National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for us-japan rare elements

  1. US-Japan rare elements meeting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    US-Japan rare elements meeting US-Japan rare elements meeting US-Japan rare earth elements meeting PDF icon US-Japan rare elements meeting More Documents & Publications Microsoft...

  2. Microsoft Word - US_Japan_REE_agenda_ver7.doc | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Microsoft Word - USJapanREEagendaver7.doc Microsoft Word - USJapanREEagendaver7.doc U.S. - Japan Roundtable on Rare Earth Elements Research PDF icon Microsoft Word -...

  3. Rare Earth Elements Home Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rare Earth Elements Rare Earth Elements from Coal and Coal By-Products logo. Rare Earth Elements from Coal and Coal By-Products program overview slide. The REE Program is focused on developing technologies for the recovery of REEs from Coal and Coal By-Products. Rare Earth Elements from Coal and Coal By-Products background slide The 17-element group known as rare earth elements (REEs) provides significant value to our national security, energy independence, environmental future, and economic

  4. US-Japan Clean Energy Cooperation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Japan Clean Energy Cooperation US-Japan Clean Energy Cooperation PDF icon US-Japan Clean Energy Cooperation.pdf More Documents & Publications Edward Jones, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Outcomes of U.S.-Japan Roundtable U.S.-Japan Joint Statement China CERC, U.S. India and Other international Agreements

  5. Trace rare earth element analysis in briny groundwaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laul, J.C.; Lepel, E.A.; Smith, M.R.

    1986-08-01

    A rare-earth element (REE) group separation scheme has been developed. REE data for two briny groundwaters representing Granite Wash and Wolfcamp Carbonate formations are reported. (DLC)

  6. Calculation of binary phase diagrams between the actinide elements, rare earth elements, and transition metal elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selle, J E

    1992-06-26

    Attempts were made to apply the Kaufman method of calculating binary phase diagrams to the calculation of binary phase diagrams between the rare earths, actinides, and the refractory transition metals. Difficulties were encountered in applying the method to the rare earths and actinides, and modifications were necessary to provide accurate representation of known diagrams. To calculate the interaction parameters for rare earth-rare earth diagrams, it was necessary to use the atomic volumes for each of the phases: liquid, body-centered cubic, hexagonal close-packed, and face-centered cubic. Determination of the atomic volumes of each of these phases for each element is discussed in detail. In some cases, empirical means were necessary. Results are presented on the calculation of rare earth-rare earth, rare earth-actinide, and actinide-actinide diagrams. For rare earth-refractory transition metal diagrams and actinide-refractory transition metal diagrams, empirical means were required to develop values for the enthalpy of vaporization for rare earth elements and values for the constant (C) required when intermediate phases are present. Results of using the values determined for each element are presented.

  7. CMI Webinar: Recycling of Rare Earth Elements: A Microbiological Approach |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Critical Materials Institute Recycling of Rare Earth Elements: A Microbiological Approach The CMI Webinar series includes a presentation CMI Webinar: Recycling of Rare Earth Elements: A Microbiological Approach by David Reed, Idaho National Laboratory (INL), on April 23, 2015. The recording of the webinar runs nearly 39 minutes (38:52

  8. US & Japan TG 4 Activities of QA Forum | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    US & Japan TG 4 Activities of QA Forum US & Japan TG 4 Activities of QA Forum Presented at the PV Module Reliability Workshop, February 26 - 27 2013, Golden, Colorado PDF icon...

  9. US-Japan_NuclearEnergyActionPlan.pdf | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    US-Japan_NuclearEnergyActionPlan.pdf US-Japan_NuclearEnergyActionPlan.pdf PDF icon US-Japan_NuclearEnergyActionPlan.pdf More Documents & Publications Fact Sheet: United States-Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan United States -Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan

  10. Rare earth element patterns in biotite, muscovite and tourmaline minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laul, J.C.; Lepel, E.A.

    1986-04-21

    Rare earth element concentrations in the minerals biotite and muscovite from the mica schist country rocks of the Etta pegmatite and tourmalines from the Bob Ingersoll pegmatite have been measured by INAA and CNAA. The concentrations range from 10/sup -4/ g/g to 10/sup -10g//sub g/. The REE patterns of biotite, muscovite and tourmaline reported herein are highly fractionated from light to heavy REE. The REE concentrations in biotite and muscovite are high and indigenous. The pegmatite tourmalines contain low concentrations of REE. Variations in tourmaline REE patterns reflect the geochemical evolution of pegmatite melt/fluid system during crystallization.

  11. Trans-Atlantic Workshop on Rare Earth Elements and Other Critical Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for a Clean Energy Future | Department of Energy Trans-Atlantic Workshop on Rare Earth Elements and Other Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future Trans-Atlantic Workshop on Rare Earth Elements and Other Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future Trans-Atlantic Workshop on Rare Earth Elements and Other Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future PDF icon Trans-Atlantic Workshopon Rare Earth Elements andOther Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future More Documents &

  12. Google Earth locations of USA and seafloor hydrothermal vents with associated rare earth element data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Andrew Fowler

    2016-02-10

    Google Earth .kmz files that contain the locations of geothermal wells and thermal springs in the USA, and seafloor hydrothermal vents that have associated rare earth element data. The file does not contain the actual data, the actual data is available through the GDR website in two tier 3 data sets entitled "Compilation of Rare Earth Element Analyses from US Geothermal Fields and Mid Ocean Ridge (MOR) Hydrothermal Vents" and "Rare earth element content of thermal fluids from Surprise Valley, California"

  13. DOE Seeks Your Novel Ideas for Recovery of Rare Earth Elements...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    economically recovering rare earth elements from coal and coal byproduct streams, such as fly ash, coal refuse, and aqueous effluents," and "to report its findings and, if...

  14. Watch a Rare Earth Elements Event Live This Morning

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    From 9:30am to noon ET today you can tune into a live discussion rare earth materialsmthat are critical to the production of clean energy technologies.

  15. DOE Seeks Your Novel Ideas for Recovery of Rare Earth Elements from Coal and Coal Byproducts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Do you have innovative ideas about technologies and concepts for the recovery of rare earth elements? Are these ideas applicable to recovery from coal and coal byproducts? If so, the Department of Energy needs your input.

  16. Column Sorption Uptake and Regeneration Study; Rare Earth Element Sorbent Uptake and Sorbent Stripping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tim Lanyk

    2015-12-18

    Study of rare earth element (REE) uptake from geothermal brine simulant by column loading, metal recovery through stripping, and regeneration of column for re-loading. Simulated brine testing.

  17. Trans-Atlantic Workshop on Rare Earth Elements and Other Critical Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for a Clean Energy Future | Department of Energy Trans-Atlantic Workshop on Rare Earth Elements and Other Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future Trans-Atlantic Workshop on Rare Earth Elements and Other Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future December 3, 2010 Session A: Setting the Scene - Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future Diana Bauer, Office of Policy and International Affairs, U.S. Department of Energy, Highlights of the DOE Critical Materials Strategy Antje

  18. Rare earth element content of thermal fluids from Surprise Valley, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew Fowler

    2015-09-23

    Rare earth element measurements for thermal fluids from Surprise Valley, California. Samples were collected in acid washed HDPE bottles and acidified with concentrated trace element clean (Fisher Scientific) nitric acid. Samples were pre-concentratated by a factor of approximately 10 using chelating resin with and IDA functional group and measured on magnetic sector ICP-MS. Samples include Seyferth Hot Springs, Surprise Valley Resort Mineral Well, Leonard's Hot Spring, and Lake City Mud Volcano Boiling Spring.

  19. Fluid rare earth element anlayses from wells RN-12 and RN-19, Reykjanes, Iceland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew Fowler

    2015-07-24

    Results for fluid rare earth elment analyses from Reykjanes wells RN-12 and RN-19. The data have not been corrected for flashing. Samples preconcetrated using chelating resin with IDA functional group (InertSep ME-1). Analyzed using and Element magnetic sctor ICP-MS.

  20. Compilation of Rare Earth Element Analyses from US Geothermal Fields and Mid Ocean Ridge Hydrothermal Vents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew Fowler

    2015-10-01

    Compilation of rare earth element and associated major and minor dissolved constituent analytical data for USA geothermal fields and global seafloor hydrothermal vents. Data is in original units. Reference to and use of this data should be attributed to the original authors and publications according to the provisions outlined therein.

  1. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence and absorption of rare earth elements in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fossils: implications for anatomical and taphonomical studies | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence and absorption of rare earth elements in fossils: implications for anatomical and taphonomical studies Wednesday, January 27, 2016 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Pierre Gueriau, Synchrotron SOLEIL Program Description Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) has mainly been used in fossils to map organics and metal

  2. US/Japan Cooperation in High Energy Physics. Review of activities, 1988--1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-16

    The objective of the Implementing Arrangement was to further the energy programs of both countries by establishing a framework for cooperation in the field of high energy physics, including research, accelerator and detector instrumentation research and development, the fabrication and subsequent use of new experimental devices and facilities, and related joint efforts as may be mutually agreed. Over the years, this cooperation has been very effective and has strengthened the overall collaborative efforts and the understanding between our nations and their citizens. It has demonstrated to the world our ability to work together to attack difficult problems. High Energy Physics goes across national borders; the bond is clearly intellectual and common ground is shared for the benefit of all in a most effective manner. This review covers the activities conducted under the aegis of the US/Japan Committee for Cooperation in High Energy Physics during the past five years (1988--1993). This was the second such US review of the US/Japan cooperative activities; the first was held in 1987.

  3. Proceedings of a joint US-Japan Seminar in the Environmental Sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeAngelis, D.L.; Teramoto, E.; Neergaard, D.A.

    1993-11-01

    The Joint US-Japan Seminar in the Environmental Sciences was based on the premises that questions remain concerning the factors that control many of the regularities observed in ecological communities and that increased collaboration between researchers in the United States and Japan can contribute to answering these questions. The papers included in this report resulted from the Seminar. These papers as well as workshop discussions summarized here outline the main issues that face theoretical ecology today. The papers cover four different areas of theoretical ecology: (1) individual species adaptations, (2) ecological community-food web interactions, (3) food web theory, and (4) concepts related to the ecosystem. Individual projects are processed separately for the databases.

  4. Behavior of Rare Earth Element In Geothermal Systems; A New Exploration/Exploitation Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott A. Wood

    2002-01-28

    The goal of this four-year project was to provide a database by which to judge the utility of the rare earth elements (REE) in the exploration for and exploitation of geothermal fields in the United States. Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: (1) the North Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); (2) the Cascades of Oregon; (3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; (4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; (5) Palinpion, the Philippines: (6) the Salton Sea and Heber geothermal fields of southern California; and (7) the Dieng field in Central Java, Indonesia. We have analyzed the samples from all fields for REE except the last two.

  5. Rare earth element carriers in the Shergotty meteorite and implications for its chronology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundberg, L.L.; Crozaz, G.; Zinner, E. ); McKay, G. )

    1988-08-01

    Ion probe measurements of the rare earth element (REE) concentrations of individual grains of the Shergotty meteorite are reported. Phases analyzed include whitlockite, apatite, baddeleyite, augite, pigeonite, maskelynite and K-rich glass. U concentrations of whitlockite and apatite crystals were also obtained. The whole rock REE pattern is dominated by whitlockite, which contains over 95% of the light rare earth elements (LREE). REE concentrations in apatite are much lower than estimated by Laul et al. (1986). All of the whitlockites have the same relative abundances of LREE. The observation, by Jones et al. (1985), of a skeletal whitlockite with LREE enrichment is not confirmed by analyses of the same grain. Pyroxene rims are not enriched in LREE. No leachable carrier, enriched in LREE and associated with pyroxene, has been found. Instead, either a laboratory contamination or a petrographically cryptic phase such as a film on grain boundaries is suspected as the carrier of LREE enrichments. Estimates of REE abundances in the Shergotty intercumulus melt indicate that a complex petrogenesis is required, in agreement with the conclusions of McKay et al. (1986a). Pyroxene distribution coefficients measured experimentally are compared with estimates from measured REE abundances in augite and pigeonite. Evolution of REE abundances in the Shergotty late-stage interstitial melt, as inferred from analyses of whitlockite, conforms with trends predicted from partitioning considerations, and requires no special processes such as metasomatism. The average U concentrations of whitlockite and apatite are respectively 540 and 1,550 ppb. Although the calcium phosphates are enriched in U, they contain less than 20% of the U in Shergotty.

  6. Improved estimates of rare K decay matrix elements from K{sub l3} decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mescia, Federico; Smith, Christopher

    2007-08-01

    The estimation of rare K decay matrix elements from K{sub l3} experimental data is extended beyond LO in chiral perturbation theory. Isospin-breaking effects at next-to-leading order (and partially next-to-next-to-leading order) in the chiral perturbation theory expansion, as well as QED radiative corrections, are now accounted for. The analysis relies mainly on the cleanness of two specific ratios of form factors, for which the theoretical control is excellent. As a result, the uncertainties on the K{sup +}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{nu}{nu} and K{sub L}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{nu} matrix elements are reduced by a factor of about 7 and 4, respectively, and similarly for the direct CP-violating contributions to K{sub L}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}e{sup +}e{sup -} and K{sub L}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}. They could be reduced even further with better experimental data for the K{sub l3} slopes and the K{sub l3}{sup +} branching ratios. As a result, the nonparametric errors for B(K{yields}{pi}{nu}{nu}) and for the direct CP-violating contributions to B(K{sub L}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}l{sup +}l{sup -}) are now completely dominated by those on the short-distance physics.

  7. Final Report US-Japan IEC Workshop on Small Plasma and Accelerator Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miley, George, H.

    2008-06-04

    Abstract The history of IEC development will be briefly described, and some speculation about future directions will be offered. The origin of IEC is due to the brilliance of Phil Farnsworth, inventor of electronic TV in the US. Early experiments were pioneered in the late 1960s by Robert Hirsch who later became head of the DOE fusion program. At that time studies of IEC physics quickly followed at the University of Illinois and at Penn State University. However, despite many successes in this early work, IEC research died as DOE funding stopped in the mid 1980s. In the early 90’s, R. W. Bussard of EMC revived work with a new major project based on a magnetic assisted IEC. While doing supportive studies for that project, G. Miley proposed a grided “STAR mode” IEC as a neutron source for NAA. This concept was later used commercially by Daimler- Benz in Germany to analysis impurities in incoming ores. This represented a first practical application of the IEC. During this period other research groups at LANL, U of Wisconsin and Kyoto University entered IEC research with innovative new concepts and approaches to IEC physics and applications. Much of this work is documented in the present and in past US-Japan Workshops. At present we stand on the threshold of a new area of IEC applications as neutron source, for isotope production, and as a plasma source. These applications provide a way to continue IEC understanding and technology development with the ultimate goal being a fusion power plant. Indeed, a distinguishing feature of the IEC vs. other fusion confinement approaches is the unique opportunity for “spin off” applications along the way to a power producing plant.

  8. Utilizing rare earth elements as tracers in high TDS reservoir brines in CCS applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McLing, Travis; Smith, William; Smith, Robert

    2014-12-31

    In this paper we report the result of research associated with the testing of a procedures necessary for utilizing natural occurring trace elements, specifically the Rare Earth Elements (REE) as geochemical tracers in Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) applications. Trace elements, particularly REE may be well suited to serve as in situ tracers for monitoring geochemical conditions and the migration of CO₂-charged waters within CCS storage systems. We have been conducting studies to determine the efficacy of using REE as a tracer and characterization tool in the laboratory, at a CCS analogue site in Soda Springs, Idaho, and at amore » proposed CCS reservoir at the Rock Springs Uplift, Wyoming. Results from field and laboratory studies have been encouraging and show that REE may be an effective tracer in CCS systems and overlying aquifers. In recent years, a series of studies using REE as a natural groundwater tracer have been conducted successfully at various locations around the globe. Additionally, REE and other trace elements have been successfully used as in situ tracers to describe the evolution of deep sedimentary Basins. Our goal has been to establish naturally occurring REE as a useful monitoring measuring and verification (MMV) tool in CCS research because formation brine chemistry will be particularly sensitive to changes in local equilibrium caused by the addition of large volumes of CO₂. Because brine within CCS target formations will have been in chemical equilibrium with the host rocks for millions of years, the addition of large volumes of CO₂ will cause reactions in the formation that will drive changes to the brine chemistry due to the pH change caused by the formation of carbonic acid. This CO₂ driven change in formation fluid chemistry will have a major impact on water rock reaction equilibrium in the formation, which will impart a change in the REE fingerprint of the brine that can measured and be used to monitor in situ reservoir conditions. Our research has shown that the REE signature imparted to the formation fluid by the introduction of CO₂ to the formation, can be measured and tracked as part of an MMV program. Additionally, this REE fingerprint may serve as an ideal tracer for fluid migration, both within the CCS target formation, and should formation fluids migrate into overlying aquifers. However application of REE and other trace elements to CCS system is complicated by the high salt content of the brines contained within the target formations. In the United States by regulation, in order for a geologic reservoir to be considered suitable for carbon storage, it must contain formation brine with total dissolved solids (TDS) > 10,000 ppm, and in most cases formation brines have TDS well in excess of that threshold. The high salinity of these brines creates analytical problems for elemental analysis, including element interference with trace metals in Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS) (i.e. element mass overlap due to oxide or plasma phenomenon). Additionally, instruments like the ICP-MS that are sensitive enough to measure trace elements down to the parts per trillion level are quickly oversaturated when water TDS exceeds much more than 1,000 ppm. Normally this problem is dealt with through dilution of the sample, bringing the water chemistry into the instruments working range. However, dilution is not an option when analyzing these formation brines for trace metals, because trace elements, specifically the REE, which occur in aqueous solutions at the parts per trillion levels. Any dilution of the sample would make REE detection impossible. Therefore, the ability to use trace metals as in situ natural tracers in high TDS brines environments requires the development of methods for pre-concentrating trace elements, while reducing the salinity and associated elemental interference such that the brines can be routinely analyzed by standard ICP-MS methods. As part of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Project the INL-CAES has developed a rapid, easy to use process that pre-concentrates trace metals, including REE, up to 100x while eliminating interfering ions (e.g. Ba, Cl). The process is straightforward, inexpensive, and requires little infrastructure, using only a single chromatography column with inexpensive, reusable, commercially available resins and wash chemicals. The procedure has been tested with synthetic brines (215,000 ppm or less TDS) and field water samples (up to 5,000 ppm TDS). Testing has produced data of high quality with REE capture efficiency exceeding 95%, while reducing interfering elements by > 99%.« less

  9. Rare earth elements in chloride-rich groundwater, Palo Duro Basin, Texas, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gosselin, D.C. ); Smith, M.R.; Lepel, E.A. ); Laul, J.C. )

    1992-04-01

    Rare earth element (REE) data for groundwater samples from the Deep-Basin Brine aquifer of the Palo Duro Basin, Texas, USA, illustrates the potential use of REE for inferring groundwater flow paths through different geologic materials. The REE content of the groundwaters range over 2.5 orders of magnitude and are depleted by 10{sup 2} to 10{sup 5} relative to aquifer materials. The shale-normalized REE patterns for groundwater that have primarily interacted with arkosic sandstones (granite wash) are flat with similar heavy REE (HREE) enrichments ((Lu/La){sub n} = 0.60 to 0.80). The samples with highest REE contents and REE patterns, which are enriched in the intermediate REEs (IREEs; Sm-Tb) reflect variable degrees of interaction with carbonate rocks. The IREE enrichment is the result of fluid interaction with Fe-Mn coatings on carbonate minerals and/or secondary minerals in fractures and vugs. The chloride complex. (LnCl{sup 2+}), and free-ions are the predominant REE species, accounting for over 95% of the REEs. Carbonate and sulfate species account for the other 5% and have very little influence on the behavior of the REEs. Although this study indicates a potentially important role for the REEs in understanding geochemical transport and groundwater movement, it also indicates the necessity for developing a better understanding of REE speciation in high ionic strength solutions.

  10. Extraction processes and solvents for recovery of cesium, strontium, rare earth elements, technetium and actinides from liquid radioactive waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaitsev, Boris N. (St. Petersburg, RU); Esimantovskiy, Vyacheslav M. (St. Petersburg, RU); Lazarev, Leonard N. (St. Petersburg, RU); Dzekun, Evgeniy G. (Ozersk, RU); Romanovskiy, Valeriy N. (St. Petersburg, RU); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Brewer, Ken N. (Arco, ID); Herbst, Ronald S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Law, Jack D. (Pocatello, ID)

    2001-01-01

    Cesium and strontium are extracted from aqueous acidic radioactive waste containing rare earth elements, technetium and actinides, by contacting the waste with a composition of a complex organoboron compound and polyethylene glycol in an organofluorine diluent mixture. In a preferred embodiment the complex organoboron compound is chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, the polyethylene glycol has the formula RC.sub.6 H.sub.4 (OCH.sub.2 CH.sub.2).sub.n OH, and the organofluorine diluent is a mixture of bis-tetrafluoropropyl ether of diethylene glycol with at least one of bis-tetrafluoropropyl ether of ethylene glycol and bis-tetrafluoropropyl formal. The rare earths, technetium and the actinides (especially uranium, plutonium and americium), are extracted from the aqueous phase using a phosphine oxide in a hydrocarbon diluent, and reextracted from the resulting organic phase into an aqueous phase by using a suitable strip reagent.

  11. Proceedings of US/Japan workshop, Q219 on high heat flux components and plasma surface interactions for next fusion devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulrickson, M.A.; Stevens, P.L.; Hino, T.; Hirohata, Y.

    1996-12-01

    This report contains the viewgraphs from the proceedings of US/Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices. Some of the general topics covered by this report are: PFC/PSI in tokamak and helical devices; development of high heat flux components; PSIS and plasma facing materials;tritium; and material damage.

  12. Rare-earth elements in hot brines (165 to 190 degree C) from the Salton Sea geothermal field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lepel, E.A.; Laul, J.C.; Smith, M.R.

    1988-01-01

    Rare-earth element (REE) concentrations are important indicators for revealing various chemical fractionation processes (water/rock interactions) and source region geochemistry. Since the REE patterns are characteristic of geologic materials (basalt, granite, shale, sediments, etc.) and minerals (K-feldspar, calcite, illite, epidote, etc.), their study in geothermal fluids may serve as a geothermometer. The REE study may also enable us to address the issue of groundwater mixing. In addition, the behavior of the REE can serve as analogs of the actinides in radioactive waste (e.g., neodymium is an analog of americium and curium). In this paper, the authors port the REE data for a Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF) brine (two aliquots: port 4 at 165{degree}C and port 5 at 190{degree}C) and six associated core samples.

  13. Magnetocaloric effect in heavy rare-earth elements doped Fe-based bulk metallic glasses with tunable Curie temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jiawei; Huo, Juntao; Chang, Chuntao E-mail: dujun@nimte.ac.cn; Du, Juan E-mail: dujun@nimte.ac.cn; Man, Qikui; Wang, Xinmin; Li, Run-Wei; Law, Jiayan

    2014-08-14

    The effects of heavy rare earth (RE) additions on the Curie temperature (T{sub C}) and magnetocaloric effect of the Fe-RE-B-Nb (RE = Gd, Dy and Ho) bulk metallic glasses were studied. The type of dopping RE element and its concentration can easily tune T{sub C} in a large temperature range of 120 K without significantly decreasing the magnetic entropy change (ΔS{sub M}) and refrigerant capacity (RC) of the alloys. The observed values of ΔS{sub M} and RC of these alloys compare favorably with those of recently reported Fe-based metallic glasses with enhanced RC compared to Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 1.9}Si{sub 2}Fe{sub 0.1}. The tunable T{sub C} and large glass-forming ability of these RE doped Fe-based bulk metallic glasses can be used in a wide temperature range with the final required shapes.

  14. Detection of rare earth elements in Powder River Basin sub-bituminous coal ash using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tran, Phuoc

    2015-10-01

    We reported our preliminary results on the use of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy to analyze the rare earth elements contained in ash samples from Powder River Basin sub-bituminous coal (PRB-coal). We have identified many elements in the lanthanide series (cerium, europium, holmium, lanthanum, lutetium, praseodymium, promethium, samarium, terbium, ytterbium) and some elements in the actinide series (actinium, thorium, uranium, plutonium, berkelium, californium) in the ash samples. In addition, various metals were also seen to present in the ash samples

  15. Am phases in the matrix of a U–Pu–Zr alloy with Np, Am, and rare-earth elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janney, Dawn E.; Kennedy, J. Rory; Madden, James W.; O’Holleran, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    Phases and microstructures in the matrix of an as-cast U-Pu-Zr alloy with 3 wt% Am, 2% Np, and 8% rare-earth elements were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The matrix consists primarily of two phases, both of which contain Am: ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am) (~70 at% U, 5% Np, 14% Pu, 1% Am, and 10% Zr) and ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2 (~25% U, 2% Np, 10-15% Pu, 1-2% Am, and 55-60 at% Zr). These phases are similar to those in U-Pu-Zr alloys, although the Zr content in ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am) is higher than that in ?-(U, Pu) and the Zr content in ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2 is lower than that in ?-UZr2. Nanocrystalline actinide oxides with structures similar to UO2 occurred in some areas, but may have formed by reactions with the atmosphere during sample handling. Planar features consisting of a central zone of ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am) bracketed by zones of ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2 bound irregular polygons ranging in size from a few micrometers to a few tens of micrometers across. The rest of the matrix consists of elongated domains of ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am) and ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2. Each of these domains is a few tens of nanometers across and a few hundred nanometers long. The domains display strong preferred orientations involving areas a few hundred nanometers to a few micrometers across.

  16. Thorium, uranium and rare earth elements content in lanthanide concentrate (LC) and water leach purification (WLP) residue of Lynas advanced materials plant (LAMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AL-Areqi, Wadeeah M. Majid, Amran Ab. Sarmani, Sukiman

    2014-02-12

    Lynas Advanced Materials Plant (LAMP) has been licensed to produce the rare earths elements since early 2013 in Malaysia. LAMP processes lanthanide concentrate (LC) to extract rare earth elements and subsequently produce large volumes of water leach purification (WLP) residue containing naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). This residue has been rising up the environmental issue because it was suspected to accumulate thorium with significant activity concentration and has been classified as radioactive residue. The aim of this study is to determine Th-232, U-238 and rare earth elements in lanthanide concentrate (LC) and water leach purification (WLP) residue collected from LAMP and to evaluate the potential radiological impacts of the WLP residue on the environment. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis and ?-spectrometry were used for determination of Th, U and rare earth elements concentrations. The results of this study found that the concentration of Th in LC was 1289.7 ± 129 ppm (5274.9 ± 527.6Bq/kg) whereas the Th and U concentrations in WLP were determined to be 1952.9±17.6 ppm (7987.4 ± 71.9 Bq/kg) and 17.2 ± 2.4 ppm respectively. The concentrations of Th and U in LC and WLP samples determined by ?- spectrometry were 1156 ppm (4728 ± 22 Bq/kg) and 18.8 ppm and 1763.2 ppm (7211.4 Bq/kg) and 29.97 ppm respectively. This study showed that thorium concentrations were higher in WLP compare to LC. This study also indicate that WLP residue has high radioactivity of {sup 232}Th compared to Malaysian soil natural background (63 - 110 Bq/kg) and come under preview of Act 304 and regulations. In LC, the Ce and Nd concentrations determined by INAA were 13.2 ± 0.6% and 4.7 ± 0.1% respectively whereas the concentrations of La, Ce, Nd and Sm in WLP were 0.36 ± 0.04%, 1.6%, 0.22% and 0.06% respectively. This result showed that some amount of rare earth had not been extracted and remained in the WLP and may be considered to be reextracted.

  17. Trace rare earth element analysis of IAEA hair (HH-1), animal bone (H-5) and other biological standards by radiochemical neutron activation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lepel, E.A.; Laul, J.C.

    1986-03-01

    A radiochemical neutron activation analysis using a rare earth group separation scheme has been used to measure ultratrace levels of rare earth elements (REE) in IAEA Human Hair (HH-1), IAEA Animal Bone (H-5), NBS Bovine Liver (SRM 1577), and NBS Orchard Leaf (SRM 1571) standards. The REE concentrations in Human Hair and Animal Bone range from 10/sup -8/g/g to 10/sup -11/g/g and their chondritic normalized REE patterns show a negative Eu anomaly and follow as a smooth function of the REE ionic radii. The REE patterns for NBS Bovine Liver and Orchard Leaf are identical except that their concentrations are higher. The similarity among the REE patterns suggest that the REE do not appear to be fractionated during the intake of biological materials by animals or humans. 14 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Element

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Departmental Element 2. System Name/ Major Application Name 3. Location 4. Name of System Owner/ Information or Data Owner 5. Contact Information 6. Does the system collect or maintain Social Security numbers? 7. Source of Legal Requirement/Authority to Collect or Maintain Social Security Numbers? 8. Does the system have a Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA)? 9. Does the system have a System of Records Notice (SORN)? If yes, provide the name of the System of Records Notice. 10. Does the system

  19. Grain refinement in heavy rare earth element-free sintered Nd–Fe–B magnets by addition of a small amount of molybdenum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jin Woo; Lee, Won Suk; Byun, Jong Min; Kim, Young Do; Kim, Se Hoon

    2015-05-07

    We employed a modified refractory-metal-addition method to achieve higher coercivity and remanence in heavy rare earth element (HREE)-free Nd–Fe–B sintered magnets. This process involved inducing the formation of a homogeneous secondary phase at the grain boundaries during sintering, making it possible to control the intergrain diffusion by adding small amounts of Mo, a refractory metal. To control the microstructure of the secondary phase effectively, a metal organic compound of the refractory metal was coated on the surfaces of the particles of an HREE-free Nd–Fe–B powder. The average grain size after this process was 5.60 μm, which was approximately 1.8 μm smaller than that of the HREE-free sintered Nd–Fe–B magnets (7.4 μm). The coercivity of the magnets prepared through this process could be increased from 11.88 kOe to 13.91 kOe without decreasing their remanence.

  20. Information basis for developing comprehensive waste management system-US-Japan joint nuclear energy action plan waste management working group phase I report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nutt, M.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-05-25

    The activity of Phase I of the Waste Management Working Group under the United States - Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan started in 2007. The US-Japan JNEAP is a bilateral collaborative framework to support the global implementation of safe, secure, and sustainable, nuclear fuel cycles (referred to in this document as fuel cycles). The Waste Management Working Group was established by strong interest of both parties, which arise from the recognition that development and optimization of waste management and disposal system(s) are central issues of the present and future nuclear fuel cycles. This report summarizes the activity of the Waste Management Working Group that focused on consolidation of the existing technical basis between the U.S. and Japan and the joint development of a plan for future collaborative activities. Firstly, the political/regulatory frameworks related to nuclear fuel cycles in both countries were reviewed. The various advanced fuel cycle scenarios that have been considered in both countries were then surveyed and summarized. The working group established the working reference scenario for the future cooperative activity that corresponds to a fuel cycle scenario being considered both in Japan and the U.S. This working scenario involves transitioning from a once-through fuel cycle utilizing light water reactors to a one-pass uranium-plutonium fuel recycle in light water reactors to a combination of light water reactors and fast reactors with plutonium, uranium, and minor actinide recycle, ultimately concluding with multiple recycle passes primarily using fast reactors. Considering the scenario, current and future expected waste streams, treatment and inventory were discussed, and the relevant information was summarized. Second, the waste management/disposal system optimization was discussed. Repository system concepts were reviewed, repository design concepts for the various classifications of nuclear waste were summarized, and the factors to consider in repository design and optimization were then discussed. Japan is considering various alternatives and options for the geologic disposal facility and the framework for future analysis of repository concepts was discussed. Regarding the advanced waste and storage form development, waste form technologies developed in both countries were surveyed and compared. Potential collaboration areas and activities were next identified. Disposal system optimization processes and techniques were reviewed, and factors to consider in future repository design optimization activities were also discussed. Then the potential collaboration areas and activities related to the optimization problem were extracted.

  1. rare earth recycling | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rare earth recycling Meet CMI Researcher David Reed CMI researcher David Reed is the principal investigator for the CMI project bioleaching for recovery of recycled rare earth elements. CMI Researcher David Reed is the PI for project 3.2.5 Bioleaching for Recovery of Recycled REE. The objective of this project is to develop and deploy a biological strategy for recovery of rare earth elements from recyclable materials. Read more about Meet CMI Researcher David Reed Subscribe to RSS - rare earth

  2. Phase stable rare earth garnets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Cherepy, Nerine J.; Roberts, Jeffery J.; Payne, Stephen A.

    2013-06-11

    A transparent ceramic according to one embodiment includes a rare earth garnet comprising A.sub.hB.sub.iC.sub.jO.sub.12, where h is 3.+-.10%, i is 2.+-.10%, and j is 3.+-.10%. A includes a rare earth element or a mixture of rare earth elements, B includes at least one of aluminum, gallium and scandium, and C includes at least one of aluminum, gallium and scandium, where A is at a dodecahedral site of the garnet, B is at an octahedral site of the garnet, and C is at a tetrahedral site of the garnet. In one embodiment, the rare earth garment has scintillation properties. A radiation detector in one embodiment includes a transparent ceramic as described above and a photo detector optically coupled to the rare earth garnet.

  3. Production method for making rare earth compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCallum, R. William (Ames, IA); Ellis, Timothy W. (Ames, IA); Dennis, Kevin W. (Ames, IA); Hofer, Robert J. (Ames, IA); Branagan, Daniel J. (Ames, IA)

    1997-11-25

    A method of making a rare earth compound, such as a earth-transition metal permanent magnet compound, without the need for producing rare earth metal as a process step, comprises carbothermically reacting a rare earth oxide to form a rare earth carbide and heating the rare earth carbide, a compound-forming reactant (e.g. a transition metal and optional boron), and a carbide-forming element (e.g. a refractory metal) that forms a carbide that is more thermodynamically favorable than the rare earth carbide whereby the rare earth compound (e.g. Nd.sub.2 Fe.sub.14 B or LaNi.sub.5) and a carbide of the carbide-forming element are formed.

  4. Production method for making rare earth compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCallum, R.W.; Ellis, T.W.; Dennis, K.W.; Hofer, R.J.; Branagan, D.J.

    1997-11-25

    A method of making a rare earth compound, such as a earth-transition metal permanent magnet compound, without the need for producing rare earth metal as a process step, comprises carbothermically reacting a rare earth oxide to form a rare earth carbide and heating the rare earth carbide, a compound-forming reactant (e.g., a transition metal and optional boron), and a carbide-forming element (e.g., a refractory metal) that forms a carbide that is more thermodynamically favorable than the rare earth carbide whereby the rare earth compound (e.g., Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B or LaNi{sub 5}) and a carbide of the carbide-forming element are formed.

  5. Modeling Magnetism in Rare-Earth Intermetallic Materials | The Ames

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Modeling Magnetism in Rare-Earth Intermetallic Materials Theoretical modeling has led to a key development in our understanding of the deeply complex magnetic properties in a series of rare-earth intermetallic materials. Rare-earth elements are unique in that their cores hold strongly localized electrons that underpin their novel magnetic properties. When combined with transition metals, rare earths become technologically-useful intermetallic materials. Here gadolinium-an element

  6. Rare Earths -- The Fraternal Fifteen | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rare Earths -- The Fraternal Fifteen cover of Rare Earths - The Fraternal Fifteen pamplet from 1964 What are rare earths? To see and read an elementary primer, check Rare Earths - The Fraternal Fifteen. The 46-page pamphlet describes this family of chemical elements that have similar chemical properties and different physical behaviors, especially the magnetic and optical properties. "Rare earths impact all of us," Karl A. Gschneidner, Jr., explains. "When you watch TV or use a

  7. Good Earths and Rare Earths | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Rare earth elements -- dysprosium, neodymium, terbium, europium and yttrium -- are essential to a wide range of green energy technologies ranging from windmills to electric ...

  8. News about Rare Earths, New or Critical Materials, and Their...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Earth Elements and National Security, October 2014 The Rare Earth Elements in Your Smartphone, 4:05 video on BloombergTV, August 8, 2014 Jony Ive Speaks on Future Products,...

  9. Ternary rare earth-lanthanide sulfides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Takeshita, Takuo (Omiya, JP); Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A. (Ames, IA); Beaudry, Bernard J. (Ames, IA)

    1987-01-06

    A new ternary rare earth sulfur compound having the formula: La.sub.3-x M.sub.x S.sub.4 where M is a rare earth element selected from the group europium, samarium and ytterbium and x=0.15 to 0.8. The compound has good high-temperature thermoelectric properties and exhibits long-term structural stability up to 1000.degree. C.

  10. The New Element Americium (Atomic Number 95)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Seaborg, G.T.; James, R.A.; Morgan, L.O.

    1948-01-00

    Several isotopes of the new element 95 have been produced and their radiations characterized. The chemical properties of this tripositive element are similar to those of the typical tripositive lanthanide rare-earth elements. Element 95 is different from the latter in the degree and rate of formation of certain compounds of the complex ion type, which makes possible the separation of element 95 from the lanthanide rare-earths. The name americium (after the Americas) and the symbol Am are suggested for the element on the basis of its position as the sixth member of the actinide rare-earth series, analogous to europium, Eu, of the lanthanide series.

  11. Rare-earth nanoparticles for catalysis | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Developing new materials based on these two elements is expected to impact favorably the supply chain of the more scarce rare earths. The SULI student in this program will work...

  12. The Search for Heavy Elements

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08

    The 1994 documentary "The Search for Heavy Elements" chronicles the expansion of the periodic table through the creation at Berkeley Lab of elements heavier than uranium. The documentary features a mix of rarely-seen archival footage, historical photos, and interviews with scientists who made history, such as Glenn Seaborg and Albert Ghiorso.

  13. The Search for Heavy Elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-04-17

    The 1994 documentary "The Search for Heavy Elements" chronicles the expansion of the periodic table through the creation at Berkeley Lab of elements heavier than uranium. The documentary features a mix of rarely-seen archival footage, historical photos, and interviews with scientists who made history, such as Glenn Seaborg and Albert Ghiorso.

  14. Microsoft Word - US_Japan_REE_agenda_ver7.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    i,NationalInstituteofAdvancedIndustrialScienceandTechnology, Japan;CeriainAutomotiveCatalysts 12:30-1:30 Lunch ...

  15. Ames Lab 101: Rare Earths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gschneidner, Karl

    2010-01-01

    "Mr. Rare Earth," Ames Laboratory scientist Karl Gschneidner Jr., explains the importance of rare-earth materials in many of the technologies we use today -- ranging from computers to hybrid cars to wind turbines. Gschneidner is a world renowned rare-earths expert at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory.

  16. Ames Lab 101: Rare Earths

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gschneidner, Karl

    2012-08-29

    "Mr. Rare Earth," Ames Laboratory scientist Karl Gschneidner Jr., explains the importance of rare-earth materials in many of the technologies we use today -- ranging from computers to hybrid cars to wind turbines. Gschneidner is a world renowned rare-earths expert at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory.

  17. Behavior of Rare Earth Elements in Geothermal Systems- A New...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ExplorationExploitation Tool? Abstract NA Author Scott A. Wood Published Department of Geology and Geological Engineering University of Idaho, 2001 DOI Not Provided Check for...

  18. Rare earth element behavior in the development of energy resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laul, J.C.

    1984-04-02

    The REE patterns in soil-soil extract-plant-coal-flyash are all identical, show a negative Eu anomaly, and follow a smooth function of the REE ionic radii. The patterns are similar to that observed in the secondary mineral apatite. Their enrichment factors in various liquefaction products and ash depositories of a coal fired power plant are nearly unity (Class 1). The REE do not chemically fractionate even in size fractions 25 ..mu..m-0.5 ..mu..m of flyash. Almost all (99%) of the REE are bound in an inorganic form in high temperature clay minerals. The remarkable similarity in REE patterns in a wide variety of matrices with REE content varying over six orders of magnitude demonstrates that the REE do not significantly fractionate during transformation from the geological-biological-geological chain over geological time scales.

  19. Yttrium and rare earth stabilized fast reactor metal fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guon, Jerold (Woodland Hills, CA); Grantham, LeRoy F. (Calabasas, CA); Specht, Eugene R. (Simi Valley, CA)

    1992-01-01

    To increase the operating temperature of a reactor, the melting point and mechanical properties of the fuel must be increased. For an actinide-rich fuel, yttrium, lanthanum and/or rare earth elements can be added, as stabilizers, to uranium and plutonium and/or a mixture of other actinides to raise the melting point of the fuel and improve its mechanical properties. Since only about 1% of the actinide fuel may be yttrium, lanthanum, or a rare earth element, the neutron penalty is low, the reactor core size can be reduced, the fuel can be burned efficiently, reprocessing requirements are reduced, and the nuclear waste disposal volumes reduced. A further advantage occurs when yttrium, lanthanum, and/or other rare earth elements are exposed to radiation in a reactor, they produce only short half life radioisotopes, which reduce nuclear waste disposal problems through much shorter assured-isolation requirements.

  20. DOE Selects Projects To Enhance Its Research into Recovery of Rare Earth

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Elements from Coal and Coal Byproducts | Department of Energy Selects Projects To Enhance Its Research into Recovery of Rare Earth Elements from Coal and Coal Byproducts DOE Selects Projects To Enhance Its Research into Recovery of Rare Earth Elements from Coal and Coal Byproducts December 2, 2015 - 10:20am Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has selected 10 projects to receive funding for research in support of the lab's program on

  1. Rare Isotopes in Cosmic Explosions and Accelerators on Earth

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Schatz, Hendrick [Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, United States

    2010-01-08

    Rare isotopes are nature?s stepping stones to produce the heavy elements, and they are produced in large quantities in stellar explosions. Despite their fleeting existence, they shape the composition of the universe and the observable features of stellar explosions. The challenge for nuclear science is to produce and study the very same rare isotopes so as to understand the origin of the elements and a range of astronomical observations. I will review the progress that has been made to date in astronomy and nuclear physics, and the prospects of finally addressing many of the outstanding issues with the future Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), which DOE will build at Michigan State University.

  2. Semiconductor sensor for optically measuring polarization rotation of optical wavefronts using rare earth iron garnets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duncan, Paul G. (8544 Electric Ave., Vienna, VA 22182)

    2002-01-01

    Described are the design of a rare earth iron garnet sensor element, optical methods of interrogating the sensor element, methods of coupling the optical sensor element to a waveguide, and an optical and electrical processing system for monitoring the polarization rotation of a linearly polarized wavefront undergoing external modulation due to magnetic field or electrical current fluctuation. The sensor element uses the Faraday effect, an intrinsic property of certain rare-earth iron garnet materials, to rotate the polarization state of light in the presence of a magnetic field. The sensor element may be coated with a thin-film mirror to effectively double the optical path length, providing twice the sensitivity for a given field strength or temperature change. A semiconductor sensor system using a rare earth iron garnet sensor element is described.

  3. Method of determining lanthanidies in a transition element host

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    De Kalb, Edward L.; Fassel, Velmer A.

    1976-02-03

    A phosphor composition contains a lanthanide activator element within a host matrix having a transition element as a major component. The host matrix is composed of certain rare earth phosphates or vanadates such as YPO.sub.4 with a portion of the rare earth replaced with one or more of the transition elements. On X-ray or other electromagnetic excitation, trace lanthanide impurities or additives within the phosphor are spectrometrically determined from their characteristic luminescence.

  4. Rare earth oxide fluoride nanoparticles and hydrothermal method for forming nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fulton, John L. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Hoffmann, Markus M. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA

    2001-11-13

    A hydrothermal method for forming nanoparticles of a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine has been discovered. Nanoparticles comprising a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine are also described. These nanoparticles can exhibit excellent refractory properties as well as remarkable stability in hydrothermal conditions. The nanoparticles can exhibit excellent properties for numerous applications including fiber reinforcement of ceramic composites, catalyst supports, and corrosion resistant coatings for high-temperature aqueous solutions.

  5. Microsoft Word - US-EU WORKSHOP on RARE EARTHS Program 20101206

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Trans-Atlantic Workshop on Rare Earth Elements and Other Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future Hosted by the MIT Energy Initiative Massachusetts Institute of Technology 400 Main Street, Building E19-307, Cambridge, Massachusetts December 3, 2010 Workshop Background Rare earth elements and other critical raw materials are essential to our industrial production, particularly for clean energy options like wind turbines, solar cells, electric vehicles, and energy- efficient lighting. Wind

  6. Rare Earth Oxide Fluoride Nanoparticles And Hydrothermal Method For Forming Nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fulton, John L. (Richland, WA); Hoffmann, Markus M. (Richland, WA)

    2003-12-23

    A hydrothermal method for forming nanoparticles of a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine has been discovered. Nanoparticles comprising a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine are also described. These nanoparticles can exhibit excellent refractory properties as well as remarkable stability in hydrothermal conditions. The nanoparticles can exhibit excellent properties for numerous applications including fiber reinforcement of ceramic composites, catalyst supports, and corrosion resistant coatings for high-temperature aqueous solutions.

  7. Process to separate transuranic elements from nuclear waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Terry R.; Ackerman, John P.; Tomczuk, Zygmunt; Fischer, Donald F.

    1989-01-01

    A process for removing transuranic elements from a waste chloride electrolytic salt containing transuranic elements in addition to rare earth and other fission product elements so the salt waste may be disposed of more easily and the valuable transuranic elements may be recovered for reuse. The salt is contacted with a cadmium-uranium alloy which selectively extracts the transuranic elements from the salt. The waste salt is generated during the reprocessing of nuclear fuel associated with the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR).

  8. Rare earth doped zinc oxide varistors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McMillan, April D.; Modine, Frank A.; Lauf, Robert J.; Alim, Mohammad A.; Mahan, Gerald D.; Bartkowiak, Miroslaw

    1998-01-01

    A varistor includes a Bi-free, essentially homogeneous sintered body of a ceramic composition including, expressed as nominal weight %, 0.2-4.0% oxide of at least one rare earth element, 0.5-4.0% Co.sub.3 O.sub.4, 0.05-0.4% K.sub.2 O, 0.05-0.2% Cr.sub.2 O.sub.3, 0-0.2% CaO, 0.00005-0.01% Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, 0-2% MnO, 0-0.05% MgO, 0-0.5% TiO.sub.3, 0-0.2% SnO.sub.2, 0-0.02% B.sub.2 O.sub.3, balance ZnO.

  9. Rare earth doped zinc oxide varistors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McMillan, A.D.; Modine, F.A.; Lauf, R.J.; Alim, M.A.; Mahan, G.D.; Bartkowiak, M.

    1998-12-29

    A varistor includes a Bi-free, essentially homogeneous sintered body of a ceramic composition including, expressed as nominal weight %, 0.2--4.0% oxide of at least one rare earth element, 0.5--4.0% Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}, 0.05--0.4% K{sub 2}O, 0.05--0.2% Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--0.2% CaO, 0.00005--0.01% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--2% MnO, 0--0.05% MgO, 0--0.5% TiO{sub 3}, 0--0.2% SnO{sub 2}, 0--0.02% B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, balance ZnO. 4 figs.

  10. RECONDITIONING FUEL ELEMENTS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brandt, H.L.

    1962-02-20

    A process is given for decanning fuel elements that consist of a uranium core, an intermediate section either of bronze, silicon, Al-Si, and uranium silicide layers or of lead, Al-Si, and uranium silicide layers around said core, and an aluminum can bonded to said intermediate section. The aluminum can is dissolved in a solution of sodium hydroxide (9 to 20 wt%) and sodium nitrate (35 to 12 wt %), and the layers of the intermediate section are dissolved in a boiling sodium hydroxide solution of a minimum concentration of 50 wt%. (AEC) A method of selectively reducing plutonium oxides and the rare earth oxides but not uranium oxides is described which comprises placing the oxides in a molten solvent of zinc or cadmium and then adding metallic uranium as a reducing agent. (AEC)

  11. On the RMgSn rare earth compounds (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: On the RMgSn rare earth compounds Citation Details In-Document Search Title: On the RMgSn rare earth compounds A new family of ternary rare earth compounds, RMgSn, has been synthesized and their crystal structures, formation thermodynamics and melting behavior have been studied. All of the rare earth elements (including Y) form the 1:1:1 equiatomic phase with Mg and Sn. These compounds crystallize with two different structure types: the RMgSn

  12. DOE-Led Research Team Makes Significant Rare Earth Discovery | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy DOE-Led Research Team Makes Significant Rare Earth Discovery DOE-Led Research Team Makes Significant Rare Earth Discovery January 15, 2016 - 9:45am Addthis DOE-Led Research Team Makes Significant Rare Earth Discovery A team of researchers led by experts from the Department of Energy (DOE) has found that rare earth elements (REEs) can be removed from two U.S. coal byproduct materials through an ion-exchange process. This discovery could potentially expand the U.S. domestic resource

  13. Laminated rare earth structure and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Senor, David J [West Richland, WA; Johnson, Roger N [Richland, WA; Reid, Bruce D [Pasco, WA; Larson, Sandra [Richland, WA

    2002-07-30

    A laminated structure having two or more layers, wherein at least one layer is a metal substrate and at least one other layer is a coating comprising at least one rare earth element. For structures having more than two layers, the coating and metal substrate layers alternate. In one embodiment of the invention, the structure is a two-layer laminate having a rare earth coating electrospark deposited onto a metal substrate. In another embodiment of the invention, the structure is a three-layer laminate having the rare earth coating electrospark deposited onto a first metal substrate and the coating subsequently abonded to a second metal substrate. The bonding of the coating to the second metal substrate may be accomplished by hot pressing, hot rolling, high deformation rate processing, or combinations thereof. The laminated structure may be used in nuclear components where reactivity control or neutron absorption is desired and in non-nuclear applications such as magnetic and superconducting films.

  14. Exploration of R2XM2 (R=Sc, Y, Ti, Zr, Hf, rare earth; X=main group element; M=transition metal, Si, Ge): Structural Motifs, the novel Compound Gd2AlGe2 and Analysis of the U3Si2 and Zr3Al2 Structure Types

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sean William McWhorter

    2006-05-01

    In the process of exploring and understanding the influence of crystal structure on the system of compounds with the composition Gd{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 4} several new compounds were synthesized with different crystal structures, but similar structural features. In Gd{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 4}, the main feature of interest is the magnetocaloric effect (MCE), which allows the material to be useful in magnetic refrigeration applications. The MCE is based on the magnetic interactions of the Gd atoms in the crystal structure, which varies with x (the amount of Si in the compound). The crystal structure of Gd{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 4} can be thought of as being formed from two 3{sup 2}434 nets of Gd atoms, with additional Gd atoms in the cubic voids and Si/Ge atoms in the trigonal prismatic voids. Attempts were made to substitute nonmagnetic atoms for magnetic Gd using In, Mg and Al. Gd{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} and Gd{sub 2}InGe{sub 2} both possess the same 3{sup 2}434 nets of Gd atoms as Gd{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 4}, but these nets are connected differently, forming the Mo{sub 2}FeB{sub 2} crystal structure. A search of the literature revealed that compounds with the composition R{sub 2}XM{sub 2} (R=Sc, Y, Ti, Zr, Hf, rare earth; X=main group element; M=transition metal, Si, Ge) crystallize in one of four crystal structures: the Mo{sub 2}FeB{sub 2}, Zr{sub 3}Al{sub 2}, Mn{sub 2}AlB{sub 2} and W{sub 2}CoB{sub 2} crystal structures. These crystal structures are described, and the relationships between them are highlighted. Gd{sub 2}AlGe{sub 2} forms an entirely new crystal structure, and the details of its synthesis and characterization are given. Electronic structure calculations are performed to understand the nature of bonding in this compound and how electrons can be accounted for. A series of electronic structure calculations were performed on models with the U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} and Zr{sub 3}Al{sub 2} structures, using Zr and A1 as the building blocks. The starting point for these models was the U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} structure, and models were created to simulate the transition from the idealized U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} structure to the distorted Zr{sub 3}Al{sub 2} structure. Analysis of the band structures of the models has shown that the transition from the U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} structure to the Zr{sub 3}Al{sub 2} structure lifts degeneracies along the {Lambda} {yields} Z direction, indicating a Peierls-type mechanism for the displacement occurring in the positions of the Zr atoms.

  15. Rare events: a state of the art

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uppuluri, V.R.R.

    1980-12-01

    The study of rare events has become increasingly important in the context of nuclear safety. Some philosophical considerations, such as the framework for the definition of a rare event, rare events and science, rare events and trans-science, and rare events and public perception, are discussed. The technical work of the Task Force on problems of Rare Events in the Reliability Analysis of Nuclear Plants (1976-1978), sponsored by OECD, is reviewed. Some recent technical considerations are discussed, and conclusions are drawn. The appendix contains an essay written by Anne E. Beachey, under the title: A Study of Rare Events - Problems and Promises.

  16. Programmatic Elements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-07-11

    The Guide provides acceptable methods of meeting the requirements of DOE O 151.1C for programmatic elements that sustain the emergency management program and maintain the readiness of the program to respond to an emergency. Supersedes DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 5-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 5-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 5-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 5-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 7-1, and DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 7-3.

  17. Response Elements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-07-11

    The Guide provides acceptable methods for meeting the requirement of DOE O 151.1C for response elements that respond or contribute to response as needed in an emergency. Supersedes DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-5, and DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-6.

  18. Precise rare earth analysis of geological materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laul, J.C.; Wogman, N.A.

    1982-01-01

    Rare earth element (REE) concentrations are very informative in revealing chemical fractionation processs in geological systems. The REE's (La-Lu) behavior is characteristic of various primary and secondary minerals which comprise a rock. The REE's contents and their patterns provide a strong fingerprint in distinguishing among various rock types and in understanding the partial melting and/or fractional crystallization of the source region. The REE contents in geological materials are usually at trace levels. To measure all the REE at such levels, radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) has been used with a REE group separation scheme. To maximize detection sensitivites for individual REE, selective ..gamma..-ray/x-ray measurements have been made using normal Ge(Li) and low-energy photon detectors (LEPD), and Ge(Li)-NaI(Tl) coincidence-noncoincidence spectrometer systems. Using these detection methods an individual REE can be measured at or below the ppB levels; chemical yields of the REE are determined by reactivation.

  19. Process to separate transuranic elements from nuclear waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, T.R.; Ackerman, J.P.; Tomczuk, Z.; Fischer, D.F.

    1989-03-21

    A process is described for removing transuranic elements from a waste chloride electrolytic salt containing transuranic elements in addition to rare earth and other fission product elements so the salt waste may be disposed of more easily and the valuable transuranic elements may be recovered for reuse. The salt is contacted with a cadmium-uranium alloy which selectively extracts the transuranic elements from the salt. The waste salt is generated during the reprocessing of nuclear fuel associated with the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). 2 figs.

  20. Process to separate transuranic elements from nuclear waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, T.R.; Ackerman, J.P.; Tomczuk, Z.; Fischer, D.F.

    1988-07-12

    A process for removing transuranic elements from a waste chloride electrolytic salt containing transuranic elements in addition to rare earth and other fission product elements so the salt waste may be disposed of more easily and the valuable transuranic elements may be recovered for reuse. The salt is contacted with a cadmium-uranium alloy which selectively extracts the transuranic elements from the salt. The waste salt is generated during the reprocessing of nuclear fuel associated with the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). 2 figs.

  1. Rare Earth Metals & Alloys | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Various processes employed by the MPC include: vacuum casting sublimation distillation electro-transport processing In most cases, the rare earth oxides are first...

  2. Improved method for preparing rare earth sesquichalcogenides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Takeshita, T.; Beaudry, B.J.; Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.

    1982-04-14

    An improved method for the preparation of high purity rare earth sesquichalcogenides is described. The rare earth, as one or more pieces of the metal, is sealed under a vacuum with a stoichiometric amount of sulfur or selenium and a small amount of iodine into a quartz reaction vessel. The sealed vessel is then heated to above the vaporization temperature of the chalcogen and below the melting temperature of the rare earth metal and maintained until the product has been formed. The iodine is then vaporized off leaving a pure product. The rare earth sulfides and selenides thus formed are useful as semiconductors and as thermoelectric generators. 3 tables.

  3. Ames Lab 101: Rare-Earth Recycling

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ryan Ott

    2013-06-05

    Recycling keeps paper, plastics, and even jeans out of landfills. Could recycling rare-earth magnets do the same? Perhaps, if the recycling process can be improved. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are working to more effectively remove the neodymium, a rare earth, from the mix of other materials in a magnet.

  4. Discrete Element Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, J; Johnson, S

    2007-12-03

    The Distinct Element Method (also frequently referred to as the Discrete Element Method) (DEM) is a Lagrangian numerical technique where the computational domain consists of discrete solid elements which interact via compliant contacts. This can be contrasted with Finite Element Methods where the computational domain is assumed to represent a continuum (although many modern implementations of the FEM can accommodate some Distinct Element capabilities). Often the terms Discrete Element Method and Distinct Element Method are used interchangeably in the literature, although Cundall and Hart (1992) suggested that Discrete Element Methods should be a more inclusive term covering Distinct Element Methods, Displacement Discontinuity Analysis and Modal Methods. In this work, DEM specifically refers to the Distinct Element Method, where the discrete elements interact via compliant contacts, in contrast with Displacement Discontinuity Analysis where the contacts are rigid and all compliance is taken up by the adjacent intact material.

  5. Prospects for Non-Rare Earth Permanent Magnets for Traction Motors and Generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, Matthew; McCallum, Kendall; Anderson, Iver; Constantinides, Steven

    2012-06-29

    With the advent of high-flux density permanent magnets based on rare earth elements such as neodymium (Nd) in the 1980s, permanent magnet-based electric machines had a clear performance and cost advantage over induction machines when weight and size were factors such as in hybrid electric vehicles and wind turbines. However, the advantages of the permanent magnet-based electric machines may be overshadowed by supply constraints and high prices of their key constituents, rare earth elements, which have seen nearly a 10-fold increase in price in the last 5 years and the imposition of export limits by the major producing country, China, since 2010. We outline the challenges, prospects, and pitfalls for several potential alloys that could replace Nd-based permanent magnets with more abundant and less strategically important elements.

  6. Ames Lab 101: Rare-Earth Magnets

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McCallum, Bill

    2012-08-29

    Senior Scientist, Bill McCallum, briefly discusses rare-earth magnets and their uses and how Ames Lab is research new ways to save money and energy using magnets.

  7. Rare Iron Oxide in Ancient Chinese Pottery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 2-3. Citation: C. Dejoie, P. Sciau, W. Li, L. No, A. Mehta, K. Chen, H. Luo, M. Kunz, N. Tamura, and Z. Liu, "Learning from the past: Rare -Fe2O3 in the ancient...

  8. Recovery of Rare Earths, Precious Metals and Other Critical Materials from Geothermal Waters with Advanced Sorbent Structures

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Pamela M. Kinsey

    2015-09-30

    The work evaluates, develops and demonstrates flexible, scalable mineral extraction technology for geothermal brines based upon solid phase sorbent materials with a specific focus upon rare earth elements (REEs). The selected organic and inorganic sorbent materials demonstrated high performance for collection of trace REEs, precious and valuable metals. The nanostructured materials typically performed better than commercially available sorbents. Data contains organic and inorganic sorbent removal efficiency, Sharkey Hot Springs (Idaho) water chemsitry analysis, and rare earth removal efficiency from select sorbents.

  9. Preparations of rare earth-iron alloys by thermite reduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA); Peterson, David T. (Ames, IA); Wheelock, John T. (Nevada, IA)

    1986-09-16

    An improved method for the preparation of high-purity rare earth-iron alloys by the aluminothermic reduction of a mixture of rare earth and iron fluorides.

  10. Precise trace rare earth analysis by radiochemical neutron activation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laul, J.C.; Lepel, E.A.; Weimer, W.C.; Wogman, N.A.

    1981-06-01

    A rare earth group separation scheme followed by normal Ge(Li), low energy photon detector (LEPD), and Ge(Li)-NaI(Tl) coincidence-noncoincidence spectrometry significantly enhances the detection sensitivity of individual rare earth elements (REE) at or below the ppB level. Based on the selected ..gamma..-ray energies, normal Ge(Li) counting is favored for /sup 140/La, /sup 170/Tb, and /sup 169/Yb; LEPD is favored for low ..gamma..-ray energies of /sup 147/Nd, /sup 153/Sm, /sup 166/Ho, and /sup 169/Yb; and noncoincidence counting is favored for /sup 141/Ce, /sup 143/Ce, /sup 142/Pr, /sup 153/Sm, /sup 171/Er, and /sup 175/Yb. The detection of radionuclides /sup 152m/Eu, /sup 159/Gd, and /sup 177/Lu is equally sensitive by normal Ge(Li) and noncoincidence counting; /sup 152/Eu is equally sensitive by LEPD and normal Ge(Li); and /sup 153/Gd and /sup 170/Tm is equally favored by all the counting modes. Overall, noncoincidence counting is favored for most of the REE. Precise measurements of the REE were made in geological and biological standards.

  11. Rare earth phosphors and phosphor screens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buchanan, Robert A. (Palo Alto, CA); Maple, T. Grant (Sunnyvale, CA); Sklensky, Alden F. (Sunnyvale, CA)

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to rare earth phosphor screens for converting image carrying incident radiation to image carrying visible or near-visible radiation and to the rare earth phosphor materials utilized in such screens. The invention further relates to methods for converting image carrying charged particles to image carrying radiation principally in the blue and near-ultraviolet region of the spectrum and to stabilized rare earth phosphors characterized by having a continuous surface layer of the phosphors of the invention. More particularly, the phosphors of the invention are oxychlorides and oxybromides of yttrium, lanthanum and gadolinium activated with trivalent cerium and the conversion screens are of the type illustratively including x-ray conversion screens, image amplifier tube screens, neutron imaging screens, cathode ray tube screens, high energy gamma ray screens, scintillation detector screens and screens for real-time translation of image carrying high energy radiation to image carrying visible or near-visible radiation.

  12. Catalyst for elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria (Winchester, MA); Liu, Wei (Cambridge, MA)

    1995-01-01

    A catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO.sub.2 -containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides high activity and selectivity, as well as stability in the reaction atmosphere, for the reduction of SO.sub.2 to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over a metal oxide composite catalyst having one of the following empirical formulas: [(OF.sub.2).sub.1-n (RO.sub.1)n].sub.1-k M.sub.k, [(FO.sub.2).sub.1-n (RO.sub.1.5).sub.n ].sub.1-k M.sub.k, or [Ln.sub.x Zr.sub.1-x O.sub.2-0.5x ].sub.1-k M.sub.k wherein FO.sub.2 is a fluorite-type oxide; RO represents an alkaline earth oxide; RO.sub.1.5 is a Group IIIB or rare earth oxide; Ln is a rare earth element having an atomic number from 57 to 65 or mixtures thereof; M is a transition metal or a mixture of transition metals; n is a number having a value from 0.0 to 0.35; k is a number having a value from 0.0 to about 0.5; and x is a number having a value from about 0.45 to about 0.55.

  13. US-Japan theory workshop on 3-D MHD studies: proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carreras, B.A.

    1984-05-01

    Abstracts for 12 of the 15 included papers were entered into EDB. Abstracts for the remaining three papers appeared previously in EDB. (MOW)

  14. 50th Anniversary of U.S.- Japan Health Studies | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... of sessions on risk estimation, noncancer end points, molecular and genetic basis of cancer, dosimetry, and studies on offspring of the atomic bomb survivors, RERF scientists ...

  15. U.S-, Japan Exchange Best Practices on Nuclear Emergency Response...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    S-, Japan Exchange Best Practices on Nuclear Emergency Response | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile...

  16. Method for preparing high cure temperature rare earth iron compound magnetic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, Yuhong; Wei, Qiang; Zheng, Haixing

    2002-01-01

    Insertion of light elements such as H,C, or N in the R.sub.2 Fe.sub.17 (R=rare earth metal) series has been found to modify the magnetic properties of these compounds, which thus become prospective candidates for high performance permanent magnets. The most spectacular changes are increases of the Curie temperature, T.sub.c, of the magnetization, M.sub.s, and of coercivity, H.sub.c, upon interstitial insertion. A preliminary product having a component R--Fe--C,N phase is produced by a chemical route. Rare earth metal and iron amides are synthesized followed by pyrolysis and sintering in an inert or reduced atmosphere, as a result of which, the R--Fe--C,N phases are formed. Fabrication of sintered rare earth iron nitride and carbonitride bulk magnet is impossible via conventional process due to the limitation of nitridation method.

  17. Method of forming magnetostrictive rods from rare earth-iron alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McMasters, O.D.

    1986-09-02

    Rods of magnetostrictive alloys of iron with rare earth elements are formed by flowing a body of rare earth-iron alloy in a crucible enclosed in a chamber maintained under an inert gas atmosphere, forcing such molten rare-earth-iron alloy into a hollow mold tube of refractory material positioned with its lower end portion within the molten body by means of a pressure differential between the chamber and mold tube and maintaining a portion of the molten alloy in the crucible extending to a level above the lower end of the mold tube so that solid particles of higher melting impurities present in the alloy collect at the surface of the molten body and remain within the crucible as the rod is formed in the mold tube. 5 figs.

  18. Method of forming magnetostrictive rods from rare earth-iron alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McMasters, O. Dale (Ames, IA)

    1986-09-02

    Rods of magnetrostructive alloys of iron with rare earth elements are formed by flowing a body of rare earth-iron alloy in a crucible enclosed in a chamber maintained under an inert gas atmosphere, forcing such molten rare-earth-iron alloy into a hollow mold tube of refractory material positioned with its lower end portion within the molten body by means of a pressure differential between the chamber and mold tube and maintaining a portion of the molten alloy in the crucible extending to a level above the lower end of the mold tube so that solid particles of higher melting impurities present in the alloy collect at the surface of the molten body and remain within the crucible as the rod is formed in the mold tube.

  19. Crystalline rare-earth activated oxyorthosilicate phosphor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McClellan, Kenneth J.; Cooke, D. Wayne

    2004-02-10

    Crystalline, transparent, rare-earth activated lutetium oxyorthosilicate phosphor. The phosphor consists essentially of lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate activated with a rare-earth metal dopant M and having the general formula Lu(.sub.2-x-z)Y.sub.x M.sub.z SiO.sub.5, wherein 0.00.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1.95, wherein 0.001.ltoreq.z.ltoreq.0.02, and wherein M is selected from Sm, Tb, Tm, Eu, Yb, and Pr. The phosphor also consists essentially of lutetium gadolinium oxyorthosilicate activated with a rare-earth metal dopant M and having the general formula Lu(.sub.2-x-z)Gd.sub.x M.sub.z SiO.sub.5, wherein 0.00.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1.95, wherein 0.001.ltoreq.z.ltoreq.0.02, and wherein M is selected from Sm, Tb, Tm, Eu, Yb, and Pr. The phosphor also consists essentially of gadolinium yttrium oxyorthosilicate activated with a rare-earth metal dopant M and having the general formula Gd(.sub.2-x-z)Y.sub.x M.sub.z SiO.sub.5, wherein 0.00.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1.95, wherein 0.001.ltoreq.z.ltoreq.0.02, and wherein M is selected from Sm, Tb, Tm, Eu, Yb, and Pr. The phosphor may be optically coupled to a photodetector to provide a radiation detector.

  20. The synthetic elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1990-05-01

    Prior to 1940, the heaviest element known was uranium, discovered in 1789. Since that time the elements 93 through 109 have been synthesized and identified and the elements 43, 61, 85, and 87 which were missing form the periodic tables of the 1930's have been discovered. The techniques and problems involved in these discoveries and the placement of the transuranium elements in the periodic table will be discussed. The production and positive identification of elements heavier than Md (Z=101), which have very short half-lives and can only be produced an atom-at-a-time, are very difficult and there have been controversies concerning their discovery. Some of the new methods which have been developed and used in these studies will be described. The prospects for production of still heavier elements will be considered.

  1. Density-functional calculations for rare-earth atoms and ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forstreuter, J.; Steinbeck, L.; Richter, M.; Eschrig, H.

    1997-04-01

    Relativistic local-spin-density (RLSD) and self-interaction-corrected (SIC) RLSD calculations were performed for the whole series of the rare-earth elements. Ionization potentials and radial expectation values with 4f wave functions were calculated. Improvement on nearly all quantities is found for SIC calculations. Comparison with other calculational methods shows that for a description of rare-earth elements SIC-RLSD competes well in accuracy with all of them, including the most accurate quantum-chemical approach. This is important since the SIC calculation has the advantage of being suited for a description of localized f states in solids with a comparatively moderate effort. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Rate Case Elements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proceeding Rate Information Residential Exchange Program Surplus Power Sales Reports Rate Case Elements BPA's rate cases are decided "on the record." That is, in making a decision...

  3. Behavior Of Rare Earth Element In Geothermal Systems, A NewExploratio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Heber geothermal fields of southern California; and (7) the Dieng field in Central Java, Indonesia. We have analyzed the samples from all fields for REE except the last two....

  4. Rare earths for life: an 85th birthday visit with Mr. Rare Earth...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rare Earth While scientists often talk about their life's work, few lives have been fuller than that of Ames Laboratory's Karl A. Gschneidner, Jr. who's being honored for over...

  5. SEPARATION OF RARE EARTHS BY SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peppard, D.F.; Mason, G.W.

    1960-10-11

    A process is given for separating lanthanide rare earths from each other from an aqueous mineral acid solution, e.g., hydrochloric or nitric acid of a concentration of above 3 M, preferably 12 to 16 M, by extraction with a water- immiscible alkyl phosphate, such as tributyl phosphate or a mixture of mono-, di- and tributyl phosphate, and fractional back-extraction with mineral acid whereby the lanthanides are taken up by the acid in the order of increasing atomic number.

  6. Concerning the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Symons, James

    2013-05-29

    James Symons, Nuclear Science Division Director at Lawrence Berkeley Lab, and Daniela Leitner, head of operations at Berkeley Lab's 88-Inch Cyclotron, discuss major contributions to the new Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) at Michigan State University, including ion source, which will based on the VENUS source built for the 88-Inch Cyclotron, and the GRETA gamma-ray detector now under construction there.

  7. Neutronic fuel element fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korton, George (Cincinnati, OH)

    2004-02-24

    This disclosure describes a method for metallurgically bonding a complete leak-tight enclosure to a matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant channels. Coolant tubes containing solid filler pins are disposed in the coolant channels. A leak-tight metal enclosure is then formed about the entire assembly of fuel matrix, coolant tubes and pins. The completely enclosed and sealed assembly is exposed to a high temperature and pressure gas environment to effect a metallurgical bond between all contacting surfaces therein. The ends of the assembly are then machined away to expose the pin ends which are chemically leached from the coolant tubes to leave the coolant tubes with internal coolant passageways. The invention described herein was made in the course of, or under, a contract with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. It relates generally to fuel elements for neutronic reactors and more particularly to a method for providing a leak-tight metal enclosure for a high-performance matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant tubes. The planned utilization of nuclear energy in high-performance, compact-propulsion and mobile power-generation systems has necessitated the development of fuel elements capable of operating at high power densities. High power densities in turn require fuel elements having high thermal conductivities and good fuel retention capabilities at high temperatures. A metal clad fuel element containing a ceramic phase of fuel intimately mixed with and bonded to a continuous refractory metal matrix has been found to satisfy the above requirements. Metal coolant tubes penetrate the matrix to afford internal cooling to the fuel element while providing positive fuel retention and containment of fission products generated within the fuel matrix. Metal header plates are bonded to the coolant tubes at each end of the fuel element and a metal cladding or can completes the fuel-matrix enclosure by encompassing the sides of the fuel element between the header plates.

  8. Elements in biological AMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogel, J.S.; McAninch, J.; Freeman, S.

    1996-08-01

    AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) provides high detection sensitivity for isotopes whose half-lives are between 10 years and 100 million years. {sup 14}C is the most developed of such isotopes and is used in tracing natural and anthropogenic organic compounds in the Earth`s biosphere. Thirty-three elements in the main periodic table and 17 lanthanides or actinides have long lived isotopes, providing potential tracers for research in elemental biochemistry. Overlap of biologically interesting heavy elements and possible AMS tracers is discussed.

  9. Recycling of rare earth metals from rare earth-transition metal alloy scrap by liquid metal extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellis, Timothy W. (Ames, IA); Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA)

    1995-08-01

    Method of treating rare earth metal-bearing scrap, waste or other material (e.g. Nd--Fe--B or Dy--Tb--Fe scrap) to recover the rare earth metal comprising melting the rare earth metal-bearing material, melting a Group IIA metal extractant, such as Mg, Ca, or Ba, in which the rare earth is soluble in the molten state, and contacting the melted material and melted extractant at a temperature and for a time effective to extract the rare earth from the melted material into the melted extractant. The rare earth metal is separated from the extractant metal by vacuum sublimation or distillation.

  10. Recycling of rare earth metals from rare earth-transition metal alloy scrap by liquid metal extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellis, T.W.; Schmidt, F.A.

    1995-08-01

    A method is described for treating rare earth metal-bearing scrap, waste or other material (e.g. Nd--Fe--B or Dy--Tb--Fe scrap) to recover the rare earth metal comprising melting the rare earth metal-bearing material, melting a Group IIA metal extractant, such as Mg, Ca, or Ba, in which the rare earth is soluble in the molten state, and contacting the melted material and melted extractant at a temperature and for a time effective to extract the rare earth from the melted material into the melted extractant. The rare earth metal is separated from the extractant metal by vacuum sublimation or distillation. 2 figs.

  11. Aljazeera story on rare earths features Alex King | The Ames...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aljazeera story on rare earths features Alex King Aljazeera America recently did a story on the demand and scarcity of rare-earth metals and spoke to Ames Laboratory scientist and...

  12. What would we do without rare earths? | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    an Energy Innovation Hub created by the U.S. Department of Energy, has a big problem to solve -- what would we do without rare earths? Rare earths are a big part of our modern...

  13. The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 2

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Riedemann, Trevor

    2013-03-01

    Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 2 of 4.

  14. The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 3

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Riedemann, Trevor

    2013-03-01

    Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 3 of 4.

  15. Preparations of rare earth-iron alloys by thermite reduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, F.A.; Peterson, D.T.; Wheelock, J.T.

    1985-10-28

    Disclosed is an improved method for the preparation of high-purity rare earth-iron alloys by the aluminothermic reduction of a mixture of rare earth and iron fluorides.

  16. The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 1

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Riedemann, Trevor

    2013-03-01

    Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 1 of 4.

  17. The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 4

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Riedemann, Trevor

    2013-03-01

    Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 4 of 4.

  18. Caterpillar and Cummins Gain Edge Through Argonnne's Rare Computer...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Caterpillar and Cummins Gain Edge Through Argonnne's Rare Computer Modeling and Analysis Resources PDF icon catcumminscomputingsuccessstorydec2015...

  19. DOE Science Showcase - Rare Earth Metal Research from DOE Databases |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information Rare Earth Metal Research from DOE Databases Information Bridge Energy Citations Database Highlighted documents of Rare Earth Metal research in DOE databases Information Bridge - Corrosion-resistant metal surfaces DOE R&D Project Summaries - Structural and magnetic studies on heavy rare earth metals at high pressures using designer diamonds Energy Citations Database - Intermultiplet transitions in rare-earth metals

  20. Rare-Earth-Free Traction Motor: Rare Earth-Free Traction Motor for Electric Vehicle Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    REACT Project: Baldor will develop a new type of traction motor with the potential to efficiently power future generations of EVs. Unlike today’s large, bulky EV motors which use expensive, imported rare-earth-based magnets, Baldor’s motor could be light, compact, contain no rare earth materials, and have the potential to deliver more torque at a substantially lower cost. Key innovations in this project include the use of a unique motor design, incorporation of an improved cooling system, and the development of advanced materials manufacturing techniques. These innovations could significantly reduce the cost of an electric motor.

  1. Effects of simulated rare earth recycling wastewaters on biological nitrification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujita, Yoshiko; Barnes, Joni; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Lencka, Malgorzata M.; Anderko, Andrzej; Riman, Richard E.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-07-16

    Current efforts to increase domestic availability of rare-earth element (REE) supplies by recycling and expanded ore processing efforts will result in increased generation of associated wastewaters. In some cases disposal to a sewage treatment plant may be favored but plant performance must be maintained. To assess the potential effects of such wastewaters on biological wastewater treatment, model nitrifying organisms Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter winogradskyi were exposed to simulated wastewaters containing varying levels of yttrium or europium (10, 50 and 100 ppm), and the REE extractant tributyl phosphate (TBP, at 0.1 g/L). Y and Eu additions above 10 ppm inhibited N. europaea activity, even when initially virtually all of the REE was insoluble. The provision of TBP together with Eu increased inhibition of nitrite production by the N. europaea, although TBP alone did not substantially alter nitrifying activity N. winogradskyi was more sensitive to the stimulated wastewaters, with even 10 ppm Eu or Y inducing significant inhibition, and a complete shutdown of nitrifying activity occurred in the presence of the TBP. To analyze the availability of REEs in aqueous solutions, REE solubility has been calculated using the previously developed MSE (Mixed-Solvent Electrolyte) thermodynamic model. The model calculations reveal a strong pH dependence of solubility, which is typically controlled by the precipitation of REE hydroxides but may also be influenced by the formation of a phosphate phase.

  2. Rare earth patterns in shergottite phosphates and residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laul, J.C.

    1987-03-30

    Leaching experiments with 1M HCl on ALHA 77005 power show that rare earth elements (REE) are concentrated in accessory phosphate phases (whitlockite, apatite) that govern the REE patterns of bulk shergottites. The REE patterns of whitlockite are typically light REE depleted with a negative Eu anomaly and show a hump at the heavy REE side, while the REE pattern of apatite (in Shergotty) is light REE enriched. Parent magmas are calculated from the model compositions of residues of ALHA 77005, Shergotty, and EETA 79001. The parent magmas lack a Eu anomaly, indicating that plagioclase was a late-stage crystallizing phase and it probably crystallized before the phosphates. The parent magmas of ALHA 77005 and Shergotty have similar REE patterns with a subchondritic Nd/Sm ratio. However, the Sm/Nd isotopics require a light REE depleted source for ALHA 77005 (if the crystallization age is <600 m.y.) and a light REE enriched source for Shergotty. Distinct Nd and Sr isotopic signatures may suggest different source regions for shergottites. copyright American Geophysical Union 1987

  3. Effects of simulated rare earth recycling wastewaters on biological nitrification

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fujita, Yoshiko; Barnes, Joni; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Lencka, Malgorzata M.; Anderko, Andrzej; Riman, Richard E.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-07-16

    Current efforts to increase domestic availability of rare-earth element (REE) supplies by recycling and expanded ore processing efforts will result in increased generation of associated wastewaters. In some cases disposal to a sewage treatment plant may be favored but plant performance must be maintained. To assess the potential effects of such wastewaters on biological wastewater treatment, model nitrifying organisms Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter winogradskyi were exposed to simulated wastewaters containing varying levels of yttrium or europium (10, 50 and 100 ppm), and the REE extractant tributyl phosphate (TBP, at 0.1 g/L). Y and Eu additions above 10 ppm inhibited N.more » europaea activity, even when initially virtually all of the REE was insoluble. The provision of TBP together with Eu increased inhibition of nitrite production by the N. europaea, although TBP alone did not substantially alter nitrifying activity N. winogradskyi was more sensitive to the stimulated wastewaters, with even 10 ppm Eu or Y inducing significant inhibition, and a complete shutdown of nitrifying activity occurred in the presence of the TBP. To analyze the availability of REEs in aqueous solutions, REE solubility has been calculated using the previously developed MSE (Mixed-Solvent Electrolyte) thermodynamic model. The model calculations reveal a strong pH dependence of solubility, which is typically controlled by the precipitation of REE hydroxides but may also be influenced by the formation of a phosphate phase.« less

  4. Nuclear fuel element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zocher, Roy W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01

    A nuclear fuel element and a method of manufacturing the element. The fuel element is comprised of a metal primary container and a fuel pellet which is located inside it and which is often fragmented. The primary container is subjected to elevated pressure and temperature to deform the container such that the container conforms to the fuel pellet, that is, such that the container is in substantial contact with the surface of the pellet. This conformance eliminates clearances which permit rubbing together of fuel pellet fragments and rubbing of fuel pellet fragments against the container, thus reducing the amount of dust inside the fuel container and the amount of dust which may escape in the event of container breach. Also, as a result of the inventive method, fuel pellet fragments tend to adhere to one another to form a coherent non-fragmented mass; this reduces the tendency of a fragment to pierce the container in the event of impact.

  5. Elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Zhicheng Hu.

    1993-09-07

    An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO[sub 2] in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst. 4 figures.

  6. Element Partners | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Product: DFJ Element, a partnership between Element Venture Partners and Draper Fisher Jurvetson, manages a venture capital fund focusing on investments in high growth,...

  7. Super-Heavy Element Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Targets for Super-Heavy Element Research Presented at International Workshop on Super-Heavy Element Research SHE-15 J. B. Roberto Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge,...

  8. American Elements | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Elements Jump to: navigation, search Name: American Elements Place: Los Angeles, California Zip: 90024 Product: US-based manufacturer and supplier of PV feedstocks such as silicon,...

  9. Elemental Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Elemental Energy Name: Elemental Energy Address: 14500 SW 92nd Ave Place: Portland, Oregon Country: United States Zip: 97224 Region: Pacific...

  10. Photovoltaic radiation detector element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Agouridis, D.C.

    1980-12-17

    A radiation detector element is formed of a body of semiconductor material, a coating on the body which forms a photovoltaic junction therewith, and a current collector consisting of narrow metallic strips, the aforesaid coating having an opening therein in the edge of which closely approaches but is spaced from the current collector strips.

  11. JACKETED REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, K.F.; Van Thyne, R.J.

    1958-12-01

    A fuel element is described for fast reactors comprised of a core of uranium metal containing material and a jacket around the core, the jacket consisting of from 2.5 to 15 percent of titanium, from 1 to 5 percent of niobium, and from 80 to 96.5 percent of vanadium.

  12. Heating element support clip

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sawyer, William C. (Salida, CA)

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus for supporting a heating element in a channel formed in a heater base is disclosed. A preferred embodiment includes a substantially U-shaped tantalum member. The U-shape is characterized by two substantially parallel portions of tantalum that each have an end connected to opposite ends of a base portion of tantalum. The parallel portions are each substantially perpendicular to the base portion and spaced apart a distance not larger than a width of the channel and not smaller than a width of a graphite heating element. The parallel portions each have a hole therein, and the centers of the holes define an axis that is substantially parallel to the base portion. An aluminum oxide ceramic retaining pin extends through the holes in the parallel portions and into a hole in a wall of the channel to retain the U-shaped member in the channel and to support the graphite heating element. The graphite heating element is confined by the parallel portions of tantalum, the base portion of tantalum, and the retaining pin. A tantalum tube surrounds the retaining pin between the parallel portions of tantalum.

  13. Heating element support clip

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sawyer, W.C.

    1995-08-15

    An apparatus for supporting a heating element in a channel formed in a heater base is disclosed. A preferred embodiment includes a substantially U-shaped tantalum member. The U-shape is characterized by two substantially parallel portions of tantalum that each have an end connected to opposite ends of a base portion of tantalum. The parallel portions are each substantially perpendicular to the base portion and spaced apart a distance not larger than a width of the channel and not smaller than a width of a graphite heating element. The parallel portions each have a hole therein, and the centers of the holes define an axis that is substantially parallel to the base portion. An aluminum oxide ceramic retaining pin extends through the holes in the parallel portions and into a hole in a wall of the channel to retain the U-shaped member in the channel and to support the graphite heating element. The graphite heating element is confined by the parallel portions of tantalum, the base portion of tantalum, and the retaining pin. A tantalum tube surrounds the retaining pin between the parallel portions of tantalum. 6 figs.

  14. Senescence responsive transcriptional element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campisi, Judith; Testori, Alessandro

    1999-01-01

    Recombinant polynucleotides have expression control sequences that have a senescence responsive element and a minimal promoter, and which are operatively linked to a heterologous nucleotide sequence. The molecules are useful for achieving high levels of expression of genes in senescent cells. Methods of inhibiting expression of genes in senescent cells also are provided.

  15. Finite Element Analysis Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-03-08

    MAPVAR-KD is designed to transfer solution results from one finite element mesh to another. MAPVAR-KD draws heavily from the structure and coding of MERLIN II, but it employs a new finite element data base, EXODUS II, and offers enhanced speed and new capabilities not available in MERLIN II. In keeping with the MERLIN II documentation, the computational algorithms used in MAPVAR-KD are described. User instructions are presented. Example problems are included to demonstrate the operationmore »of the code and the effects of various input options. MAPVAR-KD is a modification of MAPVAR in which the search algorithm was replaced by a kd-tree-based search for better performance on large problems.« less

  16. OXIDATION OF TRANSURANIC ELEMENTS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, R.L.

    1959-02-17

    A method is reported for oxidizing neptunium or plutonium in the presence of cerous values without also oxidizing the cerous values. The method consists in treating an aqueous 1N nitric acid solution, containing such cerous values together with the trivalent transuranic elements, with a quantity of hydrogen peroxide stoichiometrically sufficient to oxidize the transuranic values to the hexavalent state, and digesting the solution at room temperature.

  17. Nuclear fuel element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meadowcroft, Ronald Ross; Bain, Alastair Stewart

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear fuel element wherein a tubular cladding of zirconium or a zirconium alloy has a fission gas plenum chamber which is held against collapse by the loops of a spacer in the form of a tube which has been deformed inwardly at three equally spaced, circumferential positions to provide three loops. A heat resistant disc of, say, graphite separates nuclear fuel pellets within the cladding from the plenum chamber. The spacer is of zirconium or a zirconium alloy.

  18. Synthesis and Characterization of Rare-earth-free Magnetic Manganese Bismuth Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Jian Q.; Cui, Huizhong; Huang, Xiaopeng; Gong, Maogang; Qin, Wei; Kirkeminde, Alec; Cui, Jun; Ren, Shenqiang

    2015-01-01

    Earth abundant manganese bismuth (MnBi) has long been of interest due to its large magnetocrystalline anisotropy and high energy density for advanced permanent magnet applications. However, solution synthesis of MnBi phase is challenging due to the reduction potential mismatch between Mn and Bi elements. In this study, we show a versatile MnBi synthesis method involving the metal co-reduction followed by thermal annealing. The magnetically hard MnBi crystalline phase is then exchange coupled with magnetically soft cobalt coating. Our processing approach offers a promising strategy for manufacturing rare-earth-free magnetic nanocrystals.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of rare-earth-free magnetic manganese bismuth nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, J; Cui, HZ; Huang, XP; Gong, MG; Qin, W; Kirkeminde, A; Cui, J; Ren, SQ

    2015-01-01

    Earth abundant manganese bismuth (MnBi) has long been of interest due to its largemagnetocrystalline anisotropy and high energy density for advanced permanent magnet applications. However, solution synthesis of MnBi phase is challenging due to the reduction potential mismatch between Mn and Bi elements. In this study, we show a versatile MnBi synthesis method involving the metal co-reduction followed by thermal annealing. The magnetically hard MnBi crystalline phase is then exchange coupled with magnetically soft cobalt coating. Our processing approach offers a promising strategy for manufacturing rare-earth-free magnetic nanocrystals.

  20. Enhanced pinning in mixed rare earth-123 films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Driscoll, Judith L. (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-06-16

    An superconductive article and method of forming such an article is disclosed, the article including a substrate and a layer of a rare earth barium cuprate film upon the substrate, the rare earth barium cuprate film including two or more rare earth metals capable of yielding a superconductive composition where ion size variance between the two or more rare earth metals is characterized as greater than zero and less than about 10.times.10.sup.-4, and the rare earth barium cuprate film including two or more rare earth metals is further characterized as having an enhanced critical current density in comparison to a standard YBa.sub.2Cu.sub.3O.sub.y composition under identical testing conditions.

  1. Fact Sheet: Facility For Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) Applicant Selection |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Facility For Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) Applicant Selection Fact Sheet: Facility For Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) Applicant Selection December 11, 2008 - 8:51am Addthis Based on the analyses and recommendations over the last decade, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science determined that the establishment of a Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) is a high priority for the future of U.S. nuclear science research. This determination and supporting rationale

  2. COLLOQUIUM: Facility for Rare Isotope Beams - Scientific Opportunities and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technical Challenges | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab February 4, 2015, 4:00pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Facility for Rare Isotope Beams - Scientific Opportunities and Technical Challenges Dr. Georg Bollen Michigan State University - The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams Wednesday Colloquium, February 4, 2015, "Facility for Rare Isotope Beams - Scientific Opportunities and Technial Chanllenges", Dr. Georg Bollen Colloquium Committee: The Princeton Plasma Physics

  3. The transuranium elements: From neptunium and plutonium to element 112

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, D.C. |

    1996-07-26

    Beginning in the 1930`s, both chemists and physicists became interested in synthesizing new artificial elements. The first transuranium element, Np, was synthesized in 1940. Over the past six decades, 20 transuranium elements have been produced. A review of the synthesis is given. The procedure of naming the heavy elements is also discussed. It appears feasible to produce elements 113 and 114. With the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator, it should be possible to reach the superheavy elements in the region of the spherical Z=114 shell, but with fewer neutrons than the N=184 spherical shell. 57 refs, 6 figs.

  4. Rare Earth Metals for Science | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center (MPC) by one of the following processes: vacuum casting sublimation distillation zone refining electro-transport processing More information on the rare-earth...

  5. CHARACTERIZATION OF NEAR NET-SHAPE CASTABLE RARE EARTH MODIFIED...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    HIGH TEMPERATURE APPLICATION Citation Details In-Document Search Title: CHARACTERIZATION OF NEAR NET-SHAPE CASTABLE RARE EARTH MODIFIED ALUMINUM ALLOYS FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE ...

  6. DOE Announces RFI on Rare Earth Metals | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    RFI on Rare Earth Metals DOE Announces RFI on Rare Earth Metals May 6, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - The Department of Energy has released a Request for Information (RFI) soliciting information on rare earth metals and other materials used in the energy sector. The request is specifically focused on rare earth metals (e.g., lanthanum, cerium and neodymium) and several other metals including lithium and cobalt, but respondents are welcome to identify other materials of interest. These

  7. Lepton flavor violation in Higgs boson decays under the rare...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    experimental results and also from requirements of theoretical consistencies such as vacuum stability and perturbative unitarity. Current data for rare tau decays provide...

  8. Organic-Inorganic Complexes Containing a Luminescent Rare Earth...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a Luminescent Rare Earth-Metal Nanocluster and an Antenna Ligand, Luminescent Articles, and Methods of Making Luminescent Articles Powerpane TM Battelle Memorial Institute...

  9. At 85, Mr. Rare Earth is Retiring | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    At 85, Mr. Rare Earth is Retiring At 85, Mr. Rare Earth is Retiring February 19, 2016 - 11:00am Addthis We first talked to Dr. Gschneider back in 2013 for one of our <a href="/node/609731">"10 Questions with a Scientist"</a> blogs. Today he looks back at over 60 years of studying rare earth metals. We first talked to Dr. Gschneider back in 2013 for one of our "10 Questions with a Scientist" blogs. Today he looks back at over 60 years of studying rare

  10. Actinide targets for the synthesis of super-heavy elements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Roberto, J.; Alexander, Charles W.; Boll, Rose Ann; Ezold, Julie G.; Felker, Leslie Kevin; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Hogle, Susan L.

    2015-06-18

    Since 2000, six new super-heavy elements with atomic numbers 113 through 118 have been synthesized in hot fusion reactions of 48Ca beams on actinide targets. These target materials, including 242Pu, 244Pu, 243Am, 245Cm, 248Cm, 249Cf, and 249Bk, are available in very limited quantities and require specialized production and processing facilities resident in only a few research centers worldwide. This report describes the production and chemical processing of heavy actinide materials for super-heavy element research, current availabilities of these materials, and related target fabrication techniques. The impact of actinide materials in super-heavy element discovery is reviewed, and strategies for enhancing themore » production of rare actinides including 249Bk, 251Cf, and 254Es are described.« less

  11. Finite Element Analysis Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-05-07

    CONEX is a code for joining sequentially in time multiple exodusll database files which all represent the same base mesh topology and geometry. It is used to create a single results or restart file from multiple results or restart files which typically arise as the result of multiple restarted analyses. CONEX is used to postprocess the results from a series of finite element analyses. It can join sequentially the data from multiple results databases intomore »a single database which makes it easier to postprocess the results data.« less

  12. Nuclear reactor fuel element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Carl E. (Elk Grove, IL); Crouthamel, Carl E. (Richland, WA)

    1980-01-01

    A nuclear reactor fuel element is described which has an outer cladding, a central core of fissionable or mixed fissionable and fertile fuel material and a layer of oxygen gettering material on the inner surface of the cladding. The gettering material reacts with oxygen released by the fissionable material during irradiation of the core thereby preventing the oxygen from reacting with and corroding the cladding. Also described is an improved method for coating the inner surface of the cladding with a layer of gettering material.

  13. Magnetic properties of RT2Zn20; R = rare earth, T = Fe, Co, Ru, Os and Ir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, Shuang

    2008-12-15

    It is well known that rare earth intermetallic compounds have versatile, magnetic properties associated with the 4f electrons: a local moment associated with the Hund's rule ground state is formed in general, but a strongly correlated, hybridized state may also appear for specific 4f electronic configuration (eg. for rare earth elements such as Ce or Yb). On the other hand, the conduction electrons in rare earth intermetallic compounds, certainly ones associated with non hybridizing rare earths, usually manifest non-magnetic behavior and can be treated as a normal, non-interacted Fermi liquid, except for some 3d-transition metal rich binary or ternary systems which often manifest strong, itinerant, d electron dominant magnetic behavior. Of particular interest are examples in which the band filling of the conduction electrons puts the system in the vicinity of a Stoner transition: such systems, characterized as nearly or weakly ferromagnet, manifest strongly correlated electronic properties [Moriya, 1985]. For rare earth intermetallic compounds, such systems provide an additional versatility and allow for the study of the behaviors of local moments and hybridized moments which are associated with 4f electron in a correlated conduction electron background.

  14. Tunable, rare earth-doped solid state lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Emmett, John L. (Pleasanton, CA); Jacobs, Ralph R. (Livermore, CA); Krupke, William F. (Pleasanton, CA); Weber, Marvin J. (Danville, CA)

    1980-01-01

    Laser apparatus comprising combinations of an excimer pump laser and a rare earth-doped solid matrix, utilizing the 5d-4f radiative transition in a rare earth ion to produce visible and ultra-violet laser radiation with high overall efficiency in selected cases and relatively long radiative lifetimes.

  15. Cohesive Zone Model User Element

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-04-17

    Cohesive Zone Model User Element (CZM UEL) is an implementation of a Cohesive Zone Model as an element for use in finite element simulations. CZM UEL computes a nodal force vector and stiffness matrix from a vector of nodal displacements. It is designed for structural analysts using finite element software to predict crack initiation, crack propagation, and the effect of a crack on the rest of a structure.

  16. Influence of rare earth doping on thermoelectric properties of SrTiO{sub 3} ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, J. Wang, C. L.; Li, Y.; Su, W. B.; Zhu, Y. H.; Li, J. C.; Mei, L. M.

    2013-12-14

    Thermoelectric properties of SrTiO{sub 3} ceramics, doped with different rare earth elements, were investigated in this work. It's found that the ionic radius of doping elements plays an important role on thermoelectric properties: SrTiO{sub 3} ceramics doped with large rare earth ions (such as La, Nd, and Sm) exhibit large power factors, and those doped with small ions (such as Gd, Dy, Er, and Y) exhibit low thermal conductivities. Therefore, a simple approach for enhancing the thermoelectric performance of SrTiO{sub 3} ceramics is proposed: mainly doped with large ions to obtain a large power factor and, simultaneously, slightly co-doped with small ions to obtain a low thermal conductivity. Based on this rule, Sr{sub 0.8}La{sub 0.18}Yb{sub 0.02}TiO{sub 3} ceramics were prepared, whose ZT value at 1?023?K reaches 0.31, increasing by a factor of 19% compared with the single-doped counterpart Sr{sub 0.8}La{sub 0.2}TiO{sub 3} (ZT?=?0.26)

  17. REACTOR FUEL ELEMENTS TESTING CONTAINER

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whitham, G.K.; Smith, R.R.

    1963-01-15

    This patent shows a method for detecting leaks in jacketed fuel elements. The element is placed in a sealed tank within a nuclear reactor, and, while the reactor operates, the element is sparged with gas. The gas is then led outside the reactor and monitored for radioactive Xe or Kr. (AEC)

  18. Multi-element microelectropolishing method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Peter J. (Middleton, WI)

    1994-01-01

    A method is provided for microelectropolishing a transmission electron microscopy nonhomogeneous multi-element compound foil. The foil is electrolyzed at different polishing rates for different elements by rapidly cycling between different current densities. During a first portion of each cycle at a first voltage a first element electrolyzes at a higher current density than a second element such that the material of the first element leaves the anode foil at a faster rate than the second element and creates a solid surface film, and such that the solid surface film is removed at a faster rate than the first element leaves the anode foil. During a second portion of each cycle at a second voltage the second element electrolyzes at a higher current density than the first element, and the material of the second element leaves the anode foil at a faster rate than the first element and creates a solid surface film, and the solid surface film is removed at a slower rate than the second element leaves the foil. The solid surface film is built up during the second portion of the cycle, and removed during the first portion of the cycle.

  19. Multi-element microelectropolishing method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, P.J.

    1994-10-11

    A method is provided for microelectropolishing a transmission electron microscopy nonhomogeneous multi-element compound foil. The foil is electrolyzed at different polishing rates for different elements by rapidly cycling between different current densities. During a first portion of each cycle at a first voltage a first element electrolyzes at a higher current density than a second element such that the material of the first element leaves the anode foil at a faster rate than the second element and creates a solid surface film, and such that the solid surface film is removed at a faster rate than the first element leaves the anode foil. During a second portion of each cycle at a second voltage the second element electrolyzes at a higher current density than the first element, and the material of the second element leaves the anode foil at a faster rate than the first element and creates a solid surface film, and the solid surface film is removed at a slower rate than the second element leaves the foil. The solid surface film is built up during the second portion of the cycle, and removed during the first portion of the cycle. 10 figs.

  20. Photoconductive circuit element reflectometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rauscher, Christen (Alexandria, VA)

    1990-01-01

    A photoconductive reflectometer for characterizing semiconductor devices at millimeter wavelength frequencies where a first photoconductive circuit element (PCE) is biased by a direct current voltage source and produces short electrical pulses when excited into conductance by short first laser light pulses. The electrical pulses are electronically conditioned to improve the frequency related amplitude characteristics of the pulses which thereafter propagate along a transmission line to a device under test. Second PCEs are connected along the transmission line to sample the signals on the transmission line when excited into conductance by short second laser light pulses, spaced apart in time a variable period from the first laser light pulses. Electronic filters connected to each of the second PCEs act as low-pass filters and remove parasitic interference from the sampled signals and output the sampled signals in the form of slowed-motion images of the signals on the transmission line.

  1. Nuclear fuel element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Armijo, Joseph S.; Coffin, Jr., Louis F.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear fuel element for use in the core of a nuclear reactor is disclosed and has a composite cladding having a substrate and a metal barrier metallurgically bonded on the inside surface of the substrate so that the metal barrier forms a shield between the substrate and the nuclear fuel material held within the cladding. The metal barrier forms about 1 to about 30 percent of the thickness of the cladding and is comprised of a low neutron absorption metal of substantially pure zirconium. The metal barrier serves as a preferential reaction site for gaseous impurities and fission products and protects the substrate from contact and reaction with such impurities and fission products. The substrate of the composite cladding is selected from conventional cladding materials and preferably is a zirconium alloy. Methods of manufacturing the composite cladding are also disclosed.

  2. Nuclear fuel element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Armijo, Joseph S.; Coffin, Jr., Louis F.

    1980-04-29

    A nuclear fuel element for use in the core of a nuclear reactor is disclosed and has an improved composite cladding comprised of a moderate purity metal barrier of zirconium metallurgically bonded on the inside surface of a zirconium alloy tube. The metal barrier forms a shield between the alloy tube and a core of nuclear fuel material enclosed in the composite cladding. There is a gap between the cladding and the core. The metal barrier forms about 1 to about 30 percent of the thickness of the composite cladding and has low neutron absorption characteristics. The metal barrier serves as a preferential reaction site for gaseous impurities and fission products and protects the alloy tube from contact and reaction with such impurities and fission products. Methods of manufacturing the composite cladding are also disclosed.

  3. Photoconductive circuit element reflectometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rauscher, C.

    1987-12-07

    A photoconductive reflectometer for characterizing semiconductor devices at millimeter wavelength frequencies where a first photoconductive circuit element (PCE) is biased by a direct current voltage source and produces short electrical pulses when excited into conductance by short first laser light pulses. The electrical pulses are electronically conditioned to improve the frequency related amplitude characteristics of the pulses which thereafter propagate along a transmission line to a device under test. Second PCEs are connected along the transmission line to sample the signals on the transmission line when excited into conductance by short second laser light pulses, spaced apart in time a determinable period from the first laser light pulses. Electronic filters connected to each of the second PCEs act as low-pass filters and remove parasitic interference from the sampled signals and output the sampled signals in the form of slowed-motion images of the signals on the transmission line. 4 figs.

  4. Resistive hydrogen sensing element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2000-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for providing a hydrogen sensing element with a more robust exposed metallization by application of a discontinuous or porous overlay to hold the metallization firmly on the substrate. An apparatus includes: a substantially inert, electrically-insulating substrate; a first Pd containing metallization deposited upon the substrate and completely covered by a substantially hydrogen-impermeable layer so as to form a reference resistor on the substrate; a second Pd containing metallization deposited upon the substrate and at least a partially accessible to a gas to be tested, so as to form a hydrogen-sensing resistor; a protective structure disposed upon at least a portion of the second Pd containing metallization and at least a portion of the substrate to improve the attachment of the second Pd containing metallization to the substrate while allowing the gas to contact said the second Pd containing metallization; and a resistance bridge circuit coupled to both the first and second Pd containing metallizations. The circuit determines the difference in electrical resistance between the first and second Pd containing metallizations. The hydrogen concentration in the gas may be determined. The systems and methods provide advantages because adhesion is improved without adversely effecting measurement speed or sensitivity.

  5. Cerium-Based Magnets: Novel High Energy Permanent Magnet Without Critical Elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    REACT Project: Ames Laboratory will develop a new class of permanent magnets based on the more commonly available element cerium for use in both EVs and renewable power generators. Cerium is 4 times more abundant and significantly less expensive than the rare earth element neodymium, which is frequently used in today’s most powerful magnets. Ames Laboratory will combine other metal elements with cerium to create a new magnet that can remain stable at the high temperatures typically found in electric motors. This new magnetic material will ultimately be demonstrated in a prototype electric motor, representing a cost-effective and efficient alternative to neodymium-based motors.

  6. Critical Materials and Rare Futures: Ames Laboratory Signs a...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Signs a New Agreement on Rare-Earth Research June 15, 2011 - 7:07pm Addthis The plasma torch in the Retech plasma furnace is one tool used in Materials Preparation Center to...

  7. Formation of rare earth carbonates using supercritical carbon dioxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fernando, Quintus (Tucson, AZ); Yanagihara, Naohisa (Zacopan, MX); Dyke, James T. (Santa Fe, NM); Vemulapalli, Krishna (Tuscon, AZ)

    1991-09-03

    The invention relates to a process for the rapid, high yield conversion of select rare earth oxides or hydroxides, to their corresponding carbonates by contact with supercritical carbon dioxide.

  8. Caterpillar and Cummins Gain Edge Through Argonnne's Rare Computer Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Analysis Resources | Argonne National Laboratory Caterpillar and Cummins Gain Edge Through Argonnne's Rare Computer Modeling and Analysis Resources A private industry success story. PDF icon cat_cummins_computing_success_story_dec_

  9. Chemical pressure and hidden one-dimensional behavior in rare...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    report on the first optical measurements of the rare-earth tri-telluride charge-density-wave systems. Our data, collected over an extremely broad spectral range, allow us to...

  10. FUEL ELEMENT FOR NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, T.C.; Beasley, E.G.

    1961-01-17

    A fuel element for neutronic reactors, particularly the gas-cooled type of reactor, is described. The element comprises a fuel-bearing plate rolled to form a cylinder having a spiral passageway passing from its periphery to its center. In operation a coolant is admitted to the passageway at the periphery of the element, is passed through the spiral passageway, and emerges into a central channel defined by the inner turn of the rolled plate. The advantage of the element is that the fully heated coolant (i.e., coolant emerging into the central channel) is separated and thus insulated from the periphery of the element, which may be in contact with a low-temperature moderator, by the intermediate turns of the spiral fuel element.

  11. FUEL ELEMENT FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bassett, C.H.

    1961-05-16

    A fuel element particularly adapted for use in nuclear reactors of high power density is offered. It has fissionable fuel pellet segments mounted in a tubular housing and defining a central passage in the fuel element. A burnable poison element extends through the central passage, which is designed to contain more poison material at the median portion than at the end portions thereby providing a more uniform hurnup and longer reactivity life.

  12. Finite element modeling of lightning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, C.C.; Huang, S.R.; Bor, S.S.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper the transmission line equation which describes the transient voltage and current distributions of a lightning stroke is employed. Finite element method is used to derive the element equations and one-dimensional linear elements are used to discretize the field region. The implicit Newmark time integration technique is used to convert the resulting second-order ordinary differential equations into a set of recurrence equations which are then solved at each time step. Numerical example is included and discussed.

  13. Non-Rare Earth magnetic materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    magnetic materials Non-Rare Earth magnetic materials 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon pm035_mcguire_2011_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Non-Rare Earth magnetic materials (Agreement ID:19201) Vehicle Technologies Office: 2011 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2012 Propulsion

  14. Extraordinary Responsive Rare Earth Magnetic Materials | The Ames

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Extraordinary Responsive Rare Earth Magnetic Materials Research Personnel Updates Publications https://www.ameslab.gov/dmse/highlight/real-estate-atoms-it-all-about-location-location-location Read More Rare Earth Alloys - Why Purity Matters Read More A Mystery at Cryogenic Temperatures Read More Previous Pause Next Synthesis Responsive systems, where a small change of an extrinsic thermodynamic variable, such as temperature, pressure, or magnetic field, triggers an intrinsic phase

  15. Spomenka Kobe, Jozef Stefan Institut, Rare Earth Magnets in Europe |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Spomenka Kobe, Jozef Stefan Institut, Rare Earth Magnets in Europe Spomenka Kobe, Jozef Stefan Institut, Rare Earth Magnets in Europe PDF icon Session_B4_Kobe_-_Josef_Stefan_Institut.pdf More Documents & Publications George Hadjipanayis, Chairman, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Moving Beyond Neodymium-Iron Permanent Magnets for EV Motors Iowa lab gets critical materials research center Unique Lanthide-Free Motor Construction

  16. Element Labs | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Labs Jump to: navigation, search Name: Element Labs Address: 3350 Scott Blvd Place: Santa Clara, California Zip: 95054 Region: Bay Area Sector: Efficiency Product: LED Producer...

  17. Structural and Crystal Chemical Properties of Alkali Rare-earth Double Phosphates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, James Matthew; Boatner, Lynn A.; Chakoumakos, Bryan C.; Rawn, Claudia J.; Richardson, Jim

    2015-09-16

    When appropriately activated, alkali rare-earth double phosphates of the form: M3RE(PO4)2 (where M denotes an alkali metal and RE represents either a rare-earth element or Y or Sc) are of interest for use as inorganic scintillators for radiation detection at relatively long optical emission wavelengths. These compounds exhibit layered crystal structures whose symmetry properties depend on the relative sizes of the rare-earth and alkali-metal cations. Single-crystal X-ray and powder neutron diffraction methods were used here to refine the structures of the series of rare-earth double phosphate compounds: K3RE(PO4)2 with RE = Lu, Er, Ho, Dy, Gd, Nd, Ce, plus Y and Sc - as well as the compounds: A3Lu(PO4)2, with A = Rb, and Cs. The double phosphate K3Lu(PO4)2 was reported and structurally refined previously. This material had a hexagonal unit cell at room temperature with the Lu ion six-fold coordinated with oxygen atoms of the surrounding phosphate groups. Additionally two lower-temperature phases were observed for K3Lu(PO4)2. The first phase transition to a monoclinic P21/m phase occurred at ~230 K, and the Lu ion retained its six-fold coordination. The second K3Lu(PO4)2 phase transition occurred at ~130 K. The P21/m space group symmetry was retained, however, one of the phosphate groups rotated to increase the oxygen coordination number of Lu from six to seven. This structure then became isostructural with the room-temperature form of the compound K3Yb(PO4)2 reported here that also exhibits an additional high-temperature phase which occurs at T = 120 °C with a transformation to hexagonal P-3 space group symmetry and a Yb-ion coordination number reduction from seven to six. This latter result was confirmed using EXAFS. The single-crystal growth methods structural systematics, and thermal expansion properties of the present series of alkali rare-earth double phosphates, as determined by X-ray and neutron diffraction methods, are treated here.

  18. Structural and Crystal Chemical Properties of Alkali Rare-earth Double Phosphates

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Farmer, James Matthew; Boatner, Lynn A.; Chakoumakos, Bryan C.; Rawn, Claudia J.; Richardson, Jim

    2015-09-16

    When appropriately activated, alkali rare-earth double phosphates of the form: M3RE(PO4)2 (where M denotes an alkali metal and RE represents either a rare-earth element or Y or Sc) are of interest for use as inorganic scintillators for radiation detection at relatively long optical emission wavelengths. These compounds exhibit layered crystal structures whose symmetry properties depend on the relative sizes of the rare-earth and alkali-metal cations. Single-crystal X-ray and powder neutron diffraction methods were used here to refine the structures of the series of rare-earth double phosphate compounds: K3RE(PO4)2 with RE = Lu, Er, Ho, Dy, Gd, Nd, Ce, plus Ymore » and Sc - as well as the compounds: A3Lu(PO4)2, with A = Rb, and Cs. The double phosphate K3Lu(PO4)2 was reported and structurally refined previously. This material had a hexagonal unit cell at room temperature with the Lu ion six-fold coordinated with oxygen atoms of the surrounding phosphate groups. Additionally two lower-temperature phases were observed for K3Lu(PO4)2. The first phase transition to a monoclinic P21/m phase occurred at ~230 K, and the Lu ion retained its six-fold coordination. The second K3Lu(PO4)2 phase transition occurred at ~130 K. The P21/m space group symmetry was retained, however, one of the phosphate groups rotated to increase the oxygen coordination number of Lu from six to seven. This structure then became isostructural with the room-temperature form of the compound K3Yb(PO4)2 reported here that also exhibits an additional high-temperature phase which occurs at T = 120 °C with a transformation to hexagonal P-3 space group symmetry and a Yb-ion coordination number reduction from seven to six. This latter result was confirmed using EXAFS. The single-crystal growth methods structural systematics, and thermal expansion properties of the present series of alkali rare-earth double phosphates, as determined by X-ray and neutron diffraction methods, are treated here.« less

  19. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Deevi, Seetharama C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Fleischhauer, Grier S. (Midlothian, VA); Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Richmond, VA); Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton (Chesterfield, VA)

    2001-01-01

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  20. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, V.K.; Deevi, S.C.; Fleischhauer, G.S.; Hajaligol, M.R.; Lilly, A.C. Jr.

    1997-04-15

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, {<=}1% Cr and either {>=}0.05% Zr or ZrO{sub 2} stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or {>=}0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, {<=}2% Ti, {<=}2% Mo, {<=}1% Zr, {<=}1% C, {<=}0.1% B, {<=}30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, {<=}1% rare earth metal, {<=}1% oxygen, {<=}3% Cu, balance Fe. 64 figs.

  1. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Deevi, Seetharama C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Fleischhauer, Grier S. (Midlothian, VA); Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Richmond, VA); Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton (Chesterfield, VA)

    1997-01-01

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  2. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Deevi, Seetharama C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Fleischhauer, Grier S. (Midlothian, VA); Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Richmond, VA); Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton (Chesterfield, VA)

    1999-01-01

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  3. Theory of rare Kaon and Pion decays (Journal Article) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Theory of rare Kaon and Pion decays Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Theory of rare Kaon and Pion decays I discuss recent theoretical progress in rare (leptonic) decay...

  4. US-Japan seminar on magnetic multilayered structures held in Kauai, Hawaii on 15-17 May 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-17

    This seminar included the following topics: Advancement in soft magnetic materials by means of multilayering, Elastic moduli of metallic multilayered films measured by Brillouin Scattering method, Structural aspects of the superlattices under high pressure, Structural influence on the magnetic anisotropy of Co/Pd superlattices, Low dimensional magnetic and structural effects in single crystals grown by molecular beam epitaxy, Polarized neutron reflection and diffraction from magnetic superlattices, and Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of magnetic multilayers.

  5. US-Japan workshop Q-181 on high heat flux components and plasma-surface interactions for next devices: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGrath, R.T.; Yamashina, T.

    1994-04-01

    This report contain viewgraphs of papers from the following sessions: plasma facing components issues for future machines; recent PMI results from several tokamaks; high heat flux technology; plasma facing components design and applications; plasma facing component materials and irradiation damage; boundary layer plasma; plasma disruptions; conditioning and tritium; and erosion/redeposition.

  6. Department of Energy Hosts First Steering Committee Meeting on U.S.- Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy, Dennis R. Spurgeon, today hosted Director-General of Japan's Agency of Natural Resources and Energy, Harufumi...

  7. The impact of trade costs on rare earth exports : a stochastic frontier estimation approach.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanyal, Prabuddha; Brady, Patrick Vane; Vugrin, Eric D.

    2013-09-01

    The study develops a novel stochastic frontier modeling approach to the gravity equation for rare earth element (REE) trade between China and its trading partners between 2001 and 2009. The novelty lies in differentiating betweenbehind the border' trade costs by China and theimplicit beyond the border costs' of China's trading partners. Results indicate that the significance level of the independent variables change dramatically over the time period. While geographical distance matters for trade flows in both periods, the effect of income on trade flows is significantly attenuated, possibly capturing the negative effects of financial crises in the developed world. Second, the total export losses due tobehind the border' trade costs almost tripled over the time period. Finally, looking atimplicit beyond the border' trade costs, results show China gaining in some markets, although it is likely that some countries are substituting away from Chinese REE exports.

  8. Rare earth/iron fluoride and methods for making and using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA); Wheelock, John T. (Neveda, IA); Peterson, David T. (Ames, IA)

    1991-12-17

    A particulate mixture of Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 and RE.sub.2 O.sub.3, where RE is a rare earth element, is reacted with an excess of HF acid to form an insoluble fluoride compound (salt) comprising REF.sub.3 and FeF.sub.3 present in solid solution in the REF.sub.3 crystal lattice. The REF.sub.3 /FeF.sub.3 compound is dried to render it usable as a reactant in the thermite reduction process as well as other processes which require an REF.sub.3 /FeF.sub.3 mixture. The dried REF.sub.3 /FeF.sub.3 compound comprises about 5 weight % to about 40 weight % of FeF.sub.3 and the balance REF.sub.3 to this end.

  9. Modeling the value recovery of rare earth permanent magnets at end-of-life

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cong, Liang; Jin, Hongyue; Fitsos, Pete; McIntyre, Timothy; Yih, Yuehwern; Zhao, Fu; Sutherland, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Permanent magnets containing rare earth elements (REEs) such as Dysprosium and Neodymium offer an advantage over non-REE containing magnets (e.g., ferrite and AlNiCo) in terms of power relative to size. However, REE availability has varied significantly in recent years leading to volatility in the cost of rare earth permanent magnets (REPMs). The supply of REEs can be increased by recycling consumer products and industrial machinery that contain REPMs at product end-of-life (EOL). This paper discusses the REE recovery process for EOL products. The optimal dismantling of products is examined with an emphasis placed on obtaining used REPMs. The challenge ofmore » collecting, managing, transporting, and processing used products is addressed through the development of a cost model for REPM recovery. This model is used to investigate several EOL strategies for recovering REPMs. Sensitivity analysis is conducted to identify the key factors that influence value recovery economics. A hard disk drive serves as a case study for model demonstration.« less

  10. Modeling the value recovery of rare earth permanent magnets at end-of-life

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cong, Liang; Jin, Hongyue; Fitsos, Pete; McIntyre, Timothy; Yih, Yuehwern; Zhao, Fu; Sutherland, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Permanent magnets containing rare earth elements (REEs) such as Dysprosium and Neodymium offer an advantage over non-REE containing magnets (e.g., ferrite and AlNiCo) in terms of power relative to size. However, REE availability has varied significantly in recent years leading to volatility in the cost of rare earth permanent magnets (REPMs). The supply of REEs can be increased by recycling consumer products and industrial machinery that contain REPMs at product end-of-life (EOL). This paper discusses the REE recovery process for EOL products. The optimal dismantling of products is examined with an emphasis placed on obtaining used REPMs. The challenge of collecting, managing, transporting, and processing used products is addressed through the development of a cost model for REPM recovery. This model is used to investigate several EOL strategies for recovering REPMs. Sensitivity analysis is conducted to identify the key factors that influence value recovery economics. A hard disk drive serves as a case study for model demonstration.

  11. Wall rock-magma interactions in Etna, Italy, studied by U-Th disequilibrium and rare earth element systematics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villemant, B. CNRS URA 196, Paris ); Michaud, V.; Metrich, N. )

    1993-03-01

    [sup 230]Th/[sup 238]U disequilibria have been studied in xenoliths and associated lavas of the 1892 and 1989 eruptions of Etna. Most xenoliths are out of secular equilibrium within 1 [sigma] errors and have lower [sup 230]Th/[sup 232]Th ratios than their host magmas. Siliceous and peraluminous xenoliths display large ranges of Th/U ratios for similar [sup 230]Th/[sup 232]Th values, which are interpreted in terms of Th isotopic rehomogenization. The siliceous xenoliths have also suffered thorium and uranium enrichments, which are best explained by chemical diffusion between xenolith melts and differentiated magmas. Estimates of thorium self-diffusivities and [sup 230]Th-[sup 238]U disequilibria give age constraints on these events corresponding to the last major volcanic event of Etna at 14 ka (formation of the elliptic crater caldera). These results suggest that magma storage in superficial and long-lived magma chambers favors the thorium isotopic homogenization of wall rocks by a thermal effect. Chemical diffusion of uranium and thorium and isotopic homogenization between siliceous melts of wall rocks and differentiated magmas may significantly modify the initial thorium isotopic compositions. Such contamination processes could explain the large variations of the [sup 230]Th/[sup 232]Th initial ratios of Etna magmas. 33 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Method for detecting an element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blackwood, Larry G.; Reber, Edward L.; Rohde, Kenneth W.

    2007-02-06

    A method for detecting an element is disclosed and which includes the steps of providing a gamma-ray spectrum which depicts, at least in part, a test region having boundaries, and which has a small amount of the element to be detected; providing a calculation which detects the small amount of the element to be detected; and providing a moving window and performing the calculation within the moving window, and over a range of possible window boundaries within the test region to determine the location of the optimal test region within the gamma-ray spectrum.

  13. Method for treating rare earth-transition metal scrap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA); Peterson, David T. (Ames, IA); Wheelock, John T. (Nevada, IA); Jones, Lawrence L. (Des Moines, IA)

    1992-12-29

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g., iron) scrap (e.g., Nd-Fe-B scrap) is flux (slag) remelted to reduce tramp non-metallic impurities, such as oxygen and nitrogen, and metallic impurities, such as Li, Na, Al, etc., picked up by the scrap from previous fabrication operations. The tramp impurities are reduced to concentrations acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. The scrap is electroslag or inductoslag melted using a prefused, rare earth fluoride-bearing flux of CaF.sub.2, CaCl.sub.2 or mixtures thereof or the slag resulting from practice of the thermite reduction process to make a rare earth-iron alloy.

  14. Method for treating rare earth-transition metal scrap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, F.A.; Peterson, D.T.; Wheelock, J.T.; Jones, L.L.

    1992-12-29

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g., iron) scrap (e.g., Nd-Fe-B scrap) is flux (slag) remelted to reduce tramp non-metallic impurities, such as oxygen and nitrogen, and metallic impurities, such as Li, Na, Al, etc., picked up by the scrap from previous fabrication operations. The tramp impurities are reduced to concentrations acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. The scrap is electroslag or inductoslag melted using a rare earth fluoride-bearing flux of CaF[sub 2], CaCl[sub 2] or mixtures thereof or the slag resulting from practice of the thermite reduction process to make a rare earth-iron alloy. 3 figs.

  15. Rare earth-transition metal scrap treatment method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, F.A.; Peterson, D.T.; Wheelock, J.T.; Jones, L.L.; Lincoln, L.P.

    1992-02-11

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g. iron) scrap (e.g. Nd-Fe-B scrap) is melted to reduce the levels of tramp oxygen and nitrogen impurities therein. The tramp impurities are reduced in the melt by virtue of the reaction of the tramp impurities and the rare earth to form dross on the melt. The purified melt is separated from the dross for reuse. The oxygen and nitrogen of the melt are reduced to levels acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. 3 figs.

  16. Jefferson Lab Laser Twinkles in Rare Color | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser Twinkles in Rare Color NEWPORT NEWS, VA, Dec. 21 - December is a time for twinkling lights, and scientists at the Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility are delivering. They've just produced a long-sought, rare color of laser light 100 times brighter than that generated anywhere else. The light was produced by Jefferson Lab's Free-Electron Laser facility. The laser delivered vacuum ultraviolet light in the form of 10 eV photons (a wavelength of 124

  17. Rare earth-transition metal scrap treatment method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA); Peterson, David T. (Ames, IA); Wheelock, John T. (Nevada, IA); Jones, Lawrence L. (Des Moines, IA); Lincoln, Lanny P. (Woodward, IA)

    1992-02-11

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g. iron) scrap (e.g. Nd-Fe-B scrap) is melted to reduce the levels of tramp oxygen and nitrogen impurities therein. The tramp impurities are reduced in the melt by virtue of the reaction of the tramp impurities and the rare earth to form dross on the melt. The purified melt is separated from the dross for reuse. The oxygen and nitrogen of the melt are reduced to levels acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets.

  18. Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackerman, John P.; Johnson, Terry R.

    1994-01-01

    The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner.

  19. Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

    1994-08-09

    The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner. 1 fig.

  20. Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

    1992-01-01

    The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner.

  1. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- International Rare Metals Refinery Inc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    - NY 38 Rare Metals Refinery Inc - NY 38 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: International Rare Metals Refinery, Inc. (NY.38 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Canadian Radium and Uranium Corporation NY.38-1 Location: 69 Kisko Avenue , Mt. Kisko , New York NY.38-1 NY.38-3 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.38-4 Site Operations: Manufactured and distributed radium and polonium products. NY.38-5 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - Site was a

  2. FUEL ELEMENTS FOR NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foote, F.G.; Jette, E.R.

    1963-05-01

    A fuel element for a nuclear reactor is described that consists of a jacket containing a unitary core of fissionable material and a filling of a metal of the group consisting of sodium and sodium-potassium alloys. (AEC)

  3. Environmental research on actinide elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinder, J.E. III; Alberts, J.J.; McLeod, K.W.; Schreckhise, R.G.

    1987-08-01

    The papers synthesize the results of research sponsored by DOE's Office of Health and Environmental Research on the behavior of transuranic and actinide elements in the environment. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the 21 individual papers. (ACR)

  4. Rare-Earth Transition-Metal Intermetallics: Structure-bonding-Property Relationships

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mi-Kyung Han

    2006-05-01

    Our explorations of rare-earth, transition metal intermetallics have resulted in the synthesis and characterization, and electronic structure investigation, as well as understanding the structure-bonding-property relationships. Our work has presented the following results: (1) Understanding the relationship between compositions and properties in LaFe{sub 13-x}Si{sub x} system: A detailed structural and theoretical investigation provided the understanding of the role of a third element on stabilizing the structure and controlling the transformation of cubic NaZn{sub 13}-type structures to the tetragonal derivative, as well as the relationship between the structures and properties. (2) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth iron silicides RE{sub 2-x}Fe{sub 4}Si{sub 14-y} and proposed superstructure: This compound offers complex structural challenges such as fractional occupancies and their ordering in superstructure. (3) Electronic structure calculation of FeSi{sub 2}: This shows that the metal-semiconductor phase transition depends on the structure. The mechanism of band gap opening is described in terms of bonding and structural distortion. This result shows that the electronic structure calculations are an essential tool for understanding the relationship between structure and chemical bonding in these compounds. (4) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth Zinc aluminides Tb{sub 3}Zn{sub 3.6}Al{sub 7.4}: Partially ordered structure of Tb{sub 3}Zn{sub 3.6}Al{sub 7.4} compound provides new insights into the formation, composition and structure of rare-earth transition-metal intermetallics. Electronic structure calculations attribute the observed composition to optimizing metal-metal bonding in the electronegative (Zn, Al) framework, while the specific ordering is strongly influenced by specific orbital interactions. (5) Synthesis of new structure type of Zn{sub 39}(Cr{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}){sub 81}: These layered structures are similar to icosahedral Mn-Al quasicrystalline compounds. Therefore, this compound may provide new insights into the formation, composition and structure of quasicrystalline materials.

  5. Rare-earth transition-metal intermetallics: Structure-bonding-property relationships

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, M.K.

    2006-05-06

    The explorations of rare-earth, transition metal intermetallics have resulted in the synthesis and characterization, and electronic structure investigation, as well as understanding the structure-bonding property relationships. The work has presented the following results: (1) Understanding the relationship between compositions and properties in LaFe{sub 13-x}Si{sub x} system: A detailed structural and theoretical investigation provided the understanding of the role of a third element on stabilizing the structure and controlling the transformation of cubic NaZn{sub 13}-type structures to the tetragonal derivative, as well as the relationship between the structures and properties. (2) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth iron silicides Re{sub 2-x}Fe{sub 4}Si{sub 14-y} and proposed superstructure: This compound offers complex structural challenges such as fractional occupancies and their ordering in superstructure. (3) Electronic structure calculation of FeSi{sub 2}: This shows that the metal-semiconductor phase transition depends on the structure. The mechanism of band gap opening is described in terms of bonding and structural distortion. This result shows that the electronic structure calculations are an essential tool for understanding the relationship between structure and chemical bonding in these compounds. (4) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth Zinc aluminides Tb{sub 3}Zn{sub 3.6}Al{sub 7.4}: Partially ordered structure of Tb{sub 3}Zn{sub 3.6}Al{sub 7.4} compound provides new insights into the formation, composition and structure of rare-earth transition-metal intermetallics. Electronic structure calculations attribute the observed composition to optimizing metal-metal bonding in the electronegative (Zn, Al) framework, while the specific ordering is strongly influenced by specific orbital interactions. (5) Synthesis of new structure type of Zn{sub 39}(Cr{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}){sub 81}: These layered structures are similar to icosahedral Mn-Al quasicrystalline compounds. Therefore, this compound may provide new insights into the formation, composition and structure of quasicrystalline materials.

  6. ARPA-E Workshop on Rare Earth and Critical Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ARPA-E Workshop on Rare Earth and Critical Materials ARPA-E Workshop on Rare Earth and Critical Materials ARPA-E Workshop on Rare Earth and Critical Materials, December 6, 2010 PDF icon ARPA-E_RareEarth_Workshop_Overview.pdf More Documents & Publications Critical Materials Workshop Critical Materials Workshop Iowa lab gets critical materials research center

  7. Complex Electronic Structure of Rare Earth Activators in Scintillators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aberg, D.; Yu, S. W.; Zhou, F.

    2015-10-27

    To aid and further the understanding of the microscopic mechanisms behind the scintillator nonproportionality that leads to degradation of the attainable energy resolution, we have developed theoretical and experimental algorithms and procedures to determine the position of the 4f energy levels of rare earth dopants relative to the host band edge states.

  8. Rare Isotope Beams for the 21st Century

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    James Symons

    2010-01-08

    In a scientific keynote address on Friday, June 12 at Michigan State University (MSU) in East Lansing, James Symons, Director of Berkeley Labs Nuclear Science Division (NSD), discussed the exciting research prospects of the new Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) to be built at MSUs National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory.

  9. Derivation of an optical potential for statically deformed rare-earth nuclei from a global spherical potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nobre, G. P. A.; Palumbo, A.; Herman, M.; Brown, D.; Hoblit, S.; Dietrich, F. S.

    2015-02-25

    The coupled-channel theory is a natural way of treating nonelastic channels, in particular those arising from collective excitations characterized by nuclear deformations. A proper treatment of such excitations is often essential to the accurate description of experimental nuclear-reaction data and to the prediction of a wide variety of scattering observables. Stimulated by recent work substantiating the near validity of the adiabatic approximation in coupled-channel calculations for scattering on statically deformed nuclei, we explore the possibility of generalizing a global spherical optical model potential (OMP) to make it usable in coupled-channel calculations on this class of nuclei. To do this, we have deformed the Koning-Delaroche global spherical potential for neutrons, coupling a sufficient number of states of the ground state band to ensure convergence. We present an extensive study of the effects of collective couplings and nuclear deformations on integrated cross sections as well as on angular distributions for neutron-induced reactions on statically deformed nuclei in the rare-earth region. We choose isotopes of three rare-earth elements (Gd, Ho, W), which are known to be nearly perfect rotors, to exemplify the results of the proposed method. Predictions from our model for total, elastic and inelastic cross sections, as well as for elastic and inelastic angular distributions, are in reasonable agreement with measured experimental data. In conclusion, these results suggest that the deformed Koning-Delaroche potential provides a useful regional neutron optical potential for the statically deformed rare earth nuclei.

  10. Element Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Element Energy Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Element Energy Ltd. Place: Cambridge, England, United Kingdom Zip: CB1 2JD Product: Cambridge-based strategic energy...

  11. Element Labs Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Labs Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Element Labs, Inc. Place: Santa Clara, California Zip: 95054 Product: Element Labs is a developer of LED video technology for...

  12. Room Temperature Dispenser Photocathode Using Elemental Cesium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Room Temperature Dispenser Photocathode Using Elemental Cesium Room Temperature Dispenser Photocathode Using Elemental Cesium Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) researchers have...

  13. Single element laser beam shaper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Shukui (Yorktown, VA); Michelle D. Shinn (Newport News, VA)

    2005-09-13

    A single lens laser beam shaper for converting laser beams from any spatial profile to a flat-top or uniform spatial profile. The laser beam shaper includes a lens having two aspheric surfaces. The beam shaper significantly simplifies the overall structure in comparison with conventional 2-element systems and therefore provides great ease in alignment and reduction of cost.

  14. Fast acting multiple element valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Jefferson Y. S. (Orange, CA); Wada, James M. (Torrance, CA)

    1991-01-01

    A plurality of slide valve elements having plural axial-spaced annular parts and an internal slide are inserted into a bulkhead in a fluid conduit from a downstream side of the bulkhead, locked in place by a bayonet coupling and set screw, and project through the bulkhead into the upstream conduit. Pneumatic lines connecting the slide valve element actuator to pilot valves are brought out the throat of the valve element to the downstream side. Pilot valves are radially spaced around the exterior of the valve to permit the pneumatic lines to be made identical, thereby to minimize adverse timing tolerances in operation due to pressure variations. Ring manifolds surround the valve adjacent respective pilot valve arrangements to further reduce adverse timing tolerances due to pressure variations, the manifolds being directly connected to the respective pilot valves. Position sensors are provided the valve element slides to signal the precise time at which a slide reaches or passes through a particular point in its stroke to initiate a calibrated timing function.

  15. Infrared trace element detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bien, F.; Bernstein, L.S.; Matthew, M.W.

    1988-11-15

    An infrared trace element detection system includes an optical cell into which the sample fluid to be examined is introduced and removed. Also introduced into the optical cell is a sample beam of infrared radiation in a first wavelength band which is significantly absorbed by the trace element and a second wavelength band which is not significantly absorbed by the trace element for passage through the optical cell through the sample fluid. The output intensities of the sample beam of radiation are selectively detected in the first and second wavelength bands. The intensities of a reference beam of the radiation are similarly detected in the first and second wavelength bands. The sensed output intensity of the sample beam in one of the first and second wavelength bands is normalized with respect to the other and similarly, the intensity of the reference beam of radiation in one of the first and second wavelength bands is normalized with respect to the other. The normalized sample beam intensity and normalized reference beam intensity are then compared to provide a signal from which the amount of trace element in the sample fluid can be determined. 11 figs.

  16. Quadrilateral finite element mesh coarsening

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Staten, Matthew L; Dewey, Mark W; Benzley, Steven E

    2012-10-16

    Techniques for coarsening a quadrilateral mesh are described. These techniques include identifying a coarsening region within the quadrilateral mesh to be coarsened. Quadrilateral elements along a path through the coarsening region are removed. Node pairs along opposite sides of the path are identified. The node pairs along the path are then merged to collapse the path.

  17. Detecting rare, abnormally large grains by x-ray diffraction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Detecting rare, abnormally large grains by x-ray diffraction - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle

  18. Microsoft Word - rare earth speech 3-18 6am

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    REMARKS PREPARED FOR DELIVERY TECHNOLOGY AND RARE EARTH METALS CONFERENCE 2010 KEYNOTE ADDRESS DAVID SANDALOW ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR POLICY & INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WASHINGTON, D.C. MARCH 17, 2010 [Acknowledgements.] 1. INTRODUCTION Thank you for the invitation to speak at this important conference. At energy conferences today, no topic is hotter than shale gas. The story is striking: recoverable reserves of shale gas have increased six-fold in the past few years,

  19. CMI Offers Webinars on Critical Materials and Rare Earths | Critical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Institute Offers Webinars on Critical Materials and Rare Earths CMI at Mines offers webinars about critical materials at no charge. These began in March 2015: December 9: Alex King, CMI, and Stacy Joiner, Ames Laboratory, discuss the updates to the CMI Affiliates Membership Program. A recording of the webinar is available. October 28: Bruce Moyer, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Challenges in Diversifying Supply of Critical Materials for Clean Energy. A recording of the webinar is

  20. Physics and Outlook for Rare, All-neutral Eta Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mack, David J.

    2014-06-01

    The $\\eta$ meson provides a laboratory to study isospin violation and search for new flavor-conserving sources of C and CP violation with a sensitivity approaching $10^{-6}$ of the isospin-conserving strong amplitude. Some of the most interesting rare $\\eta$ decays are the neutral modes, yet the effective loss of photons from the relatively common decay $\\eta \\rightarrow 3\\pi^0 \\rightarrow 6\\gamma$ (33$\\%$) has largely limited the sensitivity for decays producing 3-5$\\gamma$'s. Particularly important relevant branches include the highly suppressed $\\eta \\rightarrow \\pi^0 2\\gamma \\rightarrow 4\\gamma$, which provides a rare window on testing models of $O(p^6)$ contributions in ChPTh, and $\\eta \\rightarrow 3\\gamma$ and $\\eta \\rightarrow 2\\pi^0 \\gamma \\rightarrow 5\\gamma$ which provide direct constraints on C violation in flavor-conserving processes. The substitution of lead tungstate in the forward calorimeter of the GluEx setup in Jefferson Lab's new Hall D would allow dramatically improved measurements. The main niche of this facility, which we call the JLab Eta Factory (JEF), would be $\\eta$ decay neutral modes. However, this could likely be expanded to rare $\\eta'(958)$ decays for low energy QCD studies as well as $\\eta$ decays involving muons for new physics searches.

  1. What are the Rare Earths? | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cars components. The Elements Scandium Sc symbol Scandium Atomic Weight: 44.955 gmol Density: 2.958 gcm3 Electron Configuration: Ar 3d14s2 Melting Point: 1814 K, 1541 C,...

  2. Critical Materials and Rare Futures: Ames Laboratory Signs a New Agreement

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    on Rare-Earth Research | Department of Energy Critical Materials and Rare Futures: Ames Laboratory Signs a New Agreement on Rare-Earth Research Critical Materials and Rare Futures: Ames Laboratory Signs a New Agreement on Rare-Earth Research June 15, 2011 - 7:07pm Addthis The plasma torch in the Retech plasma furnace is one tool used in Materials Preparation Center to create ultra-high purity metal alloy samples, particularly rare-earth metals, located at the Ames Lab. | Photo Courtesy of

  3. The Transuranium Elements - Present Status: Nobel Lecture

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Seaborg, G. T.

    1951-12-12

    The discovery of the transuranium elements and the work done on them up to the present time are reviewed. The properties of these elements, their relationship to other elements, their place in the periodic table, and the possibility of production and identification of other transuranium elements are discussed briefly.

  4. The Origin of the Elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Edward

    2012-11-20

    The world around us is made of atoms. Did you ever wonder where these atoms came from? How was the gold in our jewelry, the carbon in our bodies, and the iron in our cars made? In this lecture, we will trace the origin of a gold atom from the Big Bang to the present day, and beyond. You will learn how the elements were forged in the nuclear furnaces inside stars, and how, when they die, these massive stars spread the elements into space. You will learn about the origin of the building blocks of matter in the Big Bang, and we will speculate on the future of the atoms around us today.

  5. Composite oxygen ion transport element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Jack C. (Getzville, NY); Besecker, Charles J. (Batavia, IL); Chen, Hancun (Williamsville, NY); Robinson, Earil T. (Mentor, OH)

    2007-06-12

    A composite oxygen ion transport element that has a layered structure formed by a dense layer to transport oxygen ions and electrons and a porous support layer to provide mechanical support. The dense layer can be formed of a mixture of a mixed conductor, an ionic conductor, and a metal. The porous support layer can be fabricated from an oxide dispersion strengthened metal, a metal-reinforced intermetallic alloy, a boron-doped Mo.sub.5Si.sub.3-based intermetallic alloy or combinations thereof. The support layer can be provided with a network of non-interconnected pores and each of said pores communicates between opposite surfaces of said support layer. Such a support layer can be advantageously employed to reduce diffusion resistance in any type of element, including those using a different material makeup than that outlined above.

  6. Self supporting heat transfer element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Story, Grosvenor Cook (Livermore, CA); Baldonado, Ray Orico (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides an improved internal heat exchange element arranged so as to traverse the inside diameter of a container vessel such that it makes good mechanical contact with the interior wall of that vessel. The mechanical element is fabricated from a material having a coefficient of thermal conductivity above about 0.8 W cm.sup.-1.degree. K.sup.-1 and is designed to function as a simple spring member when that member has been cooled to reduce its diameter to just below that of a cylindrical container or vessel into which it is placed and then allowed to warm to room temperature. A particularly important application of this invention is directed to a providing a simple compartmented storage container for accommodating a hydrogen absorbing alloy.

  7. FUEL ELEMENT FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bassett, C.H.

    1961-11-21

    A fuel element is designed which is particularly adapted for reactors of high power density used to generate steam for the production of electricity. The fuel element consists of inner and outer concentric tubes forming an annular chamber within which is contained fissionable fuel pellet segments, wedge members interposed between the fuel segments, and a spring which, acting with wedge members, urges said fuel pellets radially into contact against the inner surface of the outer tube. The wedge members may be a fertile material convertible into fissionable fuel material by absorbing neutrons emitted from the fissionable fuel pellet segments. The costly grinding of cylindrical fuel pellets to close tolerances for snug engagement is reduced because the need to finish the exact size is eliminated. (AEC)

  8. Element of an inductive coupler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe

    2006-08-15

    An element for an inductive coupler in a downhole component comprises magnetically conductive material, which is disposed in a recess in annular housing. The magnetically conductive material forms a generally circular trough. The circular trough comprises an outer generally U-shaped surface, an inner generally U-shaped surface, and two generally planar surfaces joining the inner and outer surfaces. The element further comprises pressure relief grooves in at least one of the surfaces of the circular trough. The pressure relief grooves may be scored lines. Preferably the pressure relief grooves are parallel to the magnetic field generated by the magnetically conductive material. The magnetically conductive material is selected from the group consisting of soft iron, ferrite, a nickel iron alloy, a silicon iron alloy, a cobalt iron alloy, and a mu-metal. Preferably, the annular housing is a metal ring.

  9. The Origin of the Elements

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Murphy, Edward

    2014-08-06

    The world around us is made of atoms. Did you ever wonder where these atoms came from? How was the gold in our jewelry, the carbon in our bodies, and the iron in our cars made? In this lecture, we will trace the origin of a gold atom from the Big Bang to the present day, and beyond. You will learn how the elements were forged in the nuclear furnaces inside stars, and how, when they die, these massive stars spread the elements into space. You will learn about the origin of the building blocks of matter in the Big Bang, and we will speculate on the future of the atoms around us today.

  10. 2.10 Heavy Element Chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 6/1/2011 2.10 Heavy Element Chemistry For more than 50 years, the Office of Science and predecessor agencies have supported the discovery and study of the actinide elements, in particular the transuranium elements-atoms that are heavier than uranium. Glenn Seaborg and Ed McMillan of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1951 Nobel Laureates in Chemistry for the discovery of plutonium and other actinide elements, began this quest. Today, the Heavy Element Chemistry program continues the

  11. Photoconductive circuit element pulse generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rauscher, Christen (Alexandria, VA)

    1989-01-01

    A pulse generator for characterizing semiconductor devices at millimeter wavelength frequencies where a photoconductive circuit element (PCE) is biased by a direct current voltage source and produces short electrical pulses when excited into conductance by short laser light pulses. The electrical pulses are electronically conditioned to improve the frequency related amplitude characteristics of the pulses which thereafter propagate along a transmission line to a device under test.

  12. Charm Mixing, CP Violation and Rare D**0 Decays at BaBar (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Charm Mixing, CP Violation and Rare D**0 Decays at BaBar Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Charm Mixing, CP Violation and Rare D**0 Decays at BaBar Dsup 0-bar Dsup 0...

  13. Rare-earth tantalates and niobates suitable for use as nanophosphors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nyman, May D; Rohwer, Lauren E.S& gt

    2013-11-19

    A family of rare-earth Group 5 oxides, where the Group 5 oxide is a niobate or tantalate. The rare-earth Group 5 oxides can be doped with suitable emitter ions to form nanophosphors.

  14. Alternative High-Performance Motors with Non-Rare Earth Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Performance Motors with Non-Rare Earth Materials Alternative High-Performance Motors with Non-Rare Earth Materials 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

  15. GROUND-STATE PROPERTIES OF RARE-EARTH METALS: AN EVALUATION OF...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GROUND-STATE PROPERTIES OF RARE-EARTH METALS: AN EVALUATION OF DENSITY-FUNCTIONAL THEORY Citation Details In-Document Search Title: GROUND-STATE PROPERTIES OF RARE-EARTH METALS: AN...

  16. Peridynamic Multiscale Finite Element Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costa, Timothy; Bond, Stephen D.; Littlewood, David John; Moore, Stan Gerald

    2015-12-01

    The problem of computing quantum-accurate design-scale solutions to mechanics problems is rich with applications and serves as the background to modern multiscale science research. The prob- lem can be broken into component problems comprised of communicating across adjacent scales, which when strung together create a pipeline for information to travel from quantum scales to design scales. Traditionally, this involves connections between a) quantum electronic structure calculations and molecular dynamics and between b) molecular dynamics and local partial differ- ential equation models at the design scale. The second step, b), is particularly challenging since the appropriate scales of molecular dynamic and local partial differential equation models do not overlap. The peridynamic model for continuum mechanics provides an advantage in this endeavor, as the basic equations of peridynamics are valid at a wide range of scales limiting from the classical partial differential equation models valid at the design scale to the scale of molecular dynamics. In this work we focus on the development of multiscale finite element methods for the peridynamic model, in an effort to create a mathematically consistent channel for microscale information to travel from the upper limits of the molecular dynamics scale to the design scale. In particular, we first develop a Nonlocal Multiscale Finite Element Method which solves the peridynamic model at multiple scales to include microscale information at the coarse-scale. We then consider a method that solves a fine-scale peridynamic model to build element-support basis functions for a coarse- scale local partial differential equation model, called the Mixed Locality Multiscale Finite Element Method. Given decades of research and development into finite element codes for the local partial differential equation models of continuum mechanics there is a strong desire to couple local and nonlocal models to leverage the speed and state of the art of local models with the flexibility and accuracy of the nonlocal peridynamic model. In the mixed locality method this coupling occurs across scales, so that the nonlocal model can be used to communicate material heterogeneity at scales inappropriate to local partial differential equation models. Additionally, the computational burden of the weak form of the peridynamic model is reduced dramatically by only requiring that the model be solved on local patches of the simulation domain which may be computed in parallel, taking advantage of the heterogeneous nature of next generation computing platforms. Addition- ally, we present a novel Galerkin framework, the 'Ambulant Galerkin Method', which represents a first step towards a unified mathematical analysis of local and nonlocal multiscale finite element methods, and whose future extension will allow the analysis of multiscale finite element methods that mix models across scales under certain assumptions of the consistency of those models.

  17. Alternative High-Performance Motors with Non-Rare Earth Materials |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy High-Performance Motors with Non-Rare Earth Materials Alternative High-Performance Motors with Non-Rare Earth Materials 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon ape045_elrefaie_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Alternative High-Performance Motors with Non-Rare Earth Materials Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Alternative High-Performance Motors with Non-Rare

  18. Jefferson Lab Laser Twinkles in Rare Color (PhysOrg) | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    phys.org/news/2010-12-jefferson-lab-laser-twinkles-rare.html Submitted: Tuesday, December 21

  19. Multicanonical sampling of rare events in random matrices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saito, Nen; Iba, Yukito; Hukushima, Koji

    2010-09-15

    A method based on multicanonical Monte Carlo is applied to the calculation of large deviations in the largest eigenvalue of random matrices. The method is successfully tested with the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble, sparse random matrices, and matrices whose components are subject to uniform density. Specifically, the probability that all eigenvalues of a matrix are negative is estimated in these cases down to the values of {approx}10{sup -200}, a region where simple random sampling is ineffective. The method can be applied to any ensemble of matrices and used for sampling rare events characterized by any statistics.

  20. Population and community ecology of the rare plant amsinckia grandiflora

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlsen, T.M.

    1996-11-01

    Research was conducted between the fall of 1992 and the spring on the population and community ecology of the rare annual plant, Amsinckia glandiflora (Gray) Kleeb. ex Greene (Boraginaceae). The research goal was to investigate the causes of the species rarity, data useful to restorative efforts. The work focused on the examination of competitive suppression by exotic annual grasses; comparisons with common, weedy congener; and the role of litter cover and seed germination and seedling establishment. Annual exotic grasses reduced A. grandiflora reproductive output to a greater extent than did the native perennial bunch grass.

  1. Method of monitoring stored nuclear fuel elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borloo, E.; Buergers, W.; Crutzen, S.; Vinche, C.

    1983-05-24

    To monitor a nuclear fuel element or fuel elements located in a store, e.g. a pond in a swimming pool reactor, the store is illuminated ultrasonically using one or more transducers transmitting ultrasonic signals in one or more predetermined directions to obtain an output which, because it depends on the number and relative location of the fuel elements in the store, and the structure of the store itself is distinctive to the fuel elements or elements stored therein. From this distinctive output is derived an identity unique to the stored fuel element or elements and a reference signal indicative of the whole structure when intact, the reference signal and identity being recorded. Subsequent ultrasonic testing of the store and its contents under identical operating conditions produces a signal which is compared to the recorded reference signal and if different therefrom reveals the occurrence of tampering with the store and/or the fuel element or elements.

  2. Monitoring arrangement for vented nuclear fuel elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campana, Robert J. (Solana Beach, CA)

    1981-01-01

    In a nuclear fuel reactor core, fuel elements are arranged in a closely packed hexagonal configuration, each fuel element having diametrically opposed vents permitting 180.degree. rotation of the fuel elements to counteract bowing. A grid plate engages the fuel elements and forms passages for communicating sets of three, four or six individual vents with respective monitor lines in order to communicate vented radioactive gases from the fuel elements to suitable monitor means in a manner readily permitting detection of leakage in individual fuel elements.

  3. Sublattice Magnetic Relaxation in Rare Earth Iron Garnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCloy, John S.; Walsh, Brian

    2013-07-08

    The magnetic properties of rare earth garnets make them attractive materials for applications ranging from optical communications to magnetic refrigeration. The purpose of this research was to determine the AC magnetic properties of several rare earth garnets, in order to ascertain the contributions of various sublattices. Gd3Fe5O¬12, Gd3Ga5O12, Tb3Fe5O12, Tb3Ga5O12, and Y3Fe5O12 were synthesized by a solid state reaction of their oxides and verified by x-ray diffraction. Frequency-dependent AC susceptibility and DC magnetization were measured versus temperature (10 – 340 K). Field cooling had little effect on AC susceptibility, but large effect on DC magnetization, increasing magnetization at the lowest temperature and shifting the compensation point to lower temperatures. Data suggest that interaction of the two iron lattices results in the two frequency dependent magnetic relaxations in the iron garnets, which were fit using the Vogel-Fulcher and Arrhenius laws.

  4. Ab Initio Nuclear Structure and Reaction Calculations for Rare Isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Draayer, Jerry P.

    2014-09-28

    We have developed a novel ab initio symmetry-adapted no-core shell model (SA-NCSM), which has opened the intermediate-mass region for ab initio investigations, thereby providing an opportunity for first-principle symmetry-guided applications to nuclear structure and reactions for nuclear isotopes from the lightest p-shell systems to intermediate-mass nuclei. This includes short-lived proton-rich nuclei on the path of X-ray burst nucleosynthesis and rare neutron-rich isotopes to be produced by the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). We have provided ab initio descriptions of high accuracy for low-lying (including collectivity-driven) states of isotopes of Li, He, Be, C, O, Ne, Mg, Al, and Si, and studied related strong- and weak-interaction driven reactions that are important, in astrophysics, for further understanding stellar evolution, X-ray bursts and triggering of s, p, and rp processes, and in applied physics, for electron and neutrino-nucleus scattering experiments as well as for fusion ignition at the National Ignition Facility (NIF).

  5. Carbide/nitride grain refined rare earth-iron-boron permanent magnet and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCallum, R.W.; Branagan, D.J.

    1996-01-23

    A method of making a permanent magnet is disclosed wherein (1) a melt is formed having a base alloy composition comprising RE, Fe and/or Co, and B (where RE is one or more rare earth elements) and (2) TR (where TR is a transition metal selected from at least one of Ti, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, W, and Al) and at least one of C and N are provided in the base alloy composition melt in substantially stoichiometric amounts to form a thermodynamically stable compound (e.g. TR carbide, nitride or carbonitride). The melt is rapidly solidified in a manner to form particulates having a substantially amorphous (metallic glass) structure and a dispersion of primary TRC, TRN and/or TRC/N precipitates. The amorphous particulates are heated above the crystallization temperature of the base alloy composition to nucleate and grow a hard magnetic phase to an optimum grain size and to form secondary TRC, TRN and/or TRC/N precipitates dispersed at grain boundaries. The crystallized particulates are consolidated at an elevated temperature to form a shape. During elevated temperature consolidation, the primary and secondary precipitates act to pin the grain boundaries and minimize deleterious grain growth that is harmful to magnetic properties. 33 figs.

  6. Carbide/nitride grain refined rare earth-iron-boron permanent magnet and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCallum, R. William (Ames, IA); Branagan, Daniel J. (Ames, IA)

    1996-01-23

    A method of making a permanent magnet wherein 1) a melt is formed having a base alloy composition comprising RE, Fe and/or Co, and B (where RE is one or more rare earth elements) and 2) TR (where TR is a transition metal selected from at least one of Ti, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, W, and Al) and at least one of C and N are provided in the base alloy composition melt in substantially stoichiometric amounts to form a thermodynamically stable compound (e.g. TR carbide, nitride or carbonitride). The melt is rapidly solidified in a manner to form particulates having a substantially amorphous (metallic glass) structure and a dispersion of primary TRC, TRN and/or TRC/N precipitates. The amorphous particulates are heated above the crystallization temperature of the base alloy composition to nucleate and grow a hard magnetic phase to an optimum grain size and to form secondary TRC, TRN and/or TRC/N precipitates dispersed at grain boundaries. The crystallized particulates are consolidated at an elevated temperature to form a shape. During elevated temperature consolidation, the primary and secondary precipitates act to pin the grain boundaries and minimize deleterious grain growth that is harmful to magnetic properties.

  7. The Dy-Ni-Si system as a representative of the rare earth-Ni-Si

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    family: Its isothermal section and new rare-earth nickel silicides (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: The Dy-Ni-Si system as a representative of the rare earth-Ni-Si family: Its isothermal section and new rare-earth nickel silicides Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Dy-Ni-Si system as a representative of the rare earth-Ni-Si family: Its isothermal section and new rare-earth nickel silicides The Dy-Ni-Si system has been

  8. Identification of Human Repetitive DNA Elements

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    PYTHIA identifies the subfamily membership of Alu sequences, occurrences of repetitive human DNA elements, and simple DNA sequences.

  9. Stacked switchable element and diode combination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branz, Howard M.; Wang, Qi

    2006-06-27

    A device (10) comprises a semiconductor diode (12) and a switchable element (14) positioned in stacked adjacent relationship so that the semiconductor diode (12) and the switchable element (14) are electrically connected in series with one another. The switchable element (14) is switchable from a low-conductance state to a high-conductance state in response to the application of a forming voltage to the switchable element (14).

  10. Stacked Switchable Element and Diode Combination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branz, H. M.; Wang, Q.

    2006-06-27

    A device (10) comprises a semiconductor diode (12) and a switchable element (14) positioned in stacked adjacent relationship so that the semiconductor diode (12) and the switchable element (14) are electrically connected in series with one another. The switchable element (14) is switchable from a low-conductance state to a high-conductance state in response to the application of a forming voltage to the switchable element (14).

  11. Element One, Inc. | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Element One, Inc. America's Next Top Energy Innovator Challenge 191524 likes Element One, Inc. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Element One's detection products will change the paradigm in the way hydrogen and other hazardous gas leaks are detected, achieving a new level of safety in existing industrial and emerging consumer environments. Element One has patented the only available coatings for the detection of hydrogen that change color reversibly or non-reversibly as desired to give both

  12. Cryogenic distribution for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Jones, Dana Arenius, Adam Fila, P. Geutschow, Helmut Laumer, Matt Johnson, Cory S. Waltz, J. G. Weisend II

    2012-06-01

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) is a new National User Facility for nuclear science funded by the Department of Energy Office of Science and operated by Michigan State University. The FRIB accelerator linac consists of superconducting radio-frequency (SCRF) cavities operating at 2 K and SC magnets operating at 4.5 K all cooled by a large scale cryogenic refrigeration system. A major subsystem of the cryogenic system will be the distribution system whose primary components will include a distribution box, the transfer lines and the interconnect valve boxes at each cryogenic device. An overview of the conceptual design of the distribution system including engineering details, capabilities and schedule is described.

  13. Derivation of an optical potential for statically deformed rare-earth nuclei from a global spherical potential

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nobre, G. P. A.; Palumbo, A.; Herman, M.; Brown, D.; Hoblit, S.; Dietrich, F. S.

    2015-02-25

    The coupled-channel theory is a natural way of treating nonelastic channels, in particular those arising from collective excitations characterized by nuclear deformations. A proper treatment of such excitations is often essential to the accurate description of experimental nuclear-reaction data and to the prediction of a wide variety of scattering observables. Stimulated by recent work substantiating the near validity of the adiabatic approximation in coupled-channel calculations for scattering on statically deformed nuclei, we explore the possibility of generalizing a global spherical optical model potential (OMP) to make it usable in coupled-channel calculations on this class of nuclei. To do this, wemore » have deformed the Koning-Delaroche global spherical potential for neutrons, coupling a sufficient number of states of the ground state band to ensure convergence. We present an extensive study of the effects of collective couplings and nuclear deformations on integrated cross sections as well as on angular distributions for neutron-induced reactions on statically deformed nuclei in the rare-earth region. We choose isotopes of three rare-earth elements (Gd, Ho, W), which are known to be nearly perfect rotors, to exemplify the results of the proposed method. Predictions from our model for total, elastic and inelastic cross sections, as well as for elastic and inelastic angular distributions, are in reasonable agreement with measured experimental data. In conclusion, these results suggest that the deformed Koning-Delaroche potential provides a useful regional neutron optical potential for the statically deformed rare earth nuclei.« less

  14. Theoretical studies of strongly correlated rare-earth intermetallics RIn? and RSn? (R=Sm, Eu, and Gd)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafiq, M.; Ahmad, Iftikhar E-mail: dr.iftikhar@uom.edu.pk; Jalali Asadabadi, S.

    2014-09-14

    In this paper, the structural, elastic, and electronic properties of RIn? and RSn? (R = Sm, Eu, Gd) compounds have been investigated using the full potential linearized augmented plane wave plus local orbital method within the density functional theory. The structural properties are investigated using the LDA, GGA, and the band correlated LDA+U and GGA+U schemes. The lattice parameters are in good agreement with the available experimental results and the divalent state of Eu is also verified. The spin-orbit coupling is included in order to predict the correct electronic properties and splitting of 4f states of the rare earth elements is also incorporated. We calculated Bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young's modulus, anisotropic ratio, Kleinman parameters, Poisson's ratio, Lame's co-efficient, sound velocities for shear and longitudinal waves, and Debye temperature. We also predict the Cauchy pressure and B/G ratio in order to explore the ductile and brittle behaviors of these compounds.

  15. Data transmission element for downhole drilling components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David S.; Dahlgren, Scott; Fox, Joe; Sneddon, Cameron; Briscoe, Michael

    2006-01-31

    A robust data transmission element for transmitting information between downhole components, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The data transmission element components include a generally U-shaped annular housing, a generally U-shaped magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element such as ferrite, and an insulated conductor. Features on the magnetically conducting, electrically insulating element and the annular housing create a pocket when assembled. The data transmission element is filled with a polymer to retain the components within the annular housing by filling the pocket with the polymer. The polymer can bond with the annular housing and the insulated conductor but preferably not the magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element. A data transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe.

  16. Methods for preparation of nanocrystalline rare earth phosphates for lighting applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Comanzo, Holly Ann; Manoharan, Mohan; Martins Loureiro, Sergio Paulo; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Srivastava, Alok Mani

    2013-04-16

    Disclosed here are methods for the preparation of optionally activated nanocrystalline rare earth phosphates. The optionally activated nanocrystalline rare earth phosphates may be used as one or more of quantum-splitting phosphor, visible-light emitting phosphor, vacuum-UV absorbing phosphor, and UV-emitting phosphor. Also disclosed herein are discharge lamps comprising the optionally activated nanocrystalline rare earth phosphates provided by these methods.

  17. Non-Rare Earth High-Performance Wrought Magnesium Alloys | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy High-Performance Wrought Magnesium Alloys Non-Rare Earth High-Performance Wrought Magnesium Alloys 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon lm056_lavender_2012_o-revised.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Non-Rare Earth High-Performance Wrought Magnesium Alloys Non-Rare Earth High-Performance Wrought Magnesium Alloys Vehicle Technologies Office:

  18. Widget:HoverMultipleElements | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the element with hovered state to be applied without being hovered targetclass - css class to apply to target element when trigger element is hovered Example...

  19. Microsoft Word - ARPA-E_RareEarth_Workshop_Overview_v6

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ARPA-E WORKSHOP Rare Earth and Critical Materials December 6, 2010 in Arlington, VA Background ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 2 Breakout Sessions and Participant Preparation .............................................................................................................. 8 Agenda

  20. A consistent approach to falsifying ?CDM with rare galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, Ian; Hotchkiss, Shaun E-mail: shaun.hotchkiss@helsinki.fi

    2013-07-01

    We consider methods with which to answer the question ''is any observed galaxy cluster too unusual for ?CDM?'' After emphasising that many previous attempts to answer this question will overestimate the confidence level at which ?CDM can be ruled out, we outline a consistent approach to these rare clusters, which allows the question to be answered. We define three statistical measures, each of which are sensitive to changes in cluster populations arising from different modifications to the cosmological model. We also use these properties to define the ''equivalent mass at redshift zero'' for a cluster — the mass of an equally unusual cluster today. This quantity is independent of the observational survey in which the cluster was found, which makes it an ideal proxy for ranking the relative unusualness of clusters detected by different surveys. These methods are then used on a comprehensive sample of observed galaxy clusters and we confirm that all are less than 2? deviations from the ?CDM expectation. Whereas we have only applied our method to galaxy clusters, it is applicable to any isolated, collapsed, halo. As motivation for future surveys, we also calculate where in the mass redshift plane the rarest halo is most likely to be found, giving information as to which objects might be the most fruitful in the search for new physics.

  1. Element One, Inc. | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    191524 likes Element One, Inc. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Element One's detection products will change the paradigm in the way hydrogen and other hazardous gas leaks are detected, achieving a new level of safety in existing industrial and emerging consumer environments. Element One has patented the only available coatings for the detection of hydrogen that change color reversibly or non-reversibly as desired to give both current and historical information about leaked hydrogen. In

  2. William Fowler and Elements in the Stars

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    William Fowler and Elements in the Stars Resources with Additional Information William A. Fowler Courtesy AIP Emilio Segrè Visual Archives 'William A. Fowler ... shared the 1983 Nobel Prize in physics for his research into the creation of chemical elements inside stars ... . During his career in nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics, which spanned more that 60 years, Fowler was primarily concerned with studies of fusion reactions--how the nuclei of lighter chemical elements fuse to create

  3. Two position optical element actuator device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holdener, Fred R. (Tracy, CA); Boyd, Robert D. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention is a two position optical element actuator device utilizing a powered means to hold an actuation arm, to which an optical element is attached, in a first position. A non-powered means drives the actuation arm to a second position, when the powered means ceases to receive power. The optical element may be a electromagnetic (EM) radiation or particle source, an instrument, or EM radiation or particle transmissive, reflective or absorptive elements. A bearing is used to transfer motion and smoothly transition the actuation arm from the first to second position.

  4. Nature Elements Holding AG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Holding AG Jump to: navigation, search Name: Nature Elements Holding AG Place: Baar, Switzerland Zip: CH-6340 Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Swiss developer of renewable energy...

  5. Nature Elements Capital | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name: Nature Elements Capital Place: Beijing, Beijing Municipality, China Zip: 100125 Product: Beijing-based private equity firm investing in...

  6. Spectral analysis method for detecting an element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blackwood, Larry G [Idaho Falls, ID; Edwards, Andrew J [Idaho Falls, ID; Jewell, James K [Idaho Falls, ID; Reber, Edward L [Idaho Falls, ID; Seabury, Edward H [Idaho Falls, ID

    2008-02-12

    A method for detecting an element is described and which includes the steps of providing a gamma-ray spectrum which has a region of interest which corresponds with a small amount of an element to be detected; providing nonparametric assumptions about a shape of the gamma-ray spectrum in the region of interest, and which would indicate the presence of the element to be detected; and applying a statistical test to the shape of the gamma-ray spectrum based upon the nonparametric assumptions to detect the small amount of the element to be detected.

  7. Elemental Energy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sector: Solar Product: Elemental Energy develops, owns and operates distributed solar energy facilities and sells solar-generated electricity through Power Purchase Agreements...

  8. Trace Element Analysis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    In The Past 20 Years- Geochemistry In Geothermal Exploration Resource Evaluation And Reservoir Management Trace Element Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region...

  9. Low exchange element for nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brogli, Rudolf H. (Aarau, CH); Shamasunder, Bangalore I. (Encinitas, CA); Seth, Shivaji S. (Encinitas, CA)

    1985-01-01

    A flow exchange element is presented which lowers temperature gradients in fuel elements and reduces maximum local temperature within high temperature gas-cooled reactors. The flow exchange element is inserted within a column of fuel elements where it serves to redirect coolant flow. Coolant which has been flowing in a hotter region of the column is redirected to a cooler region, and coolant which has been flowing in the cooler region of the column is redirected to the hotter region. The safety, efficiency, and longevity of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor is thereby enhanced.

  10. Bi-stable optical element actuator device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holdener, Fred R. (Tracy, CA); Boyd, Robert D. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention is a bistable optical element actuator device utilizing a powered means to move an actuation arm, to which an optical element is attached, between two stable positions. A non-powered means holds the actuation arm in either of the two stable positions. The optical element may be a electromagnetic (EM) radiation or particle source, an instrument, or EM radiation or particle transmissive reflective or absorptive elements. A bearing is used to transfer motion and smoothly transition the actuation arm between the two stable positions.

  11. (Relative mobilities and transport mechanisms of trace elements during contact metamorphism of carbonate rocks). Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to investigate the relative mobilities and transport mechanisms of major, minor, and trace elements during the contact metamorphism of carbonate rocks. The large contrasts in chemical potentials of SiO/sub 2/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and CaO across a granitic pluton-limestone contact may induce metasomatism. In addition, rare earth and transition metal elements may act as tracers, and their redistribution during metamorphism may record convective cooling processes. The results of this study may have an application toward the problem of radioactive waste disposal and the degree to which radioactive nuclides may be expected to migrate during geologically significant periods of time.

  12. 3-D Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1996-07-15

    TAURUS is an interactive post-processing application supporting visualization of finite element analysis results on unstructured grids. TAURUS provides the ability to display deformed geometries and contours or fringes of a large number of derived results on meshes consisting of beam, plate, shell, and solid type finite elements. Time history plotting is also available.

  13. The New Element Curium (Atomic Number 96)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Seaborg, G. T.; James, R. A.; Ghiorso, A.

    1948-00-00

    Two isotopes of the element with atomic number 96 have been produced by the helium-ion bombardment of plutonium. The name curium, symbol Cm, is proposed for element 96. The chemical experiments indicate that the most stable oxidation state of curium is the III state.

  14. TRACE ELEMENT ANALYSES OF URANIUM MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beals, D; Charles Shick, C

    2008-06-09

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed an analytical method to measure many trace elements in a variety of uranium materials at the high part-per-billion (ppb) to low part-per-million (ppm) levels using matrix removal and analysis by quadrapole ICP-MS. Over 35 elements were measured in uranium oxides, acetate, ore and metal. Replicate analyses of samples did provide precise results however none of the materials was certified for trace element content thus no measure of the accuracy could be made. The DOE New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) does provide a Certified Reference Material (CRM) that has provisional values for a series of trace elements. The NBL CRM were purchased and analyzed to determine the accuracy of the method for the analysis of trace elements in uranium oxide. These results are presented and discussed in the following paper.

  15. Elemental composition of two cumulate rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naeem, A.; Almohandis, A.A.

    1983-04-01

    Two cumulate rock samples K-185, K-250 from the Kapalagulu intrusion, W. Tanzania, were analyzed using X-ray fluorescence (XRF), wet chemical and neutron activation analysis (NAA) techniques. Major element oxides were determined by XRF and wet chemical methods, while the concentration of trace elements were measured by NAA, using high resolution Ge(Li) detector, minicomputer-based data acquisition system and off-line computer. The percentage of major oxides and sixteen trace elements have been reported. It has been found that Cr, Ni, and Co are highly concentrated in K-250 while Sc, and most of the major elements are more concentrated in K-185. The variation of major and trace elements in these two samples have been discussed.

  16. Molten metal containment vessel with rare earth oxysulfide protective coating thereon and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krikorian, Oscar H.; Curtis, Paul G.

    1992-01-01

    An improved molten metal containment vessel is disclosed in which wetting of the vessel's inner wall surfaces by molten metal is inhibited by coating at least the inner surfaces of the containment vessel with one or more rare earth oxysulfide or rare earth sulfide compounds to inhibit wetting and or adherence by the molten metal to the surfaces of the containment vessel.

  17. Grant Helps Make U.S. Rare Earth Magnets More Common

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sintered rare earth magnets - which are vital components in hybrid vehicle motors and wind turbine generators - are a $4 billion worldwide industry. Landisville, Pa.-based Electron Energy Corporation is hoping to bring a share of that market (and jobs) to the U.S. with their sintered rare earth magnet innovation.

  18. Hydrothermal method of synthesis of rare-earth tantalates and niobates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nyman, May D; Rohwer, Lauren E.S.; Martin, James E

    2012-10-16

    A hydrothermal method of synthesis of a family of rare-earth Group 5 oxides, where the Group 5 oxide is a niobate or tantalate. The rare-earth Group 5 oxides can be doped with suitable emitter ions to form nanophosphors.

  19. Development of a fast cyclotron gas stopper for intense rare isotope beams from projectile fragmentation: Study of ion extraction with a radiofrequency carpet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bollen, Georg; Morrissey, David

    2011-01-16

    Research and development has been performed in support of the design of a future rare isotope beam facility in the US. An important aspect of plans for earlier RIA (Rare Isotope Accelerator) and a requirement of FRIB (Facility of Rare Isotope Beams) to be built at Michigan State University are the availability of so-called “stopped beams” for research that contributes to answering questions like how elements in the universe are created and to provide better insight into the nature of Fundamental Interactions. In order to create “stopped beams” techniques are required that transform fast rare isotopes beams as they are available directly after addresses questions like the origin of that will allow and High priority is given to the evaluation of intensity limitations and the efficiency of stopping of fast fragment beams in gas cells and to the exploration of options to increase the efficiency and the reduction of space charge effects. Systematic studies performed at MSU as part of the RIA R&D with a linear gas cell under conditions close to those expected at RIA and related simulations confirm that the efficiency of stopping and extracting ions decreases with increasing beam intensity. Similar results have also been observed at RIKEN in Japan. These results indicate the concepts presently under study will not be able to cover the full range of intensities of fast beams expected at RIA without major losses. The development of a more robust concept is therefore critical to the RIA concept. Recent new beam simulation studies performed at the NSCL show that the stopping of heavy ions in a weakly focusing gas-filled magnetic field can overcome the intensity limitation of present systems while simultaneously providing a much faster ion extraction. We propose to design and build such a cyclotron gas stopper and to test it at the NSCL under conditions as close as possible to those found at RIA.

  20. Pressurization of whole element canister during staging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, F.F.

    1998-01-27

    An analytical model was developed to estimate the buildup of gas pressure for a single outer element in a hot cell test container for a post cold vacuum drying staging/storage test. This model considers various sources of gas generation and gas consumption as a function of time. In a canister containing spent nuclear fuel, hydrogen is generated from the reactions of uranium with free water or hydrated water, hydride decomposition, and radiolysis. The canister pressurization model predicts a stable pressure and a peak temperature during staging, with an assumption that a fuel element contains 40 gm of corrosion products and a decay heat of 2.07 or 1.06 Watts. Calculations were also performed on constant temperature tests for fuel elements containing varied amounts of sludge tested at 150, 125, 105, and 85 C. The pressurization model will be used to evaluate test results obtained from post-drying testing on whole fuel elements.

  1. Magnetic bearing element with adjustable stiffness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F

    2013-11-12

    A compact magnetic bearing element is provided which is made of permanent magnet discs configured to be capable of the adjustment of the bearing stiffness and levitation force over a wide range.

  2. Ion processing element with composite media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mann, Nick R. (Blackfoot, ID); Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Sebesta, Ferdinand (Prague, CZ)

    2003-02-04

    An ion processing element employing composite media disposed in a porous substrate, for facilitating removal of selected chemical species from a fluid stream. The ion processing element includes a porous fibrous glass substrate impregnated by composite media having one or more active components supported by a matrix material of polyacrylonitrile. The active components are effective in removing, by various mechanisms, one or more constituents from a fluid stream passing through the ion processing element. Due to the porosity and large surface area of both the composite medium and the substrate in which it is disposed, a high degree of contact is achieved between the active component and the fluid stream being processed. Further, the porosity of the matrix material and the substrate facilitates use of the ion processing element in high volume applications where it is desired to effectively process a high volume flows.

  3. Method and apparatus for staking optical elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woods, Robert O. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1988-01-01

    A method and apparatus for staking two optical elements together in order to retain their alignment is disclosed. The apparatus includes a removable adaptor made up of first and second adaptor bodies each having a lateral slot in their front and side faces. The adaptor also includes a system for releasably attaching each adaptor body to a respective optical element such that when the two optical elements are positioned relative to one another the adaptor bodies are adjacent and the lateral slots therein are aligned to form key slots. The adaptor includes keys which are adapted to fit into the key slots. A curable filler material is employed to retain the keys in the key slots and thereby join the first and second adaptor bodies to form the adaptor. Also disclosed is a method for staking together two optical elements employing the adaptor of the present invention.

  4. Ion processing element with composite media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mann, Nick R. (Blackfoot, ID); Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Sebesta, Ferdinand (Prague, CZ)

    2009-03-24

    An ion processing element employing composite media disposed in a porous substrate, for facilitating removal of selected chemical species from a fluid stream. The ion processing element includes a porous fibrous glass substrate impregnated by composite media having one or more active components supported by a matrix material of polyacrylonitrile. The active components are effective in removing, by various mechanisms, one or more constituents from a fluid stream passing through the ion processing element. Due to the porosity and large surface area of both the composite medium and the substrate in which it is disposed, a high degree of contact is achieved between the active component and the fluid stream being processed. Further, the porosity of the matrix material and the substrate facilitates use of the ion processing element in high volume applications where it is desired to effectively process a high volume flows.

  5. Quadrilateral/hexahedral finite element mesh coarsening

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Staten, Matthew L; Dewey, Mark W; Scott, Michael A; Benzley, Steven E

    2012-10-16

    A technique for coarsening a finite element mesh ("FEM") is described. This technique includes identifying a coarsening region within the FEM to be coarsened. Perimeter chords running along perimeter boundaries of the coarsening region are identified. The perimeter chords are redirected to create an adaptive chord separating the coarsening region from a remainder of the FEM. The adaptive chord runs through mesh elements residing along the perimeter boundaries of the coarsening region. The adaptive chord is then extracted to coarsen the FEM.

  6. Poole-frenkel piezoconductive element and sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Habermehl, Scott D.

    2004-08-03

    A new class of highly sensitive piezoconductive strain sensor elements and sensors has been invented. The new elements function under conditions such that electrical conductivity is dominated by Poole-Frenkel transport. A substantial piezoconductive effect appears in this regime, allowing the new sensors to exhibit sensitivity to applied strain as much as two orders of magnitude in excess of prior art sensors based on doped silicon.

  7. Stretchable semiconductor elements and stretchable electrical circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A. (Champaign, IL); Khang, Dahl-Young (Seoul, KR); Menard, Etienne (Durham, NC)

    2009-07-07

    The invention provides methods and devices for fabricating printable semiconductor elements and assembling printable semiconductor elements onto substrate surfaces. Methods, devices and device components of the present invention are capable of generating a wide range of flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices and arrays of devices on substrates comprising polymeric materials. The present invention also provides stretchable semiconductor structures and stretchable electronic devices capable of good performance in stretched configurations.

  8. PROCESS FOR SEPARATING YTTRIUM FROM THE RARE EARTHS BY SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peppard, D.F.; Mason, G.W.

    1963-11-12

    A process of isolating yttrium from other rare earths present together with it in aqueous solutions is presented. Yttrium and rare earths heavier than yttrium are first extracted with dialkyl phosphoric acid, after adjustment of the acidity to 2 N, and then back-extracted with 5-6 N mineral acid to form a strip solution. Thiocyanate is added to the strip solution and the rare earths heavier than yttrium are then selectively extracted with trialkyl phosphate, dialkyl phosphoric acid, alkyl phosphonate, or dialkyl aryl phosphonate, leaving the yttrium in the aqueous solution. (AEC)

  9. U.S. Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table © 3-1-2016 page 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table © 3-1-2016 page 1 Disclaimer: This U.S. Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table contains a sample of the rare earth-magnet patents issued by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. It was created with key word searching. The Table is not all inclusive of U.S. magnet patents and does not include foreign patents. Some cells in the Table contain estimates, approximations or assessments. Please consult with a professional patent attorney or patent agent, possessing license to

  10. U.S. Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table Neodymium-iron-boron magnet created with one-step refining process developed at The Ames Laboratory. CMI reviewed the U.S. patent database to better understand what is known about rare earth magnets and to identify potential areas to explore. Based on this, CMI created a table of more than 460 recent U.S. patents that address rare earth magnet compositions and processes. The table is available as a searchable pdf document (updated March 1, 2016). Information

  11. Visible light activated photocatalytic behaviour of rare earth modified commercial TiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobaldi, D.M.; Seabra, M.P.; Labrincha, J.A.

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: • RE gave more surface hydroxyl groups attached to the photocatalyst's surface. • RE gave the modified and fired samples a high specific surface area. • Photocatalytic activity was assessed in gas–solid phase under visible-light exposure. • Thermal treated RE-TiO{sub 2}s showed a superior visible-light photocatalytic activity. • La-TiO{sub 2} was the best performing photocatalyst. - Abstract: A commercial TiO{sub 2} nanopowder, Degussa P25, was modified with several rare earth (RE) elements in order to extend its photocatalytic activity into the visible range. The mixtures were prepared via solid-state reaction of the precursor oxides, and thermally treated at high temperature (900 and 1000 °C), with the aim of investigating the photocatalytic activity of the thermally treated samples. This thermal treatment was chosen for a prospective application as a surface layer in materials that need to be processed at high temperatures. The photocatalytic activity (PCA) of the samples was assessed in gas–solid phase – monitoring the degradation of isopropanol (IPA) – under visible-light irradiation. Results showed that the addition of the REs lanthanum, europium and yttrium to TiO{sub 2} greatly improved its photocatalytic activity, despite the thermal treatment, because of the presence of more surface hydroxyl groups attached to the photocatalyst's surface, together with a higher specific surface area (SSA) of the modified and thermally treated samples, with regard to the unmodified and thermally treated Degussa P25. The samples doped with La, Eu and Y all had excellent PCA under visible-light irradiation, even higher than the untreated Degussa P25 reference sample, despite their thermal treatment at 900 °C, with lanthanum producing the best results (i.e. the La-, Eu- and Y-TiO{sub 2} samples, thermally treated at 900 °C, had, respectively, a PCA equal to 26, 27 and 18 ppm h{sup ?1} – in terms of acetone formation – versus 15 ppm h{sup ?1} for the 900 °C thermally treated Degussa P25). On the other hand, Ce–TiO{sub 2}s had no significant photocatalytic activity.

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Non-Rare Earth Motor Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about non-rare earth...

  13. Need rare-earths know-how? The Critical Materials Institute offers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Need rare-earths know-how? The Critical Materials Institute offers lower-cost access to experts and research Contacts: For release: Dec. 1, 2015 Alex King, Director, Critical...

  14. The f-spin physics of rare-earth iron pnictides: influence of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    physics of rare-earth iron pnictides: influence of d-electron antiferromagnetic order on heavy fermion phase diagram Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The f-spin physics ...

  15. UQM Patents Non-Rare Earth Magnet Motor under DOE-Supported Project...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    While most plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) use motors with rare earth metals, these materials are expensive, their prices have been highly volatile (from 80kg to 750kg), and ...

  16. Pressure Dependence of the Charge-Density-Wave Gap in Rare-Earth...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Pressure Dependence of the Charge-Density-Wave Gap in Rare-Earth Tri-Tellurides Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Pressure Dependence of the Charge-Density-Wave Gap in...

  17. U.S. Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table © 11-10-2015 page...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    which has a remanence, Mr, of 0.95 T or more; and a process where the laminated magnet is multi-polar magnetized in-plane of the thick films. U.S. Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table...

  18. The f-spin physics of rare-earth iron pnictides: influence of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The f-spin physics of rare-earth iron pnictides: influence of d-electron antiferromagnetic order on heavy fermion phase diagram Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The f-spi...

  19. Stacked switchable element and diode combination with a low breakdown switchable element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Qi (Littleton, CO); Ward, James Scott (Englewood, CO); Hu, Jian (Englewood, CO); Branz, Howard M. (Boulder, CO)

    2012-06-19

    A device (10) comprises a semiconductor diode (12) and a switchable element (14) positioned in stacked adjacent relationship. The semiconductor diode (12) and the switchable element (14) are electrically connected in series with one another. The switchable element (14) is switchable from a low-conductance state to a high-conductance state in response to the application of a low-density forming current and/or a low voltage.

  20. Production and characterization of thin film group IIIB, IVB and rare earth

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    hydrides by reactive evaporation (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Production and characterization of thin film group IIIB, IVB and rare earth hydrides by reactive evaporation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Production and characterization of thin film group IIIB, IVB and rare earth hydrides by reactive evaporation A recent short history of reactive evaporation by D. M. Mattox [History Corner-A Short History of Reactive Evaporation, SVC Bulletin (Society of Vacuum Coaters,

  1. Lepton flavor violation in Higgs boson decays under the rare tau decay

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    results (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Lepton flavor violation in Higgs boson decays under the rare tau decay results Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Lepton flavor violation in Higgs boson decays under the rare tau decay results We study lepton flavor violation (LFV) associated with tau leptons in the framework of the two Higgs doublet model, in which LFV couplings are introduced as a deviation from Model II Yukawa interaction. Parameters of the model are constrained from

  2. CHARACTERIZATION OF NEAR NET-SHAPE CASTABLE RARE EARTH MODIFIED ALUMINUM

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ALLOYS FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE APPLICATION (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: CHARACTERIZATION OF NEAR NET-SHAPE CASTABLE RARE EARTH MODIFIED ALUMINUM ALLOYS FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE APPLICATION Citation Details In-Document Search Title: CHARACTERIZATION OF NEAR NET-SHAPE CASTABLE RARE EARTH MODIFIED ALUMINUM ALLOYS FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE APPLICATION Authors: Sims, Zachary C [1] ; Rios, Orlando [1] ; McCall, S. K. [2] ; Ott, Dr. Ryan T. [3] ; Van Buuren, Tony [2] + Show Author Affiliations

  3. Rare Earth Atoms Make the Best Thermoelectrics Better | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Science (SC) Rare Earth Atoms Make the Best Thermoelectrics Better Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) Community Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: Email Us More Information » 10.01.12 Rare Earth Atoms Make

  4. Facility for Rare Isotope Beams: The Journey Has Begun on DOE's latest

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Scientific User Facility | Department of Energy Facility for Rare Isotope Beams: The Journey Has Begun on DOE's latest Scientific User Facility Facility for Rare Isotope Beams: The Journey Has Begun on DOE's latest Scientific User Facility March 20, 2014 - 3:11pm Addthis From left to right: Congressman Rogers, Senator Stabenow, Deputy Under Secretary for Science and Energy Dr. Michael Knotek, President Lou Anna Simon of Michigan State University, and Senator Levin break ground on the FRIB

  5. 10 Questions for a Materials Scientist: Mr. Rare Earth -- Dr. Karl A.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gschneidner, Jr. | Department of Energy Mr. Rare Earth -- Dr. Karl A. Gschneidner, Jr. 10 Questions for a Materials Scientist: Mr. Rare Earth -- Dr. Karl A. Gschneidner, Jr. April 3, 2013 - 12:59pm Addthis Dr. Karl Gschneidner is holding a neodymium-iron-boron magnet produced using a new, greener process. The process that Dr. Gschneidner helped develop doesn’t produce the environmentally unfriendly byproducts that result from traditional manufacturing methods. | Photo courtesy of Ames

  6. Spark discharge trace element detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adler-Golden, S.; Bernstein, L.S.; Bien, F.

    1988-08-23

    A spark discharge trace element detection system is provided which includes a spark chamber including a pair of electrodes for receiving a sample of gas to be analyzed at no greater than atmospheric pressure. A voltage is provided across the electrodes for generating a spark in the sample. The intensity of the emitted radiation in at least one primary selected narrow band of the radiation is detected. Each primary band corresponds to an element to be detected in the gas. The intensity of the emission in each detected primary band is integrated during the afterglow time interval of the spark emission and a signal representative of the integrated intensity of the emission in each selected primary bond is utilized to determine the concentration of the corresponding element in the gas. 12 figs.

  7. Logic elements for reactor period meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McDowell, William P.; Bobis, James P.

    1976-01-01

    Logic elements are provided for a reactor period meter trip circuit. For one element, first and second inputs are applied to first and second chopper comparators, respectively. The output of each comparator is O if the input applied to it is greater than or equal to a trip level associated with each input and each output is a square wave of frequency f if the input applied to it is less than the associated trip level. The outputs of the comparators are algebraically summed and applied to a bandpass filter tuned to f. For another element, the output of each comparator is applied to a bandpass filter which is tuned to f to give a sine wave of frequency f. The outputs of the filters are multiplied by an analog multiplier whose output is 0 if either input is 0 and a sine wave of frequency 2f if both inputs are a frequency f.

  8. Catalyst for elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Liu, W.

    1995-01-24

    A catalytic reduction process is described for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides high activity and selectivity, as well as stability in the reaction atmosphere, for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over a metal oxide composite catalyst having one of the following empirical formulas: [(FO[sub 2])[sub 1[minus]n](RO)[sub n

  9. Broadband diffractive lens or imaging element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ceglio, Natale M. (Livermore, CA); Hawryluk, Andrew M. (Modesto, CA); London, Richard A. (Oakland, CA); Seppala, Lynn G. (Livermore, CA)

    1993-01-01

    A broadband diffractive lens or imaging element produces a sharp focus and/or a high resolution image with broad bandwidth illuminating radiation. The diffractive lens is sectored or segmented into regions, each of which focuses or images a distinct narrowband of radiation but all of which have a common focal length. Alternatively, a serial stack of minus filters, each with a diffraction pattern which focuses or images a distinct narrowband of radiation but all of which have a common focal length, is used. The two approaches can be combined. Multifocal broadband diffractive elements can also be formed. Thin film embodiments are described.

  10. TAURUS. 3-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whirley, R.G.

    1991-05-01

    TAURUS reads the binary plot files generated by the LLNL three-dimensional finite element analysis codes, NIKE3D (ESTSC 139), DYNA3D (ESTSC 138), TACO3D (ESTSC 287), TOPAZ3D (ESTSC 231), and GEMINI (ESTSC 455) and plots contours, time histories,and deformed shapes. Contours of a large number of quantities may be plotted on meshes consisting of plate, shell, and solid type elements. TAURUS can compute a variety of strain measures, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. TAURUS has three phases: initialization, geometry display with contouring, and time history processing.

  11. TAURUS. 3-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whirley, R.G.

    1992-03-03

    TAURUS reads the binary plot files generated by the LLNL three-dimensional finite element analysis codes, NIKE3D (ESTSC 139), DYNA3D (ESTSC 138), TACO3D (ESTSC 287), TOPAZ3D (ESTSC 231), and GEMINI (ESTSC 455) and plots contours, time histories,and deformed shapes. Contours of a large number of quantities may be plotted on meshes consisting of plate, shell, and solid type elements. TAURUS can compute a variety of strain measures, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. TAURUS has three phases: initialization, geometry display with contouring, and time history processing.

  12. TAURUS. 3-D Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whirley, R.G.

    1984-05-01

    TAURUS reads the binary plot files generated by the LLNL three-dimensional finite element analysis codes, NIKE3D, DYNA3D, TACO3D, TOPAZ3D, and GEMINI and plots contours, time histories,and deformed shapes. Contours of a large number of quantities may be plotted on meshes consisting of plate, shell, and solid type elements. TAURUS can compute a variety of strain measures, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. TAURUS has three phases: initialization, geometry display with contouring, and time history processing.

  13. TAURUS. 3-D Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whirley, R.G.

    1993-11-30

    TAURUS reads the binary plot files generated by the LLNL three-dimensional finite element analysis codes, NIKE3D, DYNA3D, TACO3D, TOPAZ3D, and GEMINI and plots contours, time histories,and deformed shapes. Contours of a large number of quantities may be plotted on meshes consisting of plate, shell, and solid type elements. TAURUS can compute a variety of strain measures, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. TAURUS has three phases: initialization, geometry display with contouring, and time history processing.

  14. TAURUS. 3-D Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whirley, R.G.

    1992-03-03

    TAURUS reads the binary plot files generated by the LLNL three-dimensional finite element analysis codes, NIKE3D, DYNA3D, TACO3D, TOPAZ3D, and GEMINI and plots contours, time histories,and deformed shapes. Contours of a large number of quantities may be plotted on meshes consisting of plate, shell, and solid type elements. TAURUS can compute a variety of strain measures, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. TAURUS has three phases: initialization, geometry display with contouring, and time history processing.

  15. TAURUS. 3-D Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, T.

    1992-03-03

    TAURUS reads the binary plot files generated by the LLNL three-dimensional finite element analysis codes, NIKE3D, DYNA3D, TACO3D, TOPAZ3D, and GEMINI and plots contours, time histories, and deformed shapes. Contours of a large number of quantities may be plotted on meshes consisting of plate, shell, and solid type elements. TAURUS can compute a variety of strain measures, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. TAURUS has three phases: initialization, geometry display with contouring, and time history processing.

  16. JACKETED FUEL ELEMENTS FOR GRAPHITE MODERATED REACTORS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Szilard, L.; Wigner, E.P.; Creutz, E.C.

    1959-05-12

    Fuel elements for a heterogeneous, fluid cooled, graphite moderated reactor are described. The fuel elements are comprised of a body of natural uranium hermetically sealed in a jacket of corrosion resistant material. The jacket, which may be aluminum or some other material which is non-fissionable and of a type having a low neutron capture cross-section, acts as a barrier between the fissioning isotope and the coolant or moderator or both. The jacket minimizes the tendency of the moderator and coolant to become radioactive and/or contaminated by fission fragments from the fissioning isotope.

  17. Broadband diffractive lens or imaging element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ceglio, Natale M. (Livermore, CA); Hawryluk, Andrew M. (Modesto, CA); London, Richard A. (Oakland, CA); Seppala, Lynn G. (Livermore, CA)

    1991-01-01

    A broadband diffractive lens or imaging element produces a sharp focus and/or a high resolution image with broad bandwidth illuminating radiation. The diffractive lens is sectored or segmented into regions, each of which focuses or images a distinct narrowband of radiation but all of which have a common focal length. Alternatively, a serial stack of minus filters, each with a diffraction pattern which focuses or images a distinct narrowband of radiation but all of which have a common focal length, is used. The two approaches can be combined. Multifocal broadband diffractive elements can also be formed.

  18. Broadband diffractive lens or imaging element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ceglio, N.M.; Hawryluk, A.M.; London, R.A.; Seppala, L.G.

    1993-10-26

    A broadband diffractive lens or imaging element produces a sharp focus and/or a high resolution image with broad bandwidth illuminating radiation. The diffractive lens is sectored or segmented into regions, each of which focuses or images a distinct narrowband of radiation but all of which have a common focal length. Alternatively, a serial stack of minus filters, each with a diffraction pattern which focuses or images a distinct narrowband of radiation but all of which have a common focal length, is used. The two approaches can be combined. Multifocal broadband diffractive elements can also be formed. Thin film embodiments are described. 21 figures.

  19. Status of Segmented Element Thermoelectric Generator for Vehicle...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Segmented Element Thermoelectric Generator for Vehicle Waste Heat Recovery Status of Segmented Element Thermoelectric Generator for Vehicle Waste Heat Recovery Discusses progress...

  20. The Common Elements of Atomic and Hadronic Physics (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Common Elements of Atomic and Hadronic Physics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Common Elements of Atomic and Hadronic Physics Authors: Brodsky, Stanley J. ;...

  1. GNEP Element:Develop Advanced Burner Reactors | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Develop Advanced Burner Reactors GNEP Element:Develop Advanced Burner Reactors An article describing burner reactors and the role in GNEP. PDF icon GNEP Element:Develop Advanced...

  2. Potential trace element emissions from the gasification of Illinois...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the gasification of Illinois coals. Duplicate determinations of 34 elements in coal and ash samples Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Potential trace element emissions...

  3. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Maui Area (DOE GTP) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Compound and Elemental Analysis At Maui Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Maui...

  4. OSHA Rulemaking on Basic Program Elements for Federal Employee...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    OSHA Rulemaking on Basic Program Elements for Federal Employee Occupational Safety and Health Programs and Related Matters; 29 CFR 1960 OSHA Rulemaking on Basic Program Elements...

  5. Element Agglomeration Algebraic Multigrid and Upscaling Library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-02-11

    ELAG is a serial C++ library for numerical upscaling of finite element discretizations. It provides optimal complexity algorithms to build multilevel hierarchies and solvers that can be used for solving a wide class of partial differential equation (elliptic, hyperbolic, saddle point problems) on general unstructured mesh. Additionally, a novel multilevel solver for saddle point problems with divergence constraint is implemented.

  6. An association between the risk of ovarian cancer and rare HRAS1 alleles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weitzel, J.N.; Patel, J.; Smith, D.M.

    1994-09-01

    The highly polymorphic HRAS1 minisatellite locus just downstream from the proto-oncogene H-ras-1 on chromosome 11p consists of four common progenitor alleles and several dozen rare alleles, which apparently derive from mutations of the progenitors. Mutant alleles of this locus represent a major risk factor for common types of cancer. Rare-sized HRAS1 alleles have been found more frequently in patients with carcinoma of the breast, colorectum, and urinary bladder and acute leukemia, compared to cancer-free controls. This highly significant association (p<1.001) results in a modest relative risk for patients with one rare allele, but the prevalence of this class of mutant alleles implies an important attributable risk: 1 in 11 cancers of the breast, colorectum, and bladder. Therefore, we performed a case-control study using conventional (Southern blot) and PCR-based methods to score HRAS1 alleles in the leukocyte DNA from 59 patients with ovarian cancer, and 51 cancer-free controls. Our preliminary data suggest an increased incidence of rare and intermediate HRAS1 alleles in caucasian ovarian cancer patients (13%) compared to cancer-free controls (4%). These results parallel the allele distribution seen in the large published series, and lend support for a significant association between rare HRAS1 alleles and ovarian cancer predisposition.

  7. Ferroelectric tunneling element and memory applications which utilize the tunneling element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kalinin, Sergei V. [Knoxville, TN; Christen, Hans M. [Knoxville, TN; Baddorf, Arthur P. [Knoxville, TN; Meunier, Vincent [Knoxville, TN; Lee, Ho Nyung [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-07-20

    A tunneling element includes a thin film layer of ferroelectric material and a pair of dissimilar electrically-conductive layers disposed on opposite sides of the ferroelectric layer. Because of the dissimilarity in composition or construction between the electrically-conductive layers, the electron transport behavior of the electrically-conductive layers is polarization dependent when the tunneling element is below the Curie temperature of the layer of ferroelectric material. The element can be used as a basis of compact 1R type non-volatile random access memory (RAM). The advantages include extremely simple architecture, ultimate scalability and fast access times generic for all ferroelectric memories.

  8. Potential trace element emissions from the gasification of Illinois...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GASIFICATION PLANTS; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS; ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY; ACTIVATION ANALYSIS; AIR POLLUTION; BERYLLIUM; COAL GASIFICATION; ELEMENTS; FLOWSHEETS; FLUORESCENCE...

  9. Using NERSC Systems, Physicists Close In on a Rare-Particle Decay Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using NERSC Systems, Physcists Close in on a Rare-Particle Decay Process Using NERSC Systems, Physicists Close In on a Rare-Particle Decay Process Underground Experiment May Unlock the Mysteries of the Neutrino June 11, 2012 NERSC Contact: Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 exo-1.jpg Located at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad, New Mexico, EXO-200 is a 200-kg detector using liquid xenon, enriched in the isotope 136, to detect "neutrino-less double beta decay." With

  10. GROUND-STATE PROPERTIES OF RARE-EARTH METALS: AN EVALUATION OF

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DENSITY-FUNCTIONAL THEORY (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: GROUND-STATE PROPERTIES OF RARE-EARTH METALS: AN EVALUATION OF DENSITY-FUNCTIONAL THEORY Citation Details In-Document Search Title: GROUND-STATE PROPERTIES OF RARE-EARTH METALS: AN EVALUATION OF DENSITY-FUNCTIONAL THEORY Authors: Soderlind, P ; Turchi, P A ; Landa, A ; Lordi, V Publication Date: 2014-02-04 OSTI Identifier: 1188629 Report Number(s): LLNL-JRNL-649338 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC52-07NA27344 Resource

  11. EERE Success Story-UQM Patents Non-Rare Earth Magnet Motor under

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE-Supported Project | Department of Energy UQM Patents Non-Rare Earth Magnet Motor under DOE-Supported Project EERE Success Story-UQM Patents Non-Rare Earth Magnet Motor under DOE-Supported Project April 16, 2015 - 10:29am Addthis Credit: UQM Technologies Credit: UQM Technologies Through a cooperative R&D project with the Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO), UQM Technologies, a company developing propulsion systems for electric, hybrid electric, plug-in hybrid electric and fuel cell

  12. Ames Laboratory to Lead New Research Effort to Address Shortages in Rare

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Earth and Other Critical Materials | Department of Energy Laboratory to Lead New Research Effort to Address Shortages in Rare Earth and Other Critical Materials Ames Laboratory to Lead New Research Effort to Address Shortages in Rare Earth and Other Critical Materials January 9, 2013 - 12:13pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy announced today that a team led by Ames Laboratory in Ames, Iowa, has been selected for an award of up to $120

  13. UQM Patents Non-Rare Earth Magnet Motor under DOE-Supported Project |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy UQM Patents Non-Rare Earth Magnet Motor under DOE-Supported Project UQM Patents Non-Rare Earth Magnet Motor under DOE-Supported Project April 16, 2015 - 10:29am Addthis Credit: UQM Technologies Credit: UQM Technologies Through a cooperative R&D project with the Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO), UQM Technologies, a company developing propulsion systems for electric, hybrid electric, plug-in hybrid electric and fuel cell electric vehicles recently patented a new

  14. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adams, Jesse D.; Sulchek, Todd A.; Feigin, Stuart C.

    2012-07-10

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  15. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adams, Jesse D; Sulchek, Todd A; Feigin, Stuart C

    2014-04-29

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  16. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adams, Jesse D; Sulchek, Todd A; Feigin, Stuart C

    2013-04-30

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  17. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adams, Jesse D.; Sulchek, Todd A.; Feigin, Stuart C.

    2010-04-06

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  18. Continuous, real time microwave plasma element sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woskov, P.P.; Smatlak, D.L.; Cohn, D.R.; Wittle, J.K.; Titus, C.H.; Surma, J.E.

    1995-12-26

    Microwave-induced plasma is described for continuous, real time trace element monitoring under harsh and variable conditions. The sensor includes a source of high power microwave energy and a shorted waveguide made of a microwave conductive, refractory material communicating with the source of the microwave energy to generate a plasma. The high power waveguide is constructed to be robust in a hot, hostile environment. It includes an aperture for the passage of gases to be analyzed and a spectrometer is connected to receive light from the plasma. Provision is made for real time in situ calibration. The spectrometer disperses the light, which is then analyzed by a computer. The sensor is capable of making continuous, real time quantitative measurements of desired elements, such as the heavy metals lead and mercury. 3 figs.

  19. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1996-07-15

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forcesmore »along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.« less

  20. Continuous, real time microwave plasma element sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woskov, Paul P. (4 Ledgewood Dr., Bedford, MA 01730); Smatlak, Donna L. (10 Village Hill Rd., Belmont, MA 02178); Cohn, Daniel R. (26 Walnut Hill Rd., Chestnut Hill, MA 02167); Wittle, J. Kenneth (1740 Conestoga Rd., Chester Springs, PA 19425); Titus, Charles H. (323 Echo Valley La., Newton Square, PA 19072); Surma, Jeffrey E. (806 Brian La., Kennewick, WA 99337)

    1995-01-01

    Microwave-induced plasma for continuous, real time trace element monitoring under harsh and variable conditions. The sensor includes a source of high power microwave energy and a shorted waveguide made of a microwave conductive, refractory material communicating with the source of the microwave energy to generate a plasma. The high power waveguide is constructed to be robust in a hot, hostile environment. It includes an aperture for the passage of gases to be analyzed and a spectrometer is connected to receive light from the plasma. Provision is made for real time in situ calibration. The spectrometer disperses the light, which is then analyzed by a computer. The sensor is capable of making continuous, real time quantitative measurements of desired elements, such as the heavy metals lead and mercury.

  1. GNEP Element:Demonstrate More Proliferation-Resistant Recycling |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy GNEP Element:Demonstrate More Proliferation-Resistant Recycling GNEP Element:Demonstrate More Proliferation-Resistant Recycling An article describing GNEP element of recycling. PDF icon GNEP Element:Demonstrate More Proliferation-Resistant Recycling More Documents & Publications GNEP Element:Develop Enhanced Nuclear Safeguards Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Enhanced Nuclear Safeguards Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Demonstrate

  2. conformal decomposition finite-element method

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    conformal decomposition finite-element method - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste

  3. Oxidation of hydrogen halides to elemental halogens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rohrmann, Charles A. (Kennewick, WA); Fullam, Harold T. (Richland, WA)

    1985-01-01

    A process for oxidizing hydrogen halides having substantially no sulfur impurities by means of a catalytically active molten salt is disclosed. A mixture of the subject hydrogen halide and an oxygen bearing gas is contacted with a molten salt containing an oxidizing catalyst and alkali metal normal sulfates and pyrosulfates to produce an effluent gas stream rich in the elemental halogen and substantially free of sulfur oxide gases.

  4. ExodusII Finite Element Data Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-05-14

    EXODUS II is a model developed to store and retrieve data for finite element analyses. It is used for preprocessing (problem definition), postprocessing (results visualization), as well as code to code data transfer. An EXODUS II data file is a random access, machine independent, binary file that is written and read via C, C++, or Fortran library routines which comprise the Application Programming Interface. (exodus II is based on netcdf)

  5. DISSOLVED CONCENTRATION LIMITS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Bernot

    2005-07-13

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of elements with radioactive isotopes under probable repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, field measurements, and laboratory experiments. The scope of this activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for elements with radioactive isotopes (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium) relevant to calculated dose. Model outputs for uranium, plutonium, neptunium, thorium, americium, and protactinium are provided in the form of tabulated functions with pH and log fCO{sub 2} as independent variables, plus one or more uncertainty terms. The solubility limits for the remaining elements are either in the form of distributions or single values. Even though selection of an appropriate set of radionuclides documented in Radionuclide Screening (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160059]) includes actinium, transport of Ac is not modeled in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) model because of its extremely short half-life. Actinium dose is calculated in the TSPA-LA by assuming secular equilibrium with {sup 231}Pa (Section 6.10); therefore, Ac is not analyzed in this report. The output data from this report are fundamental inputs for TSPA-LA used to determine the estimated release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Consistent modeling approaches and environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models for the actinides discussed in this report. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, and activity coefficients have been quantified or otherwise addressed.

  6. ASC Program Elements | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Program Elements | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA

  7. Finite Element Results Visualization for Unstructured Grids

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1996-07-15

    GRIZ is a general-purpose post-processing application supporting interactive visualization of finite element analysis results on unstructured grids. In addition to basic pseudocolor renderings of state variables over the mesh surface, GRIZ provides modern visualization techniques such as isocontours and isosurfaces, cutting planes, vector field display, and particle traces. GRIZ accepts both command-line and mouse-driven input, and is portable to virtually any UNIX platform which provides Motif and OpenGl libraries.

  8. Circuit level modeling of inductive elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muyshondt, G.P.; Portnoy, W.M.

    1989-01-01

    Design and analysis of spacecraft power systems have been difficult to perform because of the lack of circuit level models for nonlinear inductive elements. This paper reviews some of the models which have been proposed, their limitations, and applications. An improved saturation dependent model will be described. The model has been implemented in SPICE and with a commercial circuit program and demonstrated to be satisfactory in both implementations. 3 refs., 9 figs.

  9. Finite Element Interface to Linear Solvers

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-03-18

    Sparse systems of linear equations arise in many engineering applications, including finite elements, finite volumes, and others. The solution of linear systems is often the most computationally intensive portion of the application. Depending on the complexity of problems addressed by the application, there may be no single solver capable of solving all of the linear systems that arise. This motivates the desire to switch an application from one solver librwy to another, depending on themore »problem being solved. The interfaces provided by solver libraries differ greatly, making it difficult to switch an application code from one library to another. The amount of library-specific code in an application Can be greatly reduced by having an abstraction layer between solver libraries and the application, putting a common "face" on various solver libraries. One such abstraction layer is the Finite Element Interface to Linear Solvers (EEl), which has seen significant use by finite element applications at Sandia National Laboratories and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.« less

  10. Fuel elements of research reactor CM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozlov, A.V.; Morozov, A.V.; Vatulin, A.V.; Ershov, S.A.

    2013-07-01

    In 1961 the CM research reactor was commissioned at the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (Dimitrovgrad, Russia), it was intended to carry on investigations and the production of transuranium nuclides. The reactor is of a tank type. Original fuel assembly contained plate fuels that were spaced with vanes and corrugated bands. Nickel was used as a cladding material, fuel meat was produced from UO{sub 2} + electrolytic nickel composition. Fuel plates have been replaced by self-spacing cross-shaped dispersion fuels clad in stainless steel. In 2005 the reactor was updated. The purpose of this updating was to increase the quantity of irradiation channels in the reactor core and to improve the neutron balance. The updating was implemented at the expense of 20 % reduction in the quantity of fuel elements in the core which released a space for extra channels and decreased the mass of structural materials in the core. The updated reactor is loaded with modified standard fuel elements with 20 % higher uranium masses. At the same time stainless steel in fuel assembly shrouds was substituted by zirconium alloy. Today in progress are investigations and work to promote the second stage of reactor updating that involve developments of cross-shaped fuel elements having low neutron absorption matrix materials. This article gives an historical account of the design and main technical changes that occurred for the CM reactor since its commissioning.

  11. Foreword [Special Issue on Superheavy Elements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    DĂĽllmann, Christoph E.; Herzberg, Rolf -Dietmar; Nazarewicz, Witold; Oganessian, Yuri

    2015-12-07

    Reflecting the breadth of research opportunities in the field of superheavy element research, this special issue covers the range of topics in a comprehensive way, including synthesis of superheavy isotopes, nuclear structure, atomic shell structure, and chemical properties. The contributions detail the status of the field and lay out perspectives for the future. The prospects are bright: new isotopes are awaiting discovery, completing the landscape of superheavy nuclei and bridging the currently existing gap between nuclei synthesized in cold fusion reactions and those from 48Ca induced fusion reactions. The possibility that the limits of nuclear structure studies can be pushedmore » even further in mass and charge has greatly motivated a number of new facilities. Advances in experimental techniques will allow studies on isotopes produced significantly below the 1 pb level. Chemical studies progressing to elements never studied to date are already being prepared. Ultra-fast chemistry setups are under development and it will be fascinating to see them at work, elucidating the influence of relativistic effects on superheavy elements. The richness of chemical systems available for transactinides will expand further, giving access to new chemical systems, giving more information on the architecture of the periodic table.« less

  12. Foreword [Special Issue on Superheavy Elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DĂĽllmann, Christoph E.; Herzberg, Rolf -Dietmar; Nazarewicz, Witold; Oganessian, Yuri

    2015-12-07

    Reflecting the breadth of research opportunities in the field of superheavy element research, this special issue covers the range of topics in a comprehensive way, including synthesis of superheavy isotopes, nuclear structure, atomic shell structure, and chemical properties. The contributions detail the status of the field and lay out perspectives for the future. The prospects are bright: new isotopes are awaiting discovery, completing the landscape of superheavy nuclei and bridging the currently existing gap between nuclei synthesized in cold fusion reactions and those from 48Ca induced fusion reactions. The possibility that the limits of nuclear structure studies can be pushed even further in mass and charge has greatly motivated a number of new facilities. Advances in experimental techniques will allow studies on isotopes produced significantly below the 1 pb level. Chemical studies progressing to elements never studied to date are already being prepared. Ultra-fast chemistry setups are under development and it will be fascinating to see them at work, elucidating the influence of relativistic effects on superheavy elements. The richness of chemical systems available for transactinides will expand further, giving access to new chemical systems, giving more information on the architecture of the periodic table.

  13. Nuclear fuel elements having a composite cladding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gordon, Gerald M.; Cowan, II, Robert L.; Davies, John H.

    1983-09-20

    An improved nuclear fuel element is disclosed for use in the core of nuclear reactors. The improved nuclear fuel element has a composite cladding of an outer portion forming a substrate having on the inside surface a metal layer selected from the group consisting of copper, nickel, iron and alloys of the foregoing with a gap between the composite cladding and the core of nuclear fuel. The nuclear fuel element comprises a container of the elongated composite cladding, a central core of a body of nuclear fuel material disposed in and partially filling the container and forming an internal cavity in the container, an enclosure integrally secured and sealed at each end of said container and a nuclear fuel material retaining means positioned in the cavity. The metal layer of the composite cladding prevents perforations or failures in the cladding substrate from stress corrosion cracking or from fuel pellet-cladding interaction or both. The substrate of the composite cladding is selected from conventional cladding materials and preferably is a zirconium alloy.

  14. Nuclear fuel elements made from nanophase materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heubeck, N.B.

    1998-09-08

    A nuclear reactor core fuel element is composed of nanophase high temperature materials. An array of the fuel elements in rod form are joined in an open geometry fuel cell that preferably also uses such nanophase materials for the cell structures. The particular high temperature nanophase fuel element material must have the appropriate mechanical characteristics to avoid strain related failure even at high temperatures, in the order of about 3000 F. Preferably, the reactor type is a pressurized or boiling water reactor and the nanophase material is a high temperature ceramic or ceramic composite. Nanophase metals, or nanophase metals with nanophase ceramics in a composite mixture, also have desirable characteristics, although their temperature capability is not as great as with all-ceramic nanophase material. Combinations of conventional or nanophase metals and conventional or nanophase ceramics can be employed as long as there is at least one nanophase material in the composite. The nuclear reactor so constructed has a number of high strength fuel particles, a nanophase structural material for supporting a fuel rod at high temperature, a configuration to allow passive cooling in the event of a primary cooling system failure, an ability to retain a coolable geometry even at high temperatures, an ability to resist generation of hydrogen gas, and a configuration having good nuclear, corrosion, and mechanical characteristics. 5 figs.

  15. Nuclear fuel elements made from nanophase materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heubeck, Norman B.

    1998-01-01

    A nuclear reactor core fuel element is composed of nanophase high temperature materials. An array of the fuel elements in rod form are joined in an open geometry fuel cell that preferably also uses such nanophase materials for the cell structures. The particular high temperature nanophase fuel element material must have the appropriate mechanical characteristics to avoid strain related failure even at high temperatures, in the order of about 3000.degree. F. Preferably, the reactor type is a pressurized or boiling water reactor and the nanophase material is a high temperature ceramic or ceramic composite. Nanophase metals, or nanophase metals with nanophase ceramics in a composite mixture, also have desirable characteristics, although their temperature capability is not as great as with all-ceramic nanophase material. Combinations of conventional or nanophase metals and conventional or nanophase ceramics can be employed as long as there is at least one nanophase material in the composite. The nuclear reactor so constructed has a number of high strength fuel particles, a nanophase structural material for supporting a fuel rod at high temperature, a configuration to allow passive cooling in the event of a primary cooling system failure, an ability to retain a coolable geometry even at high temperatures, an ability to resist generation of hydrogen gas, and a configuration having good nuclear, corrosion, and mechanical characteristics.

  16. Synthesis, structural characterization and magnetic properties of RE{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} (RE=rare-earth metal)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suen, Nian-Tzu; Tobash, Paul H.; Bobev, Svilen

    2011-11-15

    A series of rare-earth metal-magnesium-germanides RE{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} (RE=Y, Nd, Sm, Gd-Tm, Lu) has been synthesized by reactions of the corresponding elements at high temperature. Their structures have been established by single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction and belong to the Mo{sub 2}FeB{sub 2} structure type (space group P4/mbm (No. 127), Z=2; Pearson symbol tP10). Temperature dependent DC magnetization measurements indicate Curie-Weiss paramagnetism in the high-temperature regime for all members of the family, excluding Y{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2}, Sm{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2}, and Lu{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2}. At cryogenic temperatures (ca. 60 K and below), most RE{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} phases enter into an antiferromagnetic ground-state, except for Er{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} and Tm{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2}, which do not undergo magnetic ordering down to 5 K. The structural variations as a function of the decreasing size of the rare-earth metals, following the lanthanide contraction, and the changes in the magnetic properties across the series are discussed as well. - Graphical Abstract: The structure of RE{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} (RE=Y, Nd, Sm, Gd-Tm, Lu) can be best viewed as 2-dimensional slabs of Mg and Ge atoms (anionic sub-lattice), and layers of rare-earth metal atoms (cationic sub-lattice) between them. Within this description, one should consider the Ge-Ge dumbbells (formally Ge{sup 6-}{sub 2}), interconnected with square-planar Mg atom as forming flat [MgGe{sub 2}] layers (z=0), stacked along the c-axis with the layers at z=1/2, made of rare-earth metal cations (formally RE{sup 3+}). Highlights: > RE{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} (RE=Y, Nd, Sm, Gd-Tm, Lu) are new ternary germanides. > Their structures can be recognized as a 1:1 intergrowth of CsCl- and AlB{sub 2}-like slabs. > Ge atoms are covalently bound into Ge{sub 2} dumbbells. > Most RE{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} phases are antiferromagnetically ordered at cryogenic temperatures.

  17. Method and system for processing optical elements using magnetorheological finishing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Menapace, Joseph Arthur; Schaffers, Kathleen Irene; Bayramian, Andrew James; Molander, William A

    2012-09-18

    A method of finishing an optical element includes mounting the optical element in an optical mount having a plurality of fiducials overlapping with the optical element and obtaining a first metrology map for the optical element and the plurality of fiducials. The method also includes obtaining a second metrology map for the optical element without the plurality of fiducials, forming a difference map between the first metrology map and the second metrology map, and aligning the first metrology map and the second metrology map. The method further includes placing mathematical fiducials onto the second metrology map using the difference map to form a third metrology map and associating the third metrology map to the optical element. Moreover, the method includes mounting the optical element in the fixture in an MRF tool, positioning the optical element in the fixture; removing the plurality of fiducials, and finishing the optical element.

  18. Thermal treatment for increasing magnetostrictive response of rare earth-iron alloy rods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Verhoeven, John D. (Ames, IA); McMasters, O. D. (Ames, IA)

    1989-07-18

    Magnetostrictive rods formed from rare earth-iron alloys are subjected to a short time heat treatment to increase their Magnetostrictive response under compression. The heat treatment is preferably carried out at a temperature of from 900.degree. to 1000.degree. C. for 20 minutes to six hours.

  19. Thermal treatment for increasing magnetostrictive response of rare earth-iron alloy rods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Verhoeven, J.D.; McMasters, O.D.

    1989-07-18

    Magnetostrictive rods formed from rare earth-iron alloys are subjected to a short time heat treatment to increase their magnetostrictive response under compression. The heat treatment is preferably carried out at a temperature of from 900 to 1,000 C for 20 minutes to six hours.

  20. Managing Natural and Reintroduced Rare Plant Populations within a Large Government Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlsen, T M; Paterson, L E; Alfaro, T M

    2009-07-15

    California is home to many large government reservations that have been in existence for decades. Many of these reservations were formed to support various Department of Defense and Department of Energy national defense activities. Often, only a very small percentage of the reservation is actively used for programmatic activities, resulting in large areas of intact habitat. In some cases, this has benefited rare plant populations, as surrounding lands have been developed for residential or industrial use. However, land management activities such as the suppression or active use of fire and other disturbance (such as fire trail grading) can also work to either the detriment or benefit of rare plant populations at these sites. A management regime that is beneficial to the rare plant populations of interest and is at best consistent with existing site programmatic activities, and at a minimum does not impact such activities, has the best potential for a positive outcome. As a result, some species may be 'difficult' while others may be 'easy' to manage in this context, depending on how closely the species biological requirements match the programmatic activities on the reservation. To illustrate, we compare and contrast two rare annual plant species found at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Site 300. Although several populations of Amsinckia grandiflora have been restored on the site, and all populations are intensively managed, this species continues to decline. In contrast, Blepharizonia plumosa appears to take advantage of the annual controlled burns conducted on the site, and is thriving.

  1. Ternary rare earth-lanthanide sulfides. [Re = Eu, Sm or Yb

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Takeshita, Takuo; Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.; Beaudry, B.J.

    1986-03-06

    Disclosed is a new ternary rare earth sulfur compound having the formula La/sub 3-x/M/sub x/S/sub 4/, where M is europium, samarium, or ytterbium, with x = 0.15 to 0.8. The compound has good high-temperature thermoelectric properties and exhibits long-term structural stability up to 1000/sup 0/C.

  2. Prospects for and Status of CUORE ? The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman, E B

    2009-07-07

    CUORE (Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events) is a next generation experiment designed to search for the neutrinoless DBD of {sup 130}Te using a bolometric technique. The present status of the CUORE is presented along with the latest results from its prototype, CUORICINO.

  3. Magnetic behaviour of the rare earth binary R-Fe alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabral, F.A.O.; Turtelli, R.S.; Gama, S.; Machado, F.L.A. )

    1989-09-01

    Thermomagnetic analysis and coercive field measurements in rare-earth-rich alloys of the systems Fe-Ce, Fe-Pr and Fe-Nd suggest the presence of two different magnetically hard phases in all these systems. These phases can be metastable and their magnetic properties are strongly affected by heat-treatments at 600{sup 0}C.

  4. Posterior Circulation Stroke After Bronchial Artery Embolization. A Rare but Serious Complication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laborda, Alicia; Tejero, Carlos; Fredes, Arturo; Cebrian, Luis; Guelbenzu, Santiago; Gregorio, Miguel Angel de

    2013-06-15

    Bronchial artery embolization (BAE) is the treatment of choice for massive hemoptysis with rare complications that generally are mild and transient. There are few references in the medical literature with acute cerebral embolization as a complication of BAE. We report a case of intracranial posterior territory infarctions as a complication BAE in a patient with hemoptysis due to bronchiectasis.

  5. Upgraded HFIR Fuel Element Welding System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sease, John D [ORNL

    2010-02-01

    The welding of aluminum-clad fuel plates into aluminum alloy 6061 side plate tubing is a unique design feature of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fuel assemblies as 101 full-penetration circumferential gas metal arc welds (GMAW) are required in the fabrication of each assembly. In a HFIR fuel assembly, 540 aluminum-clad fuel plates are assembled into two nested annular fuel elements 610 mm (24-inches) long. The welding process for the HFIR fuel elements was developed in the early 1960 s and about 450 HFIR fuel assemblies have been successfully welded using the GMAW process qualified in the 1960 s. In recent years because of the degradation of the electronic and mechanical components in the old HFIR welding system, reportable defects in plate attachment or adapter welds have been present in almost all completed fuel assemblies. In October 2008, a contract was awarded to AMET, Inc., of Rexburg, Idaho, to replace the old welding equipment with standard commercially available welding components to the maximum extent possible while maintaining the qualified HFIR welding process. The upgraded HFIR welding system represents a major improvement in the welding system used in welding HFIR fuel elements for the previous 40 years. In this upgrade, the new inner GMAW torch is a significant advancement over the original inner GMAW torch previously used. The innovative breakthrough in the new inner welding torch design is the way the direction of the cast in the 0.762 mm (0.030-inch) diameter aluminum weld wire is changed so that the weld wire emerging from the contact tip is straight in the plane perpendicular to the welding direction without creating any significant drag resistance in the feeding of the weld wire.

  6. Heat Exchanger With Internal Pin Elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerstmann, Joseph (Framingham, MA); Hannon, Charles L. (Arlington, MA)

    2004-01-13

    A heat exchanger/heater comprising a tubular member having a fluid inlet end, a fluid outlet end and plurality of pins secured to the interior wall of the tube. Various embodiments additionally comprise a blocking member disposed concentrically inside the pins, such as a core plug or a baffle array. Also disclosed is a vapor generator employing an internally pinned tube, and a fluid-heater/heat-exchanger utilizing an outer jacket tube and fluid-side baffle elements, as well as methods for heating a fluid using an internally pinned tube.

  7. Eddy current measurement of tube element spacing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Latham, Wayne Meredith (Forest, VA); Hancock, Jimmy Wade (Lynchburg, VA); Grut, Jayne Marie (Madison Heights, VA)

    1998-01-01

    A method of electromagnetically measuring the distance between adjacent tube elements in a heat exchanger. A cylindrical, high magnetic permeability ferrite slug is placed in the tube adjacent the spacing to be measured. A bobbin or annular coil type probe operated in the absolute mode is inserted into a second tube adjacent the spacing to be measured. From prior calibrations on the response of the eddy current coil, the signals from the coil, when sensing the presence of the ferrite slug, are used to determine the spacing between the tubes.

  8. Identification of elemental mercury in the subsurface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackson, Dennis G

    2015-01-06

    An apparatus and process is provided for detecting elemental mercury in soil. A sacrificial electrode of aluminum is inserted below ground to a desired location using direct-push/cone-penetrometer based equipment. The insertion process removes any oxides or previously found mercury from the electrode surface. Any mercury present adjacent the electrode can be detected using a voltmeter which indicates the presence or absence of mercury. Upon repositioning the electrode within the soil, a fresh surface of the aluminum electrode is created allowing additional new measurements.

  9. 2-D Finite Element Heat Conduction

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1989-10-30

    AYER is a finite element program which implicitly solves the general two-dimensional equation of thermal conduction for plane or axisymmetric bodies. AYER takes into account the effects of time (transient problems), in-plane anisotropic thermal conductivity, a three-dimensional velocity distribution, and interface thermal contact resistance. Geometry and material distributions are arbitrary, and input is via subroutines provided by the user. As a result, boundary conditions, material properties, velocity distributions, and internal power generation may be mademore » functions of, e.g., time, temperature, location, and heat flux.« less

  10. Electrical connection structure for a superconductor element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lallouet, Nicolas; Maguire, James

    2010-05-04

    The invention relates to an electrical connection structure for a superconductor element cooled by a cryogenic fluid and connected to an electrical bushing, which bushing passes successively through an enclosure at an intermediate temperature between ambient temperature and the temperature of the cryogenic fluid, and an enclosure at ambient temperature, said bushing projecting outside the ambient temperature enclosure. According to the invention, said intermediate enclosure is filled at least in part with a solid material of low thermal conductivity, such as a polyurethane foam or a cellular glass foam. The invention is applicable to connecting a superconductor cable at cryogenic temperature to a device for equipment at ambient temperature.

  11. Finite Element Heat & Mass Transfer Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1996-10-10

    FEHM is a numerical simulation code for subsurface transport processes. It models 3-D, time-dependent, multiphase, multicomponent, non-isothermal, reactive flow through porous and fractured media. It can accurately represent complex 3-D geologic media and structures and their effects on subsurface flow and transport. Its capabilities include flow of gas, water, and heat; flow of air, water, and heat; multiple chemically reactive and sorbing tracers; finite element/finite volume formulation; coupled stress module; saturated and unsaturated media; andmore »double porosity and double porosity/double permeability capabilities.« less

  12. Finite Element Heat & Mass Transfer Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1996-10-10

    FEHM is a numerical simulation code for subsurface transport processes. It models 3-D, time-dependent, multiphase, multicomponent, non-isothermal, reactive flow through porous and fractured media. It can accurately represent complex 3-D geologic media and structures and their effects on subsurface flow and transport. Its capabilities include flow of gas, water, and heat; flow of air, water, and heat; multiple chemically reactive and sorbing tracers; finite element/finite volume formulation; coupled stress module; saturated and unsaturated media; andmore » double porosity and double porosity/double permeability capabilities.« less

  13. Visual examinations of K east fuel elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitner, A.L., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-03

    Selected fuel elements stored in both ``good fuel`` and ``bad fuel`` canisters in K East Basin were extracted and visually examined full length for damage. Lower end damage in the ``bad fuel`` canisters was found to be more severe than expected based on top end appearances. Lower end damage for the ``good fuel`` canisters, however, was less than expected based on top end observations. Since about half of the fuel in K East Basin is contained in ``good fuel`` canisters based on top end assessments, the fraction of fuel projected to be intact with respect to IPS processing considerations remains at 50% based on these examination results.

  14. Antiferromagnetic transitions of osmium-containing rare earth double perovskites Ba{sub 2}LnOsO{sub 6} (Ln=rare earths)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinatsu, Yukio Doi, Yoshihiro; Wakeshima, Makoto

    2013-10-15

    The perovskite-type compounds containing both rare earth and osmium Ba{sub 2}LnOsO{sub 6} (Ln=Pr, Nd, Sm–Lu) have been prepared. Powder X-ray diffraction measurements and Rietveld analysis show that Ln{sup 3+} and Os{sup 5+} ions are structurally ordered at the M site of the perovskite BaMO{sub 3}. Magnetic susceptibility and specific heat measurements show that an antiferromagnetic ordering of Os{sup 5+} ions has been observed for Ba{sub 2}LnOsO{sub 6} (Ln=Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Lu) at 65–71 K. Magnetic ordering of Ln{sup 3+} moments occurs when the temperature is furthermore decreased. - Graphical abstract: The perovskite-type compounds containing both rare earth and osmium Ba{sub 2}LnOsO{sub 6} (Ln=Pr, Nd, Sm–Lu) have been prepared. An antiferromagnetic ordering of Os{sup 5+} ions has been observed for Ba{sub 2}LnOsO{sub 6} (Ln=Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Lu) at 65–71 K. Measurements and analysis of the specific heat for Ba{sub 2}PrOsO{sub 6} show that magnetic ordering of the Pr{sup 3+} moments should have occurred at ?20 K. Display Omitted.

  15. Method of manufacturing iron aluminide by thermomechanical processing of elemental powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deevi, Seetharama C. (Midlothian, VA); Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton (Chesterfield, VA); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hajaligol, Mohammed R. (Richmond, VA)

    2000-01-01

    A powder metallurgical process of preparing iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 20 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1 % rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, and/or .ltoreq.3% Cu. The process includes forming a mixture of aluminum powder and iron powder, shaping the mixture into an article such as by cold rolling the mixture into a sheet, and sintering the article at a temperature sufficient to react the iron and aluminum powders and form iron aluminide. The sintering can be followed by hot or cold rolling to reduce porosity created during the sintering step and optional annealing steps in a vacuum or inert atmosphere.

  16. Finite element analysis of multilayer coextrusion.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Schunk, Peter Randall; Baer, Thomas A.; Mrozek, Randy A.; Lenhart, Joseph Ludlow; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Collins, Robert; Mondy, Lisa Ann

    2011-09-01

    Multilayer coextrusion has become a popular commercial process for producing complex polymeric products from soda bottles to reflective coatings. A numerical model of a multilayer coextrusion process is developed based on a finite element discretization and two different free-surface methods, an arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) moving mesh implementation and an Eulerian level set method, to understand the moving boundary problem associated with the polymer-polymer interface. The goal of this work is to have a numerical capability suitable for optimizing and troubleshooting the coextrusion process, circumventing flow instabilities such as ribbing and barring, and reducing variability in layer thickness. Though these instabilities can be both viscous and elastic in nature, for this work a generalized Newtonian description of the fluid is used. Models of varying degrees of complexity are investigated including stability analysis and direct three-dimensional finite element free surface approaches. The results of this work show how critical modeling can be to reduce build test cycles, improve material choices, and guide mold design.

  17. Measuring Sparticles with the Matrix Element

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alwall, Johan; /SLAC /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.; Freitas, Ayres; /Pittsburgh U.; Mattelaer, Olivier; /INFN, Rome3 /Rome III U. /Louvain U.

    2012-04-10

    We apply the Matrix Element Method (MEM) to mass determination of squark pair production with direct decay to quarks and LSP at the LHC, showing that simultaneous mass determination of squarks and LSP is possible. We furthermore propose methods for inclusion of QCD radiation effects in the MEM. The goal of the LHC at CERN, scheduled to start this year, is to discover new physics through deviations from the Standard Model (SM) predictions. After discovery of deviations from the SM, the next step will be classification of the new physics. An important first goal in this process will be establishing a mass spectrum of the new particles. One of the most challenging scenarios is pair-production of new particles which decay to invisible massive particles, giving missing energy signals. Many methods have been proposed for mass determination in such scenarios (for a recent list of references, see e.g. [1]). In this proceeding, we report the first steps in applying the Matrix Element Method (MEM) in the context of supersymmetric scenarios giving missing energy signals. After a quick review of the MEM, we will focus on squark pair production, a process where other mass determination techniques have difficulties to simultaneously determine the LSP and squark masses. Finally, we will introduce methods to extend the range of validity of the MEM, by taking into account initial state radiation (ISR) in the method.

  18. Elemental compositions of two extrasolar rocky planetesimals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, S.; Jura, M.; Klein, B.; Zuckerman, B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1562 (United States); Koester, D., E-mail: sxu@astro.ucla.edu, E-mail: jura@astro.ucla.edu, E-mail: kleinb@astro.ucla.edu, E-mail: ben@astro.ucla.edu, E-mail: koester@astrophysik.uni-kiel.de [Institut fur Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, University of Kiel, D-24098 Kiel (Germany)

    2014-03-10

    We report Keck/HIRES and Hubble Space Telescope/COS spectroscopic studies of extrasolar rocky planetesimals accreted onto two hydrogen atmosphere white dwarfs, G29-38 and GD 133. In G29-38, eight elements are detected, including C, O, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, and Fe while in GD 133, O, Si, Ca, and marginally Mg are seen. These two extrasolar planetesimals show a pattern of refractory enhancement and volatile depletion. For G29-38, the observed composition can be best interpreted as a blend of a chondritic object with some refractory-rich material, a result from post-nebular processing. Water is very depleted in the parent body accreted onto G29-38, based on the derived oxygen abundance. The inferred total mass accretion rate in GD 133 is the lowest of all known dusty white dwarfs, possibly due to non-steady state accretion. We continue to find that a variety of extrasolar planetesimals all resemble to zeroth order the elemental composition of bulk Earth.

  19. ORNL, partners officially recognized for discovery of elements 115, 117

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Roberto, Jim

    2016-01-15

    The International Union for Pure and Applied Chemistry has announced formal verification of four new chemical elements, recognizing the Department of Energy?s Oak Ridge National Laboratory and its collaborators for the discovery of elements 115 and 117.

  20. Texas Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  1. The Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) Finite Element Meshing Discussion |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy The Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) Finite Element Meshing Discussion The Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) Finite Element Meshing Discussion The Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) Finite Element Meshing Discussion Loring Wyllie Arne Halterman Degenkolb Engineers, San Francisco PDF icon The Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) Finite Element Meshing Discussion More Documents & Publications SASSI Subtraction Method Effects at Various DOE projects October 2009 Seismic

  2. Shielded regeneration heating element for a particulate filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI; Ament, Frank [Troy, MI

    2011-01-04

    An exhaust system includes a particulate filter (PF) that is disposed downstream from an engine. The PF filters particulates within an exhaust from the engine. A heating element heats particulate matter in the PF. A catalyst substrate or a flow converter is disposed upstream from said heating element. The catalyst substrate oxidizes the exhaust prior to reception by the heating element. The flow converter converts turbulent exhaust flow to laminar exhaust flow prior to reception by the heating element.

  3. Residential Energy Efficiency Financing: Key Elements of Program Design

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presents key programmatic elements and context of financing initiatives, including contractor support, rebates, quality assurance, and more.

  4. Heavy Element Synthesis Reactions W. Loveland Oregon State University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reactions W. Loveland Oregon State University The role of ATLAS in helping us understand heavy element synthesis reactions and heavy element properties * Hot (E*=35-60 MeV) and Cold (E*=15 MeV) fusion reactions * Multi-nucleon transfer reactions * Fission * Atomic physics and chemistry of the heaviest elements * Structure of the heaviest nuclei The challenge of studying the heaviest elements at ATLAS * ATLAS beam time is oversubscribed * Low cross section studies - High luminosity - ATLAS has

  5. International team discovers element 117 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    team discovers element 117 International team discovers element 117 April 6, 2010 - 12:14pm Addthis An international team of scientists from Russia and the United States, including two Department of Energy national laboratories and two universities, has discovered the newest superheavy element, element 117. The team included scientists from the Joint Institute of Nuclear Research (Dubna, Russia), the Research Institute for Advanced Reactors (Dimitrovgrad), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory,

  6. Elements of a Federal Privacy Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Elements of a Federal Privacy Program Elements of a Federal Privacy Program The seven elements described in this document provide the basis for a robust federal privacy program, and will assist federal organizations to implement and sustain privacy awareness and stewardship. PDF icon Elements of a Federal Privacy Program v1.0_June2010 Final.pdf More Documents & Publications PIA - GovTrip (DOE data) PIA - INL PeopleSoft - Human Resource System Energy Employees' Occupational Illness

  7. Best Practices: Elements of a Federal Privacy Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Best Practices: Elements of a Federal Privacy Program Version 1.0 Sponsored By: Federal CIO Council Privacy Committee June 2010 Best Practices: Elements of a Federal Privacy Program June 2010 Page i Contents Acknowledgements __________________________________________________________________ ii Purpose ____________________________________________________________________________ 1 Introduction: Privacy Stewardship and Governance _________________________________________ 3 Element 1 -Leadership

  8. GNEP Element:Develop Enhanced Nuclear Safeguards | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    GNEP Element:Develop Enhanced Nuclear Safeguards GNEP Element:Develop Enhanced Nuclear Safeguards A description of GNEP development of enhanced nuclear safeguards. PDF icon GNEP Element:Develop Enhanced Nuclear Safeguards More Documents & Publications Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Enhanced Nuclear Safeguards Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Demonstrate Small-Scale Reactors The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership

  9. Iron-Nitride Alloy Magnets: Transformation Enabled Nitride Magnets Absent Rare Earths (TEN Mare)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    REACT Project: Case Western is developing a highly magnetic iron-nitride alloy to use in the magnets that power electric motors found in EVs and renewable power generators. This would reduce the overall price of the motor by eliminating the expensive imported rare earth minerals typically found in today’s best commercial magnets. The iron-nitride powder is sourced from abundant and inexpensive materials found in the U.S. The ultimate goal of this project is to demonstrate this new magnet system, which contains no rare earths, in a prototype electric motor. This could significantly reduce the amount of greenhouse gases emitted in the U.S. each year by encouraging the use of clean alternatives to oil and coal.

  10. Search for rare nuclear decays with HPGe detectors at the STELLA facility of the LNGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belli, P.; Di Marco, A.; Bernabei, R.; D'Angelo, S.; Cappella, F.; D'Angelo, A.; Incicchitti, A.; Cerulli, R.; Di Vacri, M. L.; Laubenstein, M.; Nisi, S.; Danevich, F. A.; Kobychev, V. V.; Poda, D. V.; Tretyak, V. I.; Kovtun, G. P.; Kovtun, N. G.; Shcherban, A. P.; Solopikhin, D. A.; Polischuk, O. G.; and others

    2013-12-30

    Results on the search for rare nuclear decays with the ultra low background facility STELLA at the LNGS using gamma ray spectrometry are presented. In particular, the best T{sub 1/2} limits were obtained for double beta processes in {sup 96}Ru and {sup 104}Ru. Several isotopes, which potentially decay through different 2? channels, including also possible resonant double electron captures, were investigated for the first time ({sup 156}Dy, {sup 158}Dy, {sup 184}Os, {sup 192}Os, {sup 190}Pt, {sup 198}Pt). Search for resonant absorption of solar {sup 7}Li axions in a LiF crystal gave the best limit for the mass of {sup 7}Li axions (< 8.6 keV). Rare alpha decay of {sup 190}Pt to the first excited level of {sup 186}Os(E{sub exc}?=?137.2keV) was observed for the first time.

  11. Enthalpies of formation of rare earth orthovanadates, REVO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorogova, M.; Navrotsky, A. Boatner, L.A.

    2007-03-15

    Rare earth orthovanadates, REVO{sub 4}, having the zircon structure, form a series of materials interesting for magnetic, optical, sensor, and electronic applications. Enthalpies of formation of REVO{sub 4} compounds (RE=Sc, Y, Ce-Nd, Sm-Tm, Lu) were determined by oxide melt solution calorimetry in lead borate (2PbO.2B{sub 2}O{sub 3}) solvent at 1075 K. The enthalpies of formation from oxide components become more negative with increasing RE ionic radius. This trend is similar to that obtained for the rare earth phosphates. - Graphical abstract: Comparison of enthalpies of formation from oxides at 298 K for REVO{sub 4} [this work] and REPO{sub 4} compounds [S.V. Ushakov, K.B. Helean, A. Navrotsky, L.A. Boatner, J. Mater. Res. 16(9) (2001) 2623] vs. RE{sup 3+} ionic radius. Filled symbols indicate scheelite structure, open symbols zircon structure.

  12. The Human Phenotype Ontology: Semantic Unification of Common and Rare Disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groza, Tudor; Köhler, Sebastian; Moldenhauer, Dawid; Vasilevsky, Nicole; Baynam, Gareth; Zemojtel, Tomasz; Schriml, Lynn Marie; Kibbe, Warren Alden; Schofield, Paul N.; Beck, Tim; Vasant, Drashtti; Brookes, Anthony J.; Zankl, Andreas; Washington, Nicole L.; Mungall, Christopher J.; Lewis, Suzanna E.; Haendel, Melissa A.; Parkinson, Helen; Robinson, Peter N.

    2015-06-25

    The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) is widely used in the rare disease community for differential diagnostics, phenotype-driven analysis of next-generation sequence-variation data, and translational research, but a comparable resource has not been available for common disease. Here, we have developed a concept-recognition procedure that analyzes the frequencies of HPO disease annotations as identified in over five million PubMed abstracts by employing an iterative procedure to optimize precision and recall of the identified terms. We derived disease models for 3,145 common human diseases comprising a total of 132,006 HPO annotations. The HPO now comprises over 250,000 phenotypic annotations for over 10,000 rare and common diseases and can be used for examining the phenotypic overlap among common diseases that share risk alleles, as well as between Mendelian diseases and common diseases linked by genomic location. The annotations, as well as the HPO itself, are freely available.

  13. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-02-01

    TOPAZ3D is a three-dimensional implicit finite element computer code for heat transfer analysis. TOPAZ3D can be used to solve for the steady-state or transient temperature field on three-dimensional geometries. Material properties may be temperature-dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation. By implementing the user subroutine feature, users can model chemical reaction kinetics and allow for any type of functionalmore » representation of boundary conditions and internal heat generation. TOPAZ3D can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in the material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluids, phase change, and energy balances.« less

  14. Ni/metal hydride secondary element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bauerlein, Peter

    2005-04-19

    A Ni/metal hydride secondary element having a positive nickel hydroxide electrode, a negative electrode having a hydrogen storage alloy, and an alkaline electrolyte, the positive electrode, provided with a three-dimensional metallic conductive structure, also contains an aluminum compound which is soluble in the electrolyte, in addition to nickel hydroxide and cobalt oxide. The aluminum compound is aluminum hydroxide and/or aluminum oxide, and the mass of the aluminum compound which is present in the positive bulk material mixture is 0.1 to 2% by weight relative to the mass of the nickel hydroxide which is present. In combination with aluminum hydroxide or aluminum oxide, the positive electrode further contains lanthanoid oxidic compounds Y.sub.2 O.sub.3, La.sub.2 O.sub.3 and Ca(OH).sub.2, as well as mixtures of these compounds.

  15. Electrical bushing for a superconductor element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mirebeau, Pierre; Lallouet, Nicolas; Delplace, Sebastien; Lapierre, Regis

    2010-05-04

    The invention relates to an electrical bushing serving to make a connection at ambient temperature to a superconductor element situated in an enclosure at cryogenic temperature. The electrical bushing passes successively through an enclosure at intermediate temperature between ambient temperature and cryogenic temperature, and an enclosure at ambient temperature, and it comprises a central electrical conductor surrounded by an electrically insulating sheath. According to the invention, an electrically conductive screen connected to ground potential surrounds the insulating sheath over a section that extends from the end of the bushing that is in contact with the enclosure at cryogenic temperature at least as far as the junction between the enclosure at intermediate temperature and the enclosure at ambient temperature. The invention is more particularly applicable to making a connection to a superconductor cable.

  16. Method of increasing magnetostrictive response of rare earth-iron alloy rods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Verhoeven, J.D.; McMasters, O.D.; Gibson, E.D.; Ostenson, J.E.; Finnemore, D.K.

    1989-04-04

    This invention comprises a method of increasing the magnetostrictive response of rare earth-iron (RFe) magnetostrictive alloy rods by a thermal-magnetic treatment. The rod is heated to a temperature above its Curie temperature, viz. from 400 to 600 C; and, while the rod is at that temperature, a magnetic field is directionally applied and maintained while the rod is cooled, at least below its Curie temperature. 2 figs.

  17. Structural and crystal chemical properties of rare-earth titanate pyrochlores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, James Matthew; Boatner, Lynn A; Chakoumakos, Bryan C; Du, Mao-Hua; Lance, Michael J; Rawn, Claudia J.; Bryan, Jeff C.

    2014-01-01

    Rare-earth titanates, RE2Ti2O7 (where RE = a rare-earth) with the pyrochlore structure continue to be investigated for use as potential stable host materials for nuclear and actinide-rich wastes. Accordingly, the present work is directed towards the elucidation of the fundamental structural, physical, and thermochemical properties of this class of compounds. Single-crystals of the rare earth pyrochlores were synthesized using a high-temperature flux technique and were subsequently characterized using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The cubic lattice parameters display an approximately linear correlation with the RE-site cation radius. Theoretical calculations of the lattice constants and bond lengths of the subject materials were carried out using density functional theory, and the results are compared to the experimental values. The Sm and Eu titanates exhibit a covalency increase between the REO8 and TiO6 polyhedra resulting in a deviation from the increasing linear lattice parameter through the transition series. Gd2Ti2O7 with the 4f7 half-filled f-orbital Gd3+ sub-shell exhibits the lowest 48f oxygen positional parameter. The coefficient of thermal expansion for the rare-earth titanate series is approximately linear, and it has a range of 10.1 11.2 x 10-6 C-1. Raman spectroscopy indicated that the ~530 cm-1 peak associated with the Ti-O stretching mode follows a general trend of decreasing frequency with increasing RE reduced mass.

  18. ORISE: Helping to Provide Rare Access to World-Class Computing Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supercomputing ORISE peer review services helping to advance, provide rare access to world-class computing resources The Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education (ORISE) recognizes that computational capabilities play an integral role in everything from stockpile stewardship and defense intelligence, to climate prediction and manufacturing. It is important to continue to advance high-performance computing, so that scientists can continue to perform mass computing activities at especially high

  19. Method of increasing magnetostrictive response of rare earth-iron alloy rods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Verhoeven, John D. (Ames, IA); McMasters, O. Dale (Ames, IA); Gibson, Edwin D. (Ames, IA); Ostenson, Jerome E. (Ames, IA); Finnemore, Douglas K. (Ames, IA)

    1989-04-04

    This invention comprises a method of increasing the magnetostrictive response of rare earth-iron (RFe) magnetostrictive alloy rods by a thermal-magnetic treatment. The rod is heated to a temperature above its Curie temperature, viz. from 400.degree. to 600.degree. C.; and, while the rod is at that temperature, a magnetic field is directionally applied and maintained while the rod is cooled, at least below its Curie temperature.

  20. DYNA3D: a finite element program for supercomputers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, D.J.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1986-01-01

    DYNA3D is an explicit three-dimensional finite element code for analyzing the large deformation dynamic response of inelastic solids and structures. A contact-impact algorithm permits gaps and sliding along material interfaces with friction. By a specialization of this algorithm, such interfaces can be rigidly tied to admit variable zoning without the need of transition regions. Spatial discretization is achieved by the use of 8-node solid elements, 2-node beam elements, 4-node shell elements, 8-node solid shell elements, and rigid bodies. The equations-of-motion are integrated in time by the central difference method. 8 refs., 15 figs.

  1. Hexahedral finite element mesh coarsening using pillowing technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Staten, Matthew L. (Pittsburgh, PA); Woodbury, Adam C. (Provo, UT); Benzley, Steven E. (Provo, UT); Shepherd, Jason F. (Edgewood, NM)

    2012-06-05

    A techniques for coarsening a hexahedral mesh is described. The technique includes identifying a coarsening region within a hexahedral mesh to be coarsened. A boundary sheet of hexahedral elements is inserted into the hexahedral mesh around the coarsening region. A column of hexahedral elements is identified within the boundary sheet. The column of hexahedral elements is collapsed to create an extraction sheet of hexahedral elements contained within the coarsening region. Then, the extraction sheet of hexahedral elements is extracted to coarsen the hexahedral mesh.

  2. Remote Handling and Maintenance in the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgess, Thomas W; Aaron, Adam M; Carroll, Adam J; DeVore, Joe R; Giuliano, Dominic R; Graves, Van B; Bennett, Richard P; Bollen, Georg; Cole, Daniel F.; Ronningen, Reginald M.; Schein, Mike E; Zeller, Albert F

    2011-01-01

    Michigan State University (MSU) in East Lansing, MI was selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to design and establish a Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), a cutting-edge research facility to advance the understanding of rare nuclear isotopes and the evolution of the cosmos. The research conducted at the FRIB will involve experimentation with intense beams of rare isotopes within a well-shielded target cell that will result in activation and contamination of components. The target cell is initially hands-on accessible after shutdown and a brief cool-down period. Personnel are expected to have hands-on access to the tops of shielded component modules with the activated in-beam sections suspended underneath. The modules are carefully designed to include steel shielding for protecting personnel during these hand-on operations. However, as the facility has greater levels of activation and contamination, a bridge mounted servomaniputor may be added to the cell, to perform the disconnecting of services to the component assemblies. Dexterous remote handling and exchange of the modularized activated components is completed at a shielded window workstation with a pair of master-slave manipulators. The primary components requiring exchange or maintenance are the production target, the beam wedge filter, the beam dump, and the beam focusing and bending magnets. This paper provides an overview of the FRIB Target Facility remote handling and maintenance design requirements, concepts, and techniques.

  3. Transposable Elements and Genetic Instabilities in Crop Plants

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Burr, B.; Burr, F.

    1981-04-10

    Transposable elements have long been associated with certain unstable loci in maize and have been intensively studied by McClintock and others. It is known that a transposable element can control the expression of the structural genes at the locus where it resides. These controlling elements in maize are now beginning to be studied at the molecular level. Using recombinant molecular probes we have been able to describe the changes induced by the controlling element Ds at the shrunken locus. Ds elements appear to be large and dissimilar insertions into the wild-type locus - two elements actually map within the transcribed region of the gene. Genetic instabilities have been described in other economically important plants but the bases for these phenomena have not been understood. We believe that it is likely that some of these instabilities are the result of transposable element activity much as in the case of maize.

  4. Magnesium transport extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackerman, John P.; Battles, James E.; Johnson, Terry R.; Miller, William E.; Pierce, R. Dean

    1992-01-01

    A process of separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels which contain rare earth and noble metal fission products. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of CaCl.sub.2 and a U-Fe alloy containing not less than about 84% by weight uranium at a temperature in the range of from about 800.degree. C. to about 850.degree. C. to produce additional uranium metal which dissolves in the U-Fe alloy raising the uranium concentration and having transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals and the noble metal fission products dissolved therein. The CaCl.sub.2 having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein is separated and electrolytically treated with a carbon electrode to reduce the CaO to Ca metal while converting the carbon electrode to CO and CO.sub.2. The Ca metal and CaCl.sub.2 is recycled to reduce additional oxide fuel. The U-Fe alloy having transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals and the noble metal fission products dissolved therein is contacted with Mg metal which takes up the actinide and rare earth fission product metals. The U-Fe alloy retains the noble metal fission products and is stored while the Mg is distilled and recycled leaving the transuranium actinide and rare earth fission products isolated.

  5. Enumeration of Secondary Structure Element Bundles

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-10-26

    A deterministic algorithm for enumeration of transmembrane protein folds is implemented. Using a set of sparse pairwise atomic distance constraints (such as those obtained from chemical cross-linking, FRET, or dipolar EPR experiments), the algorithm performs an exhaustive search of secondary structure element packing conformations distributed throughout the entire conformational space. The end result is a set of distinct protein conformations which can be scored and refined as part of a process designed for computational elucidationmore » of transmembrane protein structures. Algorithm Overview: The ESSEB algorithm works by dividing the conforrnational space of each secondary structure element (SSE) into a set of cells. For each cell there is a representative conformation and for each atom in the SSE for which a distance restraint is available, there is an associated internal error, The internal error for a distance restraint is the maximum distance that the atom, when positioned in any conformation within a cell, can be from the atom in the representative conformation. The algorithm works recursively by positioning one representative conformation of an SSE. AdI distance restraints are checked with a tolerance that includes both the experimental and internal error. If all restraints are satisfied, every representative conformation of the next SSE is checked, otherwise, the program moves on to the next representative conformation of the current SSE. In addition to the distance restraints, other constraints on protein conformation can be enforced. These include the distance of closest approach between SSE axes, a restraint which prevents the crossover of loops connecting adjacent SSEs, and a restriction on the minimum and maximum distances between axis end-points. Any protein conformation satisfying all of the restraints is enumerated for later scoring and possible refinement. Additionally, in order to make run-times feasible, a divide-and-conquer approach is used in which the cells of each SSE in an accepted protein conformation can be further divided such that the internal errors are reduced and the new representative conformations can be evaluated.« less

  6. Summary compilation of shell element performance versus formulation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heinstein, Martin Wilhelm; Hales, Jason Dean; Breivik, Nicole L.; Key, Samuel W.

    2011-07-01

    This document compares the finite element shell formulations in the Sierra Solid Mechanics code. These are finite elements either currently in the Sierra simulation codes Presto and Adagio, or expected to be added to them in time. The list of elements are divided into traditional two-dimensional, plane stress shell finite elements, and three-dimensional solid finite elements that contain either modifications or additional terms designed to represent the bending stiffness expected to be found in shell formulations. These particular finite elements are formulated for finite deformation and inelastic material response, and, as such, are not based on some of the elegant formulations that can be found in an elastic, infinitesimal finite element setting. Each shell element is subjected to a series of 12 verification and validation test problems. The underlying purpose of the tests here is to identify the quality of both the spatially discrete finite element gradient operator and the spatially discrete finite element divergence operator. If the derivation of the finite element is proper, the discrete divergence operator is the transpose of the discrete gradient operator. An overall summary is provided from which one can rank, at least in an average sense, how well the individual formulations can be expected to perform in applications encountered year in and year out. A letter grade has been assigned albeit sometimes subjectively for each shell element and each test problem result. The number of A's, B's, C's, et cetera assigned have been totaled, and a grade point average (GPA) has been computed, based on a 4.0-system. These grades, combined with a comparison between the test problems and the application problem, can be used to guide an analyst to select the element with the best shell formulation.

  7. High performance fuel element with end seal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Gary E. (San Diego, CA); Zogg, Gordon J. (San Diego, CA)

    1987-01-01

    A nuclear fuel element comprising an elongate block of refractory material having a generally regular polygonal cross section. The block includes parallel, spaced, first and second end surfaces. The first end surface has a peripheral sealing flange formed thereon while the second end surface has a peripheral sealing recess sized to receive the flange. A plurality of longitudinal first coolant passages are positioned inwardly of the flange and recess. Elongate fuel holes are separate from the coolant passages and disposed inwardly of the flange and the recess. The block is further provided with a plurality of peripheral second coolant passages in general alignment with the flange and the recess for flowing coolant. The block also includes two bypasses for each second passage. One bypass intersects the second passage adjacent to but spaced from the first end surface and intersects a first passage, while the other bypass intersects the second passage adjacent to but spaced from the second end surface and intersects a first passage so that coolant flowing through the second passages enters and exits the block through the associated first passages.

  8. Combined passive bearing element/generator motor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    2000-01-01

    An electric machine includes a cylindrical rotor made up of an array of permanent magnets that provide a N-pole magnetic field of even order (where N=4, 6, 8, etc.). This array of permanent magnets has bars of identical permanent magnets made of dipole elements where the bars are assembled in a circle. A stator inserted down the axis of the dipole field is made of two sets of windings that are electrically orthogonal to each other, where one set of windings provides stabilization of the stator and the other set of windings couples to the array of permanent magnets and acts as the windings of a generator/motor. The rotor and the stator are horizontally disposed, and the rotor is on the outside of said stator. The electric machine may also include two rings of ferromagnetic material. One of these rings would be located at each end of the rotor. Two levitator pole assemblies are attached to a support member that is external to the electric machine. These levitator pole assemblies interact attractively with the rings of ferromagnetic material to produce a levitating force upon the rotor.

  9. On-line gas chromatographic studies of rutherfordium (Element 104), hahnium (Element 105), and homologs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadkhodayan, B.

    1993-05-01

    Gas-phase isothermal chromatogaphy is a method by which volatile compounds of different chemical elements can be separated according to their volatilities. The technique, coupled with theoretical modeling of the processes occurring in the chromatogaphy column, provides accurate determination of thermodynamic properties (e.g., adsorption enthalpies) for compounds of elements, such as the transactinides, which can only be produced on an atom-at-a-time basis. In addition, the chemical selectivity of the isothermal chromatogaphy technique provides the decontamination from interfering activities necessary for the determination of the nuclear decay properties of isotopes of the transactinide elements. Volatility measurements were performed on chloride species of Rf and its group 4 homologs, Zr and Hf, as well as Ha and its group 5 homologs, Nb and Ta. Adsorption enthalpies were calculated for all species using a Monte Carlo code simulation based on a microscopic model for gas thermochromatography in open columns with laminar flow of the carrier gas. Preliminary results are presented for Zr- and Nb-bromides.

  10. Rare-Earth-Free Nanostructure Magnets: Rare-Earth-Free Permanent Magnets for Electric Vehicle Motors and Wind Turbine Generators: Hexagonal Symmetry Based Materials Systems Mn-Bi and M-type Hexaferrite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    REACT Project: The University of Alabama is developing new iron- and manganese-based composite materials for use in the electric motors of EVs and renewable power generators that will demonstrate magnetic properties superior to today’s best rare-earth-based magnets. Rare earths are difficult and expensive to refine. EVs and renewable power generators typically use rare earths to make their electric motors smaller and more powerful. The University of Alabama has the potential to improve upon the performance of current state-of-the-art rare-earth-based magnets using low-cost and more abundant materials such as manganese and iron. The ultimate goal of this project is to demonstrate improved performance in a full-size prototype magnet at reduced cost.

  11. THE CONNECTION BETWEEN INTERNETWORK MAGNETIC ELEMENTS AND SUPERGRANULAR FLOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orozco Suarez, D.; Katsukawa, Y.; Bellot Rubio, L. R.

    2012-10-20

    The advection of internetwork magnetic elements by supergranular convective flows is investigated using high spatial resolution, high cadence, and high signal-to-noise ratio Na I D1 magnetograms obtained with the Hinode satellite. The observations show that magnetic elements appear everywhere across the quiet Sun surface. We calculate the proper motion of these magnetic elements with the aid of a feature tracking algorithm. The results indicate that magnetic elements appearing in the interior of supergranules tend to drift toward the supergranular boundaries with a non-constant velocity. The azimuthally averaged radial velocities of the magnetic elements and of the supergranular flow, calculated from a local correlation tracking technique applied to Dopplergrams, are very similar. This suggests that, in the long term, surface magnetic elements are advected by supergranular flows, although on short timescales their very chaotic motions are driven mostly by granular flows and other processes.

  12. Photoemission Study of the Rare Earth Intermetallic Compounds: RNi2Ge2 (R=Eu, Gd)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jongik Park

    2004-12-19

    EuNi{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} and GdNi{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} are two members of the RT{sub 2}X{sub 2} (R = rare earth, T = transition metal and X = Si, Ge) family of intermetallic compounds, which has been studied since the early 1980s. These ternary rare-earth intermetallic compounds with the tetragonal ThCr{sub 2}Si{sub 2} structure are known for their wide variety of magnetic properties, Extensive studies of the RT{sub 2}X{sub 2} series can be found in Refs [ 1,2,3]. The magnetic properties of the rare-earth nickel germanides RNi{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} were recently studied in more detail [4]. The purpose of this dissertation is to investigate the electronic structure (both valence band and shallow core levels) of single crystals of EuNi{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} and GdNi{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} and to check the assumptions that the f electrons are non-interacting and, consequently, the rigid-band model for these crystals would work [11], using synchrotron radiation because, to the best of our knowledge, no photoemission measurements on those have been reported. Photoemission spectroscopy has been widely used to study the detailed electronic structure of metals and alloys, and especially angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has proven to be a powerful technique for investigating Fermi surfaces (FSs) of single-crystal compounds.

  13. Structural transition in rare earth doped zirconium oxide: A positron annihilation study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakraborty, Keka; Bisoi, Abhijit

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: New microstructural analysis and phase transition of rare earth doped mixed oxide compounds such as: Sm{sub 2?x}Dy{sub x}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} (where x = 0.0 ? x ? 2.0) that are potentially useful as solid oxide fuels, ionic conductors, optoelectronic materials and most importantly as radiation resistant host for high level rad-waste disposal, structural transition in the system is reported through positron annihilation spectroscopy as there is an indication in the X-ray diffraction analysis. Highlights: ? Zirconium oxide material doped with rare earth ions. ? The method of positron annihilation spectroscopy suggests a phase transition in the system. ? The crystal structure transformation from pure pyrochlore to defect fluorite type of structure is shown by X-ray diffraction results. -- Abstract: A series of compounds with the general composition Sm{sub 2?x}Dy{sub x}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} (where 0 ? x ? 2.0) were synthesized by chemical route and characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The rare earth ion namely Sm{sup +3} in the compound was gradually replaced with another smaller and heavier ion, Dy{sup +3} of the 4f series, there by resulting in order–disorder structural transition, which has been studied by positron annihilation lifetime and Doppler broadening spectroscopy. This study reveals the subtle electronic micro environmental changes in the pyrochlore lattice (prevalent due to the oxygen vacancy in anti-site defect structure of the compound) toward its transformation to defect fluorite structure as found in Dy{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}. A comparison of the changes perceived with PAS as compared to XRD analysis is critically assayed.

  14. Work Group Leadership Meetings: Transition Elements | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Leadership Meetings: Transition Elements Work Group Leadership Meetings: Transition Elements Meeting Dates: November 13 - 15, 2012 This Focus Group Work Group telecom was held with the Work Group Co-Leads to discuss change elements and strategic direction to support accelerated efforts to advancing progress, productivity and performance within each of the Work Groups. Although current roles within all of the Work Groups and Focus Group efforts remain the same, the addition of centralized

  15. Coming up with platinum substitutes may be elemental

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Coming up with platinum substitutes may be elemental Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:Mar. 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Coming up with platinum substitutes may be elemental Lab researchers are working with an abundant element to take their place: cobalt. February 1, 2013 dummy image Read our archives. Contacts Editor Linda Anderman Email Community Programs Office Kurt Steinhaus Email Initial findings by a Los

  16. OSHA Rulemaking on Basic Program Elements for Federal Employee Occupational

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Safety and Health Programs and Related Matters; 29 CFR 1960 | Department of Energy OSHA Rulemaking on Basic Program Elements for Federal Employee Occupational Safety and Health Programs and Related Matters; 29 CFR 1960 OSHA Rulemaking on Basic Program Elements for Federal Employee Occupational Safety and Health Programs and Related Matters; 29 CFR 1960 November 26, 2004 Federal Register copy of OSHA Rulemaking on Basic Program Elements for Federal Employee Occupational Safety and Health

  17. Status of Segmented Element Thermoelectric Generator for Vehicle Waste Heat

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Recovery | Department of Energy Segmented Element Thermoelectric Generator for Vehicle Waste Heat Recovery Status of Segmented Element Thermoelectric Generator for Vehicle Waste Heat Recovery Discusses progress of thermoelectric generator development at BSST and assessment of potential to enter commercial operation in vehicles PDF icon crane.pdf More Documents & Publications Status of Segmented Element Thermoelectric Generator for Vehicle Waste Heat Recovery Development of a 100-Watt

  18. Synchrotron Diffraction Studies of Spontaneous Magnetostriction in Rare Earth Transition Metal Compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ning Yang

    2004-12-19

    Thermal expansion anomalies of R{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B and R{sub 2}Fe{sub 17}C{sub x} (x = 0,2) (R = Y, Nd, Gd, Tb, Er) stoichiometric compounds are studied with high-energy synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction using Debye-Schemer geometry in temperature range 10K to 1000K. Large spontaneous magnetostriction up to their Curie temperatures (T{sub c}) is observed. The a-axes show relatively larger invar effects than c-axes in the R{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compounds whereas the R{sub 2}Fe{sub 17}C{sub x} show the contrary anisotropies. The iron sub-lattice is shown to dominate the spontaneous magnetostriction of the compounds. The contribution of the rare earth sublattice is roughly proportional to the spin magnetic moment of the rare earth in the R{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compounds but in R{sub 2}Fe{sub 17}C{sub x}, the rare earth sub-lattice contribution appears more likely to be dominated by the local bonding. The calculation of spontaneous magnetostrain of bonds shows that the bonds associated with Fe(j2) sites in R{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B and the dumbbell sites in R{sub 2}Fe{sub 17}C{sub x} have larger values, which is strongly related to their largest magnetic moment and Wigner-Seitz atomic cell volume. The roles of the carbon atoms in increasing the Curie temperatures of the R{sub 2}Fe{sub 17} compounds are attributed to the increased separation of Fe hexagons. The R{sub 2}Fe{sub 17} and R{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phases with magnetic rare earth ions also show anisotropies of thermal expansion above T{sub c}. For R{sub 2}Fe{sub 17} and R{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B the a{sub a}/a{sub c} > 1 whereas the anisotropy is reversed with the interstitial carbon in R{sub 2}Fe{sub 17}. The average bond magnetostrain is shown to be a possible predictor of the magnetic moment of Fe sites in the compounds. Both of the theoretical and phenomenological models on spontaneous magnetostriction are discussed and a Landau model on the spontaneous magnetostriction is proposed.

  19. Recent results at ultrahigh spin: Terminating states and beyond in mass 160 rare-earth nuclei

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Paul, E. S.; Rees, J. M.; Hampson, P.; Riley, M. A.; Simpson, J.; Ayangeakaa, A. D.; Baron, J. S.; Carpenter, M. P.; Chiara, C. J.; Garg, U.; et al

    2015-01-01

    A classic region of band termination at high spin occurs in rare-earth nuclei with around ten valence nucleons above the 146Gd closed core. The results are presented here for such non-collective oblate (γ = 60°) terminating states in odd-Z 155Ho, odd–odd 156Ho, and even–even 156Er, where they are compared with neighboring nuclei. In addition to these particularly favoured states, the occurrence of collective triaxial strongly deformed (TSD) bands, bypassing the terminating states and extending to over 65ℏ, is reviewed.

  20. Separation of technetium and rare earth metals for co-decontamination process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riddle, Catherine; Martin, Leigh

    2015-05-01

    Poster. In the US there are several technologies under consideration for the separation of the useful components in used nuclear fuel. One such process is the co-decontamination process to separate U, Np and Pu in a single step and produce a Np/ Pu and a U product stream. Although the behavior of the actinide elements is reasonably well defined in this system, the same is not true for the fission products, mainly Zr, Mo, Ru and Tc. As these elements are cationic and anionic they may interact with each other to extract in a manner not predicted by empirical models such as AMUSE. This poster presentation will discuss the initial results of batch contact testing under flowsheet conditions and as a function of varying acidity and flowsheet conditions to optimize recovery of Tc and minimize extraction of Mo, Zr and Ru with the goal of developing a better understanding of the behavior of these elements in the co-decontamination process.

  1. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Snake River Plain Region ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Compound and Elemental Analysis At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

  2. Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Area Indonesia Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Improving Exploration Models of...

  3. Office of Enterprise Assessments Review of Field Element Line...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    SNL Sandia National Laboratories ii Office of Enterprise Assessments Review of Field Element Line Management Oversight at Sandia National Laboratories EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The...

  4. Process for synthesizing compounds from elemental powders and product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rabin, Barry H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Richard N. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1993-01-01

    A process for synthesizing intermetallic compounds from elemental powders. The elemental powders are initially combined in a ratio which approximates the stoichiometric composition of the intermetallic compound. The mixed powders are then formed into a compact which is heat treated at a controlled rate of heating such that an exothermic reaction between the elements is initiated. The heat treatment may be performed under controlled conditions ranging from a vacuum (pressureless sintering) to compression (hot pressing) to produce a desired densification of the intermetallic compound. In a preferred form of the invention, elemental powders of Fe and Al are combined to form aluminide compounds of Fe.sub.3 Al and FeAl.

  5. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Kilauea Southwest Rift And...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Michelle L. Coombs, Thomas W. Sisson, Peter W. Lipman...

  6. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Kilauea East Rift Area (Coombs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Michelle L. Coombs, Thomas W. Sisson, Peter W. Lipman...

  7. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical...

  8. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical...

  9. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical...

  10. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References J. Michael...

  11. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Buffalo Valley Hot Springs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Location Buffalo Valley Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical...

  12. Nuclear fission and transuranium elements: Fifty years ago

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1988-09-01

    This paper reviews some historical aspects of the knowledge and discovery of transuranium elements. This fission of plutonium is discussed also. 12 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Compound and Elemental Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Evans, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  14. Using support vector machines to improve elemental ion identification...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    elemental ions in X-ray crystal structures has been extended to use support vector machine (SVM) classifiers trained on selected structures in the PDB, with significantly...

  15. Trace Element Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for geothermal exploration, the analysis of lithium and other elements in tufa deposits could serve as exploration guides for hot spring...

  16. Trace Element Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for geothermal exploration, the analysis of lithium and other elements in tufa deposits could serve as exploration guides for hot spring...

  17. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for geothermal exploration, the analysis of lithium and other elements in tufa deposits could serve as exploration guides for hot spring...

  18. Trace Element Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for geothermal exploration, the analysis of lithium and other elements in tufa deposits could serve as exploration guides for hot spring...

  19. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for geothermal exploration, the analysis of lithium and other elements in tufa deposits could serve as exploration guides for hot spring...

  20. Trace Element Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for geothermal exploration, the analysis of lithium and other elements in tufa deposits could serve as exploration guides for hot spring...

  1. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for geothermal exploration, the analysis of lithium and other elements in tufa deposits could serve as exploration guides for hot spring...

  2. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for geothermal exploration, the analysis of lithium and other elements in tufa deposits could serve as exploration guides for hot spring...

  3. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Fish Lake Valley Area...

  4. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Fish...

  5. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Clear Lake Area (Thompson...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Details Location Clear Lake Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Based on the above discussion,...

  6. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Little Valley Area (Wood,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Little Valley Area (Wood, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Little Valley Area (Wood,...

  7. A new elastoplastic shell element formulation for DYNA3D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelmann, B.E.; Whirley, R.G.

    1990-08-01

    The analysis of shell structures undergoing dynamic elastoplastic deformation is an important capability of DYNA3D. This paper presents an improved formulation for a 4-node quadrilateral shell element for explicit dynamic analysis. The proposed element is derived from a three-field weak form, and incorporates recently developed assumed strain methods for improved accuracy. In addition, the element is formulated in a large-displacement small-strain setting for minimum cost. Complex nonlinear constitutive models are easily incorporated into this formulation. Numerical examples illustrating the accuracy, robustness, and speed of the new element are shown. 13 refs., 3 tabs.

  8. Discovery of the Transuranium Elements (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hoffman, Darleane

    2011-04-28

    Summer Lecture Series 2006: Darleane Hoffman, a Berkeley Lab nuclear chemist, chronicles the discovery of the heaviest elements ? those much heavier than uranium and plutonium.

  9. GNEP Element:Minimize Nuclear Waste | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Enhanced Nuclear Safeguards Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Develop Enhanced Nuclear Safeguards GNEP Element:Demonstrate More Proliferation-Resistant Recycling...

  10. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Roosevelt Hot Springs Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    useful DOE-funding Unknown References Odin D. Christensen, Regina A. Capuano, Joseph N. Moore (1983) Trace-Element Distribution In An Active Hydrothermal System, Roosevelt Hot...

  11. Trace Element Analysis At Roosevelt Hot Springs Area (Christensen...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    release has occurred. References Odin D. Christensen, Regina A. Capuano, Joseph N. Moore (1983) Trace-Element Distribution In An Active Hydrothermal System, Roosevelt Hot...

  12. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lightning Dock Area (Norman...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lightning Dock Area (Norman &...

  13. Electromagnetic eXtended Finite Elements for Accurate Resolution...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Accurate Resolution of Multi-Material Cells. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electromagnetic eXtended Finite Elements for Accurate Resolution of Multi-Material Cells. ...

  14. Damping element for reducing the vibration of an airfoil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Christian X; Marra, John J

    2013-11-12

    An airfoil (10) is provided with a tip (12) having an opening (14) to a center channel (24). A damping element (16) is inserted within the opening of the center channel, to reduce an induced vibration of the airfoil. The mass of the damping element, a spring constant of the damping element within the center channel, and/or a mounting location (58) of the damping element within the center channel may be adjustably varied, to shift a resonance frequency of the airfoil outside a natural operating frequency of the airfoil.

  15. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 2000) Exploration Activity Details Location Mt St Helens Area Exploration Technique...

  16. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Goff &...

  17. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Goff, Et Al., 1982) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs...

  18. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Goff ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Goff & Janik, 2002)...

  19. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Jemez Springs Area (Goff ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002)...

  20. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al., 1982) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  1. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Mt St Helens Area Exploration Technique...

  2. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al., 1985) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs...

  3. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lightning Dock Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area (Dellechaie, 1977) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...

  4. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell & Garside, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date...

  5. The generalized finite element method applied to the dynamic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: The generalized finite element method applied to the dynamic response of heterogeneous media. Authors: Robbins, Joshua ; Voth, Thomas E. Publication Date: 2013-02-01 OSTI ...

  6. Dynamic Control of Spin Sates in Interacting Magnetic Elements...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Dynamic Control of Spin Sates in Interacting Magnetic Elements DOE Grant Recipients Argonne National...

  7. A Finite Element Model Of Self-Resonating Bimorph Microcantilever...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: A Finite Element Model Of Self-Resonating Bimorph Microcantilever For Fast Temperature Cycling In A Pyroelectric Energy Harvester A self resonating bimorph cantilever ...

  8. Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DOE, in consultation with the USEPA and State agencies, prepared this guidance on packaging, transportation, receipt, management, and long-term storage of elemental mercury at...

  9. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Wister Area (DOE GTP) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wister Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Wister Area (DOE GTP) Exploration...

  10. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Alum Area (DOE GTP) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alum Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Alum Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity...

  11. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Seven Mile Hole...

  12. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Mcgee Mountain Area (DOE GTP...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mcgee Mountain Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Mcgee Mountain Area (DOE GTP)...

  13. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis...

  14. The Uranium Processing Facility Finite Element Meshing Discussion

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2 - 15'-20' element size deemed adequate as the building geometry was rather straightforward. - Linear dynamic computer model October 25, 2011 8 Department of Energy -...

  15. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Raft River Geothermal Area (1981) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area...

  16. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The chemistry of the hot springs strongly suggests the existence of a neutral chloride reservoir...

  17. CESP Tool 1.2: Leadership Team Charter Elements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CESP Tool 1.2: Leadership Team Charter Elements in Step 1: Establish and Charge a Leadership Team in the Introduction to Community Energy Strategic Planning.

  18. THERMAL EXPANSION AND PHASE INVERSION OF RARE-EARTH OXIDES By Stephan Stecura and William J. Campbell

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    EXPANSION AND PHASE INVERSION OF RARE-EARTH OXIDES By Stephan Stecura and William J. Campbell * * * * * * * * * * * report of investigations 5847 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Stewart L. Udall, Secretary BUREAU OF MINES Marling J. Ankeny, Director DISTRIBUTION OF THIS DOCUMENT IS UNLIMITED This publication has been cataloged as follows: Stecura, Stephan Thermal expansion and phase inversion of rare-earth oxides, by Stephan Stecura and William J. Campbell. [Washington] U. S. Dept. of

  19. Resource management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. Volume 29, Rare plants on the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunningham, M.; Pounds, L.; Oberholster, S.; Parr, P.; Mann, L.; Edwards, L.; Rosensteel, B.

    1993-08-01

    Rare plant species listed by state or federal agencies and found on or near the Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) are identified. Seventeen species present on the ORR are listed by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation as either endangered, threatened, or of special concern. Four of these are under review by the US Fish and Wildlife Service for possible listing as threatened or endangered species. Ten species listed by the state occur near and may be present on the ORR; four are endangered in Tennessee, and one is a candidate for federal listing. A range of habitats supports the rare taxa on the ORR: River bluffs, calcareous barrens, wetlands, and deciduous forest. Sites for listed rare species on the ORR have been designated as Research Park Natural Areas. Consideration of rare plant habitats is an important component of resource management and land-use planning; protection of rare species in their natural habitat is the best method of ensuring their long-term survival. In addition, the National Environmental Policy Act requires that federally funded projects avoid or mitigate impacts to listed species. The list of rare plant species and their location on the ORR should be considered provisional because the entire ORR has not been surveyed, and state and federal status of all species continues to be updated.

  20. Movable Genetic Elements: Detection of Changes in Maize DNA at the Shrunken Locus Due to the Intervention of Ds Elements

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Burr, B.; Burr, F.A.

    1980-05-28

    This report describes our initial attempts at the molecular characterization of a maize controlling element. We have prepared a cDNA probe and used it to detect changes at a locus where Ds elements are found. Evidence of their presence are indicated by changes in the restriction patterns, but there is as yet no information on the physical nature of the controlling elements nor on the kinds of rearrangements they cause.

  1. Local Burn-Up Effects in the NBSR Fuel Element

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown N. R.; Hanson A.; Diamond, D.

    2013-01-31

    This study addresses the over-prediction of local power when the burn-up distribution in each half-element of the NBSR is assumed to be uniform. A single-element model was utilized to quantify the impact of axial and plate-wise burn-up on the power distribution within the NBSR fuel elements for both high-enriched uranium (HEU) and low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. To validate this approach, key parameters in the single-element model were compared to parameters from an equilibrium core model, including neutron energy spectrum, power distribution, and integral U-235 vector. The power distribution changes significantly when incorporating local burn-up effects and has lower power peaking relative to the uniform burn-up case. In the uniform burn-up case, the axial relative power peaking is over-predicted by as much as 59% in the HEU single-element and 46% in the LEU single-element with uniform burn-up. In the uniform burn-up case, the plate-wise power peaking is over-predicted by as much as 23% in the HEU single-element and 18% in the LEU single-element. The degree of over-prediction increases as a function of burn-up cycle, with the greatest over-prediction at the end of Cycle 8. The thermal flux peak is always in the mid-plane gap; this causes the local cumulative burn-up near the mid-plane gap to be significantly higher than the fuel element average. Uniform burn-up distribution throughout a half-element also causes a bias in fuel element reactivity worth, due primarily to the neutronic importance of the fissile inventory in the mid-plane gap region.

  2. The Human Phenotype Ontology: Semantic Unification of Common and Rare Disease

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Groza, Tudor; Köhler, Sebastian; Moldenhauer, Dawid; Vasilevsky, Nicole; Baynam, Gareth; Zemojtel, Tomasz; Schriml, Lynn Marie; Kibbe, Warren Alden; Schofield, Paul N.; Beck, Tim; et al

    2015-06-25

    The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) is widely used in the rare disease community for differential diagnostics, phenotype-driven analysis of next-generation sequence-variation data, and translational research, but a comparable resource has not been available for common disease. Here, we have developed a concept-recognition procedure that analyzes the frequencies of HPO disease annotations as identified in over five million PubMed abstracts by employing an iterative procedure to optimize precision and recall of the identified terms. We derived disease models for 3,145 common human diseases comprising a total of 132,006 HPO annotations. The HPO now comprises over 250,000 phenotypic annotations for over 10,000more »rare and common diseases and can be used for examining the phenotypic overlap among common diseases that share risk alleles, as well as between Mendelian diseases and common diseases linked by genomic location. The annotations, as well as the HPO itself, are freely available.« less

  3. Trace element and isotope geochemistry of geothermal fluids, East Rift Zone, Kilauea, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, H.B.; Delanoy, G.A.; Thomas, D.M. . Hawaii Inst. of Geophysics); Gerlach, D.C. ); Chen, B.; Takahashi, P.; Thomas, D.M. Evans and Associates, Redwood City, CA )

    1992-01-01

    A research program has been undertaken in an effort to better characterize the composition and the precipitation characteristic of the geothermal fluids produced by the HGP-A geothermal well located on the Kilauea East Rift Zone on the Island of Hawaii. The results of these studies have shown that the chemical composition of the fluids changed over the production life of the well and that the fluids produced were the result of mixing of at least two, and possibly three, source fluids. These source fluids were recognized as: a sea water composition modified by high temperature water-rock reactions; meteoric recharge; and a hydrothermal fluid that had been equilibrated with high temperature reservoir rocks and magmatic volatiles. Although the major alkali and halide elements show clearly increasing trends with time, only a few of the trace transition metals show a similar trend. The rare earth elements, were typically found at low concentrations and appeared to be highly variable with time. Studies of the precipitation characteristics of silica showed that amorphous silica deposition rates were highly sensitive to fluid pH and that increases in fluid pH above about 8.5 could flocculate more than 80% of the suspended colloidal silica in excess of its solubility. Addition of transition metal salts were also found to enhance the recovery fractions of silica from solution. The amorphous silica precipitate was also found to strongly scavenge the alkaline earth and transition metal ions naturally present in the brines; mild acid treatments were shown to be capable of removing substantial fractions of the scavenged metals from the silica flocs yielding a moderately pure gelatinous by-product. Further work on the silica precipitation process is recommended to improve our ability to control silica scaling from high temperature geothermal fluids or to recover a marketable silica by-product from these fluids prior to reinjection.

  4. Salt transport extraction of transuranium elements from lwr fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pierce, R. Dean; Ackerman, John P.; Battles, James E.; Johnson, Terry R.; Miller, William E.

    1992-01-01

    A process of separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels which contain rare earth and noble metal fission products. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of CaCl.sub.2 and a Cu--Mg alloy containing not less than about 25% by weight Mg at a temperature in the range of from about 750.degree. C. to about 850.degree. C. to precipitate uranium metal and some of the noble metal fission products leaving the Cu--Mg alloy having transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals and some of the noble metal fission products dissolved therein. The CaCl.sub.2 having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein is separated and electrolytically treated with a carbon electrode to reduce the CaO to Ca metal while converting the carbon electrode to CO and CO.sub.2. The Ca metal and CaCl.sub.2 is recycled to reduce additional oxide fuel. The Cu--Mg alloy having transuranium metals and rare earth fission product metals and the noble metal fission products dissolved therein is contacted with a transport salt including Mg Cl.sub.2 to transfer Mg values from the transport salt to the Cu--Mg alloy while transuranium actinide and rare earth fission product metals transfer from the Cu--Mg alloy to the transport salt. Then the transport salt is mixed with a Mg--Zn alloy to transfer Mg values from the alloy to the transport salt while the transuranium actinide and rare earth fission product values dissolved in the salt are reduced and transferred to the Mg--Zn alloy.

  5. Salt transport extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pierce, R.D.; Ackerman, J.P.; Battles, J.E.; Johnson, T.R.; Miller, W.E.

    1992-11-03

    A process is described for separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels which contain rare earth and noble metal fission products. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of CaCl[sub 2] and a Cu--Mg alloy containing not less than about 25% by weight Mg at a temperature in the range of from about 750 C to about 850 C to precipitate uranium metal and some of the noble metal fission products leaving the Cu--Mg alloy having transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals and some of the noble metal fission products dissolved therein. The CaCl[sub 2] having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein is separated and electrolytically treated with a carbon electrode to reduce the CaO to Ca metal while converting the carbon electrode to CO and CO[sub 2]. The Ca metal and CaCl[sub 2] is recycled to reduce additional oxide fuel. The Cu--Mg alloy having transuranium metals and rare earth fission product metals and the noble metal fission products dissolved therein is contacted with a transport salt including MgCl[sub 2] to transfer Mg values from the transport salt to the Cu--Mg alloy while transuranium actinide and rare earth fission product metals transfer from the Cu--Mg alloy to the transport salt. Then the transport salt is mixed with a Mg--Zn alloy to transfer Mg values from the alloy to the transport salt while the transuranium actinide and rare earth fission product values dissolved in the salt are reduced and transferred to the Mg--Zn alloy. 2 figs.

  6. Nuclear breeder reactor fuel element with silicon carbide getter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Karnesky, Richard A. (Richland, WA)

    1987-01-01

    An improved cesium getter 28 is provided in a breeder reactor fuel element or pin in the form of an extended surface area, low density element formed in one embodiment as a helically wound foil 30 located with silicon carbide, and located at the upper end of the fertile material upper blanket 20.

  7. Beam and Truss Finite Element Verification for DYNA3D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rathbun, H J

    2007-07-16

    The explicit finite element (FE) software program DYNA3D has been developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to simulate the dynamic behavior of structures, systems, and components. This report focuses on verification of beam and truss element formulations in DYNA3D. An efficient protocol has been developed to verify the accuracy of these structural elements by generating a set of representative problems for which closed-form quasi-static steady-state analytical reference solutions exist. To provide as complete coverage as practically achievable, problem sets are developed for each beam and truss element formulation (and their variants) in all modes of loading and physical orientation. Analyses with loading in the elastic and elastic-plastic regimes are performed. For elastic loading, the FE results are within 1% of the reference solutions for all cases. For beam element bending and torsion loading in the plastic regime, the response is heavily dependent on the numerical integration rule chosen, with higher refinement yielding greater accuracy (agreement to within 1%). Axial loading in the plastic regime produces accurate results (agreement to within 0.01%) for all integration rules and element formulations. Truss elements are also verified to provide accurate results (within 0.01%) for elastic and elastic-plastic loading. A sample problem to verify beam element response in ParaDyn, the parallel version DYNA3D, is also presented.

  8. CMI Webinar: Critical Elements in Phosphate | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Critical Elements in Phosphate The CMI Webinar series began with a presentation on Critical Elements in Phosphate by Patrick Zhang, Florida Industrial and Phosphate Research Institute (FIPR), on March 24, 2015. The recording of the webinar runs nearly 38 minutes (37:54

  9. Modular Finite Element Methods Library Version: 1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-06-22

    MFEM is a general, modular library for finite element methods. It provides a variety of finite element spaces and bilinear/linear forms in 2D and 3D. MFEM also includes classes for dealing with various types of meshes and their refinement.

  10. Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In addition to banning the export of elemental mercury from the United States as of January 1, 2013, the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (MEBA) required DOE to establish a facility for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury.

  11. Recoverable immobilization of transuranic elements in sulfate ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenhalgh, Wilbur O. (Richland, WA)

    1985-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of reversibly immobilizing sulfate ash at least about 20% of which is sulfates of transuranic elements. The ash is mixed with a metal which can be aluminum, cerium, samarium, europium, or a mixture thereof, in amounts sufficient to form an alloy with the transuranic elements, plus an additional amount to reduce the transuranic element sulfates to elemental form. Also added to the ash is a fluxing agent in an amount sufficient to lower the percentage of the transuranic element sulfates to about 1% to about 10%. The mixture of the ash, metal, and fluxing agent is heated to a temperature sufficient to melt the fluxing agent and the metal. The mixture is then cooled and the alloy is separated from the remainder of the mixture.

  12. Means for supporting fuel elements in a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andrews, Harry N.; Keller, Herbert W.

    1980-01-01

    A grid structure for a nuclear reactor fuel assembly comprising a plurality of connecting members forming at least one longitudinally extending opening peripheral and inner fuel element openings through each of which openings at least one nuclear fuel element extends, said connecting members forming wall means surrounding said each peripheral and inner fuel element opening, a pair of rigid projections longitudinally spaced from one another extending from a portion of said wall means into said each peripheral and inner opening for rigidly engaging said each fuel element, respectively, yet permit individual longitudinal slippage thereof, and resilient means formed integrally on and from said wall means and positioned in said each peripheral and inner opening in opposed relationship with said projections and located to engage said fuel element to bias the latter into engagement with said rigid projections, respectively

  13. Mobile Monolith Polymer Elements For Flow Control In Microfluidic Systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hasselbrink, Jr., Ernest F.; Rehm, Jason E.; Shepodd, Timothy J.; Kirby, Brian J.

    2006-01-24

    A cast-in-place and lithographically shaped mobile, monolithic polymer element for fluid flow control in microfluidic devices and method of manufacture. Microfluid flow control devices, or microvalves that provide for control of fluid or ionic current flow can be made incorporating a cast-in-place, mobile monolithic polymer element, disposed within a microchannel, and driven by fluid pressure (either liquid or gas) against a retaining or sealing surface. The polymer elements are made by the application of lithographic methods to monomer mixtures formulated in such a way that the polymer will not bond to microchannel walls. The polymer elements can seal against pressures greater than 5000 psi, and have a response time on the order of milliseconds. By the use of energetic radiation it is possible to depolymerize selected regions of the polymer element to form shapes that cannot be produced by conventional lithographic patterning and would be impossible to machine.

  14. Mobile monolithic polymer elements for flow control in microfluidic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hasselbrink, Jr., Ernest F.; Rehm, Jason E.; Shepodd, Timothy J.; Kirby, Brian J.

    2005-11-11

    A cast-in-place and lithographically shaped mobile, monolithic polymer element for fluid flow control in microfluidic devices and method of manufacture. Microfluid flow control devices, or microvalves that provide for control of fluid or ionic current flow can be made incorporating a cast-in-place, mobile monolithic polymer element, disposed within a microchannel, and driven by fluid pressure (either liquid or gas) against a retaining or sealing surface. The polymer elements are made by the application of lithographic methods to monomer mixtures formulated in such a way that the polymer will not bond to microchannel walls. The polymer elements can seal against pressures greater than 5000 psi, and have a response time on the order of milliseconds. By the use of energetic radiation it is possible to depolymerize selected regions of the polymer element to form shapes that cannot be produced by conventional lithographic patterning and would be impossible to machine.

  15. Method of holding optical elements without deformation during their fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hed, P.P.

    1997-04-29

    An improved method for securing and removing an optical element to and from a blocking tool without causing deformation of the optical element is disclosed. A lens tissue is placed on the top surface of the blocking tool. Dots of UV cement are applied to the lens tissue without any of the dots contacting each other. An optical element is placed on top of the blocking tool with the lens tissue sandwiched therebetween. The UV cement is then cured. After subsequent fabrication steps, the bonded blocking tool, lens tissue, and optical element are placed in a debonding solution to soften the UV cement. The optical element is then removed from the blocking tool. 16 figs.

  16. Radioactive Elements in the Standard Atomic Weights Table.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holden,N.E.

    2007-08-04

    In the 1949 Report of the Atomic Weights Commission, a series of new elements were added to the Atomic Weights Table. Since these elements had been produced in the laboratory and were not discovered in nature, the atomic weight value of these artificial products would depend upon the production method. Since atomic weight is a property of an element as it occurs in nature, it would be incorrect to assign an atomic weight value to that element. As a result of that discussion, the Commission decided to provide only the mass number of the most stable (or longest-lived) known isotope as the number to be associated with these entries in the Atomic Weights Table. As a function of time, the mass number associated with various elements has changed as longer-lived isotopes of a particular element has been found in nature, or as improved half-life values of an element's isotopes might cause a shift in the longest-lived isotope from one mass to another. In the 1957 Report of the Atomic Weights Commission, it was decided to discontinue the listing of the mass number in the Atomic Weights Table on the grounds that the kind of information supplied by the mass number is inconsistent with the primary purpose of the Table, i.e., to provide accurate values of 'these constants' for use in various chemical calculations. In addition to the Table of Atomic Weights, the Commission included an auxiliary Table of Radioactive Elements for the first time, where the entry would be the isotope of that element which was the most stable, i.e., the one with the longest known half-life. In their 1973 Report, the Commission noted that the users of the main Table of Atomic Weights were dissatisfied with the omission of values for some elements in that Table and it was decided to reintroduce the mass number for the radioactive elements into the main Table. In their 1983 Report, the Commission decided that radioactive elements were considered to lack a characteristic terrestrial isotopic composition, from which an atomic weight value could be calculated to five or more figure accuracy, without prior knowledge of the sample involved. These elements were again listed in the Atomic Weights Table with no further information, i.e., with no mass number or atomic weight value.

  17. A Search for the Rare Decay $B\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma$

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-06-02

    We report the result of a search for the rare decay B{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} in 426 fb{sup -1} of data, corresponding to 226 million B{sup 0}{bar B}{sup 0} pairs, collected on the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider using the BABAR detector. We use a maximum likelihood fit to extract the signal yield and observe 21{sub -12}{sup +13} signal events with a statistical signficance of 1.9 {sigma}. This corresponds to a branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}) = (1.7 {+-} 1.1(stat.) {+-} 0.2(syst.)) x 10{sup -7}. Based on this result, we set a 90% confidence level upper limit of {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}) < 3.2 x 10{sup -7}.

  18. Velocity map imaging of HBr photodissociation in large rare gas clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedor, J.; Kocisek, J.; Poterya, V.; Votava, O.; Pysanenko, A.; Farnik, M.; Lipciuc, M. L.; Kitsopoulos, T. N.

    2011-04-21

    We have implemented the velocity map imaging technique to study clustering in the pulsed supersonic expansions of hydrogen bromide in helium, argon, and xenon. The expansions are characterized by direct imaging of the beam velocity distributions. We have investigated the cluster generation by means of UV photodissociation and photoionization of HBr molecules. Two distinct features appear in the hydrogen atom photofragment images in the clustering regime: (i) photofragments with near zero kinetic energies and (ii) ''hot'' photofragments originating from vibrationally excited HBr molecules. The origin of both features is attributed to the fragment caging by the cluster. We discuss the nature of the formed clusters based on the change of the photofragment images with the expansion parameters and on the photoionization mass spectra and conclude that single HBr molecule encompassed with rare gas ''snowball'' is consistent with the experimental observations.

  19. Structure and magnetism of epitaxial rare-earth-transition-metal films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fullerton, E.E.; Sowers, C.H.; Pearson, J.P.; Bader, S.D.

    1996-10-01

    Growth of epitaxial transition-metal superlattices; has proven essential in elucidating the role of crystal orientation and structure on magnetic properties such as giant magnetoresistance, interlayer coupling, and magnetic surface anisotropies. Extending these studies to the growth of epitaxial rare earth-transition metal (RE-TM) films and superlattices promises to play an equally important role in exploring and optimizing the properties of hard magnets. For instance, Skomski and Coey predict that a giant energy product (120 MG Oe) is possible in multilayer structures consisting of aligned hard-magnet layers exchanged coupled with soft-phase layers with high magnetization. Epitaxy provides one route to synthesizing such exchange-hardened magnets on controlled length scales. Epitaxial growth also allows the magnetic properties to be tailored by controlling the crystal orientation and the anisotropies of the magnetic layers and holds the possibility of stabilizing metastable phases. This paper describes the epitaxy and magnetic properties for several alloys.

  20. Low-phonon-frequency chalcogenide crystalline hosts for rare earth lasers operating beyond three microns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Payne, Stephen A. (Castro Valley, CA); Page, Ralph H. (San Ramon, CA); Schaffers, Kathleen I. (Pleasanton, CA); Nostrand, Michael C. (Livermore, CA); Krupke, William F. (Pleasanton, CA); Schunemann, Peter G. (Malden, MA)

    2000-01-01

    The invention comprises a RE-doped MA.sub.2 X.sub.4 crystalline gain medium, where M includes a divalent ion such as Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, Pb, Eu, or Yb; A is selected from trivalent ions including Al, Ga, and In; X is one of the chalcogenide ions S, Se, and Te; and RE represents the trivalent rare earth ions. The MA.sub.2 X.sub.4 gain medium can be employed in a laser oscillator or a laser amplifier. Possible pump sources include diode lasers, as well as other laser pump sources. The laser wavelengths generated are greater than 3 microns, as becomes possible because of the low phonon frequency of this host medium. The invention may be used to seed optical devices such as optical parametric oscillators and other lasers.