultural Library] [Danish Veterinary and Agricultural Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Rasmus

    , formulae and drug doses should be independently verified with primary sources. The publisher shallThis article was downloaded by:[Danish Veterinary and Agricultural Library] [Danish Veterinary and Agricultural Library] On: 25 April 2007 Access Details: [subscription number 773444395] Publisher: Taylor

  11. A global warning for global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paepe, R.

    1996-12-31

    The problem of global warming is a complex one not only because it is affecting desert areas such as the Sahel leading to famine disasters of poor rural societies, but because it is an even greater threat to modern well established industrial societies. Global warming is a complex problem of geographical, economical and societal factors together which definitely are biased by local environmental parameters. There is an absolute need to increase the knowledge of such parameters, especially to understand their limits of variance. The greenhouse effect is a global mechanism which means that in changing conditions at one point of the Earth, it will affect all other regions of the globe. Industrial pollution and devastation of the forest are quoted as similar polluting anthropogenic activities in far apart regions of the world with totally different societies and industrial compounds. The other important factor is climatic cyclicity which means that droughts are bound to natural cycles. These natural cycles are numerous as is reflected in the study of geo-proxydata from several sequential geological series on land, ice and deepsea. Each of these cycles reveals a drought cycle which occasionally interfere at the same time. It is believed that the present drought might well be a point of interference between the natural cycles of 2,500 and 1,000 years and the man induced cycle of the last century`s warming up. If the latter is the only cycle involved, man will be able to remediate. If not, global warming will become even more disastrous beyond the 21st century.

  12. Analysis of a secondary mortgage market for agricultural real estate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewandrowski, David J.

    1988-01-01

    Record of Study ANALYSIS OF A SECONDARY MORTGAGE MARKET FOR AGRICULTURAL REAL ESTATE A PROFESSIONAL PAPER by David J, Letrandrotrskt Submitted to the College of Agriculture of Texas Aadf University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OP AGRICULTURE MAY, 1988 Major Subject: Agrl-Banking Department of Agricultural Economics ANALYSIS OF A SECONDARY MORTGAGE MARKET FOR AGRICULTURAL REAL ESTATE A Professional Paper by David J. Lewandrowski...

  13. Global Cool Cities Alliance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is currently supporting the Global Cool Cities Alliance (GCCA), a non-profit organization that works with cities, regions, and national governments to speed the...

  14. Global Energy Management System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eidt, B. D.

    2005-01-01

    commitment to Stanford University's Global Climate and Energy Project (GCEP). The overarching goal of this program is the accelerated development of commercially viable energy technologies that can substantially reduce greenhouse gas emissions on a...

  15. The Global Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatzivasileiadis, Spyros; Andersson, Göran

    2012-01-01

    This paper puts forward the vision that a natural future stage of the electricity network could be a grid spanning the whole planet and connecting most of the large power plants in the world: this is the "Global Grid". The main driving force behind the Global Grid will be the harvesting of remote renewable sources, and its key infrastructure element will be the high capacity long transmission lines. Wind farms and solar power plants will supply load centers with green power over long distances. This paper focusses on the introduction of the concept, showing that a globally interconnected network can be technologically feasible and economically competitive. We further highlight the multiple opportunities emerging from a global electricity network such as smoothing the renewable energy supply and electricity demand, reducing the need for bulk storage, and reducing the volatility of the energy prices. We also discuss possible investment mechanisms and operating schemes. Among others, we envision in such a system...

  16. KRFTWRK – Global Human Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prohaska, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    Power Network 2.1.1 Virtual Power Plants The Global Powernetwork, based on "Virtual Power Plants", called "VPP". A "participant runs a virtual human power plant. Per every "

  17. Global Research Collaborations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    i Global Research Collaborations Merrill Series on The Research Mission..........................................................................................................9 Director, North America Office, German Research Foundation (Deutsch Forschungsgemeinschaft, DFG) International Research Collaboration: Just Nice to Have or Necessary? Panel 1: Research Administrators Prem

  18. USDA Feedstocks and Biofuels

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics And Statistics » USAJobs Search USAJobs Search The jobs listed belowPlanned for Pine

  19. USDA Tribal Energy Summit

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowing YouNeedof EnergyMeeting - March

  20. Systems integration for global sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    footprinting of global biofuel production. Appl. Energy 112,tion research because biofuel production and consumption as90% of the global biofuel production of 105 billion liters

  1. Public Parking Lots > Agriculture Building Parkade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    A R M L A N E F A R M L A N E Stone Barn Livestock Research Animal Science Farm Residences Rayner Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada SCIENCE PLACE VETERINARY CRE SCENT Western College of Veterinary Medicine Teaching Unit Reproduction Centre Ryan-Dubé Equine PerformanceCentre Environment Canada Canadian Wildlife

  2. Agriculture,Environmental RestorationandEcosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    , Environment and Planning #12;2 Abstract Agricultural lands in Florida are being explored for increased water by the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan, calls for more water storage on lands south of Lake Okeechobee to restore the natural water flows of the Everglades Watershed. Modifying traditional farming systems

  3. Discounts, Fungibility and Agricultural GHG Offset projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    in MMT of Carbon Equivalents Soil Carbon Sequestration Discount for Saturating Sinks No Sink Discounting of Carbon Equivalents Carbon Sequestration from Trees Discount for Saturating Sinks No Sink Discounting 0.S. Agricultural and Forest Carbon Sequestration," 2003. #12;FungibilityFungibility A number of concepts have

  4. Montana State University 1 College of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barge, Marcy

    , livestock production, and soil and water conservation. Soil Science Minor (http://catalog-majors with fundamental soils courses in preparation for natural resource careers. Water Resources Minor (http://catalog for professional training in veterinary medicine. · B.S. in Agricultural Business (http://catalog

  5. Cole Museum/AMS New Agriculture Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandler-Wilde, Simon N.

    Agriculture, Policy & Development 38 Cybernetics E5 School of Systems Engineering N15 Dental Centre C2 Computer Science E5 School of Systems Engineering 33 Construction Management and Engineering D4 URS Engineering E5 School of Systems Engineering 25 Engineering C5 Engineering Building 1 English and Ameri- can

  6. Dr. Carlo Fezzi Valuing production: the agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Ian J.

    impact of adaptation 2040 Changes #12;Adaptation and environmental policy 2040 Changes Woodland planting) The environmental impact of climate change adaptation on land use and water quality, Nature Climate Change, vol. 5 Climate change impacts Climate change #12;Agriculture Climate change impacts Climate change Environment

  7. The Story of The Department of Agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    ............................................................................................................ 59 THE TAYLOR-HIBBARD CLUB of Wisconsin Press, 1949. Taylor, H. C. and Anne Dewees Taylor The Story of Agricultural Economics in the United States, 1840-1932. Ames IA: The Iowa State College Press, 1952. McIntyre, E.R. Fifty Years

  8. 1USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Report PSW-GTR-163. 1997. Photo Series for Quantifying Fuels and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest staff in cooperation with Sequoia-Kings Canyon National Park and Mountain Home Demonstration State, or undisturbed were located in Sequoia National Forest, Sequoia-Kings Canyon National Parks, and Mountain Home and bearing from a prominent landmark or latitude and longitude determined with a global positioning system

  9. USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-193. 2004. 43 Recent Projections of 21st-Century Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westerling, Anthony L.

    in the atmosphere. The model, part of the Department of Energy-funded Accelerated Climate Prediction Initiative, and ecosystems. Simulated temperatures in climate-model grid cells over Northern California began to warm notably by the coupled global atmosphere-ocean-ice- land Parallel Climate Model (PCM) in response to historical

  10. Comment on "Global Genetic Change Tracks Global Climate Warming in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel

    Comment on "Global Genetic Change Tracks Global Climate Warming in Drosophila subobscura" Francisco in response to global warming. However, that conclusion is not adequately buttressed by their data, because that chromosomal inversion polymorphisms of Drosophila subobscura are evolving in response to global warming. (2

  11. Is the Texas Agricultural Extension Service succeeding at educating and satisfying Texas agricultural producers? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huett, Buffy K.

    1999-01-01

    of satisfaction with TAEX. The survey was mailed to 3200 Texas landowner and TAEX clientele across the state (excluding the Piney Woods) and most likely reflected the Texas agricultural operator population; 1058 surveys (33%) were returned usable for analysis...

  12. Agricultural Science Teachers' Perceptions of Online Curriculum Resources in Agricultural Education 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutherford, Vanessa

    2014-10-14

    The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptions of agricultural science teachers’ use of online curriculum resources in regard to planning time, time management, classroom management, content knowledge, home and work life balance...

  13. The role of US agricultural and forest activities in global climate change mitigation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, En

    2009-05-15

    cost strategies to help with this mitigation principally through carbon sequestration but must be competitive with mitigation costs in the rest of the economy. A general equilibrium approach is used herein to evaluate the role of AF mitigation...

  14. GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT AND YOUR FAMILY'S CONTRIBUTION TO IT Stephen E. Schwartz://www.grida.no/climate/ipcc_tar/wg1/ #12;EVIDENCE OF GLOBAL WARMING OTHER THAN SURFACE TEMPERATURE ANOMALY The global ocean has warmed latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere. #12;MORE EVIDENCE OF GLOBAL WARMING OTHER THAN SURFACE TEMPERATURE

  15. Increasing homogeneity in global food supplies and the implications for food security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieseberg, Loren

    Increasing homogeneity in global food supplies and the implications for food security Colin K Trust, 53115 Bonn, Germany; g CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture, and Food Security to the world's food supplies has been considered a potential threat to food security. However, changes

  16. The State and the Global Ecological Crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carchidi, Victoria

    2006-01-01

    acknowledges that global environmental governance oftenforms of global environmental governance” sitting between

  17. The Private Regulation of Global Corporate Conduct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, David

    2006-01-01

    issue annual reports Can Forest Certification Fill Gaps in the Global Forest Regime” Global Environmental Politics

  18. Organic agriculture and ecological justice: Ethics and practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    : Danish Research Centre for Organic Food and Farming, Research Centre Foulum, Blichers Allé 20. P.O. Box3 Organic agriculture and ecological justice: Ethics and practice Hugo F. Alrøe*, John Byrne.......................................................................79 Sustainability, globalisation and organic agriculture ..........................................79

  19. Agricultural soil and its conservation in Mexico as percei 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revello, Valerie Ann

    1995-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine the perceptions of agricultural college students in Mexico toward agricultural soil and its conservation in their country. The study also determined relationships between ...

  20. ROBERTA COOK Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    ROBERTA COOK Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics University of California Davis, CA and Resource Economics, UC Davis. Applied research and extension program focusing on fresh produce marketing State University, East Lansing, Michigan Major: Agricultural Economics Areas of Concentration

  1. Using big data for decisions in agricultural supply chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Derik Lafayette

    2013-01-01

    Agriculture is an industry where historical and current data abound. This paper investigates the numerous data sources available in the agricultural field and analyzes them for usage in supply chain improvement. We identified ...

  2. Taiwan International Graduate Program --Molecular and Biological Agricultural Sciences Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taiwan International Graduate Program -- Molecular and Biological Agricultural Sciences Introduction Taiwan's academic interest in agricultural sciences began in earnest about 40 years ago with a breeding program in Taiwan's local rice varieties. Since then, various life science research institutes

  3. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS Faculty Tenure and Promotion Evaluation Procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermúdez, José Luis

    DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS Faculty Tenure and Promotion Evaluation Procedures Revised............................................20 2 #12;DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS Faculty Tenure and Promotion Evaluation Procedures November 2013 #12;Table of Contents I. The Evaluation Process

  4. Agricultural Outlook Forum | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12 Beta-3AUDITLeslie PezzulloAgenda Agenda AgendaAgricultural Outlook

  5. Dr. Roger Beachy was appointed to be the first director of the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) in October, 2009, and in January 2010 was appointed Chief Scientist of USDA. NIFA is responsible for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    of the world's first genetically modified food crop, a variety of tomato that was modified for resistanceDr. Roger Beachy was appointed to be the first director of the National Institute of Food

  6. Agricultural Productivity and Mortality: Evidence from Kagera, Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ikegami, Munenobu

    2009-01-01

    and seminar participants at “Agriculture for Development in Sub-Saharan Africa” or- ganized by African Economic Research

  7. Abstract: Design and Demonstration of an Advanced Agricultural...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project Director Principal Investigator: Fred Circle, President Project Title: Design and Demonstration of an Advanced Agricultural Feedstock Supply System for...

  8. Global Health Center (GHC) Website Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    Global Health Center (GHC) Website Architecture About Global Health Student Interest Group Contact) Leadership Electives (overview) PTGH Conversations in Global Health OHSU Global Health Grants Concentration in Global Health Studies Scholarship · Information · Awards · Reports News & Events Donate to the Center

  9. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    USDA- High Energy Cost Grant Program The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) offers an ongoing grant program for the improvement of energy generation, transmission, and...

  10. 255USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech.Rep. PSW-GTR-166. 1998. Vitality inventories of Scots pine stands, the most common species in Poland, have been done since 1991 by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    255USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech.Rep. PSW-GTR-166. 1998. Abstract Vitality inventories of Scots pine as the primary indicator of stand vitality. During 1991 to 1995, SO2 and NOx were measured at 1,417 forest, decreasing concentrations of SO2 and NOx were observed during the past 5 years. Changes of vitality in Scots

  11. AARON SMITH Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    AARON SMITH Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics One Shields Ave, University.ucdavis.edu Employment Professor, 2014-present, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, UC Davis. Associate Professor, 2007-2014, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, UC Davis. Assistant Professor, 2001

  12. Guide to Using Wood Ash as an Agricultural Soil Amendment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Guide to Using Wood Ash as an Agricultural Soil Amendment OLIVIA SAUNDERS, Extension Field Specialist "Wood ash contains significant amounts of potassium and calcium, while providing smaller amounts.unh.edu Spring 2014 UNH EXTENSION AGRICULTURE FACT SHEET Food & Agriculture Introduction Wood ash has a long

  13. Richard C. Ready Department of Agricultural Economics and Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Richard C. Ready Department of Agricultural Economics and Economics Montana State University, University of Wisconsin, Madison: Agricultural Economics Major Field: Environmental and Resource Economics 2. M.A. - 1985, University of Wisconsin, Madison: Agricultural Economics 3. B.S - 1981, Cornell

  14. The Economic Impacts of Agriculture in Wisconsin Counties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohnhoff, David

    The Economic Impacts of Agriculture in Wisconsin Counties Steven Deller Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics University of Wisconsin­Madison/Extension David Williams Agricultural and Natural and Economic Development provided support for this work. Published March, 2011. Cooperative Extension #12

  15. Agricultural Soil Carbon Sequestration: Economic Issues and Research Needs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    Agricultural Soil Carbon Sequestration: Economic Issues and Research Needs Draft paper Bruce A Mc............................................................................................................. 5 2 Why Consider Promoting Agricultural Soil Carbon Sequestration?...................... 6 2 Agricultural Soil Carbon Sequestration....... 11 3.1 What is the cost of GHGE offsets arising from large

  16. Agriculture and Environmental Quality ALS 3133 Spring 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    treatment process and the use of biosolids and reclaimed water in agriculture. Students will scrutinize for using agricultural systems for disposal of other wastes and the effects of pollution on the agricultural environment. Topics covered include: Soil characterization and erosion/leaching, non-point source pollution

  17. Global decarbonization strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Messner, S.

    1996-12-31

    The presentation covers a brief summary of the research activities of the Environmentally Compatible Energy Strategies Project (ECS) at IIASA. The overall research focuses on long-term global energy development and emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG). The ultimate goal is to analyze strategies that achieve decarbonization of global energy systems during the next century. The specific activities range from mitigation of GHG emissions to an integrated assessment of climate change. One focal point is the GHG mitigation technology inventory CO{sub 2}DB, which presently covers approximately 1,400 technologies related to energy and the greenhouse effect. Another integral part is the development of global energy and emissions scenarios, an effort involving a number of formal models to assess the implications. A large number of global scenarios for the next century has been developed, that could be grouped into three families. All of them include energy efficiency improvements and some degree of decarbonization in the world. They are based on different economic and technological development trajectories, and their emissions range from very high to a stabilization of atmospheric carbon dioxide emissions. The presentation will outline the salient characteristics of the three scenario families and provide some regional implications of these alternative futures.

  18. WORKPLACE GUIDES GLOBAL WORKING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roelleke, Thomas

    of Stonewall good practice publications ­ profiles some of the employers paving the way for gay staff to work do arise. This guide provides clear, practical tips on how gay employees can access internationalWORKPLACE GUIDES GLOBAL WORKING Supporting lesbian, gay and bisexual staff on overseas assignments

  19. Global Change at Edinburgh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenaway, Alan

    at Edinburgh | 2 The Global Change Group Human impacts on our planet are changing the atmosphere, climate, ice and to the CarboEurope programme. Cryosphere: field & remote observations & experiments on glacial erosion Biodiversity and the carbon cycle in Peru 10 Radiation penetration in forest stands 12 Genetics and Past

  20. GLOBALIZATION HAS EXISTED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wei

    -tech and social spheres. Leading in our highly connected, dynamic and fast-changing world takes special skills that you will consider joining us in expanding and strengthening Darden's global community and impact. MARC countries with active alumni chapters around the globe. EXAMPLES India Mexico Brazil PARTNER SCHOOLS Darden

  1. Preparation to teach agricultural mechanics: a qualitative case study of expert agricultural science and technology teachers in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Richard Kirby

    2006-04-12

    Since federal legislation in 1917 and the widespread program growth in the 1930?s, agricultural mechanics has been a major part of the high school agricultural science and technology curriculum. Local programs integrated ...

  2. Agriculture, Farm Labor, and Rural Communities in California in the 21st Century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palerm, Juan Vicente

    2010-01-01

    Agriculture, Farm Labor, and Rural Communities in CaliforniaAgriculture, Farm Labor, and Rural Communities in CaliforniaCalifornia's rural/agricultural communities located within

  3. AERC Conference on Agriculture for Development in Sub-Saharan Africa: Introduction.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Janvry, Alain

    2009-01-01

    0900 Issued in July 2009 AERC Conference on Agriculture forpresented at the May 2009 Conference on “Agriculture forAlain de Janvry. (2009). AERC Conference on Agriculture for

  4. Global crop yield losses from recent warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobell, D; Field, C

    2006-06-02

    Global yields of the world-s six most widely grown crops--wheat, rice, maize, soybeans, barley, sorghum--have increased since 1961. Year-to-year variations in growing season minimum temperature, maximum temperature, and precipitation explain 30% or more of the variations in yield. Since 1991, climate trends have significantly decreased yield trends in all crops but rice, leading to foregone production since 1981 of about 12 million tons per year of wheat or maize, representing an annual economic loss of $1.2 to $1.7 billion. At the global scale, negative impacts of climate trends on crop yields are already apparent. Annual global temperatures have increased by {approx}0.4 C since 1980, with even larger changes observed in several regions (1). While many studies have considered the impacts of future climate changes on food production (2-5), the effects of these past changes on agriculture remain unclear. It is likely that warming has improved yields in some areas, reduced them in others, and had negligible impacts in still others; the relative balance of these effects at the global scale is unknown. An understanding of this balance would help to anticipate impacts of future climate changes, as well as to more accurately assess recent (and thereby project future) technologically driven yield progress. Separating the contribution of climate from concurrent changes in other factors--such as crop cultivars, management practices, soil quality, and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) levels--requires models that describe the response of yields to climate. Studies of future global impacts of climate change have typically relied on a bottom-up approach, whereby field scale, process-based models are applied to hundreds of representative sites and then averaged (e.g., ref 2). Such approaches require input data on soil and management conditions, which are often difficult to obtain. Limitations on data quality or quantity can thus limit the utility of this approach, especially at the local scale (6-8). At the global scale, however, many of the processes and impacts captured by field scale models will tend to cancel out, and therefore simpler empirical/statistical models with fewer input requirements may be as accurate (8, 9). Empirical/statistical models also allow the effects of poorly modeled processes (e.g., pest dynamics) to be captured and uncertainties to be readily quantified (10). Here we develop new, empirical/statistical models of global yield responses to climate using datasets on broad-scale yields, crop locations, and climate variability. We focus on global average yields for the six most widely grown crops in the world: wheat, rice, maize, soybeans, barley, and sorghum. Production of these crops accounts for over 40% of global cropland area (11). 55% of non-meat calories, and over 70% of animal feed (12).

  5. Global interrupt and barrier networks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blumrich, Matthias A. (Ridgefield, CT); Chen, Dong (Croton-On-Hudson, NY); Coteus, Paul W. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Gara, Alan G. (Mount Kisco, NY); Giampapa, Mark E (Irvington, NY); Heidelberger, Philip (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Kopcsay, Gerard V. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D. (Mount Kisco, NY); Takken, Todd E. (Mount Kisco, NY)

    2008-10-28

    A system and method for generating global asynchronous signals in a computing structure. Particularly, a global interrupt and barrier network is implemented that implements logic for generating global interrupt and barrier signals for controlling global asynchronous operations performed by processing elements at selected processing nodes of a computing structure in accordance with a processing algorithm; and includes the physical interconnecting of the processing nodes for communicating the global interrupt and barrier signals to the elements via low-latency paths. The global asynchronous signals respectively initiate interrupt and barrier operations at the processing nodes at times selected for optimizing performance of the processing algorithms. In one embodiment, the global interrupt and barrier network is implemented in a scalable, massively parallel supercomputing device structure comprising a plurality of processing nodes interconnected by multiple independent networks, with each node including one or more processing elements for performing computation or communication activity as required when performing parallel algorithm operations. One multiple independent network includes a global tree network for enabling high-speed global tree communications among global tree network nodes or sub-trees thereof. The global interrupt and barrier network may operate in parallel with the global tree network for providing global asynchronous sideband signals.

  6. Evaluation of agricultural residues for paper manufacture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alcaide, L.J.; Baldovin, F.L.; Herranz, J.L.F. (Univ. of Cordoba (Spain))

    1993-03-01

    Five agricultural residues-olive tree fellings, wheat straw, sunflower stalks, vine shoots, and cotton stalks-were evaluated for use as raw materials for paper manufacture. The untreated raw materials and their pulps were tested for hot-water solubles, 1%-NaOH solubles, alcohol-benzene extractables, ash, holocellulose, lignin, [alpha]-cellulose, and pentosans. Handsheets were tested for breaking length, stretch, burst index, and tear index. The results showed wheat straw to be the most promising material. Vine shoots showed the least promise.

  7. Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Research Participation Program -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TA I N P A T T E R N AManaged by ORAU Agricultural

  8. Wyoming Department of Agriculture | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan) Jump to: navigation,InformationZhongcaiAgriculture

  9. Oregon Department of Agriculture | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly Smart Grid Data availableInformationOptonyAgriculture Jump to:

  10. Globalization and the Middle Class

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    of Liberal Trade on the Middle Class There is considerableGlobalization and the Middle Class Katherine V.W. StoneGlobalization and the Middle Class ? Katherine V.W. Stone

  11. International Health Global Health Policy--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyashita, Yasushi

    50 International Health Global Health Policy-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- http://www.ghp.m.u-tokyo.ac.jp Our mission is to improve population health by enhancing accountability and improving evidence base of global (both domestic and international) health programmes through the provision

  12. Global climate feedbacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manowitz, B.

    1990-10-01

    The important physical, chemical, and biological events that affect global climate change occur on a mesoscale -- requiring high spatial resolution for their analysis. The Department of Energy has formulated two major initiatives under the US Global Change Program: ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurements), and CHAMMP (Computer Hardware Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics). ARM is designed to use ground and air-craft based observations to document profiles of atmospheric composition, clouds, and radiative fluxes. With research and models of important physical processes, ARM will delineate the relationships between trace gases, aerosol and cloud structure, and radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and will improve the parameterization of global circulation models. The present GCMs do not model important feedbacks, including those from clouds, oceans, and land processes. The purpose of this workshop is to identify such potential feedbacks, to evaluate the uncertainties in the feedback processes (and, if possible, to parameterize the feedback processes so that they can be treated in a GCM), and to recommend research programs that will reduce the uncertainties in important feedback processes. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

  13. CHILLING CONSIDERATIONS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    CHILLING CONSIDERATIONS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING: GREENHOUSE GASES, AEROSOLS, RADIATIVE FORCING dioxide increase: sources, mixing ratio, forcing Global temperature change Climate sensitivity and time;#12;ATMOSPHERIC RADIATION Energy per area per time Power per area Unit: Watt per square meter W m-2 #12;GLOBAL

  14. CHILLING CONSIDERATIONS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    CHILLING CONSIDERATIONS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING Stephen E. Schwartz Ethical Culture Society of Suffolk;ATMOSPHERIC RADIATION Energy per area per time Power per area Unit: Watt per square meter W m-2 #12;GLOBAL ENERGY BALANCE Global and annual average energy fluxes in watts per square meter 343 237 237 254K 390

  15. Forecasting phenology under global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silander Jr., John A.

    Forecasting phenology under global warming Ine´s Iba´n~ez1,*, Richard B. Primack2, Abraham J in phenology. Keywords: climate change; East Asia, global warming; growing season, hierarchical Bayes; plant is shifting, and these shifts have been linked to recent global warming (Parmesan & Yohe 2003; Root et al

  16. 2, 921942, 2002 Global ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACPD 2, 921­942, 2002 Global ozone forecasting H. J. Eskes et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Geophysical Society 2002 Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Global ozone forecasting based on ERS-2 July 2002 Correspondence to: H. J. Eskes (eskes@knmi.nl) 921 #12;ACPD 2, 921­942, 2002 Global ozone

  17. Agricultural, industrial and municipal waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    It is right that consideration of the environment is of prime importance when agricultural and industrial processes are being developed. This book compiles the papers presented at the Institution of Mechanical Engineers conference. The contents include: The use of wastes for land reclamation and restoration; landfill, an environmentally acceptable method of waste disposal and an economic source of energy; control of leachate from waste disposal landfill sites using bentonite; landfill gas migration from operational landfill sites, monitoring and prevention; monitoring of emissions from hazardous waste incineration; hazardous wastes management in Hong Kong, a summary of a report and recommendations; the techniques and problems of chemical analysis of waste waters and leachate from waste tips; a small scale waste burning combustor; energy recovery from municipal waste by incineration; anaerobic treatment of industrial waste; a review of developments in the acid hydrolysis of cellulosic wastes; reduction of slag deposits by magnesium hydroxide injection; integrated rural energy centres (for agriculture-based economies); resource recovery; straw as a fuel in the UK; the computer as a tool for predicting the financial implications of future municipal waste disposal and recycling projects; solid wastes as a cement kiln fuel; monitoring and control of landfill gas; the utilization of waste derived fuels; the economics of energy recovery from municipal and industrial wastes; the development and construction of a municipal waste reclamation plant by a local authority.

  18. Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Ann E.

    2008-01-01

    Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation Ann E. Carlson*2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 175 stroke2001). 2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 177

  19. Global Warming, endogenous risk and irreversibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Anthony C.; Narain, Urvashi

    2002-01-01

    The economics of global warming, Institute for InternationalEconomic Models of Global Warming, Cambridge, Mass. MITstochastic losses from global warming, Risk Analysis 16(2):

  20. Global Warming Systemically Caused Hurricane Sandy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakoff, George

    2012-01-01

    Global Warming Systemically Caused Hurricane Sandyby George Lakoff Yes, global warming systemically causedExplain to others why global warming systemically caused the

  1. Global warming from HFC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, E.

    1998-11-01

    Using a variety of public sources, a computer model of hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerant emissions in the UK has been developed. This model has been used to estimate and project emissions in 2010 under three types of scenarios: (1) business as usual; (2) voluntary agreements to reduce refrigerant leakage; and (3) comprehensive regulations to reduce refrigerant leakage. This resulting forecast is that UK emissions of HFC refrigerants in 2010 will account for 2% to 4% of the UK`s 1990 baseline global warming contribution.

  2. The Global Energy Challenge

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Crabtree, George

    2010-01-08

    The expected doubling of global energy demand by 2050 challenges our traditional patterns of energy production, distribution and use.   The continued use of fossil fuels raises concerns about supply, security, environment and climate.  New routes are needed for the efficient conversion of energy from chemical fuel, sunlight, and heat to electricity or hydrogen as an energy carrier and finally to end uses like transportation, lighting, and heating. Opportunities for efficient new energy conversion routes based on nanoscale materials will be presented, with emphasis on the sustainable energy technologies they enable.

  3. Global carbon budget 2014

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Le Quéré, C.; Moriarty, R.; Andrew, R. M.; Peters, G. P.; Ciais, P.; Friedlingstein, P.; Jones, S. D.; Sitch, S.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; et al

    2015-05-08

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we describe data sets and a methodology to quantify all major components of the global carbon budget, including their uncertainties, based on the combination of a range of data, algorithms, statistics, and model estimates and their interpretation by a broad scientific community. We discuss changes compared to previous estimates, consistency within and among components, alongside methodology and data limitations. CO2 emissionsmore »from fossil fuel combustion and cement production (EFF) are based on energy statistics and cement production data, respectively, while emissions from land-use change (ELUC), mainly deforestation, are based on combined evidence from land-cover-change data, fire activity associated with deforestation, and models. The global atmospheric CO2 concentration is measured directly and its rate of growth (GATM) is computed from the annual changes in concentration. The mean ocean CO2 sink (SOCEAN) is based on observations from the 1990s, while the annual anomalies and trends are estimated with ocean models. The variability in SOCEAN is evaluated with data products based on surveys of ocean CO2 measurements. The global residual terrestrial CO2 sink (SLAND) is estimated by the difference of the other terms of the global carbon budget and compared to results of independent dynamic global vegetation models forced by observed climate, CO2, and land-cover-change (some including nitrogen–carbon interactions). We compare the mean land and ocean fluxes and their variability to estimates from three atmospheric inverse methods for three broad latitude bands. All uncertainties are reported as ±1?;, reflecting the current capacity to characterise the annual estimates of each component of the global carbon budget. For the last decade available (2004–2013), EFF was 8.9 ± 0.4 GtC yr?¹,ELUC 0.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr?¹, GATM 4.3 ± 0.1 GtC yr?¹, SOCEAN 2.6 ± 0.5 GtC yr?¹, and SLAND 2.9 ± 0.8 GtC yr?¹. For year 2013 alone, EFF grew to 9.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr?¹, 2.3% above 2012, continuing the growth trend in these emissions, ELUC was 0.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr?¹, GATM was 5.4 ± 0.2 GtC yr?¹, SOCEAN was 2.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr?¹, and SLAND was 2.5 ± 0.9 GtC yr?¹. GATM was high in 2013, reflecting a steady increase in EFF and smaller and opposite changes between SOCEAN and SLAND compared to the past decade (2004–2013). The global atmospheric CO2 concentration reached 395.31 ± 0.10 ppm averaged over 2013. We estimate that EFF will increase by 2.5% (1.3–3.5%) to 10.1 ± 0.6 GtC in 2014 (37.0 ± 2.2 GtCO2 yr?¹), 65% above emissions in 1990, based on projections of world gross domestic product and recent changes in the carbon intensity of the global economy. From this projection of EFF and assumed constant ELUC for 2014, cumulative emissions of CO2 will reach about 545 ± 55 GtC (2000 ± 200 GtCO2) for 1870–2014, about 75% from EFF and 25% from ELUC. This paper documents changes in the methods and data sets used in this new carbon budget compared with previous publications of this living data set (Le Quéré et al., 2013, 2014). All observations presented here can be downloaded from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (doi:10.3334/CDIAC/GCP_2014).« less

  4. Sandia Energy - Global

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis ofSample SULIColinEnergy PolicyLeaks inGlobal Home Analysis

  5. Global Threat Reduction Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide to Tapping intoandMinimaland(GTO)GetSafeguards |Global

  6. Global Home Filesystem

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFESOpportunitiesNERSC Getting Started at NERSCGitGlennGlobalofGlobal

  7. Health effects of global warming: Problems in assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Longstreth, J.

    1993-06-01

    Global warming is likely to result in a variety of environmental effects ranging from impacts on species diversity, changes in population size in flora and fauna, increases in sea level and possible impacts on the primary productivity of the sea. Potential impacts on human health and welfare have included possible increases in heat related mortality, changes in the distribution of disease vectors, and possible impacts on respiratory diseases including hayfever and asthma. Most of the focus thus far is on effects which are directly related to increases in temperature, e.g., heat stress or perhaps one step removed, e.g., changes in vector distribution. Some of the more severe impacts are likely to be much less direct, e.g., increases in migration due to agricultural failure following prolonged droughts. This paper discusses two possible approaches to the study of these less-direct impacts of global warming and presents information from on-going research using each of these approaches.

  8. Authenticated writing assessments of agricultural education graduate students 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Kimberly Dawn

    2004-11-15

    -1 AUTHENTICATED WRITING ASSESSMENTS OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION GRADUATE STUDENTS A Thesis by KIMBERLY DAWN WRIGHT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2004 Major Subject: Agricultural Education AUTHENTICATED WRITING ASSESSMENTS OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION GRADUATE STUDENTS A Thesis by KIMBERLY DAWN WRIGHT Submitted to Texas A...

  9. Risk management in the financing of Texas agricultural exports 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kratz, Robert J.

    1985-01-01

    RISK MANAGEMENT IN THE FINANCING OF TEXAS AGRICULTURE EXPORTS A PROFESSIONAL PAPER ROBERT J. KRATZ Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF AGRICULTLRE... August, 1985 AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS RISK iNANAGEiVENT IN THE FINANCING OF TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPORTS A Professional Paper ROBERT J. KRATZ Approved as to style and content by: John A. Hop in Chairman, Advisory Committee C M Ai I Mechel S. Paggi...

  10. Ecological, Economic and Policy Alternatives for Texas Rice Agriculture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alston, Letitia T.; Lacher, Thomas E.; Slack, R. Douglas; Vedlitz, Arnold; Woodward, Richard T.; Franklin, James C.; Canzoneri, Nicole; Conkey, April Ann Torres; Cowman, Deborah F.; Harris, Jeanine; Henry, April; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Krohn, Michelle R.; Mizell, Kelly; Nicholson, Jill; Tierce, Kelly; Wui, Yong-Sukh

    2000-01-01

    RESOURCES INSTITUTE Report by the INSTITUTE FOR SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND PUBLIC POLICY George Bush School of Government and Public Service Funded by TR-181 ECOLOGICAL, ECONOMIC AND POLICY ALTERNATIVES FOR TEXAS RICE AGRICULTURE September 25, 2000..., economic, and policy alternatives for Texas rice agriculture. A report by the Institute for Science, Technology and Public Policy in the George Bush School of Government and Public Service to the Texas Water Resources Institute/Agricultural Program...

  11. KEITH KLINE VIRGINIA H. DALE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    factor in world food costs. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) calculated that biofuel production documented that since their peak in July 2008, oil prices declined by 69% as of Decem- ber 2008, and global ways can contribute significantly to the nation's-- indeed, the world's--energy security while

  12. Global tree network for computing structures enabling global processing operations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blumrich; Matthias A. (Ridgefield, CT); Chen, Dong (Croton-On-Hudson, NY); Coteus, Paul W. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Gara, Alan G. (Mount Kisco, NY); Giampapa, Mark E. (Irvington, NY); Heidelberger, Philip (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Hoenicke, Dirk (Ossining, NY); Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D. (Mount Kisco, NY); Takken, Todd E. (Mount Kisco, NY); Vranas, Pavlos M. (Bedford Hills, NY)

    2010-01-19

    A system and method for enabling high-speed, low-latency global tree network communications among processing nodes interconnected according to a tree network structure. The global tree network enables collective reduction operations to be performed during parallel algorithm operations executing in a computer structure having a plurality of the interconnected processing nodes. Router devices are included that interconnect the nodes of the tree via links to facilitate performance of low-latency global processing operations at nodes of the virtual tree and sub-tree structures. The global operations performed include one or more of: broadcast operations downstream from a root node to leaf nodes of a virtual tree, reduction operations upstream from leaf nodes to the root node in the virtual tree, and point-to-point message passing from any node to the root node. The global tree network is configurable to provide global barrier and interrupt functionality in asynchronous or synchronized manner, and, is physically and logically partitionable.

  13. Climate-Smart Agriculture: Policies, Practices and Financing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and responding to climate change. Projections based on population growth and food consumption patterns indicate that agricultural production will need to increase by at...

  14. Cultivation, Capital, and Contamination: Urban Agriculture in Oakland, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClintock, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    flatlands urban agriculture. The rolling range and orchardsurban areas, Pb arsenate (PbHAsO 4 ) was commonly applied as a pesticide in orchards (

  15. Applying Innovation System Concept in Agricultural Research for...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Applying Innovation System Concept in Agricultural Research for Development: A learning module Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Applying Innovation System...

  16. Agricultural Progress in Cameroon, Mali and Ghana: Why it Happened...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Development (IFAD). The purpose was to identify constraints to agricultural growth and poverty reduction that might be eased through better policy, both domestically and...

  17. Agricultural Productivity Growth in China: Farm Level versus National Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Colin A.; Chen, Jing; Chu, Baojin

    1999-01-01

    bias any measurement of agricultural productivity, becauseProductivity Growth in China: Farm Level versus National MeasurementProductivity Growth in China: Farm Level versus National Measurement

  18. Memorandum of Understanding Between the Department of Agriculture...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Commission of the People's Republic of China on Cooperation in the Development of Biofuels Memorandum of Understanding Between the Department of Agriculture and the Department...

  19. The Business of Global Environmental Governance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton-Smith, Elery

    2005-01-01

    The Business of Global Environmental Governance By David L.Business of Global Environmental Governance. Cambridge, MA :

  20. Ethics in collaborative global health researchhealth research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    in developing countries ­Global health inequalities­Global health inequalities ­Disproportionate burden

  1. Economic and Physical Modeling of Land Use in GCAM 3.0 and an Application to Agricultural Productivity, Land, and Terrestrial Carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick; Edmonds, James A.

    2014-09-01

    We explore the impact of changes in agricultural productivity on global land use and terrestrial carbon using the new agriculture and land use modeling approach developed for Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) version 3.0. This approach models economic land use decisions with regional, physical, and technological specificity while maintaining economic and physical integration with the rest of the GCAM model. Physical land characteristics and quantities are tracked explicitly, and crop production practices are modeled discretely to facilitate coupling with physical models. Economic land allocation is modeled with non-linear functions in a market equilibrium rather than through a constrained optimization. In this paper, we explore three scenarios of future agriculture productivity in all regions of the globe over this century, ranging from a high growth to a zero growth level. The higher productivity growth scenario leads to lower crop prices, increased production of crops in developing nations, preservation of global forested lands and lower terrestrial carbon emissions. The scenario with no productivity improvement results in higher crop prices, an expansion of crop production in the developed world, loss of forested lands globally, and higher terrestrial carbon emissions.

  2. Proceedings of the Second International Symposium on Fire Economics, Planning, and Policy: A Global View United States Forest Service (USFS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : A Global View United States Forest Service (USFS) NRIS-INFORMS-Fire/Fuels Analysis Tool 1 David S. Martinez routines, and rule bases (a knowledge base component) Build and retain project alternatives via Arc Ecologist, Fire & Aviation Management, Southwestern Region, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture

  3. Atmospheric chemistry and global change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prather, MJ

    1999-01-01

    and particles. Thus Atmospheric Chemistry and Global Changethe future of atmospheric chemistry. BROWSINGS Tornadothe complexity of atmospheric chemistry well, but trips a

  4. Systems integration for global sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    air pollution, and energy security policy. Energy Policy 38,Mima, European climate–energy security nexus: A model based16). Coupling global energy security policy with climate

  5. Enlighten Your Research Global Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    your data Programs & Workshops CrossConnects Workshop Series Operating Innovative Networks Workshop Series Enlighten Your Research Global Program Science Requirements Reviews...

  6. Environmental Regulation, Globalization, and Innovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashford, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    This essay explores the complex relationship between environmental regulation, innovation, and sustainable development within the context of an increasingly globalizing economy. It will be argued that industrial policy, ...

  7. U.S. Agriculture's Role Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    U.S. Agriculture's Role in a Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation World: An Economic Perspective the IMPAC project. #12;Abstract International agreements are likely to stimulate greenhouse gas mitigation Words Agricultural Sinks, Emissions Trading, Greenhouse Gas Emission Reductions, Kyoto Protocol #12

  8. United States Department of Agriculture Research, Education and Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiblen, George D

    basic process engineering background, knowledge of engineering unit operations and cost analysisUnited States Department of Agriculture Research, Education and Economics Agricultural Research will also be expected to construct accurate mass balances and conduct first-order techno-economic

  9. LINKING WATER QUALITY WITH AGRICULTURAL INTENSIFICATION IN A RURAL WATERSHED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    , agricultural pollution, animal waste, land-water interactions, nitrate, nitrogen surplus, nonpoint source pollution, water pollution, watershed management 1. Background Agriculture is rapidly emerging not require extra nutrients. Animal waste is primarily applied to soils, Water, Air, and Soil Pollution 127

  10. DISCUSSION: ECONOMIES OF SCALE AND SCOPE IN AGRICULTURAL BIOTECHNOLOGY RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foltz, Jeremy D.

    incentives for research, new avenues of rents for firms and the public sector in agriculture, and new types and applied research or product development) as well as between dif- ferent types of research organizationsDISCUSSION: ECONOMIES OF SCALE AND SCOPE IN AGRICULTURAL BIOTECHNOLOGY RESEARCH JEREMY D. FOLTZ

  11. UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT AND STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE BOARD OF TRUSTEES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT AND STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE BOARD OF TRUSTEES UNIVERSITY BYLAWS ARTICLE I: Name Section 1.1. Name: The name of the corporation is the University of Vermont and State Agricultural.1. Purpose: The University shall be recognized and utilized as an instrumentality of the State of Vermont

  12. For additional information, contact: Department of Agricultural Economics & Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barge, Marcy

    For additional information, contact: Department of Agricultural Economics & Economics Montana State.montana.edu/econ agecon@montana.edu 1 2 AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS & ECONOMICS KELLY GORHAM 1 Austin Owens traveled to Greece as mentors for students in Economics 101 4 Chris Stoddard was the recipient of a MSU Cox Family Faculty

  13. REVIEW ARTICLE Polyethylene and biodegradable mulches for agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of plastic mulch in agriculture has increased dramatically in the last 10 years throughout the world- able and biodegradable mulches. Here we review the use of plastic mulches in agriculture, with special reference to biode- gradable mulches. Major topics discussed are (1) history of plastic mulch and impact

  14. Agriculture-related radiation dose calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furr, J.M.; Mayberry, J.J.; Waite, D.A.

    1987-10-01

    Estimates of radiation dose to the public must be made at each stage in the identification and qualification process leading to siting a high-level nuclear waste repository. Specifically considering the ingestion pathway, this paper examines questions of reliability and adequacy of dose calculations in relation to five stages of data availability (geologic province, region, area, location, and mass balance) and three methods of calculation (population, population/food production, and food production driven). Calculations were done using the model PABLM with data for the Permian and Palo Duro Basins and the Deaf Smith County area. Extra effort expended in gathering agricultural data at succeeding environmental characterization levels does not appear justified, since dose estimates do not differ greatly; that effort would be better spent determining usage of food types that contribute most to the total dose; and that consumption rate and the air dispersion factor are critical to assessment of radiation dose via the ingestion pathway. 17 refs., 9 figs., 32 tabs.

  15. Fuel alcohol production from agricultural lignocellulosic feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farina, G.E.; Barrier, J.W.; Forsythe, M.L. )

    1988-01-01

    A two-stage, low-temperature, ambient pressure, acid hydrolysis process that utilizes separate unit operations to convert hemicellulose and cellulose in agricultural residues and crops to fermentable sugars is being developed and tested. Based on the results of the bench-scale tests, an acid hydrolysis experimental plant to demonstrate the concepts of low-temperature acid hydrolysis on a much larger scale was built. Plant tests using corn stover have been conducted for more that a year and conversion efficiences have equaled those achieved in the laboratory. Laboratory tests to determine the potential for low-temperature acid hydrolysis of other feedstocks - including red clover, alfalfa, kobe lespedeza, winter rape, and rye grass - are being conducted. Where applicable, process modifications to include extraction before or after hydrolysis also are being studied. This paper describes the experimental plant and process, results obtained in the plant, results of alternative feedstocks testing in the laboratory, and a plan for an integrated system that will produce other fuels, feed, and food from crops grown on marginal land.

  16. Perceptions on what Influences Writing in Agricultural Journalism 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilburn, Misty B.

    2011-02-22

    Respondents Cattlenetwork.com R6 CDC.gov R7 CNN.com R31, R37, R43 20 Table 2. Continued Web sites Respondent Drudgereport.com R8 Economist.com R16 ESPN.go.com R34 Foxnews.com R6, R23, R31, R32 Google.com R7 TheHorse.com R5, R6... Landolakesinc.com R21 Money.MSN.com R29 Msnbc.com R5 News.Google.com R2 Sciencedaily.com R7 USDA.gov R7 Wikipedia.org R7 Yahoo.com R19, R21, R23 Textbooks Respondents Animal Anatomy R5 Associated Press Stylebook R35 Communications Law R35...

  17. White House Conference on Global Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    President Clinton has directed the White House office on Environmental Policy to coordinate an interagency process to develop a plan to fulfill the commitment he made in his Earth Day address on April 21, 1993. This plan will become the cornerstone of the Climate Change Plan that will be completed shortly after the Rio Accord enters into force. The Office on Environmental Policy established the Interagency Climate Change Mitigation Group to draw on the expertise of federal agencies including the National Economic Council; the Council of Economic Advisors; the Office of Science and Technology Policy; the Office of Management and Budget; the National Security Council; the Domestic Policy Council; the Environmental Protection Agency; and the Departments of Energy, Transportation, Agriculture, Interior, Treasury, Commerce, and State. Working groups have been established to examine six key policy areas: energy demand, energy supply, joint implementation, methane and other gases, sinks, and transportation. The purpose of the White House Conference on Global Climate Change was to ``tap the real-world experiences`` of diverse participants and seek ideas and information for meeting the President`s goals. During the opening session, senior administration officials defined the challenge ahead and encouraged open and frank conversation about the best possible ways to meet it.

  18. Migration and Global Environmental Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Migration and Global Environmental Change Future Challenges and Opportunities FINAL PROJECT REPORT and adaptation, and also developmental and humanitarian agendas. Migration and Global Environmental Change Future Environmental Change (2011) Final Project Report The Government Office for Science, London #12;3 A range

  19. GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    PercentofTotal US China Russia Japan Germany ANNUAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION Total Global Consum ENERGY BALANCE Global and annual average energy fluxes in watts per square meter 343 237 237 254K 390 RADIATION Energy per area per time Power per area Unit: Watt per square meter W m-2 #12;Everybody talks

  20. FAO in the Changing Global Landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalla, Alex F.

    2007-01-01

    agriculture research, the GMO debate and patents on livingand the marketing of GMO seeds by large multinationals, have

  1. (Managing the global environment)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, S.F.

    1989-10-03

    The conference was stimulated by concern that policy makers increasingly have to make environmental management decisions in the absence of solidly established scientific consensus about ecological processes and the consequences of human actions. Often, as in the case of climate change, some decisions may have to be made in the absence of information that is desirable but may not be available for years to come, if ever. Six topics were identified as running throughout the Congress. These were: the epistemology and history of the sciences or disciplines concerned with the environment, including the scientific basis of rationality and modes of dealing with uncertainty and complexity; the social, economic, and institutional conditions for the production of knowledge bearing on the environment, including the politics of research and the improvement of scientific data; the structuring and institutionalization of expert assessments on national and international levels, including the global distribution of expertise; the means of establishing scientific information, the role of the media in transmitting and processing knowledge about the environment, and the organization of public environmental debate; and decision making and management under conditions of uncertainty; and, finally the relationship between science and ethics. 13 refs.

  2. A Globally Unevolving Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meir Shimon

    2015-09-30

    A scalar-tensor theory of gravity is formulated in which $G$ and particle masses are allowed to vary. The theory yields a globally static cosmological model with no evolutionary timescales, no cosmological coincidences, and no flatness and horizon `problems'. It can be shown that the energy densities of dark energy ($\\rho_{DE}$) and non-relativistic baryons and dark matter ($\\rho_{M}$) are related by $\\rho_{DE}=2\\rho_{M}$, in agreement with current observations, if DE is associated with the canonical kinetic and potential energy densities of the scalar fields. Under general assumptions, the model favors light fermionic dark matter candidates (e.g., sterile neutrinos). The main observed features of the CMB are naturally explained in this model, including the spectral flatness of its perturbations on the largest angular scales, and the observed adiabatic and gaussian nature of density perturbations. More generally, we show that many of the cosmological observables, normally attributed to the dynamics of expanding space, could be of kinematic origin. In gravitationally bound systems, the values of G and particle masses spontaneously freeze out by a symmetry breaking of the underlying conformal symmetry, and the theory reduces to standard general relativity (with, e.g., all solar system tests satisfied).

  3. The global gridded crop model intercomparison: Data and modeling protocols for Phase 1 (v1.0)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, J.; Müller, C.; Deryng, D.; Chryssanthacopoulos, J.; Boote, K. J.; Büchner, M.; Foster, I.; Glotter, M.; Heinke, J.; Iizumi, T.; Izaurralde, R. C.; Mueller, N. D.; Ray, D. K.; Rosenzweig, C.; Ruane, A. C.; Sheffield, J.

    2015-02-11

    We present protocols and input data for Phase 1 of the Global Gridded Crop Model Intercomparison, a project of the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP). The project consist of global simulations of yields, phenologies, and many land-surface fluxes using 12–15 modeling groups for many crops, climate forcing data sets, and scenarios over the historical period from 1948 to 2012. The primary outcomes of the project include (1) a detailed comparison of the major differences and similarities among global models commonly used for large-scale climate impact assessment, (2) an evaluation of model and ensemble hindcasting skill, (3) quantification of key uncertainties from climate input data, model choice, and other sources, and (4) a multi-model analysis of the agricultural impacts of large-scale climate extremes from the historical record.

  4. The global gridded crop model intercomparison: Data and modeling protocols for Phase 1 (v1.0)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Elliott, J.; Müller, C.; Deryng, D.; Chryssanthacopoulos, J.; Boote, K. J.; Büchner, M.; Foster, I.; Glotter, M.; Heinke, J.; Iizumi, T.; et al

    2015-02-11

    We present protocols and input data for Phase 1 of the Global Gridded Crop Model Intercomparison, a project of the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP). The project consist of global simulations of yields, phenologies, and many land-surface fluxes using 12–15 modeling groups for many crops, climate forcing data sets, and scenarios over the historical period from 1948 to 2012. The primary outcomes of the project include (1) a detailed comparison of the major differences and similarities among global models commonly used for large-scale climate impact assessment, (2) an evaluation of model and ensemble hindcasting skill, (3) quantification ofmore »key uncertainties from climate input data, model choice, and other sources, and (4) a multi-model analysis of the agricultural impacts of large-scale climate extremes from the historical record.« less

  5. THIS REPORT CONTAINS ASSESSMENTS OF COMMODITY AND TRADE ISSUES MADE BY USDA STAFF AND NOT NECESSARILY STATEMENTS OF OFFICIAL U.S. GOVERNMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    10 are yet to be reached for the entire country; Colombia is not expected to export biofuels of biofuels aimed at diversifying their sources of energy by reducing its dependency on fossil-fuels, using-industry to promote agricultural employment in rural areas. For the energy sector as a whole, the Colombian government

  6. We have only listed Oklahoma Hatcheries as they appear in the National Poultry Improvement Plan. For a listing of hatcheries in your state, contact your state USDA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    We have only listed Oklahoma Hatcheries as they appear in the National Poultry Improvement Plan by the Department of Animal Science, Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources or Oklahoma State University. If you are an Oklahoma Resident you can obtain a copy by contacting: Mr. Ralph Duncan Animal

  7. Global production through 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foreman, N.E.

    1996-12-01

    Two companion studies released recently should provide great food for thought among geo-political strategists and various national governments. If predictions contained in these Petroconsultants studies of oil and gas production trends for the next 10 years are realized, there will be great repercussions for net exporters and importers, alike. After analyzing and predicting trends within each of the world`s significant producing nations for the 1996--2005 period, the crude oil and condensate report concludes tat global production will jump nearly 24%. By contrast, worldwide gas output will leap 40%. The cast of characters among producers and exporters that will benefit from these increases varies considerably for each fuel. On the oil side, Russia and the OPEC members, particularly the Persian Gulf nations, will be back in the driver`s seat in terms of affecting export and pricing patterns. On the gas side, the leading producers will be an interesting mix of mostly non-OPEC countries. The reemergence of Persian Gulf oil producers, coupled with an anticipated long-term decline among top non-OPEC producing nations should present a sobering picture to government planners within large net importers, such as the US. They are likely to find themselves in much the same supply trap as was experienced in the 1970s, only this time the dependence on foreign oil supplies will be much worse. Gas supplies will not be similarly constrained, and some substitution for oil is probable. Here, two articles, ``World oil industry is set for transition`` and ``Worldwide gas surges forward in next decade,`` present a summary of the findings detailed in Petroconsultants` recent studies.

  8. Industrial and agricultural process heat information user study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belew, W.W.; Wood, B.L.; Marle, T.L.; Reinhardt, C.L.

    1981-03-01

    The results of a series of telephone interviews with groups of users of information on solar industrial and agricultural process heat (IAPH) are described. These results, part of a larger study on many different solar technologies, identify types of information each group needed and the best ways to get information to each group. In the current study only high-priority groups were examined. Results from 10 IAPH groups of respondents are analyzed in this report: IPH Researchers; APH Researchers; Representatives of Manufacturers of Concentrating and Nonconcentrating Collectors; Plant, Industrial, and Agricultural Engineers; Educators; Representatives of State Agricultural Offices; and County Extension Agents.

  9. Assessing the interactions among U.S. climate policy, biomass energy, and agricultural trade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, Marshall A.; McJeon, Haewon C.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page

    2014-09-01

    Energy from biomass is potentially an important contributor to U.S. climate change mitigation efforts. However, an important consideration to large-scale implementation of bioenergy is that the production of biomass competes with other uses of land. This includes traditionally economically productive uses, such as agriculture and forest products, as well as storage of carbon in forests and non-commercial lands. In addition, in the future, biomass may be more easily traded, meaning that increased U.S. reliance on bioenergy could come with it greater reliance on imported energy. Several approaches could be implemented to address these issues, including limits on U.S. biomass imports and protection of U.S. and global forests. This paper explores these dimensions of bioenergy’s role in U.S. climate policy and the relationship to these alternative measures for ameliorating the trade and land use consequences of bioenergy. It first demonstrates that widespread use of biomass in the U.S. could lead to imports; and it highlights that the relative stringency of domestic and international carbon mitigation policy will heavily influence the degree to which it is imported. Next, it demonstrates that while limiting biomass imports would prevent any reliance on other countries for this energy supply, it would most likely alter the balance of trade in other agricultural products against which biomass competes; for example, it might turn the U.S. from a corn exporter to a corn importer. Finally, it shows that increasing efforts to protect both U.S. and international forests could also affect the balance of trade in other agricultural products.

  10. Resisting globalization- ATTAC in France: local discourses, global terrain 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Marie des Neiges

    2007-04-25

    The debate over the "globalization" process has been influenced by the emergence of social movements who deplore this process. This research focuses on the French social movement ATTAC (Action for a Tobin Tax for the Aid of Citizens...

  11. Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry -Forestry Service Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    E-988 Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry - Forestry Service Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service United States Department of Agriculture - Forestry Service Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation Natural Resources Conservation Service Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food

  12. Teaching Organic Farming and Gardening: Resources for Instructors, 3rd Edition. Part 3 - Social and Environmental Issues in Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    Food & Agriculture System b) Climate change i. AgriculturalAgricul- ture, Climate Change and Carbon Sequestration.agriculture, climate change and carbon sequestration.

  13. The China-in-Global Energy Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi, T.

    The China-in-Global Energy Model (C-GEM) is a global Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model that captures the interaction of production, consumption and trade among multiple global regions and sectors – including five ...

  14. MA in Globalization Studies Student Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Michael

    MA in Globalization Studies Student Handbook 2014-15 Institute on Globalization and the Human://globalization.mcmaster.ca Meetings and materials are available in accessible formats on request #12;Table of Contents Welcome...................................................................................................................................................3 Selecting a Topic

  15. Direct health effects of global warming in Japan and China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ando, M.; Yamamoto, S.; Tamura, K.

    1997-12-31

    Combustion of fossil fuels and industrial and agricultural activities are resulting in greater emissions of some greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide and methane into the atmosphere, therefore contributing to global warming. Using general circulation models, it is estimated that surface temperatures in temperate regions will rise 1 to 3 degrees C during the next 100 years. Because global warming may increase the frequency and length of high temperatures during hot summer months, various health risks caused by heat stress have been studied. According to our epidemiological survey, the incidence of heat-related illness was significantly correlated to hot environments in Tokyo, Japan and in Nanjing and Wuhan, China. The epidemiological results also showed that the incidence of heat-related morbidity and mortality in the elderly increased very rapidly in summer. The regression analysis on these data showed that the number of heat stroke patients increased exponentially when the mean daily temperature and maximum daily temperature exceeded 27C and 32C in Tokyo and 31C and 36C in Wuhan and Nanjing, respectively. Since the incidence of heat-related morbidity and mortality has been shown to increase as a result of exposure to long periods of hot summer temperatures, it is important to determine to what extent the incidence of heat stress-related morbidity and mortality will be affected as a result of global warming.

  16. The relationship between perseverance and academic attainment in agricultural education 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, James Frank

    2001-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the perseverance level of agricultural education educators nationwide. The study design was descriptive-correlational with data collected using a written questionnaire that was mailed to stratified, systemic...

  17. Control of agricultural nonpoint source pollution in Kranji Catchment, Singapore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoff, Margaret A. (Margaret Ann)

    2013-01-01

    Singapore's Kranji Reservoir is highly sensitive to nutrient and bacterial pollution, both of which can be directly traced to agricultural runoff. Water quality samples were collected along the main drainage channel in the ...

  18. Incorporation of Agricultural Risk into Water Resource Planning Models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conner, J. R.

    1970-01-01

    , domestic, municipal, agricultural and industrial uses of water, ... and all relevant means (including nonstructural as well as structural measures) singly, in combination, or in alternative combinations reflecting different choice patterns for providing...

  19. Robert M. Goodman Executive Dean, Agriculture & Natural Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    Robert M. Goodman Executive Dean, Agriculture & Natural Resources Executive Dean, School. Thomas Leustek Assoc. Dean Academic Administration Robert Hills Assoc. Dean Academic Programs Rebecca and Business Administration Barbara Turpin Campus Dean G. H. Cook Campus School of Environmental and Biological

  20. The Current Water and Agriculture Context, Challenges, and Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Winston

    Surveys the current policy environment for addressing water and agricultural issues in a changing climate, which is shaped by economic development plans at the national and provincial levels, sector plans for water and ...

  1. Kevin Novan Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    , Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics University of California, Davis Education Ph.D., Economics of Bulk Electricity Storage," (with Richard Carson), Journal of Environmental Economics and Management Efficiency and Behavior: Electricity Savings from Residential Weatherization Programs," (with Joshua Graff

  2. Weather Effects on European Agricultural Output 1850-1913

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solomou, Solomos; Wu, Weike

    2004-06-16

    This paper compares the effects of weather shocks on agricultural production in Britain, France and Germany during the late nineteenth century. Using semi- parametric models to estimate the non-linear agro-weather relationship, we find...

  3. Evaluation of pre-packaged agricultural drip irrigation kits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Shen, S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to conduct user testing and performance evaluation of two different agricultural pre-packaged drip irrigation kit (PDIK) systems: Chapin Bucket Kit and International Design Enterprises (IDE) ...

  4. Missouri Agricultural and Energy Saving Team- A Revolutionary Opportunity (MAESTRO)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Note: Rates listed below are for farmers who signed up for the program by January 1, 2011; however, the Missouri Agricultural and Small Business Development Authority still has some funding...

  5. Potential Role of Biochar in Water Management in Rainfed Agriculture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flavia, Namagembe

    2012-08-16

    employed to help manage agricultural water sustainably. Previous studies indicate that incorporation of biochar into sandy soil improves its water retention capacity. This study demonstrates how addition of biochar produced from different feedstock biomass...

  6. Is Florida's Growth Management Act protecting agricultural lands?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lloyd, Stephen (Stephen Charles Rhys)

    2011-01-01

    Florida has experienced more population growth over the past half century than any other state, which has led to some of the most extensive urban development on valuable agricultural lands. To address this and other impacts ...

  7. Evaluating the utility of dynamical downscaling in agricultural impacts projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evaluating the utility of dynamical downscaling in agricultural impacts projections Michael evaluate here whether this computationally intensive approach significantly alters projections circulation model (GCM) output--to produce fine-spatial-scale climate projections for impacts assessments. We

  8. Three Essays on Climate Variability, Water and Agricultural Production 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Jinxiu

    2014-07-23

    examine the implications of increasing drought frequency in the Edwards Aquifer (EA) region of Texas on municipal, industrial, and agricultural water; land allocation; environmental flows; and welfare. To carry out this study we expand a regional...

  9. Departments of Energy, Navy, and Agriculture Invest $210 million...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    | Photo courtesy of U.S. Navy. Energy Department Joins Agriculture and Navy in the Fight for Clean Energy Transportation Photo courtesy of U.S. Navy Energy Department Joins...

  10. Communication Factors Affecting African Policymakers' Decisions about Agricultural Biotechnology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Begashaw, Belay Ejigu

    2010-10-12

    The purpose of this study was to develop a model for impacting decisions on agricultural biotechnology practices in food production among African policymakers. The research focused on three African countries, namely, South Africa, Malawi and Ghana...

  11. Rapid Recolonisation of Agricultural Soil by Microarthropods After Steam Disinfestation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cucco, Marco

    sterilisation. This research was supported by ACNA and MURST grants. Journal of Sustainable Agriculture, Vol. 27 to methyl bromide. Indeed, steam sterilisation presents several obvious advantages, such as the lack

  12. EVALUATING TRADEOFFS BETWEEN ENVIRONMENTAL FLOW PROTECTIONS AND AGRICULTURAL WATER SECURITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merenlender, Adina

    environmental policy associated with the greatest impacts to water users. Surprisingly, the moderate environmental flow policy had larger impacts to bypass flows than the unregulated management scenarioEVALUATING TRADEOFFS BETWEEN ENVIRONMENTAL FLOW PROTECTIONS AND AGRICULTURAL WATER SECURITY T. E

  13. Optimal Operation of Large Agricultural Watersheds with Water Quality Restraints 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, J. R.; Hann, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    Improved technology is needed for use in properly managing large agricultural watersheds. Proper watershed management means selecting land uses that are appropriate for each subarea, using erosion control measures where ...

  14. Energy efficiency of Pacific Northwest agriculture irrigation pumping systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilfert, G.L.; Harrer, B.J.

    1987-03-01

    This document addresses the energy use and efficiency characteristics of pumping plants used to irrigate agricultural cropland in the Pacific Northwest. The principal focus of this document is on field information obtained from tests of irrigation pumping plants.

  15. Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    E-1010 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Prescribed Burning Handbook Oklahoma Prescribed Burning Research Associate, Natural Resource Ecology and Management Oklahoma Prescribed Burning Handbook Oklahoma

  16. Memorandum of Understanding Between the Department of Agriculture...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    between the U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Energy and the National Department and Reform Commission of the People's Republic of China. It outlines an agreement between the two...

  17. Undergraduate Retention Initiatives College of Agricultural Sciences & Natural Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    Undergraduate Retention Initiatives College of Agricultural Sciences & Natural Resources Office and Natural Resources. Current Structure/Approach The college generally provides retention services. Practically speaking, the evidence of effective programs is clear, namely that the route to successful

  18. The economic potential of producing energy from agricultural biomass 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerko, Christine

    1996-01-01

    fuels; hence, are largely unable to be supplied at a competitive price. This study examined how forcing increased biomass energy generation, along with improvements in biomass production technology, will impact agricultural feedstock prices...

  19. Comparative toxicities of two common agricultural chemicals to toads 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowman, Deborah Fay

    1997-01-01

    species, Bufo valliceps Wiegmann, 1833, and B. velatus Bragg & Sanders, 1951, in relation to two major agricultural pesticides, carbofuran and trifluralin, that are widely used and applied directly to the soil. Toads of both species were collected at a...

  20. Net Benefits to Agriculture from the Trinity River Project, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fish, B.; Williford, G.; Elling, H.; Lacewell, R. D.; Hosch, P.; Griffin, W.; Reddell, D. L.; Hiler, E. A.; Bausch, W.

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the agricultural benefits due to flood protection provided by the proposed Trinity River Project. The area examined was the land located between the 100-year flood plain with the project and without...

  1. Global Warming* The Perfect Storm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Global Warming* The Perfect Storm Jim Hansen 29 January 2008 Health Implications of Climate Change opinion #12;Perfect Storm, Perfect Disaster 1. Great Inertia of Systems - Ocean: Half of Warming still "In

  2. Computational Differentiation in Global Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumaier, Arnold

    Computational Differentiation in Global Optimization Software This talk will present: 1. The general problem framework in optimization software. 2. An example of effectiveness of computational differentiation in optimization packages. 3. Particular importance of computational differentiation verified

  3. Global optimization in reduced space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsung, Achim

    2014-01-01

    Optimization is a key activity in any engineering discipline. Global optimization methods, in particular, strive to solve nonconvex problems, which often arise in chemical engineering, and deterministic algorithms such as ...

  4. Systems integration for global sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    of the global virtual water trade network. Proc. Natl. Acad.J. Wang et al. , China’s water–energy nexus: Greenhouse-gasand future trends in grey water footprints of anthropogenic

  5. Puzzles from the First Globalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berger, Suzanne

    In the first globalization, 1870-1914, as in our own times, debates raged over the impact on domestic life of free movement across borders of goods, people, and capital. Then as today in the hard times that have followed ...

  6. Trends in agricultural lending by commercial banks 1964-1984 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeBerry, David Kendall

    1986-01-01

    to this larger asset size category added banks from lower ag-lending groups. A reason- able conclusion based on that observation, then, is that the management of some of these larger institutions has made a commitment to become more involved in agricultural... sttee Member May, 1986 TABLE OF CONTENTS ABSTRACT Introduction Trends in Agricultural Lending By All Banks Banks Grouped By Asset Size , Current Dollars Banks Grouped By Asset Size , Constant Dollars Page 1 Banks Grouped According...

  7. Food & Agriculture Policy Issues for the 1980s. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous

    1980-01-01

    to urban development, highways and other nonfarm uses. This conversion of 2.5 to 3.0 million acres annually is reducing this basic resource for food pro duction and may also have environmental effects in local areas. Policy questions raised by the land... conversion issue include: Should federal, state and local government policies be developed to preserve agri cultural land for food and fiber production? If so, what type of policies are needed? Energy and Agriculture American agriculture production...

  8. Agricultural Sector Analysis on Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation in the United States 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Uwe A.

    2000-01-01

    This dissertation analyzes the economic potential of agriculture to participate in greenhouse gas emission mitigation efforts. Major agricultural mitigation strategies are included simultaneously to capture interactions. ...

  9. New Chemical Aerosol Characterization Methods- Examples Using Agricultural and Urban Airborne Particulate Matter 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Lijun

    2010-10-12

    This study explored different chemical characterization methods of agricultural and urban airborne particulate matter. Three different field campaigns are discussed. For the agricultural aerosols, measurement of the chemical ...

  10. Essays on U.S. agricultural policy : subsidies, crop insurance, and environmental auctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirwan, Barrett E., 1974-

    2005-01-01

    This thesis investigates the unintended consequences of government policy, specifically policy meant to benefit agricultural producers. The first chapter asks how agricultural subsidies affect farmland rental rates. Chapter ...

  11. The Private Regulation of Global Corporate Conduct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, David

    2006-01-01

    Legitimacy in Global Environmental Governance,” Journal ofundermining of global environmental governance,” Review ofglobal scope of business activity into Robert Falkner, “Private Environmental Governance

  12. Engine Combustion Network (ECN): Global sensitivity analysis...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engine Combustion Network (ECN): Global sensitivity analysis of Spray A for different combustion vessels Title Engine Combustion Network (ECN): Global sensitivity analysis of Spray...

  13. Energy Frontier Research Center | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    include GE Global Research, Yale University-Crabtree Group, Yale University-Batista Group, Stanford University and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. GE Global...

  14. Climate Models from the Joint Global Change Research Institute

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Staff at the Joint Institute develop and use models to simulate the economic and physical impacts of global change policy options. The GCAM, for example, gives analysts insight into how regional and national economies might respond to climate change mitigation policies including carbon taxes, carbon trading, and accelerated deployment of energy technology. Three available models are Phoenix, GCAM, and EPIC. Phoenix is a global, dynamic recursive, computable general equilibrium model that is solved in five-year time steps from 2005 through 2100 and divides the world into twenty-four regions. Each region includes twenty-six industrial sectors. Particular attention is paid to energy production in Phoenix. There are nine electricity-generating technologies (coal, natural gas, oil, biomass, nuclear, hydro, wind, solar, and geothermal) and four additional energy commodities: crude oil, refined oil products, coal, and natural gas. Phoenix is designed to answer economic questions related to international climate and energy policy and international trade. Phoenix replaces the Second Generation Model (SGM) that was formerly used for general equilibrium analysis at JGCRI. GCAM is the Global Change Assessment Model, a partial equilibrium model of the world with 14 regions. GCAM operates in 5 year time steps from 1990 to 2095 and is designed to examine long-term changes in the coupled energy, agriculture/land-use, and climate system. GCAM includes a 151-region agriculture land-use module and a reduced form carbon cycle and climate module in addition to its incorporation of demographics, resources, energy production and consumption. The model has been used extensively in a number of assessment and modeling activities such as the Energy Modeling Forum (EMF), the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program, and the U.S. Climate Change Science Program and IPCC assessment reports. GCAM is now freely available as a community model. The Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) Model is a process-based agricultural systems model composed of simulation components for weather, hydrology, nutrient cycling, pesticide fate, tillage, crop growth, soil erosion, crop and soil management and economics. Staff at PNNL have been involved in the development of this model by integrating new sub-models for soil carbon dynamics and nitrogen cycling.

  15. Assistant Professor Agricultural Machine Systems Engineering The School of Agricultural, Forest, and Environmental Sciences (SAFES), within the College of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohnhoff, David

    design, field machinery automation, post-harvest handling and processing, sustainable practices and systems, rotary power and fluid power transfer, bulk material handling, machinery automation mentoring and advising; preparing students for careers in the agricultural and machinery industries

  16. Global Cooling: Effect of Urban Albedo on Global Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashem; Menon, Surabi; Rosenfeld, Arthur

    2007-05-22

    In many urban areas, pavements and roofs constitute over 60% of urban surfaces (roof 20-25%, pavements about 40%). The roof and the pavement albedo can be increased by about 0.25 and 0.10, respectively, resulting in a net albedo increase for urban areas of about 0.1. Many studies have demonstrated building cooling-energy savings in excess of 20% upon raising roof reflectivity from an existing 10-20% to about 60%. We estimate U.S. potential savings in excess of $1 billion (B) per year in net annual energy bills. Increasing albedo of urban surfaces can reduce the summertime urban temperature and improve the urban air quality. Increasing the urban albedo has the added benefit of reflecting more of the incoming global solar radiation and countering the effect of global warming. We estimate that increasing albedo of urban areas by 0.1 results in an increase of 3 x 10{sup -4} in Earth albedo. Using a simple global model, the change in air temperature in lowest 1.8 km of the atmosphere is estimated at 0.01K. Modelers predict a warming of about 3K in the next 60 years (0.05K/year). Change of 0.1 in urban albedo will result in 0.01K global cooling, a delay of {approx}0.2 years in global warming. This 0.2 years delay in global warming is equivalent to 10 Gt reduction in CO2 emissions.

  17. Case Study #1 "The Global Warming Debate"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Christopher A.

    CHEM 001A Case Study #1 "The Global Warming Debate" Global warming is one of the most contentious issues of our time. There is an ongoing debate about whether global warming is caused by human activity.S., and because the scientific evidence used to determine if global warming is man-made is so difficult

  18. PRINT ONLY: GLOBAL WARMING Alexeev V. A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    PRINT ONLY: GLOBAL WARMING Alexeev V. A. Global Warming: 0.6°C or Less? [#1035] The peculiarities of global warming on the Earth during the last century are discussed. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXVIII (2007) full818.pdf #12;GLOBAL WARMING: 0.6 OR LESS? V.A.Alexeev; Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry

  19. Group Work: Global warming & natural variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    Group Work: Global warming & natural variability Left: Global annual temperature departure from://skepticalscience.com/foster-and-rahmstorf-measure-global-warming-signal.html 2013 2012 2011 #12;: 1963-1964, 1982-83, 1991-93 1. How do these events affect the global annual temperature and can you

  20. Race and racism: Towards a global future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winant, H

    2006-01-01

    accomplishment of dismantling the various colonialSingh 1998). The global dismantling of European empire was

  1. Center for Innovation in GLOBAL HEALTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    Center for Innovation in GLOBAL HEALTH Conversations in Global Health Thursday, April 9, 2015 5 in integrated and innovative delivery, finding creative new ways to ensure solutions and products get and the Duke Global Health Institute. Sponsored by the Center for Innovation in Global Health (CIGH). The event

  2. Public Transport and Sustainable Urbanism: Global Lesson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cervero, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Public Transport and Sustainable Urbanism: Global Lessonsviable and sustainable form of urbanism. Notes J. Kenworthy

  3. Center for Innovation in GLOBAL HEALTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    Center for Innovation in GLOBAL HEALTH Center for Innovation in GLOBAL HEALTH Conversations in Global Health Gavin Yamey, MD, MPH, MA, MRCP with featured guest: Wednesday, March 4, 2015 4:00 - 5:00 p.m. Li Ka Shing Center, Room 120 A leading global health researcher and former journalist, Professor

  4. USDA NRCS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, New York: EnergyU.S. EPA RegionforUStoNRCS Jump to: navigation,

  5. GEOC: Division of Geochemistry 162 -Organo-mineral associations in agricultural soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    practice to neutralize soil acidity after the conversion of land from forest to agriculture. However

  6. Clean Development Mechanism agricultural methodologies could help California to achieve AB 32 goals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dinar, Ariel; Larson, Donald F; Frisbie, J. Aapris

    2012-01-01

    Biogas from manure or composting ACM006‡ Biomass residue from agriculture used for electricity generation

  7. How Important Is Economic Geography for Rural Non-agricultural Employment? Lessons from Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krivobokova, Tatyana

    How Important Is Economic Geography for Rural Non-agricultural Employment? Lessons from Brazil ERIK-agricultural employment prospects and earnings. Key words: Rural non-agricultural employment, economic geography, Latin to assess the importance of economic geography for rural non-agricultural employment. To reach a deeper

  8. Global warming: A Northwest perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, M.J.; Counts, C.A.

    1990-02-01

    The Northwest Power Planning Council convened a symposium in Olympia, Washington, on the subject of global climate change ( the greenhouse effect'') and its potential for affecting the Pacific Northwest. The symposium was organized in response to a need by the Power Council to understand global climate change and its potential impacts on resource planning and fish and wildlife planning for the region, as well as a need to understand national policy developing toward climate change and the Pacific Northwest's role in it. 40 figs., 15 tabs.

  9. Increase of global monsoon area and precipitation under global warming: A robust signal?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tim

    Increase of global monsoon area and precipitation under global warming: A robust signal? Pang future sea surface temperature (SST) warming patterns. The results show that the global monsoon area. Zhao (2012), Increase of global monsoon area and precipitation under global warming: A robust signal

  10. Graduate Certificate in Global Health Fact Sheet College of Public Health GRADUATE EDUCATION IN GLOBAL HEALTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Graduate Certificate in Global Health Fact Sheet · College of Public Health GRADUATE EDUCATION IN GLOBAL HEALTH Graduate Certificate in Global Health A UGA Graduate Program What is Global Health? Global health applies public health principles to solutions of health problems that transcend national

  11. Cost Methodology for Biomass Feedstocks: Herbaceous Crops and Agricultural Residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turhollow Jr, Anthony F; Webb, Erin; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine

    2009-12-01

    This report describes a set of procedures and assumptions used to estimate production and logistics costs of bioenergy feedstocks from herbaceous crops and agricultural residues. The engineering-economic analysis discussed here is based on methodologies developed by the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) and the American Agricultural Economics Association (AAEA). An engineering-economic analysis approach was chosen due to lack of historical cost data for bioenergy feedstocks. Instead, costs are calculated using assumptions for equipment performance, input prices, and yield data derived from equipment manufacturers, research literature, and/or standards. Cost estimates account for fixed and variable costs. Several examples of this costing methodology used to estimate feedstock logistics costs are included at the end of this report.

  12. Global visibility of naked singularities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Giambo'

    2006-03-29

    Global visibility of naked singularities is analyzed here for a class of spherically symmetric spacetimes, extending previous studies - limited to inhomogeneous dust cloud collapse - to more physical valid situations in which pressures are non-vanishing. Existence of nonradial geodesics escaping from the singularity is shown, and the observability of the singularity from far-away observers is discussed.

  13. Excellence in Public & Global Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maizels, Rick

    countries · A positive and constructive working environment, shared by our diverse population of staff and supportive working environment based upon an ethos of respect and rigorous scientific enquiry. We health and health equity worldwide · Global reach and partnerships across high, medium and low income

  14. Satellite Radio: Its Global Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Udgaonkar, Jayant B.

    Satellite Radio: Its Global Impact TIFR Alumni Lecture By S.Rangarajan #12;1 A wonder called RADIO "No wonder so many physicists started as radio tinkers, and no wonder, before physicist became on Richard Feynmann We will stick to the definition of Radio as · Wireless Audio Delivery ·Listener cannot

  15. RENEWABLES 2005 GLOBAL STATUS REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    to renewable energy. The establishment of a global policy network was embraced in the Political Declaration Research Institute Chinese Renewable Energy Industries Association China Susan McDade Energy Environment Institute Lead Author: Eric Martinotwww.ren21.net #12;Renewable Energy Policy Network for the 21st Century

  16. RENEWABLES 2007 GLOBAL STATUS REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    RENEWABLES 2007 GLOBAL STATUS REPORT www.ren21.net #12;Renewable Energy Policy Network for the 21st renewable energy. It provides a forum for leadership and exchange in international policy processes. It bolsters appropriate policies that increase the wise use of renewable energies in developing

  17. Global Temperature November 3, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    of instrumental temperature measurements occurred when the 1997-98 "El Nino of the century" occurred on the back of a strong two-decade warming trend; in addition, the global temperature impact of the El Nino, which typically lags the El Nino by a few months, coincided almost precisely with calendar year 1998. As a result

  18. Conservation and Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landweber, Laura

    V.6 Conservation and Global Climate Change Diane M. Debinski and Molly S. Cross OUTLINE 1. Introduction 2. How climate is changing 3. Environmental responses to climate change 4. Consequences of climate the coming decades will be preserving biodiversity in the face of climate change. It has become increasingly

  19. Global Information for Export Success

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    they are in a draft stage and subject to revision. In this way, international free trade, international transpar- encyGlobal Information for Export Success Notify U.S. is a service for U.S. exporters and trade and regulations that impact export market access · A daily report providing U.S. trade stakeholders

  20. Global fire emissions and the contribution of deforestation, savanna, forest, agricultural, and peat fires (1997-2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    John- stone, J. F. : Quantifying fire severity, carbon, andfrom Canadian forest fires, 1959– 1999, Can. J. Forestwildland fires1, Int. J. Wildland Fire, 16, 593–606, doi:

  1. Global fire emissions and the contribution of deforestation, savanna, forest, agricultural, and peat fires (1997-2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    K. G. : Direct carbon emissions from Canadian forest fires,O. , and Merlet, P. : Emission of trace gases and aerosolsEstimating direct carbon emissions from Canadian wildland

  2. Global fire emissions and the contribution of deforestation, savanna, forest, agricultural, and peat fires (1997-2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    released from peat and forest fires in Indonesia duringZhang, Y. H. : Boreal forest fires burn less in- tensely inemissions from boreal forest fires, J. Geophys. Res. -Atmos,

  3. Global fire emissions and the contribution of deforestation, savanna, forest, agricultural, and peat fires (1997-2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    at total deforestation car- bon emissions is prone to largesavanna on fires car- were bon emissions. Savanna fires

  4. Global fire emissions and the contribution of deforestation, savanna, forest, agricultural, and peat fires (1997-2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    in Canadian boreal forest fires, Can. J. Forest Res. , 39,emissions from boreal forest fires, J. Geophys. Res. -Atmos,released from peat and forest fires in Indonesia during

  5. Evaluation of the potential for agricultural development at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RG Evans; MJ Hattendorf; CT Kincaid

    2000-02-25

    By 2050, when cleanup of the Hanford Site is expected to be completed, large worldwide demands to increase the global production of animalhlish protein, food, and fiber are anticipated, despite advancements in crop breeding, genetic engineering, and other technologies. World population is projected to double to more than 12 billion people, straining already stressed worldwide agricultural resources. The current world surpluses in many commodities will not last when faced with increasing population, decreasing ocean fisheries, and rapid loss of productive lands from soil salivation and erosion. The production of pharmaceuticals from bioengineered plants and animals will undoubtedly add more pressure on the already limited (and declining) arable land base. In addition there will be pressure to produce crops that can help reduce the world's dependence on petroleum and be used for chemical plant feedstock. These external, formidable pressures will necessitate increasing investments in irrigation infi-a-structures in many areas of the world to increase productivity. Intensive greenhouse culture and aqua-culture also will be greatly expanded. There will be large economic and social pressures to expand production in areas such as the Pacific Northwest. Agricultural exports will continue to be important The most likely large areas for expanded irrigation in the Pacific Northwest are the undeveloped East High areas of the Columbia Basin Project and non-restricted areas within the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. Both of these are potentially highly productive area: for producing food and export capital. The environmental concerns will be large however, the favorable growing conditions, high-quality (low-salinity) abundant water supplies and minimal problems with salivation of soils make the Pacific Northwest a very desirable region for economically sustainable expansion from a world perspective.

  6. Agriculture intensifies soil moisture decline in Northern China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yaling; Pan, Zhihua; Zhuang, Qianlai; Miralles, Diego; Teuling, Adriann; Zhang, Tonglin; An, Pingli; Dong, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Jingting; He, Di; Wang, Liwei; Pan, Xuebiao; Bai, Wei; Niyogi, Dev

    2015-07-09

    Northern China is one of the most densely populated regions in the world. Agricultural activities have intensified since the 1980s to provide food security to the country. However, this intensification has likely contributed to an increasing scarcity in water resources, which may in turn be endangering food security. Based on in-situ measurements of soil moisture collected in agricultural plots during 1983–2012, we find that topsoil (0–50 cm) volumetric water content during the growing season has declined significantly (p<0.01), with a trend of -0.011 to -0.015 m3 m-3 per decade. Observed discharge declines for the three large river basins are consistent with the effects of agricultural intensification, although other factors (e.g. dam constructions) likely have contributed to these trends. Practices like fertilizer application have favoured biomass growth and increased transpiration rates, thus reducing available soil water. In addition, the rapid proliferation of water-expensive crops (e.g., maize) and the expansion of the area dedicated to food production have also contributed to soil drying. Adoption of alternative agricultural practices that can meet the immediate food demand without compromising future water resources seem critical for the sustainability of the food production system.

  7. Stephen R. Boucher Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    -Naude, "Immigration and the US Farm Labor Supply," Migration Letters, 2012, 9(1): 87 ­ 99. · Stephen R. Boucher Experiments in Development Economics: Risk Valuation in Morocco, Kenya, and Peru," Agricultural and Resource-308. · Steve Boucher, Michael Carter and Catherine Guirkinger, "Risk Rationing and Wealth Effects in Credit

  8. OSU Agricultural Composting Workshop Day 1 Title Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    OSU Agricultural Composting Workshop Day 1 Title Description 8:30 Registration 9:00 Welcome; provide handouts; form work groups 9:30 The composting process Stages of composting; composting methods; composting parameters (temperature, moisture, C/N ratio, pH, micro-organisms, etc.); what should I compost

  9. Laser a Controlled Assistant in Agriculture Stoyan Dinoev

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borissova, Daniela

    86 Laser a Controlled Assistant in Agriculture Stoyan Dinoev Institute of Information Technologies, 1113 Sofia Introduction The results achieved in the application of laser irradiation of plant organisms still continue to attract the scientific interest ­ in the past realized by He-Ne lasers, and nowadays

  10. AGRICULTURAL BMP PLACEMENT FOR COST-EFFECTIVE POLLUTION CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coello, Carlos A. Coello

    AGRICULTURAL BMP PLACEMENT FOR COST-EFFECTIVE POLLUTION CONTROL AT THE WATERSHED LEVEL Tamie Lynne-EFFECTIVE POLLUTION CONTROL AT THE WATERSHED LEVEL Tamie Lynne Veith Abstract The overall goal of this research was to increase, relative to targeting recommendations, the cost-effectiveness of pollution reduction measures

  11. Fundamental Mass Flow Measurement of Solid Department of Agricultural Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engineering University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, USA A generic mass flow measurement device formation and direct counting of individual particles is impossible. If a method could be available correspondence to Tony Grift, Department of Agricultural Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana

  12. Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station Vehicle Rental Request Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, David

    Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station Vehicle Rental Request Form Driver Name Date: Travel Destination: Account #: Vehicle Information 1995 Crown Victoria 1995 Crown Victoria 1995 with the MSU Authorized Vehicle Use Policy. You further acknowledge that you have executed the Mississippi

  13. Insights from Agricultural GHG Offset studies that might

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    (agriculture only) Pacific Northwest - West Side Pacific Northwest - East Side South Central Southern Plains Livestock Herd Size Emission X X Livestock System Change Emission X X Manure Management Emission X X Rice supply and demand Regression ­ Pesticide usage, Non Ag water use Extreme event effects Adaptation obs

  14. Survey of Agricultural Practices in the Thompson Basin -1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    helicopter fly-overs. These fly-overs identified 103 sites of potential environmental impact from agriculture practices to coincide with the development of an educational proactive program will promote a sustainable Environmental Protection Pacific and Yukon Region North Vancouver, B.C. by Barbara John Monika Geier Regional

  15. Recommended Academic Plan for Agricultural Systems Management (ASM) University Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omiecinski, Curtis

    Recommended Academic Plan for Agricultural Systems Management (ASM) University Park Effective requirements. GWS, GHA, GQ, GN, GA, GH, and GS are codes used to identify General Education requirements. US, IL, and US;IL are codes used to designate courses that satisfy University United States

  16. Recommended Academic Plan for Agricultural Systems Management (ASM) Commonwealth Campuses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omiecinski, Curtis

    Recommended Academic Plan for Agricultural Systems Management (ASM) Commonwealth Campuses Effective Education requirements. GWS, GHA, GQ, GN, GA, GH, and GS are codes used to identify General Education requirements. US, IL, and US;IL are codes used to designate courses that satisfy University United States

  17. The embarrassment of riches: agricultural food subsidies, high

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rockwell, Robert F.

    of Natural History, Central Park West, New York, N.Y. 10024, USA. K.F.Abraham. Ontario Ministry of Natural of agricultural foods allows the birds to meet much of their energy demand for migration and reproduction Arctic. Foraging has produced alternative stable states characterized by sward destruction and near

  18. CLASSIFYING AGRICULTURAL LAND IN AN URBAN LANDSCAPE WITH APPLICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    difference vegetation index (60.6 ± 1.8), second modified soil adjusted vegetation index (60.6 ± 1 software and reduced the financial cost by 25%. A classified agricultural map was combined with a species than the normalized difference vegetation index, second modified soil adjusted vegetation index

  19. Minor in Plant Breeding College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    Minor in Plant Breeding College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Cornell University Description of the Minor The Minor Program of Study in Plant Breeding will provide a basic understanding of crop improvement, a historical perspective of the discipline, and a sense of how plant breeding contributes

  20. Emergency Water Assistance During Drought: Federal Non-Agricultural Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    of Agriculture's RUS provides grants and loans for rural water systems in communities with less than 10.3 billion in loans and $370 million in grants are available for rural community water and waste systems and Water Assistance Grants program $3 million for California's rural communities. Bureau of Reclamation