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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "usage indicators attached" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Stress Indices for Elbows with Trunnion Attachments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trunnions on elbows are generally used as supports and are also used in some applications as anchors. The qualification of trunnions is an important item in the design and fitness-for-service of many piping systems. This report provides equations, based on experimental and test data, for determining the stress indices, B and C, and the flexibility factor, k, for elbows with hollow circular cross-section attachments (trunnions). The report contains explicit modifications to ASME Code Cases 391 and 392 for...

1998-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

2

"Table HC15.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Four Most Populated States" "Lighting Usage...

3

"Table HC10.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Lighting Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","U.S. Census Region" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,"Northeast","Mi...

4

"Table HC3.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Zone, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Zone, 2005" 3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Indoor Lights Turned On During Summer" "Number of Lights Turned On" "Between 1 and 4 Hours per Day",91.8,65,54.3,3.3,1.5,1.6,4.4 "1.",28.6,17.9,14,0.9,0.6,0.7,1.7

5

"Table HC4.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,33,8,3.4,5.9,14.4,1.2 "Cooking Appliances" "Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked" "3 or More Times A Day",8.2,3.4,1,0.4,0.6,1.2,"Q" "2 Times A Day",24.6,8.6,2.3,1,1.6,3.5,0.2

6

"Table HC4.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,33,8,3.4,5.9,14.4,1.2 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,0.6,"Q","Q","Q",0.3,"Q" "Have Space Heating Equipment",109.8,32.3,8,3.3,5.8,14.1,1.1

7

"Table HC3.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,0.6,0.3,"N","Q","Q","Q" "Have Space Heating Equipment",109.8,77.5,63.7,4.2,1.8,2.2,5.6

8

"Table HC3.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Air Conditioning Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,11.3,9.3,0.6,"Q",0.4,0.9 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,66.8,54.7,3.6,1.7,1.9,4.8 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,65.8,54,3.6,1.7,1.9,4.7

9

"Table HC13.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by South Census Region...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Lighting Usage Indicators by South Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"South Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total...

10

"Table HC11.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by Northeast Census...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division"...

11

"Table HC12.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total...

12

"Table HC14.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by West Census Region...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Lighting Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"West Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total West"...

13

Table HC6.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Number of Household...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005 Total... 111.1 30.0 34.8 18.4 15.9...

14

Table HC6.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Number of...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005 Total... 111.1 30.0 34.8 18.4...

15

Table HC2.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Type of Housing ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Million U.S. Housing Units Table HC2.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units

16

Stress Indices for Straight Pipe with Trunnion Attachments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides equations based on experimental and test data for determining B and C stress indices and the flexibility factor, k, for straight pipe with trunnions (or hollow circular cross-section welded attachments). The report contains explicit modifications to ASME Code Cases 391 and 392 for qualification of trunnions on pipe. It also provides flexibility equations for a more accurate evaluation of these configurations.

1998-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

17

Table HC5.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Year of ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Million U.S. Housing Units 1950 to 1959 1960 to 1969 1970 to 1979 Table HC5.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, 2005 Year of Construction

18

"Table HC11.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005" 3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Northeast" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,,"Middle Atlantic","New England" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,20.6,15.1,5.5 "Indoor Lights Turned On During Summer" "Number of Lights Turned On" "Between 1 and 4 Hours per Day",91.8,16.8,12.2,4.6 "1.",28.6,5,3.5,1.5 "2.",29.5,6.2,4.8,1.4 "3.",14.7,2.5,1.7,0.8 "4.",9.3,1.5,1.1,0.4 "5 or More",9.7,1.6,1.1,0.5 "Energy-Efficient Bulbs Used",31.1,5.2,3.6,1.6

19

"Table HC13.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by South Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Lighting Usage Indicators by South Census Region, 2005" 3 Lighting Usage Indicators by South Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"South Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total South" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,,"South Atlantic","East South Central","West South Central" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,40.7,21.7,6.9,12.1 "Indoor Lights Turned On During Summer" "Number of Lights Turned On" "Between 1 and 4 Hours per Day",91.8,33.8,17.5,6.1,10.3 "1.",28.6,11.2,6.5,1.5,3.2 "2.",29.5,10.5,5.4,2,3.1 "3.",14.7,5,2.1,1.2,1.7 "4.",9.3,3.4,1.5,0.8,1.2 "5 or More",9.7,3.7,1.9,0.6,1.2

20

"Table HC7.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" 0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Cooking Appliances" "Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked" "3 or More Times A Day",8.2,2.9,2.5,1.3,0.5,1,2.4,4.6 "2 Times A Day",24.6,6.5,7,4.3,3.2,3.6,4.8,10.3 "Once a Day",42.3,8.8,9.8,8.7,5.1,10,5,12.9

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "usage indicators attached" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

"Table HC9.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Climate Zone, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Climate Zone, 2005" 2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Home Electronics Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal Computer",35.5,3.2,8.3,8.9,7.7,7.5 "Use a Personal Computer",75.6,7.8,17.8,18.4,16.3,15.3 "Most-Used Personal Computer" "Type of PC" "Desk-top Model",58.6,6.2,14.3,14.2,12.1,11.9

22

"Table HC14.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Lighting Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005" 3 Lighting Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"West Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total West" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,,"Mountain","Pacific" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,24.2,7.6,16.6 "Indoor Lights Turned On During Summer" "Number of Lights Turned On" "Between 1 and 4 Hours per Day",91.8,19.5,6.1,13.4 "1.",28.6,6.1,1.7,4.4 "2.",29.5,6.3,1.8,4.5 "3.",14.7,3.1,1.1,2 "4.",9.3,1.9,0.6,1.3 "5 or More",9.7,2,0.8,1.2 "Energy-Efficient Bulbs Used",31.1,8.6,2.3,6.3 "1.",14.6,3.6,1,2.6

23

"Table HC7.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" 5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Space Heating Usage Indicators" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,0.5,0.3,0.2,"Q",0.2,0.3,0.6 "Have Space Heating Equipment",109.8,26.2,28.5,20.4,13,21.8,16.3,37.9 "Use Space Heating Equipment",109.1,25.9,28.1,20.3,12.9,21.8,16,37.3

24

Table HC15.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005 7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005 Total.................................................................................. 111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment.................................... 17.8 1.8 Q Q 4.9 Have Cooling Equipment................................................. 93.3 5.3 7.0 7.8 7.2 Use Cooling Equipment.................................................. 91.4 5.3 7.0 7.7 6.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................................ 1.9 Q N Q 0.6 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................................. 65.9 1.1 6.4 6.4 5.4 Without a Heat Pump................................................. 53.5 1.1 3.5 5.7 4.9 With a Heat Pump......................................................

25

Table HC15.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005 0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005 Total.................................................................................... 111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day................................................. 8.2 0.6 0.5 0.8 1.4 2 Times A Day.............................................................. 24.6 1.4 1.5 2.0 3.1 Once a Day................................................................... 42.3 2.4 3.0 2.7 4.1 A Few Times Each Week.............................................. 27.2 2.1 1.7 1.7 2.5 About Once a Week...................................................... 3.9 0.3 Q 0.4 0.6 Less Than Once a Week............................................... 4.1 Q Q 0.3 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked...................................................

26

Table HC6.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005 5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005 Total U.S. Housing Units.................................. 111.1 30.0 34.8 18.4 15.9 12.0 Do Not Have Heating Equipment..................... 1.2 0.3 0.3 Q 0.2 0.2 Have Space Heating Equipment....................... 109.8 29.7 34.5 18.2 15.6 11.8 Use Space Heating Equipment........................ 109.1 29.5 34.4 18.1 15.5 11.6 Have But Do Not Use Equipment.................... 0.8 Q Q Q Q Q Space Heating Usage During 2005 Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None............................................................ 3.6 1.0 0.8 0.5 0.5 0.7 1 to 499........................................................ 6.1 3.0 1.6 0.6 0.6 0.3 500 to 999.................................................... 27.7 11.6 8.3 3.6 2.7 1.6 1,000 to 1,499..............................................

27

Table HC6.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005 2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005 Total................................................................................ 111.1 30.0 34.8 18.4 15.9 12.0 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer............................. 35.5 16.3 9.4 4.0 2.7 3.2 Use a Personal Computer.......................................... 75.6 13.8 25.4 14.4 13.2 8.8 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model..................................................... 58.6 10.0 20.0 11.2 10.1 7.3 Laptop Model........................................................ 16.9 3.7 5.4 3.2 3.1 1.5 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours................................................. 13.6 4.0 4.7 1.7 1.8 1.4 2 to 15 Hours........................................................

28

Table HC6.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005 7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005 Total........................................................................ 111.1 30.0 34.8 18.4 15.9 12.0 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment.......................... 17.8 5.4 5.3 2.7 2.5 2.0 Have Cooling Equipment...................................... 93.3 24.6 29.6 15.7 13.4 10.0 Use Cooling Equipment....................................... 91.4 24.0 29.1 15.5 13.2 9.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it...................... 1.9 0.6 0.5 Q 0.2 0.4 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System................................................... 65.9 15.3 22.6 10.7 9.9 7.3 Without a Heat Pump....................................... 53.5 12.5 17.9 8.7 8.2 6.3 With a Heat Pump............................................ 12.3

29

"Table HC10.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005" 5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","U.S. Census Region" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,20.6,25.6,40.7,24.2 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,"Q","Q","Q",0.7 "Have Space Heating Equipment",109.8,20.5,25.6,40.3,23.4 "Use Space Heating Equipment",109.1,20.5,25.6,40.1,22.9 "Have But Do Not Use Equipment",0.8,"N","N","Q",0.6 "Space Heating Usage During 2005" "Heated Floorspace (Square Feet)"

30

"Table HC8.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Urban/Rural Location, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" 5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,"City","Town","Suburbs","Rural" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,47.1,19,22.7,22.3 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,0.7,"Q",0.2,"Q" "Have Space Heating Equipment",109.8,46.3,18.9,22.5,22.1 "Use Space Heating Equipment",109.1,45.6,18.8,22.5,22.1 "Have But Do Not Use Equipment",0.8,0.7,"Q","N","N" "Space Heating Usage During 2005" "Heated Floorspace (Square Feet)"

31

"Table HC12.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005" 5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Midwest" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,,"East North Central","West North Central" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,"Q","Q","N" "Have Space Heating Equipment",109.8,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Use Space Heating Equipment",109.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Have But Do Not Use Equipment",0.8,"N","N","N" "Space Heating Usage During 2005"

32

"Table HC11.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005" 5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Northeast" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,,"Middle Atlantic","New England" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,20.6,15.1,5.5 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,"Q","Q","Q" "Have Space Heating Equipment",109.8,20.5,15.1,5.4 "Use Space Heating Equipment",109.1,20.5,15.1,5.4 "Have But Do Not Use Equipment",0.8,"N","N","N" "Space Heating Usage During 2005"

33

"Table HC15.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005" 5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)","Four Most Populated States" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,"New York","Florida","Texas","California" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,7.1,7,8,12.1 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,"Q","Q","Q",0.2 "Have Space Heating Equipment",109.8,7.1,6.8,7.9,11.9 "Use Space Heating Equipment",109.1,7.1,6.6,7.9,11.4 "Have But Do Not Use Equipment",0.8,"N","Q","N",0.5 "Space Heating Usage During 2005" "Heated Floorspace (Square Feet)"

34

Usage based indicators to assess the impact of scholarly works: architecture and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Although recording of usage data is common in scholarly information services, its exploitation for the creation of value-added services remains limited due to concerns regarding, among others, user privacy, data validity, and the lack of accepted standards for the representation, sharing and aggregation of usage data. A technical, standards-based architecture for sharing usage information is presented. In this architecture, OpenURL-compliant linking servers aggregate usage information of a specific user community as it navigates the distributed information environment that it has access to. This usage information is made OAI-PMH harvestable so that usage information exposed by many linking servers can be aggregated to facilitate the creation of value-added services with a reach beyond that of a single community or a single information service.

Bollen, Johan (Santa Fe, NM); Van De Sompel, Herbert (Santa Fe, NM)

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

35

"Table HC8.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Urban/Rural Location, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" 2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Home Electronics Usage Indicators",,"City","Town","Suburbs","Rural" "Total",111.1,47.1,19,22.7,22.3 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal Computer",35.5,16.9,6.5,4.6,7.6 "Use a Personal Computer",75.6,30.3,12.5,18.1,14.7 "Most-Used Personal Computer" "Type of PC" "Desk-top Model",58.6,22.9,9.8,14.1,11.9 "Laptop Model",16.9,7.4,2.7,4,2.9 "Hours Turned on Per Week" "Less than 2 Hours",13.6,5.7,1.8,2.9,3.2

36

"Table HC11.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005" 2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Northeast" "Home Electronics Usage Indicators",,,"Middle Atlantic","New England" "Total",111.1,20.6,15.1,5.5 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal Computer",35.5,6.9,5.3,1.6 "Use a Personal Computer",75.6,13.7,9.8,3.9 "Most-Used Personal Computer" "Type of PC" "Desk-top Model",58.6,10.4,7.3,3.1 "Laptop Model",16.9,3.3,2.6,0.7 "Hours Turned on Per Week" "Less than 2 Hours",13.6,2.4,1.8,0.6

37

"Table HC11.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005" 7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Northeast" "Air Conditioning Usage Indicators",,,"Middle Atlantic","New England" "Total",111.1,20.6,15.1,5.5 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,4,2.4,1.7 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,16.5,12.8,3.8 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,16.3,12.6,3.7 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use it",1.9,0.3,"Q","Q" "Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment1, 2" "Central System",65.9,6,5.2,0.8 "Without a Heat Pump",53.5,5.5,4.8,0.7

38

"Table HC15.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005" 7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Four Most Populated States" "Air Conditioning Usage Indicators",,"New York","Florida","Texas","California" "Total",111.1,7.1,7,8,12.1 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,1.8,"Q","Q",4.9 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,5.3,7,7.8,7.2 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,5.3,7,7.7,6.6 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use it",1.9,"Q","N","Q",0.6 "Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment1, 2" "Central System",65.9,1.1,6.4,6.4,5.4

39

"Table HC15.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005" 0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Four Most Populated States" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators",,"New York","Florida","Texas","California" "Total",111.1,7.1,7,8,12.1 "Cooking Appliances" "Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked" "3 or More Times A Day",8.2,0.6,0.5,0.8,1.4 "2 Times A Day",24.6,1.4,1.5,2,3.1 "Once a Day",42.3,2.4,3,2.7,4.1 "A Few Times Each Week",27.2,2.1,1.7,1.7,2.5 "About Once a Week",3.9,0.3,"Q",0.4,0.6 "Less Than Once a Week",4.1,"Q","Q",0.3,0.4

40

"Table HC12.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005" 2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Midwest" "Home Electronics Usage Indicators",,,"East North Central","West North Central" "Total",111.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal Computer",35.5,8.1,5.6,2.5 "Use a Personal Computer",75.6,17.5,12.1,5.4 "Most-Used Personal Computer" "Type of PC" "Desk-top Model",58.6,14.1,10,4 "Laptop Model",16.9,3.4,2.1,1.3 "Hours Turned on Per Week" "Less than 2 Hours",13.6,3.4,2.5,0.9

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "usage indicators attached" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

"Table HC10.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005" 7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","U.S. Census Region" "Air Conditioning Usage Indicators",,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Total",111.1,20.6,25.6,40.7,24.2 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,4,2.1,1.4,10.3 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,16.5,23.5,39.3,13.9 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,16.3,23.4,38.9,12.9 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use it",1.9,0.3,"Q",0.5,1 "Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment1, 2" "Central System",65.9,6,17.3,32.1,10.5 "Without a Heat Pump",53.5,5.5,16.2,23.2,8.7

42

"Table HC13.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by South Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by South Census Region, 2005" 0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by South Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"South Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total South" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators",,,"South Atlantic","East South Central","West South Central" "Total",111.1,40.7,21.7,6.9,12.1 "Cooking Appliances" "Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked" "3 or More Times A Day",8.2,3,1.6,0.3,1.1 "2 Times A Day",24.6,8.3,4.2,1.3,2.7 "Once a Day",42.3,15,8.1,2.7,4.2 "A Few Times Each Week",27.2,10.9,6,1.8,3.1 "About Once a Week",3.9,1.6,0.7,0.4,0.5

43

"Table HC14.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005" 2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"West Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total West" "Home Electronics Usage Indicators",,,"Mountain","Pacific" "Total",111.1,24.2,7.6,16.6 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal Computer",35.5,6.4,2.2,4.2 "Use a Personal Computer",75.6,17.8,5.3,12.5 "Most-Used Personal Computer" "Type of PC" "Desk-top Model",58.6,13.7,4.2,9.5 "Laptop Model",16.9,4.1,1.1,3 "Hours Turned on Per Week" "Less than 2 Hours",13.6,2.9,0.9,2 "2 to 15 Hours",29.1,6.6,2,4.6

44

"Table HC14.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005" 0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"West Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total West" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators",,,"Mountain","Pacific" "Total",111.1,24.2,7.6,16.6 "Cooking Appliances" "Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked" "3 or More Times A Day",8.2,2.6,0.7,1.9 "2 Times A Day",24.6,6.6,2,4.6 "Once a Day",42.3,8.8,2.9,5.8 "A Few Times Each Week",27.2,4.7,1.5,3.1 "About Once a Week",3.9,0.7,"Q",0.6 "Less Than Once a Week",4.1,0.7,0.3,0.4 "No Hot Meals Cooked",0.9,0.2,"Q","Q"

45

"Table HC13.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by South Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by South Census Region, 2005" 7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by South Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"South Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total South" "Air Conditioning Usage Indicators",,,"South Atlantic","East South Central","West South Central" "Total",111.1,40.7,21.7,6.9,12.1 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,1.4,0.8,0.2,0.3 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,39.3,20.9,6.7,11.8 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,38.9,20.7,6.6,11.7 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use it",1.9,0.5,"Q","Q","Q" "Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment1, 2"

46

"Table HC11.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005" 0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ," U.S. Housing Units (millions) " ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Northeast" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators",,,"Middle Atlantic","New England" "Total",111.1,20.6,15.1,5.5 "Cooking Appliances" "Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked" "3 or More Times A Day",8.2,1.2,1,0.2 "2 Times A Day",24.6,4,2.7,1.2 "Once a Day",42.3,7.9,5.4,2.5 "A Few Times Each Week",27.2,6,4.8,1.2 "About Once a Week",3.9,0.6,0.5,"Q" "Less Than Once a Week",4.1,0.6,0.4,"Q"

47

"Table HC11.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Northeast Census...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"No",54.7,9.8,6.7,3 "Housing Unit Characteristics Affecting Usage" "Adequacy of Insulation" "Well Insulated",42.8,8.2,5.9,2.3 "Adequately Insulated",46.3,8.1,6.1,2 "Poorly...

48

"Table HC8.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Urban/Rural Location...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

",54.7,24.9,8.6,11.5,9.7 "Housing Unit Characteristics Affecting Usage" "Adequacy of Insulation" "Well Insulated",42.8,16,7.1,9.4,10.3 "Adequately Insulated",46.3,20.3,8,9.5,8.5...

49

"Table HC13.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by South Census...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

No",54.7,20.9,11.3,3.6,6 "Housing Unit Characteristics Affecting Usage" "Adequacy of Insulation" "Well Insulated",42.8,16.1,9.1,2.5,4.5 "Adequately Insulated",46.3,17,9.1,3.2,4.7...

50

"Table HC3.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6.7,29.4,2.3,0.9,1.3,2.8 "Housing Unit Characteristics Affecting Usage" "Adequacy of Insulation" "Well Insulated",42.8,32.8,27.8,1.5,1,0.9,1.6 "Adequately Insulated",46.3,33,26.8,2...

51

"Table HC15.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

No",54.7,3.2,3.3,3.8,5.7 "Housing Unit Characteristics Affecting Usage" "Adequacy of Insulation" "Well Insulated",42.8,3.1,2.7,3,3.5 "Adequately Insulated",46.3,2.7,3.1,3.1,5.2...

52

"Table HC10.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by U.S. Census...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,54.7,9.8,12.9,20.9,11.2 "Housing Unit Characteristics Affecting Usage" "Adequacy of Insulation" "Well Insulated",42.8,8.2,10.6,16.1,7.9 "Adequately Insulated",46.3,8.1,10.6,17,10....

53

"Table HC4.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

17.9,3.6,1.9,3.2,8.6,0.6 "Housing Unit Characteristics Affecting Usage" "Adequacy of Insulation" "Well Insulated",42.8,10,2,0.8,1.8,5.1,0.2 "Adequately Insulated",46.3,13.3,3,1.5,2...

54

"Table HC12.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Midwest Census...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"No",54.7,12.9,9.1,3.7 "Housing Unit Characteristics Affecting Usage" "Adequacy of Insulation" "Well Insulated",42.8,10.6,7.2,3.4 "Adequately Insulated",46.3,10.6,7.5,3.1 "Poorly...

55

"Table HC14.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by West Census...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"No",54.7,11.2,3.4,7.8 "Housing Unit Characteristics Affecting Usage" "Adequacy of Insulation" "Well Insulated",42.8,7.9,2.8,5.1 "Adequately Insulated",46.3,10.6,3.3,7.3 "Poorly...

56

"Table HC7.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Household Income...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5,11.2,6.7,13.2,5.8,14.5 "Housing Unit Characteristics Affecting Usage" "Adequacy of Insulation" "Well Insulated",42.8,9,11,8.2,5.1,9.5,4.8,13.1 "Adequately Insulated",46.3,10.4,11...

57

"Table HC15.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005" 3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Four Most Populated States" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,"New York","Florida","Texas","California" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,7.1,7,8,12.1 "Indoor Lights Turned On During Summer" "Number of Lights Turned On" "Between 1 and 4 Hours per Day",91.8,5.5,5.5,6.7,9.5 "1.",28.6,1.8,2,2.3,2.8 "2.",29.5,2.3,1.9,2,3.4 "3.",14.7,0.7,0.8,0.9,1.4 "4.",9.3,0.4,"Q",0.8,1.1 "5 or More",9.7,0.4,0.4,0.8,0.9 "Energy-Efficient Bulbs Used",31.1,1.7,1.7,2.1,4.7

58

"Table HC8.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Urban/Rural Location, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" 0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators",,"City","Town","Suburbs","Rural" "Total",111.1,47.1,19,22.7,22.3 "Cooking Appliances" "Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked" "3 or More Times A Day",8.2,3.7,1.6,1.4,1.5 "2 Times A Day",24.6,10.8,4.1,4.3,5.5 "Once a Day",42.3,17,7.2,8.7,9.3 "A Few Times Each Week",27.2,11.4,4.7,6.4,4.8 "About Once a Week",3.9,1.7,0.6,0.9,0.8 "Less Than Once a Week",4.1,2.2,0.6,0.8,0.5 "No Hot Meals Cooked",0.9,0.4,"Q","Q","Q"

59

"Table HC10.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Regions, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Regions, 2005" 0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Regions, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","U.S. Census Region" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators",,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Total",111.1,20.6,25.6,40.7,24.2 "Cooking Appliances" "Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked" "3 or More Times A Day",8.2,1.2,1.4,3,2.6 "2 Times A Day",24.6,4,5.8,8.3,6.6 "Once a Day",42.3,7.9,10.7,15,8.8 "A Few Times Each Week",27.2,6,5.6,10.9,4.7 "About Once a Week",3.9,0.6,0.9,1.6,0.7 "Less Than Once a Week",4.1,0.6,1.1,1.7,0.7 "No Hot Meals Cooked",0.9,0.3,"Q","Q",0.2

60

"Table HC10.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Lighting Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005" 3 Lighting Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","U.S. Census Region" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,20.6,25.6,40.7,24.2 "Indoor Lights Turned On During Summer" "Number of Lights Turned On" "Between 1 and 4 Hours per Day",91.8,16.8,21.7,33.8,19.5 "1.",28.6,5,6.3,11.2,6.1 "2.",29.5,6.2,6.5,10.5,6.3 "3.",14.7,2.5,4,5,3.1 "4.",9.3,1.5,2.5,3.4,1.9 "5 or More",9.7,1.6,2.4,3.7,2 "Energy-Efficient Bulbs Used",31.1,5.2,6.7,10.6,8.6

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "usage indicators attached" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

"Table HC1.3 Heated Floorspace Usage Indicators, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Heated Floorspace Usage Indicators, 2005" 3 Heated Floorspace Usage Indicators, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Heated Floorspace (square feet)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Fewer than 500","500 to 999","1,000 to 1,499","1,500 to 1,999","2,000 to 2,499","2,500 to 2,999","3,000 or More" "Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,6.1,27.7,26,17.6,10,"7 7.8",11.6 "No Main Space Heating Equipment",1.2,"N","N","N","N","N","N","N" "Have Main Space Heating Equipment",109.8,6.1,27.7,26,17.6,10,"7 7.8",11.6 "Use Main Space Heating Equipment",109.1,6.1,27.7,26,17.6,10,"7 7.8",11.6

62

"Table HC1.4 Cooled Floorspace Usage Indicators, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Cooled Floorspace Usage Indicators, 2005" 4 Cooled Floorspace Usage Indicators, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Cooled Floorspace (square feet)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Fewer than 500","500 to 999","1,000 to 1,499","1,500 to 1,999","2,000 to 2,499","2,500 to 2,999","3,000 or More" "Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,49.2,15.1,15.6,11.1,7,5.2,8 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,31.3,15.1,15.6,11.1,7,5.2,8 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,30.4,14.6,15.4,11.1,6.9,5.2,7.9 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use it",1.9,1,0.5,"Q","Q","Q","Q","Q" "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,17.8,"N","N","N","N","N","N"

63

usage_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Usage Indicators Tables Usage Indicators Tables (Million U.S. Households; 60 pages, 247 kb) Contents Pages HC6-1a. Usage Indicators by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-2a. Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-3a. Usage Indicators by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-4a. Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-5a. Usage Indicators by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-6a. Usage Indicators by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-7a. Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5

64

Usage Demographics 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NERSC Usage Demographics 2010 Academic Usage Usage by Discipline DOE & Other Lab Usage Usage by Institution Type Last edited: 2012-10-30 13:51:35...

65

Brain usage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

usage Name: A W Chen Status: NA Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: For my science fair project I would like to know if every part of the brain is used all the...

66

Brain Usage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Usage Name: Matt Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: what percentage of the brain does the average human use? Replies: This is a very difficult question to address. Your...

67

Usage of Electronic Monograph  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Usage of Electronic Monograph. The following table shows the approximate usage of the monograph since April 1998. ...

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

68

Brookhaven Logo Usage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Logo Usage The Correct Usage of the BNL Logo - The following examples picture correct and incorrect use of the Laboratory logo. If you need assistance in using the logo, contact...

69

Context: Usage and Effectiveness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Context: Usage and Effectiveness. US Navy Aircraft Halon 1301 Effectivity Analysis.. Tedeschi, M.; Leach, W.; 1995. ...

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

70

APS LOM Shop Usage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Division XSD Groups Industry Argonne Home Advanced Photon Source APS LOM Shop Usage User Shop Access - Policies and Procedures User Shop Orientation User Shop...

71

Device for monitoring utility usage  

SciTech Connect

A device for monitoring utility usage for installation and use by homeowners and consumers with existing public utility meters having a disk that is mounted inside a transparent case and that rotates in response to electrical current usage, the device is described comprising: a disk rotation monitoring assembly for mounting on the exterior of the transparent case, said monitoring assembly comprising: (a) a sensor for sensing disk rotation speed and generating a signal in response thereto; and (b) means for mounting said sensor on the transparent case, said mounting means further comprising means for holding said sensor, means for attaching said holding means to the transparent case, and means for adjusting the position of said holding means to enable precise alignment of said sensor with the plane of the disk such that said sensor is in optical communication with the edge of said disk; one or more remote display terminals in electrical communication with said monitoring assembly, each of said one or more remote terminals comprising: (a) means for receiving said signal and processing said signal into utility consumption data; (b) an electronic memory for storing said data; (c) a visual display for displaying data in a reader-usable format about consumption; and (d) a display controller that enables selective displaying of any of said data on said visual display.

Green, R.G.

1993-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

72

Attachment 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May, 2003 May, 2003 1 Attachment 1 Sensitive Foreign Nations Controls SENSITIVE SUBJECTS Rev. 0 May, 2003 2 This is a list of areas of technical subject matter or technologies containing "sensitive" information. The list identifies subjects related to the development and production of weapons of mass destruction (nuclear, chemical, and biological) and their delivery systems (including missiles), conventional weapons, and other technologies deemed significant to the national security of the United States. Department of Energy (DOE) hosts of foreign visitor, DOE travelers, and others holding information on these subjects should be aware of all constraints on releasing information. They should also be cautious

73

Robotics and Energy Usage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is commonly assumed that the use of robots in an industrial plant will cut energy usage, because robots require no heat, light, or air conditioning in their work space. However, in analyzing industrial installations, we have found that, in practice, energy usage may either increase or decrease depending on the parameters of the particular facility. This paper describes our findings at the plants of various manufacturers. We performed on-site studies at plants operated by Chrysler Corporation in St. Louis (62 welding robots) and Franklin Manufacturing Company in St. Cloud, Minnesota (4 spray painting robots used in freezer manufacture), We also examined data on energy effects of robots from John Deere, caterpillar, and GM Guide Division. The effect of robots on electricity usage and other forms of energy usage are analyzed in this paper.

Hershey, R. L.; Fenton, S. E.; Letzt, A. M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Adaptive web usage profiling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Web usage models and profiles capture significant interests and trends from past accesses. They are used to improve user experience, say through recommendation of pages, pre-fetching of pages, etc. While browsing behavior changes dynamically over time, ...

Bhushan Shankar Suryavanshi; Nematollaah Shiri; Sudhir P. Mudur

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Exemplary Units Markup Language usage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sample UnitsML tools and usage. ... Its usage is limited to demonstrating capabilities of plain XSLT processing with the data stored in UnitsML. ...

76

Attachment Apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention includes an attachment apparatus comprising a rotation limiting member adapted to be threaded onto a threaded member; and a preload nut adapted to be threaded onto the threaded member. The rotation limiting member comprises a plurality of pins; and the preload nut comprises plurality of slots, preferably wherein the plurality of pins and the plurality of slots are the same in number, which is preferably three. The plurality of pins of the rotation limiting member are filled into a corresponding plurality of slots of the preload nut to form a rotatable unit adapted to be threaded onto the threaded member. In use, the rotatable unit is threaded onto the threaded member. The present invention thus provides a unitized removable device for holes, including holes other than circular in shape, which have an established depth before an end of, or before an enlargement of the hole. The configuration of some exposed part of the device, or the head, is shaped and formed for its intended purpose, such as clamping, anchor points, eye bolts, stud anchor, and the like. The device allows for the installation, preloading and removal of all components of the device, as a unit, without damage to the member for which attachment is required by simple rotations of some exposed part of the device.

Morrison, Edward F.

1998-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

77

Automotive materials usage trends  

SciTech Connect

The materials composition of US passenger cars is traced from 1960 and projected into 1990's. Sales-weighted average vehicle-weight trends are analyzed in terms of shifts in the large/small car mix, downsizing, and downweighting. The growth in the usage of lightweight materials: -high strength steels, cast/wrought aluminum, plastics and composites - are examined in detail. Usage trends in a host of other materials such as alloy steels, zinc, lead, copper, etc. are also discussed. An approximate quantitative analysis of changes in the usage of steel by the automotive industry worldwide show that about 10% of total decline in Western-World steel consumption is accounted for by the automotive industry. An assessment is presented for automotive industry use of critical materials such as chromium in alloy steels/cast irons and the platinum group metals in exhaust-gas catalysts. 10 references, 13 figures, 9 tables.

Gjostein, N.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Energy Usage | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Usage Energy Usage How much do you spend per year compared to others? A state-by-state map of per capita energy expenditures. Subtopics Storage Consumption Transmission Smart Grid...

79

Memory Usage Considerations on Franklin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the memory requirement vvia internal checking in their codes or by some tools. Craypat could track heap usage. And IPM also tracks memory usage. Last edited: 2013-06-30 08:33:51...

80

Usage by Job Size  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Usage by Job Usage by Job Size Table Usage by Job Size Table page loading animation Usage Query Interface System All Hopper Edison Carver Planck Matgen Franklin Hopper 1 Magellan Dirac Bassi Jacquard Seaborg User Account (Repo) Execution Queue All Debug Interactive Premium Regular Short Regular Long Regular Small Regular Medium Regular Big Regular Extra Big Killable Low Transfer IO Task Special System Serial Big Memory Westmere === Inactive === Magellan Serial Magellan Short Magellan Small Magellan Medium Magellan Big Magellan Long Regular 1 Regular 1 Long Regular 16 Regular 32 Regular 48 Full Config Seaborg Serial Batch 16 Batch 32 Batch 64 Submit Queue all interactive debug premium regular low DOE Office all ASCR BER BES FES HEP NP Summary for jobs that completed after Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun July Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 @ 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 : 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "usage indicators attached" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Improving energy usage  

SciTech Connect

The Phillips Petroleum Company's Borger Refinery and NGL Process Center Energy Conservation program has been one of surveying, making revisions and additions to, and redesign of processes and equipment to conserve energy. Special emphasis has been placed on minimizing energy usage in the design of new processes in the plants. In 1972 an average of 758,800 Btu's were used to process each barrel of fresh charge. Now 7.5 days of fresh charge are being saved to the plant each year. The energy-use reduction programs discussed were: (1) furnace and boiler excess-oxygen and combustibles control program; (2) installation of an Applied Automation, Inc., Fractionator Computer Control System named Optrol; and (3) the steam-trap program. 1 figure. (DP)

Haage, P.R.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

HPSS Usage Examples at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Examples Advanced Usage Examples Transferring Data from Batch Jobs Once you have set up your automatic HPSS authentication you can access HPSS within batch scripts. Read More ...

83

The UCONABC usage control model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we introduce the family of UCONABC models for usage control (UCON), which integrate Authorizations (A), oBligations (B), and Conditions (C). We call these core models because they address the essence of UCON, leaving ... Keywords: access control, digital rights management, privacy, trust, usage control

Jaehong Park; Ravi Sandhu

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

step 1: retrieve usage step 2: convert usage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

planet #12;step 2: convert usage data to ghg electricity conversion EPA eGRID database provides state by state data on: lbs CO2 / MWh lbs NOx / MWH eGRID Massachusetts ­ specific conversion factors only

Paulsson, Johan

85

High Performance Window Attachments  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High Performance Window High Performance Window Attachments D. Charlie Curcija Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory dccurcija@lbl.gov 510-495-2602 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Impact of Project: * Motivate manufacturers to make improvements in Window systems U-Factors, SHGC and daylighting utilization * Increase awareness of benefits from energy efficient window attachments Problem Statement: * A wide range of residential window attachments are available, but they have widely unknown

86

2011 Radioactive Materials Usage Survey for Unmonitored Point Sources  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the results of the 2011 Radioactive Materials Usage Survey for Unmonitored Point Sources (RMUS), which was updated by the Environmental Protection (ENV) Division's Environmental Stewardship (ES) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). ES classifies LANL emission sources into one of four Tiers, based on the potential effective dose equivalent (PEDE) calculated for each point source. Detailed descriptions of these tiers are provided in Section 3. The usage survey is conducted annually; in odd-numbered years the survey addresses all monitored and unmonitored point sources and in even-numbered years it addresses all Tier III and various selected other sources. This graded approach was designed to ensure that the appropriate emphasis is placed on point sources that have higher potential emissions to the environment. For calendar year (CY) 2011, ES has divided the usage survey into two distinct reports, one covering the monitored point sources (to be completed later this year) and this report covering all unmonitored point sources. This usage survey includes the following release points: (1) all unmonitored sources identified in the 2010 usage survey, (2) any new release points identified through the new project review (NPR) process, and (3) other release points as designated by the Rad-NESHAP Team Leader. Data for all unmonitored point sources at LANL is stored in the survey files at ES. LANL uses this survey data to help demonstrate compliance with Clean Air Act radioactive air emissions regulations (40 CFR 61, Subpart H). The remainder of this introduction provides a brief description of the information contained in each section. Section 2 of this report describes the methods that were employed for gathering usage survey data and for calculating usage, emissions, and dose for these point sources. It also references the appropriate ES procedures for further information. Section 3 describes the RMUS and explains how the survey results are organized. The RMUS Interview Form with the attached RMUS Process Form(s) provides the radioactive materials survey data by technical area (TA) and building number. The survey data for each release point includes information such as: exhaust stack identification number, room number, radioactive material source type (i.e., potential source or future potential source of air emissions), radionuclide, usage (in curies) and usage basis, physical state (gas, liquid, particulate, solid, or custom), release fraction (from Appendix D to 40 CFR 61, Subpart H), and process descriptions. In addition, the interview form also calculates emissions (in curies), lists mrem/Ci factors, calculates PEDEs, and states the location of the critical receptor for that release point. [The critical receptor is the maximum exposed off-site member of the public, specific to each individual facility.] Each of these data fields is described in this section. The Tier classification of release points, which was first introduced with the 1999 usage survey, is also described in detail in this section. Section 4 includes a brief discussion of the dose estimate methodology, and includes a discussion of several release points of particular interest in the CY 2011 usage survey report. It also includes a table of the calculated PEDEs for each release point at its critical receptor. Section 5 describes ES's approach to Quality Assurance (QA) for the usage survey. Satisfactory completion of the survey requires that team members responsible for Rad-NESHAP (National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants) compliance accurately collect and process several types of information, including radioactive materials usage data, process information, and supporting information. They must also perform and document the QA reviews outlined in Section 5.2.6 (Process Verification and Peer Review) of ES-RN, 'Quality Assurance Project Plan for the Rad-NESHAP Compliance Project' to verify that all information is complete and correct.

Sturgeon, Richard W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

87

2011 Radioactive Materials Usage Survey for Unmonitored Point Sources  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the results of the 2011 Radioactive Materials Usage Survey for Unmonitored Point Sources (RMUS), which was updated by the Environmental Protection (ENV) Division's Environmental Stewardship (ES) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). ES classifies LANL emission sources into one of four Tiers, based on the potential effective dose equivalent (PEDE) calculated for each point source. Detailed descriptions of these tiers are provided in Section 3. The usage survey is conducted annually; in odd-numbered years the survey addresses all monitored and unmonitored point sources and in even-numbered years it addresses all Tier III and various selected other sources. This graded approach was designed to ensure that the appropriate emphasis is placed on point sources that have higher potential emissions to the environment. For calendar year (CY) 2011, ES has divided the usage survey into two distinct reports, one covering the monitored point sources (to be completed later this year) and this report covering all unmonitored point sources. This usage survey includes the following release points: (1) all unmonitored sources identified in the 2010 usage survey, (2) any new release points identified through the new project review (NPR) process, and (3) other release points as designated by the Rad-NESHAP Team Leader. Data for all unmonitored point sources at LANL is stored in the survey files at ES. LANL uses this survey data to help demonstrate compliance with Clean Air Act radioactive air emissions regulations (40 CFR 61, Subpart H). The remainder of this introduction provides a brief description of the information contained in each section. Section 2 of this report describes the methods that were employed for gathering usage survey data and for calculating usage, emissions, and dose for these point sources. It also references the appropriate ES procedures for further information. Section 3 describes the RMUS and explains how the survey results are organized. The RMUS Interview Form with the attached RMUS Process Form(s) provides the radioactive materials survey data by technical area (TA) and building number. The survey data for each release point includes information such as: exhaust stack identification number, room number, radioactive material source type (i.e., potential source or future potential source of air emissions), radionuclide, usage (in curies) and usage basis, physical state (gas, liquid, particulate, solid, or custom), release fraction (from Appendix D to 40 CFR 61, Subpart H), and process descriptions. In addition, the interview form also calculates emissions (in curies), lists mrem/Ci factors, calculates PEDEs, and states the location of the critical receptor for that release point. [The critical receptor is the maximum exposed off-site member of the public, specific to each individual facility.] Each of these data fields is described in this section. The Tier classification of release points, which was first introduced with the 1999 usage survey, is also described in detail in this section. Section 4 includes a brief discussion of the dose estimate methodology, and includes a discussion of several release points of particular interest in the CY 2011 usage survey report. It also includes a table of the calculated PEDEs for each release point at its critical receptor. Section 5 describes ES's approach to Quality Assurance (QA) for the usage survey. Satisfactory completion of the survey requires that team members responsible for Rad-NESHAP (National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants) compliance accurately collect and process several types of information, including radioactive materials usage data, process information, and supporting information. They must also perform and document the QA reviews outlined in Section 5.2.6 (Process Verification and Peer Review) of ES-RN, 'Quality Assurance Project Plan for the Rad-NESHAP Compliance Project' to verify that all information is complete and correct.

Sturgeon, Richard W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

88

Ceramic blade attachment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine wheel having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. The turbine blade has a root portion having a pair of recessed portions thereon. The turbine wheel includes a plurality of openings in which the turbine blade is positioned. Each of the openings have a pair of grooves therein in which are positioned a pair of pins having a generally rectangular cross-section and a reaction surface thereon. A pair of cylindrical rollers interposed respective ones of the pair of reaction surfaces and the pair of recessed portions. The attachment system or turbine assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective attachment of a component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion to a component having a greater preestablished rate of thermal expansion.

Boyd, Gary L. (Alpine, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Ceramic blade attachment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine wheel having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. The turbine blade has a root portion having a pair of recessed portions thereon. The turbine wheel includes a plurality of openings in which the turbine blade is positioned. Each of the openings have a pair of grooves therein in which are positioned a pair of pins having a generally rectangular cross-section and a reaction surface thereon. A pair of cylindrical rollers interposed respective ones of the pair of reaction surfaces and the pair of recessed portions. The attachment system or turbine assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective attachment of a component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion to a component having a greater preestablished rate of thermal expansion. 3 figures.

Boyd, G.L.

1994-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

90

Towards Sustainable Material Usage: Investigating Limits to ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Towards Sustainable Material Usage: Investigating Limits to ... secondary resources decreases energy consumption; this energy advantage ...

91

Energy usage in super markets  

SciTech Connect

The supermarket industry used 450 billion Btu's of energy each day, enough to heat 2 million homes. But more important than the overall energy usage is what energy is costing the supermarket operator; in many cases energy costs exceed rent. This special research report is designed to help the supermarket management determine if their stores are excessive energy users and to provide valuable data for planning remodels and new stores. The report is presented in five sections. The first two sections, General Observations and Monthly Electrical Usage and Demand Power, can easily be used by all supermarket operators. The third and fourth sections contain more detailed statistics that will be valuable to industry people who want to analyze energy usage more thoroughly. The statistics in section 1-4 are reported for various geographic regions and store sizes. Section five is the sample distribution which provides an insight into what other stores are using for refrigeration, lighting, etc. The information in this report is average for a typical supermarket and should be used only as that when compared to a specific supermarket facility.

Gerke, E.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Internal pipe attachment mechanism  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An attachment mechanism is described for repairing or extending fluid carrying pipes, casings, conduits, etc. utilizing one-way motion of spring tempered fingers to provide a mechanical connection between the attachment mechanism and the pipe. The spring tempered fingers flex to permit insertion into a pipe to a desired insertion depth. The mechanical connection is accomplished by reversing the insertion motion and the mechanical leverage in the fingers forces them outwardly against the inner wall of the pipe. A seal is generated by crushing a sealing assembly by the action of setting the mechanical connection. 6 figures.

Bast, R.M.; Chesnut, D.A.; Henning, C.D.; Lennon, J.P.; Pastrnak, J.W.; Smith, J.A.

1994-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

93

Magnetically attached sputter targets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method and assembly for attaching sputtering targets to cathode assemblies of sputtering systems which includes a magnetically permeable material is described. The magnetically permeable material is imbedded in a target base that is brazed, welded, or soldered to the sputter target, or is mechanically retained in the target material. Target attachment to the cathode is achieved by virtue of the permanent magnets and/or the pole pieces in the cathode assembly that create magnetic flux lines adjacent to the backing plate, which strongly attract the magnetically permeable material in the target assembly. 11 figures.

Makowiecki, D.M.; McKernan, M.A.

1994-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

Ladder attachment platform  

SciTech Connect

A ladder attachment platform is provided that includes a base for attachment to a ladder that has first and second side rails and a plurality of rungs that extend between in a lateral direction. Also included is a user platform for having a user stand thereon that is carried by the base. The user platform may be positioned with respect to the ladder so that it is not located between a first plane that extends through the first side rail and is perpendicular to the lateral direction and a second plane that extends through the second side rail and is perpendicular to the lateral direction.

Swygert,; Richard, W [Springfield, SC

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

95

Resource and Fuels Usage Contacting the Authors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) % of 1990 usage Natural gas 577 24% Biomass 494 1190% Renewables 182 106% Nuclear 73 62% Coal 561 908 sectors · LDV is least carbon-intensive Total Energy (PJ) % of 1990 usage Natural gas 122 5% Biomass 891T activity) 9% line (218% PxT activity) In-State Emissions Total Energy (PJ) % of 1990 usage Natural gas 123

California at Davis, University of

96

ATTACHMENT J - APPENDIX I  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

No.: DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section J - Appendix I J-I-1 ATTACHMENT J.9 APPENDIX I DOE DIRECTIVES LIST B Applicable to the Operation of PPPL Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466...

97

Predicting hourly building energy usage  

SciTech Connect

This article presents the results of an evaluation to identify the most accurate method for making hourly energy use predictions. The prediction of energy usage by HVAC systems is important for the purposes of HVAC diagnostics, system control, parameter and system identification, optimization and energy management. Many new techniques are now being applied to the analysis problems involved with predicting the future behavior of HVAC systems and deducing properties of these systems. Similar problems arise in most observational disciplines, including physics, biology and economics.

Kreider, J.F. (Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering); Haberl, J.S. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Mechanical Engineering Dept.)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Turbine nozzle attachment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nozzle guide vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The nozzle guide vane assembly includes a pair of legs extending radially outwardly from an outer shroud and a pair of mounting legs extending radially inwardly from an inner shroud. Each of the pair of legs and mounting legs have a pair of holes therein. A plurality of members attached to the gas turbine engine have a plurality of bores therein which axially align with corresponding ones of the pair of holes in the legs. A plurality of pins are positioned within the corresponding holes and bores radially positioning the nozzle guide vane assembly about a central axis of the gas turbine engine.

Norton, Paul F. (San Diego, CA); Shaffer, James E. (Maitland, FL)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Turbine nozzle attachment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nozzle guide vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and is attached to conventional metallic components. The nozzle guide vane assembly includes a pair of legs extending radially outwardly from an outer shroud and a pair of mounting legs extending radially inwardly from an inner shroud. Each of the pair of legs and mounting legs have a pair of holes therein. A plurality of members attached to the gas turbine engine have a plurality of bores therein which axially align with corresponding ones of the pair of holes in the legs. A plurality of pins are positioned within the corresponding holes and bores radially positioning the nozzle guide vane assembly about a central axis of the gas turbine engine. 3 figs.

Norton, P.F.; Shaffer, J.E.

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

100

NEWTON: Blood Group Systems Usage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Blood Group Systems Usage Blood Group Systems Usage Name: Kishori Status: student Grade: n/a Location: Outside U.S. Country: India Date: Summer 2013 Question: What is the difference between MN blood group system and ABO bloodgroup system? Although, we nowadays prefer ABO blood groups why do we use MN blood groups in the forensic department? Replies: Humans actually have multiple blood antigens on the surface of our blood cells. Wikipedia says that there are over 50 different blood group antigens. ABO and Rh are just the most dominant. Rh actually has 3 alleles called C, D and E. So one could be CCddee, for example, but clinically, when referring to Rh, only the D antigen is considered. So MN is another system that is also present. The reason it would be considered in forensics is due to population genetics considerations. Certain combinations are found in different percentages depending on what ancestry a person is a part of. Humans evolved in isolation from each other and until relatively recently, were separated due to difficult travel/migration. But even though we can move around the planet easily now, we still carry the history of our ancestry in our DNA. M and N are codominant, like the ABO system.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "usage indicators attached" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Regards, Attachment: As stated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Please find attached the 1st quarter groundwater monitoring report for the Section 4 lined evaporation ponds at the Ambrosia Lake mill facility. This report includes the quarterly reporting required for discharge permit DP-71. Also enclosed (NMED copy only) is a CD Copy of the Excel Summary Spreadsheet for the 1 st quarter groundwater monitoring report, Section 4 lined evaporation ponds. This CD Copy meets the requirements of Condition 15B of

Chuck Wentz

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

EART 265 Lecture Notes: Energy Energy Usage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EART 265 Lecture Notes: Energy Energy Usage US per capita energy usage is 10 kW. This represents 1 of 2 kW. Euro- pean countries tend to use less energy per capita by a factor of 2. China's per capita/4 of the worldwide energy usage, and with 1/20th of the world population gives a global average power consumption

Nimmo, Francis

103

Memory Usage Considerations on Hopper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Memory Considerations Memory Considerations Memory Considerations Memory Usage Considerations on Hopper Most Hopper compute nodes have 32 GB of physical memory, but, not all that memory is available to user programs. Compute Node Linux (the kernel), the Lustre file system software, and message passing library buffers all consume memory, as does loading the executable into memory. Thus the precise memory available to an application varies. Approximately 31 GB of memory can be allocated from within an MPI program using all 24 cores per node, i.e., 1.29 GB per MPI task on average. If an application uses 12 MPI tasks per node, then each MPI task could use about 2.58 GB of memory. You may see an error message such as "OOM killer terminated this process." "OOM" means Out of Memory and it means that your code has exhausted the

104

Residential Energy Usage by Origin of Householder  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Energy Users > Residential Home Page > Energy Usage by Origin of Householder. Consumption and Expenditures. NOTE: To View and/or Print PDF's ...

105

Attached sunspace design analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An introduction to new design analysis information for attached sunspaces is presented. The 28 sunspace reference designs are described. Note is taken of those designs (the semi-enclosed geometries) analyzed more recently than the previously published reports. The role of sensitivity studies is discussed, and some sample plots of sunspace performance sensitivity to key design parameters are presented. The monthly solar load ratio (SLR) correlations are reviewed with emphasis on the modified SLR used in the sunspace analysis. The application of the sunspace SLR correlations to monthly design analysis is outlined.

Jones, R.W.; McFarland, R.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Ceramic blade attachment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine flange having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. The turbine flange includes a first upstanding flange and a second upstanding flange having a groove formed therebetween. The turbine flange further includes a recess. Each of the first and second upstanding flanges have a plurality of bores therein. A turbine blade has a first member and a second member positioned in one of the groove and the recess. Each of the first member and the second member have a plurality of bores therein. And, a pin is positioned in respective ones of the plurality of bores in the first and second upstanding members and the first and second members and attach the blade to the turbine flange. The pin has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being substantially equal to the rate of thermal expansion of the blade.

Frey, deceased, Gary A. (late of Poway, CA); Jimenez, Oscar D. (Escondia, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Ceramic blade attachment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine flange having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. The turbine flange includes a first upstanding flange and a second upstanding flange having a groove formed between them. The turbine flange further includes a recess. Each of the first and second upstanding flanges have a plurality of bores therein. A turbine blade has a first member and a second member positioned in one of the groove and the recess. Each of the first member and the second member have a plurality of bores therein. A pin is positioned in respective ones of the plurality of bores in the first and second upstanding members and the first and second members and attach the blade to the turbine flange. The pin has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being substantially equal to the rate of thermal expansion of the blade. 4 figs.

Frey, G.A.; Jimenez, O.D.

1996-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

108

Exploring iPhone Usage: The Influence of Socioeconomic Differences on Smartphone Adoption, Usage and Usability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on device usage. Among our findings are that a large number of applications were uninstalled, lower SESExploring iPhone Usage: The Influence of Socioeconomic Differences on Smartphone Adoption, Usage. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 2 Dept. of Psychology, Rice University, Houston, TX {rahmati, chad

Zhong, Lin

109

Usage analysis and the web of data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The workshop on Usage Analysis and the Web of Data (USEWOD2011) was the first workshop in the field to investigate combinations of usage data with semantics and the Web of Data. Questions the workshop aims to address are for example: How can semantics ...

Bettina Berendt; Laura Hollink; Vera Hollink; Markus Luczak-Rösch; Knud Möller; David Vallet

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Detecting and analyzing insecure component usage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Software is commonly built from reusable components that provide desired functionalities. Although component reuse significantly improves software productivity, insecure component usage can lead to security vulnerabilities in client applications. ... Keywords: differential testing, insecure component usage, testing and analysis of real-world software

Taeho Kwon; Zhendong Su

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Comparison of Bandwidth Usage: Service Location Protocol and Jini  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently there has been an increase in the development of technologies for resource discovery, since for example, resources such as printers, mail boxes, memory space, and disk space are available in every network, ready to be used for any host. This has been caused, in part, by the growth in the popularity of portable devices such as laptops, PDAs, and cell phones which require configuration each time they attach to a new network segment. Since the configuration of such devices is tedious and sometimes complicated, there have been some attempts in past years to solve this problem, such as the DHCP approach. This paper focuses on the bandwidth analysis of two new approaches for dealing with resource discovery: the Service Location Protocol (SLP) and Jini. This work is particularly important since the communication among the devices is often wireless, whereas bandwidth is a limited resource. We present equations for characterizing the usage of bandwidth made by SLP and Jini, bas...

Javier Govea; Michel Barbeau

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Ceramic blade attachment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine wheel having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. The turbine blade has a root portion having a first groove and a second groove therein. The turbine wheel includes a plurality of openings in which the turbine blade is positioned. Each of the openings has a first groove and a second groove therein. The space or void formed between the first grooves and the second grooves has a plurality of spherical balls positioned therein. The plurality of spherical balls has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being equal to the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade.

Shaffer, James E. (Maitland, FL)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Ceramic blade attachment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine disc having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade and forms a turbine assembly. The turbine blade has a root portion defining a pair of sides having a pair of grooves therein. The turbine assembly includes a pair of flanges between which the turbine blades are positioned. Each of the pair of flanges has a plurality of grooves defined therein. The grooves within the pair of flanges are aligned with the grooves in the blades and have a space formed therebetween. A plurality of spherical balls are positioned within the space. The plurality of spherical balls has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being equal to the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade.

Shaffer, James E. (Maitland, FL)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Ceramic blade attachment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine disc having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade and forms a turbine assembly. The turbine blade has a root portion defining a pair of sides having a pair of grooves therein. The turbine assembly includes a pair of flanges between which the turbine blades are positioned. Each of the pair of flanges has a plurality of grooves defined therein. The grooves within the pair of flanges are aligned with the grooves in the blades and have a space formed therebetween. A plurality of spherical balls are positioned within the space. The plurality of spherical balls has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being equal to the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. 4 figs.

Shaffer, J.E.

1995-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

115

Ceramic blade attachment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine wheel having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. The turbine blade has a root portion having a first groove and a second groove therein. The turbine wheel includes a plurality of openings in which the turbine blade is positioned. Each of the openings has a first groove and a second groove therein. The space or void formed between the first grooves and the second grooves has a plurality of spherical balls positioned therein. The plurality of spherical balls has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being equal to the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. 4 figures.

Shaffer, J.E.

1995-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

116

Exhibit A, Attachment A-1 Exhibit A Attachment A-1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy retrofit incentive programs and tax credits. · Regional priority for program delivery ­ Collaborate with Clean Energy Training Program to support local training programs for skills necessary1 Exhibit A, Attachment A-1 Exhibit A Attachment A-1 Elements of Energy Upgrade California Program

117

ATTACHMENT J - APPENDIX I  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0140 0140 Contract No.: DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section J - Appendix I J-I-1 ATTACHMENT J.9 APPENDIX I DOE DIRECTIVES / LIST B Applicable to the Operation of PPPL Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 Modification 0140 Contract No.: DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section J - Appendix I J-I-2 DOE Directive Date Title ES&H O 150.1 05/08/08 Continuity Program O 151.1C 11/02/05 Comprehensive Emergency Management System O 210.2A 04/08/11 DOE Corporate Operating Experience Program O 225.1B 03/04/11 Accident Investigations O 231.1B Chg. 1 06/27/11 11/28/12 Environment, Safety and Health Reporting (10 CFR 851, DOE Worker Safety and Health Program Rule, incorporates DOE M 231.1-1A by reference and remains applicable until reference is removed from 10 CFR 851.)

118

Attachment J TERMS AND CONDITIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Attachment J TERMS AND CONDITIONS AWARD # PON-10-603 #12;TERMS AND CONDITIONS TABLE OF CONTENTS ............................................................................... 24 i #12;TERMS AND CONDITIONS 1. Grant Agreement This project is being funded with a grant from is comprised of the grant funding award, the Terms and Conditions, and all attachments. These Terms

119

Attachment K TERMS AND CONDITIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Attachment K TERMS AND CONDITIONS AWARD # #12;TERMS AND CONDITIONS TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION PAGE ............................................................................... 24 i #12;TERMS AND CONDITIONS 1. Grant Agreement This project is being funded with a grant from, the Terms and Conditions, and all attachments. These Terms and Conditions are standard requirements

120

General Guidance on Data Usage and Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Guidance on Data Usage and Management General Guidance on Data Usage and Management Summary Data Usage Credit Data Management and Documentation: Introduction Our philosophy Data management Record measured values Zero versus missing value Metadata Data documentation Define variables Specify units Provide citations For additional information Summary Ensure long-term preservation of, and full and open access to, high-quality data sets Give proper credit to the researchers providing the data Provide thorough, yet simple, documentation: how the data were produced, what they mean Generate ASCII data and documentation files; they ensure readibility by virtually all users Define variable names and units Point to, or provide, important publications that further document the data Data usage CDIAC fully supports the July 1991 Policy Statements on Data Management for

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "usage indicators attached" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

ERP Usage in Practice: An Empirical Investigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents the results of an exploratory study of Fortune 1000 firms and their enterprise resource planning ERP usage, as well as benefits and changes they have realized from ERP. The study empirically examines ERP in these organizations to ...

Mary C. Jones; Randall Young

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Material impacts on operational energy usage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Decisions regarding materials and construction of a building are made all the time in the architectural process, but thought is not always given to how those choices may affect the buildings ultimate energy usage and the ...

Love, Andrea, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Microsoft Word - Epoxy Usage Form.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Division Form Rev. 41111 Monthly Epoxy Usage Form (Weight in Grams) Date Initials CTD 101K Stycast Catalyst Epon Resin Epicure Part A Part B Part C 2850 24LV 815828 3140...

124

Electricity Use in California: Past Trends and Present Usage...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use in California: Past Trends and Present Usage Patterns Title Electricity Use in California: Past Trends and Present Usage Patterns Publication Type Journal Article Year of...

125

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Energy Usage Forecasts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alphabetically Tools by Platform PC Mac UNIX Internet Tools by Country Related Links Energy Usage Forecasts Energy Usage Forecasts Quick and easy web-based tool that provides...

126

CNST NanoFab Facility User Computer Security and Usage ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. CNST NanoFab Facility User Computer Security and Usage Policy ... CNST NanoFab Facility User Computer Security and Usage Policy ...

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

127

arXiv.org help - arXiv usage statistics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by major subject areas through January 2013 Access and download statistics: Today's usage for arXiv.org (not including mirrors) Institutional Usage Statistics: 2009, 2010,...

128

Photomultiplier tube saturation indicator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photomultiplier tube saturation indicator is formed by supplying a supplemental light source, typically a light emitting diode (LED), adjacent to the photomultiplier tube. A switch allows the light source to be activated. The light is forwarded to the photomultiplier tube by an optical fiber. If the probe is properly light tight, then a meter attached to the indicator will register the light from the LED. If the probe is no longer light tight, and the saturation indicator is saturated, no signal will be registered when the LED is activated. This photomultiplier tube is used with alpha contamination probes.

Ruch, J.F.; Urban, D.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

129

Attachment B.xls | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B.xls Attachment B.xls More Documents & Publications Attachment 5 Volume II Pricing Matrix.xls&0; Attachment 6 Volume V Pricing Matrix for Optional Enhancements.xls&0;...

130

How Usage is Charged at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

usage usage is charged How usage is charged MPP Charging (Computational Systems) When a job runs on a NERSC MPP system, such as Hopper, charges accrue against one of the user's repository allocations. The unit of accounting for these charges is the "MPP Hour". A parallel job is charged for exclusive use of each multi-core node allocated to the job. The MPP charge for such a job is calculated as the product of: the job's elapsed wall-clock time in hours, the number of nodes allocated to the job (regardless of the number actually used), the number of cores available on each allocated node, a machine charge factor (MCF) based on typical performance of the machine relative to Hopper (MCF=1.0), and a queue charge factor (QCF). Queue priority scheduling gives users

131

Automobile usage patterns. Highlight report. Volume XIV  

SciTech Connect

A report is given as part of a series of studies dealing with general public behavior and attitudes towards energy conservation. Specifically, this study concentrates on automobile usage patterns. The study is based on 1,007 telephone interviews and includes topics such as car usage affected by lifestyle, car usage patterns, planned trips as compared with routine or spontaneous trips, times per week trip is usually made, analysis of trips, the extent to which shopping trips are done by phone instead of by car, willingness to cut out trips, factors deterring car use, and a summary which concludes that the primary way that people could cut down automobile use without eliminating leisure time use would be in more careful planning of trip for shopping and errands. Another important finding in this study is lack of sensitivity to gasoline prices. (GRA)

Rappeport, M.; Labaw, P.

1975-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

DND: a model for forecasting electrical energy usage by water-resource subregion  

SciTech Connect

A forecast methodology was derived from principles of econometrics using exogenous variables, i.e., cost of electricity, consumer income, and price elasticity as indicators of growth for each consuming sector: residential, commercial, and industrial. The model was calibrated using forecast data submitted to the Department of Energy (DOE) by the nine Regional Electric Reliability Councils. Estimates on electrical energy usage by specific water-resource subregion were obtained by normalizing forecasted total electrical energy usage by state into per capita usage. The usage factor and data on forecasted population were applied for each water resource subregion. The results derived using the model are self-consistent and in good agreement with DOE Energy Information Administration projections. The differences that exist are largely the result of assumptions regarding specific aggregations and assignment of regional-system reliability and load factors. 8 references, 2 figures, 13 tables.

Sonnichsen, J.C. Jr.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Reducing the Energy Usage of Office Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we demonstrate how component-based middleware can reduce the energy usage of closed-source applications. We rst describe how the Puppeteer system exploits well-dened interfaces exported by applications to modify their behavior. We then present a detailed study of the energy usage of Microsoft's PowerPoint application and show that adaptive policies can reduce energy expenditure by 49% in some instances. In addition, we use the results of the study to provide general advice to developers of applications and middleware that will enable them to create more energy-ecient software. 1

Jason Flinn; Eyal De Lara; M. Satyanarayanan; Dan S. Wallach; Willy Zwaenepoel; Willy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

CloudMonitor: Profiling Power Usage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Cloud Computing platforms the addition of hardware monitoring devices to gather power usage data can be impractical or uneconomical due to the large number of machines to be metered. CloudMonitor, a monitoring tool that can generate power models for software-based power estimation, can provide insights to the energy costs of deployments without additional hardware. Accurate power usage data leads to the possibility of Cloud providers creating a separate tariff for power and therefore incentivizing software developers to create energy-efficient applications.

Smith, James William; Ward, Jonathan Stuart; Sommerville, Ian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Identifying diverse usage behaviors of smartphone apps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Smartphone users are increasingly shifting to using apps as "gateways" to Internet services rather than traditional web browsers. App marketplaces for iOS, Android, and Windows Phone platforms have made it attractive for developers to deploy apps and ... Keywords: app usage behavior, smartphone apps

Qiang Xu; Jeffrey Erman; Alexandre Gerber; Zhuoqing Mao; Jeffrey Pang; Shobha Venkataraman

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Energy Savings from Window Attachments  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

from from Window Attachments October 2013 Prepared for: Building Technologies Office Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy Prepared by: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory October 2013 Prepared for: Building Technologies Office Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy Prepared By: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory One Cyclotron Road, MS 90R3111 Berkeley, CA 94720 Authors: D. Charlie Curcija Mehry Yazdanian Christian Kohler Robert Hart Robin Mitchell Simon Vidanovic 1 ENERGY SAVINGS FROM WINDOW ATTACHMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS: TABLE OF CONTENTS:................................................................................................... 1 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ......................................................................................... 3

137

Energy Savings from Window Attachments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from from Window Attachments October 2013 Prepared for: Building Technologies Office Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy Prepared by: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory October 2013 Prepared for: Building Technologies Office Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy Prepared By: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory One Cyclotron Road, MS 90R3111 Berkeley, CA 94720 Authors: D. Charlie Curcija Mehry Yazdanian Christian Kohler Robert Hart Robin Mitchell Simon Vidanovic 1 ENERGY SAVINGS FROM WINDOW ATTACHMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS: TABLE OF CONTENTS:................................................................................................... 1 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ......................................................................................... 3

138

ATTACHMENT E TERMS AND CONDITIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ATTACHMENT E TERMS AND CONDITIONS TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION PAGE NO. 1. Vehicle Buy-Down Incentive Program Agreement................................................ 1 2. Term of the Agreement..................................................................................................... 14 #12;TERMS AND CONDITIONS 1. Vehicle Buy-Down Incentive Program Agreement The Vehicle Buy

139

Green Button Helps More Consumers Click with Their Energy Usage...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Helps More Consumers Click with Their Energy Usage Data Green Button Helps More Consumers Click with Their Energy Usage Data September 12, 2013 - 2:41pm Addthis At the White House...

140

Soy Protein ProductsChapter 7 Regulations Regarding Usage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soy Protein Products Chapter 7 Regulations Regarding Usage Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 7 Regulations Regarding Usage from the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "usage indicators attached" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Energy usage of rotating biological contractor facilities  

SciTech Connect

A recent US Environmental Protection Agency field study investigated the energy requirements for rotating biological contactor (RBC) units. The energy measurements for mechanically driven units varied considerably, but the overall average of 2.03 kW/shaft was very close to current manufacturer estimates. The power factor of most of the mechanically driven units was very low, and most installations could benefit from power factor correction. The energy requirements of air driven units also were highly variable and must be evaluated on an individual plant basis. The results of this study provide factual data on energy usage of RBC units, as well as a basis for developing design and operational considerations to reduce energy usage and maximize operational flexibility and plant performance. 9 references, 7 tables.

Gilbert, W.G.; Wheeler, J.F.; MacGregor, A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

New energy usage patterns in manufacturing  

SciTech Connect

Long term energy demands of industrial societies will exceed energy production capabilities if present usage patterns remain unchanged. Thus the central core of the current energy dilemma involves the change from reliance on petroleum sources to the utilization of more plentiful energy resources. The two energy resources which are plentiful and the technology already exists for their development are coal and uranium. Several concepts of substituting electricity for oil and natural gas are presented.

Hauser, L.G.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

ATTACHMENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy Policy Act N E P A PROCEDURES for SUBMITTING DOCUMENTS for POSTING on the DOE NEPA WEBSITE www.gc.energy.gov/NEPA August 2008 U.S. Department of Energy Office of General Counsel Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance U.S. Department of Energy, Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance August 2008 1 PREFACE The DOE NEPA Website has served as the focal point for DOE NEPA practice since it was created in 1993. A reorganization in which the Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance became part of the Office of the General Counsel provided an opportunity to modernize the original DOE NEPA Website. Therefore, the Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance recently launched a brand new DOE NEPA Website at a new internet address: www.gc.energy.gov/NEPA/. The new DOE NEPA Website contains all of the

144

Attachment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ivan'kovskoe Reservoir Ivan'kovskoe reservoir was created in 1938 by closing the Volga river waterway in the area of the town of Dubna. Major Specifications Type: River-like Water surface area: 3,278.0 km 2 Volume: 1.12 km 3 Length: 133 km Maximum width: 8.0 km Average depth: 3.4 m Maximum depth: 20.0 m Average annual water intake: through Ivan'kovskaya HPP 7.74 km 3 through Moscow Channel 6.82 km 3 Annual water exchange coefficient: 13 The major HPP facilities include the following: locks for navigation, concrete dam with eight openings designed for the maximum flow rate of 7,350 m 3 /sec and the hydroelectric station itself. The Ivan'kovskaya HPP is a low head facility, with the

145

Energy Usage Data Standard for US Smart Grid Passes Key ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy Usage Data Standard for US Smart Grid Passes Key Advisory Panel Vote. From NIST Tech Beat: March 1, 2011. ...

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

The Impact of Residential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residential transportation energy usage is vital for theDensity on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption Table 2Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption with

Golob, Thomas F.; Brownstone, David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

How Households Use Different Types of Vehicles: A Structural Driver Allocation and Usage Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

types Mini cars have approximately average usage. SubcompactCompact cars have greater than average usage only if theycar is driven morethan otherwise expected. The . -elationships between usage

Golob, Thomas F.; Kim, Seyoung; Ren, Weiping

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

The impact of residential density on vehicle usage and fuel consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on vehicle usage and energy consumption. Journal of Urbanon vehicle usage and fuel consumption Jinwon Kim and Davidon vehicle usage and fuel consumption* Jinwon Kim and David

Kim, Jinwon; Brownstone, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Split ring containment attachment device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A containment attachment device is described for operatively connecting a glovebag to plastic sheeting covering hazardous material. The device includes an inner split ring member connected on one end to a middle ring member wherein the free end of the split ring member is inserted through a slit in the plastic sheeting to captively engage a generally circular portion of the plastic sheeting. A collar portion having an outer ring portion is provided with fastening means for securing the device together wherein the glovebag is operatively connected to the collar portion. Hazardous material such as radioactive waste may be sealed in plastic bags for small items or wrapped in plastic sheeting for large items. Occasionally the need arises to access the hazardous material in a controlled manner, that is, while maintaining total containment. Small items could be placed entirely inside a containment glovebag. However, it may not be possible or practical to place large items inside a containment; instead, one or more glovebags could be attached to the plastic sheeting covering the hazardous material. It is this latter application for which the split ring containment attachment device is intended.

Sammel, A.G.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

150

Climate Indices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indices Indices Climate Indices Climate indices are diagnostic tools used to describe the state of the climate system and monitor climate. They are most often represented with a time series, where each point in time corresponds to one index value. An index can be constructed to describe almost any atmospheric event; as such, they are myriad. Therefore, CDIAC provides these links to other web sites to help guide users to the most widely used climate indices, which in many cases are updated monthly. Data Set Website/Name NOAA's Climate Prediction Center, Monitoring and Data Index Page NOAA's Earth Systems Research Laboratory, Monthly Atmospheric and Ocean Time Series Page (plot, analyze, and compare time series) The Monthly Teleconnection Indices Page from NOAA's National

151

Development of office paper attachment methodologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A design project was carried out which began with the study and critique of office paper attachment systems, such as paperclips and staples. A set of criteria for an ideal system of attachment was then developed. This led ...

Slowik, Jonathan (Jonathan Steven)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Disseminating the Kilogram, No Strings Attached  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Disseminating the Kilogram, No Strings Attached. August 24, 2012. ... The impending redefinition of the kilogram presents a weighty dilemma. ...

2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

153

An assessment of worldwide supercomputer usage  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a comparative study of advanced supercomputing usage in Japan and the United States as of Spring 1994. It is based on the findings of a group of US scientists whose careers have centered on programming, evaluating, and designing high-performance supercomputers for over ten years. The report is a follow-on to an assessment of supercomputing technology in Europe and Japan that was published in 1993. Whereas the previous study focused on supercomputer manufacturing capabilities, the primary focus of the current work was to compare where and how supercomputers are used. Research for this report was conducted through both literature studies and field research in Japan.

Wasserman, H.J.; Simmons, M.L.; Hayes, A.H.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

The REDTI and MSI: Two New National Climate Impact Indices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two climate indices that are useful for monitoring the impact of weather and climate on energy usage and crop yields in the United States have been developed at the National Climatic Data Center. The residential energy-demand temperature index (...

Richard R. Heim Jr.; Jay H. Lawrimore; David B. Wuertz; Anne M. Waple; Trevor W. R. Wallis

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Federal Water Use Indices | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Water Use Indices Federal Water Use Indices Federal Water Use Indices FEMP provides water use indices as a guide for Federal agencies. Note that each is a rough estimate of water usage at different types of sites. Your site may vary considerably. The following indices should be used only to assist in determining baseline data when no other information is available on site water usage. Conversion factors for the Federal water use indices are also available. Source: American Water Works Association 1996. Data represents gallons per unit per day. Commercial User Unit Range Typical Airport Passenger 4-5 3 Apartment house Person 100-200 100 Boarding house Person 25-50 40 Hotel Guest 40-60 50 Employee 8-13 10 Lodging house and tourist home Guest 30-50 40 Motel Guest 25-40 35

156

Reducing Energy Usage in Extractive Distillation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Butadiene 1:3 is separated from other C4-hydrocarbons by extractive distillation in a sieve plate tower. Prior to the development work to be described, the pressure in the extraction tower was controlled at a fixed value. The tower pressure-boilup control loop did not behave satisfactorily in the presence of non-condensables which entered with the feed. The capacity of the flooded reflux drum condenser for the tower was limiting production during summer months. The tower pressure control loop was put on manual. The pressure was allowed to drop to its lowest attainable value for the existing conditions of boilup and condenser cooling capability. This manner of operation is known as floating pressure control. By taking advantage of the higher relative volatility at the lower tower pressure, energy usage was reduced and there was an increase in production capacity. The tower operation at a lower temperature reduced tower and reboiler fouling. Substantial savings have resulted from these improvements. The annual energy consumption has been reduced by 25% and maximum productive capacity is higher by 15%. The rate of tower and reboiler fouling has not been fully quantified but is greatly reduced. A more stable tower operation has also contributed to higher productivity and reduced energy usage. Venting of non-condensables does not affect tower stability and the operators have adapted well to the new control strategy.

Saxena, A. C.; Bhandari, V. A.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Electron attachment to halocarbons of environmental interest: Chloroethanes  

SciTech Connect

Electron attachment to the chlorofluoroethanes 1,1-C/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/F/sub 4/, 1,2-C/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/F/sub 4/, 1,1,1-C/sub 2/Cl/sub 3/F/sub 3/, and 1,1,2-C/sub 2/Cl/sub 3/F/sub 3/ was investigated in dilute mixtures with nitrogen and argon using the electron swarm method. The 1,1,1-C/sub 2/Cl/sub 3/F/sub 3/ molecule has a very large electron attachment rate constant at thermal energy (2.8 x 10/sup -7/ cm/sup 3/ s/sup -1/); the rate constant for this molecule decreases monotonically with increasing electron energy above thermal. The other chlorofluoroethanes investigated attach electrons less strongly and show maxima in the rate constant vs mean electron energy at approx.0.5 eV. For all four compounds, the measured rate constants are due primarily to dissociative electron attachment producing Cl/sup -/. Electron attachment cross sections were determined for these halocarbons which showed the existence of several negative ion states below approx.2 eV. Additionally, the temperature dependence of electron attachment to 1,1-C/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/H/sub 4/ was investigated from 323--473 K. The measured rate constants and unfolded cross sections indicated electron attachment to a repulsive negative ion state from the v = 0 and v = 1 levels of the neutral molecule.

McCorkle, D.L.; Szamrej, I.; Christophorou, L.G.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Attachment FY2011-75 OPAM | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OPAM Attachment FY2011-75 OPAM Federal Supply Schedules Attachment FY2011-75 OPAM More Documents & Publications Chapter 8 - Required Sources of Supplies and Services Attachment...

159

Methane production by attached film  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for purifying wastewater of biodegradable organics by converting the organics to methane and carbon dioxide gases is disclosed, characterized by the use of an anaerobic attached film expanded bed reactor for the reaction process. Dilute organic waste material is initially seeded with a heterogeneous anaerobic bacteria population including a methane-producing bacteria. The seeded organic waste material is introduced into the bottom of the expanded bed reactor which includes a particulate support media coated with a polysaccharide film. A low-velocity upward flow of the organic waste material is established through the bed during which the attached bacterial film reacts with the organic material to produce methane and carbon dioxide gases, purified water, and a small amount of residual effluent material. The residual effluent material is filtered by the film as it flows upwardly through the reactor bed. In a preferred embodiment, partially treated effluent material is recycled from the top of the bed to the bottom of the bed for further treatment. The methane and carbon dioxide gases are then separated from the residual effluent material and purified water.

Jewell, William J. (202 Eastwood Ave., Ithaca, NY 14850)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Energy Usage Forecasts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Usage Forecasts Energy Usage Forecasts Energy Usage Forecasts Quick and easy web-based tool that provides free 14-day ahead energy usage forecasts based on the degree day forecasts for 1,200 stations in the U.S. and Canada. The user enters the daily non-weather base load and the usage per degree day weather factor; the tool applies the degree day forecast and displays the total energy usage forecast. Helpful FAQs explain the process and describe various options for the calculation of the base load and weather factor. Historical degree day reports and 14-day ahead degree day forecasts are available from the same site. Keywords degree days, historical weather, mean daily temperature, load calculation, energy simulation Validation/Testing Degree day data provided by AccuWeather.com, updated daily at 0700.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "usage indicators attached" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

File:Energy Data Jam - Attachment C.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jam - Attachment C.pdf Jam - Attachment C.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:Energy Data Jam - Attachment C.pdf Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,500 × 1,125 pixels, file size: 2.31 MB, MIME type: application/pdf, 17 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 10:02, 10 July 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 10:02, 10 July 2012 1,500 × 1,125, 17 pages (2.31 MB) Graham7781 (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup instructions for more information) File usage The following page links to this file:

162

Cleaning optimization for reduced chemical usage  

SciTech Connect

The use of dilute SC-1 (NH40H:H202:H20) chemistry cleaning processes for particle removal from silicon surfaces has been investigated. Dilute chemistries can be highly effective, especially when high- frequency acoustic energy (megasonics) is applied. The high particle removal efficacy of the dilute chemistry processes presumably arises due to increased double layer effects caused by reduced ionic strength. Dilute chemistry SC- I solutions exhibit somewhat reduced efficacy for removal of certain light organics; however, when dilute SC-1 is used along with other pre-gate cleaning steps (e.g. HF, SC-2, and piranha), then the overall cleaning sequence is quite effective. In addition to providing robust cleaning processes, dilute chemistries also result in significantly lower chemical and rinse water usage. Waste water treatment requirements are also lessened when dilute chemistry cleaning solutions are employed.

Resnick, P.J.; Simonson, G.C.; Matlock, C.A.; Kelly, M.J.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Child Care Availability and Usage Among Welfare Recipients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Child Care Availability and Usage Among Welfare Recipients 1the impact that the availability of nearby licensed care hasemployment and that the availability of nearby licensed care

Houston, Douglas; Ong, Paul M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

POWER PLANT WATER USAGE AND LOSS STUDY - Final  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

POWER PLANT WATER USAGE AND LOSS STUDY August 2005 Revised May 2007 Prepared for: The United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory DOE Gasification...

165

VEHICLE USAGE LOG Department ________________________________________ Vehicle Homebase ____________________________ Week Ended (Sunday) _________________  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VEHICLE USAGE LOG Department ________________________________________ Vehicle Homebase of the owning Unit. Vehicle Homebase: Enter the City, Zip Code, Building, or other location designation. Week

Johnston, Daniel

166

Form EIA-457E (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas Usage  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Fuel Oil or Kerosene Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring February 29, 2004 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Answers to Frequently Asked Questions About the...

167

NANOFAB TOOL USAGE RATES Effective 1/1/13  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Application specific training beyond general tool usage will require additional training time and should be discussed with process engineer prior to ...

2013-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

168

Integrate Real-Time Weather with Thermostat Electrical Usage...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Xiufeng Pang Weather and its dynamics are big drivers of energy usage. Integration of key weather variables - solar, wind, and temperature - into home energy management and demand...

169

Attachment 1-SF 18.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

QUOTATIONS QUOTATIONS This Notice of Small Business-Small-Purchase Set-Aside on the Attachment 1 PAGE OF PAGES (THIS IS NOT AN ORDER) reverse of this form is not applicable. 1 1 REQUEST NO. DE-RQ01-04ME90001 DATE ISSUED June 16,2004 18. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQUEST NO. 01-04ME90001.000 18. CERT. FOR NAT.DEF. UNDER BDSA REG.2 AND/OR DMS REG. 1 ⇒ RATING 5A. ISSUED BY 6. DELIVER BY (Date) U.S. Department of Energy Office of Headquarters Procurement Services, ME-641.2 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20585 7. DELIVERY 5B. FOR INFORMATION CALL: (Name and telephone no.) (No collect calls) Debbie Draper (202) 287-1437 FOB OTHER

170

1Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Facility Representive Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached covering the period from January  to March  2002. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field...

171

4Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

"The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from October to December 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field...

172

Crime Indicators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

data collection efforts are used to gauge the problem of crime in America. These two data series are intended to measure different aspects of crime, but this point is often lost in the front-page headline summaries of whether crime is “up,” “down, ” or about the same. Confusion regarding the two crime indicators is exacerbated when the two data series show substantially different trends, as was the case with the most recent release of data in 2001. For this column, we asked Michael Rand and Callie Rennison of the U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics to describe the two national crime indicators and their differences. Their article clearly describes the distinct approaches to measuring crime used by these two data series, and provides a strong justification for maintaining these two approaches to address very distinct policy needs. Just a thought... A previous Window on Washington column from summer 1998 discussed the U.S. Census Bureau’s Small-Area Income and Poverty Estimates Program, which used administrative records and census data in conjunction with Current Population Survey estimates to produce modelbased small-area estimates that incorporated information from all these sources. It would be interesting to see if a similar approach might be used to provide small-area estimates of violent crime, possibly by fitting a regression model to the National Crime Victimization Survey data, using the Uniform Crime Reports and other data as explanatory variables. Such approaches to combine information from the two national crime indicators—continuing efforts to refine inferences from two frequently confused data series—are interesting possibilities for future research.

Daniel Cork; Michael Cohen; Michael R. R; Callie M. Rennison

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Attachment 3, Budget Information, SF 424A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ATTACHMENT 3 OMB Approval No. 0343 0044 BUDGET INFORMATION - Non-Construction Programs SECTION A - BUDGET SUMMARY Grant Program Function or Activity (a) Catalog of Federal...

174

Molecular mechanisms of kinetochore microtubule attachment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To ensure equal chromosome segregation during mitosis, the macromolecular kinetochore must remain attached to depolymerizing microtubules, which drive poleward chromosome movement. Microtubules are highly dynamic structures ...

Schmidt, Jens C. (Jens Christopher)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Usage derived recommendations for a video digital library  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a minimalist methodology to develop usage-based recommender systems for multimedia digital libraries. A prototype recommender system based on this strategy was implemented for the Open Video Project, a digital library of videos that are freely ... Keywords: Open Video Project, Recommender systems, Usage analysis, Video

Johan Bollen; Michael L. Nelson; Gary Geisler; Raquel Araujo

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

A MOOS MODULE FOR MONITORING ENERGY USAGE OF AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A MOOS MODULE FOR MONITORING ENERGY USAGE OF AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES Anthony Kanago, Kevin Roos, James--Tracking the energy usage of an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) and making accurate data available provides especially effectively in energy-aware systems, allowing inspection vehicles (which typically travel farther

Idaho, University of

177

Cloud resource usage: extreme distributions invalidating traditional capacity planning models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For years Capacity Planning professionals knew or suspected that various characteristics of computer usage have non-normal distribution. At the same time much of the traditional workload modeling and forecasting is based on mathematical techniques assuming ... Keywords: capacity planning, power law, probability distributions, resource usage, volatility

Charles Z. Loboz

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Towards appliance usage prediction for home energy management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we address the problem of predicting the usage of home appliances where a key challenge is to model the everyday routine of homeowners and the inter-dependency between the use of different appliances. To this end, we propose an agent based ... Keywords: home energy management, usage prediction

Ngoc Cuong Truong, Long Tran-Thanh, Enrico Costanza, Sarvapali D. Ramchurn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Table HC15.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Four Most...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New York Florida Texas California Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC15.7...

180

"Table HC4.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and End Use, Forms EIA-457 A, B, C of the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey. " " Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "usage indicators attached" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

"Table HC9.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Climate Zone...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

areas, determined according to the 30-year average (1971-2000) of the annual heating and cooling degree-days. A household is assigned to a climate zone according to the 30-year...

182

"Table HC9.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Climate Zone...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

areas, determined according to the 30-year average (1971-2000) of the annual heating and cooling degree-days. A household is assigned to a climate zone according to the 30-year...

183

"Table HC4.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1,"Q","Q","Q","Q","Q","N" "Monitor is Turned Off",0.5,"Q","Q","Q","Q","Q","N" "Use of Internet" "Have Access to Internet" "Yes",66.9,14.2,4,1.3,2.1,6.6,"Q" "Dial-up...

184

"Table HC10.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by U.S. Census...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sleep Mode",1,"Q",0.3,0.4,0.3 "Monitor is Turned Off",0.5,"Q","Q","Q","Q" "Use of Internet" "Have Access to Internet" "Yes",66.9,12.3,15.3,23.3,16 "Dial-up...

185

"Table HC7.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Household...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

",0.3,"Q",0.5,"Q","Q" "Monitor is Turned Off",0.5,"N","Q","Q","Q","Q","N","Q" "Use of Internet" "Have Access to Internet" "Yes",66.9,7.2,15.1,14.6,10.4,19.6,4.9,14 "Dial-up...

186

"Table HC8.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Urban/Rural...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sleep Mode",1,0.3,"Q",0.3,0.3 "Monitor is Turned Off",0.5,"Q","Q","Q","Q" "Use of Internet" "Have Access to Internet" "Yes",66.9,26.6,11,16.7,12.6 "Dial-up...

187

"Table HC14.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by West Census...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Automatic Sleep Mode",1,0.3,"Q","Q" "Monitor is Turned Off",0.5,"Q","Q","Q" "Use of Internet" "Have Access to Internet" "Yes",66.9,16,4.7,11.3 "Dial-up (phone)",26.8,5.4,1.8,3.6...

188

"Table HC15.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Four Most...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sleep Mode",1,"N","Q","Q","Q" "Monitor is Turned Off",0.5,"N","Q","Q","Q" "Use of Internet" "Have Access to Internet" "Yes",66.9,3.7,4.5,4.8,8.2 "Dial-up (phone)",26.8,1.2,1.7,...

189

"Table HC12.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Midwest...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Automatic Sleep Mode",1,0.3,"Q","Q" "Monitor is Turned Off",0.5,"Q","Q","Q" "Use of Internet" "Have Access to Internet" "Yes",66.9,15.3,10.5,4.8 "Dial-up (phone)",26.8,6.9,4.6,2....

190

"Table HC11.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Northeast...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Automatic Sleep Mode",1,"Q","Q","Q" "Monitor is Turned Off",0.5,"Q","Q","N" "Use of Internet" "Have Access to Internet" "Yes",66.9,12.3,8.9,3.5 "Dial-up (phone)",26.8,4.3,3.2,1.1...

191

"Table HC3.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1,0.9,0.8,"Q","Q","N","Q" "Monitor is Turned Off",0.5,0.3,0.3,"N","N","N","N" "Use of Internet" "Have Access to Internet" "Yes",66.9,52.6,44.8,2.8,1.2,1.4,2.5 "Dial-up...

192

Table HC10.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total U.S. Housing Units..... 111.1 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Indoor Lights Turned On During Summer Number of Lights Turned On

193

"Table HC15.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Four Most...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3,12.3,0.4,1.2,1,0.9 "4 or More",25.8,0.7,2.7,3.2,1.9 "Use of Most-Used Ceiling Fan" "Used All Summer",18.7,1.1,0.9,0.9,2.1 "Used Quite a Bit",16.2,1,1.1,1.2,1.7 "Used...

194

"Table HC10.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by U.S. Census...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3,12.3,1.8,3.4,5.3,1.8 "4 or More",25.8,2.8,6.1,13.2,3.8 "Use of Most-Used Ceiling Fan" "Used All Summer",18.7,3.5,4.9,6,4.4 "Used Quite a Bit",16.2,3.1,4.1,5.8,3.2 "Used...

195

"Table HC12.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Midwest Census...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3,12.3,3.4,2.3,1.1 "4 or More",25.8,6.1,3.7,2.3 "Use of Most-Used Ceiling Fan" "Used All Summer",18.7,4.9,3.4,1.5 "Used Quite a Bit",16.2,4.1,3,1.1 "Used Only a Few...

196

"Table HC7.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"4 or More",25.8,2.8,5.8,5.5,3.8,7.9,1.4,5.1 "Use of Most-Used Ceiling Fan" "Used All Summer",18.7,4.2,4.9,4.1,2.1,3.4,2.4,6.3 "Used Quite a Bit",16.2,3.4,3.8,3.3...

197

"Table HC8.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Urban/Rural...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3,12.3,5,2.1,2.6,2.6 "4 or More",25.8,8.6,4.7,6.7,5.8 "Use of Most-Used Ceiling Fan" "Used All Summer",18.7,7.1,3.2,4.3,4.1 "Used Quite a Bit",16.2,6.3,2.8,3.4,3.7 "Used...

198

Table HC6.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Number of Household...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

... 25.8 4.1 9.3 4.7 4.5 3.2 Use of Most-Used Ceiling Fan Used All Summer... 18.7 4.7 6.0 2.9 2.9...

199

"Table HC14.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by West Census...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3,12.3,1.8,0.7,1.1 "4 or More",25.8,3.8,1.6,2.2 "Use of Most-Used Ceiling Fan" "Used All Summer",18.7,4.4,1.4,2.9 "Used Quite a Bit",16.2,3.2,1,2.2 "Used Only a Few...

200

"Table HC4.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1,1.1,"Q",0.4,0.5,"Q" "4 or More",25.8,2.1,1.6,"Q","Q","Q","N" "Use of Most-Used Ceiling Fan" "Used All Summer",18.7,4.1,1.1,"Q",0.9,1.7,"Q" "Used Quite a Bit",16.2,3.2,1,0.4,0.5,1...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "usage indicators attached" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

"Table HC9.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Climate Zone...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3,12.3,1.3,2.7,2.9,2.2,3.2 "4 or More",25.8,1.4,5,4.8,5.7,8.9 "Use of Most-Used Ceiling Fan" "Used All Summer",18.7,2.3,4.6,4.9,4.3,2.6 "Used Quite a Bit",16.2,2,4.1,3.3,3.4,3.4...

202

"Table HC13.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by South Census...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3,12.3,5.3,2.7,1,1.6 "4 or More",25.8,13.2,6.2,2.3,4.7 "Use of Most-Used Ceiling Fan" "Used All Summer",18.7,6,3.6,1,1.3 "Used Quite a Bit",16.2,5.8,3.2,0.9,1.6 "Used Only...

203

"Table HC3.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"4 or More",25.8,23.7,22.1,0.6,"Q","Q",0.6 "Use of Most-Used Ceiling Fan" "Used All Summer",18.7,14.7,12.3,0.8,"Q",0.3,1 "Used Quite a Bit",16.2,13,11.1,0.7,0.4...

204

"Table HC11.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Northeast...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3,12.3,1.8,1.3,0.5 "4 or More",25.8,2.8,2.3,0.5 "Use of Most-Used Ceiling Fan" "Used All Summer",18.7,3.5,2.6,0.9 "Used Quite a Bit",16.2,3.1,2.4,0.7 "Used Only a...

205

Table HC15.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Four Most...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Used at All... 2.9 Q Q Q 0.3 Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools......

206

Table HC6.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Number of ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Use Battery-Operated Appliances/Tools..... 54.9 9.9 20.4 9.8 9.0 5.8 Plugged in All the Time..... 10.0 1.8 4.0 1.8 1.6 0.9 Recharged as Needed ...

207

Table HC2.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Type of Housing ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Use Battery-Operated Appliances/Tools..... 54.9 6.3 12.3 13.4 11.9 11.0 Plugged in All the Time..... 10.0 0.7 2.1 2.7 2.2 2.4 Recharged as Needed ...

208

"Table HC10.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by U.S. Census...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Quite a Bit",12.6,1.2,4.5,4.5,2.4 "All Summer",40.5,3,8.8,24.8,3.9 "At Home Behavior" "Home Used for Business" "Yes",6.4,0.6,1.7,2.8,1.4 "No",59.5,5.4,15.6,29.4,9....

209

"Table HC11.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Northeast...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Needed",11.4,1.6,1.4,0.3 "Quite a Bit",12.6,1.2,1.1,0.1 "All Summer",40.5,3,2.6,0.3 "At Home Behavior" "Home Used for Business" "Yes",6.4,0.6,0.5,"Q" "No",59.5,5.4,4.7,0.7 "Someone...

210

"Table HC15.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Four Most...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Quite a Bit",12.6,0.3,0.5,0.9,1.3 "All Summer",40.5,0.4,5.7,5.2,1.2 "At Home Behavior" "Home Used for Business" "Yes",6.4,"Q",0.7,0.4,0.6 "No",59.5,1,5.8,6,4.9...

211

"Table HC13.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by South Census...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Quite a Bit",12.6,4.5,2.5,0.8,1.2 "All Summer",40.5,24.8,13.4,3.8,7.6 "At Home Behavior" "Home Used for Business" "Yes",6.4,2.8,1.8,0.4,0.6 "No",59.5,29.4,15.8,4.8,8....

212

"Table HC14.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by West Census...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

eded",11.4,3.4,0.7,2.7 "Quite a Bit",12.6,2.4,0.8,1.6 "All Summer",40.5,3.9,2.4,1.5 "At Home Behavior" "Home Used for Business" "Yes",6.4,1.4,0.6,0.8 "No",59.5,9.1,3.3,5.8 "Someone...

213

"Table HC4.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a Bit",12.6,2.9,0.5,0.4,0.3,1.6,"Q" "All Summer",40.5,8.1,2.6,0.7,1.2,3.3,0.3 "At Home Behavior" "Home Used for Business" "Yes",6.4,0.7,"Q","N","Q",0.3,"N"...

214

"Table HC12.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Midwest Census...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

eded",11.4,3.9,2.8,1.1 "Quite a Bit",12.6,4.5,3.1,1.4 "All Summer",40.5,8.8,5.4,3.4 "At Home Behavior" "Home Used for Business" "Yes",6.4,1.7,1,0.7 "No",59.5,15.6,10.3,5.3 "Someone...

215

"Table HC3.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Quite a Bit",12.6,9.7,8.2,0.5,"Q","Q",0.6 "All Summer",40.5,32.3,28.1,1,0.4,0.9,2 "At Home Behavior" "Home Used for Business" "Yes",6.4,5.7,5.1,"Q","Q","Q","Q"...

216

Table HC2.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

No Insulation..... 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.2 Q Don't Know..... 1.7 1.0 0.5 Q Q Home is Too Drafty During the Winter Never ...

217

Table HC6-1a. Usage Indicators by Climate Zone, | | | 1 | | |  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Adequacy of Insulation | Well Insulated..... 42.6 3.8 12.3 10.3 7.2 9.1 | 8.9 Adequately Insulated ...

218

Table HC6-7a. Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

No Insulation ... Use a Central System..... 58.6 1.3 4.5 6.2 5.9 | 6.3 All Summer ... Cold..... 28.2 1.2 ...

219

Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Apartments in Buildings Housing With--Units (millions) Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit ... Adequacy of Insulation Well Insulated ...

220

ATTACHMENT J.3 - APPENDIX C  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

M060 M060 Contract No.: DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section J - Appendix C J-C-1 ATTACHMENT J.3 APPENDIX C SPECIAL FINANCIAL INSTITUTION ACCOUNT AGREEMENT Applicable to the Operation of PPPL Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 Modification No. M060 Contract No.: DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section J - Appendix C J-C-2 Modification No. M060 Contract No.: DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section J - Appendix C J-C-3 Modification No. M060 Contract No.: DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section J - Appendix C J-C-4 Modification No. M060 Contract No.: DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section J - Appendix C J-C-5 Modification No. M060 Contract No.: DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section J - Appendix C J-C-6 Modification No. M060 Contract No.: DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section J - Appendix C J-C-7 Modification No. M060 Contract No.: DE-AC02-09CH11466

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "usage indicators attached" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Coexistence in preferential attachment networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Competition in markets is ubiquitous: cell-phone providers, computer manufacturers, and sport gear brands all vie for customers. Though several coexisting competitors are often observed in empirical data, many current theoretical models of competition on small-world networks predict a single winner taking over the majority of the network. We introduce a new model of product adoption that focuses on word-of-mouth recommendations to provide an explanation for this coexistence of competitors. The key property of our model is that customer choices evolve simultaneously with the network of customers. When a new node joins the network, it chooses neighbors according to preferential attachment, and then chooses its type based on the number of initial neighbors of each type. This can model a new cell-phone user choosing a cell-phone provider, a new student choosing a laptop, or a new athletic team member choosing a gear provider. We provide a detailed analysis of the new model; in particular, we determine the possibl...

Antunovi?, Ton?i; Racz, Miklos Z

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Residential energy usage comparison project: An overview  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an overveiw of the residential energy usage comparison project, an integrated load and market research project sponsored by EPRI and the Southern California Edison Company. Traditional studies of the relative energy consumption of electric and gas household appliances have relied on laboratory analyses and computer simulations. This project was designed to study the appliance energy consumption patterns of actual households. Ninety-two households in Orange County, California, southeast of Los Angeles, served as the study sample. Half of the households received new electric space-conditioning, water-heating, cooking, and clothes-drying equipment; the other half received gas equipment. The electric space-conditioning and water-heating appliances were heat pump technologies. All of the appliances were metered to collect load-shape and energy consumption data. The households were also surveyed periodically to obtain information on their energy needs and their acceptance of the appliances. The metered energy consumption data provide an important benchmark for comparing the energy consumption and costs of alternative end-use technologies. The customer research results provide new insights into customer preferences for fuel and appliance types. 15 figs., 3 tabs.

Smith, B.A.; Uhlaner, R.T.; Cason, T.N. (Quantum Consulting, Inc., Berkeley, CA (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

ATTACHMENT A - CHECKLIST FOR SELF ASSESSMENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ATTACHMENT A - CHECKLIST FOR SELF ASSESSMENT ATTACHMENT A - CHECKLIST FOR SELF ASSESSMENT Site: Federal or Contractor Program: Name: ____________________________________________ Title:______________________________________________ Organization:_______________________________________ Address: __________________________________________ Bldg and Room Number _____________________________ Phone Number __________________ E-Mail ________________________________ Years of Records Management experience? Length of time in current position? Training? __________________________________________________________________ Signature: Date: 02/03/2010 2 INSTITUTIONALIZATION

224

POWER PLANT WATER USAGE AND LOSS STUDY - Final  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

POWER PLANT WATER USAGE AND LOSS STUDY POWER PLANT WATER USAGE AND LOSS STUDY August 2005 Revised May 2007 Prepared for: The United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory DOE Gasification Technology Manager: Gary J. Stiegel DOE Project Manager: James R. Longanbach Project Manager: Michael D. Rutkowski Principal Investigators: Michael G. Klett Norma J. Kuehn Ronald L. Schoff Vladimir Vaysman Jay S. White Power Plant Water Usage and Loss Study i August 2005 TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS ...................................................................................................................... I LIST OF TABLES.............................................................................................................................III

225

The Impact of Residential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residential transportation energy usage is vital for theDensity on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption ReferencesDensity on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption UCI-ITS-WP-

Golob, Thomas F; Brownstone, David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

How Households Use Different Types of Vehicles: A Structural Driver Allocation and Usage Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the first car. Mid-size car usage also involves the secondTypes Mini cars have approximately average usage. SubcompactCompact cars have greater than average usage only if they

Golob, Thomas F.; Kim, Seyoung K.; Ren, Weiping Willliam

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Video game console usage and national energy consumption: Results from a field-metering study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of usage nationwide, we can estimate total national energythe total combined energy use. 3. Average usage over alltotal game console usage, this suggests that an appreciable fraction of console energy

Desroches, Louis-Benoit

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

The Impact of Residential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption References Bento,Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption UCI-ITS-WP-05-1 Thomason Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption Thomas F. Golob

Golob, Thomas F; Brownstone, David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Exploring Sense of Place Attitudes as Indicators of Travel Behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

significant in explaining car usage, as expected, positivenegatively towards car usage, and possessing an indifferent

Deutsch, Kate; Goulias, Kostas

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

XIV.1-Draft ATTACHMENT XIV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for producing syngas from methane: steam reforming and partial oxidation. The primary advantage of partial oxidation over steam reforming is indicated to be that the reaction is self-sustaining and the only heat of reducing the formation of excess hydrogen from the reformer or partial oxidation unit and increasing

Kentucky, University of

231

Identify Vehicle Usage Mission Constraints for Reducing Greenhouse Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Identify Vehicle Usage Mission Constraints for Reducing Greenhouse Identify Vehicle Usage Mission Constraints for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Identify Vehicle Usage Mission Constraints for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions October 7, 2013 - 11:46am Addthis YOU ARE HERE: Step 2 As Federal agencies work to identify opportunities for right-sizing the fleet and replacing inefficient vehicles with new, efficient, and/or alternatively fueled models to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, they should flag potential mission constraints associated with vehicle usage. This may involve further data collection to understand the mission considerations associated with individual vehicles. For instance, in Figure 1, Vehicle 004 appears to be underutilized, having both a low user-to-vehicle ratio and a relatively low time in use per day. However,

232

Energy Usage Information: Lessons from the Credit Reporting Industry.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Usage Information: Lessons from the Credit Reporting Industry. Energy Usage Information: Lessons from the Credit Reporting Industry. Speaker(s): Philip Henderson Date: October 4, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Janie Page There has been much discussion about the use of customer energy usage information to deliver value, such as with benchmarking tools that compare energy use in a building to a peer set, continuous commissioning services that diagnose faults in building systems, and tools that estimate expected savings from upgrades. A utility can use customer information to deliver these kinds of services to its customers directly, but most utilities today do not enable companies to obtain a customer's energy usage information in a systematic, automated way to deliver services to the customer, even if

233

People are Strange: Current Behavioral Insights into Energy Usage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

People are Strange: Current Behavioral Insights into Energy Usage Speaker(s): Susan Mazur-Stommen Date: October 10, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-1099 Seminar HostPoint of Contact:...

234

Energy Usage Information: Lessons from the Credit Reporting Industry...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Usage Information: Lessons from the Credit Reporting Industry. Speaker(s): Philip Henderson Date: October 4, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar HostPoint of Contact:...

235

Electricity Use in California: Past Trends and Present Usage...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electricity Use in California: Past Trends and Present Usage Patterns Speaker(s): Rich Brown Date: May 16, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Was explosive growth in electricity...

236

Memory Usage Inference for Object-Oriented Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a type-based approach to statically derive symbolic closed-form formulae that characterize the bounds of heap memory usages of programs written in object-oriented languages. Given a program with size and alias ...

Nguyen, Huu Hai

237

Usage of Appliances in U - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Households Usage of Appliances in 1997. Household PCs by Year. The number of personal computers (PCs) in U.S. households has risen from zero in 1976, when the ...

238

UC Libraries Academic e-Book Usage Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Usage Study [Q1. Create condition: academic e-book users] 1.Do you use e-books for your academic work? (Select one) a.you generally prefer print books or e-books? (Select one) a.

Li, Chan; Poe, Felicia; Potter, Michele; Quigley, Brian; Wilson, Jacqueline

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

RECS Propane Usage Form_v1 (Draft).xps  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

propane usage for this housing unit between September 2008 and April 2010. Delivery Number Enter the Delivery Date for each delivery 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Enter the Total Dollar...

240

FATIGUEPRO: On-Line Fatigue Usage Transient Monitoring System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FATIGUEPRO accurately monitors plant data to calculate actual fatigue usage for critical nuclear plant components. This system should improve plant reliability and contribute to plant life extension by providing a more realistic estimation of fatigue demands.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "usage indicators attached" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

NanoFab User Facility Usage Fee Schedule  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. NanoFab User Facility Usage Fee Schedule Effective 11/1/09 Tool Full Rate ($/hr) Reduced Rate ($/hr) Base NanoFab Use 60 30 ...

242

Postnominal prepositional phrase attachment in proteomics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a small set of attachment heuristics for postnominal PPs occurring in full-text articles related to enzymes. A detailed analysis of the results suggests their utility for extraction of relations expressed by nominalizations (often with several ...

Jonathan Schuman; Sabine Bergler

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Chemomechanics of attached and suspended cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemomechanical coupling in single eukaryotic animal cells is investigated in the con- text of the attached (substratum-adhered) and the suspended (free-floating) states. These dichotomous configurations determine behavioral ...

Maloney, John Mapes

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

The impact of residential density on vehicle usage and fuel consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

characteristics on household residential choice and auto2009. The impact of residential density on vehicle usage and2010-05) The impact of residential density on vehicle usage

Kim, Jinwon; Brownstone, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

The Impact of Residential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding total residential transportation energy usageon Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption total annual fuelUsage and Energy Consumption Gasoline-equivalent gallons per year total

Golob, Thomas F; Brownstone, David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

The Impact of Residential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption Table 2 Housing Unitsresidential vehicular energy consumption is graphed as aon Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption with vehicles, but

Golob, Thomas F.; Brownstone, David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Attachment B: Other AIP Program Policies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B: Other AIP Program Policies B: Other AIP Program Policies Attachment B: Other AIP Program Policies Other AIP Program Policies Question #1: What is the role of local governments in AIP program emergency management planning activities? Answer: As indicated in the suggested model provisions related to emergency response in Attachment E, it is DOE policy that AIP provisions regarding emergency management planning activities encourage active participation by applicable local governments. Question #2: Which AIP provisions should be addressed through the development of site-specific procedures and protocol? Answer: Generally, site-specific procedures and protocols should be developed to address AIP program concerns that must be tailored to site conditions, such as: State generation of hazardous and/or radioactive wastes; on-site

248

Attachment FY2011-3(3) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3) Attachment FY2011-3(3) Stripes Template for Interagency Agreement Attachment FY2011-3(3) More Documents & Publications AttachmentFlash2011-3(7).pdf ATTACHMENTFLASH2011-31AL2011-...

249

Attachment 5 Volume II Pricing Matrix.xls | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 Volume II Pricing Matrix.xls&0; Attachment 5 Volume II Pricing Matrix.xls&0; Attachment 5 Volume II Pricing Matrix.xls&0; More Documents & Publications Attachment 6 Volume V...

250

Attachment FY2011-46(4) OPAM | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4) OPAM Attachment FY2011-46(4) OPAM Types of Compliance Requirements Chart Attachment FY2011-46(4) OPAM More Documents & Publications FLASH2011-46-OPAM Attachment FY2011-80 OPAM...

251

Attachment FY2011-83 OPAM | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Attachment FY2011-83 OPAM Attachment FY2011-83 OPAM Federal Supply Schedules Attachment FY2011-83 OPAM More Documents & Publications Chapter 8 - Required Sources of Supplies and...

252

Attachment 6 Volume V Pricing Matrix for Optional Enhancements...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Attachment 6 Volume V Pricing Matrix for Optional Enhancements.xls&0; Attachment 6 Volume V Pricing Matrix for Optional Enhancements.xls&0; Attachment 6 Volume V Pricing Matrix...

253

Attachment FY2011-77 OPAM | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Agencies You are here Home Attachment FY2011-77 OPAM Attachment FY2011-77 OPAM Data Quality Plan Attachment FY2011-77 OPAM More Documents & Publications Flash2011-77...

254

Attachment FY2011-31 OPAM | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 OPAM Attachment FY2011-31 OPAM attachment 3 flow chart of new 17.5 FAR Team update based on FAC2005-47 Dec 13, 2010 Attachment FY2011-31 OPAM More Documents & Publications...

255

Attachment FY2011-15 OPAM | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agencies You are here Home Attachment FY2011-15 OPAM Attachment FY2011-15 OPAM FAR Dollar Threshold Changes Attachment FY2011-15 OPAM More Documents & Publications Flash2011-15...

256

Vacuum Attachment for Collection of Lithium Powder ---- Inventor...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vacuum Attachment for Collection of Lithium Powder ---- Inventor(s) Hans Schneider and Stephan Jurczynski The Vacuum Attachment is part of an integrated system designed to collect...

257

Attachment 1: Green Lease Policies and Procedures for Lease Acquisitio...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Attachment 1: Green Lease Policies and Procedures for Lease Acquisition Attachment 1: Green Lease Policies...

258

Attachment FY2011-75 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Attachment FY2011-75 Multiple-Award Contracts and Governmentwide Acquisition Contracts Including Delivery Orders and Task Orders Attachment FY2011-75 More Documents & Publications...

259

Associating Internet usage with depressive behavior among college students  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract — Depression is a mental health problem affecting a large population of college students. Since college students are active users of the Internet today, investigating associations between symptoms of depression and Internet usage has been an active area of research. While existing studies do provide critical insights, they are limited due to the fact that Internet usage of subjects is characterized by means of self-reported surveys only. In this paper, we report our findings on a month long experiment conducted at Missouri University of Science and Technology on associating depressive symptoms among college students and Internet usage using real Internet data collected continuously, unobtrusively and preserving privacy. In our study, 216 undergraduates were surveyed for depressive symptoms using the CES-D scale. We then collected their on-campus Internet usage via Cisco NetFlow records. Subsequent analysis revealed that several Internet usage features like average packets per flow, peer-to-peer (octets, packets and duration), chat octets, mail (packets and duration), ftp duration, and remote file octets exhibit a statistically significant correlation with depressive symptoms. Additionally, Mann-Whitney U-tests revealed that average packets per flow, remote file octets, chat (octets, packets and duration) and flow duration entropy demonstrate statistically significant differences in the mean values across groups with and without depressive symptoms. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that associates depressive symptoms among college students with continuously collected real Internet data.

Raghavendra Kotikalapudi; Frances Montgomery; Donald Wunsch

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

MESUR: USAGE-BASED METRICS OF SCHOLARLY IMPACT  

SciTech Connect

The evaluation of scholarly communication items is now largely a matter of expert opinion or metrics derived from citation data. Both approaches can fail to take into account the myriad of factors that shape scholarly impact. Usage data has emerged as a promising complement to existing methods o fassessment but the formal groundwork to reliably and validly apply usage-based metrics of schlolarly impact is lacking. The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation funded MESUR project constitutes a systematic effort to define, validate and cross-validate a range of usage-based metrics of schlolarly impact by creating a semantic model of the scholarly communication process. The constructed model will serve as the basis of a creating a large-scale semantic network that seamlessly relates citation, bibliographic and usage data from a variety of sources. A subsequent program that uses the established semantic network as a reference data set will determine the characteristics and semantics of a variety of usage-based metrics of schlolarly impact. This paper outlines the architecture and methodology adopted by the MESUR project and its future direction.

BOLLEN, JOHAN [Los Alamos National Laboratory; RODRIGUEZ, MARKO A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; VAN DE SOMPEL, HERBERT [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "usage indicators attached" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The use of web structure and content to identify subjectively interesting web usage patterns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The discipline of Web Usage Mining has grown rapidly in the past few years, despite the crash of the e-commerce boom of the late 1990s. Web Usage Mining is the application of data mining techniques to Web clickstream data in order to extract usage patterns. ... Keywords: Data mining, Web usage mining, World Wide Web

Robert Cooley

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

A practical ontology for the large-scale modeling of scholarly artifacts and their usage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The large-scale analysis of scholarly artifact usage is constrained primarily by current practices in usage data archiving, privacy issues concerned with the dissemination of usage data, and the lack of a practical ontology for modeling the usage domain. ... Keywords: resource description framework and schema, semantic networks, web ontology language

Marko A. Rodriguez; Johan Bollen; Herbert Van de Sompel

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Potentials and limits of secondary spectrum usage by CDMA base stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the progress of transmission technology and fast growing demand for ubiquitous high speed wireless services, it is clear that the pressure towards more flexibility in usage of limited spectrum will increase. With concept of spectrum sharing, in ... Keywords: primary exclusive region (PER), secondary spectrum usage, secondary usage allowable region (SAR), secondary usage prohibitive region (SPR)

Eun-Hee Shin; Dongwoo Kim

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

DEVELOPMENT OF A WIRELINE CPT SYSTEM FOR MULTIPLE TOOL USAGE  

SciTech Connect

The first phase of development of a wireline cone penetrometer system for multiple tool usage was completed under DOE award number DE-AR26-98FT40366. Cone penetrometer technology (CPT) has received widespread interest and is becoming more commonplace as a tool for environmental site characterization activities at several Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Although CPT already offers many benefits for site characterization, the wireline system can improve CPT technology by offering greater utility and increased cost savings. Currently the use of multiple CPT tools during a site characterization (i.e. piezometric cone, chemical sensors, core sampler, grouting tool) must be accomplished by withdrawing the entire penetrometer rod string to change tools. This results in multiple penetrations being required to collect the data and samples that may be required during characterization of a site, and to subsequently seal the resulting holes with grout. The wireline CPT system allows multiple CPT tools to be interchanged during a single penetration, without withdrawing the CPT rod string from the ground. The goal of the project is to develop and demonstrate a system by which various tools can be placed at the tip of the rod string depending on the type of information or sample desired. Under the base contract, an interchangeable piezocone and grouting tool was designed, fabricated, and evaluated. The results of the evaluation indicate that success criteria for the base contract were achieved. In addition, the wireline piezocone tool was validated against ASTM standard cones, the depth capability of the system was found to compare favorably with that of conventional CPT, and the reliability and survivability of the system were demonstrated.

Stephen P. Farrington; Martin L. Gildea; J. Christopher Bianchi

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Nuclear reactor fuel rod attachment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reusable system for removably attaching a nuclear reactor fuel rod (12) to a support member (14). A locking cap (22) is secured to the fuel rod (12) and a locking strip (24) is fastened to the support member (14). The locking cap (22) has two opposing fingers (24a and 24b) shaped to form a socket having a body portion (26). The locking strip has an extension (36) shaped to rigidly attach to the socket's body portion (26). The locking cap's fingers are resiliently deflectable. For attachment, the locking cap (22) is longitudinally pushed onto the locking strip (24) causing the extension (36) to temporarily deflect open the fingers (24a and 24b) to engage the socket's body portion (26). For removal, the process is reversed.

Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Ethanol Usage in Urban Public Transportation - Presentation of Results |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethanol Usage in Urban Public Transportation - Presentation of Results Ethanol Usage in Urban Public Transportation - Presentation of Results Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Ethanol Usage in Urban Public Transportation - Presentation of Results Agency/Company /Organization: BioEthanol for Sustainable Transport Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency Topics: Best Practices Website: cenbio.iee.usp.br/download/publicacoes/SAE_BEST_2010.pdf This paper presents the BioEthanol for Sustainable Transport (BEST) project in Brazil, its partners, and the results from the demonstration tests performed in field, as well as the proposals of public policies that were elaborated and are being implemented. The BEST project was implemented in Sao Paulo as well as eight other cities located in Europe and Asia. How to Use This Tool

267

Form EIA-457E (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas Usage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F (2001) -- Household Natural Gas Usage Form F (2001) -- Household Natural Gas Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring February 29, 2004 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Answers to Frequently Asked Questions About the Household Natural Gas Usage Form What is the purpose of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey? The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) collects data on energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. housing units. Over 5,000 statistically selected households across the U.S. have already provided information about their household, the physical characteristics of their housing unit, their energy-using equipment, and their energy suppliers. Now we are requesting the energy billing records for these households from each of their energy suppliers. After all this information has been collected, the information will be used to

268

Form EIA-457E (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas Usage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E (2001) - Household Electricity Usage Form E (2001) - Household Electricity Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring February 29, 2004 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Answers to Frequently Asked Questions About the Household Electricity Usage Form What is the purpose of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey? The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) collects data on energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. housing units. Over 5,000 statistically selected households across the U.S. have already provided information about their household, the physical characteristics of their housing unit, their energy-using equipment, and their energy suppliers. Now we are requesting the energy billing records for these households from each of their energy suppliers. After all this information has been collected, the information will be used to

269

Water Usage Law, Major Water Users (Missouri) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Usage Law, Major Water Users (Missouri) Water Usage Law, Major Water Users (Missouri) Water Usage Law, Major Water Users (Missouri) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Missouri Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Missouri Department of Natural Resources Any water user with the capability to withdraw or divert 100,000 gallons or more per day from any stream, river, lake, well, spring or other water source must register and file for a permit for water withdrawal and diversion from the Department of Natural Resources. Additionally, no major

270

Definition: Reduced Oil Usage (Not Monetized) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Usage (Not Monetized) Usage (Not Monetized) Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Oil Usage (Not Monetized) The functions that provide this benefit eliminate the need to send a line worker or crew to the switch or capacitor locations to operate them eliminate the need for truck rolls to perform diagnosis of equipment condition, and reduce truck rolls for meter reading and measurement purposes. This reduces the fuel consumed by a service vehicle or line truck. The use of plug-in electric vehicles can also lead to this benefit since the electrical energy used by plug-in electric vehicles displaces the equivalent amount of oil.[1] References ↑ SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Benefits' An LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. inline Glossary Definition

271

APS Guideline for Hand Tool and Portable Power Tool Usage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hand Tool and Portable Power Tool Usage Hand Tool and Portable Power Tool Usage Introduction CAT/XSD recognizes that the misuse and improper maintenance of hand tools and portable power tools cause a significant number of injuries to even "experienced" workers. Consequently, CAT/XSD has adopted the following policies and procedures to minimize the hazards associated with the use of such equipment at the APS. These guidelines apply to all use of hand tools and portable power tools by CAT/XSD personnel while performing maintenance or installation activities at the APS. Although CAT/XSD feels that most of the guidelines also apply to tool usage during experimental activities, CAT/XSD will not require that short-term users complete the training described below. Using Tools Safely If you have not had formal training in the use of common tools, either view

272

Mining Software Usage with the Automatic Library Tracking Database (ALTD)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tracking software usage is important for HPC centers, computer vendors, code developers and funding agencies to provide more efficient and targeted software support, and to forecast needs and guide HPC software effort towards the Exascale era. However, accurately tracking software usage on HPC systems has been a challenging task. In this paper, we present a tool called Automatic Library Tracking Database (ALTD) that has been developed and put in production on several Cray systems. The ALTD infrastructure prototype automatically and transparently stores information about libraries linked into an application at compilation time and also the executables launched in a batch job. We will illustrate the usage of libraries, compilers and third party software applications on a system managed by the National Institute for Computational Sciences.

Hadri, Bilel [ORNL; Fahey, Mark R [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Multiple uses of indicators and indices in cumulative effects assessment and management  

SciTech Connect

Both environmental indicators and multi-metric indices are useful for describing baseline conditions and qualitatively predicting the cumulative consequences of multiple actions. Several examples and case studies associated with indicators and/or indices are presented herein. They can be easily modified for usage in CEAM. Habitat suitability models reflect special indices related to habitat needs and quality for specific species or broad habitat types. Such models have been used to address direct and indirect effects, and with some modification, they can be also used to address cumulative effects of multiple actions. This review has indicated that there are numerous examples of such tools which have been or could be used in both EIA and CEAM. Some key lessons are: (1) in conducting CEAM studies, it is useful to think from the mindset that 'I am the VEC or indicator, and what is my historical and current condition and how have I, or will I, be affected by multiple past, present, and future actions?'; (2) due to the likely absence of detailed information on future actions, the described tools can still be used to 'predict' future conditions by focusing on qualitative up-or-down changes in individual indicators or indices with their aggregated displays; and (3) numerous regional and site-specific tools are currently available, with one example being indices of biological integrity for specific watersheds and water bodies. Such tools, even though they may not have been developed for CEAM usage, can certainly benefit CEAM studies and practice. Finally, usage of selected and appropriate tools as described herein can aid in conducting science-based, systematic, and documentable CEAM studies.

Canter, L.W., E-mail: envimptr@aol.com [University of Oklahoma and Environmental Impact Training, Horseshoe Bay, TX (United States); Atkinson, S.F. [Institute of Applied Science, University of North Texas, Denton, TX (United States)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

Page 1 of 7 Attachment to Notice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information about ongoing staff work from which Energy Commission forecasts of future transportation fuelPage 1 of 7 Attachment to Notice 2011 Integrated Energy Policy Report ­ Transportation Fuel of a Transportation Committee workshop on transportation fuel infrastructure issues. This provides further details

275

Attachment 14 Special Terms and Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Attachment 14 Exhibit D Special Terms and Conditions Exhbit D PON-12-605 Special Terms. By accepting this grant, Recipient as a material term of this agreement shall be fully responsible wage. Therefore, as a material term of this grant, Recipient must either: (a) Proceed on the assumption

276

Traffic characterization and internet usage in rural Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While Internet connectivity has reached a significant part of the world's population, those living in rural areas of the developing world are still largely disconnected. Recent efforts have provided Internet connectivity to a growing number of remote ... Keywords: internet usage, interviews, rural networks

David L. Johnson; Veljko Pejovic; Elizabeth M. Belding; Gertjan van Stam

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Editorial Style Guide: Word List and General Usage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI "Editorial Style Guide," together with the Company's "Graphic Standards Guide," provides information for building a strong corporate identity in EPRI publications. Providing lists of frequently used terms, EPRI software, and chemical elements, plus examples of word usage, the style guide can help authors both develop text efficiently and economically and brand EPRI as an integrated, global science and technology company.

1998-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

278

Determine Vehicle Usage and Refueling Trends to Minimize Greenhouse Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicle Usage and Refueling Trends to Minimize Greenhouse Vehicle Usage and Refueling Trends to Minimize Greenhouse Gas Emissions Determine Vehicle Usage and Refueling Trends to Minimize Greenhouse Gas Emissions October 7, 2013 - 11:42am Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 2 Once a Federal agency has identified its most important mobile greenhouse gas (GHG) emission sources overall, it can work with individual sites to determine vehicle usage and refueling trends. Agencies can compare the results of this analysis to internal standards and requirements to identify GHG mitigation opportunities for assets that are underperforming or underutilized. Two examples of this type of analysis focus on: Alternative fuel consumption Vehicle utilization. Figure 1 - An image of a vertical, stacked bar chart titled 'Alternative Fuel Use in AFVs.' The frequency data axis is labeled 'Gallons of Gasoline Equivalent' with a scale of 0-1,400,000 in increments of 200,000. The stacked bar labeled 'CNG Dual Fuel Vehicles' shows CNG from 0-300,000 gallons and Gasoline from 300,000-800,000 gallons. The stacked bar labeled 'E-85 Flex Fuel Vehicles' shows E85 from 0-1,000,000 gallons and Gasoline from 1,000,000-1,250,000 gallons.

279

Security Implications of Typical Grid Computing Usage Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Grid Computing consists of a collection of heterogeneous computers and resources spread across multiple administrative domains with the intent of providing users uniform access to these resources. There are many ways to access the resources of a Grid, ... Keywords: Global Grid Forum, Globus, Grid Computing, Legion, computer security, usage scenarios

Marty Humphrey; Mary R. Thompson

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Resource usage analysis for a functional language with exceptions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Igarashi and Kobayashi have proposed a general type system for checking whether resources such as files and memory are accessed in a valid manner. Their type system is, however, for call-by-value ?-calculus with resource primitives, and does not ... Keywords: effect system, exception, resource usage analysis, type inference, type system

Futoshi Iwama; Atsushi Igarashi; Naoki Kobayashi

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "usage indicators attached" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Forecasting multi-appliance usage for smart home energy management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We address the problem of forecasting the usage of multiple electrical appliances by domestic users, with the aim of providing suggestions about the best time to run appliances in order to reduce carbon emissions and save money (assuming time-of-use ...

Ngoc Cuong Truong, James McInerney, Long Tran-Thanh, Enrico Costanza, Sarvapali D. Ramchurn

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Identifying and Testing the Inhibitors of Technology Usage Intentions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An important area of information systems (IS) research has been the identification of the individual-level beliefs that enable technology acceptance such as the usefulness, reliability, and flexibility of a system. This study posits the existence of ... Keywords: inhibitors, nonacceptance, technology rejection, usage intentions

Ronald T. Cenfetelli; Andrew Schwarz

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Exploiting Service Usage Information for Optimizing Server Resource Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is often difficult to tune the performance of modern component-based Internet services because: (1) component middleware are complex software systems that expose several independently tuned server resource management mechanisms; (2) session-oriented ... Keywords: Internet application, client behavior, component middleware, optimization, quality-of-service, server resource management, service usage information

Alexander Totok; Vijay Karamcheti

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Fuel bundle design for enhanced usage of plutonium fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear fuel bundle includes a square array of fuel rods each having a concentration of enriched uranium and plutonium. Each rod of an interior array of the rods also has a concentration of gadolinium. The interior array of rods is surrounded by an exterior array of rods void of gadolinium. By this design, usage of plutonium in the nuclear reactor is enhanced.

Reese, Anthony P. (San Jose, CA); Stachowski, Russell E. (Fremont, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Designation of facility usage categories for Hanford Site facilities  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the Hanford Site methodology used to ensure facility compliance with the natural phenomena design criteria set forth in the US Department of Energy Orders and guidance. The current Hanford Site methodology for Usage Category designation is based on an engineered feature's safety function and on the feature's assigned Safety Class. At the Hanford Site, Safety Class assignments are deterministic in nature and are based on teh consequences of failure, without regard to the likelihood of occurrence. The report also proposes a risk-based approach to Usage Category designation, which is being considered for future application at the Hanford Site. To establish a proper Usage Category designation, the safety analysis and engineering design processes must be coupled. This union produces a common understanding of the safety function(s) to be accomplished by the design feature(s) and a sound basis for the assignment of Usage Categories to the appropriate systems, structures, and components. 4 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

Woodrich, D.D.; Ellingson, D.R.; Scott, M.A.; Schade, A.R.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Scintillation probe with photomultiplier tube saturation indicator  

SciTech Connect

A photomultiplier tube saturation indicator is formed by supplying a supplemental light source, typically an light emitting diode (LED), adjacent to the photomultiplier tube. A switch allows the light source to be activated. The light is forwarded to the photomultiplier tube by an optical fiber. If the probe is properly light tight, then a meter attached to the indicator will register the light from the LED. If the probe is no longer light tight, and the saturation indicator is saturated, no signal will be registered when the LED is activated. 2 figs.

Ruch, J.F.; Urban, D.J.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Scintillation probe with photomultiplier tube saturation indicator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photomultiplier tube saturation indicator is formed by supplying a supplemental light source, typically an light emitting diode (LED), adjacent to the photomultiplier tube. A switch allows the light source to be activated. The light is forwarded to the photomultiplier tube by an optical fiber. If the probe is properly light tight, then a meter attached to the indicator will register the light from the LED. If the probe is no longer light tight, and the saturation indicator is saturated, no signal will be registered when the LED is activated.

Ruch, Jeffrey F. (Bethel Park, PA); Urban, David J. (Glassport, PA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Attachment 7 - Solicitation Provisions.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Attachment 7 Attachment 7 1 FAR CLAUSES 52.204-7 Central Contractor Registration (Oct 2003) (a) Definitions. As used in this clause- "Central Contractor Registration (CCR) database" means the primary Government repository for Contractor information required for the conduct of business with the Government. "Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) number" means the 9-digit number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet, Inc. (D&B) to identify unique business entities. "Data Universal Numbering System +4 (DUNS+4) number" means the DUNS number assigned by D&B plus a 4-character suffix that may be assigned by a business concern. (D&B has no affiliation with this 4-character suffix.) This 4-character suffix may be assigned at the discretion

289

Flexible Network Attached Storage using Remote DMA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose to make nodes in a cluster double as compute nodes and network attached storage (NAS) nodes. This allows for a flexible and customizable storage system as the NAS control software is handled by regular workstations. The nodes can still be efficient compute nodes if networks with remote DMA capabilities are used, as such networks remove the processor from the data forwarding loop. We demonstrate this through measurements of a prototype implementation.

Jørgen S. Hansen

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Mass and fans in attached sunspaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effect of thermal storage mass on the performance of an attached sunspace is investigated for a particular design in Boston. Mass in the sunspace and in the adjoining building are compared. Performance is evaluated in terms of temperature conditions in the sunspace and delivery of useful solar heat to the adjoining building. The dependence of the results on the manner of heat delivery is studied. Both natural convection and fan-forced air flow are included.

Jones, R.W.; McFarland, R.D.; Lazarus, G.S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

A neurocomputational approach to prepositional phrase attachment ambiguity resolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A neurocomputational model based on emergent massively overlapping neural cell assemblies (CAs) for resolving prepositional phrase (PP) attachment ambiguity is described. PP attachment ambiguity is a well-studied task in natural language processing and ...

Kailash Nadh; Christian Huyck

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

DE-SOL-0005195/000002 Conformed Copy Attachment 5  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conformed Copy Attachment 5 07022013 ATTACHMENT 5 DOE Orders, Directives, Guides and Memos DOE O 142.3A, Unclassified Foreign Visits and Assignments Program The Order defines a...

293

AttachmentFlash2010-75.pdf | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5.pdf AttachmentFlash2010-75.pdf AttachmentFlash2010-75.pdf More Documents & Publications DEAR952.204-2SecrutiyClause(AUG2009)RequirementFactSheet.pdf Flash2010-75.pdf...

294

The Impact of Residential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kenworthy (1989a). Gasoline consumption and cities. Journalon Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption References Bento,Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption UCI-ITS-WP-05-1 Thomas

Golob, Thomas F; Brownstone, David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Towards sustainable material usage : time-dependent evaluation of upgrading technologies for recycling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As consumption in the US grows, so does concern about sustainable materials usage. Increasing recycling is a key component within a broad arsenal of strategies for moving towards sustainable materials usage. There are many ...

Gaustad, Gabrielle G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Residential hot water usage: A review of published metered studies. Topical report, August-December 1994  

SciTech Connect

The report presents a review of residential hot water usage studies. The studies included were published and publicly available, they measured actual hot water usage or energy usage, and they had sufficient demographic information to determine the number of people per household. The available hot water usage data were normalized to a 135 F setpoint temperature to eliminate the variations in usage caused by different water heater thermostat settings. Typical hot water usage as a function of family size was determined from linear regression analyses of the normalized metered studies` data points. A national average hot water usage of 53 gallons per day was determined from the regression analyses and census data on average household size. The review of metered studies also shows that there is no discernible difference in hot water usage for households with either electric or gas water heaters.

Paul, D.D.; Ide, B.E.; Hartford, P.A.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Audit Report on "Credit Card Usage at the Ohio Field Office and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report on "Credit Card Usage at the Ohio Field Office and the Fernald and Miamisburg Environmental Management Projects," ER-B-99-04 Audit Report on "Credit Card Usage at the Ohio...

298

Fuel bundle design for enhanced usage of plutonium fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear fuel bundle includes a square array of fuel rods each having a concentration of enriched uranium and plutonium. Each rod of an interior array of the rods also has a concentration of gadolinium. The interior array of rods is surrounded by an exterior array of rods void of gadolinium. By this design, usage of plutonium in the nuclear reactor is enhanced. 10 figs.

Reese, A.P.; Stachowski, R.E.

1995-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

299

Video game console usage and national energy consumption: Results from a field-metering study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

console usage and national energy consumption: Results fromNational Energy Consumption .Discussion National Energy Consumption Under the assumption

Desroches, Louis-Benoit

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Photoswitchable method for the ordered attachment of proteins to surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described herein is a method for the attachment of proteins to any solid support with control over the orientation of the attachment. The method is extremely efficient, not requiring the previous purification of the protein to be attached, and can be activated by UV-light. Spatially addressable arrays of multiple protein components can be generated by using standard photolithographic techniques.

Camarero, Julio A. (Livermore, CA); DeYoreo, James J. (Clayton, CA); Kwon, Youngeun (Livermore, CA)

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "usage indicators attached" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Red Storm usage model :Version 1.12.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Red Storm is an Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) funded massively parallel supercomputer located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The Red Storm Usage Model (RSUM) documents the capabilities and the environment provided for the FY05 Tri-Lab Level II Limited Availability Red Storm User Environment Milestone and the FY05 SNL Level II Limited Availability Red Storm Platform Milestone. This document describes specific capabilities, tools, and procedures to support both local and remote users. The model is focused on the needs of the ASC user working in the secure computing environments at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and SNL. Additionally, the Red Storm Usage Model maps the provided capabilities to the Tri-Lab ASC Computing Environment (ACE) requirements. The ACE requirements reflect the high performance computing requirements for the ASC community and have been updated in FY05 to reflect the community's needs. For each section of the RSUM, Appendix I maps the ACE requirements to the Limited Availability User Environment capabilities and includes a description of ACE requirements met and those requirements that are not met in that particular section. The Red Storm Usage Model, along with the ACE mappings, has been issued and vetted throughout the Tri-Lab community.

Jefferson, Karen L.; Sturtevant, Judith E.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Leveraging usage similarity for effective retrieval of examples in code repositories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Developers often learn to use APIs (Application Programming Interfaces) by looking at existing examples of API usage. Code repositories contain many instances of such usage of APIs. However, conventional information retrieval techniques fail to perform ... Keywords: api usage, code search, software information retrieval, ssi, structural semantic indexing

Sushil K. Bajracharya; Joel Ossher; Cristina V. Lopes

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

An Empirical Analysis of User Content Generation and Usage Behavior on the Mobile Internet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We quantify how user mobile Internet usage relates to unique characteristics of the mobile Internet. In particular, we focus on examining how the mobile-phone-based content generation behavior of users relates to content usage behavior. The key objective ... Keywords: content generation, content usage, geographical mobility, identification, interdependence, mobile Internet, social networks

Anindya Ghose; Sang Pil Han

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Polytechnic Institute of New York University GRAPHIC STANDARDS AND LOGO USAGE GUIDE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, some machines' memory usage are always relatively lightly-loaded (the green lines shown in the figure, and also investigate valuable statistics of machine's maximum load, queue state and relative usage levels describe dynamic metrics, such as queue state, and relative usage levels compared to capacities

Aronov, Boris

305

"Same same but different" how service contexts of mobile technologies shape usage motives and barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As wireless technologies evolve, mobile technologies and services will increasingly affect our lives, accompanied by positive and negative effects. This development requires a high acceptance of users to the presence of mobile services in various usage ... Keywords: ICT, acceptance, medical technologies, system design, usage barriers, usage motives

Katrin Arning; Sylvia Gaul; Martina Ziefle

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Attachment 9 - SCA Oregon.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

439 OR,EUGENE DE-RQ01-04ME90001 439 OR,EUGENE DE-RQ01-04ME90001 ATTACHMENT 9 WAGE DETERMINATION NO: 94-2439 REV (20) AREA: OR,EUGENE HEALTH AND WELFARE LEVEL - INSURANCE ONLY **OTHER WELFARE LEVEL WD: 94-2440** ****************************************************************************** REGISTER OF WAGE DETERMINATIONS UNDER | U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR THE SERVICE CONTRACT ACT | EMPLOYMENT STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION By direction of the Secretary of Labor | WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION | WASHINGTON D.C. 20210 | | | | Wage Determination No.: 1994-2439

307

Attachment 8 - SCA Washington.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

103 DC,DISTRICT-WIDE DE-RQ01-04ME90001 103 DC,DISTRICT-WIDE DE-RQ01-04ME90001 ATTACHMENT 8 WAGE DETERMINATION NO: 94-2103 REV (30) AREA: DC,DISTRICT-WIDE HEALTH AND WELFARE LEVEL - INSURANCE ONLY **OTHER WELFARE LEVEL WD: 94-2104** ****************************************************************************** REGISTER OF WAGE DETERMINATIONS UNDER | U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR THE SERVICE CONTRACT ACT | EMPLOYMENT STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION By direction of the Secretary of Labor | WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION | WASHINGTON D.C. 20210 | | | | Wage Determination No.: 1994-2103

308

Attachment 10 - SCA Washington.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-1183 37 Elevator Services [8] DE-RQ01-04ME90001 -1183 37 Elevator Services [8] DE-RQ01-04ME90001 ATTACHMENT 10 REGISTER OF WAGE DETERMINATIONS UNDER ³ U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR THE SERVICE CONTRACT ACT ³ EMPLOYMENT STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION By direction of the Secretary of Labor ³ WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION ³ WASHINGTON, D.C. 20210 ³ ³ William W. Gross Division of Wage ³ Wage Determination No: 1978-1183 Director Determinations ³ Revision No: 37 ³ Date Of Revision: 06/02/2003 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

309

al99-06attachment.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

------------------------------- ------------------------------- -------------------------AL-99-06[DATED 8/27/99] ATTACHMENT MODEL PROJECT AGREEMENT FOR PARTNER PROJECTS BETWEEN THE INTERNATIONAL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY CENTER, INSTITUTIONS IN THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION AND OTHER INTERESTED STATES OF THE CIS AND PARTNER/DOE NATIONAL LABORATORIES 2 PROJECT AGREEMENT between THE INTERNATIONAL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY CENTER, (NAME OF RECIPIENT), and (NAME OF PARTNER) The International Science and Technology Center (hereinafter referred to as "Center"), _____________ (name of Institute in the Russian Federation or other interested State of the Commonwealth of Independent States or CIS) (hereinafter referred to as "Recipient") and _______________ (name of Partner)

310

ATTACHMENT L-__ PAST PERFORMANCE INFORMATION QUESTIONNAIRE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PAST PERFORMANCE INFORMATION QUESTIONNAIRE PAST PERFORMANCE INFORMATION QUESTIONNAIRE COVER LETTER (JUL 2010) Date Dear:_______________ The Department of Energy is seeking your assistance on a very important procurement. __[insert name of offeror]___________________________is participating in a proposal for a DOE contract. _[insert name of offeror]____________has identified you as someone who is familiar with their past performance on similar work. We are asking you to complete the attached Past Performance Information Questionnaire to help DOE evaluate __[insert name of offeror]_________________'s past performance. We greatly appreciate your time and assistance in completing this questionnaire. In accordance with Part 15.506 of the Federal Acquisition Regulation, the names of

311

Enhanced negative ion formation via electron attachment to electronically-excited states  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent basic studies on electron attachment to laser-excited molecules show that electron attachment to electronically-excited states can have orders of magnitude larger cross sections compared to the respective ground electronic states. Even though systematic studies have not been conducted, there are indications that electronically-excited states may play a significant role in negative ion formation in gas discharges. The high-lying Rydberg states could be of particular significance since, (i) their production efficiencies are high, and (ii) they have comparatively long lifetimes. Such states could be populated in discharge sources via direct electron impact or via excitation transfer from metastable states of inert gases.

Pinnaduwage, L.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Health Sciences Research Div.]|[Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

312

HPC Usage Behavior Analysis and Performance Estimation with Machine Learning Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most researchers with little high performance computing (HPC) experience have difficulties productively using the supercomputing resources. To address this issue, we investigated usage behaviors of the world s fastest academic Kraken supercomputer, and built a knowledge-based recommendation system to improve user productivity. Six clustering techniques, along with three cluster validation measures, were implemented to investigate the underlying patterns of usage behaviors. Besides manually defining a category for very large job submissions, six behavior categories were identified, which cleanly separated the data intensive jobs and computational intensive jobs. Then, job statistics of each behavior category were used to develop a knowledge-based recommendation system that can provide users with instructions about choosing appropriate software packages, setting job parameter values, and estimating job queuing time and runtime. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of the proposed recommendation system, which included 127 job submissions by users from different research fields. Great feedback indicated the usefulness of the provided information. The average runtime estimation accuracy of 64.2%, with 28.9% job termination rate, was achieved in the experiments, which almost doubled the average accuracy in the Kraken dataset.

Zhang, Hao [ORNL; You, Haihang [ORNL; Hadri, Bilel [ORNL; Fahey, Mark R [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Microsoft Word - ATTACHMENT A Suppl 5.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ATTACHMENT A: ATTACHMENT A: Modeling in Support of Additional Two-Unit Operating Configurations Unit 1 & Unit 2 Operation - SO2 Table Mirant Potomac, Alexandria, Virginia Maximum Impacts Predicted by AERMOD-PRIME Compliance Based on Highest, Second-Highest Short-term and Highest Annual Concentrations Units 1 & 2 on 24 hrs/day @ Max load SO2 = 0.31 lb/MBtu for both units. AERMOD- PRIME Monitored Background AERMOD-PRIME + Background NAAQS Distance Direction Ground Elevation Flagpole Elevation X (m) Y (m) m deg m m 3-hour 608 238.4 847 1300 322770.8 4298791.5 182.7 349 6.1 39.6 24-hour 330 27.0 357 365 322880.8 4298542.5 102.7 133 6.7 0.0 Annual* 31 15.7 47 80 322880.8 4298542.5 102.7 133 6.7 0.0 3-hour 651 238.4 889 1300 322770.8 4298791.5 182.7 349 6.1 39.6 24-hour 327 27.0 354 365 322880.8 4298542.5 102.7 133 6.7

314

Predicting Envelope Leakage in Attached Dwellings  

SciTech Connect

The most common method for measuring air leakage is to use a single blower door to pressurize and/or depressurize the test unit. In detached housing, the test unit is the entire home and the single blower door measures air leakage to the outside. In attached housing, this 'single unit', 'total', or 'solo' test method measures both the air leakage between adjacent units through common surfaces as well air leakage to the outside. Measuring and minimizing this total leakage is recommended to avoid indoor air quality issues between units, reduce energy losses to the outside, reduce pressure differentials between units, and control stack effect. However, two significant limitations of the total leakage measurement in attached housing are: for retrofit work, if total leakage is assumed to be all to the outside, the energy benefits of air sealing can be significantly over predicted; for new construction, the total leakage values may result in failing to meet an energy-based house tightness program criterion. The scope of this research is to investigate an approach for developing a viable simplified algorithm that can be used by contractors to assess energy efficiency program qualification and/or compliance based upon solo test results.

Faakye, O.; Arena, L.; Griffiths, D.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

A PRACTICAL ONTOLOGY FOR THE LARGE-SCALE MODELING OF SCHOLARLY ARTIFACTS AND THEIR USAGE  

SciTech Connect

The large-scale analysis of scholarly artifact usage is constrained primarily by current practices in usage data archiving, privacy issues concerned with the dissemination of usage data, and the lack of a practical ontology for modeling the usage domain. As a remedy to the third constraint, this article presents a scholarly ontology that was engineered to represent those classes for which large-scale bibliographic and usage data exists, supports usage research, and whose instantiation is scalable to the order of 50 million articles along with their associated artifacts (e.g. authors and journals) and an accompanying 1 billion usage events. The real world instantiation of the presented abstract ontology is a semantic network model of the scholarly community which lends the scholarly process to statistical analysis and computational support. They present the ontology, discuss its instantiation, and provide some example inference rules for calculating various scholarly artifact metrics.

RODRIGUEZ, MARKO A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; BOLLEN, JOHAN [Los Alamos National Laboratory; VAN DE SOMPEL, HERBERT [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

316

Use of nanofiltration to reduce cooling tower water usage.  

SciTech Connect

Nanofiltration (NF) can effectively treat cooling-tower water to reduce water consumption and maximize water usage efficiency of thermoelectric power plants. A pilot is being run to verify theoretical calculations. A side stream of water from a 900 gpm cooling tower is being treated by NF with the permeate returning to the cooling tower and the concentrate being discharged. The membrane efficiency is as high as over 50%. Salt rejection ranges from 77-97% with higher rejection for divalent ions. The pilot has demonstrated a reduction of makeup water of almost 20% and a reduction of discharge of over 50%.

Sanchez, Andres L.; Everett, Randy L.; Jensen, Richard Pearson; Cappelle, Malynda A.; Altman, Susan Jeanne

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

FPGA curved track fitter with very low resource usage  

SciTech Connect

Standard least-squares curved track fitting process is tailored for FPGA implementation. The coefficients in the fitting matrices are carefully chosen so that only shift and accumulation operations are used in the process. The divisions and full multiplications are eliminated. Comparison in an application example shows that the fitting errors of the low resource usage implementation are less than 4% bigger than the fitting errors of the exact least-squares algorithm. The implementation is suitable for low-cost, low-power applications such as high energy physics detector trigger systems.

Wu, Jin-Yuan; Wang, M.; Gottschalk, E.; Shi, Z.; /Fermilab

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Research and development opportunities for improved transportation energy usage. (REDOTEUS)  

SciTech Connect

The document is a draft of the final report of the Transportation Energy Panel (TEP) prepared for the Office of Science and Technology. The report attempts to assess the relevant technology for improving the usage by the transportation sector of the energy resources of the nation. In pursuit of its study, TEP sponsored several workshops, briefings, and coordination meetings which had personnel from a variety of Federal, academic, and industrial organizations. Emphasis was given both to transportation demands and to relevant technology assessment. (GRA)

1972-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

319

Predicting Envelope Leakage in Attached Dwellings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Predicting Envelope Leakage in Predicting Envelope Leakage in Attached Dwellings Dianne Griffiths April 30, 2013 Presentation Outline * Objectives * What we accomplished last year * What we plan to do this year Why do we do blower door testing? * Compliance to some standard * Identify opportunity for reducing energy use * Identify opportunity for improving IAQ * Measure implementation verification Total (or Solo) Leakage Test P = 50 Pa P = 50 Pa P = 50 Pa P = 50 Pa Open windows, open doors, same test pressure across whole envelope. If pressure across envelope at any point is different from test pressure by less than 5 Pa, not neccessary. "Fully" Guarded Test P = 0 Pa P = 0 Pa P = 50 Pa P = 0 Pa Isolates exterior leakage What's the big deal? * How we measure depends on why we're

320

Attachment 11 - DB Washington.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DC030003 01/02/2004 DC3 DE-RQ01-04ME90001 DC030003 01/02/2004 DC3 DE-RQ01-04ME90001 ATTACHMENT 11 Superseded General Decision Number: DC020003 State: District of Columbia Construction Type: Building County: District of Columbia Statewide. BUILDING CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS (Does not include single family homes and apartments up to and including 4 stories) Modification Number Publication Date 0 06/13/2003 1 10/03/2003 2 10/31/2003 3 01/02/2004 ASBE0024-001 03/01/2003 Rates Fringes Asbestos Worker/Heat and Frost Insulator Includes application of all insulating materials, protective coverings, coatings and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "usage indicators attached" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Attachment 13 - DB Oregon.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OR030001 02/13/2004 OR1 DE-RQ01-04ME90001 OR030001 02/13/2004 OR1 DE-RQ01-04ME90001 ATTACHMENT 13 Superseded General Decision Number: OR020001 State: Oregon Construction Types: Building Counties: Baker, Benton, Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Crook, Deschutes, Gilliam, Grant, Harney, Hood River, Jackson, Jefferson, Klamath, Lake, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Malheur, Marion, Morrow, Multnomah, Polk, Sherman, Tillamook, Umatilla, Union, Wallowa, Wasco, Washington, Wheeler and Yamhill Counties in Oregon. BUILDING CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS (does not include residential construction consisting of single family homes and apartments up to and including 4 stories) Modification Number Publication Date 0 06/13/2003 1 02/06/2004

322

Attachment FY2011-55 OPAM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, Summary of Small Business 1, Summary of Small Business Administration and Department of Energy Partnership Agreement Reference: FAR 19.8 Overview Recently, the Secretary and the Administrator of the Small Business Administration (SBA) executed a Partnership Agreement to expedite the award of requirements pursuant to section 8(a) of the Small Business Act. It will remain in effect through September 30, 2012. A copy is attached. This section discusses the effects of that Partnership Agreement on the way Department of Energy (DOE) contracting officers process awards under the 8(a) Program. Background Section 8(a) of the Small Business Act provides for the award of contracts to the SBA and the award of a subcontract to a small disadvantaged businesses accepted into the SBA's 8(a)

323

Vacuum die attach for integrated circuits  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thin film eutectic bond for attaching an integrated circuit die to a circuit substrate is formed by coating at least one bonding surface on the die and substrate with an alloying metal, assembling the die and substrate under compression loading, and heating the assembly to an alloying temperature in a vacuum. A very thin bond, 10 microns or less, which is substantially void free, is produced. These bonds have high reliability, good heat and electrical conduction, and high temperature tolerance. The bonds are formed in a vacuum chamber, using a positioning and loading fixture to compression load the die, and an IR lamp or other heat source. For bonding a silicon die to a silicon substrate, a gold silicon alloy bond is used. Multiple dies can be bonded simultaneously. No scrubbing is required.

Schmitt, Edward H. (Livermore, CA); Tuckerman, David B. (Livermore, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Vacuum die attach for integrated circuits  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thin film eutectic bond for attaching an integrated circuit die to a circuit substrate is formed by coating at least one bonding surface on the die and substrate with an alloying metal, assembling the die and substrate under compression loading, and heating the assembly to an alloying temperature in a vacuum. A very thin bond, 10 microns or less, which is substantially void free, is produced. These bonds have high reliability, good heat and electrical conduction, and high temperature tolerance. The bonds are formed in a vacuum chamber, using a positioning and loading fixture to compression load the die, and an IR lamp or other heat source. For bonding a silicon die to a silicon substrate, a gold silicon alloy bond is used. Multiple dies can be bonded simultaneously. No scrubbing is required. 1 figure.

Schmitt, E.H.; Tuckerman, D.B.

1991-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

325

Attachment FY2011-30 OPAM | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waiver of Mandatory Use of the Stratetic Integrated Procurement Enterprise System (STRIPES) for Certain Purchase Card Transactions Attachment FY2011-30 OPAM More Documents &...

326

Expert Meeting Report: Cladding Attachment Over Exterior Insulation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

regarding cladding attachment over exterior insulation with a specific focus on: 1. Gravity load resistance, 2. Wind load resistance. The presentations explore these topics from...

327

Electron Attachment to Pyrimidine and Styrene in SC Ethane  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

attachment to pyrimidine (ka) was time resolved using the short pulse of the Laser-Electron Accelerator Facility (LEAF). The rate constant, ka, is large and nearly...

328

Woodfuel Usage Update 1 I Wood fuel use in Scotland 2011 I Hudson Consulting I September 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recycled fibre Energy crops, forest residues and tree stumps The first reports on wood fuel usage data hadWoodfuel Usage Update 1 I Wood fuel use in Scotland 2011 I Hudson Consulting I September 2011 Woodfuel Demand and Usage in Scotland Report 2011 #12;Woodfuel Usage Update 2 I Wood fuel use in Scotland

329

Thermal indicator for wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Minute durable plate-like thermal indicators are employed for precision measuring static and dynamic temperatures of well drilling fluids. The indicators are small enough and sufficiently durable to be circulated in the well with drilling fluids during the drilling operation. The indicators include a heat resistant indicating layer, a coacting meltable solid component and a retainer body which serves to unitize each indicator and which may carry permanent indicator identifying indicia. The indicators are recovered from the drilling fluid at ground level by known techniques.

Gaven, Jr., Joseph V. (Oakton, VA); Bak, Chan S. (Newbury Park, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from January 2000 to March 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standard, DOE-STD-1 063, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definitions of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data." 1Q CY2000, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

331

4Q CY2001 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2001 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2001 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2001 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representive Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached covering the period from October to December 2001. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standards , DOE-STD-1063, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definition of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data 4Q CY2001, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators More Documents & Publications

332

A ranking and exploration service based on large-scale usage data  

SciTech Connect

This poster presents the architecture and user interface of a prototype service that was designed to allow end-users to explore the s tructure of science and perform assessments of scholarly impact on the basis of large-scale usage data. The underlying usage data set was constructed by the NIESUR project which collected 1 billion usage events from a wide range of publishers, aggregators and institutional consortia.

Bollen, Johan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Van De Sompel, Herbert L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Balakireva, Lyudmila L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chute, Ryan M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Department of Energy Federal Acquisition Regulation Clause Usage Guide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Type of Contract: FP SUP Fixed-Price Supply CR SUP Cost-Reimbursement Supply FP SVC Fixed-Price Service CR SVC Cost Reimbursement Service FP CON Fixed-Price Construction CR CON Cost Reimbursement Construction T&M LH Time & Material, Labor Hours FP A-E Fixed Price Architect-Engineer CR A-E Cost Reimbursement Architect-Engineer Comm. Items Commercial Items M&O Management & Operating Other Fac. Mgmt. Other Facility Management SAP Simplified Acquisition Procedures Clause Usage R Required A Required When Applicable NA Not Applicable Provision or Clause (Click on clause number to see its text and prescription FP Sup. CR Sup. FP Serv. Cost Serv. FP Cons. Cost Cons. T&M. L.H. FP A- E Cost A-E Com. Items. M&O Other

334

Trends in Building Energy Usage in Texas State Agencies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In late 1983, a cost containment program was initiated out of the governor's office directed at the major state agencies. The Energy Management Group at Texas A&M University provided technical expertise in obtaining agency energy usage and cost figures for the fiscal years 1981 to 1983. While there is considerable diversity from agency to agency, the trend is toward dramatically higher energy cost per square foot for virtually all agencies. This alarming trend can be partially explained by rising unit costs for gas and electricity and a lack of incentives for conservation efforts due to the method of utility budget allocations. A building standard signed into law in 1976 could have reduced energy consumption, but was never enforced. Beginning in fiscal year 1986, universities will be allowed to comingle utility money with capital operating money so that conservation can really pay off for them.

Murphy, W. E.; Turner, W. D.; O'Neal, D. L.; Seshan, S.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Commercial Building HVAC Energy Usage in Semi-Tropical Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design of heating and cooling equipment in semi-tropical climates presents some design considerations and limitations not so prevalent in temperate climates. In some cases, the heating season may be non-existent for all practical purposes. Another consideration is the high ventilation loads due to cooling the moist air prevalent in semi-tropical climates. This paper describes a computer program which assesses all the pertinent variables which comprise the annual heating and cooling energy requirements for commercial buildings. It is then suggested that this computer program would be valuable in determining the changes one could expect in annual energy usage by varying certain building design parameters. Secondly, a small office building actually constructed in Central Florida in which the author designed the Heating and Cooling HVAC system is described. Tradeoffs are presented showing the effects of changes in these building design parameters.

Worbs, H. E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Security Implications of Typical Grid Computing Usage Scenarios  

SciTech Connect

A Computational Grid is a collection of heterogeneous computers and resources spread across multiple administrative domains with the intent of providing users uniform access to these resources. There are many ways to access the resources of a Computational Grid, each with unique security requirements and implications for both the resource user and the resource provider. A comprehensive set of Grid usage scenarios are presented and analyzed with regard to security requirements such as authentication, authorization, integrity, and confidentiality. The main value of these scenarios and the associated security discussions are to provide a library of situations against which an application designer can match, thereby facilitating security-aware application use and development from the initial stages of the application design and invocation. A broader goal of these scenarios are to increase the awareness of security issues in Grid Computing.

Humphrey, Marty; Thompson, Mary R.

2001-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

337

Skin Effect of Hf-Rich Melts and Some Aspects in its Usage for Hf ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

USAGE FOR Hf-CONTAINING. CAST NICKEL- ... of advanced gas turbines. ... were polished by metallo- graphy and then melted by tungsten inert gas(TIG).

338

Video game console usage and national energy consumption: Results from a field-metering study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and energy savings potential of video game consoles in thethe energy efficiency of video game consoles. NaturalVideo game console usage and national energy consumption:

Desroches, Louis-Benoit

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Availability, usage and expected contribution of potential nursery habitats for the California halibut  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a damsel?sh re?ect availability of suitable habitat.locate/ecss Availability, usage and expected contribution ofthe spatial coverage (availability) of all potential nursery

Fodrie, Fredrick Joel; Mendoza, Guillermo F.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Network effects, economic efficiency, and usage-based pricing for internet access.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper attempts to shed some light on the issue of net neutrality by examining the extent to which Internet usage is efficiently allocated under… (more)

Cooper, Matthew L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "usage indicators attached" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

The Impact of Residential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DC. Steiner, R.L. (1994). Residential density and traveland Brownstone The Impact of Residential Density on VehicleUsage Total annual residential vehicular energy consumption

Golob, Thomas F.; Brownstone, David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

The Impact of Residential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kenworthy (1989a). Gasoline consumption and cities. JournalVehicle Usage and Energy Consumption Table 2 Housing Unitsvehicular energy consumption is graphed as a function of

Golob, Thomas F.; Brownstone, David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Git usage — FiPy 3.0.1-dev157-g518df83 documentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Join our mailing list. 100 Bureau Drive, M/S 6555 Gaithersburg, MD 20899 301-975-5329 Telephone 301-975-4553 Facsimile. Git usage¶. ...

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

344

Energy Usage Evaluation and Condition Monitoring for Electric Machines using Wireless Sensor Networks.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Energy usage evaluation and condition monitoring for electric machines are important in industry for overall energy savings. Traditionally these functions are realized only for large… (more)

Lu, Bin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Alternative Solar Indices  

SciTech Connect

Possible alternative Solar Indices which could either be a perturbation from the currently defined Solar Index or possible indices based on current technologies for other media markets are discussed. An overview is given of the current project, including the logic that was utilized in defining its current structure and then alternative indices and definitions are presented and finally, recommendations are made for adopting alternative indices.

Lantz, L.J.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Electron attachment fo halocarbons of interest in gaseous dielectrics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Total electron attachment rate constants and cross sections for halomethane and haloethane (freon) compounds are summarized and new results are reported for haloethylenes. The relationship between the electron attachment cross section and the breakdown strength of dielectric gases reported earlier is further discussed.

McCorkle, D.L.; Christodoulides, A.A.; Christophorou, L.G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

3Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representive Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached covering the period from July to September 2002. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standards , DOE-STD-1063-2000, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definition of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data. The percentage of fully qualified Facility Representatives in the DOE complex

348

2Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representive Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached covering the period from April to June 2002. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standards , DOE-STD-1063-2000, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definition of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data. Overall, the percentage of fully qualified Facility Representatives increased to 80% last quarter, from 78% the previous quarter , and

349

1Q CY2000, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May May 9,2000 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: .yc,..,%$'! L.W.T oseph Arango, Facl ity Representative Program Manager (S-3.1) SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from January 2000 to March 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standard, DOE-STD-1 063, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definitions of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data. You will note that the indicators show the attrition of five Facility Representatives from the program during this reporting period. Of those five, two were promoted

350

MAXIMUM HUMIDITY INDICATOR  

SciTech Connect

Moisture-sensitive systems to measure and indicate the maximum level of humidity exposure are discussed. A chemical indicator utilizing deliquescent salts and water-soluble dyes provides an irreversible color change at discrete levels of relative humidity. To provide indication of the time at which the exposure occurs, a circuit employing a resistive-type sensor was developed. A small, commercially available sensor is used in a portable probe to detect humidity leaks into controlled areas.

Abel, W B

1974-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Performance indicators - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 17, 2009 ... Low energy consumption (MWh/t) ... 1) Define individual performance indicators. 2) Develop .... Required to face Alma high intensity low energy ...

352

Synonymous Codon Usage in Escherichia coli: Selection for Translational Nina Stoletzki* and Adam Eyre-Walker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

usage. Genetics. 129:897­907. Bu¨rger R, Willensdorfer M, Nowak MA. 2006. Why are pheno- typic mutationSynonymous Codon Usage in Escherichia coli: Selection for Translational Accuracy Nina Stoletzki that produce non- or misfunctional proteins are costly to the cell because they consume amino acids and energy

Eyre-Walker, Adam

353

Using historical accounting information to predict the resource usage of grid jobs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Basing job scheduling decisions on estimated queue wait times may help in efficiently balancing the workload on the grid. Previous work on usage prediction has mainly described methods for the estimation of queue wait times on clusters and supercomputers, ... Keywords: Grid accounting, Resource usage prediction, Workload analysis

Rosario M. Piro; Andrea Guarise; Giuseppe Patania; Albert Werbrouck

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Summarizing observational client-side data to reveal web usage patterns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Client-side event logs may reveal patterns of usage of Web pages. Nevertheless, extracting useful and novel information from this voluminous data set is a challenge for evaluation tools, since a few minutes simple task may result in a sequence of hundreds ... Keywords: client-side event logs, usage patterns, websites evaluation tool

Vagner Figuerêdo de Santana; M. Cecília C. Baranauskas

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Towards purpose enforcement model for privacy-aware usage control policy in distributed healthcare  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enforcing the purpose of data usage means to ensure that data are used as it intends for and that excessive usage cannot happen. In general, the enforcement of purpose is a complicated task. The main difficulty is to identify the purpose of an agent ...

Annanda Thavymony Rath; Jean-Noël Colin

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Reducing Energy Usage of NULL Convention Logic Circuits using NULL Cycle Reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in approximately 25% overall lower energy usage. Keywords: asynchronous circuits; NULL Convention Logic (NCL); NULLReducing Energy Usage of NULL Convention Logic Circuits using NULL Cycle Reduction Combined with Supply Voltage Scaling Brett Sparkman and Scott C. Smith Department of Electrical Engineering, University

Smith, Scott C.

357

2Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2008. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 87% Fully Qualifed ( last quarter was 85%) 86% Staffing Level ( last quarter was 88%)

358

3Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. A summary of this quarters data concluded: 76% fully qualified 41% staffing level

359

2Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to impove the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 74% Fully Qualified 94% Staffing Level ( last quarter was

360

4Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. A summary of this quarters data concluded: 72% Fully Qualified ( last Quarter was

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "usage indicators attached" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Battery condition indicator  

SciTech Connect

A battery condition indicator is described for indicating both the charge used and the life remaining in a rechargeable battery comprising: rate multiplying and counting means for indirectly measuring the charge useed by the battery between charges; means for supplying variable rate clock pulse to the rate multiplying and counting means, the rate of the clock pulses being a function of whether a high current consumption load is connected to the battery or not; timing means for measuring the total time in service of the battery; charge used display means responsive to the rate multiplying and counting means for providing an indication of the charge remaining in the battery; and age display means responsive to the timing means for providing an indication of the life or age of the battery.

Fernandez, E.A.

1987-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

362

4Q CY2000, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 February 26,2001 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: seph Arango, Facility Representative Program Manager (S-3.1) SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from October to December 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standard, 063, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definitions of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data. I intend to continue to provide this summary information to you quarterly. These provide

363

Irreversible humidity indicator  

SciTech Connect

This patent relates to a humidity indicator having particles of colored dye distributed over the surface of a dry, deliquescent salt of a neutral color. When exposed to a humidity level above that which causes deliquescence of the salt, the dye bleeds through and imparts its developed tincture to the resulting saturated salt solution. On dehydration, the dye remains infused throughout the dried salt to present an irreversible indication of the humidity exposure. (auth)

Reif, R.B.; Kurz, P.F.

1975-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

364

Vehicle battery polarity indicator  

SciTech Connect

Battery jumper cables provide an effective means to connect a charged battery to a discharged battery. However, the electrodes of the batteries must be properly connected for charging to occur and to avoid damage to the batteries. A battery polarity indicator is interposed between a set of battery jumper cables to provide a visual/aural indication of relative battery polarity as well as a safety circuit to prevent electrical connection where polarities are reversed.

Cole, L.

1980-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

365

Attachment F: Summary Checklist of Model AIP Provisions and Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

F: Summary Checklist of Model AIP Provisions and Program F: Summary Checklist of Model AIP Provisions and Program Policies Attachment F: Summary Checklist of Model AIP Provisions and Program Policies Summary Checklist of Model AIP Provisions and Program Policies In response to concerns expressed by DOE and State AIP program representatives, the Office of Environmental Activities has developed a list of mandatory and non-mandatory model language provisions for new and renegotiated AIPs. The underlying concepts for the mandatory provisions are set forth in Attachment A. Other program policies are set forth in a question and answer format in Attachment B. The texts of the optional provisions and mandatory provisions that may be applicable are provided in Attachments C and D respectively. Suggested language related to emergency

366

Property:NEPA ApplicationAttachments | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ApplicationAttachments ApplicationAttachments Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NEPA ApplicationAttachments Property Type Page Description FONSI files for NEPA Docs. For example: Cover letters, Plan of Operations, Maps. This is a property of type Page. It links to pages that use the form NEPA_Doc. Pages using the property "NEPA ApplicationAttachments" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) D DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0030-CX + 87401 - Proposed Action.pdf +, 87402 - Proposed Action.pdf +, 87400 - Proposed Action.pdf +, ... DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2010-0008-CX + 88211 - Proposed Action.pdf + DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2011-0514-EA + Figure 1 Project Location 032111.pdf +, Figure 2 Project Boundary Leases and Land Status 032111.pdf +, Figure 3 Proposed Disturbance 060211.pdf +, ...

367

Expert Meeting Report: Cladding Attachment Over Exterior Insulation |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cladding Attachment Over Exterior Insulation Cladding Attachment Over Exterior Insulation Expert Meeting Report: Cladding Attachment Over Exterior Insulation The addition of insulation to the exterior of buildings is an effective means of increasing the thermal resistance of both wood framed walls as well as mass masonry wall assemblies. The location of the insulation to the exterior of the structure has many direct benefits including better effective R-value from reduced thermal bridging, better condensation resistance, reduced thermal stress on the structure, as well as other commonly associated improvements such as increased air tightness and improved water management (Hutcheon 1964, Lstiburek 2007). The intent of the meeting was to review the current state of industry knowledge regarding cladding attachment over exterior insulation with a specific focus on: 1.

368

Attachment E: Emergency Response Activities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Attachment E: Emergency Response Activities Attachment E: Emergency Response Activities Attachment E: Emergency Response Activities Emergency Response Activities States may or may not elect to fund emergency management activities with AIP money. If they do, the AIP should include an Emergency Management section. This section may be implemented at any time - when the AIP is first negotiated, at renewal, or through amendment. This Attachment provides examples of items that might be appropriate in an AIP's Emergency Management section (most have come directly from existing AIPs). These items should be considered neither requirements or restrictions. Since funding is not available to support all of these activities, the AIP should be tailored to reflect the State's most urgent and realistic needs in order

369

Bicycle-powered attachments : designing for developing countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are 550 million smallholder farmers around the world who earn less than $1/day who could benefit from pedal-powered attachments. This project discusses factors to consider in designing for developing countries and ...

Wu, Jodie (Jodie Z.)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Electron attachment to chlorine azide at 298 and 400 K  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electron attachment to chlorine azide (ClN{sub 3}) was studied using a flowing-afterglow Langmuir-probe apparatus. Electron attachment rates were measured to be 3.5x10{sup -8} and 4.5x10{sup -8} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} at 298 and 400 K, respectively, with an estimated 35% absolute accuracy. Cl{sup -} was the sole ion product of the attachment reaction; weak ion signals were observed for other anions and attributed to impurities and secondary ion-molecule reactions. Assuming a relative uncertainty of {+-}10% for these data, an activation energy for the attachment reaction may be given as 24{+-}10 meV.

Freel, Keith; Friedman, Jeffrey F.; Miller, Thomas M.; Viggiano, A. A. [Space Vehicles Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, 29 Randolph Road, Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts 01731-3010 (United States); Heaven, Michael C. [Department of Chemistry, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

2010-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

371

Attachment A: AIP Program Principles (Questions and Answers 1-12) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A: AIP Program Principles (Questions and Answers 1-12) A: AIP Program Principles (Questions and Answers 1-12) Attachment A: AIP Program Principles (Questions and Answers 1-12) AIP Program Principles This attachment contains twelve questions and answers that designate the mandatory AIP provisions that shall be included in new and renegotiated agreements and discusses the principles underlying these requirements. Headquarters approval is required if mandatory language is not included in a new or renegotiated AIP. Question #1: Can States use AIP funds to support State regulatory activities? Answer: No, States cannot use AIP funds to support their regulatory activities. The Office of Management and Budget and the Department's congressional oversight committees have consistently indicated that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the states are required to use their current

372

Attachment of radon progeny to cigarette-smoke aerosols  

SciTech Connect

The daughter products of radon gas are now recognized as a significant contributor to radiation exposure to the general public. It is also suspected that a synergistic effect exists with the combination cigarette smoking and radon exposure. We have conducted an experimental investigation to determine the physical nature of radon progeny interactions with cigarette smoke aerosols. The size distributions of the aerosols are characterized and attachment rates of radon progeny to cigarette-smoke aerosols are determined. Both the mainstream and sidestream portions of the smoke aerosol are investigated. Unattached radon progeny are very mobile and, in the presence of aerosols, readily attach to the particle surfaces. In this study, an aerosol chamber is used to contain the radon gas, progeny and aerosol mixture while allowing the attachment process to occur. The rate of attachment is dependent on the size distribution, or diffusion coefficient, of the radon progeny as well as the aerosol size distribution. The size distribution of the radon daughter products is monitored using a graded-screen diffusion battery. The diffusion battery also enables separation of the unattached radon progeny from those attached to the aerosol particles. Analysis of the radon decay products is accomplished using alpha spectrometry. The aerosols of interest are size fractionated with the aid of a differential mobility analyzer and cascade impactor. The measured attachment rates of progeny to the cigarette smoke are compared to those found in similar experiments using an ambient aerosol. The lowest attachment coefficients observed, {approximately}10{sup {minus}6} cm{sup 3}/s, occurred for the ambient aerosol. The sidestream and mainstream smoke aerosols exhibited higher attachment rates in that order. The results compared favorably with theories describing the coagulation process of aerosols.

Biermann, A.H.; Sawyer, S.R.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Performance estimates for attached-sunspace passive solar heated buildings  

SciTech Connect

Performance predictions have been made for attached-sunspace types of passively solar heated buildings. The predictions are based on hour-by-hour computer simulations using computer models developed in the framework of PASOLE, the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) passive solar energy simulation program. The models have been validated by detailed comparison with actual hourly temperature measurements taken in attached-sunspace test rooms at LASL.

McFarland, R.D.; Jones, R.W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Policy_Flash_2011-59__Attachment.pdf | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

011-59Attachment.pdf PolicyFlash2011-59Attachment.pdf More Documents & Publications PartnershipAgreementsTraining&0; Attachment FY2011-28 OPAM OPAM Policy Acquisition Guides...

375

Attachment 4 Volume III Pricing Matrix for Phase-in Period.xls...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Attachment 4 Volume III Pricing Matrix for Phase-in Period.xls&0; Attachment 4 Volume III Pricing Matrix for Phase-in Period.xls&0; Attachment 4 Volume III Pricing Matrix for...

376

Enzymatic temperature change indicator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A temperature change indicator is described which is composed of an enzyme and a substrate for that enzyme suspended in a solid organic solvent or mixture of solvents as a support medium. The organic solvent or solvents are chosen so as to melt at a specific temperature or in a specific temperature range. When the temperature of the indicator is elevated above the chosen, or critical temperature, the solid organic solvent support will melt, and the enzymatic reaction will occur, producing a visually detectable product which is stable to further temperature variation.

Klibanov, Alexander M. (Newton, MA); Dordick, Jonathan S. (Iowa City, IA)

1989-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

377

Evaluation of the impact of solder die attach versus epoxy die attach in a state of the art power package  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Subject of this paper is the thermal investigation of epoxy (EDA) and solder (SDA) die attaches by a comparison of an ASIC with multiple heat sources in different package assemblies. Static and transient thermal measurements and simulations were performed to investigate the thermal behavior of two samples in a state of the art QFP power package differing only in the die attach material (EDA and SDA).

J. Czernohorsky; B. Maj; Matthias Viering; L. Wright; G. Balanon

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

378

Attachment A: Modeling in Support of Additional Two-Unit Operating...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Attachment A: Modeling in Support of Additional Two-Unit Operating Configurations Attachment A: Modeling in Support of Additional Two-Unit Operating Configurations Docket No....

379

Energy consumption and usage characteristics from field measurements of residential dishwashers, clothes washers and clothes dryers  

SciTech Connect

The measured energy consumption and usage characteristics for household dishwashers, clothes washers, and clothes dryers for ten townhouses at Twin Rivers, N.J., are presented. Whenever the dishwashers and/or clothes washers were in use, the energy consumption, water consumption, frequency of usage, and water temperature were measured by a data acquisition system. The electrical energy of electric clothes dryers and the gas consumption of gas clothes dryers were measured, as well as their frequency and duration of use, and exhaust temperature. Typical household usage patterns of these major appliances are included.

Chang, Y.L.; Grot, R.A.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Survey and update of F-14a mission profiles for TF30 engine usage. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The mission profiles and maintenance procedures relating to the TF30-P-412 engines have been investigated to find out whether an observed reduction in engine usage was due to different aircraft missions or new flight procedures. A survey of fleet squadron personnel revealed mission profiles are essentially the same; however, fewer air combat engagements and landing practices account for the lower usage. The F-14 role is now more evenly distributed between air combat and intercepts, while the total number of these missions remains constant. A future advanced technology engine in this aircraft is likely to encounter higher usage requirements if there are no throttle cycle restrictions.

Cote, S.M.

1982-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "usage indicators attached" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Woodfuel Usage Update 1 I Wood fuel use in Scotland 2010 I Hudson Consulting I October 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

woodfuel usage in the commercial, industrial and electrical energy sectors of the Scottish market) to 30 of electrical energy generation, was paramount in the initial survey and remains so. Total woodfuel usageWoodfuel Usage Update 1 I Wood fuel use in Scotland 2010 I Hudson Consulting I October 2010

382

Vermont Climate Change Indicators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate change indicators are developed for Vermont in recent decades based on the trends in freeze dates, the length of the growing season, the frozen period of small lakes, and the onset of spring. These trends, which show a consistent pattern ...

Alan K. Betts

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Energy Efficiency Indicators Methodology Booklet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Intensity Indicators .related policies. Energy intensity indicators are used forStructure of US Energy Intensity Indicators Sectors Industry

Sathaye, Jayant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

LEADING WITH LEADING INDICATORS  

SciTech Connect

This paper documents Fluor Hanford's use of Leading Indicators, management leadership, and statistical methodology in order to improve safe performance of work. By applying these methods, Fluor Hanford achieved a significant reduction in injury rates in 2003 and 2004, and the improvement continues today. The integration of data, leadership, and teamwork pays off with improved safety performance and credibility with the customer. The use of Statistical Process Control, Pareto Charts, and Systems Thinking and their effect on management decisions and employee involvement are discussed. Included are practical examples of choosing leading indicators. A statistically based color coded dashboard presentation system methodology is provided. These tools, management theories and methods, coupled with involved leadership and employee efforts, directly led to significant improvements in worker safety and health, and environmental protection and restoration at one of the nation's largest nuclear cleanup sites.

PREVETTE, S.S.

2005-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

385

Battery capacity indicator  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a battery capacity indicator for providing a continuous indication of battery capacity for a battery powered device. It comprises means for periodically effecting a first and a second positive discharge rate of the battery; voltage measurement means, for measuring the battery terminal voltage at the first and second positive discharge rates during the operation of the device, and for generating a differential battery voltage value in response thereto; memory means for storing a set of predetermined differential battery voltage values and a set of predetermined battery capacity values, each of the set of predetermined differential battery voltage values defining one of the set of predetermined battery capacity values; comparison means, coupled to the memory means and to the voltage measurement means, for comparing the measured differential battery voltage values with the set of predetermined differential battery voltage values, and for selecting the predetermined battery capacity value corresponding thereto.

Kunznicki, W.J.

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

386

RECS Fuel Oil Usage Form_v1 (Draft).xps  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

fuel oil usage for this delivery address between September 2008 and April 2010. Delivery Number Enter the Delivery Date for each delivery 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Enter the Total...

387

The Impact of Residential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DC. Steiner, R.L. (1994). Residential density and traveland Brownstone The Impact of Residential Density on VehicleWP-05-1 The Impact of Residential Density on Vehicle Usage

Golob, Thomas F; Brownstone, David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

arXiv.org help - 2010 Institutional arXiv Usage Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Institutional arXiv Usage Data The following table is a compilation of arXiv downloads for calendar year 2010 for the 200 heaviest user institutions. See also arXiv Support....

389

arXiv.org help - 2012 Institutional arXiv Usage Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Institutional arXiv Usage Data The following table is a compilation of arXiv downloads for calendar year 2012 for the 200 heaviest user institutions. See also arXiv Support....

390

arXiv.org help - 2009 Institutional arXiv Usage Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Institutional arXiv Usage Data The following table is a compilation of arXiv downloads for calendar year 2009 for the 200 heaviest user institutions. See also arXiv Support....

391

arXiv.org help - 2011 Institutional arXiv Usage Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Institutional arXiv Usage Data The following table is a compilation of arXiv downloads for calendar year 2011 for the 200 heaviest user institutions. See also arXiv Support....

392

Horses and Barn Doors: Evolution of Corporate Guidelines for Internet Usage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intel's Internet usage policy evolved from paractically non-existant to explicitly defined - all in reaction to changing conditions and security threats. This paper covers the evolution of Intel Internet access policy, a continual struggle to close the ...

Sally Hambridge; Jeffrey C. Sedayao

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

3Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from July to September 2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the facility Representative Program. 3Q CY2003, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators More Documents & Publications 2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

394

2Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. 2Q CY2006, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators More Documents & Publications 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

395

Annual fuel usage charts for oil-fired boilers. [Building space heating and hot water supplies  

SciTech Connect

On the basis of laboratory-determined boiler efficiency data, one may calculate the annual fuel usage (AFU) for any oil-fired boiler, serving a structure of a given design heat load, for any specified hourly weather pattern. Further, where data are available regarding the energy recapture rates of the strucutre due to direct gain solar energy (windows), lighting, cooking, electrical appliances, metabolic processes, etc., the annual fuel usage savings due to such (re) capture are straightforwardly determinable. Employing the Brookhaven National Laboratory annual fuel usage formulation, along with efficiency data determined in the BNL Boiler Laboratory, computer-drawn annual fuel usage charts can be generated for any selected boiler for a wide range of operating conditions. For two selected boilers operating in any one of the hour-by-hour weather patterns which characterize each of six cities over a wide range of firing rates, domestic hot water consumption rates, design heat loads, and energy (re) capture rates, annual fuel usages are determined and graphically presented. Figures 1 to 98, inclusive, relate to installations for which energy recapture rates are taken to be zero. Figures 97 to 130, inclusive, apply to a range of cases for which energy recapture rates are nonzero and determinable. In all cases, simple, direct and reliable annual fuel usage values can be determined by use of charts and methods such as those illustrated.

Berlad, A.L.; Yeh, Y.J.; Salzano, F.J.; Hoppe, R.J.; Batey, J.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Tamper-indicating seal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is disclosed a tamper-indicating seal that permits in the field inspection and detection of tampering. Said seal comprises a shrinkable tube having a visible pattern of markings which is shrunk over th item to be sealed, and a second transparent tube, having a second visible marking pattern, which is shrunk over the item and the first tube. The relationship between the first and second set of markings produces a pattern so that the seal may not be removed without detection. The seal is particularly applicable to UF/sub 6/ cylinder valves.

Fiarman, S.; Degen, M.F.; Peters, H.F.

1982-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

397

Attachment D: Mandatory Provisions if Applicable | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

D: Mandatory Provisions if Applicable D: Mandatory Provisions if Applicable Attachment D: Mandatory Provisions if Applicable Mandatory Provisions if Applicable This attachment contains provisions that may be mandatory for an AIP if the State: (1) chooses to develop an emergency response program but does not want to use the suggested language in Attachment E; (2) receives DOE grant funding for both AIP and monitoring activities conducted under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA); and (3) if the parties anticipate that a state's sampling activities will generate hazardous waste mixed with radioactive materials. If emergency response activities will be included in a new or renegotiated AIP but the AIP does not incorporate the suggested model provisions related

398

Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) Attachment, Integrated Safety Analysis |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) Attachment, Integrated Safety Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) Attachment, Integrated Safety Analysis Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) Attachment, Integrated Safety Analysis This paper addresses why the use of an Integrated Safety Analysis ("ISA") is appropriate for fuel recycling facilities1 which would be licensed under new regulations currently being considered by NRC. The use of the ISA for fuel facilities under Part 70 is described and compared to the use of a Probabilistic Risk Assessment ("PRA") for reactor facilities. A basis is provided for concluding that future recycling facilities - which will possess characteristics similar to today's fuel cycle facilities and distinct from reactors - can best be assessed using established qualitative or semi-quantitative ISA techniques to achieve and

399

Attachment H: Delegation of Authority Memorandum | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Attachment H: Delegation of Authority Memorandum Attachment H: Delegation of Authority Memorandum Attachment H: Delegation of Authority Memorandum United States Department of Energy Memorandum DATE: August 14, 1994 REPLY TO ATTN OF: EM-16 SUBJECT: Delegation of Authority TO: Manager, DOE Operations Offices Manager, Fernald Field Office Manager, Rocky Flats Office Manager, Golden Office On April 21, 1994, a memorandum delegating certain authorities related to financial assistance agreements was sent to you. I am expanding the original delegation to include additional categories of financial assistance to facilitate and streamline the award process. Relevant portions of the original memorandum and modifications are provided below. In accordance with provisions of the Financial Assistance Rules, the Office of Environmental Management (EM) has determined that providing EM funding

400

Home Consumer Perceptions about Landscape Water Conservation and Relationships with Historical Usage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water is considered to be one of the most limited and precious resources on Earth. Due to this scarcity, water conservation has become essential in order to preserve water resources. Landscape plant material brings quality to urban and suburban lifestyles and increases value to home properties. Yet it has been shown that an excess amount of water is often applied to landscapes when the plant material does not in fact need the supplemental irrigation. A researcher based survey, the Landscape Water Conservation Survey, was sent to 799 single family homes in the College Station, TX. Data collection occurred from November 2005 through August 2006 with a 27% return. The survey asked the recipients 14 questions on water use and home consumers? perceptions. Historical landscape water usage was compiled from 2000-2002 which included actual water use, taxable value, of the residence, heated area, and the water meter identification number for these selected households supplied by The City of College Station Water Utilities. The survey indicates a strong disconnect between the amount of irrigation landscape plant materials need and the quantity of water that is actually applied. Surveyed home consumer perceptions demonstrate excessive amounts of irrigation were normally applied to landscape plant material when no irrigation was needed due to rainfall. Many respondents to The Landscape Water Management Survey indicated that they believed to have efficient irrigation practices in place when in actuality they do not. Educational resources are needed to teach the public on the amounts of irrigation landscape plant materials actually need, how to apply measured home irrigation practices, the principles of water conservation, and meeting the water requirements of varied landscape plant material. If these could be established and implemented, there would be a higher rate of conserving water and providing plant material with the sufficient amount of irrigation required.

Milberger, Whitney F.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "usage indicators attached" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

PolFlash10-31_attach2.pdf | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

attach2.pdf PolFlash10-31attach2.pdf PolFlash10-31attach2.pdf More Documents & Publications OPAM Policy Acquisition Guides PolFlash10-31attach1.pdf PolFlash10-31...

402

Microsoft Word - AL2000-05Attachment.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Attachment to Attachment to AL-2000-05 (05/17/00) MODEL PROJECT AGREEMENT FOR PARTNER PROJECTS BETWEEN THE THE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY CENTER IN UKRAINE, INSTITUTIONS IN UKRAINE AND OTHER INTERESTED STATES OF THE CIS PARTNER/DOE NATIONAL LABORATORIES Παγε 1 οφ 49 PROJECT AGREEMENT between THE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY CENTER IN UKRAINE, (NAME OF RECIPIENT), and (NAME OF PARTNER) The Science and Technology Center in Ukraine (hereinafter referred to as "Center"), ______________________ (name of Institute in Ukraine or other interested State of the Commonwealth of Independent States or CIS) (hereinafter referred to as "Recipient") and ______________________ (name of Partner) (hereinafter referred to as "Partner"),

403

Microsoft Word - Policy Flash 2010-73 Attachment 5  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Attachment L-___ Past Performance Information Questionnaire (JUL 2010) Attachment L-___ Past Performance Information Questionnaire (JUL 2010) 4 = Outstanding Performance was substantially and consistently above contract requirements. Contractor displayed an overall superior understanding of contract requirements, and used innovative approaches leading to enhanced performance. 3 = Good Performance was above minimum contract requirements. Contractor displayed a thorough understanding of contract requirements. 2 = Satisfactory Performance met minimum contract requirements. 1 = Marginal Performance was below minimum contract requirements. Contractor displayed a lack of thorough understanding of contract requirements in one or more significant performance areas. 0 = Unsatisfactory Performance completely failed to meet the minimum contract requirements.

404

Apparatus for attaching a cleaning tool to a robotic manipulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of an apparatus for connecting a cleaning tool to a robotic manipulator so that the tool can be used in contaminated areas on horizontal, vertical and sloped surfaces. The apparatus comprises a frame and a handle, with casters on the frame to facilitate movement. The handle is pivotally and releasibly attached to the frame at a preselected position of a plurality of attachment positions. The apparatus is specifically configured for the KELLY VACUUM SYSTEM but can be modified for use with any standard mobile robot and cleaning tool.

Killian, M.A.; Zollinger, W.T.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Interface structure for hub and mass attachment in flywheel rotors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An interface structure is described for hub and mass attachment in flywheel rotors. The interface structure efficiently transmits high radial compression forces and withstands both large circumferential elongation and local stresses generated by mass-loading and hub attachments. The interface structure is comprised of high-strength fiber, such as glass and carbon, woven into an angle pattern which is about 45{degree} with respect to the rotor axis. The woven fiber is bonded by a ductile matrix material which is compatible with and adheres to the rotor material. This woven fiber is able to elongate in the circumferential direction to match the rotor growth during spinning. 2 figs.

Deteresa, S.J.; Groves, S.E.

1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

406

Interface structure for hub and mass attachment in flywheel rotors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An interface structure for hub and mass attachment in flywheel rotors. The interface structure efficiently transmits high radial compression forces and withstands both large circumferential elongation and local stresses generated by mass-loading and hub attachments. The interface structure is comprised of high-strength fiber, such as glass and carbon, woven into an angle pattern which is about 45.degree. with respect to the rotor axis. The woven fiber is bonded by a ductile matrix material which is compatible with and adheres to the rotor material. This woven fiber is able to elongate in the circumferential direction to match the rotor growth during spinning.

Deteresa, Steven J. (Livermore, CA); Groves, Scott E. (Brentwood, CA)

1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

407

Positioning and locking device for fuel pin to grid attachment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A positioning and locking device for fuel pin to grid attachment provides an inexpensive means of positively positioning and locking the individual fuel pins which make up the driver fuel assemblies used in nuclear reactors. The device can be adapted for use with a currently used attachment grid assembly design and insures that the pins remain in their proper position throughout the in-reactor life of the assembly. This device also simplifies fuel bundle assembly in that a complete row of fuel pins can be added to the bundle during each step of assembly.

Frick, Thomas M. (Irwin, PA); Wineman, Arthur L. (Greensburg, PA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Reliability Testing the Die-Attach of CPV Cell Assemblies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results and progress are reported for a course of work to establish an efficient reliability test for the die-attach of CPV cell assemblies. Test vehicle design consists of a ~1 cm2 multijunction cell attached to a substrate via several processes. A thermal cycling sequence is developed in a test-to-failure protocol. Methods of detecting a failed or failing joint are prerequisite for this work; therefore both in-situ and non-destructive methods, including infrared imaging techniques, are being explored as a method to quickly detect non-ideal or failing bonds.

Bosco, N.; Sweet, C.; Kurtz, S.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Total U.S. Housing Units.................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Space Heating Usage Indicators Million U.S. Housing Units Detached Attached Energy Information...

410

TableHC2.13.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 0.3 Q Q Q N N Type of Housing Unit Lighting Usage Indicators Detached Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Table...

411

1Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March2010. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report are presented below." 1Q CY2010, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators More Documents & Publications 1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

412

3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per Department of Energy (DOE-STD-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. A summary of this quarter 's data concluded: 3Q CY2007, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators More Documents & Publications 2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

413

Industrial Energy Use Indices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy use indices and associated coefficients of variation are computed for major industry categories for electricity and natural gas use in small and medium-sized plants in the U.S. Standard deviations often exceed the average EUI for an energy type, with coefficients of variation averaging 290% for 8,200 plants from all areas of the continental U.S. Data from milder climates appears more scattered than that from colder climates. For example, the ratio of the average of coefficient of variations for all industry types in warm versus cold regions of the U.S. generally is greater than unity. Data scatter may have several explanations, including climate, plant area accounting, the influence of low cost energy and low cost buildings used in the south of the U.S. This analysis uses electricity and natural gas energy consumption and area data of manufacturing plants available in the U.S. Department of Energy’s national Industrial Assessment Center database.

Hanegan, A.; Heffington, W. M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Attached-sunspace designs: a nationwide economic appraisal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Performance estimates for attached-sunspace passive solar heated residences have recently been incorporated into the Los Alamos/UNM EASE III model. These estimates are used to analyze the economic performance of a fixed dimension sunspace design when attached to a pre-existing single family residential unit. The sunspace is a passive design which can be easily and effectively adapted to a retrofit situation. Several key parameters are carefully evaluated for the sunspace retrofit design. These include loan or mortgage terms, ownership period, resale potential and competing conventional fuel prices. General economic and design parameters are combined in a variant of life cycle costing to evaluate the feasibility of both owner-built and contractor-built attached sunspaces for 220 regions in the contiguous United States. This evaluation is made for two conventional fuel types - natural gas and electric resistance - and for three resale values - 0%, 100%, and 200%. Results show that the prospect for conventional fuel displacement through retrofit of attached sunspaces is very good with the design's economic performance enhanced in regions with expensive conventional fuel alternatives.

Roach, F.; Kirschner, C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Designing for emotional attachment to energy James Pierce, Eric Paulos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Designing for emotional attachment to energy James Pierce, Eric Paulos Human-Computer Interaction a perspective on energy-as-materiality and employing a designerly approach of materializing energy [1]. Building on a framework for approaching energy as materiality, we discuss several design explorations around emotional

Paulos, Eric

416

2Q CY2004, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Attachment Attachment Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report September 20, 2004 Distribution: Kyle McSlarrow, S-2 Bruce Carnes, S-2 Les Novitsky, S-2 David Garman, S-3 Linton Brooks, NA-1 Tyler Przybylek, NA-1 Everet Beckner, NA-10 James Mangeno, NA-3.6 Glenn Podonsky, SP-1 Mike Kilpatrick, OA-1 Patricia Worthington, OA-40 Paul Golan, EM-1 Inés Triay, EM-3 Patty Bubar, EM-3.2 Raymond Orbach, SC-1 Milt Johnson, SC-3 William Magwood, NE-1 Manager, Ames Site Office Manager, Argonne Site Office Manager, Brookhaven Site Office Manager, Carlsbad Field Office Manager, Fermi Site Office Manager, Idaho Operations Office Manager, Livermore Site Office Manager, Los Alamos Site Office Manager, Nevada Site Office Manager, Oak Ridge Operations Office Manager, Office of River Protection

417

2Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. As of June 30,2005, 97% of all FRs were fully qualified, down from 88% the previous quarter, but exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Eighteen of 27 reporting sites meet the goal of FR qualifications. 2Q CY2005, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

418

RECS Fuel Oil Usage Form_v1 (Draft).xps  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

fuel oil usage for this delivery address between fuel oil usage for this delivery address between September 2008 and April 2010. Delivery Number Enter the Delivery Date for each delivery 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Enter the Total Dollar Amount including taxes [Exclude late fees, merchandise, repairs, and service charges] 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Form EIA 457G OMB No. 1905-0092 Expires 1/31/13 2009 RECS Fuel Oil and Kerosene Usage Form Delivery Address: Account Number: $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / Enter the Amount Delivered in Gallons XXXX Type of Fuel Sold was: 1=Fuel Oil #1 2=Fuel Oil #2 3=Kerosene 4=Other Enter the Price per Gallon $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ XXX.XX $ X.XX (select one) 1 2 3 4 MM/DD/YY Page 1 of 2 U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis

419

Groff (GNU ditroff) usage on Sun and SGI machines at the Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Groff (GNU ditroff) usage on Sun and SGI machines at the Lab Groff (GNU ditroff) usage on Sun and SGI machines at the Lab groff is the front end for the groff document formatting system. (GNU ditroff). groff's default device is ps (PostScript). (You may need to use "module load groff" to make groff available.) Sample usage Write groff output to a PostScript file me macros: groff -set -me myfile.me > myfile.ps ms macros: groff -set -mgs myfile.ms > myfile.ps Note well: "-mgs" uses the groff version of the MS ("gs") macros. Send groff output to a PostScript printer me macros: groff -set -me myfile.me | lpr -P someprinter ms macros: groff -set -mgs myfile.ms | lpr -P someprinter "someprinter" is some PostScript printer on distributed printing. Some common flags (from "man groff")

420

Heavy-duty truck population, activity and usage patterns. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the study was to update the heavy-duty truck (HDT) population, activity (e.g., vehicle miles traveled (VMT), numbers of starts and trips, trip duration, etc.), and usage patterns type of service/business (e.g., delivery, construction, etc.), area of operation (i.e., local, short-haul, long-haul) for HDT`s registered and/or operated in California. The population and activity estimates were done on a weight-class-specific basis light-heavy-duty, medium-heavy-duty and heavy-heavy-duty. Population, activity and usage estimates were based primarily on Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) registration data and Truck Inventory and Usage Survey (TIUS) data. In addition to the analysis of existing data (i.e., DMV and TIUS), 42 HDTs were fitted with on-board data loggers that recorded numbers of trips and starts, daily VMT and travel by time-of-day.

Fischer, M.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "usage indicators attached" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Understanding Motivations for Facebook Use: Usage Metrics, Network Structure, and Privacy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study explores the links between motives for using a social network service and numerical measures of that activity. Specifically, it identified motives for Facebook use by employing a Uses and Gratifications (U&G) approach and then investigated the extent to which these motives can be predicted through usage and network metrics collected automatically via the Facebook API. In total, 11 Facebook usage metrics and eight personal network metrics served as predictors. Results showed that all three variable types in this expanded U&G frame of analysis (covering social antecedents, usage metrics, and personal network metrics) effectively predicted motives and highlighted interesting behaviors. To further illustrate the power of this framework, the intricate nature of privacy in social media was explored and relationships drawn between privacy attitudes (and acts) and measures of use and network structure. Author Keywords Uses and gratifications; social network sites; social networks; Facebook; privacy; computer-mediated communication.

Tasos Spiliotopoulos; Ian Oakley

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

" Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 1998;" 1. Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",,,"Computer","Control of","Processes"," "," "," ",,,," ",," " " "," ","Computer Control","of Building-Wide","Environment(b)","or Major","Energy-Using","Equipment(c)","Waste","Heat","Recovery","Adjustable -","Speed","Motors","RSE"

423

" Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2002;" 2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," ",,"Computer Control of Building Wide Evironment(c)",,,"Computer Control of Processes or Major Energy-Using Equipment(d)",,,"Waste Heat Recovery",,,"Adjustable - Speed Motors",,,"Oxy - Fuel Firing",,," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Row"

424

High-Intensity Discharge Industrial Lighting Design Strategies for the Minimization of Energy Usage and Life-Cycle Cost.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Worldwide, the electrical energy consumed by artificial lighting is second only to the amount consumed by electric machinery. Of the energy usage attributed to lighting… (more)

Flory IV, Isaac L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Attachment C: Optional AIP Provisions | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

C: Optional AIP Provisions C: Optional AIP Provisions Attachment C: Optional AIP Provisions Optional AIP Provisions This attachment contains sample language for a number of optional provisions that sites may choose to include or not to include in their AIPs. Optional AIP provisions are not mandatory and the language presented is a sample which may be used as is, serve as a guideline for the creation of a modified provision to suit the site-specific needs of a particular AIP program, or not included in a new or renegotiated AIP. 1. Public Participation/Public Accountability in the DOE Planning Process "The DOE will make available to the public in a timely manner all environmental planning documents that require public comment. The DOE will promptly reply to, and confirm receipt of, requests for information

426

Microsoft Word - ARRAGuideAttachment10v1.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Attachment 10 Attachment 10 BUY AMERICAN ISSUES IN THE RECOVERY ACT FOR FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AGREEMENTS The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued interim guidance for financial assistance actions funded by the Recovery Act in March 2009. Public comments on the interim guidance have been received and are currently being analyzed by OMB. The following questions and answers address many issues that are expected to be clarified in OMB's final guidance, and will be updated as needed. 1. What are the Buy American restrictions in the Recovery Act? The Buy American provision in the Recovery Act (section 1605 of Title XI), directs that, subject to certain exceptions, no funds appropriated or otherwise made available for a project may be used for the construction, alteration, or repair of a public building or public work unless all the

427

Expert Meeting Report: Cladding Attachment Over Exterior Insulation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cladding Attachment Over Cladding Attachment Over Exterior Insulation P. Baker Building Science Corporation October 2013 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, subcontractors, or affiliated partners makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

428

Relative Lifetime Prediction for CPV Die-Attach Layers: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In concentrating photovoltaics (CPV) cell assemblies, a large-area die-attach layer is subjected to thermal cycles, leading to thermomechanical fatigue. This causes cracking and the eventual failure of the CPV cell by thermal runaway. We define a damage metric representing lumped progress toward failure and present a numerical model for computing the accumulation of damage for arbitrary transient temperature conditions. The model is applied to a particular design with a solder die-attach layer. We show that accelerated-test thermal cycles with higher ramp rates cause more damage, both per cycle and per unit time. Outdoor exposure to one entire year in two geographic locations is also simulated, revealing that a year of exposure in Golden, Colorado is equivalent to 1.4 years of exposure in Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

Silverman, T. J.; Bosco, N.; Kurtz, S.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

End effectors and attachments for buried waste excavation equipment  

SciTech Connect

The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) supports the applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. Their efforts are identified and coordinated in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER&WM) Department`s needs and objectives. The present focus of BWID is to support retrieval and ex-situ treatment configuration options. Future activities will explore and support containment, and stabilization efforts in addition to the retrieval/ex situ treatment options. This report presents a literature search on the state-of-the-art in end effectors and attachments in support of excavator of buried transuranic waste. Included in the report are excavator platforms and a discussion of the various attachments. Also included is it list of vendors and specifications.

King, R.H.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Pin and roller attachment system for ceramic blades  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a turbine, a plurality of blades are attached to a turbine wheel by way of a plurality of joints which form a rolling contact between the blades and the turbine wheel. Each joint includes a pin and a pair of rollers to provide rolling contact between the pin and an adjacent pair of blades. Because of this rolling contact, high stress scuffing between the blades and the turbine wheel reduced, thereby inhibiting catastrophic failure of the blade joints. 3 figs.

Shaffer, J.E.

1995-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

431

Removable, hermetically-sealing, filter attachment system for hostile environments  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A removable and reusable filter attachment system. A filter medium is fixed o, and surrounded by, a filter frame having a coaxial, longitudinally extending, annular rim. The rim engages an annular groove which surrounds the opening of a filter housing. The annular groove contains a fusible material and a heating mechanism for melting the fusible material. Upon resolidifying, the fusible material forms a hermetic bond with the rim and groove. Remelting allows detachment and replacement of the filter frame.

Mayfield, Glenn L. (Richland, WA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Pin and roller attachment system for ceramic blades  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a turbine, a plurality of blades are attached to a turbine wheel by way of a plurality of joints which form a rolling contact between the blades and the turbine wheel. Each joint includes a pin and a pair of rollers to provide rolling contact between the pin and an adjacent pair of blades. Because of this rolling contact, high stress scuffing between the blades and the turbine wheel reduced, thereby inhibiting catastrophic failure of the blade joints.

Shaffer, James E. (Maitland, FL)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

FIELD TEST OF THE FLAME QUALITY INDICATOR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The flame quality indicator concept was developed at BNL specifically to monitor the brightness of the flame in a small oil burner and to provide a ''call for service'' notification when the brightness has changed from its setpoint, either high or low. In prior development work BNL has explored the response of this system to operational upsets such as excess air changes, fouled atomizer nozzles, poor fuel quality, etc. Insight Technologies, Inc. and Honeywell, Inc. have licensed this technology from the U.S. Department of Energy and have been cooperating to develop product offerings which meet industry needs with an optimal combination of function and price. Honeywell has recently completed the development of the Flame Quality Monitor (FQM or Honeywell QS7100F). This is a small module which connects via a serial cable to the burners primary operating control. Primary advantages of this approach are simplicity, cost, and ease of installation. Call-for-service conditions are output in the form of front panel indicator lights and contact closure which can trigger a range of external communication options. Under this project a field test was conducted of the FQM in cooperation with service organizations in Virginia, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, and Connecticut. At total of 83 field sites were included. At each site the FQM was installed in parallel with another embodiment of this concept--the Insight AFQI. The AFQI incorporates a modem and provides the ability to provide detailed information on the trends in the flame quality over the course of the two year test period. The test site population was comprised of 79.5% boilers, 13.7% warm air furnaces, and 6.8% water heaters. Nearly all were of residential size--with firing rates ranging from 0.6 gallons of oil per hour to 1.25. During the course of the test program the monitoring equipment successfully identified problems including: plugged fuel lines, fouled nozzles, collapsed combustion chambers, and poor fuel pump cut-off. Service organizations can use these early indications to reduce problems and service costs. There were also some ''call-for-service'' indications for which problems were not identified. The test program also showed that monitoring of the flame can provide information on burner run times and this can be used to estimate current oversize factors and to determine actual fuel usage, enabling more efficient fuel delivery procedures.

Andrew M. Rudin; Thomas Butcher; Henry Troost

2003-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

434

Energy Efficiency Indicators Methodology Booklet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indicators Methodology Booklet Title Energy Efficiency Indicators Methodology Booklet Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-3702E Year of Publication 2010 Authors...

435

1Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives. and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the FR Program. As of March 31st, 2005, 88% of all FRs were fully qualified, up from 86% the previous quarter, and exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Several of the new FRs hired recently completed qualifications. Eighteen of 27 reporting sites meet the goal of FR qualifications

436

4Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December 2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the facility Representative Program. As of December 31,2003, 93% of all Facility Representatives were fully qualified, exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Currently, 23 of 27 sites meet the goal of 80%. Currently, 23 of 27 sites meet the goal for Facility Representative

437

4Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December 2004. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the FR program. As of December 31, 2004, 86% of all FRs were fully qualified,down from 89% the previous quarter, and exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Several sites added new FRs or switched FRs from their exisiting facilities to new facilities, reducing the overall qualification rate.

438

2Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Covering the Period from April to June 2004. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the FR program. As of June 30, 2004, 89% of all FRs were fully qualified , exceeding the DOE goal of 80%, but down slightly from the previous quarter. Twenty of 28 reporting sites meet the goal for FR qualifications. Overall FR staffing is at 85% of the levels needed per the staffing

439

3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. As of September 30,2005, 84% of all FRs were fully qualified , down from 87% the previous quarter, but exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Several sites shifted fully-qualifed FRs to new facilities, thus requiring new qualifications. Although the overall percentage of fully qualified FRS

440

3Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Covering the Period from July to September 2004. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the FR program. As of September 30, 2004, 89% of all FRs were fully qualified, the same as last quarter, and exceeding the DOE goal of 80%. Twenty of 28 reporting sites meet the goal for FR qualifications. Overall FR stadding is at 85% of the levels needed per the staffing analysis methodology in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "usage indicators attached" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 77% Fully Qualified (last quarter was 78%) 90% Staffing Level ( last Quarter was 90%); 45% Time Spent in the Field (DOE goal is>40%); and 73% Time Spent in Oversight Activites (DOE Goal is > 65%)"

442

1Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from January to March 2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the facility Representative Program. The percentage of Facility Representatives who are fully qualified reached 91% across DOE. In EM the percenage of 97%, in Sc the percentage is 95% and in NNSA the percentage is 78%. The DOE goal is 75%. Staffing levels for the three organizations continue to be below

443

4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2008. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 76% Fully Qualified ( last Quarter was 80%) 89% Staffing Level (last Quarter was 89%) 44% Time Spent in the Field ( Department of Energy)(DOE) goal is > 40%) 73% Time Spent in Oversight Activites (DOE Goal is> 65%)"

444

4Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 83% Fully Qualified (last Quarter was 82%) 85% Staffing Level (last Quarter was 93%) 45% Time Spent in the Field (DOE goal is >40%) 73% Time Spent in Oversight Activities (DOE Goal is> 65%)"

445

2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from April to June 2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the facility Representative Program. A total of 13 Facility Representatives transferred to other positions during the quarter. Five of these accepted Facility Representative positions at other sites. Of the 8 that left the Program. 1 recieved a promotion and 7 accepted lateral positions. All of

446

1Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 6 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. As of March 31,2006 81% of all FRs were fully qualified,up from 78% the previous quarter, and just above the DOE goal of 80%. To assist site offices in continuing to meet the qualification goal, there will be two focused training sessions for FR candidates in the coming months. These

447

4Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (Pis) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December 2002. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements Quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the facility Representative Program. The format of the report is changed from past reports. Information will now be provided according to the major offices having field or site office Facility Representative programs: National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSSA), the Office of

448

4Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2000, Facility Representatives and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. As of December 31, 2005 78% of all FRs were fully qualified , down from the 84% the previous quarter, and below the DOE goal of 80%. Site offices hired 11 new FRs in the quarter and several sites moved FRs to new facilities, thus requiring new qualifications.

449

1Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March 2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 78% Fully Qualified ( last Quarter was 76%) 90% Staffing Level ( last Quarter was 89%) 47% Time Spent in the Field (DOE goal is>40%) 74% Time Spent in Oversight Activites (DOE Goal is>65%)"

450

The role of attachment style in building social capital from a social networking site: The interplay of anxiety and avoidance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Drawing on attachment theory, the present study examines the attachment styles of individuals relative to two ways of building social capital - bonding social capital and bridging social capital. In trying to relate attachment theory to the use of SNS, ... Keywords: Attachment style, Attachment theory, Social capital, Social networking site (SNS)

Doo Young Lee

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Policy_Flash_2011-62__Attachment.pdf | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

sh2011-62Attachment.pdf PolicyFlash2011-62Attachment.pdf More Documents & Publications PolicyFlash2011-62.pdf OPAM Policy Acquisition Guides Microsoft Word - AL2006-07.doc...

452

AttachmentFlash2011-2 -(2)-OPAM | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-(2)-OPAM AttachmentFlash2011-2 -(2)-OPAM REQUESTS BY POLITICAL CANDIDATES TO TOUR DOE FACILITIES AttachmentFlash2011-2 -(2)-OPAM More Documents & Publications...

453

Multimedia-based mobile phone consciousness and usage amongst the undergraduate students in Malaysia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The idea of presenting undergraduates' awareness, usage and other various issues regarding mobile phone multimedia application will be the paper's main agenda and talking point. The first section of this paper will give a succinct introduction to today's ... Keywords: consciousness, mobile phone, multimedia application, undergraduates, youth

Amirrudin Kamsin; Md Nor Ridzuan Daud

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Impact of Liquefied Natural Gas usage and payload size on Hybrid Wing Body aircraft fuel efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work assessed Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft in the context of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) fuel usage and payload/range scalability at three scales: H1 (B737), H2 (B787) and H3 (B777). The aircraft were optimized for ...

Mody, Pritesh (Pritesh Chetan)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Recommending energy tariffs and load shifting based on smart household usage profiling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a system and study of personalized energy-related recommendation. AgentSwitch utilizes electricity usage data collected from users' households over a period of time to realize a range of smart energy-related recommendations on energy tariffs, ... Keywords: demand response, energy tariffs, load shifting, personalization, recommender systems, smart grid

Joel E. Fischer; Sarvapali D. Ramchurn; Michael Osborne; Oliver Parson; Trung Dong Huynh; Muddasser Alam; Nadia Pantidi; Stuart Moran; Khaled Bachour; Steve Reece; Enrico Costanza; Tom Rodden; Nicholas R. Jennings

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Cell phone usage and broad feature preferences: A study among Finnish undergraduate students  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to investigate the cell phone use and broad cell phone feature preferences among high school and undergraduate in Finland. Of particular interest is the issue of gender differences regarding the use of the cell phones and ... Keywords: Cell phone usage, Conceptualization, Feature preferences

Matti Haverila

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

RadioJockey: Mining Program Execution to Optimize Cellular Radio Usage Pavan K. Athivarapu1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dormancy is typically invoked with a fixed short inactivity timer (e.g., 3-5s), thereby reducing the energy. BACKGROUND AND MOTIVATION 2.1 Energy and Signaling Overhead During normal usage, a cellular radio switches costs. This has a major implication on the energy consumed by background applications that typically

458

Modeling Long-Term Search Engine Usage Ryen W. White, Ashish Kapoor, and Susan T. Dumais  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

photosensor design accurately senses daylight availability, cutting electric light usage 40­60 percent or morePhotosensors and associated control systems can dim or raise fluorescent lighting systems to decrease or increase the electrical lighting used as the amount of daylight changes during the day. However

Dumais, Susan

459

Instructions for CEC-1250E-4 Biomass and Fossil Fuel Usage Report for Biomass Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Instructions for CEC-1250E-4 Biomass and Fossil Fuel Usage Report for Biomass Facilities Biomass energy input basis in the upcoming calendar year? - Please check "yes" or "no." 12. Types of Biomass Fuel Used - Please report the quantity and supplier of the following types of biomass fuel used

460

Identifying software usage at HPC centers with the automatic library tracking database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A library tracking database has been developed to monitor software/library usage. This Automatic Library Tracking Database (ALTD) automatically and transparently stores, into a database, information about the libraries linked into an application at compilation ... Keywords: Cray XT, database, library, most/least used software, tracking

Bilel Hadri; Mark Fahey; Nick Jones

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "usage indicators attached" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

ON THE USAGE OF ANTENNAS IN MIMO AND MISO INTERFERENCE CHANNELS Mariam Kaynia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ON THE USAGE OF ANTENNAS IN MIMO AND MISO INTERFERENCE CHANNELS Mariam Kaynia , Andrea J. Goldsmith. of Science and Technology Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford Mobile and small), we derive upper and lower bounds to both our per- formance metrics. Moreover, the particular

Gesbert, David

462

Engineers and the Web: An analysis of real life gaps in information usage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Engineers face a wide range of gaps when trying to identify, acquire, and utilize information from the Web. To be able to avoid creating such gaps, it is essential to understand them in detail. This paper reports the results of a study of the real life ... Keywords: Critical incident technique, Engineers, Gaps, Information usage processes

Jeroen Kraaijenbrink

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

WebKDD 2005: web mining and web usage analysis post-workshop report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this report, we summarize the contents and outcomes of the recent WebKDD 2005 workshop on Web Mining and Web Usage Analysis that was held in conjunction with the 11th ACM SIGKDD International Conference on Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining (KDD ... Keywords: clickstream analysis, mining evolving web data, personalization, profiling, recommender systems, web mining

Olfa Nasraoui; Osmar R. Zaïane; Myra Spiliopoulou; Bamshad Mobasher; Brij Masand; Philip S. YU

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

UDP: Usage-based Dynamic Pricing with Privacy Preservation for Smart Grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UDP: Usage-based Dynamic Pricing with Privacy Preservation for Smart Grid Xiaohui Liang, Student for smart grid in a community environment, which enables the electricity price to correspond-preserving manner. Index Terms--Smart grid; dynamic price; privacy preserva- tion; community-specific I

Shen, Xuemin "Sherman"

465

Accelerated Testing and On-Sun Failure of CPV Die-Attach (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Accelerated Testing and On-Sun Failure of CPV Die-attach. Presentation on CPV accelerated reliability testing.

Bosco, N.; Kurtz, S.; Stokes, A.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

The Effect of an Externally Attached Neutrally Buoyant Transmitter on Mortal Injury during Simulated Hydroturbine Passage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On their seaward migration, juvenile salmonids commonly pass hydroelectric dams. Fish passing through hydroturbines experience a rapid decrease in pressure as they pass by the turbine blade and the severity of this decompression can be highly variable. This rapid decrease in pressure can result in injuries such as swim bladder rupture, exophthalmia, and emboli and hemorrhaging in the fins and tissues. However, recent research indicates that the presence of a telemetry tag (acoustic, radio, inductive) implanted inside the coelom of a juvenile salmon increases the likelihood that the fish will be injured or die during turbine passage. Thus, previous research conducted using telemetry tags implanted into the coelom of fish may have been inaccurate. Thus, a new technique is needed to provide unbiased estimates of survival through turbines. This research provides an evaluation of the effectiveness of a neutrally buoyant externally attached acoustic transmitter. Both nontagged fish and fish tagged with a neutrally buoyant external transmitter were exposed to a range of rapid decompressions simulating turbine passage. Juvenile Chinook salmon tagged with a neutrally buoyant externally attached acoustic transmitter did not receive a higher degree of barotrauma than their nontagged counterparts. We suggest that future research include field-based comparisons of survival and behavior among fish tagged with a neutrally buoyant external transmitter and those internally implanted with transmitters.

Brown, Richard S.; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Deng, Zhiqun

2012-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

467

C:\Eco-SSLs\Final Guidance November 2003\Attachments\Attachment 1-2 Microbial Processes\Final Eco-SSL Guidance Attachment 1-2.w  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Guidance for Developing Ecological Soil Screening Levels (Eco-SSLs) Assessment of Whether to Develop Ecological Soil Screening Levels for Microbes and Microbial Processes OSWER Directive 92857-55 November 2003 This page left intentionally blank Guidance for Developing Eco-SSLs Attachment 1-2 November 2003 1 Assessment of Whether to Develop Ecological Soil Screening Levels for Microbes and Microbial Processes Executive Summary Bacteria and fungi (i.e., microbes) are essential components of soil systems and the importance of microbial processes in terrestrial systems is well recognized. The Eco-SSL workgroup had lengthy discussions as to the merits of deriving microbial Eco-SSLs, and the potential significance of either having or not having Eco-SSLs for microbes in this guidance. As an

468

C:\Eco-SSLs\Final Guidance November 2003\Attachments\Attachment 4-4\Final Eco-SSL Attachment 4-4.wpd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Guidance for Developing Ecological Soil Screening Levels (Eco-SSLs) Eco-SSL Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) # 5: Wildlife TRV Data Evaluation OSWER Directive 92857-55 November 2003 This page intentionally left blank Attachment 4-4 Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) #5: Wildlife Toxicity Reference Value Data Evaluation for Ecological Soil Screening Levels (Eco-SSLs) OSWER Directive 92857-55 November 2003 Prepared for USEPA Region 8 by Syracuse Research Corporation 999 18th Street, Suite 1975 North Tower Denver, CO 80202 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2.0 PURPOSE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 3.0 THE SCORING SYSTEM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 4.0 EVALUATION AND SCORING OF STUDY ATTRIBUTES .

469

Determinants of residential electrical appliance usage in the Tri-State Region, 1960-1970: a regression study. Working paper  

SciTech Connect

The possible impact of areawide residential location policy on future residential electricity usage in the Tri-State Metropolitan Region centering on New York City is investigated. This study was undertaken to assess residential electricity usage, particularly electrical appliance use, in the residential sector of the New York Metropolitan area from 1960 to 1970. The attempts to choose and quantify the contribution of various determinants of electrical appliance usage using multiple regression analyses has been relatively successful. In addition, these results were compared with 1960 and 1970 data in an effort to establish a degree of consistency over time. The implications of the findings here point toward two complementary institutions for change: urban planning and public administration. The relationship between single family structures and high energy usage argue strongly for more dense communities, while price elasticities can be used by regulators to control electrical usage.

Stone, B.

1974-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Electric household equipment and electric fuel usage in the Tri-State Region and the United States: 1960-70. Working paper  

SciTech Connect

The possible impact of areawide residential location policy on future residential electricity usage in the Tri-State Metropolitan Region centering on New York City is investigated. This report is concerned with selected residential electric appliance usage in the Tri-State Region as compared with usage of these appliances across the United States between 1960 and 1970. Included are tabular representations of comparisons between residential air conditioner usage in the Tri-State Region and the United States. Tabular comparisons also are made with respect to residential appliance usage and electric fuel usage.

Hillman, B.

1973-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Electron attachment to chlorofluoromethanes using the electron-swarm method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electron attachment rate constants, as a function of pressure-reduced electric field, were measured in mixtures with nitrogen for CCl/sub 3/F, CCl/sub 2/F/sub 2/, and CClF/sub 3/ using the electron swarm method. From these data total electron attachment cross sections sigma/sub a/(epsilon) as a function of electron energy epsilon were determined for the chlorofluoromethanes using the electron-swarm unfolding technique and a new set of electron energy distribution functions for N/sub 2/. For CCl/sub 3/F and CCl/sub 2/F/sub 2/ three maxima in sigma/sub a/(epsilon) were found at thermal energy, 0.25 and 0.75 eV and at 0.07, 0.30, and 0.93 eV, respectively. Only one pronounced maximum in sigma/sub a/(epsilon) for CClF/sub 3/ was observed at 1.4 eV. The thermal values of the attachment rate constant for CCl/sub 3/F, CCl/sub 2/F/sub 2/, and CClF/sub 3/ are, respectively, 3.90 x 10/sup 8/, 4.00 x 10/sup 7/, and 6.05 x 10/sup 3/ sec/sup -1/ Torr/sup -1/. Additionally, comparisons are made between the sigma/sub a/(epsilon) calculated for these and other molecules using both the new electron energy distribution functions for N/sub 2/ and those determined earlier. Substituent effects on the number and position of negative ion states and on the magnitude of sigma/sub a/(epsilon) for the chlorofluoromethanes are discussed.

McCorkle, D.L.; Christodoulides, A.A.; Christophorou, L.G.; Szamrej, I.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Microsoft Word - Policy Flash 2011-2 Attachment 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

activities on DOE facilities or using DOE email addresses. The General Counsel has issued guidance on this issue for federal employees [see attached]. The following Q&A relates to contractors' use of Government property for political activity. Please ensure that your contractors are aware of and respect these limitations. Contractor Political Activity Q: Are DOE contractors permitted to use Government property or facilities to conduct political activity? A: No, political activity is not an authorized use of Government property or facilities and the Contracting Officer will not approve or allow its use. Q: Does DOE Order 203.1, which is entitled, "Limited Personal use of Government

473

Traffic of cytoskeletal motors with disordered attachment rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motivated by experimental results on the interplay between molecular motors and tau proteins, we extend lattice-based models of intracellular transport to include a second species of particle which locally influences the motor-filament attachment rate. We consider various exactly solvable limits of a stochastic multi-particle model before focusing on the low-motor-density regime. Here, an approximate treatment based on the random walk behaviour of single motors gives good quantitative agreement with simulation results for the tau-dependence of the motor current. Finally, we discuss the possible physiological implications of our results.

H. Grzeschik; R. J. Harris; L. Santen

2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

474

4Q CY2007, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, 2008 6, 2008 MEMORANDUM FROM: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATNE TO THE DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD OFFICE OF HEALTH, SAFETY AND SECURITY SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report, October - December (4th Quarter CY2007) Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 83% Fully Qualified (last Quarter was 82%) 85% Staffing Level (last Quarter was 93%) 45% Time Spent in the Field (DOE goal is >40%)

475

2Q CY2007, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0,2007 0,2007 M E M 0 R A N D ; p s ' X Z FROM: M RK B. WHI DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVE TO THE DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD OFFICE OF HEALTH, SAFETY AND SECURITY SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report, April - June (2nd Quarter CY2007) Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 74% Fully Qualified (last Quarter was 72%) 94% Staffing Level (last Quarter was 9 1 %)

476

NIST sustainable manufacturing indicators repository  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... GLOSSARY. This section contains definitions of the terms used in this Webportal. Benchmark Value. The targeted value of an indicator. ...

477

Weather Normalization of Reliability Indices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Weather significantly increases variability of reliability indices. This project focuses on exploring statistical correlations between weather parameters and system performance indices using historical utility reliability data and weather data. Using this information, various approaches for normalizing utility performance indices for variability in weather can be developed.

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

478

Attachment1_Overview_Spreadsheet_Aug_2011_final.xlsx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Attachment 1: Overview of Department/Agency NEPA Status as of June 30, 2011 Attachment 1: Overview of Department/Agency NEPA Status as of June 30, 2011 # of ARRA Funded Projects NEPA Does Not Apply Categorical Exclusions (CE) CE Pending CE Done Environmental Assessments (EA) EA Pending EA Done Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) EIS Pending EIS Done All NEPA Actions All Withdrawn Actions All Pending NEPA Actions All Completed NEPA Actions OVERALL TOTALS: 274,757 4,277 183,785 92 183,693 7,171 184 6,987 863 29 834 191,819 1,899 305 191,514 Department of Agriculture (USDA): 184,856 254 96,784 1 96,783 1,498 0 1,498 150 0 150 98,432 395 1 98,431 Agricultural Research Service (ARS) 41 2 38 0 38 1 0 1 0 0 0 39 0 0 39 Farm Service Agency (FSA) 87,487 0 4 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 4 Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) 251 0 4 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

479

Predicting Envelope Leakage in Attached Dwellings (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

The most common method of measuring air leakage is to perform single (or solo) blower door pressurization and/or depressurization test. In detached housing, the single blower door test measures leakage to the outside. In attached housing, however, this "solo" test method measures both air leakage to the outside and air leakage between adjacent units through common surfaces. Although minimizing leakage to neighboring units is highly recommended to avoid indoor air quality issues between units, reduce pressure differentials between units, and control stack effect, the energy benefits of air sealing can be significantly overpredicted if the solo air leakage number is used in the energy analysis. Guarded blower door testing is more appropriate for isolating and measuring leakage to the outside in attached housing. This method uses multiple blower doors to depressurize adjacent spaces to the same level as the unit being tested. Maintaining a neutral pressure across common walls, ceilings, and floors acts as a "guard" against air leakage between units. The resulting measured air leakage in the test unit is only air leakage to the outside. Although preferred for assessing energy impacts, the challenges of performing guarded testing can be daunting.

Not Available

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2008 Attachment A: Site Description  

SciTech Connect

This attachment expands on the general description of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) presented in the Introduction to the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2008 (National Security Technologies, LLC [NSTec], 2009a). Included are subsections that summarize the site’s geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting. The cultural resources of the NTS are also presented. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NTS. An adequate knowledge of the site’s environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NTS. The NTS environment contributes to several key features of the site that afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NTS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NTS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This attachment complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

Cathy A. Wills

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "usage indicators attached" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Insulating Sheathing (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The addition of insulation to the exterior of buildings is an effective means of increasing the thermal resistance of wood-framed walls and mass masonry wall assemblies. The location of the insulation on the exterior of the structure has many direct benefits, including better effective R-value from reduced thermal bridging, better condensation resistance, reduced thermal stress on the structure, as well as other commonly associated improvements such as increased airtightness and improved water management. For thick layers of exterior insulation (more than 1.5 in.), the use of wood furring strips attached through the insulation back to the structure has been used by many contractors and designers as a means to provide a convenient cladding attachment location. Although the approach has proven effective, there is significant resistance to its widespread implementation due to a lack of research and understanding of the mechanisms involved in the development of the vertical displacement resistance capacity. In addition, the long-term in-service performance of the system has been questioned due to potential creep effects of the assembly under the sustained dead load of the cladding and effects of varying environmental conditions. In addition, the current International Building Code (IBC) and International Residential Code (IRC) do not have a provision that specifically allows this assembly.

Not Available

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Label Building Natural Gas Usage Form 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Usage Form Natural Gas Usage Form 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) 1. Timely submission of this report is mandatory under Public Law 93-275, as amended. 2. This completed questionnaire is due by 3. Data reported on this questionnaire are for the entire building identified in the label to the right. 4. Data may be submitted directly on this questionnaire or in any other format, such as a computer-generated listing, which provides the same i nformation and is conve nient for y our company. a. You may submit a single report for the entire building, or if it i s easier, a separate report for each of several accounts in the building. These will then be aggregated by the survey contractor. b. If you are concerned about your individual account information, you may choose to mark

483

PowerScope: A Tool for Profiling the Energy Usage of Mobile Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of PowerScope, a tool for profiling energy usage by applications. PowerScope maps energy consumption to program structure, in much the same way that CPU profilers map processor cycles to specific processes and procedures. Our approach combines hardware instrumentation to measure current level with kernel software support to perform statistical sampling of system activity. Postprocessing software maps the sample data to program structure and produces a profile of energy usage by process and procedure. Using PowerScope, we have been able to reduce the energy consumption of an adaptive video playing application by 46%. 1. Introduction Energy is a critical resource for mobile computers [5, 8]. In spite of many improvements in low-power hardware design and battery life, there is now growing awareness that a strategically viable approach to energy management must include higher levels of the system [2]. For example, a network applica...

Jason Flinn; M. Satyanarayanan

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Identifying Software Usage at HPC Centers with the Automatic Library Tracking Database  

SciTech Connect

A library tracking database has been developed to monitor software/library usage. This Automatic Library Tracking Database (ALTD) automatically and transparently stores, into a database, information about the libraries linked into an application at compilation time and also the executables launched in a batch job. Information gathered into the database can then be mined to provide reports. Analyzing the results from the data collected will help to identify, for example, the most frequently used and the least used libraries and codes, and those users that are using deprecated libraries or applications. We will illustrate the usage of libraries and executables on the Cray XT platforms hosted at the National Institute for Computational Sciences and the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (both located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory).

Hadri, Bilel [ORNL; Fahey, Mark R [ORNL; Jones, Nicholas A [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Space heating systems in the Northwest: energy usage and cost analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The question of energy usage and cost of providing space heat in the Northwest is discussed. Though space heating needs represents only 18% of the U.S.'s total energy consumption, it nevertheless appears to offer the greatest potential for conservation and near term applications of alternate energy sources. Efficiency and economic feasibility factors are considered in providing for space heating demands. These criteria are presented to establish energy usage, cost effectiveness and beneficial conservation practices for space heating of residential, commercial, and industrial buildings. Four Northwestern cities have been chosen whose wide range of climate conditions are used to formulate the seasonal fuel and capital cost and hence the annual heating cost covering a broad spectrum of heating applications, both the traditional methods, the newer alternate forms of energy, and various methods to achieve more efficient utilization of all types.

Keller, J.G.; Kunze, J.F.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

An empirical analysis of the relationship between web usage and academic performance in undergraduate students  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of the internet, and in particular web browsing, offers many potential advantages for educational institutions as students have access to a wide range of information previously not available. However, there are potential negative effects due to factors such as time-wasting and asocial behaviour. In this study, we conducted an empirical investigation of the academic performance and the web-usage pattern of 2153 undergraduate students. Data from university proxy logs allows us to examine usage patterns and we compared this data to the students' academic performance. The results show that there is a small but significant (both statistically and educationally) association between heavier web browsing and poorer academic results (lower average mark, higher failure rates). In addition, among good students, the proportion of students who are relatively light users of the internet is significantly greater than would be expected by chance.

Hazelhurst, Scott; Sanders, Ian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Structural proteomics of minimal organisms: conservation ofprotein fold usage and evolutionary implications  

SciTech Connect

Background: Determining the complete repertoire of proteinstructures for all soluble, globular proteins in a single organism hasbeen one of the major goals of several structural genomics projects inrecent years. Results: We report that this goal has nearly been reachedfor several "minimal organisms"--parasites or symbionts with reducedgenomes--for which over 95 percent of the soluble, globular proteins maynow be assigned folds, overall 3-D backbone structures. We analyze thestructures of these proteins as they relate to cellular functions, andcompare conservation off old usage between functional categories. We alsocompare patterns in the conservation off olds among minimal organisms andthose observed between minimal organisms and other bacteria. Conclusion:We find that proteins performing essential cellular functions closelyrelated to transcription and translation exhibit a higher degree ofconservation in fold usage than proteins in other functional categories.Folds related to transcription and translation functional categories werealso over represented in minimal organisms compared to otherbacteria.

Chandonia, John-Marc; Kim, Sung-Hou

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

488

Space heating systems in the Northwest: energy usage and cost analysis  

SciTech Connect

The question of energy usage and cost of providing space heat in the Northwest is discussed. Though space heating needs represents only 18% of the U.S.'s total energy consumption, it nevertheless appears to offer the greatest potential for conservation and near term applications of alternate energy sources. Efficiency and economic feasibility factors are considered in providing for space heating demands. These criteria are presented to establish energy usage, cost effectiveness and beneficial conservation practices for space heating of residential, commercial, and industrial buildings. Four Northwestern cities have been chosen whose wide range of climate conditions are used to formulate the seasonal fuel and capital cost and hence the annual heating cost covering a broad spectrum of heating applications, both the traditional methods, the newer alternate forms of energy, and various methods to achieve more efficient utilization of all types.

Keller, J.G.; Kunze, J.F.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Nitroglycerine Usage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

trinitroglycerin, as other related drugs are used for relief of chest pain in coronary heart disease, the so called angina pectoris. The effect is done by relaxing the coronary...

490

Extending the boundaries of the usage of NMR chemical shifts in deciphering biomolecular structure and dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extending the Boundaries of the Usage of NMR Chemical Shifts in Deciphering Biomolecular Structure and Dynamics Aleksandr B. Sahakyan A thesis submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy Department of Chemistry University of Cambridge Darwin 9... ? and ? dihedral angles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 1.3 The gas-phase optimised structures of the selected representative conformations of Ace-Ala-Nme with the fixed ? and ? angles and the corresponding secondary...

Sahakyan, Aleksandr B.

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

491

Determination of usage patterns and emissions for propane/LPG in California. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the study was to determine California usage patterns of Liquified Petroleum Gas (LPG), and to estimate propane emissions resulting from LPG transfer operations statewide, and by county and air basin. The study is the first attempt to quantify LPG transfer emissions for California. This was accomplished by analyzing data from a telephone survey of California businesses that use LPG, by extracting information from existing databases.

Sullivan, M.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

On-Off Minimum-Time Control With Limited Fuel Usage: Global Optima Via Linear Programming  

SciTech Connect

A method for finding a global optimum to the on-off minimum-time control problem with limited fuel usage is presented. Each control can take on only three possible values: maximum, zero, or minimum. The simplex method for linear systems naturally yields such a solution for the re-formulation presented herein because it always produces an extreme point solution to the linear program. Numerical examples for the benchmark linear flexible system are presented.

DRIESSEN,BRIAN

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Assessing user experiences and usage intentions of m-banking service  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

M-banking is a channel through which banks interact with customers via mobile devices. M-banking is an emerging mobile commerce application. It is a challenging task for banks to encourage customers to continue using m-banking services, and ... Keywords: bank operations, dual process, financial information systems, m-banking, m-commerce, marketing strategies, mobile banking, mobile commerce, mobile communications, product attributes, product knowledge, promotional campaigns, usage intention, user experiences

Kuang-Hsun Shih; Hsu-Feng Hung; Binshan Lin

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

CHEMICAL INDICATORS Appendix A Chemistry Indicators and Evaluation Methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The chemical indicators evaluated in this study were based on chemical-specific sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) obtained from several sources. SQGs are numeric values intended to help in the interpretation of sediment chemistry data. SQGs are not intended to be a final assessment of environmental condition at a site, but rather to assist in the determination of the potential for biological effects. Numerical SQGs have been developed using both mechanistic and empirical relationships between chemistry and biological effect. Both types of approaches were evaluated in the early phases of the SQO project, but the mechanistic approaches (i.e., equilibrium partitioning) were not included in the final statistical evaluations based on the results of preliminary analyses and the recommendation of the SSC. Three types of empirical chemical indicators were compared and evaluated: established indicators that were based on existing published SQGs that were developed for application on a national level, regional indicators that represent established indicator approaches calibrated to California data, and new indicators developed specifically for this project. All of the chemical indicators were based on chemical mixtures in order to represent the joint effects of multiple chemicals present in a sample. The individual chemical SQGs were integrated using a method specific to each approach to describe mixture effects. The chemicals included in each candidate indicator are shown in Table

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within Cogeneration Technologies;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 2006; 3 Number of Establishments by Usage of Cogeneration Technologies, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within Cogeneration Technologies; Unit: Establishment Counts. Establishments with Any Cogeneration NAICS Technology Code(a) Subsector and Industry Establishments(b) in Use(c) In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(d) Not in Use Don't Know Total United States 311 Food 14,128 297 99 11,338 2,691 51 11,217 2,860 10 11,333 2,786 164 11,129 2,836 9 11,235 2,884 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 580 53 Q 499 38 5 532 42 W 533 W Q 533 44 5 530 45 311221 Wet Corn Milling 47 11 W 35 W W 43 W W 39 W 0 44 3 0 41 6 31131 Sugar Manufacturing

496

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2006; 2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies; Unit: Establishment Counts. NAICS Code(a) Subsector and Industry Establishments(b) In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know In Use(e) Not in Use Don't Know Total United States 311 Food 14,128 1,632 9,940 2,556 3,509 8,048 2,571 1,590 9,609 2,929 6,260 5,014 2,854 422 9,945 3,762 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 580 59 475 46 300 236 Q 154 398 28 446 95 Q 45 442 92 311221 Wet Corn Milling 47 9 34 4 36 W W 27 15 6 38 3 6 8 24 16 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 77

497

Simple strategies for minimization of cooling water usage in binary power plants  

SciTech Connect

The geothermal resources which could be used for the production of electrical power in the United States are located for the most part in the semi-arid western regions of the country. The availability of ground or surface water in the quantity or quality desired for a conventional wet'' heat rejections system represents a barrier to the development of these resources with the binary cycle technology. This paper investigates some simple strategies to minimize the cooling water usage of binary power plants. The cooling water usage is reduced by increasing the thermal efficiency of the plant. Three methods of accomplishing this are considered here: increasing the average source temperature, by increasing the geofluid outlet temperature; decreasing pinch points on the heat rejection heat exchangers, increasing their size; and using internal recuperation within the cycle. In addition to the impact on water usage, the impact on cost-of-electricity is determined. The paper shows that some of these strategies can reduce the cooling water requirements 20 to 30% over that for a plant similar to the Heber Binary Plant, with a net reduction in the cost-of-electricity of about 15%. 13 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Bliem, C.J.; Mines, G.L. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Ownership and usage of small passenger vehicles: findings from the 1977 National Personal Transportation Study  

SciTech Connect

This report examines current patterns in the ownership and usage of small vehicles by private households. The analysis was conducted to shed additional light on the market potential for smaller, energy efficient vehicles, in particular, electric cars. The 1977 Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey (NPTS) was used to obtain information on the socio-demographic characteristics and the travel and vehicle ownership behavior of US households based on a national probability sample. The issues posed to direct the investigation of small vehicle ownership and use behavior include: the ownership of small vehicles; the proportion of the private vehicle population accounted for by small vehicles; how small and large vehicles compare in terms of physical characteristics and performance and terms of usage; and how small/large vehicle ownership and usage differences are explained by household differences or physical differences in the vehicles themselves. The study's approach to these issues has focused on descriptive data analysis, employing such tools as cross-classification tables, distributions, and graphic displays. (MCW)

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Simple strategies for minimization of cooling water usage in binary power plants  

SciTech Connect

The geothermal resources which could be used for the production of electrical power in the United States are located for the most part in the semi-arid western regions of the country. The availability of ground or surface water in the quantity or quality desired for a conventional wet'' heat rejections system represents a barrier to the development of these resources with the binary cycle technology. This paper investigates some simple strategies to minimize the cooling water usage of binary power plants. The cooling water usage is reduced by increasing the thermal efficiency of the plant. Three methods of accomplishing this are considered here: increasing the average source temperature, by increasing the geofluid outlet temperature; decreasing pinch points on the heat rejection heat exchangers, increasing their size; and using internal recuperation within the cycle. In addition to the impact on water usage, the impact on cost-of-electricity is determined. The paper shows that some of these strategies can reduce the cooling water requirements 20 to 30% over that for a plant similar to the Heber Binary Plant, with a net reduction in the cost-of-electricity of about 15%. 13 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Bliem, C.J.; Mines, G.L. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

National Climate Assessment: Indicators System  

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Indicators System Print E-mail Indicators System Print E-mail What are the goals for the NCA indicators? The vision for the National Climate Assessment (NCA) is to create a system of indicators that will help inform policy-makers and citizens understand key aspects of our changing climate. Scientific information about physical climate conditions, climate impacts, vulnerabilities, and preparedness will be tracked and compiled. These measures are called indicators. The goals of the Indicators System are to: Provide meaningful, authoritative climate-relevant measures about the status, rates, and trends of key physical, ecological, and societal variables and values Inform decisions on management, research, and education at regional to national scales Identify climate-related conditions and impacts to help develop effective mitigation and adaptation measures