Sample records for us-japan rare elements

  1. US-Japan rare elements meeting | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCOSystems Analysis Success|Sustainable EnergyMotor Company |

  2. US-Japan Bilateral

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    301B SPED 205 TASF US-Japan Bilateral (301A SPED, 8 AM - noon) Workshop: Materials Thermodynamics Research 8:00 AM 8:30 AM 9:00 AM 9:30 AM BREAK 10:00 AM BREAK 10:30 AM 11:00 AM...

  3. Rapporteur's Report - workshop on rare earth elements

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Trans-Atlantic Workshop on Rare Earth Elements and Other Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future Hosted by the MIT Energy Initiative, cambridge, Massachusetts december 3, 2010...

  4. Rare Earth Element Mines, Deposits, and Occurrences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Rare Earth Element Mines, Deposits, and Occurrences by Greta J. Orris1 and Richard I. Grauch2 Open Table 1. Rare earth mineral codes and associated mineral names.......................................................................................6 Table 2. Non-rare earth mineral codes and associated mineral names

  5. Us-Japan cooperation on safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beddingfield, David H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, Howard O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hori, Masato [JAEA; Kawakubo, Yoko [JAEA; Mcclelland - Kerr, J [NNSA

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a long history of collaborative safeguards development between the United States and Japan. Japan has built, and continues to expand, the largest civil nuclear fuel cycle under full-scope IAEA safeguards in world. This development has posed unique challenges to the international safeguards system. Safeguards developments made through the US-Japan cooperation to address these unique challenges have significantly impacted the technologies deployed for international safeguards applications around the world.

  6. Prospects for Rare Earth Elements From Marine Minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prospects for Rare Earth Elements From Marine Minerals Rare earth elements (REEs) compose in the earth's crust. However, because of their geochemical proper es, rare earth elements are typically. Briefing Paper 02/12 Jim Hein | May 2012 www.isa.org.jm Table 1: Rare Earth Elements This paper

  7. Note: Portable rare-earth element analyzer using pyroelectric crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imashuku, Susumu, E-mail: imashuku.susumu.2m@kyoto-u.ac.jp; Fuyuno, Naoto; Hanasaki, Kohei; Kawai, Jun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a portable rare-earth element analyzer with a palm-top size chamber including the electron source of a pyroelectric crystal and the sample stage utilizing cathodoluminescence (CL) phenomenon. The portable rare-earth element analyzer utilizing CL phenomenon is the smallest reported so far. The portable rare-earth element analyzer detected the rare-earth elements Dy, Tb, Er, and Sm of ppm order in zircon, which were not detected by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis. We also performed an elemental mapping of rare-earth elements by capturing a CL image using CCD camera.

  8. Behavior of Rare Earth Elements in Geothermal Systems- A New...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ExplorationExploitation Tool? Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Behavior of Rare Earth Elements in Geothermal Systems- A New Exploration...

  9. Thermodynamic Database for Rare Earth Elements Recycling Process...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thermodynamic Database for Rare Earth Elements Recycling Process: Energetics of the REE-X Systems (XA;, Mg, Zn, Si, Sn, Mn, Pb, Fe, Co, Ni) Apr 17 2015 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM In-Ho...

  10. Behaviour of zirconium, niobium, yttrium and the rare earth elements in the Thor Lake rare-metal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behaviour of zirconium, niobium, yttrium and the rare earth elements in the Thor Lake rare in the Northwest Territories of Canada represents one of the largest resources of zirconium, niobium, yttrium ressources de zircon, niobium, yttrium et des éléments du groupe des terres rares lourdes (REE) au monde. Une

  11. Rare earth elements activate endocytosis in plant cells Lihong Wanga,b,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Xing-Wang

    Rare earth elements activate endocytosis in plant cells Lihong Wanga,b,1 , Jigang Lic,d,1 , Qing (sent for review May 15, 2014) It has long been observed that rare earth elements (REEs) regulate, such as rare earth elements (REEs), have been observed for a long time to be beneficial to plant growth (1, 2

  12. Rare Earth Elements: A Tool for Understanding the Behaviour of Trivalent Actinides in the Geosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buil, Belen; Gomez, Paloma; Garralon, Antonio; Turrero, M. Jesus [Medioambiente, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, Madrid, 28040 (Spain)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rare earth element (REE) concentrations have been determined in groundwaters, granite and fracture fillings in a restored uranium mine. The granitoids normalized REE patterns of groundwaters show heavy rare earth elements (HREE)-enrichment and positive Eu anomalies. This suggests that the REE are fractionated during leaching from the source rocks by groundwaters. Preferential leaching of HREE would be consistent with the greater stability of their aqueous complexes compared to those of the light rare earth elements (LREE), together with the dissolution of certain fracture filling minerals, dissolution/alteration of phyllosilicates and colloidal transport. (authors)

  13. DOE Seeks Your Novel Ideas for Recovery of Rare Earth Elements...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DOE Seeks Your Novel Ideas for Recovery of Rare Earth Elements from Coal and Coal Byproducts Replies to the RFI are due October 10, 2014, by 8:00 p.m. EDT. Details about how and...

  14. Behavior Of Rare Earth Element In Geothermal Systems, A NewExploratio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Behavior Of Rare Earth Element In Geothermal Systems, A New Exploration-Exploitation Tool Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Behavior Of...

  15. u.s. & JAPAN CONTINUE COOPERATIVE RESEARCH IN NORTH PACIFIC (1970-71)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    u.s. & JAPAN CONTINUE COOPERATIVE RESEARCH IN NORTH PACIFIC (1970-71) R . Bakkala and R. French Each spring since 1968, scientists of the United States and Japan have conducted co- operative cruises.S., Japan, and Canada, as treaty members of the International North Pacific Fisherie s Commission (INPFC

  16. US-Japan energy policy dialogue. [Final] report, June 1991--December 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Atlantic Council has cooperated in an ongoing dialogue on energy policy issues with key Japanese organizations for the past twelve years. These Japanese organizations are the Committee for Energy Policy Promotion (CEPP) and the Institute of Energy Economics (IEE). The members of CEPP are major energy supplier and user companies. The IEE conducts sophisticated research and prepares policy papers on a range of international and Japanese energy issues. This energy dialogue is the only long-term US-Japan dialogue which engages CEPP/IEE members. Over the past twelve years the US-Japan energy dialogue has met seventeen times, with alternating meetings held in Tokyo, Hawaii, and Washington, DC. While the dialogue is a private sector activity, US and Japanese government officials are kept informed on the program and are invited to participate in the meetings in Washington and Tokyo. Major benefits of this activity have included: Establishment of close working relationships among Japanese and US private sector energy institutions and experts; exchange of papers on energy issues among participants and on a selected basis to others in the private and governmental sectors; facilitation of separate US-Japanese work on policy issues - for example a joint US-Japan cooperative policy paper on global climate change published in 1991, some government representatives participated in a May 1991 meeting on this subject. Encouragement of Japanese participation in separate Atlantic Council programs on US energy policy imperatives (1990); technology cooperation with developing countries in the field of energy supply and use for sustainable development (1992); creation of a World Energy Efficiency Association (1993); and a US-Japan-Newly Independent States project on NIS energy policy (1992--1994).

  17. Symmetric charge-transfer cross sections of IIIa rare-earth-metal elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hashida, Masaki; Sakabe, Shuji; Izawa, Yasukazu [ARCBS, Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan) and Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan) and Institute for Laser Technology, 2-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Symmetric charge-transfer cross sections of IIIa rare-earth-metal elements (Sc, Y, and Gd) in the impact energy range of 30 to 1000 eV were measured for the first time. The experiments were performed with a crossed-beam apparatus that featured primary ion production by photoionization with a tunable dye laser. Comparing the cross sections of IIIa rare-earth-metal elements ({sigma}{sub Sc}, {sigma}{sub Y}, and {sigma}{sub Gd}) with those of alkali metals or helium {sigma}{sub 0}, we found that {sigma}{sub 0{approx_equal}{sigma}Sc}<{sigma}{sub Y}<{sigma}{sub Gd{approx_equal}}2{sigma}{sub 0}at an impact energy of 1000 eV.

  18. US/Japan Cooperation in High Energy Physics. Review of activities, 1988--1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Implementing Arrangement was to further the energy programs of both countries by establishing a framework for cooperation in the field of high energy physics, including research, accelerator and detector instrumentation research and development, the fabrication and subsequent use of new experimental devices and facilities, and related joint efforts as may be mutually agreed. Over the years, this cooperation has been very effective and has strengthened the overall collaborative efforts and the understanding between our nations and their citizens. It has demonstrated to the world our ability to work together to attack difficult problems. High Energy Physics goes across national borders; the bond is clearly intellectual and common ground is shared for the benefit of all in a most effective manner. This review covers the activities conducted under the aegis of the US/Japan Committee for Cooperation in High Energy Physics during the past five years (1988--1993). This was the second such US review of the US/Japan cooperative activities; the first was held in 1987.

  19. 13.21 Geochemistry of the Rare-Earth Element, Nb, Ta, Hf, and Zr Deposits RL Linnen, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakhmouradian, Anton

    13.21 Geochemistry of the Rare-Earth Element, Nb, Ta, Hf, and Zr Deposits RL Linnen, University of rare metals in natural fluids 551 13.21.2.2.2 Aqueous complexation and mineral solubility 552 13 Acknowledgments 564 References 564 13.21.1 Introduction Rare-element mineral deposits, also called rare-metal

  20. Proceedings of US-Japan heliotron-stellarator workshop: Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is the third of four volumes on the US-Japan Heliotron-Stellarator Workshop. It contains talks on the following: Heliotron EICRF Heating Experiment; CHS Heating Systems (NBI, ECH, ICH); ICH Program for ATF; ICRF Wave Propagation; the HBQM Heliac Work; configuration studies; compact torsatron studies; low aspect ratio torsatron design; optimized small stellarator designs; configuration studies for ATF; currents in ATF; currents in ATF; computations of 3-D equilibria with islands; magnetic surface mapping studies; magnetic field alignment and mapping on ATF; divertor experiments in IMS; PMI program and wall conditioning for ATF; hard X-ray suppression on ATF; plasma rotation and potential measurement; and status of heavy ion beam probe for ATF.

  1. Proceedings of a joint US-Japan Seminar in the Environmental Sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeAngelis, D.L. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Teramoto, E. [ed.] [Ryukoku Univ., Otsu (Japan); Neergaard, D.A. [ed.] [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Joint US-Japan Seminar in the Environmental Sciences was based on the premises that questions remain concerning the factors that control many of the regularities observed in ecological communities and that increased collaboration between researchers in the United States and Japan can contribute to answering these questions. The papers included in this report resulted from the Seminar. These papers as well as workshop discussions summarized here outline the main issues that face theoretical ecology today. The papers cover four different areas of theoretical ecology: (1) individual species adaptations, (2) ecological community-food web interactions, (3) food web theory, and (4) concepts related to the ecosystem. Individual projects are processed separately for the databases.

  2. Ultra-low rare earth element content in accreted ice from sub-glacial Lake Vostok, Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    Ultra-low rare earth element content in accreted ice from sub-glacial Lake Vostok, Antarctica Paolo. We suggest that such ultra-low concentrations are unlikely to be representative of the real REE

  3. New Rare Earth Element Abundance Distributions for the Sun and Five r-Process-Rich Very Metal-Poor Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sneden, Christopher; Cowan, John J; Ivans, Inese I; Hartog, Elizabeth A Den

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have derived new abundances of the rare-earth elements Pr, Dy, Tm, Yb, and Lu for the solar photosphere and for five very metal-poor, neutron-capture r-process-rich giant stars. The photospheric values for all five elements are in good agreement with meteoritic abundances. For the low metallicity sample, these abundances have been combined with new Ce abundances from a companion paper, and reconsideration of a few other elements in individual stars, to produce internally-consistent Ba, rare-earth, and Hf (56<= Z <= 72) element distributions. These have been used in a critical comparison between stellar and solar r-process abundance mixes.

  4. Behavior of Rare Earth Element In Geothermal Systems; A New Exploration/Exploitation Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott A. Wood

    2002-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this four-year project was to provide a database by which to judge the utility of the rare earth elements (REE) in the exploration for and exploitation of geothermal fields in the United States. Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: (1) the North Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); (2) the Cascades of Oregon; (3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; (4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; (5) Palinpion, the Philippines: (6) the Salton Sea and Heber geothermal fields of southern California; and (7) the Dieng field in Central Java, Indonesia. We have analyzed the samples from all fields for REE except the last two.

  5. Study on the electrochemical extraction of rare earth elements from FLINAK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Dewu; Huang, Wei; Jiang, Feng; Tian, Lifang; Li, Qingnuan [Department of Radiochemistry and Engineering, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics - SINAP, Chinese Academy of Sciences - CAS, Shanghai 201800 (Costa Rica)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrochemical behaviors of rare earth elements, such as NdF{sub 3}, GdF{sub 3}, SmF{sub 3}, YF{sub 3}, and EuF{sub 3}, were investigated in a LiF-NaF-KF (46.5-11.5-42.0 mol %, FLINAK, m. p. 454 Celsius degrees) solvent. The results indicated that it is possible to extract Nd, Gd and Y directly by electrochemical deposition since the reductions of those cations to metal are located in the electrochemical window of the FLINAK eutectic, while the reductions of Sm and Eu metal are out of the range of the medium. Subsequently electro-deposition of Nd was carried out with two kinds of cathodic materials, namely, an inert cathode, Pt, and a reactive electrode, Cu. The collected products were characterized by various techniques revealing that a Nd-rich product was obtained. (authors)

  6. Rare earth element components in atmospheric particulates in the Bayan Obo mine region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lingqing, E-mail: wanglq@igsnrr.ac.cn; Liang, Tao, E-mail: liangt@igsnrr.ac.cn; Zhang, Qian; Li, Kexin

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bayan Obo mine, located in Inner Mongolia, China, is the largest light rare earth body ever found in the world. The research for rare earth elements (REEs) enrichment in atmospheric particulates caused by mining and ore processing is fairly limited so far. In this paper, atmospheric particulates including total suspended particulate (TSP) matter and particles with an equivalent aerodynamic diameter less than 10 ?m (PM{sub 10}) were collected around the Bayan Obo mine region, in August 2012 and March 2013, to analyze the levels and distributions of REEs in particles. The total concentrations of REEs for TSP were 149.8 and 239.6 ng/m{sup 3}, and those for PM{sub 10} were 42.8 and 68.9 ng/m{sup 3}, in August 2012 and March 2013, respectively. Enrichment factor was calculated for all 14 REEs in the TSP and PM{sub 10} and the results indicated that REEs enrichment in atmosphere particulates was caused by anthropogenic sources and influenced by the strong wind in springtime. The spatial distribution of REEs in TSP showed a strong gradient concentration in the prevailing wind direction. REE chondrite normalized patterns of TSP and PM{sub 10} were similar and the normalized curves inclined to the right side, showing the conspicuous fractionation between the light REEs and heavy REE, which supported by the chondrite normalized concentration ratios calculated for selected elements (La{sub N}/Yb{sub N}, La{sub N}/Sm{sub N}, Gd{sub N}/Yb{sub N}). - Highlights: • TSP and PM{sub 10} samples were collected to analyze the levels and distributions of REE. • Enrichment factors indicated that REE enrichment was caused by anthropogenic sources. • The distribution of REEs showed a strong gradient in the prevailing wind direction. • Obvious fractionation between LREEs and HREEs is observed in atmospheric particulates.

  7. US-Japan energy policy dialogue. [Contains a list of attendees, agenda, report summaries, and a financial report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Atlantic Council has cooperated in an ongoing dialogue on energy policy issues with key Japanese organizations for the past twelve years. These Japanese organizations are the Committee for Energy Policy Promotion (CEPP) and the Institute of Energy Economics (IEE). The members of CEPP are major energy supplier and user companies. The IEE conducts sophisticated research and prepares policy papers on a range of international and Japanese energy issues. This energy dialogue is the only long-term US-Japan dialogue which engages CEPP/IEE members. Over the past twelve years the US-Japan energy dialogue has met seventeen times, with alternating meetings held in Tokyo, Hawaii, and Washington, DC. While the dialogue is a private sector activity, US and Japanese government officials are kept informed on the program and are invited to participate in the meetings in Washington and Tokyo. Major benefits of this activity have included: Establishment of close working relationships among Japanese and US private sector energy institutions and experts; exchange of papers on energy issues among participants and on a selected basis to others in the private and governmental sectors; facilitation of separate US-Japanese work on policy issues - for example a joint US-Japan cooperative policy paper on global climate change published in 1991, some government representatives participated in a May 1991 meeting on this subject. Encouragement of Japanese participation in separate Atlantic Council programs on US energy policy imperatives (1990); technology cooperation with developing countries in the field of energy supply and use for sustainable development (1992); creation of a World Energy Efficiency Association (1993); and a US-Japan-Newly Independent States project on NIS energy policy (1992--1994).

  8. Final Report US-Japan IEC Workshop on Small Plasma and Accelerator Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miley, George, H.

    2008-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract The history of IEC development will be briefly described, and some speculation about future directions will be offered. The origin of IEC is due to the brilliance of Phil Farnsworth, inventor of electronic TV in the US. Early experiments were pioneered in the late 1960s by Robert Hirsch who later became head of the DOE fusion program. At that time studies of IEC physics quickly followed at the University of Illinois and at Penn State University. However, despite many successes in this early work, IEC research died as DOE funding stopped in the mid 1980s. In the early 90’s, R. W. Bussard of EMC revived work with a new major project based on a magnetic assisted IEC. While doing supportive studies for that project, G. Miley proposed a grided “STAR mode” IEC as a neutron source for NAA. This concept was later used commercially by Daimler- Benz in Germany to analysis impurities in incoming ores. This represented a first practical application of the IEC. During this period other research groups at LANL, U of Wisconsin and Kyoto University entered IEC research with innovative new concepts and approaches to IEC physics and applications. Much of this work is documented in the present and in past US-Japan Workshops. At present we stand on the threshold of a new area of IEC applications as neutron source, for isotope production, and as a plasma source. These applications provide a way to continue IEC understanding and technology development with the ultimate goal being a fusion power plant. Indeed, a distinguishing feature of the IEC vs. other fusion confinement approaches is the unique opportunity for “spin off” applications along the way to a power producing plant.

  9. Adsorption of rare earth elements onto bacterial cell walls and its implication for REE sorption onto natural microbial mats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adsorption of rare earth elements onto bacterial cell walls and its implication for REE sorption Received 8 May 2004; received in revised form 7 January 2005; accepted 15 February 2005 Abstract Adsorption. The occurrence of M-type tetrad effect suggests that REE form inner sphere complexes during their adsorption onto

  10. Utilizing rare earth elements as tracers in high TDS reservoir brines in CCS applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McLing, Travis; Smith, William; Smith, Robert

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we report the result of research associated with the testing of a procedures necessary for utilizing natural occurring trace elements, specifically the Rare Earth Elements (REE) as geochemical tracers in Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) applications. Trace elements, particularly REE may be well suited to serve as in situ tracers for monitoring geochemical conditions and the migration of CO?-charged waters within CCS storage systems. We have been conducting studies to determine the efficacy of using REE as a tracer and characterization tool in the laboratory, at a CCS analogue site in Soda Springs, Idaho, and at amore »proposed CCS reservoir at the Rock Springs Uplift, Wyoming. Results from field and laboratory studies have been encouraging and show that REE may be an effective tracer in CCS systems and overlying aquifers. In recent years, a series of studies using REE as a natural groundwater tracer have been conducted successfully at various locations around the globe. Additionally, REE and other trace elements have been successfully used as in situ tracers to describe the evolution of deep sedimentary Basins. Our goal has been to establish naturally occurring REE as a useful monitoring measuring and verification (MMV) tool in CCS research because formation brine chemistry will be particularly sensitive to changes in local equilibrium caused by the addition of large volumes of CO?. Because brine within CCS target formations will have been in chemical equilibrium with the host rocks for millions of years, the addition of large volumes of CO? will cause reactions in the formation that will drive changes to the brine chemistry due to the pH change caused by the formation of carbonic acid. This CO? driven change in formation fluid chemistry will have a major impact on water rock reaction equilibrium in the formation, which will impart a change in the REE fingerprint of the brine that can measured and be used to monitor in situ reservoir conditions. Our research has shown that the REE signature imparted to the formation fluid by the introduction of CO? to the formation, can be measured and tracked as part of an MMV program. Additionally, this REE fingerprint may serve as an ideal tracer for fluid migration, both within the CCS target formation, and should formation fluids migrate into overlying aquifers. However application of REE and other trace elements to CCS system is complicated by the high salt content of the brines contained within the target formations. In the United States by regulation, in order for a geologic reservoir to be considered suitable for carbon storage, it must contain formation brine with total dissolved solids (TDS) > 10,000 ppm, and in most cases formation brines have TDS well in excess of that threshold. The high salinity of these brines creates analytical problems for elemental analysis, including element interference with trace metals in Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS) (i.e. element mass overlap due to oxide or plasma phenomenon). Additionally, instruments like the ICP-MS that are sensitive enough to measure trace elements down to the parts per trillion level are quickly oversaturated when water TDS exceeds much more than 1,000 ppm. Normally this problem is dealt with through dilution of the sample, bringing the water chemistry into the instruments working range. However, dilution is not an option when analyzing these formation brines for trace metals, because trace elements, specifically the REE, which occur in aqueous solutions at the parts per trillion levels. Any dilution of the sample would make REE detection impossible. Therefore, the ability to use trace metals as in situ natural tracers in high TDS brines environments requires the development of methods for pre-concentrating trace elements, while reducing the salinity and associated elemental interference such that the brines can be routinely analyzed by standard ICP-MS methods. As part of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Project the INL-CAES has developed a rapid, easy to use proces

  11. Rare Earth Elements--End Use and Recyclability Scientific Investigations Report 20115094

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pass, Calif., mine. The Mountain Pass mine is one of the two largest rare earth mines in the world........................................................................................................................................8 Neodymium-Iron-Boron Magnets..........................................................................................................................................13 Figures 1. Chart showing world mine production of rare earth oxides from 1990 through 2008 ....................................................................................

  12. Microstructure and properties of 17-4PH steel plasma nitrocarburized with a carrier gas containing rare earth elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, R.L., E-mail: ruiliangliu@126.com [National Key Laboratory for Precision Hot Processing of Metals, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Yan, M.F., E-mail: yanmufu@hit.edu.cn [National Key Laboratory for Precision Hot Processing of Metals, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wu, Y.Q. [National Key Laboratory for Precision Hot Processing of Metals, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhao, C.Z. [College of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin150001 (China)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of rare earth addition in the carrier gas on plasma nitrocarburizing of 17-4PH steel was studied. The microstructure and crystallographically of the phases in the surface layer as well as surface morphology of the nitrocarburized specimens were characterized by optical microscope, X-ray diffraction and scanning tunneling microscope, respectively. The hardness of the surface layer was measured by using a Vickers hardness test. The results show that the incorporation of rare earth elements in the carrier gas can increase the nitrocarburized layer thickness up to 55%, change the phase proportion in the nitrocarburized layer, refine the nitrides in surface layer, and increase the layer hardness above 100HV. The higher surface hardening effect after rare earth addition is caused by improvement in microstructure and change in the phase proportion of the nitrocarburized layer.

  13. Extraction processes and solvents for recovery of cesium, strontium, rare earth elements, technetium and actinides from liquid radioactive waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaitsev, Boris N. (St. Petersburg, RU); Esimantovskiy, Vyacheslav M. (St. Petersburg, RU); Lazarev, Leonard N. (St. Petersburg, RU); Dzekun, Evgeniy G. (Ozersk, RU); Romanovskiy, Valeriy N. (St. Petersburg, RU); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Brewer, Ken N. (Arco, ID); Herbst, Ronald S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Law, Jack D. (Pocatello, ID)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cesium and strontium are extracted from aqueous acidic radioactive waste containing rare earth elements, technetium and actinides, by contacting the waste with a composition of a complex organoboron compound and polyethylene glycol in an organofluorine diluent mixture. In a preferred embodiment the complex organoboron compound is chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, the polyethylene glycol has the formula RC.sub.6 H.sub.4 (OCH.sub.2 CH.sub.2).sub.n OH, and the organofluorine diluent is a mixture of bis-tetrafluoropropyl ether of diethylene glycol with at least one of bis-tetrafluoropropyl ether of ethylene glycol and bis-tetrafluoropropyl formal. The rare earths, technetium and the actinides (especially uranium, plutonium and americium), are extracted from the aqueous phase using a phosphine oxide in a hydrocarbon diluent, and reextracted from the resulting organic phase into an aqueous phase by using a suitable strip reagent.

  14. Overview of the US-Japan collaborative investigation on hydrogen isotope retention in neutron-irradiated and ion-damaged tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masashi Shimada; Y. Hatano; Y. Oya; T. Oda; M. Hara; G. Cao; M. Kobayashi; M. Sokolov; H. Watanabe; B. Tyburska; Y. Ueda; P. Calderoni

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma-facing components (PFCs) will be exposed to 14 MeV neutrons from deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion reactions, and tungsten, a candidate PFC for the divertor in ITER, is expected to receive a neutron dose of 0.7 displacement per atom (dpa) by the end of operation in ITER. The effect of neutron-irradiation damage has been mainly simulated using high-energy ion bombardment. While this prior database of results is quite valuable for understanding the behavior of hydrogen isotopes in PFCs, it does not encompass the full range of effects that must be considered in a practical fusion environment due to short penetration depth, damage gradient, high damage rate, and high PKA energy spectrum of the ion bombardment. In addition, neutrons change the elemental composition via transmutations, and create a high radiation environment inside PFCs, which influence the behavior of hydrogen isotope in PFCs, suggesting the utilization of fission reactors is necessary for neutron irradiation. Therefore, the effort to correlate among high-energy ions, fission neutrons, and fusion neutrons is crucial for accurately estimating tritium retention under a neutron-irradiation environment. Under the framework of the US-Japan TITAN program, tungsten samples (99.99 at. % purity from A.L.M.T. Co.) were irradiated by neutron in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), ORNL, at 50 and 300C to 0.025, 0.3, and 1.2 dpa, and the investigation of deuterium retention in neutron-irradiation was performed in the INL Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE), the unique high-flux linear plasma facility that can handle tritium, beryllium and activated materials. This paper reports the recent results from the comparison of ion-damaged tungsten via various ion species (2.8 MeV Fe2+, 20 MeV W2+, and 700 keV H-) with that from neutron-irradiated tungsten to identify the similarities and differences among them.

  15. Proceedings of US/Japan workshop, Q219 on high heat flux components and plasma surface interactions for next fusion devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulrickson, M.A.; Stevens, P.L.; Hino, T.; Hirohata, Y. [eds.] [eds.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the viewgraphs from the proceedings of US/Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices. Some of the general topics covered by this report are: PFC/PSI in tokamak and helical devices; development of high heat flux components; PSIS and plasma facing materials;tritium; and material damage.

  16. Control of interface fracture in silicon nitride ceramics: influence of different rare earth elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, E.Y.; Becher, P.F.; Waters, S.B.; Hsueh, Chun-Hway; Plucknett, K.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hoffmann, M.J. [Karlsruhe Univ. (T.H.) (Germany). Inst. fuer Keramik im Maschinenbau

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The toughness of self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramics is improved by enhancing crack deflection and crack bridging mechanisms. Both mechanisms rely on the interfacial debonding process between the elongated {Beta}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} grains and the intergranular amorphous phases. The various sintering additives used for densification may influence the interfacial debonding process by modifying the thermal and mechanical properties of the intergranular glasses, which will result in different residual thermal expansion mismatch stresses; and the atomic bonding structure across the {Beta}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} glass interface. Earlier studies indicated that self-reinforced silicon nitrides sintered with different rare earth additives and/or different Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:AI{sub 2}0{sub 3} ratios could exhibit different fracture behavior that varied from intergranular to transgranular fracture. No studies have been conducted to investigate the influence of sintering additives on the interfacial fracture in silicon nitride ceramics. Because of the complexity of the material system and the extremely small scale, it is difficult to conduct quantitative analyses on the chemistry and stress states of the intergranular glass phases and to relate the results to the bulk properties. The influence of different sintering additives on the interfacial fracture behavior is assessed using model systems in which {Beta}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}whiskers are embedded in SIAIRE (RE: rare-earth) oxynitride glasses. By systematically varying the glass composition, the role of various rare-earth additives on interfacial fracture has been examined. Specifically, four different additives were investigated: Al{sub 2}0{sub 3}, Y{sub 2}0{sub 3}, La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3}. In addition, applying the results from the model systems, the R- curve behavior of self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramics sintered with different Y{sub 2}0{sub 3}:AI{sub 2}0{sub 3} ratios was characterized.

  17. Partitioning and Leaching Behavior of Actinides and Rare Earth Elements in a Zirconolite- Bearing Hydrothermal Vein System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Payne, Timothy E.; Hart, Kaye P.; Lumpkin, Gregory R.; McGlinn, Peter J. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, PMB 1, Menai, 2234 (Australia); Giere, Reto [Mineralogisch-Geochemisches Institut, Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet, Freiburg, D-79104 (Germany)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical extraction techniques and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the distribution and behavior of actinides and rare earth elements (REE) in hydrothermal veins at Adamello (Italy). The six samples discussed in this paper were from the phlogopite zone, which is one of the major vein zones. The samples were similar in their bulk chemical composition, mineralogy, and leaching behavior of major elements (determined by extraction with 9 M HCl). However, there were major differences in the extractability of REE and actinides. The most significant influence on the leaching characteristics appears to be the amounts of U, Th and REE incorporated in resistant host phases (zirconolite and titanite) rather than readily leached phases (such as apatite). Uranium and Th are very highly enriched in zirconolite grains. Actinides were more readily leached from samples with a higher content of U and Th, relative to the amount of zirconium. The results show that REE and actinides present in chemically resistant host minerals can be retained under aggressive leaching conditions. (authors)

  18. Trace and rare earth elemental variation in Arabian sea sediments through a transect across the oxygen minimum zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nath, B.N.; Rao, B.R.; Rao, C.M. [National Institute of Oceanography, Goa (India); Bau, M. [GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (Germany)

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have determined the calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}), organic carbon (C{sub org}), trace element, and rare earth element (REE) composition of surface sediments collected from a transect on the central western continental shelf and slope of India in the Eastern Arabian Sea. The transect samples across the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) allows us to compare the relative abundances of trace elements and REEs in the sediments beneath and beyond the OMZ. Shale-normalized REE patterns, La{sub n}/Yb{sub n} ratios, and Eu/Eu* anamolies indicate that the sediments in the study area are either derived from the adjoining Archaean land masses or from distal Indus source. Sediment deposited in the OMZ have high U values from 3.6 to 8.1 ppm, with their U{sub excess} (of that can be supplied by continental particles) values ranging between 82-91% of the total U, indicating that the U may be precipitated as U{sup +4} in the reducing conditions of OMZ. Sediments deposited beneath the intense OMZ (<0.2 mL/L) and away from the OMZ (1-2 mL/L) show slight negative Ce anomalies, with no significant differences between these two sets of sediments. The Ce/Ce*{sub shale} values are poorly related to U and C{sub org} which are indicators of suboxic bottom waters. Normative calculations suggest that two sources, namely, terrestrial and seawater (terrestrial > seawater) contribute to the total Ce anomaly of the sediments. The Ce anomaly values of the calculated seawater derived component are similar to the anomalies reported for other coastal waters and the oxygenated surface waters of the Arabian Sea and do not show any correspondence to the lowered redox state of the overlying water, probably due to the redirection of dissolved Ce into the oxic deeper water. 103 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. PROJECT SUMMARY Many metals, such as the rare earth elements, Nb, Ta, Ge, In, Ga...are finding new applications both

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canet, Léonie

    PROJECT SUMMARY Many metals, such as the rare earth elements, Nb, Ta, Ge, In, Ga...are finding new years ago access to natural metal resources, which were both abundant and easily accessible, caused of geologic context, metal concentration in rocks, separation and concentration techniques, and recycling

  20. Thulium anomalies and rare earth element patterns in meteorites and Earth: Nebular fractionation and the nugget effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dauphas, N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study reports the bulk rare earth element (REEs, La-Lu) compositions of 41 chondrites, including 32 falls and 9 finds from carbonaceous (CI, CM, CO and CV), enstatite (EH and EL) and ordinary (H, L and LL) groups, as well as 2 enstatite achondrites (aubrite). The CI-chondrite-normalized REE patterns and Eu anomalies in ordinary and enstatite chondrites show more scatter in more metamorphosed than in unequilibrated chondrites. This is due to parent-body redistribution of the REEs in various carrier phases during metamorphism. The dispersion in REE patterns of equilibrated ordinary chondrites is explained by the nugget effect associated with concentration of REEs in minor phosphate grains. Terrestrial rocks and samples from ordinary and enstatite chondrites display negative Tm anomalies of ~-4.5 % relative to ca chondrites. In contrast, CM, CO and CV (except Allende) show no significant Tm anomalies. Allende CV chondrite shows large excess Tm (~+10 %). These anomalies are similar to those found in group II...

  1. (Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2008. All

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    12-31-08 Thorium ores and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2008. All yttrium and compounds containing by weight >19% to rare-earth compounds, including

  2. Am phases in the matrix of a U-Pu-Zr alloy with Np, Am, and rare-earth elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dawn E Janney; J. Rory Kennedy; James W. Madden; Thomas P. O'Holleran

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phases and microstructures in the matrix of an as-cast U-Pu-Zr alloy with 3 wt% Am, 2% Np, and 8% rare-earth elements were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The matrix consists primarily of two phases, both of which contain Am: ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am) (~70 at% U, 5% Np, 14% Pu, 1% Am, and 10% Zr) and ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2 (~25% U, 2% Np, 10-15% Pu, 1-2% Am, and 55-60 at% Zr). These phases are similar to those in U-Pu-Zr alloys, although the Zr content in ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am) is higher than that in ?-(U, Pu) and the Zr content in ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2 is lower than that in ?-UZr2. Nanocrystalline actinide oxides with structures similar to UO2 occurred in some areas, but may have formed by reactions with the atmosphere during sample handling. Planar features consisting of a central zone of ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am) bracketed by zones of ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2 bound irregular polygons ranging in size from a few micrometers to a few tens of micrometers across. The rest of the matrix consists of elongated domains of ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am) and ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2. Each of these domains is a few tens of nanometers across and a few hundred nanometers long. The domains display strong preferred orientations involving areas a few hundred nanometers to a few micrometers across.

  3. Thorium, uranium and rare earth elements content in lanthanide concentrate (LC) and water leach purification (WLP) residue of Lynas advanced materials plant (LAMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AL-Areqi, Wadeeah M., E-mail: walareqi@yahoo.com; Majid, Amran Ab., E-mail: walareqi@yahoo.com; Sarmani, Sukiman, E-mail: walareqi@yahoo.com [Nuclear Science Programme, School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi (Malaysia)

    2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Lynas Advanced Materials Plant (LAMP) has been licensed to produce the rare earths elements since early 2013 in Malaysia. LAMP processes lanthanide concentrate (LC) to extract rare earth elements and subsequently produce large volumes of water leach purification (WLP) residue containing naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). This residue has been rising up the environmental issue because it was suspected to accumulate thorium with significant activity concentration and has been classified as radioactive residue. The aim of this study is to determine Th-232, U-238 and rare earth elements in lanthanide concentrate (LC) and water leach purification (WLP) residue collected from LAMP and to evaluate the potential radiological impacts of the WLP residue on the environment. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis and ?-spectrometry were used for determination of Th, U and rare earth elements concentrations. The results of this study found that the concentration of Th in LC was 1289.7 ± 129 ppm (5274.9 ± 527.6Bq/kg) whereas the Th and U concentrations in WLP were determined to be 1952.9±17.6 ppm (7987.4 ± 71.9 Bq/kg) and 17.2 ± 2.4 ppm respectively. The concentrations of Th and U in LC and WLP samples determined by ?- spectrometry were 1156 ppm (4728 ± 22 Bq/kg) and 18.8 ppm and 1763.2 ppm (7211.4 Bq/kg) and 29.97 ppm respectively. This study showed that thorium concentrations were higher in WLP compare to LC. This study also indicate that WLP residue has high radioactivity of {sup 232}Th compared to Malaysian soil natural background (63 - 110 Bq/kg) and come under preview of Act 304 and regulations. In LC, the Ce and Nd concentrations determined by INAA were 13.2 ± 0.6% and 4.7 ± 0.1% respectively whereas the concentrations of La, Ce, Nd and Sm in WLP were 0.36 ± 0.04%, 1.6%, 0.22% and 0.06% respectively. This result showed that some amount of rare earth had not been extracted and remained in the WLP and may be considered to be reextracted.

  4. RARE-EARTH METALS--1997 61.1 RARE-EARTH METALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RARE-EARTH METALS--1997 61.1 RARE-EARTH METALS By James B. Hedrick The rare earths are a relatively million, to thulium and lutetium, the least abundant rare-earth elements at about 0.5 parts per million. Scandium, atomic number 21, is the lightest rare-earth element. It is the 31st most abundant element

  5. RARE EARTHS--2003 60.1 RARE EARTHS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . U.S. imports of cerium compounds and rare-earth metals and alloys decreased (table 5). YttriumRARE EARTHS--2003 60.1 RARE EARTHS By James B. Hedrick Domestic survey data and tables were, geographic information specialist. The rare earths are a moderately abundant group of 17 elements comprising

  6. The addition of a US Rare Earth Element (REE) supply-demand model improves the characterization and scope of the United States Department of Energy's effort to forecast US REE Supply and Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mancco, Richard

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the development of a new US Rare Earth Element (REE) Supply-Demand Model for the explicit forecast of US REE supply and demand in the 2010 to 2025 time period. In the 2010 Department of Energy (DOE) ...

  7. Information basis for developing comprehensive waste management system-US-Japan joint nuclear energy action plan waste management working group phase I report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nutt, M.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The activity of Phase I of the Waste Management Working Group under the United States - Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan started in 2007. The US-Japan JNEAP is a bilateral collaborative framework to support the global implementation of safe, secure, and sustainable, nuclear fuel cycles (referred to in this document as fuel cycles). The Waste Management Working Group was established by strong interest of both parties, which arise from the recognition that development and optimization of waste management and disposal system(s) are central issues of the present and future nuclear fuel cycles. This report summarizes the activity of the Waste Management Working Group that focused on consolidation of the existing technical basis between the U.S. and Japan and the joint development of a plan for future collaborative activities. Firstly, the political/regulatory frameworks related to nuclear fuel cycles in both countries were reviewed. The various advanced fuel cycle scenarios that have been considered in both countries were then surveyed and summarized. The working group established the working reference scenario for the future cooperative activity that corresponds to a fuel cycle scenario being considered both in Japan and the U.S. This working scenario involves transitioning from a once-through fuel cycle utilizing light water reactors to a one-pass uranium-plutonium fuel recycle in light water reactors to a combination of light water reactors and fast reactors with plutonium, uranium, and minor actinide recycle, ultimately concluding with multiple recycle passes primarily using fast reactors. Considering the scenario, current and future expected waste streams, treatment and inventory were discussed, and the relevant information was summarized. Second, the waste management/disposal system optimization was discussed. Repository system concepts were reviewed, repository design concepts for the various classifications of nuclear waste were summarized, and the factors to consider in repository design and optimization were then discussed. Japan is considering various alternatives and options for the geologic disposal facility and the framework for future analysis of repository concepts was discussed. Regarding the advanced waste and storage form development, waste form technologies developed in both countries were surveyed and compared. Potential collaboration areas and activities were next identified. Disposal system optimization processes and techniques were reviewed, and factors to consider in future repository design optimization activities were also discussed. Then the potential collaboration areas and activities related to the optimization problem were extracted.

  8. A rare opportunity beckons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gschneidner, K

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a great deal of uncertainty for the future of rare-earth production. Rare-earths are a collection of 17 chemical elements in the periodic table, which include scandium and yttrium as well as the 15 lanthanides, such as dysprosium and ytterbium. China has a stranglehold on today's rare-earth market, which was worth about $3bn in 2010, with the country accounting for about 95% of worldwide production. Yet China's future actions can only be guessed at best. In September it halted shipments of rare-earth elements to Japan over a diplomatic spat concerning the detention of a Chinese trawler captain. Although the ban was later lifted, the episode raised concerns around the world about China's rare-earth monopoly and its use in diplomacy. China has already warned that it will not export any rare-earth material in the coming years as it expects its own consumption of rare-earth metals to increase. The country has introduced export taxes as well as production and export quotas, and also refused to grant any new rare-earth mining licences. Furthermore, because its reserves are limited and China's internal markets are growing so rapidly, the country has suggested it will no longer export products that require rare-earth elements, especially those that need heavy rare-earth elements, such as terbium and dysprosium. China's actions have led to huge rises in the cost of rare-earth materials and products. Dysprosium oxide, for example, has shot up from $36 per kilogram in 2005 to a massive $305 per kilogram by late last year. This could have a huge impact on much of today's electronics industry, given that rare-earth elements are ubiquitous in electric motors, computers, batteries, liquid-crystal displays (LCDs) and mobile phones. Neodymium-iron-boron permanent magnets, for example, are used as computer spindle drives. The question is: what can be done to ensure that China's dominance of the rare-earth industry does not affect the military and energy security of the US and other nations? Rare-earth elements are relatively plentiful in the Earth's crust but they are widely dispersed, which makes mining them economically nonviable. The rare-earth industry first took off in the early 1960s with the discovery of the intense red luminescence of europium when excited by electrons. This was quickly utilized by TV manufacturers in the US, which used the material to produce the colour red. Indeed, many of the rare-earth applications arise because each element is unique and so certain elements exhibit behaviours that match a particular application, such as neodymium for lasers and magnets or europium and terbium for the red and green colours in TVs. In the 1960s annual production of rare-earth elements was about 2000 tonnes, with the US company Molycorp supplying 50% of the rare-earth oxides from the Mountain Pass mine in California. This monopoly was broken in the early 1990s when China first began to export separated rare-earth oxides and metals. By the late 1990s China was moving up the supply chain to higher-value products such as magnets and phosphors. Since the turn of the century it has supplied finished products including computers, LCDs and mobile phones. Production of rare-earth elements, which has been increasing by about 10% every year since the 1960s, reached 97,000 tonnes by 2009. Fortunately, new deposits of rare-earths are being discovered all over the world, which means that China now accounts for about 30% of worldwide deposits, rather than 70% as widely thought in the 1980s. But to take advantage of this and break the monopoly, governments outside China need to open new rare-earth deposits, especially those with high concentrations of the heavier rare-earth elements. They also need to expand and open new manufacturing facilities for products that need rare-earths, as well as train scientists to replace the intellectual capital lost during the last 20-30 years because of the Chinese monopoly. The bottom line is that to reduce the rest of the world's dependence on China for a sufficient and continuous supply of rare-ear

  9. Phase stable rare earth garnets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Cherepy, Nerine J.; Roberts, Jeffery J.; Payne, Stephen A.

    2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A transparent ceramic according to one embodiment includes a rare earth garnet comprising A.sub.hB.sub.iC.sub.jO.sub.12, where h is 3.+-.10%, i is 2.+-.10%, and j is 3.+-.10%. A includes a rare earth element or a mixture of rare earth elements, B includes at least one of aluminum, gallium and scandium, and C includes at least one of aluminum, gallium and scandium, where A is at a dodecahedral site of the garnet, B is at an octahedral site of the garnet, and C is at a tetrahedral site of the garnet. In one embodiment, the rare earth garment has scintillation properties. A radiation detector in one embodiment includes a transparent ceramic as described above and a photo detector optically coupled to the rare earth garnet.

  10. Ecotoxicity of rare earth elements Rare earth elements (REEs) or rare earth metals is the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    electronic, optical, magnetic and catalytic applications. So far, the ecotoxicological properties. For example, gadolinium is the most commonly used con- trast agent in magnetic resonance imaging for tumour refrigeration, and new water treatment technologies both for drinking water and wastewater from mining

  11. Summary of a joint US-Japan study of potential approaches to reduce the attractiveness of various nuclear materials for use in a nuclear explosive device by a terrorist group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bathke, C.G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Inoue, N.; Kuno, Y.; Mihara, T.; Sagara, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-49 Muramatsu, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1184 (Japan); Ebbinghaus, B.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box L-168, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Murphy, J.; Dalton, D. [National Nuclear Security Administration, Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave, SW, Washington, DC 20585 (United States); Nagayama, Y. [Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, 3-2-2 Kasumigaseki, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-8959 (Japan)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the results of a joint US-Japan study to establish a mutual understanding, through scientific-based study, of potential approaches to reduce the attractiveness of various nuclear materials for use in a terrorist nuclear explosive device (NED). 4 approaches that can reduce materials attractiveness with a very high degree of effectiveness are: -) diluting HEU with natural or depleted U to an enrichment of less than 10% U-235; -) storing Pu in nuclear fuel that is not man portable and with a dose rate greater or equal to 10 Gy/h at 1 m; -) storing Pu or HEU in heavy items, i.e. not transportable, provided the removal of the Pu or HEU from the item requires a purification/processing capability; and -) converting Pu and HEU to very dilute forms (such as wastes) that, without any security barriers, would require very long acquisition times to acquire a Category I quantity of Pu or of HEU. 2 approaches that can reduce materials attractiveness with a high degree of effectiveness are: -) converting HEU-fueled research reactors into LEU-fueled research reactors or dilute HEU with natural or depleted U to an enrichment of less than 20% U-235; -) converting U/Al reactor fuel into U/Si reactor fuel. Other approaches have been assessed as moderately or totally inefficient to reduce the attractiveness of nuclear materials.

  12. Production method for making rare earth compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCallum, R. William (Ames, IA); Ellis, Timothy W. (Ames, IA); Dennis, Kevin W. (Ames, IA); Hofer, Robert J. (Ames, IA); Branagan, Daniel J. (Ames, IA)

    1997-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making a rare earth compound, such as a earth-transition metal permanent magnet compound, without the need for producing rare earth metal as a process step, comprises carbothermically reacting a rare earth oxide to form a rare earth carbide and heating the rare earth carbide, a compound-forming reactant (e.g. a transition metal and optional boron), and a carbide-forming element (e.g. a refractory metal) that forms a carbide that is more thermodynamically favorable than the rare earth carbide whereby the rare earth compound (e.g. Nd.sub.2 Fe.sub.14 B or LaNi.sub.5) and a carbide of the carbide-forming element are formed.

  13. Production method for making rare earth compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCallum, R.W.; Ellis, T.W.; Dennis, K.W.; Hofer, R.J.; Branagan, D.J.

    1997-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making a rare earth compound, such as a earth-transition metal permanent magnet compound, without the need for producing rare earth metal as a process step, comprises carbothermically reacting a rare earth oxide to form a rare earth carbide and heating the rare earth carbide, a compound-forming reactant (e.g., a transition metal and optional boron), and a carbide-forming element (e.g., a refractory metal) that forms a carbide that is more thermodynamically favorable than the rare earth carbide whereby the rare earth compound (e.g., Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B or LaNi{sub 5}) and a carbide of the carbide-forming element are formed.

  14. Microwave Plasma Monitoring System For Real-Time Elemental Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    air for the presence of minor amounts of elements, particularly transition metals, rare earth elements, actinides, and alkali and alkaline earth elements. The invention...

  15. Ternary rare earth-lanthanide sulfides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Takeshita, Takuo (Omiya, JP); Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A. (Ames, IA); Beaudry, Bernard J. (Ames, IA)

    1987-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A new ternary rare earth sulfur compound having the formula: La.sub.3-x M.sub.x S.sub.4 where M is a rare earth element selected from the group europium, samarium and ytterbium and x=0.15 to 0.8. The compound has good high-temperature thermoelectric properties and exhibits long-term structural stability up to 1000.degree. C.

  16. STRONG RARE EARTH COBALT QUADRUPOLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halbach, K.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ^3 LBL-8906 STRONG RARE EARTH COBALT QUADRUPOLES tfl Klausowned righu. STRONG RARE EARTH COBALT QUADRUPOLES Klausof i new family of strong Rare Earth Cobalt quadrupoles are

  17. Synthesis and luminescence properties of rare earth activated phosphors for near UV-emitting LEDs for efficacious generation of white light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Jinkyu

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mn 2+ and some of rare earth metals showing 4f-5d transitionare typically transition metal or rare earth elements. The

  18. Rare earth thermoelectrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahan, G.D.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review is presented of the thermoelectric properties of rare earth compounds: A discussion is presented of the prospects for future improvements in the figure of merit.

  19. Rare muon processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, M.D.; The MEGA Collaboration

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The status of rare muon processes as tests of the standard model is reviewed with the emphasis on results that are expected from experiments in the near future.

  20. Rare muon processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, M.D.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The status of rare muon processes as tests of the standard model is reviewed with the emphasis on results that are expected from experiments in the near future.

  1. About Rare Earth Metals | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Rare Earth Metals What Are Rare Earths? Ames Laboratory's Materials Preparation Center The Ames Process for Purification of Rare Earths USGS Rare Earth Information Rare Earth...

  2. Elements & Compounds Atoms (Elements)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Terry

    #12;Elements & Compounds #12;Atoms (Elements) Molecules (Compounds) Cells Elements & Compounds #12 #12;First shell Second shell Third shell Hydrogen 1H Lithium 3Li Sodium 11Na Beryllium 4Be Magnesium energy Higher energy (a) A ball bouncing down a flight of stairs provides an analogy for energy levels

  3. Synthesis and characterization of monodisperse spherical SiO{sub 2}-RE{sub 2}O{sub 3} (RE=rare earth elements) and SiO{sub 2}-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Ln{sup 3+} (Ln=Eu, Tb, Dy, Sm, Er, Ho) particles with core-shell structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, H.; Yang, J.; Zhang, C.M. [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Lin, J., E-mail: jlin@ciac.jl.c [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China)

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Spherical SiO{sub 2} particles have been coated with rare earth oxide layers by a Pechini sol-gel process, leading to the formation of core-shell structured SiO{sub 2}-RE{sub 2}O{sub 3} (RE=rare earth elements) and SiO{sub 2}-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Ln{sup 3+} (Ln=Eu, Tb, Dy, Sm, Er, Ho) particles. X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), photoluminescence (PL), and cathodoluminescence spectra as well as lifetimes were used to characterize the resulting SiO{sub 2}-RE{sub 2}O{sub 3} (RE=rare earth elements) and SiO{sub 2}-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Ln{sup 3+} (Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+}, Sm{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+}, Ho{sup 3+}) samples. The obtained core-shell phosphors have perfect spherical shape with narrow size distribution (average size ca. 380 nm), smooth surface and non-agglomeration. The thickness of shells could be easily controlled by changing the number of deposition cycles (40 nm for two deposition cycles). Under the excitation of ultraviolet, the Ln{sup 3+} ion mainly shows its characteristic emissions in the core-shell particles from Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Ln{sup 3+} (Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}, Sm{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+}, Ho{sup 3+}) shells. - Graphical abstract: The advantages of core-shell phosphors are the easy availability of homogeneous spherical morphology in different size, and its corresponding luminescence color can change from red, yellow to green.

  4. The Search for Heavy Elements

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1994 documentary "The Search for Heavy Elements" chronicles the expansion of the periodic table through the creation at Berkeley Lab of elements heavier than uranium. The documentary features a mix of rarely-seen archival footage, historical photos, and interviews with scientists who made history, such as Glenn Seaborg and Albert Ghiorso.

  5. RARE EARTHS--2002 61.1 RARE EARTHS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of rare earths are iron gray to silvery lustrous metals that are typically soft, malleable, ductile decreased as imports of rare-earth alloys, compounds, and metals declined. Production of bastnäsiteRARE EARTHS--2002 61.1 RARE EARTHS By James B. Hedrick Domestic survey data and tables were

  6. ANALYSIS OF THE ELECTRON EXCITATION SPECTRA IN HEAVY RARE EARTH METALS, HYDRIDES AND OXIDES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    397 ANALYSIS OF THE ELECTRON EXCITATION SPECTRA IN HEAVY RARE EARTH METALS, HYDRIDES AND OXIDES C thin evaporated foils of heavy rare earths (Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu) in three different chemical of high energy incident electrons (75 keV) transmitted through thin foils of yttric rare earth elements

  7. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Unknown Exploration Basis The goal of this project was to create a database of rare earth elements found in exploration for geothermal resources. Notes Geothermal fluids from...

  8. Yttrium and rare earth stabilized fast reactor metal fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guon, Jerold (Woodland Hills, CA); Grantham, LeRoy F. (Calabasas, CA); Specht, Eugene R. (Simi Valley, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To increase the operating temperature of a reactor, the melting point and mechanical properties of the fuel must be increased. For an actinide-rich fuel, yttrium, lanthanum and/or rare earth elements can be added, as stabilizers, to uranium and plutonium and/or a mixture of other actinides to raise the melting point of the fuel and improve its mechanical properties. Since only about 1% of the actinide fuel may be yttrium, lanthanum, or a rare earth element, the neutron penalty is low, the reactor core size can be reduced, the fuel can be burned efficiently, reprocessing requirements are reduced, and the nuclear waste disposal volumes reduced. A further advantage occurs when yttrium, lanthanum, and/or other rare earth elements are exposed to radiation in a reactor, they produce only short half life radioisotopes, which reduce nuclear waste disposal problems through much shorter assured-isolation requirements.

  9. Ames Lab 101: Rare Earths

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gschneidner, Karl

    2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    "Mr. Rare Earth," Ames Laboratory scientist Karl Gschneidner Jr., explains the importance of rare-earth materials in many of the technologies we use today -- ranging from computers to hybrid cars to wind turbines. Gschneidner is a world renowned rare-earths expert at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory.

  10. Ames Lab 101: Rare Earths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gschneidner, Karl

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    "Mr. Rare Earth," Ames Laboratory scientist Karl Gschneidner Jr., explains the importance of rare-earth materials in many of the technologies we use today -- ranging from computers to hybrid cars to wind turbines. Gschneidner is a world renowned rare-earths expert at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory.

  11. US & Japan TG 4 Activities of QA Forum

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    have helped us i.e. SHARP, Onamba, Nihon Inter Electronics, Sanken Electronic and SOMA Optics. J---TG4 52 Task---4 R egion U S Posters Task---4 R egion U S * By---pass d iodes g...

  12. US-Japan Clean Energy Cooperation | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian Nuclear Warheads into Fuel forShale_Gas.pdfUS-EU-Japan Working

  13. Microsoft Word - US_Japan_REE_agenda_ver7.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions forCheneyNovemberi CONTENTSSTATEMENT OF DAVID14, 2007 1 TEC2

  14. Rare B Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, P.D.; /Victoria U.

    2006-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent results from Belle and BaBar on rare B decays involving flavor-changing neutral currents or purely leptonic final states are presented. Measurements of the CP asymmetries in B {yields} K*{gamma} and b {yields} s{gamma} are reported. Also reported are updated limits on B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}, B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}, B{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu} and the recent measurement of B {yields} X{sub s}{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}.

  15. Mixed Conduction in Rare-Earth Phosphates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Hannah Leung

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conduction  in  Rare-­Earth  Phosphates   by   Hannah  Conduction  in  Rare-­?Earth  Phosphates   by   Hannah  conduction  in  rare  earth  phosphates.  Specifically,  

  16. Replacing the Rare Earth Intellectual Capital

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gschneidner, Jr., Karl

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rare earth crisis slowly evolved during a 10 to 15 year period beginning in the mid-1980s, when the Chinese began to export mixed rare earth concentrates. In the early 1990s, they started to move up the supply chain and began to export the individual rare earth oxides and metals. By the late 1990s the Chinese exported higher value products, such as magnets, phosphors, polishing compounds, catalysts; and in the 21st century they supplied finished products including electric motors, computers, batteries, liquid-crystal displays (LCDs), TVs and monitors, mobile phones, iPods and compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) light bulbs. As they moved to higher value products, the Chinese slowly drove the various industrial producers and commercial enterprises in the US, Europe and Japan out of business by manipulating the rare earth commodity prices. Because of this, the technically trained rare earth engineers and scientists who worked in areas from mining to separations, to processing to production, to manufacturing of semifinished and final products, were laid-off and moved to other fields or they retired. However, in the past year the Chinese have changed their philosophy of the 1970s and 1980s of forming a rare earth cartel to control the rare earth markets to one in which they will no longer supply the rest of the world (ROW) with their precious rare earths, but instead will use them internally to meet the growing demand as the Chinese standard of living increases. To this end, they have implemented and occasionally increased export restrictions and added an export tariff on many of the high demand rare earth elements. Now the ROW is quickly trying to start up rare earth mines, e.g. Molycorp Minerals in the US and Lynas Corp. in Australia, to cover this shortfall in the worldwide market, but it will take about five years for the supply to meet the demand, even as other mines in the ROW become productive. Unfortunately, today there is a serious lack of technically trained personnel to bring the entire rare earth industry, from mining to original equipment manufacturers (OEM), up to full speed in the next few years. Accompanying this decline in technical expertise, innovation and new products utilizing rare earth elements has slowed dramatically, and it may take a decade or more to recapture America's leading role in technological advancements of rare earth containing products. Before the disruption of the US rare earth industry, about 25,000 people were employed in all aspects of the industry from mining to OEM. Today, only about 1,500 people are employed in these fields. The ratio of non-technically trained persons to those with college degrees in the sciences or engineering varies from about 8 to 1 to about 4 to 1, depending on the particular area of the industry. Assuming an average of 6 to 1, the number of college degree scientists and engineers has decreased from about 4,000 to 250 employed today. In the magnetic industry the approximate numbers are: 6,000 total with 750 technically trained people in the 1980s to 500 totally employed today of which 75 have degrees. The paucity of scientists and engineers with experience and/or training in the various aspects of production and commercialization of the rare earths is a serious limitation to the ability of the US to satisfy its own needs for materials and technologies (1) to maintain our military strength and posture, (2) to assume leadership in critical energy technologies, and (3) to bring new consumer products to the marketplace. The lack of experts is of even greater national importance than the halting in the 1990s and the recent restart of the mining/benification/separation effort in the US; and thus governmental intervention and support for at least five to 10 years will be required to ameliorate this situation. To respond quickly, training programs should be established in conjunction with a national research center at an educational institution with a long tradition in multiple areas of rare earth and other critical elements research and technology. This center should

  17. MATERIALS WORLD January 201216 Dr Steve Barrett from the University of Liverpool, UK, has been studying rare earth metals for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Steve D.

    studying rare earth metals for 20 years. Here he explains how preparation of the surface layer is crucial to the functionality of these scarce elements. S tudies into the properties of rare earth metals have been active since of the geometric and electronic structure of single crystal rare earth metal surfaces were published. Studies

  18. Behavior Of Rare Earth Element In Geothermal Systems, A New

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon, France:Barstow,Bayport

  19. Behavior of Rare Earth Elements in Geothermal Systems- A New

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon, France:Barstow,BayportExploration/Exploitation Tool? |

  20. CMI Webinar: Recycling of Rare Earth Elements: A Microbiological Approach |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess Stories Siteandscience, and8Critical Materials Institute

  1. Rare Isotopes in Cosmic Explosions and Accelerators on Earth

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hendrik Schatz

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Rare isotopes are nature?s stepping stones to produce the heavy elements, and they are produced in large quantities in stellar explosions. Despite their fleeting existence, they shape the composition of the universe and the observable features of stellar explosions. The challenge for nuclear science is to produce and study the very same rare isotopes so as to understand the origin of the elements and a range of astronomical observations. I will review the progress that has been made to date in astronomy and nuclear physics, and the prospects of finally addressing many of the outstanding issues with the future Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), which DOE will build at Michigan State University.

  2. Neutrinos, Rare Isotopes of Exotic Nuclei and Nuclear Astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B. Balantekin

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The connection between neutrino physics, nucleosynthesis of elements in astrophysical sites, laboratory measurements with rare exotic nuclei and astronomical observations is discussed. The key role played by neutrinos is emphasized and the close connection between neutrino physics and nucleosynthesis is highlighted.

  3. Semiconductor sensor for optically measuring polarization rotation of optical wavefronts using rare earth iron garnets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duncan, Paul G. (8544 Electric Ave., Vienna, VA 22182)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Described are the design of a rare earth iron garnet sensor element, optical methods of interrogating the sensor element, methods of coupling the optical sensor element to a waveguide, and an optical and electrical processing system for monitoring the polarization rotation of a linearly polarized wavefront undergoing external modulation due to magnetic field or electrical current fluctuation. The sensor element uses the Faraday effect, an intrinsic property of certain rare-earth iron garnet materials, to rotate the polarization state of light in the presence of a magnetic field. The sensor element may be coated with a thin-film mirror to effectively double the optical path length, providing twice the sensitivity for a given field strength or temperature change. A semiconductor sensor system using a rare earth iron garnet sensor element is described.

  4. Synthesis, Computations and Characterizations of Low Dimensional Rare-Earth Compounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chun-Yu

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Reduced rare-earth (Ln, lanthanide elements) compounds with low-dimensional Ln-Ln-bonded structures are promising candidates for magnetic materials because Ln-Ln-bonded molecules and solids have delocalized 5d electrons that make strong magnetic...

  5. Rare earth oxide fluoride nanoparticles and hydrothermal method for forming nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fulton, John L. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Hoffmann, Markus M. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA

    2001-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydrothermal method for forming nanoparticles of a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine has been discovered. Nanoparticles comprising a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine are also described. These nanoparticles can exhibit excellent refractory properties as well as remarkable stability in hydrothermal conditions. The nanoparticles can exhibit excellent properties for numerous applications including fiber reinforcement of ceramic composites, catalyst supports, and corrosion resistant coatings for high-temperature aqueous solutions.

  6. Rare Earth Oxide Fluoride Nanoparticles And Hydrothermal Method For Forming Nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fulton, John L. (Richland, WA); Hoffmann, Markus M. (Richland, WA)

    2003-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydrothermal method for forming nanoparticles of a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine has been discovered. Nanoparticles comprising a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine are also described. These nanoparticles can exhibit excellent refractory properties as well as remarkable stability in hydrothermal conditions. The nanoparticles can exhibit excellent properties for numerous applications including fiber reinforcement of ceramic composites, catalyst supports, and corrosion resistant coatings for high-temperature aqueous solutions.

  7. ELEMENT 98

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, S.G.; Street, K.,Jr.; Ghiorso, A.; Seaborg, G.T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    W-7405-eng-48 Element 98 S. G. Thompson, K. Street, Jr. , A.3 ELliMENT 98 So Go Thompson, K. street, Jr. , A. Ghiorso

  8. Process to separate transuranic elements from nuclear waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Terry R. (Wheaton, IL); Ackerman, John P. (Downers Grove, IL); Tomczuk, Zygmunt (Orland Park, IL); Fischer, Donald F. (Glen Ellyn, IL)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing transuranic elements from a waste chloride electrolytic salt containing transuranic elements in addition to rare earth and other fission product elements so the salt waste may be disposed of more easily and the valuable transuranic elements may be recovered for reuse. The salt is contacted with a cadmium-uranium alloy which selectively extracts the transuranic elements from the salt. The waste salt is generated during the reprocessing of nuclear fuel associated with the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR).

  9. Rare Earth ? See Rare Earth, by Ward and Brownlee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Frederick M.

    Rare Earth ? See Rare Earth, by Ward and Brownlee #12;N to date N = N* fs fGHZfp nH fl fi fc L/T ·N Earth is "Just Right" Yes, life on Earth has adapted to Earth, but ... Earth has just the right mass to be ·Tectonically-active ·Retain an atmosphere Earth has had a stable climate The Sun is particularly inactive

  10. Rare Earth-Bearing Murataite Ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefanovsky, Sergey; Stefanovsky, Olga [SIA Radon, Moscow, 119121 (Russian Federation); Yudintsev, Sergey; Nikonov, Boris [IGEM RAS, Moscow, 119017 (Russian Federation)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase composition of the murataite-based ceramics containing 10 wt.% lanthanum, cerium, neodymium, europium, gadolinium, yttrium, zirconium oxides was studied. The ceramics were prepared by melting of oxide mixtures in 20 mL glass-carbon crucibles in air at {approx}1500 deg. C. They are composed of predominant murataite-type phases and minor extra phases: rutile, crichtonite, perovskite, ilmenite/pyrophanite, and zirconolite (in the Zr-bearing sample only). Three murataite-related phases with five- (5C), eight- (8C), and three-fold (3C) elementary fluorite unit cell are normally present in all the ceramics. These phases form core, intermediate zone, and rim of the murataite grains, respectively. They are predominant host phases for the rare earth elements whose concentrations are reduced in a row: 5C>8C>3C. Appreciate fraction of La and Ce may enter the perovskite phase. (authors)

  11. Rare earth doped zinc oxide varistors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McMillan, A.D.; Modine, F.A.; Lauf, R.J.; Alim, M.A.; Mahan, G.D.; Bartkowiak, M.

    1998-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A varistor includes a Bi-free, essentially homogeneous sintered body of a ceramic composition including, expressed as nominal weight %, 0.2--4.0% oxide of at least one rare earth element, 0.5--4.0% Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}, 0.05--0.4% K{sub 2}O, 0.05--0.2% Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--0.2% CaO, 0.00005--0.01% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--2% MnO, 0--0.05% MgO, 0--0.5% TiO{sub 3}, 0--0.2% SnO{sub 2}, 0--0.02% B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, balance ZnO. 4 figs.

  12. Rare earth doped zinc oxide varistors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McMillan, April D. (Knoxville, TN); Modine, Frank A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Alim, Mohammad A. (Medina, OH); Mahan, Gerald D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bartkowiak, Miroslaw (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A varistor includes a Bi-free, essentially homogeneous sintered body of a ceramic composition including, expressed as nominal weight %, 0.2-4.0% oxide of at least one rare earth element, 0.5-4.0% Co.sub.3 O.sub.4, 0.05-0.4% K.sub.2 O, 0.05-0.2% Cr.sub.2 O.sub.3, 0-0.2% CaO, 0.00005-0.01% Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, 0-2% MnO, 0-0.05% MgO, 0-0.5% TiO.sub.3, 0-0.2% SnO.sub.2, 0-0.02% B.sub.2 O.sub.3, balance ZnO.

  13. Laminated rare earth structure and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Senor, David J [West Richland, WA; Johnson, Roger N [Richland, WA; Reid, Bruce D [Pasco, WA; Larson, Sandra [Richland, WA

    2002-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A laminated structure having two or more layers, wherein at least one layer is a metal substrate and at least one other layer is a coating comprising at least one rare earth element. For structures having more than two layers, the coating and metal substrate layers alternate. In one embodiment of the invention, the structure is a two-layer laminate having a rare earth coating electrospark deposited onto a metal substrate. In another embodiment of the invention, the structure is a three-layer laminate having the rare earth coating electrospark deposited onto a first metal substrate and the coating subsequently abonded to a second metal substrate. The bonding of the coating to the second metal substrate may be accomplished by hot pressing, hot rolling, high deformation rate processing, or combinations thereof. The laminated structure may be used in nuclear components where reactivity control or neutron absorption is desired and in non-nuclear applications such as magnetic and superconducting films.

  14. Potential synergy: the thorium fuel cycle and rare earths processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ault, T.; Wymer, R.; Croff, A.; Krahn, S. [Vanderbilt University: 2301 Vanderbilt Place/PMB 351831, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of thorium in nuclear power programs has been evaluated on a recurring basis. A concern often raised is the lack of 'thorium infrastructure'; however, for at least a part of a potential thorium fuel cycle, this may less of a problem than previously thought. Thorium is frequently encountered in association with rare earth elements and, since the U.S. last systematically evaluated the large-scale use of thorium (the 1970's,) the use of rare earth elements has increased ten-fold to approximately 200,000 metric tons per year. Integration of thorium extraction with rare earth processing has been previously described and top-level estimates have been done on thorium resource availability; however, since ores and mining operations differ markedly, what is needed is process flowsheet analysis to determine whether a specific mining operation can feasibly produce thorium as a by-product. Also, the collocation of thorium with rare earths means that, even if a thorium product stream is not developed, its presence in mining waste streams needs to be addressed and there are previous instances where this has caused issues. This study analyzes several operational mines, estimates the mines' ability to produce a thorium by-product stream, and discusses some waste management implications of recovering thorium. (authors)

  15. RARE EARTHS--2001 61.1 RARE EARTHS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    mined in Brazil, India, Russia, and the United States. Demand decreased for rare earths used), neodymium (Nd), promethium (Pm), samarium (Sm), europium (Eu), gadolinium (Gd), terbium (Tb), dysprosium (Dy of the group at 60 ppm, followed, in decreasing order, by yttrium at 33 ppm, lanthanum at 30 ppm, and neodymium

  16. RARE EARTHS--2000 62.1 RARE EARTHS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the 1880s with the mining in Sweden and Norway of the rare-earth thorium-phosphate mineral monazite requiring only the oxides of thorium and cerium. The mantles also used small amounts of neodymium was recorded in 1893 in North Carolina; however, a small tonnage of monazite was reportedly mined as early

  17. 2006 Minerals Yearbook RARE EARTHS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    bastnäsite. Rare earths were not mined in the United States in 2006; however, the mine and plant at Mountain-earth ores were primarily mined in China, with lesser amounts coming from Brazil, India, and Russia. Domestic, cerium, praseodymium, neodymium, promethium, samarium, europium, gadolinium, terbium, dysprosium, holmium

  18. Rare decays at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrington, S.M.; /Liverpool U.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The confidence level limits of the CDF and D0 searches for the B{sub s}{sup 0}, B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}{phi} rare decays are presented.

  19. Exploration of R2XM2 (R=Sc, Y, Ti, Zr, Hf, rare earth; X=main group element; M=transition metal, Si, Ge): Structural Motifs, the novel Compound Gd2AlGe2 and Analysis of the U3Si2 and Zr3Al2 Structure Types

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sean William McWhorter

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the process of exploring and understanding the influence of crystal structure on the system of compounds with the composition Gd{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 4} several new compounds were synthesized with different crystal structures, but similar structural features. In Gd{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 4}, the main feature of interest is the magnetocaloric effect (MCE), which allows the material to be useful in magnetic refrigeration applications. The MCE is based on the magnetic interactions of the Gd atoms in the crystal structure, which varies with x (the amount of Si in the compound). The crystal structure of Gd{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 4} can be thought of as being formed from two 3{sup 2}434 nets of Gd atoms, with additional Gd atoms in the cubic voids and Si/Ge atoms in the trigonal prismatic voids. Attempts were made to substitute nonmagnetic atoms for magnetic Gd using In, Mg and Al. Gd{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} and Gd{sub 2}InGe{sub 2} both possess the same 3{sup 2}434 nets of Gd atoms as Gd{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 4}, but these nets are connected differently, forming the Mo{sub 2}FeB{sub 2} crystal structure. A search of the literature revealed that compounds with the composition R{sub 2}XM{sub 2} (R=Sc, Y, Ti, Zr, Hf, rare earth; X=main group element; M=transition metal, Si, Ge) crystallize in one of four crystal structures: the Mo{sub 2}FeB{sub 2}, Zr{sub 3}Al{sub 2}, Mn{sub 2}AlB{sub 2} and W{sub 2}CoB{sub 2} crystal structures. These crystal structures are described, and the relationships between them are highlighted. Gd{sub 2}AlGe{sub 2} forms an entirely new crystal structure, and the details of its synthesis and characterization are given. Electronic structure calculations are performed to understand the nature of bonding in this compound and how electrons can be accounted for. A series of electronic structure calculations were performed on models with the U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} and Zr{sub 3}Al{sub 2} structures, using Zr and A1 as the building blocks. The starting point for these models was the U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} structure, and models were created to simulate the transition from the idealized U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} structure to the distorted Zr{sub 3}Al{sub 2} structure. Analysis of the band structures of the models has shown that the transition from the U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} structure to the Zr{sub 3}Al{sub 2} structure lifts degeneracies along the {Lambda} {yields} Z direction, indicating a Peierls-type mechanism for the displacement occurring in the positions of the Zr atoms.

  20. Rare-Earth Surface Alloying: A New Phase for GdAu2 M. J. Verstraete,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the age, from electric cars to efficient light bulbs to very large wind turbines and future magnetic refrigeration, are made pos- sible by an unusual group of elements: the rare earths (REs). The rare earths materials very chal- lenging. The REs demonstrate varying magnetism, coordi- nation, oxidation states

  1. Programmatic Elements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Guide provides acceptable methods of meeting the requirements of DOE O 151.1C for programmatic elements that sustain the emergency management program and maintain the readiness of the program to respond to an emergency. Cancels DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 5-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 5-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 5-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 5-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 7-1, and DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 7-3.

  2. Review: Rare Plants of Washington State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Ryder W.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field Guide to the Rare Plants of Washington Pamela Camp andField Guide to the Rare Plants of Washington. Seattle, WA:State’s 3600 vascular plants, 600 mosses, and 1000-1500

  3. Constraints of mixing matrix elements in the sequential fourthgeneration model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. J. Huo

    2002-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We review our works on the sequential fourth generation model and focus on the constriants of $4\\times 4$ quark mixing matrix elements. We investigate the quark mixing matrix elements from the rare $K,B$ meson decays. We talk about the $ hierarchy$ of the $4\\times 4$ matrix and the existence of fourth generation.

  4. Imestigation ol" Maenons in Rare Earth Metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imestigation ol" Maenons in Rare Earth Metals b\\ Inelastic Neutron Scattering tL Bjerrum Moiler #12;BLANK PAGE #12;Riso Report No. 178 Investigation of Magnons in Rare Earth Metals by Inelastic NeutronN LANGF h. a. dec. #12;Contents Page PREFACE 7 I. INTRODUCTION *> 1. Magnetism of Rare Earth Metals 10 2

  5. Response Elements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Guide provides acceptable methods for meeting the requirement of DOE O 151.1C for response elements that respond or contribute to response as needed in an emergency. Cancels DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-5, and DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-6.

  6. Are Earths Rare? Perhaps Not

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumni AlumniFederal FacilityAprilAre Earths Rare? Perhaps Not Are

  7. Critical Materials and Rare Futures: Ames Laboratory Signs a...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Critical Materials and Rare Futures: Ames Laboratory Signs a New Agreement on Rare-Earth Research Critical Materials and Rare Futures: Ames Laboratory Signs a New Agreement on...

  8. Process to separate transuranic elements from nuclear waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, T.R.; Ackerman, J.P.; Tomczuk, Z.; Fischer, D.F.

    1988-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing transuranic elements from a waste chloride electrolytic salt containing transuranic elements in addition to rare earth and other fission product elements so the salt waste may be disposed of more easily and the valuable transuranic elements may be recovered for reuse. The salt is contacted with a cadmium-uranium alloy which selectively extracts the transuranic elements from the salt. The waste salt is generated during the reprocessing of nuclear fuel associated with the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). 2 figs.

  9. Process to separate transuranic elements from nuclear waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, T.R.; Ackerman, J.P.; Tomczuk, Z.; Fischer, D.F.

    1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for removing transuranic elements from a waste chloride electrolytic salt containing transuranic elements in addition to rare earth and other fission product elements so the salt waste may be disposed of more easily and the valuable transuranic elements may be recovered for reuse. The salt is contacted with a cadmium-uranium alloy which selectively extracts the transuranic elements from the salt. The waste salt is generated during the reprocessing of nuclear fuel associated with the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). 2 figs.

  10. Improved method for preparing rare earth sesquichalcogenides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Takeshita, T.; Beaudry, B.J.; Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.

    1982-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method for the preparation of high purity rare earth sesquichalcogenides is described. The rare earth, as one or more pieces of the metal, is sealed under a vacuum with a stoichiometric amount of sulfur or selenium and a small amount of iodine into a quartz reaction vessel. The sealed vessel is then heated to above the vaporization temperature of the chalcogen and below the melting temperature of the rare earth metal and maintained until the product has been formed. The iodine is then vaporized off leaving a pure product. The rare earth sulfides and selenides thus formed are useful as semiconductors and as thermoelectric generators. 3 tables.

  11. Ecotoxicit des terres rares Les terres rares sont un groupe de mtaux qui

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    'automobile pour dépolluer les gaz d'échappement constituent le principal débouché des terres rares (tout véhicules hybrides, les turbines d'éoliennes ainsi que dans le nucléaire et l'armement. Les terres rares ont

  12. Ames Lab 101: Rare-Earth Recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan Ott

    2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Recycling keeps paper, plastics, and even jeans out of landfills. Could recycling rare-earth magnets do the same? Perhaps, if the recycling process can be improved. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are working to more effectively remove the neodymium, a rare earth, from the mix of other materials in a magnet.

  13. Ames Lab 101: Rare-Earth Recycling

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ryan Ott

    2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Recycling keeps paper, plastics, and even jeans out of landfills. Could recycling rare-earth magnets do the same? Perhaps, if the recycling process can be improved. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are working to more effectively remove the neodymium, a rare earth, from the mix of other materials in a magnet.

  14. RARE EARTHS1 (Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content, unless noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imports:3 Thorium ore (monazite) -- -- -- -- 22 Rare-earth metals, alloys 271 352 235 284 406 Cerium Exports:3 Thorium ore, monazite -- -- 3 27 -- Rare-earth metals, alloys 71 44 194 329 456 Cerium compounds. Rare-earth metals, whether or not intermixed or interalloyed 2805.30.0000 5.0% ad val. 31.3% ad val

  15. Prospects for Non-Rare Earth Permanent Magnets for Traction Motors and Generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, Matthew; McCallum, Kendall; Anderson, Iver; Constantinides, Steven

    2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    With the advent of high-flux density permanent magnets based on rare earth elements such as neodymium (Nd) in the 1980s, permanent magnet-based electric machines had a clear performance and cost advantage over induction machines when weight and size were factors such as in hybrid electric vehicles and wind turbines. However, the advantages of the permanent magnet-based electric machines may be overshadowed by supply constraints and high prices of their key constituents, rare earth elements, which have seen nearly a 10-fold increase in price in the last 5 years and the imposition of export limits by the major producing country, China, since 2010. We outline the challenges, prospects, and pitfalls for several potential alloys that could replace Nd-based permanent magnets with more abundant and less strategically important elements.

  16. NdHfSrPb isotopes and trace element geochemistry of Proterozoic lamproites from southern India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basu, Asish R.

    compositions. The Krishna lamproites show nearly uniform, parallel rare earth element (REE) distribution,, Dalim K. Paul b a Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY India, a rare Proterozoic occurrence of lamproites which are usually Cretaceous or younger in age

  17. Discrete Element Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, J; Johnson, S

    2007-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Distinct Element Method (also frequently referred to as the Discrete Element Method) (DEM) is a Lagrangian numerical technique where the computational domain consists of discrete solid elements which interact via compliant contacts. This can be contrasted with Finite Element Methods where the computational domain is assumed to represent a continuum (although many modern implementations of the FEM can accommodate some Distinct Element capabilities). Often the terms Discrete Element Method and Distinct Element Method are used interchangeably in the literature, although Cundall and Hart (1992) suggested that Discrete Element Methods should be a more inclusive term covering Distinct Element Methods, Displacement Discontinuity Analysis and Modal Methods. In this work, DEM specifically refers to the Distinct Element Method, where the discrete elements interact via compliant contacts, in contrast with Displacement Discontinuity Analysis where the contacts are rigid and all compliance is taken up by the adjacent intact material.

  18. Separation of rare gases and chiral molecules by selective binding in porous organic cages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Linjiang; Reiss, Paul S.; Chong, Samantha Y.; Holden, Daniel; Jelfs, Kim E.; Hasell, Tom; Little, Marc A.; Kewley, Adam; Briggs, Michael E.; Stephenson, Andrew; Thomas, K. M.; Armstrong, Jayne A.; Bell, Jon; Busto, Jose; Noel, Raymond; Liu, Jian; Strachan, Denis M.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Cooper, Andrew I.

    2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract: The rare gases krypton, xenon, and radon pose both an economic opportunity and a potential environmental hazard. Xenon is used in commercial lighting, medical imaging, and anesthesia, and can sell for $5,000 per kilogram. Radon, by contrast, Is naturally radioactive and the second largest cause of lung cancer, and radioactive xenon, 133Xe, was a major pollutant released In the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster. We describe an organic cage molecule that can capture xenon and radon with unprecedented selectivity, suggesting new technologies for environmental monitoring, removal of pollutants, or the recovery of rare, valuable elements from air.

  19. Ames Lab 101: Rare-Earth Magnets

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McCallum, Bill

    2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Senior Scientist, Bill McCallum, briefly discusses rare-earth magnets and their uses and how Ames Lab is research new ways to save money and energy using magnets.

  20. The BNL rare kaon decay program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Littenberg, L.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The rare kaon decay program at Brookhaven National Laboratory is reviewed. Results from the last round of experiments are briefly discussed. The three experiments currently collecting data are described. Prospects for future experiments are discussed.

  1. RARE EARTHS By James B. Hedrick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at its separation Domestic mine production of rare earths Uruguay Round of Multilateral Trade plant at Mountain Pass, CA. Rhône-Poulenc increased in 1994. The domestic economy Negotiation. The GATT Uruguay

  2. Cardiff Rare Books and Music Lecture Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    will present research based on historical, literary, cultural and heritage studies, from Europe's earliest contact KeelanP@cardiff.ac.uk 24 October, 2pm-3.30pm Historical Rare Books Travel Literature, 1492

  3. Rare Earth Phosphate Glass and Glass-Ceramic Proton Conductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    300-500°C. Doping rare earth phosphate glasses with Ce, andRare Earth Phosphate Glass and Glass-Ceramic Protonconductivity of alkaline-earth doped rare earth phosphate

  4. Preparations of rare earth-iron alloys by thermite reduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA); Peterson, David T. (Ames, IA); Wheelock, John T. (Nevada, IA)

    1986-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method for the preparation of high-purity rare earth-iron alloys by the aluminothermic reduction of a mixture of rare earth and iron fluorides.

  5. Valuable rare earth metals from old electronics | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Valuable rare earth metals from old electronics Scientists at the Critical Materials Institute have developed a two-step recovery process that makes recycling rare-earth metals...

  6. Metallic beam development for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Machicoane, Guillaume, E-mail: machicoa@nscl.msu.edu; Cole, Dallas; Leitner, Daniela; Neben, Derek; Tobos, Larry [Facility for Rare Isotope Beam, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)] [Facility for Rare Isotope Beam, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) at Michigan State University (MSU) will accelerate a primary ion beam to energies beyond 200 MeV/u using a superconducting RF linac and will reach a maximum beam power of 400 kW on the fragmentation target. The beam intensity needed from the ECR ion source is expected to be between 0.4 and 0.5 emA for most medium mass to heavy mass elements. Adding to the challenge of reaching the required intensity, an expanded list of primary beams of interest has been established based on the production rate and the number of isotope beams that could be produced with FRIB. We report here on the development done for some of the beam in the list including mercury (natural), molybdenum ({sup 98}Mo), and selenium ({sup 82}Ser)

  7. Method for preparing high cure temperature rare earth iron compound magnetic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, Yuhong (West Hills, CA); Wei, Qiang (West Hills, CA); Zheng, Haixing (Oak Park, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Insertion of light elements such as H,C, or N in the R.sub.2 Fe.sub.17 (R=rare earth metal) series has been found to modify the magnetic properties of these compounds, which thus become prospective candidates for high performance permanent magnets. The most spectacular changes are increases of the Curie temperature, T.sub.c, of the magnetization, M.sub.s, and of coercivity, H.sub.c, upon interstitial insertion. A preliminary product having a component R--Fe--C,N phase is produced by a chemical route. Rare earth metal and iron amides are synthesized followed by pyrolysis and sintering in an inert or reduced atmosphere, as a result of which, the R--Fe--C,N phases are formed. Fabrication of sintered rare earth iron nitride and carbonitride bulk magnet is impossible via conventional process due to the limitation of nitridation method.

  8. Method of forming magnetostrictive rods from rare earth-iron alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McMasters, O.D.

    1986-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Rods of magnetostrictive alloys of iron with rare earth elements are formed by flowing a body of rare earth-iron alloy in a crucible enclosed in a chamber maintained under an inert gas atmosphere, forcing such molten rare-earth-iron alloy into a hollow mold tube of refractory material positioned with its lower end portion within the molten body by means of a pressure differential between the chamber and mold tube and maintaining a portion of the molten alloy in the crucible extending to a level above the lower end of the mold tube so that solid particles of higher melting impurities present in the alloy collect at the surface of the molten body and remain within the crucible as the rod is formed in the mold tube. 5 figs.

  9. Catalyst for elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria (Winchester, MA); Liu, Wei (Cambridge, MA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO.sub.2 -containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides high activity and selectivity, as well as stability in the reaction atmosphere, for the reduction of SO.sub.2 to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over a metal oxide composite catalyst having one of the following empirical formulas: [(OF.sub.2).sub.1-n (RO.sub.1)n].sub.1-k M.sub.k, [(FO.sub.2).sub.1-n (RO.sub.1.5).sub.n ].sub.1-k M.sub.k, or [Ln.sub.x Zr.sub.1-x O.sub.2-0.5x ].sub.1-k M.sub.k wherein FO.sub.2 is a fluorite-type oxide; RO represents an alkaline earth oxide; RO.sub.1.5 is a Group IIIB or rare earth oxide; Ln is a rare earth element having an atomic number from 57 to 65 or mixtures thereof; M is a transition metal or a mixture of transition metals; n is a number having a value from 0.0 to 0.35; k is a number having a value from 0.0 to about 0.5; and x is a number having a value from about 0.45 to about 0.55.

  10. Rare earth phosphors and phosphor screens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buchanan, Robert A. (Palo Alto, CA); Maple, T. Grant (Sunnyvale, CA); Sklensky, Alden F. (Sunnyvale, CA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to rare earth phosphor screens for converting image carrying incident radiation to image carrying visible or near-visible radiation and to the rare earth phosphor materials utilized in such screens. The invention further relates to methods for converting image carrying charged particles to image carrying radiation principally in the blue and near-ultraviolet region of the spectrum and to stabilized rare earth phosphors characterized by having a continuous surface layer of the phosphors of the invention. More particularly, the phosphors of the invention are oxychlorides and oxybromides of yttrium, lanthanum and gadolinium activated with trivalent cerium and the conversion screens are of the type illustratively including x-ray conversion screens, image amplifier tube screens, neutron imaging screens, cathode ray tube screens, high energy gamma ray screens, scintillation detector screens and screens for real-time translation of image carrying high energy radiation to image carrying visible or near-visible radiation.

  11. Trace-element evidence for the origin of desert varnish by direct aqueous atmospheric deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Cin-Ty Aeolus

    , Ni, Pb and the rare-earth elements (REEs). In particular, they have anomalously high Ce/La and low Y Nivedita Thiagarajan, Cin-Ty Aeolus Lee* Department of Earth Science, MS-126, Rice University, Houston, TX elemental fractionations. One remaining possibility is that the Fe, Mn and trace metals in varnish

  12. ONDES DE SPIN MAGNETISM IN THE LIGHT RARE EARTH 'METALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ONDES DE SPIN MAGNETISM IN THE LIGHT RARE EARTH 'METALS A. R. MACKINTOSH H. C. Mrsted Institute terres rares Ikgeres. Abstract. -The magnetic properties of the light rare earth metals are reviewed the last decade, the magnetism of the heavy rare earth metals is now rather well understood. The magnetic

  13. Crystalline rare-earth activated oxyorthosilicate phosphor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McClellan, Kenneth J.; Cooke, D. Wayne

    2004-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Crystalline, transparent, rare-earth activated lutetium oxyorthosilicate phosphor. The phosphor consists essentially of lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate activated with a rare-earth metal dopant M and having the general formula Lu(.sub.2-x-z)Y.sub.x M.sub.z SiO.sub.5, wherein 0.00.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1.95, wherein 0.001.ltoreq.z.ltoreq.0.02, and wherein M is selected from Sm, Tb, Tm, Eu, Yb, and Pr. The phosphor also consists essentially of lutetium gadolinium oxyorthosilicate activated with a rare-earth metal dopant M and having the general formula Lu(.sub.2-x-z)Gd.sub.x M.sub.z SiO.sub.5, wherein 0.00.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1.95, wherein 0.001.ltoreq.z.ltoreq.0.02, and wherein M is selected from Sm, Tb, Tm, Eu, Yb, and Pr. The phosphor also consists essentially of gadolinium yttrium oxyorthosilicate activated with a rare-earth metal dopant M and having the general formula Gd(.sub.2-x-z)Y.sub.x M.sub.z SiO.sub.5, wherein 0.00.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1.95, wherein 0.001.ltoreq.z.ltoreq.0.02, and wherein M is selected from Sm, Tb, Tm, Eu, Yb, and Pr. The phosphor may be optically coupled to a photodetector to provide a radiation detector.

  14. Stark spectroscopy on rare gas atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, op gezag van de Rector Magnificus, prof.dr.ir. C.J. van Duijn, voor een-DATA LIBRARY TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITEIT EINDHOVEN Jiang, Tao Stark spectroscopy on rare gas atoms / by Tao Jiang.-Eindhoven : Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, 2006. - Proefschrift. ISBN-10:90-386-2122-1 ISBN-13:978-90-386-2122-7 NUR

  15. Search for rare and forbidden eta ' decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Davis, Robin E. P.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan; Zhou, X.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have searched for rare and forbidden decays of the eta' meson in hadronic events at the CLEO II detector. The search is conducted on 4.80 fb(-1) of e(+)e(-) collisions at 10.6 GeV center-of-mass energy at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. We...

  16. U.S-, Japan Exchange Best Practices on Nuclear Emergency Response...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

  17. 1991 US-Japan workshop on Nuclear Fusion in Dense Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ichimaru, S. (ed.) (Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics); Tajima, T. (ed.) (Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies)

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The scientific areas covered at the Workshop may be classified into the following subfields: (1) basic theory of dense plasma physics and its interface with atomic physics and nuclear physics; (2) physics of dense z-pinches, ICF plasmas etc; (3) stellar interior plasmas; (4) cold fusion; and (5) other dense plasmas.

  18. 1991 US-Japan workshop on Nuclear Fusion in Dense Plasmas. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ichimaru, S. [ed.] [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Tajima, T. [ed.] [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The scientific areas covered at the Workshop may be classified into the following subfields: (1) basic theory of dense plasma physics and its interface with atomic physics and nuclear physics; (2) physics of dense z-pinches, ICF plasmas etc; (3) stellar interior plasmas; (4) cold fusion; and (5) other dense plasmas.

  19. Structures in Confined Plasmas -Proceedings of Workshop of US-Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrison, Philip J.,

    Theory Program - (Received - Feb. 6, 1990) NIFS-PROC-2 Mar. 1990 . -r ,. , "; ., , ,,- RESEARCH REPORT temperature T(x) =Te (x) /To, the spatial coordinates are scaled by PiO =(TO/miw;i)1/2 with Wei =eBo/cmi, time

  20. U.S-, Japan Exchange Best Practices on Nuclear Emergency Response |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City,EnrichedSupplemental Directives | NationalEmergencyNational

  1. 50th Anniversary of U.S.- Japan Health Studies | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartment ofCBFO-13-3322(EE)DepartmentVery5Dryers;under9DayaThe1 CHAPTERofDr.

  2. Microsoft Word - US_Japan_REE_agenda_ver7.doc | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement of the National NuclearRegulation;I07 AnnualMicrosoft Word -

  3. US-Japan_NuclearEnergyActionPlan.pdf | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian Nuclear Warheads into Fuel forShale_Gas.pdfUS-EU-Japan

  4. Department of Energy Hosts First Steering Committee Meeting on U.S. - Japan

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you0andEnergyGlobal Nuclearof a Second Early Site PermitGroup$10

  5. Finite Volume Element Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    FVE is closely related to the control volume finite element method ... simple stencils, to apply to a fairly wide range of fluid flow equations, to effectively treat.

  6. The Nonlinear Evolution of Rare Events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Bernardeau

    1993-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper I consider the nonlinear evolution of a rare density fluctuation in a random density field with Gaussian fluctuations, and I rigorously show that it follows the spherical collapse dynamics applied to its mean initial profile. This result is valid for any cosmological model and is independent of the shape of the power spectrum. In the early stages of the dynamics the density contrast of the fluctuation is seen to follow with a good accuracy the form $$\\delta=(1-\\delta_L/1.5)^{-1.5}-1,$$ where $\\delta_L$ is the linearly extrapolated overdensity. I then investigate the validity domain of the rare event approximation in terms of the parameter $\

  7. Rare K decays: Challenges and Perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher Smith

    2014-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    At this stage of the LHC program, the prospect for a new physics signal in the very rare K ---> pi nu nu bar decays may be dented, but remains well alive thanks to their intrinsic qualities. First, these decays are among the cleanest observables in the quark flavor sector. When combined with their terrible suppression in the Standard Model, they thus offer uniquely sensitive probes. Second, the LHC capabilities are not ideal for all kinds of new physics, even below the TeV scale. For example, rather elusive scenarios like natural-SUSY-like hierarchical spectrum, baryon number violation, or new very light but very weakly interacting particles may well induce deviations in rare K decays. Even though experimentalists should brace themselves for tiny deviations, these modes thus have a clear role to play in the LHC era.

  8. From the subtropics to the central equatorial Pacific Ocean: Neodymium isotopic composition and rare earth element

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    From the subtropics to the central equatorial Pacific Ocean: Neodymium isotopic composition, and S. Cravatte (2013), From the subtropics to the central equatorial Pacific Ocean: Neodymium isotopic waters (112 samples) in the Southern Tropical Pacific. The relatively detailed picture of these tracer

  9. Hydrogeochemistry and rare earth element behavior in a volcanically acidified watershed in Patagonia, Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, Dana

    in Patagonia, Argentina Christopher H. Gammons a,*, Scott A. Wood b , Fernando Pedrozo c , Johan C. Varekamp d, ID, United States c Universidad del Comahue, Bariloche, Argentina d Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT, United States e CONICET, Argentina Received 10 January 2005; received in revised form 9 May 2005

  10. The Effect of Rare Earth Elements, Temperature and Rolling Speed on the Microstructure Evolution of Magnesium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    of Magnesium Jie Pan¹, supervised by Mehdi Sanjari¹ and Prof. Stephen Yue¹ ¹Department of Mining and Materials and neodymium additive samples were acquired then subsequently rolled at different temperatures (300°C and 450°C of the precipitate which led to a less pinning effect. ·The neodymium samples have longer grain growth period than

  11. Rare earth elements in the sediments of Lake Baikal Lawrence M. Och a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    as an example for early stage ocean formation (e.g. Crane et al., 1991; Granina et al., 2010). In addition, like most of the ocean, the water column of Lake Baikal is pervasively oxic with a constant chemical; Vologina and Sturm, 2009; Watanabe et al., 2009; Och et al., 2012), leads oxygen to penetrate deeply

  12. Rare Earth Elements--Critical Resources for High Technology U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , magnetic refrigeration) to futuristic (high- temperature superconductivity, safe storage and transport increased dramatically. The diverse nuclear, metallurgical, chemical, catalytic, electrical, magnetic from mundane (lighter flints, glass polishing) to high-tech (phosphors, lasers, magnets, batteries

  13. Stable isotope and Rare Earth Element evidence for recent ironstone pods within the Archean Barberton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hren, Michael

    (up to $200 m long) hematite and goethite ironstone bodies within the 3.2 to 3.5 Ga Barberton of goethite and hematite components of the ironstones to determine whether these deposits reflect formation. Goethite d18 O values range from À0.7 to +1.0& and dD from À125 to À146&, which is consistent

  14. Watch a Rare Earth Elements Event Live This Morning | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradley Nickell Director ofDepartmentDRAFTEnergy Review - Today!

  15. Trans-Atlantic Workshop on Rare Earth Elements and Other Critical Materials

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCOSystems Analysis Success| Department ofServices » Environment »

  16. Trans-Atlantic Workshop on Rare Earth Elements and Other Critical Materials

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCOSystems Analysis Success| Department ofServices » Environment »for a Clean

  17. DOE Seeks Your Novel Ideas for Recovery of Rare Earth Elements from Coal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"WaveInteractions andDefinition of Showerheadand Coal Byproducts |

  18. Experimental study of rare charged pion decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dinko Pocanic; Emil Frlez; Andries van der Schaaf

    2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The combination of simple dynamics, small number of available decay channels, and extremely well controlled radiative and loop corrections, make charged pion decays a sensitive means for testing the underlying symmetries and the universality of weak fermion couplings, as well as for improving our understanding of pion structure and chiral dynamics. This paper reviews the current state of experimental study of the allowed rare decays of charged pions: (a) leptonic, $\\pi^+ \\to e^+\

  19. Concerning the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Symons, James

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    James Symons, Nuclear Science Division Director at Lawrence Berkeley Lab, and Daniela Leitner, head of operations at Berkeley Lab's 88-Inch Cyclotron, discuss major contributions to the new Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) at Michigan State University, including ion source, which will based on the VENUS source built for the 88-Inch Cyclotron, and the GRETA gamma-ray detector now under construction there.

  20. Recycling of rare earth metals from rare earth-transition metal alloy scrap by liquid metal extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellis, T.W.; Schmidt, F.A.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for treating rare earth metal-bearing scrap, waste or other material (e.g. Nd--Fe--B or Dy--Tb--Fe scrap) to recover the rare earth metal comprising melting the rare earth metal-bearing material, melting a Group IIA metal extractant, such as Mg, Ca, or Ba, in which the rare earth is soluble in the molten state, and contacting the melted material and melted extractant at a temperature and for a time effective to extract the rare earth from the melted material into the melted extractant. The rare earth metal is separated from the extractant metal by vacuum sublimation or distillation. 2 figs.

  1. Recycling of rare earth metals from rare earth-transition metal alloy scrap by liquid metal extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellis, Timothy W. (Ames, IA); Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method of treating rare earth metal-bearing scrap, waste or other material (e.g. Nd--Fe--B or Dy--Tb--Fe scrap) to recover the rare earth metal comprising melting the rare earth metal-bearing material, melting a Group IIA metal extractant, such as Mg, Ca, or Ba, in which the rare earth is soluble in the molten state, and contacting the melted material and melted extractant at a temperature and for a time effective to extract the rare earth from the melted material into the melted extractant. The rare earth metal is separated from the extractant metal by vacuum sublimation or distillation.

  2. Preparations of rare earth-iron alloys by thermite reduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, F.A.; Peterson, D.T.; Wheelock, J.T.

    1985-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is an improved method for the preparation of high-purity rare earth-iron alloys by the aluminothermic reduction of a mixture of rare earth and iron fluorides.

  3. The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 3

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Riedemann, Trevor

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 3 of 4.

  4. The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 1

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Riedemann, Trevor

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 1 of 4.

  5. The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 4

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Riedemann, Trevor

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 4 of 4.

  6. The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riedemann, Trevor

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 3 of 4.

  7. The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riedemann, Trevor

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 1 of 4.

  8. The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riedemann, Trevor

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 4 of 4.

  9. The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riedemann, Trevor

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 2 of 4.

  10. The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 2

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Riedemann, Trevor

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 2 of 4.

  11. 2005 Minerals Yearbook RaRe eaRths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and shipped. substantial stocks of lanthanide concentrates and intermediate and refined compounds were for the petroleum industry and processed cerium and zirconia compounds In 2005, world rare-earth production decreased as did imports of individual rare-earth compounds and mixed rare-earth compounds. U.s. imports

  12. Neutronic fuel element fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korton, George (Cincinnati, OH)

    2004-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This disclosure describes a method for metallurgically bonding a complete leak-tight enclosure to a matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant channels. Coolant tubes containing solid filler pins are disposed in the coolant channels. A leak-tight metal enclosure is then formed about the entire assembly of fuel matrix, coolant tubes and pins. The completely enclosed and sealed assembly is exposed to a high temperature and pressure gas environment to effect a metallurgical bond between all contacting surfaces therein. The ends of the assembly are then machined away to expose the pin ends which are chemically leached from the coolant tubes to leave the coolant tubes with internal coolant passageways. The invention described herein was made in the course of, or under, a contract with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. It relates generally to fuel elements for neutronic reactors and more particularly to a method for providing a leak-tight metal enclosure for a high-performance matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant tubes. The planned utilization of nuclear energy in high-performance, compact-propulsion and mobile power-generation systems has necessitated the development of fuel elements capable of operating at high power densities. High power densities in turn require fuel elements having high thermal conductivities and good fuel retention capabilities at high temperatures. A metal clad fuel element containing a ceramic phase of fuel intimately mixed with and bonded to a continuous refractory metal matrix has been found to satisfy the above requirements. Metal coolant tubes penetrate the matrix to afford internal cooling to the fuel element while providing positive fuel retention and containment of fission products generated within the fuel matrix. Metal header plates are bonded to the coolant tubes at each end of the fuel element and a metal cladding or can completes the fuel-matrix enclosure by encompassing the sides of the fuel element between the header plates.

  13. RARE EARTHS1 (Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of rare earths by end use was as follows: automotive catalytic converters, 25%; petroleum refining, and consumer of rare-earth products in 2007. The estimated value of refined rare earths consumed in the United -- Rare-earth metals, alloy 1,130 804 880 867 831 Cerium compounds 2,630 1,880 2,170 2,590 3,090 Mixed

  14. RARE EARTHS1 [Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content unless otherwise noted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at Mountain Pass were further processed into rare-earth compounds and metal products. The United States,980 3,770 2,840 5,800 Rare-earth metals, alloy 226 525 468 240 390 Exports: 2 Cerium compounds 840 1,350 1,640 992 730 Rare-earth metals, alloys 4,930 1,380 3,030 2,080 1,000 Other rare-earth compounds 455

  15. Coupling of a locally implanted rare-earth ion ensemble to a superconducting micro-resonator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wisby, I., E-mail: ilana.wisby@npl.co.uk; Tzalenchuk, A. Ya. [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham TW20 0EX (United Kingdom); Graaf, S. E. de; Adamyan, A.; Kubatkin, S. E. [Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, MC2, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296, Gothenburg (Sweden); Gwilliam, R. [Advanced Technology Institute, Faculty of Electronics and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Meeson, P. J. [Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham TW20 0EX (United Kingdom); Lindström, T. [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the coupling of rare-earth ions locally implanted in a substrate (Gd{sup 3+} in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) to a superconducting NbN lumped-element micro-resonator. The hybrid device is fabricated by a controlled ion implantation of rare-earth ions in well-defined micron-sized areas, aligned to lithographically defined micro-resonators. The technique does not degrade the internal quality factor of the resonators which remain above 10{sup 5}. Using microwave absorption spectroscopy, we observe electron-spin resonances in good agreement with numerical modelling and extract corresponding coupling rates of the order of 1?MHz and spin linewidths of 50–65?MHz.

  16. RARE EARTHS1 [Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content unless otherwise noted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , was as follows: chemical catalysts, 22%; metallurgical applications and alloys, 21%; petroleum refining catalysts, and importer of rare-earth products in 2010. The estimated value of refined rare earths imported by the United) -- -- -- -- -- Rare-earth metals, alloy 867 784 564 188 250 Cerium compounds 2,590 2,680 2,080 1,500 1,400 Mixed REOs

  17. RARE EARTHS1 [Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content unless otherwise noted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    catalytic converters, 9%; glass polishing and ceramics, 6%; permanent magnets, 5%; petroleum refining, and importer of rare-earth products in 2009. The estimated value of refined rare earths imported by the United) -- -- -- -- 20 Rare-earth metals, alloy 880 867 784 679 210 Cerium compounds 2,170 2,590 2,680 2,080 1,190 Mixed

  18. RARE EARTHS1 (Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorium ore (monazite) -- -- -- 22 -- Rare-earth metals, alloys 352 235 284 905 442 Cerium compounds 806 1:3 Thorium ore, monazite -- 3 27 -- -- Rare-earth metals, alloys 44 194 329 444 272 Cerium compounds.20.0000 Free Free. Rare-earth metals, whether or not intermixed or interalloyed 2805.30.0000 5.0% ad val. 31

  19. RARE EARTHS1 (Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -- -- -- -- Imports: Thorium ore (monazite) -- 22 56 11 --3 Rare-earth metals, alloys 284 905 429 529 760 Cerium 121 123 Exports: Thorium ore, monazite 27 -- -- -- --3 Rare-earth metals, alloys 329 444 250 991 856 (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free Free. Rare-earth metals, whether or not intermixed or interalloyed 2805

  20. RARE EARTHS1 (Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Thorium ore (monazite) -- -- 22 56 --3 Rare-earth metals, alloys 235 284 905 429 507 Cerium compounds 1 Exports: Thorium ore, monazite 3 27 -- -- --3 Rare-earth metals, alloys 194 329 444 250 879 Cerium for individual rare-earth metals and compounds, with most import categories slightly behind 1996's record high

  1. Scintillation of rare earth doped fluoride nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobsohn, L. G.; McPherson, C. L.; Sprinkle, K. B.; Ballato, J. [Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies (COMSET), and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Yukihara, E. G. [Physics Department, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078-3072 (United States); DeVol, T. A. [Department of Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634-0905 (United States)

    2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The scintillation response of rare earth (RE) doped core/undoped (multi-)shell fluoride nanoparticles was investigated under x-ray and alpha particle irradiation. A significant enhancement of the scintillation response was observed with increasing shells due: (i) to the passivation of surface quenching defects together with the activation of the REs on the surface of the core nanoparticle after the growth of a shell, and (ii) to the increase of the volume of the nanoparticles. These results are expected to reflect a general aspect of the scintillation process in nanoparticles, and to impact radiation sensing technologies that make use of nanoparticles.

  2. Rare b hadron decays at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blake, T; Hiller, G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the completion of Run~I of the CERN Large Hadron Collider, particle physics has entered a new era. The production of unprecedented numbers of heavy-flavoured hadrons in high energy proton-proton collisions allows detailed studies of flavour-changing processes. The increasingly precise measurements allow to probe the Standard Model with a new level of accuracy. Rare $b$ hadron decays provide some of the most promising approaches for such tests, since there are several observables which can be cleanly interpreted from a theoretical viewpoint. In this article, the status and prospects in this field are reviewed, with a focus on precision measurements and null tests.

  3. Rare Iron Oxide in Ancient Chinese Pottery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnicalPurchase, Delivery,AssistanceRare Earth Metals

  4. Rare-Earth-Free Traction Motor: Rare Earth-Free Traction Motor for Electric Vehicle Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REACT Project: Baldor will develop a new type of traction motor with the potential to efficiently power future generations of EVs. Unlike today’s large, bulky EV motors which use expensive, imported rare-earth-based magnets, Baldor’s motor could be light, compact, contain no rare earth materials, and have the potential to deliver more torque at a substantially lower cost. Key innovations in this project include the use of a unique motor design, incorporation of an improved cooling system, and the development of advanced materials manufacturing techniques. These innovations could significantly reduce the cost of an electric motor.

  5. Reduction Chemistry of Rare-Earth Metal Complexes: Toward New Reactivity and Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wenliang

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Chemistry of Rare Earths; Karl A. Gschneidner, Jr. ,and Chemistry of Rare Earths; Karl A. Gschneidner, Jr. ,and Chemistry of Rare Earths; Gschneidner, K. A. , Bünzli,

  6. Elemental compositions and monazite age patterns of core sediments in the Changjiang Delta: Implications for sediment provenance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Shouye

    parameters of rare earth elements (cerium and europium anomalies) and elemental ratios Cr/Th, Nb/Co and Th rights reserved. Keywords: Changjiang; geochemistry; monazite; Tibetan Plateau; Quaternary 1 budget of the global ocean [1­8]. Furthermore, the basin mor- phology and regional fluvial patterns

  7. RARE EARTHS1 [Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content unless otherwise noted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,380 840 1,350 1,400 Rare-earth metals, alloys 1,470 1,390 4,920 1,380 3,400 Other rare-earth compounds 1,750 5,480 2,300 Rare-earth oxides, compounds 9,900 8,820 5,130 3,980 3,700 Rare-earth metals, alloy 784 scrap. Import Sources (2007­10): Rare-earth metals, compounds, etc.: China, 79%; France, 6%; Estonia, 4

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of Rare-earth-free Magnetic Manganese Bismuth Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Jian Q.; Cui, Huizhong; Huang, Xiaopeng; Gong, Maogang; Qin, Wei; Kirkeminde, Alec; Cui, Jun; Ren, Shenqiang

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Earth abundant manganese bismuth (MnBi) has long been of interest due to its large magnetocrystalline anisotropy and high energy density for advanced permanent magnet applications. However, solution synthesis of MnBi phase is challenging due to the reduction potential mismatch between Mn and Bi elements. In this study, we show a versatile MnBi synthesis method involving the metal co-reduction followed by thermal annealing. The magnetically hard MnBi crystalline phase is then exchange coupled with magnetically soft cobalt coating. Our processing approach offers a promising strategy for manufacturing rare-earth-free magnetic nanocrystals.

  9. Anisotropic rare-earth spin ensemble strongly coupled to a superconducting resonator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Probst; H. Rotzinger; S. Wünsch; P. Jung; M. Jerger; M. Siegel; A. V. Ustinov; P. A. Bushev

    2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Interfacing photonic and solid-state qubits within a hybrid quantum architecture offers a promising route towards large scale distributed quantum computing. Ideal candidates for coherent qubit interconversion are optically active spins magnetically coupled to a superconducting resonator. We report on a cavity QED experiment with magnetically anisotropic Er3+:Y2SiO5 crystals and demonstrate strong coupling of rare-earth spins to a lumped element resonator. In addition, the electron spin resonance and relaxation dynamics of the erbium spins are detected via direct microwave absorption, without aid of a cavity.

  10. Nuclear fuel element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zocher, Roy W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear fuel element and a method of manufacturing the element. The fuel element is comprised of a metal primary container and a fuel pellet which is located inside it and which is often fragmented. The primary container is subjected to elevated pressure and temperature to deform the container such that the container conforms to the fuel pellet, that is, such that the container is in substantial contact with the surface of the pellet. This conformance eliminates clearances which permit rubbing together of fuel pellet fragments and rubbing of fuel pellet fragments against the container, thus reducing the amount of dust inside the fuel container and the amount of dust which may escape in the event of container breach. Also, as a result of the inventive method, fuel pellet fragments tend to adhere to one another to form a coherent non-fragmented mass; this reduces the tendency of a fragment to pierce the container in the event of impact.

  11. Elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Zhicheng Hu.

    1993-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO[sub 2] in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst. 4 figures.

  12. Cryomodule Design for the Rare Isotope Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grimm, Terry; Hartung, Walter; Johnson, M.; York, Richard; Kneisel, Peter; Turlington, Larry

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) driver linac will produce >400 MeV/u proton through uranium beams using many types of superconducting accelerating cavities such as quarter wave, spoke, and elliptical cavities. A cryomodule design that can accommodate all of the superconducting cavity and magnet types is presented. Alignment of the cold mass uses a titanium rail system, which minimizes cryomodule size, and decreases both the tunnel cross-section and length. The titanium rail is supported from the top vacuum plate by an adjustable trilink, which is similar to existing Michigan State University magnet technology. A prototype cryomodule is under construction for testing 805 MHz, v/c=0.47, sixcell niobium cavities in realistic operating conditions. Details of the design and progress to date are presented.

  13. Searches for very rare decays of kaons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lang, K. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The physics motivation for searches for very rare kaon decays, either forbidden or suppressed within the Standard Model, is briefly discussed. Simple arguments conclude that such searches probe possible new forces at a 200 TeV mass scale or constitute a precision test of the electroweak model. The examples of such process are decays of K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {mu} {sup {+-}}e{sup -+}, K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +} {mu}{sup +} e{sup -}, K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +} {mu}{sup -}, and K{sup +} {yields} {pi} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}. We present the current experimental status and describe the new efforts to reach sensitivities down to one part in 10{sup 12}. The discussion is focused on the experimental program at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory, where intense beams make such studies possible.

  14. Enhanced pinning in mixed rare earth-123 films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Driscoll, Judith L. (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An superconductive article and method of forming such an article is disclosed, the article including a substrate and a layer of a rare earth barium cuprate film upon the substrate, the rare earth barium cuprate film including two or more rare earth metals capable of yielding a superconductive composition where ion size variance between the two or more rare earth metals is characterized as greater than zero and less than about 10.times.10.sup.-4, and the rare earth barium cuprate film including two or more rare earth metals is further characterized as having an enhanced critical current density in comparison to a standard YBa.sub.2Cu.sub.3O.sub.y composition under identical testing conditions.

  15. Magnetic properties of RT2Zn20; R = rare earth, T = Fe, Co, Ru, Os and Ir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, Shuang

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well known that rare earth intermetallic compounds have versatile, magnetic properties associated with the 4f electrons: a local moment associated with the Hund's rule ground state is formed in general, but a strongly correlated, hybridized state may also appear for specific 4f electronic configuration (eg. for rare earth elements such as Ce or Yb). On the other hand, the conduction electrons in rare earth intermetallic compounds, certainly ones associated with non hybridizing rare earths, usually manifest non-magnetic behavior and can be treated as a normal, non-interacted Fermi liquid, except for some 3d-transition metal rich binary or ternary systems which often manifest strong, itinerant, d electron dominant magnetic behavior. Of particular interest are examples in which the band filling of the conduction electrons puts the system in the vicinity of a Stoner transition: such systems, characterized as nearly or weakly ferromagnet, manifest strongly correlated electronic properties [Moriya, 1985]. For rare earth intermetallic compounds, such systems provide an additional versatility and allow for the study of the behaviors of local moments and hybridized moments which are associated with 4f electron in a correlated conduction electron background.

  16. Ecosystem element cycling Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    Ecosystem element cycling Introduction An ecosystem consists of all the biological organisms and the physical environments they occupy together within a defined area [1]. The actual boundaries of an ecosystem are generally defined by researchers studying the ecosystem, who are usually interested in understanding

  17. Photovoltaic radiation detector element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Agouridis, D.C.

    1980-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation detector element is formed of a body of semiconductor material, a coating on the body which forms a photovoltaic junction therewith, and a current collector consisting of narrow metallic strips, the aforesaid coating having an opening therein in the edge of which closely approaches but is spaced from the current collector strips.

  18. New CMI process recycles valuable rare earth metals from old...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    behind. Then the rare earths are recovered from the magnesium through vacuum distillation. In the second step, another material is used to bind with and extract the heavier...

  19. Australian Mining carries rare-earth-like iron release | The...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Australian Mining carries rare-earth-like iron release Australian Mining, the leading news source for the mining industry in Australia, carried a story on research Ames Lab...

  20. Rare-earth innovation to improve nylon manufacturing | The Ames...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rare-earth innovation to improve nylon manufacturing The Critical Materials Institute, a Department of Energy Innovation Hub led by the Ames Labratory, has created a new chemical...

  1. Trichofolliculoma: a rare variant of hair follicle hamartoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gokalp, Hilal; Gurer, Mehmet Ali; Alan, Saadet

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the regressing normal hair follicle in its cycle. J Cutanal. Trichofolliculoma: An Uncommon Hair Follicle Hamartoma.Trichofolliculoma: a rare variant of hair follicle hamartoma

  2. Finite Element Analysis Skateboard Truck

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De, Suvranu

    Finite Element Analysis Of a Skateboard Truck #12;2 Executive Summary: Engineering is and always is an element of the `truck,' which holds the wheels. Finite Element analysis will be conducted on this piece a combination of SolidWorks (for modeling) and ABAQUS (for finite element analysis). It is evident from

  3. DOLFIN: Automated Finite Element Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logg, Anders; Wells, G N

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ´de´lec 1980]. (4) L2-conforming finite elements: (a) DGq, arbitrary degree discontinuous Lagrange elements; and (b) CR1, first degree Crouzeix–Raviart5 elements [Crouzeix and Raviart 1973]. Arbitrary combinations of the above elements may be used to define...

  4. Nuclear Theory and Science of the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B Balantekin; J. Carlson; D. J. Dean; G. M. Fuller; R. J. Furnstahl; M. Hjorth-Jensen; R. V. F. Janssens; Bao-An Li; W. Nazarewicz; F. M. Nunes; W. E. Ormand; S. Reddy; B. M. Sherrill

    2014-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) will be a world-leading laboratory for the study of nuclear structure, reactions and astrophysics. Experiments with intense beams of rare isotopes produced at FRIB will guide us toward a comprehensive description of nuclei, elucidate the origin of the elements in the cosmos, help provide an understanding of matter in neutron stars, and establish the scientific foundation for innovative applications of nuclear science to society. FRIB will be essential for gaining access to key regions of the nuclear chart, where the measured nuclear properties will challenge established concepts, and highlight shortcomings and needed modifications to current theory. Conversely, nuclear theory will play a critical role in providing the intellectual framework for the science at FRIB, and will provide invaluable guidance to FRIB's experimental programs. This article overviews the broad scope of the FRIB theory effort, which reaches beyond the traditional fields of nuclear structure and reactions, and nuclear astrophysics, to explore exciting interdisciplinary boundaries with other areas. \\keywords{Nuclear Structure and Reactions. Nuclear Astrophysics. Fundamental Interactions. High Performance Computing. Rare Isotopes. Radioactive Beams.

  5. RARE EARTHS1 (Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    %; glass polishing and ceramics, 14%; metallurgical additives and alloys, 13%; petroleum refining catalysts continued to be a major exporter and consumer of rare-earth products in 2004. The estimated value of refined,980 Mixed REOs 2,190 2,040 1,040 2,150 1,540 Rare-earth chlorides 1,330 2,590 1,800 1,890 1,520 Rare

  6. RARE EARTHS1 (Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , televisions, and x-ray-intensifying film, 14%; chemicals and petroleum refining catalysts, 11%; ceramics, 3, and importer of rare-earth products in 2008. The estimated value of refined rare earths imported by the United,880 2,170 2,590 2,680 2,180 Mixed REOs 1,660 640 1,570 2,570 2,750 Rare-earth chlorides 1,310 2,670 2

  7. RARE EARTHS1 (Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) 56 11 -- -- -- Rare-earth metals, alloys 429 529 953 1,780 2,370 Cerium compounds 3,180 1,810 4,940 3 metals, alloys 250 991 724 1,600 1,830 Cerium compounds 6,100 5,890 4,640 3,960 3,870 Other rare-earth-99): Monazite: Australia, 67%; France, 33%; Rare-earth metals, compounds, etc.: China, 71%; France, 23%; Japan

  8. RARE EARTHS1 (Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) -- -- -- -- -- Rare-earth metals, alloy 1,420 1,450 1,130 804 945 Cerium compounds 3,850 2,540 2,630 1,880 2,210 Mixed, compounds 9,150 7,260 10,900 11,400 9,800 Ferrocerium, alloys 118 89 111 105 142 Exports:2 Rare-earth metals-04): Rare-earth metals, compounds, etc.: China, 76%; France, 14%; Japan, 6%; Austria, 2%; and other, 2

  9. RARE EARTHS1 [Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content unless otherwise noted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at Mountain Pass, CA, were further processed into rare-earth compounds and metal products. The United States -- -- -- -- 7,000 Exports: 2 Cerium compounds 1,380 840 1,350 1,640 1,100 Rare-earth metals, alloys 1,390 4,980 3,770 2,700 Rare-earth metals, alloy 679 226 525 468 280 Thorium ore (monazite or various thorium

  10. RARE EARTHS1 (Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    10,000 e 5,000 5,000 Imports:3 Thorium ore (monazite) 22 56 11 -- -- Rare-earth metals, alloys 905,720 5,600 Ferrocerium, alloys 78 107 121 117 122 Exports:3 Rare-earth metals, alloys 444 250 991 724 1%; Rare-earth metals, compounds, etc.: China, 75%; France, 19%; Japan, 3%; United Kingdom, 1%; and other

  11. Rare meson decays into very light neutralinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreiner, H. K.; Grab, S.; Koschade, Daniel; Kraemer, M.; O'Leary, Ben; Langenfeld, Ulrich [Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics and Physikalisches Institut der Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 12, 53115 Bonn (Germany); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, RWTH Aachen University, 52056 Aachen, Germany and Centre for Research in String Theory, Department of Physics, Queen Mary, University of London, E1 4NS London (United Kingdom); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, RWTH Aachen University, 52056 Aachen (Germany); DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany)

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the bounds on the mass of the lightest neutralino from rare meson decays within the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) with and without minimal flavor violation. We present explicit formulas for the two-body decays of mesons into light neutralinos and perform the first complete calculation of the loop-induced decays of kaons to pions and light neutralinos and B mesons to kaons and light neutralinos. We find that the supersymmetric branching ratios are strongly suppressed within the MSSM with minimal flavor violation, and that no bounds on the neutralino mass can be inferred from experimental data, i.e., a massless neutralino is allowed. The branching ratios for kaon and B meson decays into light neutralinos may, however, be enhanced when one allows for nonminimal flavor violation. We find new constraints on the MSSM parameter space for such scenarios and discuss prospects for future kaon and B meson experiments. Finally, we comment on the search for light neutralinos in monojet signatures at the Tevatron and at the LHC.

  12. Galactic Cosmochronometry from Radioactive Elements in the Spectra of Very Old Metal-Poor Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Sneden; J. E. Lawler; J. J. Cowan

    2001-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In a short review of neutron-capture elemental abundances in Galactic halo stars, emphasis is placed on the use of these elements to estimate the age of the Galactic halo. Two prominent characteristics of neutron-capture elements in halo stars are their large star-to-star scatter in the overall abundance level with respect to lighter elements, and the dominance of r-process abundance patterns at lowest stellar metallicities. The r-process abundance signature potentially allows the direct determination of the age of the earliest Galactic halo nucleosynthesis events, but further developments in r-process theory, high resolution spectroscopy of very metal-poor stars, and in basic atomic data are needed to narrow the uncertainties in age estimates. Attention is brought to the importance of accurate transition probabilities in neutron-capture element cosmochronometry. Recent progress in the transition probabilities of rare earth elements is discussed, along with suggestions for future work on other species.

  13. alloyed rare earth: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    alloyed rare earth First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Rare earth focused ion beam...

  14. anhydrous rare earth: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    anhydrous rare earth First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Copper Sheath Rare Earth Material...

  15. Tunable, rare earth-doped solid state lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Emmett, John L. (Pleasanton, CA); Jacobs, Ralph R. (Livermore, CA); Krupke, William F. (Pleasanton, CA); Weber, Marvin J. (Danville, CA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser apparatus comprising combinations of an excimer pump laser and a rare earth-doped solid matrix, utilizing the 5d-4f radiative transition in a rare earth ion to produce visible and ultra-violet laser radiation with high overall efficiency in selected cases and relatively long radiative lifetimes.

  16. HISTORY OF THE ORIGIN OF THE CHEMICAL ELEMENTS AND THEIR DISCOVERIES.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOLDEN,N.E.

    2001-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The origin of the chemical elements show a wide diversity with some of these elements having their origin in antiquity. Still other elements have been synthesized within the past fifty years via nuclear reactions on heavy elements, because these other elements are unstable and radioactive and do not exist in nature. The names of the elements come from many sources including mythological concepts or characters; places, areas or countries; properties of the element or its compounds, such as color, smell or its inability to combine; and the names of scientists. There are also some miscellaneous names as well as some obscure names for particular elements. The claim of discovery of an element has varied over the centuries. Many claims, e.g., the discovery of certain rare earth elements of the lanthanide series, involved the discovery of a mineral ore from which an element was later extracted. The honor of discovery has often been accorded not to the person who first isolated the element but to the person who discovered the original mineral itself, even when the ore was impure and contained many elements. The reason for this is that in the case of these rare earth elements, the ''earth'' now refers to oxides of a metal not to the metal itself. This fact was not realized at the time of their discovery, until the English chemist Humphry Davy showed that earths were compounds of oxygen and metals in 1808. In the early discoveries, the atomic weight of an element and spectral analysis of the element were not available. Later both of these elemental properties would be required before discovery of the element would be accepted. In general, the requirements for discovery claims have tightened through the years and claims that were previously accepted would no longer meet the minimum constraints now imposed. There are cases where the honor of discovery is not given to the first person to actually discover the element but to the first person to claim the discovery in print. If a publication was delayed, the discoverer has often historically been ''scooped'' by another scientist.

  17. Thematic Questions about Chemical Elements Nature of the chemical elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    Environment Element Synthesis: Exploration of Chemical Fundamentals Element Synthesis and Isotopes · Elemental thorium uranium Relativeabundance(Si=106)Relative Abundance in the Sun · non-uniform trend G302.protons 90 234Th 145 #12;5 Alpha Decay - Loss of He Atom · Decay of Uranium-238 to Thorium-234 G302

  18. Pyrometallurgical processes for recovery of actinide elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battles, J.E.; Laidler, J.J.; McPheeters, C.C.; Miller, W.E.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A metallic fuel alloy, nominally U-20-Pu-lOZr, is the key element of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle. Metallic fuel permits the use of an innovative, simple pyrometallurgical process, known as pyroprocessing, (the subject of this report), which features fused salt electrorefining of the spent fuel. Electrorefining separates the actinide elements from fission products, without producing a separate stream of plutonium. The plutonium-bearing product is contaminated with higher actinides and with a minor amount of rare earth fission products, making it diversion resistant while still suitable as a fuel material in the fast spectrum of the IFR core. The engineering-scale demonstration of this process will be conducted in the refurbished EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility, which has entered the start-up phase. An additional pyrometallurgical process is under development for extracting transuranic (TRU) elements from Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent fuel in a form suitable for use as a feed to the IFR fuel cycle. Four candidate extraction processes have been investigated and shown to be chemically feasible. The main steps in each process are oxide reduction with calcium or lithium, regeneration of the reductant and recycle of the salt, and separation of the TRU product from the bulk uranium. Two processes, referred to as the lithium and salt transport (calcium reductant) processes, have been selected for engineering-scale demonstration, which is expected to start in late 1993. An integral part of pyroprocessing development is the treatment and packaging of high-level waste materials arising from the operations, along with the qualification of these waste forms for disposal in a geologic repository.

  19. Cerium-Based Magnets: Novel High Energy Permanent Magnet Without Critical Elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REACT Project: Ames Laboratory will develop a new class of permanent magnets based on the more commonly available element cerium for use in both EVs and renewable power generators. Cerium is 4 times more abundant and significantly less expensive than the rare earth element neodymium, which is frequently used in today’s most powerful magnets. Ames Laboratory will combine other metal elements with cerium to create a new magnet that can remain stable at the high temperatures typically found in electric motors. This new magnetic material will ultimately be demonstrated in a prototype electric motor, representing a cost-effective and efficient alternative to neodymium-based motors.

  20. NO HEAVY-ELEMENT DISPERSION IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER M92

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, Judith G., E-mail: jlc@astro.caltech.edu [Palomar Observatory, Mail Stop 249-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Although there have been recent claims that there is a large dispersion in the abundances of the heavy neutron capture elements in the old Galactic globular cluster M92, we show that the measured dispersion for the absolute abundances of four of the rare earth elements within a sample of 12 luminous red giants in M92 ({<=}0.07 dex) does not exceed the relevant sources of uncertainty. As expected from previous studies, the heavy elements show the signature of the r-process. Their abundance ratios are essentially identical to those of M30, another nearby globular cluster of similar metallicity.

  1. The CEBAF Element Database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theodore Larrieu, Christopher Slominski, Michele Joyce

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the inauguration of the CEBAF Element Database (CED) in Fall 2010, Jefferson Lab computer scientists have taken a step toward the eventual goal of a model-driven accelerator. Once fully populated, the database will be the primary repository of information used for everything from generating lattice decks to booting control computers to building controls screens. A requirement influencing the CED design is that it provide access to not only present, but also future and past configurations of the accelerator. To accomplish this, an introspective database schema was designed that allows new elements, types, and properties to be defined on-the-fly with no changes to table structure. Used in conjunction with Oracle Workspace Manager, it allows users to query data from any time in the database history with the same tools used to query the present configuration. Users can also check-out workspaces to use as staging areas for upcoming machine configurations. All Access to the CED is through a well-documented Application Programming Interface (API) that is translated automatically from original C++ source code into native libraries for scripting languages such as perl, php, and TCL making access to the CED easy and ubiquitous.

  2. Ames Lab scientist hopes to improve rare earth purification process...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab scientist hopes to improve rare earth purification process Using the second fastest supercomputer in the world, a scientist at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory...

  3. acidic rare earths: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Acid-Based Synthesis of Monodisperse Rare-Earth-Doped Colloidal SiO2 Spheres Materials Science Websites Summary: Acid-Based Synthesis...

  4. Formation of rare earth carbonates using supercritical carbon dioxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fernando, Quintus (Tucson, AZ); Yanagihara, Naohisa (Zacopan, MX); Dyke, James T. (Santa Fe, NM); Vemulapalli, Krishna (Tuscon, AZ)

    1991-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to a process for the rapid, high yield conversion of select rare earth oxides or hydroxides, to their corresponding carbonates by contact with supercritical carbon dioxide.

  5. Nuclear fuel element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Armijo, Joseph S. (Saratoga, CA); Coffin, Jr., Louis F. (Schenectady, NY)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear fuel element for use in the core of a nuclear reactor is disclosed and has a composite cladding having a substrate and a metal barrier metallurgically bonded on the inside surface of the substrate so that the metal barrier forms a shield between the substrate and the nuclear fuel material held within the cladding. The metal barrier forms about 1 to about 30 percent of the thickness of the cladding and is comprised of a low neutron absorption metal of substantially pure zirconium. The metal barrier serves as a preferential reaction site for gaseous impurities and fission products and protects the substrate from contact and reaction with such impurities and fission products. The substrate of the composite cladding is selected from conventional cladding materials and preferably is a zirconium alloy. Methods of manufacturing the composite cladding are also disclosed.

  6. Nuclear fuel element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Armijo, Joseph S. (Saratoga, CA); Coffin, Jr., Louis F. (Schenectady, NY)

    1980-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear fuel element for use in the core of a nuclear reactor is disclosed and has an improved composite cladding comprised of a moderate purity metal barrier of zirconium metallurgically bonded on the inside surface of a zirconium alloy tube. The metal barrier forms a shield between the alloy tube and a core of nuclear fuel material enclosed in the composite cladding. There is a gap between the cladding and the core. The metal barrier forms about 1 to about 30 percent of the thickness of the composite cladding and has low neutron absorption characteristics. The metal barrier serves as a preferential reaction site for gaseous impurities and fission products and protects the alloy tube from contact and reaction with such impurities and fission products. Methods of manufacturing the composite cladding are also disclosed.

  7. Photoconductive circuit element reflectometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rauscher, Christen (Alexandria, VA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A photoconductive reflectometer for characterizing semiconductor devices at millimeter wavelength frequencies where a first photoconductive circuit element (PCE) is biased by a direct current voltage source and produces short electrical pulses when excited into conductance by short first laser light pulses. The electrical pulses are electronically conditioned to improve the frequency related amplitude characteristics of the pulses which thereafter propagate along a transmission line to a device under test. Second PCEs are connected along the transmission line to sample the signals on the transmission line when excited into conductance by short second laser light pulses, spaced apart in time a variable period from the first laser light pulses. Electronic filters connected to each of the second PCEs act as low-pass filters and remove parasitic interference from the sampled signals and output the sampled signals in the form of slowed-motion images of the signals on the transmission line.

  8. Photoconductive circuit element reflectometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rauscher, C.

    1987-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A photoconductive reflectometer for characterizing semiconductor devices at millimeter wavelength frequencies where a first photoconductive circuit element (PCE) is biased by a direct current voltage source and produces short electrical pulses when excited into conductance by short first laser light pulses. The electrical pulses are electronically conditioned to improve the frequency related amplitude characteristics of the pulses which thereafter propagate along a transmission line to a device under test. Second PCEs are connected along the transmission line to sample the signals on the transmission line when excited into conductance by short second laser light pulses, spaced apart in time a determinable period from the first laser light pulses. Electronic filters connected to each of the second PCEs act as low-pass filters and remove parasitic interference from the sampled signals and output the sampled signals in the form of slowed-motion images of the signals on the transmission line. 4 figs.

  9. Reduction Chemistry of Rare-Earth Metal Complexes: Toward New Reactivity and Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wenliang

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reduction chemistry of rare-earth metal complexes supportedof a series of rare-earth metal arene complexes. Highlightsmechanism for rare-earth metals; (2) the synthesis of the

  10. Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering of Rare-Earth and Copper Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kvashnina, Kristina

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bombardment for twelve rare-earths metals [1] . Accord- ingal. [3] have showed that rare-earth metals such as La has aof most of the rare- earths metals, oxides, and chlorides.

  11. POWDER METALLURGICAL PROCESSING OF MAGNETOSTRICTIVE MATERIALS BASED ON RARE EARTH-IRON INTERMETALLIC COMPOUNDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malekzadeh, Manoochehr

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by using an excess of rare earth metals during the course ofCrystal structure of rare earth-transition metal Laves phasemagnetostrictions among rare earth-transition metal as well

  12. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Deevi, Seetharama C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Fleischhauer, Grier S. (Midlothian, VA); Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Richmond, VA); Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton (Chesterfield, VA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  13. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Deevi, Seetharama C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Fleischhauer, Grier S. (Midlothian, VA); Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Richmond, VA); Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton (Chesterfield, VA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  14. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Deevi, Seetharama C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Fleischhauer, Grier S. (Midlothian, VA); Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Richmond, VA); Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton (Chesterfield, VA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  15. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, V.K.; Deevi, S.C.; Fleischhauer, G.S.; Hajaligol, M.R.; Lilly, A.C. Jr.

    1997-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, {<=}1% Cr and either {>=}0.05% Zr or ZrO{sub 2} stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or {>=}0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, {<=}2% Ti, {<=}2% Mo, {<=}1% Zr, {<=}1% C, {<=}0.1% B, {<=}30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, {<=}1% rare earth metal, {<=}1% oxygen, {<=}3% Cu, balance Fe. 64 figs.

  16. Bimetallic cleavage of aromatic C-H bonds by rare-earth-metal complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, W; Huang, W; Dulong, F; Khan, SI; Cantat, T; Diaconescu, PL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Aromatic C-H Bonds by Rare Earth Metal Complexes Wenliangone week prior to use. Rare earth metal oxides (scandium,

  17. The impact of trade costs on rare earth exports : a stochastic frontier estimation approach.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanyal, Prabuddha; Brady, Patrick Vane; Vugrin, Eric D.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study develops a novel stochastic frontier modeling approach to the gravity equation for rare earth element (REE) trade between China and its trading partners between 2001 and 2009. The novelty lies in differentiating betweenbehind the border' trade costs by China and theimplicit beyond the border costs' of China's trading partners. Results indicate that the significance level of the independent variables change dramatically over the time period. While geographical distance matters for trade flows in both periods, the effect of income on trade flows is significantly attenuated, possibly capturing the negative effects of financial crises in the developed world. Second, the total export losses due tobehind the border' trade costs almost tripled over the time period. Finally, looking atimplicit beyond the border' trade costs, results show China gaining in some markets, although it is likely that some countries are substituting away from Chinese REE exports.

  18. Rare earth/iron fluoride and methods for making and using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA); Wheelock, John T. (Neveda, IA); Peterson, David T. (Ames, IA)

    1991-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A particulate mixture of Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 and RE.sub.2 O.sub.3, where RE is a rare earth element, is reacted with an excess of HF acid to form an insoluble fluoride compound (salt) comprising REF.sub.3 and FeF.sub.3 present in solid solution in the REF.sub.3 crystal lattice. The REF.sub.3 /FeF.sub.3 compound is dried to render it usable as a reactant in the thermite reduction process as well as other processes which require an REF.sub.3 /FeF.sub.3 mixture. The dried REF.sub.3 /FeF.sub.3 compound comprises about 5 weight % to about 40 weight % of FeF.sub.3 and the balance REF.sub.3 to this end.

  19. Modeling the Value Recovery of Rare Earth Permanent Magnets at End-of-Life

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntyre, Timothy J [ORNL

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Permanent magnets containing rare earth elements (REEs) such as Dysprosium and Neodymium offer an advantage over non-REE containing magnets (e.g. ferrite or AlNiCo) in terms of power relative to size. However, REE availability has varied significantly in recent years leading to volatility in the cost of rare earth permanent magnets (REPMs). The supply of REEs can be increased by recycling consumer products and industrial machinery that contain REPMs at product end-of-life (EOL). This paper discusses the REE recovery process for EOL products. The optimal dismantling of products is examined with an emphasis placed on obtaining used REPMs. The challenge of collecting, managing, transporting, and processing used products is addressed through the development of a cost model for REPM recovery. This model is used to investigate several EOL strategies for recovering REPMs. Sensitivity analysis is conducted to identify the key factors that influence value recovery economics. A hard disk drive serves as a case study for model demonstration.

  20. Resistive hydrogen sensing element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods are described for providing a hydrogen sensing element with a more robust exposed metallization by application of a discontinuous or porous overlay to hold the metallization firmly on the substrate. An apparatus includes: a substantially inert, electrically-insulating substrate; a first Pd containing metallization deposited upon the substrate and completely covered by a substantially hydrogen-impermeable layer so as to form a reference resistor on the substrate; a second Pd containing metallization deposited upon the substrate and at least a partially accessible to a gas to be tested, so as to form a hydrogen-sensing resistor; a protective structure disposed upon at least a portion of the second Pd containing metallization and at least a portion of the substrate to improve the attachment of the second Pd containing metallization to the substrate while allowing the gas to contact said the second Pd containing metallization; and a resistance bridge circuit coupled to both the first and second Pd containing metallizations. The circuit determines the difference in electrical resistance between the first and second Pd containing metallizations. The hydrogen concentration in the gas may be determined. The systems and methods provide advantages because adhesion is improved without adversely effecting measurement speed or sensitivity.

  1. ME 872 -Finite Element Methods Spring 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diaz, Alejandro

    Element Method: Linear Static and Dynamic Finite Element Analysis (Dover Civil and Mechanical Engineering problems Special topics: Lagrange multipliers, adaptive finite elements, sensitivity analysis, nonlinearME 872 - Finite Element Methods Spring 2014 Catalog Description: Theory and application

  2. 2009 US-Japan Workshop on Advanced Simulation Methods in Plasma Physics Holistic Simulation of Auroral Arcs Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Atsushi

    successfully car- ried out based on the Macro-Micro Interlocked (MMI) algorithm [6]. The holistic simula- tion the extreme decrease to the ionospheric electric field. Consequently, the change of the electric field

  3. 2009 US-Japan Workshop on Advanced Simulation Methods in Plasma Physics Plasma Particle Simulation with Adaptive Mesh Refinement Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Atsushi

    and dynamical load balancing, we use Morton ordered (Z-ordered) curve [2] which is a kind of space-filling curve fully threaded tree (FTT) data structure [1]. And we have parallelized the code, considering good load such as Hilbert curve. Generally, in particle code such as PIC, part of particle calculation occupies most

  4. US-Japan workshop Q-181 on high heat flux components and plasma-surface interactions for next devices: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGrath, R.T. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [ed.; Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yamashina, T. [ed.] [Hokkadio Univ. (Japan)] [ed.; Hokkadio Univ. (Japan)

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contain viewgraphs of papers from the following sessions: plasma facing components issues for future machines; recent PMI results from several tokamaks; high heat flux technology; plasma facing components design and applications; plasma facing component materials and irradiation damage; boundary layer plasma; plasma disruptions; conditioning and tritium; and erosion/redeposition.

  5. Method for treating rare earth-transition metal scrap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA); Peterson, David T. (Ames, IA); Wheelock, John T. (Nevada, IA); Jones, Lawrence L. (Des Moines, IA)

    1992-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g., iron) scrap (e.g., Nd-Fe-B scrap) is flux (slag) remelted to reduce tramp non-metallic impurities, such as oxygen and nitrogen, and metallic impurities, such as Li, Na, Al, etc., picked up by the scrap from previous fabrication operations. The tramp impurities are reduced to concentrations acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. The scrap is electroslag or inductoslag melted using a prefused, rare earth fluoride-bearing flux of CaF.sub.2, CaCl.sub.2 or mixtures thereof or the slag resulting from practice of the thermite reduction process to make a rare earth-iron alloy.

  6. Method for treating rare earth-transition metal scrap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, F.A.; Peterson, D.T.; Wheelock, J.T.; Jones, L.L.

    1992-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g., iron) scrap (e.g., Nd-Fe-B scrap) is flux (slag) remelted to reduce tramp non-metallic impurities, such as oxygen and nitrogen, and metallic impurities, such as Li, Na, Al, etc., picked up by the scrap from previous fabrication operations. The tramp impurities are reduced to concentrations acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. The scrap is electroslag or inductoslag melted using a rare earth fluoride-bearing flux of CaF[sub 2], CaCl[sub 2] or mixtures thereof or the slag resulting from practice of the thermite reduction process to make a rare earth-iron alloy. 3 figs.

  7. High efficiency rare-earth emitter for thermophotovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakr, E. S.; Zhou, Z.; Bermel, P., E-mail: pbermel@purdue.edu [Birck Nanotechnology Center, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, 1205 W. State St., West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we propose a rare-earth-based ceramic thermal emitter design that can boost thermophotovoltaic (TPV) efficiencies significantly without cold-side filters at a temperature of 1573?K (1300?°C). The proposed emitter enhances a naturally occurring rare earth transition using quality-factor matching, with a quarter-wave stack as a highly reflective back mirror, while suppressing parasitic losses via exponential chirping of a multilayer reflector transmitting only at short wavelengths. This allows the emissivity to approach the blackbody limit for wavelengths overlapping with the absorption peak of the rare-earth material, while effectively reducing the losses associated with undesirable long-wavelength emission. We obtain TPV efficiencies of 34% using this layered design, which only requires modest index contrast, making it particularly amenable to fabrication via a wide variety of techniques, including sputtering, spin-coating, and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

  8. Room-temperature-grown rare-earth-doped GaN luminescent thin films D. S. Lee and A. J. Steckla)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steckl, Andrew J.

    efforts to achieve this goal with GaN growth on oxide films or on glass substrates3­6 being a main focus: 50­100 °C. GaN films were grown on p-type 111 Si substrate by MBE with a Ga elemental sourceRoom-temperature-grown rare-earth-doped GaN luminescent thin films D. S. Lee and A. J. Steckla

  9. Rare-earth transition-metal intermetallics: Structure-bonding-property relationships

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, M.K.

    2006-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The explorations of rare-earth, transition metal intermetallics have resulted in the synthesis and characterization, and electronic structure investigation, as well as understanding the structure-bonding property relationships. The work has presented the following results: (1) Understanding the relationship between compositions and properties in LaFe{sub 13-x}Si{sub x} system: A detailed structural and theoretical investigation provided the understanding of the role of a third element on stabilizing the structure and controlling the transformation of cubic NaZn{sub 13}-type structures to the tetragonal derivative, as well as the relationship between the structures and properties. (2) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth iron silicides Re{sub 2-x}Fe{sub 4}Si{sub 14-y} and proposed superstructure: This compound offers complex structural challenges such as fractional occupancies and their ordering in superstructure. (3) Electronic structure calculation of FeSi{sub 2}: This shows that the metal-semiconductor phase transition depends on the structure. The mechanism of band gap opening is described in terms of bonding and structural distortion. This result shows that the electronic structure calculations are an essential tool for understanding the relationship between structure and chemical bonding in these compounds. (4) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth Zinc aluminides Tb{sub 3}Zn{sub 3.6}Al{sub 7.4}: Partially ordered structure of Tb{sub 3}Zn{sub 3.6}Al{sub 7.4} compound provides new insights into the formation, composition and structure of rare-earth transition-metal intermetallics. Electronic structure calculations attribute the observed composition to optimizing metal-metal bonding in the electronegative (Zn, Al) framework, while the specific ordering is strongly influenced by specific orbital interactions. (5) Synthesis of new structure type of Zn{sub 39}(Cr{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}){sub 81}: These layered structures are similar to icosahedral Mn-Al quasicrystalline compounds. Therefore, this compound may provide new insights into the formation, composition and structure of quasicrystalline materials.

  10. Rare-Earth Transition-Metal Intermetallics: Structure-bonding-Property Relationships

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mi-Kyung Han

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our explorations of rare-earth, transition metal intermetallics have resulted in the synthesis and characterization, and electronic structure investigation, as well as understanding the structure-bonding-property relationships. Our work has presented the following results: (1) Understanding the relationship between compositions and properties in LaFe{sub 13-x}Si{sub x} system: A detailed structural and theoretical investigation provided the understanding of the role of a third element on stabilizing the structure and controlling the transformation of cubic NaZn{sub 13}-type structures to the tetragonal derivative, as well as the relationship between the structures and properties. (2) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth iron silicides RE{sub 2-x}Fe{sub 4}Si{sub 14-y} and proposed superstructure: This compound offers complex structural challenges such as fractional occupancies and their ordering in superstructure. (3) Electronic structure calculation of FeSi{sub 2}: This shows that the metal-semiconductor phase transition depends on the structure. The mechanism of band gap opening is described in terms of bonding and structural distortion. This result shows that the electronic structure calculations are an essential tool for understanding the relationship between structure and chemical bonding in these compounds. (4) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth Zinc aluminides Tb{sub 3}Zn{sub 3.6}Al{sub 7.4}: Partially ordered structure of Tb{sub 3}Zn{sub 3.6}Al{sub 7.4} compound provides new insights into the formation, composition and structure of rare-earth transition-metal intermetallics. Electronic structure calculations attribute the observed composition to optimizing metal-metal bonding in the electronegative (Zn, Al) framework, while the specific ordering is strongly influenced by specific orbital interactions. (5) Synthesis of new structure type of Zn{sub 39}(Cr{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}){sub 81}: These layered structures are similar to icosahedral Mn-Al quasicrystalline compounds. Therefore, this compound may provide new insights into the formation, composition and structure of quasicrystalline materials.

  11. MAGNETISM AND SUPERCONDUCTIVITY OF ANOMALOUS RARE-EARTH METALS AND ALLOYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    MAGNETISM AND SUPERCONDUCTIVITY OF ANOMALOUS RARE-EARTH METALS AND ALLOYS B. COQBLIN Laboratoire de impurities. 1. Introduction. -The rare-earth metals can be divided in two groups : - The (( normal )) rare-earths lantha- num are (( anomalous )) rare-earths metals. The same duality exists in alloys with rareearth

  12. METAL-NON METAL TRANSITIONS /N RARE EARTH COMPOUNDS. EXPERIMENT AND THEORK /.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    METAL-NON METAL TRANSITIONS /N RARE EARTH COMPOUNDS. EXPERIMENT AND THEORK /. VALENCE INSTABILITIES, superconductivity, electron-phonon and band theory, to name a few. 2. Properties of normal rare earth metals. - Before discussing rare earth valence instabilities, three relevant general features of rare earth metals

  13. METALLIC HYDRIDES. Magnetic properties of laves-phase rare earth hydrides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    METALLIC HYDRIDES. Magnetic properties of laves-phase rare earth hydrides J. J. Rhyne and G. E on the rare earth site. The rare earth spins disorder at a temperature lower than the bulk Tc in ErFe2 H3 5 per formula unit assuming complete occupation of 3 tetrahedral sites. The heavy rare earth (RFe2

  14. Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackerman, John P. (Downers Grove, IL); Johnson, Terry R. (Wheaton, IL)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner.

  15. Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

    1994-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner. 1 fig.

  16. Rare earth-transition metal scrap treatment method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, F.A.; Peterson, D.T.; Wheelock, J.T.; Jones, L.L.; Lincoln, L.P.

    1992-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g. iron) scrap (e.g. Nd-Fe-B scrap) is melted to reduce the levels of tramp oxygen and nitrogen impurities therein. The tramp impurities are reduced in the melt by virtue of the reaction of the tramp impurities and the rare earth to form dross on the melt. The purified melt is separated from the dross for reuse. The oxygen and nitrogen of the melt are reduced to levels acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. 3 figs.

  17. Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner.

  18. The Rare Earth Peak : An Overlooked r-Process Diagnostic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Mumpower; G. McLaughlin; R. Surman

    2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The astrophysical site or sites responsible for the r-process of nucleosynthesis still remains an enigma. Since the rare earth region is formed in the latter stages of the r-process it provides a unique probe of the astrophysical conditions during which the r-process takes place. We use features of a successful rare earth region in the context of a high entropy r-process (S>100k_B) and discuss the types of astrophysical conditions that produce abundance patterns that best match meteoritic and observational data. Despite uncertainties in nuclear physics input, this method effectively constrains astrophysical conditions.

  19. Rare earth-transition metal scrap treatment method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA); Peterson, David T. (Ames, IA); Wheelock, John T. (Nevada, IA); Jones, Lawrence L. (Des Moines, IA); Lincoln, Lanny P. (Woodward, IA)

    1992-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g. iron) scrap (e.g. Nd-Fe-B scrap) is melted to reduce the levels of tramp oxygen and nitrogen impurities therein. The tramp impurities are reduced in the melt by virtue of the reaction of the tramp impurities and the rare earth to form dross on the melt. The purified melt is separated from the dross for reuse. The oxygen and nitrogen of the melt are reduced to levels acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets.

  20. Rare Earths -- The Fraternal Fifteen | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnicalPurchase, Delivery,AssistanceRare Earth Metals &Rare

  1. Coherent storage of microwave excitations in rare-earth nuclear spins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gary Wolfowicz; Hannes Maier-Flaig; Robert Marino; Alban Ferrier; Hervé Vezin; John J. L. Morton; Philippe Goldner

    2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Interfacing between various elements of a computer - from memory to processors to long range communication - will be as critical for quantum computers as it is for classical computers today. Paramagnetic rare earth doped crystals, such as Nd$^{3+}$:Y$_2$SiO$_5$ (YSO), are excellent candidates for such a quantum interface: they are known to exhibit long optical coherence lifetimes (for communication via optical photons), possess a nuclear spin (memory) and have in addition an electron spin that can offer hybrid coupling with superconducting qubits (processing). Here we study two of these three elements, demonstrating coherent storage and retrieval between electron and $^{145}$Nd nuclear spin states in Nd$^{3+}$:YSO. We find nuclear spin coherence times can reach 9 ms at $\\approx 5$ K, about two orders of magnitude longer than the electron spin coherence, while quantum state and process tomography of the storage/retrieval operation reveal an average state fidelity of 0.86. The times and fidelities are expected to further improve at lower temperatures and with more homogeneous radio-frequency excitation.

  2. Magnetism of the rare earth, 3d --Theoretical review Abstract. --Compounds of rare earth and transition metals exhibit unusual and quite different behaviour. In

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and secondly those determined mainly by rare earth metals. The first group are those rich in transition metal except TCo2, TNi5, T2Ni7, TNi3, TNi2. When the transition metal is magnetic, the coupling between rare-earth temperature are much smaller, and magnetic properties bear resemblances with rare earth metals. Thus we

  3. Method for detecting an element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blackwood, Larry G.; Reber, Edward L.; Rohde, Kenneth W.

    2007-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for detecting an element is disclosed and which includes the steps of providing a gamma-ray spectrum which depicts, at least in part, a test region having boundaries, and which has a small amount of the element to be detected; providing a calculation which detects the small amount of the element to be detected; and providing a moving window and performing the calculation within the moving window, and over a range of possible window boundaries within the test region to determine the location of the optimal test region within the gamma-ray spectrum.

  4. Derivation of an optical potential for statically deformed rare-earth nuclei from a global spherical potential

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nobre, G. P. A.; Palumbo, A.; Herman, M.; Brown, D.; Hoblit, S.; Dietrich, F. S.

    2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The coupled-channel theory is a natural way of treating nonelastic channels, in particular those arising from collective excitations characterized by nuclear deformations. A proper treatment of such excitations is often essential to the accurate description of experimental nuclear-reaction data and to the prediction of a wide variety of scattering observables. Stimulated by recent work substantiating the near validity of the adiabatic approximation in coupled-channel calculations for scattering on statically deformed nuclei, we explore the possibility of generalizing a global spherical optical model potential (OMP) to make it usable in coupled-channel calculations on this class of nuclei. To do this, wemore »have deformed the Koning-Delaroche global spherical potential for neutrons, coupling a sufficient number of states of the ground state band to ensure convergence. We present an extensive study of the effects of collective couplings and nuclear deformations on integrated cross sections as well as on angular distributions for neutron-induced reactions on statically deformed nuclei in the rare-earth region. We choose isotopes of three rare-earth elements (Gd, Ho, W), which are known to be nearly perfect rotors, to exemplify the results of the proposed method. Predictions from our model for total, elastic and inelastic cross sections, as well as for elastic and inelastic angular distributions, are in reasonable agreement with measured experimental data. These results suggest that the deformed Koning-Delaroche potential provides a useful regional neutron optical potential for the statically deformed rare earth nuclei.« less

  5. Derivation of an optical potential for statically deformed rare-earth nuclei from a global spherical potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. P. A. Nobre; A. Palumbo; F. S. Dietrich; M. Herman; D. Brown; S. Hoblit

    2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The coupled-channel theory is a natural way of treating nonelastic channels, in particular those arising from collective excitations characterized by nuclear deformations. A proper treatment of such excitations is often essential to the accurate description of experimental nuclear-reaction data and to the prediction of a wide variety of scattering observables. Stimulated by recent work substantiating the near validity of the adiabatic approximation in coupled-channel calculations for scattering on statically deformed nuclei, we explore the possibility of generalizing a global spherical optical model potential (OMP) to make it usable in coupled-channel calculations on this class of nuclei. To do this, we have deformed the Koning-Delaroche global spherical potential for neutrons, coupling a sufficient number of states of the ground state band to ensure convergence. We present an extensive study of the effects of collective couplings and nuclear deformations on integrated cross sections as well as on angular distributions for neutron-induced reactions on statically deformed nuclei in the rare-earth region. We choose isotopes of three rare-earth elements (Gd, Ho, W), which are known to be nearly perfect rotors, to exemplify the results of the proposed method. Predictions from our model for total, elastic and inelastic cross sections, as well as for elastic and inelastic angular distributions, are in reasonable agreement with measured experimental data. These results suggest that the deformed Koning-Delaroche potential provides a useful regional neutron optical potential for the statically deformed rare earth nuclei.

  6. Derivation of an optical potential for statically deformed rare-earth nuclei from a global spherical potential

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nobre, G. P. A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Palumbo, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Herman, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Brown, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hoblit, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Dietrich, F. S. [Walnut Creek, CA (United States)

    2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The coupled-channel theory is a natural way of treating nonelastic channels, in particular those arising from collective excitations characterized by nuclear deformations. A proper treatment of such excitations is often essential to the accurate description of experimental nuclear-reaction data and to the prediction of a wide variety of scattering observables. Stimulated by recent work substantiating the near validity of the adiabatic approximation in coupled-channel calculations for scattering on statically deformed nuclei, we explore the possibility of generalizing a global spherical optical model potential (OMP) to make it usable in coupled-channel calculations on this class of nuclei. To do this, we have deformed the Koning-Delaroche global spherical potential for neutrons, coupling a sufficient number of states of the ground state band to ensure convergence. We present an extensive study of the effects of collective couplings and nuclear deformations on integrated cross sections as well as on angular distributions for neutron-induced reactions on statically deformed nuclei in the rare-earth region. We choose isotopes of three rare-earth elements (Gd, Ho, W), which are known to be nearly perfect rotors, to exemplify the results of the proposed method. Predictions from our model for total, elastic and inelastic cross sections, as well as for elastic and inelastic angular distributions, are in reasonable agreement with measured experimental data. These results suggest that the deformed Koning-Delaroche potential provides a useful regional neutron optical potential for the statically deformed rare earth nuclei.

  7. Rare Isotope Beams for the 21st Century

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    James Symons

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In a scientific keynote address on Friday, June 12 at Michigan State University (MSU) in East Lansing, James Symons, Director of Berkeley Labs Nuclear Science Division (NSD), discussed the exciting research prospects of the new Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) to be built at MSUs National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory.

  8. Plant Population Viability and Restoration Potential for Rare Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plant Population Viability and Restoration Potential for Rare Plants Near Solar Installations ENVIRONMENTAL AREA RESEARCH PIER Environmental Research www.energy.ca.gov/research/ environmental March 2011 with renewable energy by 2020. Largescale solar developments are needed to achieve this goal

  9. ORIGINAL PAPER Effects of dynamic taxonomy on rare species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moreno Saiz, Juan Carlos

    ORIGINAL PAPER Effects of dynamic taxonomy on rare species and conservation listing: insights from nature of biotic taxonomies and how these changes alter perceptions of extinction risk and conservation that the activity of a new, fine-scale taxonomy may have an effect in the taxonomy structure producing a taxonomic

  10. Nearest-Neighbor-Based Active Learning for Rare Category Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbonell, Jaime

    Mellon University jgc@cs.cmu.edu Abstract Rare category detection is an open challenge for active for data mining - e.g. detecting new financial transaction fraud patterns, where normal legitimate to stopping similar future fraud transactions [2]. Another example is in astronomy. Most of the objects in sky

  11. September 23, 1997 Rare Events in Stochastic Dynamical Systems and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    September 23, 1997 Rare Events in Stochastic Dynamical Systems and Failures in Ultra­Reliable reliable is the system, the sharper is the approximation. In this model, we consider two types of failures that the distribution of a failure time can be approximated by an exponen­ tial law is not new in software reliability

  12. amorphous rare earth: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    amorphous rare earth First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Acoustic propagation at low...

  13. aqueous rare earth: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aqueous rare earth First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Hydrothermal transport and...

  14. An experimental study of the solubility and speciation of the Rare Earth Elements (III) in fluoride-and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    ). Moreover, most have been for neodymium-bearing species. Only one experimental study, Gammons et al. (2002 Cosmochimica Acta 73 (2009) 7087­7109 #12;were based on extrapolation of stability constants deter- mined

  15. Iron Isotope and Rare Earth Element Patterns of the Neoproterozoic Fulu Formation, South China: Implications for Late Proterozoic Ocean Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldbaum, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    V. W. (1981). Chemical diagenesis in Narragansett Bayinfluences on the diagenesis of Beecher's Trilobite Bed andvalue unaffected by diagenesis. 4. Results and Discussion

  16. Elemental ABAREX -- a user's manual.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, A.B.

    1999-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    ELEMENTAL ABAREX is an extended version of the spherical optical-statistical model code ABAREX, designed for the interpretation of neutron interactions with elemental targets consisting of up to ten isotopes. The contributions from each of the isotopes of the element are explicitly dealt with, and combined for comparison with the elemental observables. Calculations and statistical fitting of experimental data are considered. The code is written in FORTRAN-77 and arranged for use on the IBM-compatible personal computer (PC), but it should operate effectively on a number of other systems, particularly VAX/VMS and IBM work stations. Effort is taken to make the code user friendly. With this document a reasonably skilled individual should become fluent with the use of the code in a brief period of time.

  17. Environmental research on actinide elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinder, J.E. III; Alberts, J.J.; McLeod, K.W.; Schreckhise, R.G. (eds.)

    1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The papers synthesize the results of research sponsored by DOE's Office of Health and Environmental Research on the behavior of transuranic and actinide elements in the environment. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the 21 individual papers. (ACR)

  18. Determination of toxic elements in the ecological evaluation of metalliferous deposits of heavy oil and natural bitumens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, I.S.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Elements such as vanadium, nickel, zinc, arsenic, selenium, and mercury are present in highly toxic compounds in many workable deposits of heavy oil and natural bitumens. Refining this raw material and, especially, using the heavy residues as furnace fuel and as binding material for road paving, can lead to contamination of the environment unless measures are taken to remove the metals. Various investigations of the rare and disseminated elements in heavy oil and natural bitumens have encompassed a broad range of problems: (1) In refining, assessing the role of rare elements in technological processes in order to choose the optimal schemes for refining and improving the quality of petroleum products. (2) In protecting the environment and, in particular, identifying toxic compounds in fuel oils which, when burned at power stations, emit a substantial number of harmful substances into the atmosphere. (3) In determining commercial by-products, such as vanadium and nickel, in the petroleum and bitumen raw material.

  19. Experimental Investigations into U/TRU Recovery using a Liquid Cadmium Cathode and Salt Containing High Rare Earth Concentrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shelly X. Li; Steven D. Herrmann; Michael F. Simpson

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental Investigations into U/TRU Recovery using a Liquid Cadmium Cathode and Salt Containing High Rare Earth Concentrations Shelly X. Li, Steven D. Herrmann, and Michael F. Simpson Pyroprocessing Technology Department Idaho National Laboratory P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 USA Abstract - A series of six bench-scale liquid cadmium cathode (LCC) tests was performed to obtain basic separation data with focus on the behavior of rare earth elements. The electrolyte used for the tests was a mixed salt from the Mk-IV and Mk-V electrorefiners, in which spent metal fuels from Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) had been processed. Rare earth (RE) chlorides, such as NdCl3, CeCl3, LaCl3, PrCl3, SmCl3, and YCl3, were spiked into the salt prior to the first test to create an extreme case for investigating rare earth contamination of the actinides collected by a LCC. For the first two LCC tests, an alloy with the nominal composition of 41U-30Pu-5Am-3Np-20Zr-1RE was loaded into the anode baskets as the feed material. The anode feed material for Runs 3 to 6 was spent ternary fuel (U-19Pu-10Zr). The Pu/U ratio in the salt varied from 0.6 to 1.3. Chemical and radiochemical analytical results confirmed that U and transuranics can be collected into the LCC as a group under the given run conditions. The RE contamination level in the LCC product was up to 6.7 wt% of the total metal collected. The detailed data for partitioning of actinides and REs in the salt and Cd phases are reported in the paper.

  20. The Heaviest Elements in the Universe

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    keep finding new elements. Where are they? Where are they? Where are they? Ytterby, Sweden is the namesake of four elements: ytterbium, yttrium, erbium, and terbium. The...

  1. Nuclear orientation studies of rare-earth metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krane, K.S.; Morgan, G.L.; Moses, J.D.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The angular distributions of gamma rays from /sup 166m/Ho and /sup 160/Tb aligned at low temperatures in, respectively, Ho metal and Tb metal have been measured. Large hyperfine splittings, expected for the rare earths, have been deduced from the temperature dependence of the gamma-ray anisotropies. Both samples show a macroscopic magnetic anisotropy that is not consistent with an interpretation in terms of a randomly oriented polycrystalline structure.

  2. Higher order antibunching is not a rare phenomenon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prakash Gupta; Pratap Narayan Pandey; Anirban Pathak

    2005-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the introduction of higher order nonclassical effects, higher order squeezing has been reported in a number of different physical systems but higher order antibunching is predicted only in three particular cases. In the present work, we have shown that the higher order antibunching is not a rare phenomenon rather it can be seen in many simple optical processes. To establish our claim, we have shown it in six wave mixing process, four wave mixing process and in second harmonic generation process.

  3. Physics and Outlook for Rare, All-neutral Eta Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mack, David J. [JLAB

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The $\\eta$ meson provides a laboratory to study isospin violation and search for new flavor-conserving sources of C and CP violation with a sensitivity approaching $10^{-6}$ of the isospin-conserving strong amplitude. Some of the most interesting rare $\\eta$ decays are the neutral modes, yet the effective loss of photons from the relatively common decay $\\eta \\rightarrow 3\\pi^0 \\rightarrow 6\\gamma$ (33$\\%$) has largely limited the sensitivity for decays producing 3-5$\\gamma$'s. Particularly important relevant branches include the highly suppressed $\\eta \\rightarrow \\pi^0 2\\gamma \\rightarrow 4\\gamma$, which provides a rare window on testing models of $O(p^6)$ contributions in ChPTh, and $\\eta \\rightarrow 3\\gamma$ and $\\eta \\rightarrow 2\\pi^0 \\gamma \\rightarrow 5\\gamma$ which provide direct constraints on C violation in flavor-conserving processes. The substitution of lead tungstate in the forward calorimeter of the GluEx setup in Jefferson Lab's new Hall D would allow dramatically improved measurements. The main niche of this facility, which we call the JLab Eta Factory (JEF), would be $\\eta$ decay neutral modes. However, this could likely be expanded to rare $\\eta'(958)$ decays for low energy QCD studies as well as $\\eta$ decays involving muons for new physics searches.

  4. Spent graphite fuel element processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holder, N.D.; Olsen, C.W.

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy currently sponsors two programs to demonstrate the processing of spent graphite fuel elements. General Atomic in San Diego operates a cold pilot plant to demonstrate the processing of both US and German high-temperature reactor fuel. Exxon Nuclear Idaho Company is demonstrating the processing of spent graphite fuel elements from Rover reactors operated for the Nuclear Rocket Propulsion Program. This work is done at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, where a hot facility is being constructed to complete processing of the Rover fuel. This paper focuses on the graphite combustion process common to both programs.

  5. Reduction Chemistry of Rare-Earth Metal Complexes: Toward New Reactivity and Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wenliang

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Elsner, A. ; Milliken, M. As hybrid cars gobble rare metals,rare-earths are heavily used in fuel-efficient hybrid cars.In a leading model of hybrid car, 1 kilogram of neodymium

  6. UQM Patents Non-Rare Earth Magnet Motor under DOE-Supported Project...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    that do not use rare earth metals will potentially be less expensive and have more stable prices. Non-rare earth motors may also rely more on domestic resources and processing...

  7. Rare-earth tantalates and niobates suitable for use as nanophosphors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nyman, May D; Rohwer, Lauren E.S& gt

    2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A family of rare-earth Group 5 oxides, where the Group 5 oxide is a niobate or tantalate. The rare-earth Group 5 oxides can be doped with suitable emitter ions to form nanophosphors.

  8. Alternative High-Performance Motors with Non-Rare Earth Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Performance Motors with Non-Rare Earth Materials Alternative High-Performance Motors with Non-Rare Earth Materials 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

  9. Sixth Annual Colorado Rare Plant Symposium Overview of G2 Plants of Northern Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sixth Annual Colorado Rare Plant Symposium Overview of G2 Plants of Northern Colorado 9:00 am - 4 Anticlea (Zigadenus) vaginatus 3:15 Rare Plant Conservation Initiative ­ CNHP/TNC 4:00 Adjourn #12;

  10. Statistics of amplitude and fluid velocity of large and rare waves in the ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suh, Il Ho

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The understanding of large and rare waves in the ocean is becoming more important as these rare events are turning into more common observances. In order to design a marine structure or vehicle to withstand such a potentially ...

  11. Ames Lab, CMI, NEDO hold First Meeting on Rare Metals | The Ames...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NEDO hold First Meeting on Rare Metals Image A delegation from Ames Laboratory and the Critical Materials Institute traveled to Japan May 19-20 for the first meeting on rare...

  12. RARE EARTHS1 (Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The approximate distribution in 2002 by end use was as follows: petroleum refining catalysts, 27%; glass polishing. The estimated value of refined rare earths consumed in the United States was more than $1 billion-earth metals, alloy 1,780 2,470 1,420 1,450 1,130 Cerium compounds 3,990 4,310 3,850 2,540 2,630 Mixed REOs 5

  13. RARE EARTHS1 (Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    %; permanent magnets, 16%; petroleum refining catalysts, 12%; metallurgical additives and alloys, 9%; rare-earth products. Domestic ore production was valued at an estimated $28 million. The estimated value of refined, alloy 529 953 1,780 2,470 1,670 Cerium compounds 1,810 4,940 3,990 4,310 4,940 Mixed REOs 974 2,530 5

  14. RARE EARTHS1 (Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , televisions, computer monitors, radar, and X-ray intensifying film, 10%; petroleum refining catalysts, 8 continued to be a major exporter and consumer of rare-earth products in 2006. The estimated value of refined-earth metals, alloy 1,450 1,130 804 880 947 Cerium compounds 2,540 2,630 1,880 2,170 2,530 Mixed REOs 1,040 2

  15. Element

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian NuclearandJunetrack graphics4DimitriJuneEnergy(FebruaryDepartmental

  16. Thesis and Dissertation Required Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    /dissertation documents have a uniform appearance and are suitable for archiving. The requirements follow the guidelines to the following guidelines are acceptable. · All margins must be at least 1.25" and may not be more than 1/dissertation should be double-spaced. #12;Thesis and Dissertation Required Elements 2012 version Paragraph Indentation

  17. Single element laser beam shaper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Shukui (Yorktown, VA); Michelle D. Shinn (Newport News, VA)

    2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A single lens laser beam shaper for converting laser beams from any spatial profile to a flat-top or uniform spatial profile. The laser beam shaper includes a lens having two aspheric surfaces. The beam shaper significantly simplifies the overall structure in comparison with conventional 2-element systems and therefore provides great ease in alignment and reduction of cost.

  18. Fast acting multiple element valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Jefferson Y. S. (Orange, CA); Wada, James M. (Torrance, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A plurality of slide valve elements having plural axial-spaced annular parts and an internal slide are inserted into a bulkhead in a fluid conduit from a downstream side of the bulkhead, locked in place by a bayonet coupling and set screw, and project through the bulkhead into the upstream conduit. Pneumatic lines connecting the slide valve element actuator to pilot valves are brought out the throat of the valve element to the downstream side. Pilot valves are radially spaced around the exterior of the valve to permit the pneumatic lines to be made identical, thereby to minimize adverse timing tolerances in operation due to pressure variations. Ring manifolds surround the valve adjacent respective pilot valve arrangements to further reduce adverse timing tolerances due to pressure variations, the manifolds being directly connected to the respective pilot valves. Position sensors are provided the valve element slides to signal the precise time at which a slide reaches or passes through a particular point in its stroke to initiate a calibrated timing function.

  19. The Uranium Processing Facility Finite Element Meshing Discussion

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    more nodes and elements (1 element 9 elements) - Changed from GTStrudl to SAP 2000. - Linear elastic computer model * DOE Project 2 - 15'-20' element size deemed...

  20. Alea 1, 181203 (2006) Genetic Genealogical Models in Rare Event Analy-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alea 1, 181­203 (2006) Genetic Genealogical Models in Rare Event Analy- sis Fr´ed´eric C and a genealogical model for estimating a class of rare events arising in physics and network analysis. We represent particle systems, rare events, Feynman-Kac models, ge- netic algorithms, genealogical trees. Second version

  1. Formation Of The Rare Earth Peak: Gaining Insight Into Late-Time r-Process Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthew Mumpower; Gail McLaughlin; Rebecca Surman

    2011-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the formation and final structure of the rare earth peak ($A\\sim160$) of the $r$-process nucleosynthesis. The rare earth peak forms at late times in the $r$-process after neutron exhaustion (neutron-to-seed ratio unity or R=1) as matter decays back to stability. Since rare earth peak formation does not occur during \

  2. Structure of liquid transition and rare earth metals S. N. Khanna and F. Cyrot-Lackmann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    L-45 Structure of liquid transition and rare earth metals S. N. Khanna and F. Cyrot-Lackmann Groupe It is shown that the observed structure factors of transition and rare earth liquid metals can be reaso- nably. The difference is particularly large for V, Ti, and rare earth metals which are precisely the metals where

  3. ANISO TROPIE ET MAGNETOSTRICTION MAGNETOCRYS T A L L N AM SOTROPYIN RARE EARTHSANDTHEIRALLOYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . -Magnetocrystalline anisotropy of rare earth impurities doped in Gd metal was measured by torque method constants of rare earth metals was first attempted by Liu and al. [I]for Dy through the observation determination of the aniso- tropy constants. In the present experiments, one species of rare earth metals

  4. A Rare Earth-DOTA-Binding Antibody: Probe Properties and Binding Affinity across the Lanthanide Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Andrew J.

    1) binds transition metals and rare earths with extreme stability under physiological conditionsA Rare Earth-DOTA-Binding Antibody: Probe Properties and Binding Affinity across the Lanthanide affinity and exquisite specificity.1 An antibody that binds rare earth complexes selectively could be used

  5. Pressure-Induced Electronic Phase Transitions Transition Metal Oxides and Rare Earth Metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Islam, M. Saif

    Pressure-Induced Electronic Phase Transitions in Transition Metal Oxides and Rare Earth Metals Metal Oxides and Rare Earth Metals by Brian Ross Maddox Electron correlation can affect profound changes transition in a transition metal monoxide. iv #12;The lanthanides (the 4f metals also known as rare-earths

  6. Half-metallic to insulating behavior of rare-earth nitrides C. M. Aerts,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svane, Axel Torstein

    Half-metallic to insulating behavior of rare-earth nitrides C. M. Aerts,1 P. Strange,1 M. Horne,1 W in the literature that rare-earth nitrides may form half-metallic ferromagnets.6­8 This is sur- prising because 30 January 2004 The electronic structure of the rare-earth nitrides is studied systematically using

  7. Review Article: Rare-earth monosulfides as durable and efficient cold cathodesa) Marc Cahayb)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boolchand, Punit

    structure, rare-earth monosulfides offer a more stable alternative to alkali metals to attain lowReview Article: Rare-earth monosulfides as durable and efficient cold cathodesa) Marc Cahayb made of these materials are very unstable. Beginning in 2001, we have studied rare-earth (RE

  8. Disordered electronic and magnetic systems - transition metal (Mn) and rare earth (Gd) doped amorphous group IV semiconductors (C, Si, Ge)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Li

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    various transition or rare-earth metals provide a rich ?eldTransition Metal (Mn) and Rare Earth (Gd) Doped AmorphousTransition Metal (Mn) and Rare Earth (Gd) Doped Amorphous

  9. The formation of crystals in glasses containing rare earth oxides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fadzil, Syazwani Mohd [Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Hrma, Pavel [Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang, South Korea and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington (United States); Crum, Jarrod [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington (United States); Siong, Khoo Kok; Ngatiman, Mohammad Fadzlee; Said, Riduan Mt [National University of Malaysia, Bandar Baru Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Korean spent nuclear fuel will reach the capacity of the available temporary storage by 2016. Pyroprocessing and direct disposal seems to be an alternative way to manage and reuse spent nuclear fuel while avoiding the wet reprocessing technology. Pyroprocessing produces several wastes streams, including metals, salts, and rare earths, which must be converted into stabilized form. A suitable form for rare earth immobilization is borosilicate glass. The borosilicate glass form exhibits excellent durability, allows a high waste loading, and is easy to process. In this work, we combined the rare earths waste of composition (in wt%) 39.2Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}–22.7CeO{sub 2}–11.7La{sub 2}O{sub 3}–10.9PrO{sub 2}–1.3Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3}–1.3Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}–8.1Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}–4.8Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} with a baseline glass of composition 60.2SiO{sub 2}–16.0B{sub 2}O{sub 3}–12.6Na{sub 2}O–3.8Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–5.7CaO–1.7ZrO{sub 2}. Crystallization in waste glasses occurs as the waste loading increases. It may produce complicate glass processing and affect the product quality. To study crystal formation, we initially made glasses containing 5%, 10% and 15% of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} and then glasses with 5%, 10% and 15% of the complete rare earth mix. Samples were heat-treated for 24 hours at temperatures 800°C to 1150°C in 50°C increments. Quenched samples were analyzed using an optical microscope, scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. Stillwellite (LaBSiO{sub 5}) and oxyapatite (Ca{sub 2}La{sub 8}Si{sub 6}O{sub 26}) were found in glasses containing La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, while oxyapatite (Ca{sub 2}La{sub 8}Si{sub 6}O{sub 26} and NaNd{sub 9}Si{sub 6}O{sub 26}) precipitated in glasses with additions of mixed rare earths. The liquidus temperature (T{sub L}) of the glasses containing 5%, 10% and 15% La{sub 2}O{sub 3} were 800°C, 959°C and 986°C, respectively; while T{sub L} was 825°C, 1059°C and 1267°C for glasses with 5%, 10% and 15% addition of mixed rare earth oxides. The component coefficients T{sub B2O3}, T{sub SiO2}, T{sub CaO}, and T{sub RE2O3} were also evaluated using a recently published study.

  10. Carbide/nitride grain refined rare earth-iron-boron permanent magnet and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCallum, R. William (Ames, IA); Branagan, Daniel J. (Ames, IA)

    1996-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making a permanent magnet wherein 1) a melt is formed having a base alloy composition comprising RE, Fe and/or Co, and B (where RE is one or more rare earth elements) and 2) TR (where TR is a transition metal selected from at least one of Ti, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, W, and Al) and at least one of C and N are provided in the base alloy composition melt in substantially stoichiometric amounts to form a thermodynamically stable compound (e.g. TR carbide, nitride or carbonitride). The melt is rapidly solidified in a manner to form particulates having a substantially amorphous (metallic glass) structure and a dispersion of primary TRC, TRN and/or TRC/N precipitates. The amorphous particulates are heated above the crystallization temperature of the base alloy composition to nucleate and grow a hard magnetic phase to an optimum grain size and to form secondary TRC, TRN and/or TRC/N precipitates dispersed at grain boundaries. The crystallized particulates are consolidated at an elevated temperature to form a shape. During elevated temperature consolidation, the primary and secondary precipitates act to pin the grain boundaries and minimize deleterious grain growth that is harmful to magnetic properties.

  11. Carbide/nitride grain refined rare earth-iron-boron permanent magnet and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCallum, R.W.; Branagan, D.J.

    1996-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making a permanent magnet is disclosed wherein (1) a melt is formed having a base alloy composition comprising RE, Fe and/or Co, and B (where RE is one or more rare earth elements) and (2) TR (where TR is a transition metal selected from at least one of Ti, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, W, and Al) and at least one of C and N are provided in the base alloy composition melt in substantially stoichiometric amounts to form a thermodynamically stable compound (e.g. TR carbide, nitride or carbonitride). The melt is rapidly solidified in a manner to form particulates having a substantially amorphous (metallic glass) structure and a dispersion of primary TRC, TRN and/or TRC/N precipitates. The amorphous particulates are heated above the crystallization temperature of the base alloy composition to nucleate and grow a hard magnetic phase to an optimum grain size and to form secondary TRC, TRN and/or TRC/N precipitates dispersed at grain boundaries. The crystallized particulates are consolidated at an elevated temperature to form a shape. During elevated temperature consolidation, the primary and secondary precipitates act to pin the grain boundaries and minimize deleterious grain growth that is harmful to magnetic properties. 33 figs.

  12. Review of New Rare Hadronic B-decay Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James G. Smith

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new result from Belle and many new results from BABAR for rare hadronic B decays. These include measurements of decays involving baryons, a Dalitz plot analysis of the three-charged-kaon system, many new results for B decays to eta'X and omegaX, and a limit for the decay B-> a_1 rho. Measurements of the vector-vector decays B->rhoKstar and B->omegaKstar are helping to understand the value of the longitudinal polarization fraction for these B->VV decays.

  13. Rare Decays And Exotic States With BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, S.H.; /McGill U.

    2006-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Results from the BABAR experiment are presented for searches for several rare FCNC B and D meson decays, including the modes B{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} and D{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}, B {yields} ({rho},{omega}){gamma} and B{sup +} {yields} (K,{pi}){sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}. Limits on lepton flavor violation in neutrino-less {tau} decays are also discussed. Finally, results of BABAR searches for the strange pentaquark states {Theta}{sup +}(1540), {Xi}{sup --}(1860) and {Xi}{sup 0}(1860) are summarized.

  14. Search for New Physics in Rare Top Decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratishruti Saha

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Top physics provides a fertile ground for new-physics searches. At present, most top observables appear to be in good agreement with the respective Standard Model predictions. However, in the case of decay modes that are suppressed in the Standard Model, new-physics contributions of comparable magnitude may exist and yet go unnoticed because their impact on the total decay width is small. Hence it is interesting to probe rare top decays. This analysis focuses on the decay $t \\to b \\bar b c$. Useful observables are identified and prospects for measuring new-physics parameters are examined.

  15. DOE Announces RFI on Rare Earth Metals | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesvilleAbout » ContactDepartment of Energy| Department ofRFI on Rare

  16. Non-Rare Earth magnetic materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in Many DevilsForumEnginesVacantmagnetic materials Non-Rare Earth

  17. Electronic structure of rare-earth metals | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEAWater UseC SupportsElectronic structure of rare-earth

  18. Jefferson Lab Laser Twinkles in Rare Color | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 InvestigationLab GroupHumanLaser Twinkles in Rare Color

  19. Rare Earth Metals & Alloys | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnicalPurchase, Delivery,AssistanceRare Earth Metals & Alloys

  20. Rare Earth Metals for Science | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnicalPurchase, Delivery,AssistanceRare Earth Metals &

  1. The Origin of the Elements

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Murphy, Edward

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The world around us is made of atoms. Did you ever wonder where these atoms came from? How was the gold in our jewelry, the carbon in our bodies, and the iron in our cars made? In this lecture, we will trace the origin of a gold atom from the Big Bang to the present day, and beyond. You will learn how the elements were forged in the nuclear furnaces inside stars, and how, when they die, these massive stars spread the elements into space. You will learn about the origin of the building blocks of matter in the Big Bang, and we will speculate on the future of the atoms around us today.

  2. Element of an inductive coupler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An element for an inductive coupler in a downhole component comprises magnetically conductive material, which is disposed in a recess in annular housing. The magnetically conductive material forms a generally circular trough. The circular trough comprises an outer generally U-shaped surface, an inner generally U-shaped surface, and two generally planar surfaces joining the inner and outer surfaces. The element further comprises pressure relief grooves in at least one of the surfaces of the circular trough. The pressure relief grooves may be scored lines. Preferably the pressure relief grooves are parallel to the magnetic field generated by the magnetically conductive material. The magnetically conductive material is selected from the group consisting of soft iron, ferrite, a nickel iron alloy, a silicon iron alloy, a cobalt iron alloy, and a mu-metal. Preferably, the annular housing is a metal ring.

  3. Composite oxygen ion transport element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Jack C. (Getzville, NY); Besecker, Charles J. (Batavia, IL); Chen, Hancun (Williamsville, NY); Robinson, Earil T. (Mentor, OH)

    2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A composite oxygen ion transport element that has a layered structure formed by a dense layer to transport oxygen ions and electrons and a porous support layer to provide mechanical support. The dense layer can be formed of a mixture of a mixed conductor, an ionic conductor, and a metal. The porous support layer can be fabricated from an oxide dispersion strengthened metal, a metal-reinforced intermetallic alloy, a boron-doped Mo.sub.5Si.sub.3-based intermetallic alloy or combinations thereof. The support layer can be provided with a network of non-interconnected pores and each of said pores communicates between opposite surfaces of said support layer. Such a support layer can be advantageously employed to reduce diffusion resistance in any type of element, including those using a different material makeup than that outlined above.

  4. Self supporting heat transfer element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Story, Grosvenor Cook (Livermore, CA); Baldonado, Ray Orico (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides an improved internal heat exchange element arranged so as to traverse the inside diameter of a container vessel such that it makes good mechanical contact with the interior wall of that vessel. The mechanical element is fabricated from a material having a coefficient of thermal conductivity above about 0.8 W cm.sup.-1.degree. K.sup.-1 and is designed to function as a simple spring member when that member has been cooled to reduce its diameter to just below that of a cylindrical container or vessel into which it is placed and then allowed to warm to room temperature. A particularly important application of this invention is directed to a providing a simple compartmented storage container for accommodating a hydrogen absorbing alloy.

  5. Photoconductive circuit element pulse generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rauscher, Christen (Alexandria, VA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pulse generator for characterizing semiconductor devices at millimeter wavelength frequencies where a photoconductive circuit element (PCE) is biased by a direct current voltage source and produces short electrical pulses when excited into conductance by short laser light pulses. The electrical pulses are electronically conditioned to improve the frequency related amplitude characteristics of the pulses which thereafter propagate along a transmission line to a device under test.

  6. The elements of nuclear power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennet, D.J.; Thomson, J.R.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An introduction to the principles of nuclear fission power generation. Describes the physical processes which occur in a nuclear reactor and discusses the theory behind the calculations. Also covers heat transfer in reactors, thermodynamic power cycles, reactor operators, and radiation shielding. Material covered includes topics on the effects of nuclear radiation on humans, the safety of nuclear reactors and of those parts of the nuclear fuel cycle which deal with fuel element manufacture and the reprocessing of irradiated fuel.

  7. Ab Initio Nuclear Structure and Reaction Calculations for Rare Isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Draayer, Jerry P [Louisiana State University

    2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a novel ab initio symmetry-adapted no-core shell model (SA-NCSM), which has opened the intermediate-mass region for ab initio investigations, thereby providing an opportunity for first-principle symmetry-guided applications to nuclear structure and reactions for nuclear isotopes from the lightest p-shell systems to intermediate-mass nuclei. This includes short-lived proton-rich nuclei on the path of X-ray burst nucleosynthesis and rare neutron-rich isotopes to be produced by the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). We have provided ab initio descriptions of high accuracy for low-lying (including collectivity-driven) states of isotopes of Li, He, Be, C, O, Ne, Mg, Al, and Si, and studied related strong- and weak-interaction driven reactions that are important, in astrophysics, for further understanding stellar evolution, X-ray bursts and triggering of s, p, and rp processes, and in applied physics, for electron and neutrino-nucleus scattering experiments as well as for fusion ignition at the National Ignition Facility (NIF).

  8. Coherent properties of single rare-earth spin qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Siyushev; K. Xia; R. Reuter; M. Jamali; N. Zhao; N. Yang; C. Duan; N. Kukharchyk; A. D. Wieck; R. Kolesov; J. Wrachtrup

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Rare-earth-doped crystals are excellent hardware for quantum storage of optical information. Additional functionality of these materials is added by their waveguiding properties allowing for on-chip photonic networks. However, detection and coherent properties of rare-earth single-spin qubits have not been demonstrated so far. Here, we present experimental results on high-fidelity optical initialization, effcient coherent manipulation, and optical readout of a single electron spin of Ce$^{3+}$ ion in a YAG crystal. Under dynamic decoupling, spin coherence lifetime reaches $T_2$=2 ms and is almost limited by the measured spin-lattice relaxation time $T_1$=3.8 ms. Strong hyperfine coupling to aluminium nuclear spins suggests that cerium electron spins can be exploited as an interface between photons and long-lived nuclear spin memory. Combined with high brightness of Ce$^{3+}$ emission and a possibility of creating photonic circuits out of the host material, this makes cerium spins an interesting option for integrated quantum photonics.

  9. Clues for flavor from rare lepton and quark decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varzielas, Ivo de Medeiros

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flavor symmetries successfully explain lepton and quark masses and mixings yet it is usually hard to distinguish different models that predict the same mixing angles. Further experimental input could be available, if the agents of flavor breaking are sufficiently low in mass and detectable or if new physics with non-trivial flavor charges is sufficiently low in mass and detectable. The recent hint for lepton-nonuniversality in the ratio of branching fractions $B \\to K \\mu \\mu$ over $B \\to K e e$, $R_K$, suggests the latter, at least for indirect detection via rare decays. We demonstrate the discriminating power of the rare decay data on flavor model building taking into account viable leptonic mixings and show how correlations with other observables exist in leptoquark models. We give expectations for branching ratios $B \\to K \\ell \\ell^\\prime, B_{(s)} \\to \\ell \\ell^\\prime$ and $\\ell \\to \\ell^\\prime \\gamma$, and Higgs decays $h \\to \\ell \\ell^\\prime$.

  10. Sublattice Magnetic Relaxation in Rare Earth Iron Garnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCloy, John S.; Walsh, Brian

    2013-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The magnetic properties of rare earth garnets make them attractive materials for applications ranging from optical communications to magnetic refrigeration. The purpose of this research was to determine the AC magnetic properties of several rare earth garnets, in order to ascertain the contributions of various sublattices. Gd3Fe5O¬12, Gd3Ga5O12, Tb3Fe5O12, Tb3Ga5O12, and Y3Fe5O12 were synthesized by a solid state reaction of their oxides and verified by x-ray diffraction. Frequency-dependent AC susceptibility and DC magnetization were measured versus temperature (10 – 340 K). Field cooling had little effect on AC susceptibility, but large effect on DC magnetization, increasing magnetization at the lowest temperature and shifting the compensation point to lower temperatures. Data suggest that interaction of the two iron lattices results in the two frequency dependent magnetic relaxations in the iron garnets, which were fit using the Vogel-Fulcher and Arrhenius laws.

  11. Coherency strain enhanced dielectric-temperature property of rare-earth doped BaTiO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeon, Sang-Chae; Kang, Suk-Joong L. [Materials Interface Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Materials Interface Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Core/shell-grained BaTiO{sub 3} samples were prepared with addition of rare earth elements. The core/shell interface was semi-coherent, and many misfit dislocations formed in Dy-doped samples. In contrast, a coherent interface and few dislocations were observed in Ho- and Er-doped samples. Dy-doped samples exhibited poor temperature stability, showing a peak with no frequency dispersion. Ho- and Er-doped samples exhibited a broad curve with frequency dispersion. This improved temperature stability is attributed to the coherency strain, which leads to the formation of polar nano-regions in the shell. Coherency at the core/shell interface is critical to improve the temperature stability of core/shell-structured BaTiO{sub 3}.

  12. Iron-Nickel-Based SuperMagnets: Multiscale Development of L10 Materials for Rare Earth-Free Permanent Magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REACT Project: Northeastern University will develop bulk quantities of rare-earth-free permanent magnets with an iron-nickel crystal structure for use in the electric motors of renewable power generators and EVs. These materials could offer magnetic properties that are equivalent to today’s best commercial magnets, but with a significant cost reduction and diminished environmental impact. This iron-nickel crystal structure, which is only found naturally in meteorites and developed over billions of years in space, will be artificially synthesized by the Northeastern University team. Its material structure will be replicated with the assistance of alloying elements introduced to help it achieve superior magnetic properties. The ultimate goal of this project is to demonstrate bulk magnetic properties that can be fabricated at the industrial scale.

  13. Theoretical studies of strongly correlated rare-earth intermetallics RIn? and RSn? (R=Sm, Eu, and Gd)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafiq, M.; Ahmad, Iftikhar, E-mail: ahma5532@gmail.com, E-mail: dr.iftikhar@uom.edu.pk [Center for Computational Materials Science, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Department of Physics, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Jalali Asadabadi, S. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Isfahan, Hezar Gerib Avenue, Isfahan 81744 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the structural, elastic, and electronic properties of RIn? and RSn? (R = Sm, Eu, Gd) compounds have been investigated using the full potential linearized augmented plane wave plus local orbital method within the density functional theory. The structural properties are investigated using the LDA, GGA, and the band correlated LDA+U and GGA+U schemes. The lattice parameters are in good agreement with the available experimental results and the divalent state of Eu is also verified. The spin-orbit coupling is included in order to predict the correct electronic properties and splitting of 4f states of the rare earth elements is also incorporated. We calculated Bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young's modulus, anisotropic ratio, Kleinman parameters, Poisson's ratio, Lame's co-efficient, sound velocities for shear and longitudinal waves, and Debye temperature. We also predict the Cauchy pressure and B/G ratio in order to explore the ductile and brittle behaviors of these compounds.

  14. Essential Grid Workflow Monitoring Elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunter, Daniel K.; Jackson, Keith R.; Konerding, David E.; Lee,Jason R.; Tierney, Brian L.

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Troubleshooting Grid workflows is difficult. A typicalworkflow involves a large number of components networks, middleware,hosts, etc. that can fail. Even when monitoring data from all thesecomponents is accessible, it is hard to tell whether failures andanomalies in these components are related toa given workflow. For theGrid to be truly usable, much of this uncertainty must be elim- inated.We propose two new Grid monitoring elements, Grid workflow identifiersand consistent component lifecycle events, that will make Gridtroubleshooting easier, and thus make Grids more usable, by simplifyingthe correlation of Grid monitoring data with a particular Gridworkflow.

  15. Element Partners | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJump to: navigation,Electrosolar Jump to:Element Energy Ltd

  16. Stacked Switchable Element and Diode Combination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branz, H. M.; Wang, Q.

    2006-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A device (10) comprises a semiconductor diode (12) and a switchable element (14) positioned in stacked adjacent relationship so that the semiconductor diode (12) and the switchable element (14) are electrically connected in series with one another. The switchable element (14) is switchable from a low-conductance state to a high-conductance state in response to the application of a forming voltage to the switchable element (14).

  17. Stacked switchable element and diode combination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branz, Howard M.; Wang, Qi

    2006-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A device (10) comprises a semiconductor diode (12) and a switchable element (14) positioned in stacked adjacent relationship so that the semiconductor diode (12) and the switchable element (14) are electrically connected in series with one another. The switchable element (14) is switchable from a low-conductance state to a high-conductance state in response to the application of a forming voltage to the switchable element (14).

  18. Probabilistic finite element analysis of marine risers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leder, H. Vern

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review 1. 2 Research Study 10 2 FORMULATION OF THE SECOND ? MOMENT ANALYSIS METHOD 13 2. 1 Finite Element Equations 2. 2 Random Vector Formulation 2. 3 The Correlation Function 2. 4 Random Field Discretization 2. 5 Taylor Series Expansion 2. 6... ILLUSTRATIVE EXAMPLE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 APPLICATION OF PROBABILISTIC FINITE ELEMENT METHODS TO MARINE RISER ANALYSES 4. 1 Finite Element Model . 4. 1. 1 Formulation of the Equation of Motion 4. 1. 2 Finite Element Discretization 4. 1. 3...

  19. Diffractive optical elements for spectroscopy Hallvard Angelskar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Tom Henning

    Diffractive optical elements for spectroscopy by Hallvard Angelsk°ar Submitted in partial;Abstract Diffractive optical elements can be used in spectroscopy instruments to fulfill several tasks to precisely fabricate complex diffractive optical elements with feature sizes below the micrometer scale

  20. Deformation Expression for Elements of Algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Omori; Y. Maeda; N. Miyazaki; A. Yoshioka

    2011-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to give a notion of deformation of expressions for elements of algebra. Deformation quantization (cf.[BF]) deforms the commutative world to a non-commutative world. However, this involves deformation of expression of elements of algebras even from a commutative world to another commutative world. This is indeed a deformation of expressions for elements of algebra.

  1. Medial Techniques for Automating Finite Element Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitton, Mary C.

    Medial Techniques for Automating Finite Element Analysis by Jessica Renee Crawford Crouch Analysis. (Under the direction of Stephen M. Pizer.) Finite element analysis provides a principled method the simulation of tissue deformation. The drawback to using finite element analysis for imaging problems

  2. Finite Element Analysis in Vertebrate Biomechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finite Element Analysis in Vertebrate Biomechanics CALLUM F. ROSS* Department of Organismal Biology presents a series of papers that apply the method of finite element analysis (FEA) to questions ontogenetic or phylogenetic transformations. © 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Key words: finite-element analysis

  3. Construction of Higher Order Finite Element with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kern, Michel

    ' & $ % Construction of Higher Order Finite Element with Mass Lumping Using Computer Algebra. (3D, combinatorial analysis, new third order element) 2 #12; ' & $ % Guidelines for the construction of nodes must be ~ P k unisolvent. 2. Finite element must be continuous. 3. Quadrature formula must satisfy

  4. Investigation of Rare Particle Production in High Energy Nuclear Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1999-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Our program is an investigation of the hadronization process through measurement of rare particle production in high energy nuclear interactions. Such collisions of heavy nuclei provide an environment similar in energy density to the conditions in the Big Bang. We are currently involved in two major experiments to study this environment, E896 at the AGS and STAR at RHIC. We have completed our physics running of E896, a search for the H dibaryon and measurement of hyperon production in AuAu collisions, and are in the process of analyzing the data. We have produced the electronics and software for the STAR trigger and will begin to use these tools to search for anti-nuclei and strange hadrons when RHIC turns on later this year.

  5. Epitaxial growth of rare-earth silicides on (111) Si

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, J.A.; Picraux, S.T.

    1986-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Rapid heating with an electron beam has been used to react overlayers of rare-earth (RE) metals with (111) Si, forming epitaxial layers of silicides of Y, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu. Under conventional furnace annealing, forming such silicides on Si typically leads to rough, pitted surfaces. The use of fast beam heating not only results in a much smoother surface topology but also helps promote epitaxial growth on (111) Si in both solid and liquid phase reactions. These epitaxial silicides have a hexagonal RESi/sub approximately1.7/ structure (defected AlB/sub 2/ type). Their orientation with the Si substrate is (0001)parallel(111), with predicted lattice mismatches ranging from +0.83 to -2.55%.

  6. Searches for Rare and New Types of Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Djorgovski, S G; Brunner, R J; Gal, R R; Castro, S; De Carvalho, R R; Odewahn, S C

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systematic exploration of the observable parameter space, covered by large digital sky surveys spanning a range of wavelengths, will be one of the primary modes of research with a Virtual Observatory (VO). This will include searches for rare, unusual, or even previously unknown types of astronomical objects and phenomena, e.g. as outliers in some parameter space of measured properties, both in the catalog and image domains. Examples from current surveys include high-redshift quasars, type-2 quasars, brown dwarfs, and a small number of objects with puzzling spectra. Opening of the time domain will be especially interesting in this regard. Data-mining tools such as unsupervised clustering techniques will be essential in this task, and should become an important part of the VO toolkit.

  7. Searches for Rare and New Types of Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. G. Djorgovski; A. A. Mahabal; R. J. Brunner; R. R. Gal; S. Castro; R. R. de Carvalho; S. C. Odewahn

    2000-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Systematic exploration of the observable parameter space, covered by large digital sky surveys spanning a range of wavelengths, will be one of the primary modes of research with a Virtual Observatory (VO). This will include searches for rare, unusual, or even previously unknown types of astronomical objects and phenomena, e.g. as outliers in some parameter space of measured properties, both in the catalog and image domains. Examples from current surveys include high-redshift quasars, type-2 quasars, brown dwarfs, and a small number of objects with puzzling spectra. Opening of the time domain will be especially interesting in this regard. Data-mining tools such as unsupervised clustering techniques will be essential in this task, and should become an important part of the VO toolkit.

  8. Cryogenic distribution for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Jones, Dana Arenius, Adam Fila, P. Geutschow, Helmut Laumer, Matt Johnson, Cory S. Waltz, J. G. Weisend II

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) is a new National User Facility for nuclear science funded by the Department of Energy Office of Science and operated by Michigan State University. The FRIB accelerator linac consists of superconducting radio-frequency (SCRF) cavities operating at 2 K and SC magnets operating at 4.5 K all cooled by a large scale cryogenic refrigeration system. A major subsystem of the cryogenic system will be the distribution system whose primary components will include a distribution box, the transfer lines and the interconnect valve boxes at each cryogenic device. An overview of the conceptual design of the distribution system including engineering details, capabilities and schedule is described.

  9. Fuel elements of thermionic converters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter, R.L. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Systems Assessment Dept.; Gontar, A.S.; Nelidov, M.V.; Nikolaev, Yu.V.; Schulepov, L.N. [RI SIA Lutch, Podolsk (Russian Federation)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Work on thermionic nuclear power systems has been performed in Russia within the framework of the TOPAZ reactor program since the early 1960s. In the TOPAZ in-core thermionic convertor reactor design, the fuel element`s cladding is also the thermionic convertor`s emitter. Deformation of the emitter can lead to short-circuiting and is the primary cause of premature TRC failure. Such deformation can be the result of fuel swelling, thermocycling, or increased unilateral pressure on the emitter due to the release of gaseous fission products. Much of the work on TRCs has concentrated on preventing or mitigating emitter deformation by improving the following materials and structures: nuclear fuel; emitter materials; electrical insulators; moderator and reflector materials; and gas-exhaust device. In addition, considerable effort has been directed toward the development of experimental techniques that accurately mimic operational conditions and toward the creation of analytical and numerical models that allow operational conditions and behavior to be predicted without the expense and time demands of in-pile tests. New and modified materials and structures for the cores of thermionic NPSs and new fabrication processes for the materials have ensured the possibility of creating thermionic NPSs for a wide range of powers, from tens to several hundreds of kilowatts, with life spans of 5 to 10 years.

  10. Characterization of electrodeposited elemental boron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, Ashish [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India); Anthonysamy, S. [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India)], E-mail: sas@igcar.gov.in; Ananthasivan, K.; Ranganathan, R. [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India); Mittal, Vinit; Narasimhan, S.V. [Water and Steam Chemistry Division, BARC (F), Kalpakkam, 603102 (India); Vasudeva Rao, P.R. [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Elemental boron was produced through electrowinning from potassium fluoroborate dissolved in a mixture of molten potassium fluoride and potassium chloride. The characteristics of the electrodeposited boron (raw boron) as well as the water and acid-leached product (processed boron) were studied. The chemical purity, specific surface area, size distribution of particles and X-ray crystallite size of the boron powders were investigated. The morphology of the deposits was examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The chemical state of the matrix, as well as the impurity phases present in them, was established using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In order to interpret and understand the results obtained, a thermodynamic analysis was carried out. The gas-phase corrosion in the head space as well as the chemistry behind the leaching process were interpreted using this analysis. The ease of oxidation of these powders in air was investigated using differential thermal analysis (DTA) coupled with thermogravimetry (TG). From the results obtained in this study it was established that elemental boron powder with a purity of 95-99% could be produced using a high temperature molten salt electrowinning process. The major impurities were found to be oxygen, carbon, iron and nickel.

  11. 7th Annual Colorado Rare Plant Symposium Conservation Efforts and Status Review of G1 Plants of Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    7th Annual Colorado Rare Plant Symposium Conservation Efforts and Status Review of G1 Plants of the Colorado Rare Plant Technical Committee (RPTC) for the 7th Annual Colorado Rare Plant Symposium. The RPTC is an ad-hoc group of agency and NGO botanists that has been working for years to advance rare plant

  12. Experimental demonstration of efficient and selective population transfer and qubit distillation in a rare-earth-metal-ion-doped crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suter, Dieter

    in a rare-earth-metal-ion-doped crystal Lars Rippe, Mattias Nilsson, and Stefan Kröll Department of Physics on optical interactions in rare-earth- metal-ion-doped crystals. The optical transition lines of the rare-earth-metal out in preparation for two-qubit gate operations in the rare-earth-metal-ion-doped crystals

  13. Coherent coupling of optical gain elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ury, I.; Yariv, A

    1989-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A coherent light source is described comprising: a non-linear photorefractive medium; a laser for illuminating the photorefractive medium; a mirror on the opposite side of the photorefractive medium from the laser and aligned for retroreflecting light back toward the laser; and optical gain elements. Each optical gain element has its optical axis aligned with the photo-refractive medium, each optical gain element having a reflective end remote from the photorefractive medium, the laser and optical gain elements being sufficiently aligned that laser light scattered from the photorefractive medium illuminates all of the optical gain elements for amplification and producing a coherent output beam.

  14. Methods for preparation of nanocrystalline rare earth phosphates for lighting applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Comanzo, Holly Ann; Manoharan, Mohan; Martins Loureiro, Sergio Paulo; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Srivastava, Alok Mani

    2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed here are methods for the preparation of optionally activated nanocrystalline rare earth phosphates. The optionally activated nanocrystalline rare earth phosphates may be used as one or more of quantum-splitting phosphor, visible-light emitting phosphor, vacuum-UV absorbing phosphor, and UV-emitting phosphor. Also disclosed herein are discharge lamps comprising the optionally activated nanocrystalline rare earth phosphates provided by these methods.

  15. PetrovGalerkin Spectral Elements 1 A PetrovGalerkin Spectral Element Technique for Heterogeneous Porous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in spirit to a mixed finite element method or a Petrov­Galerkin scheme. If the sequence of orthogonal commonly used for finite element approximations [14]. The technique proceeds by integrating against ``testPetrov­Galerkin Spectral Elements 1 A Petrov­Galerkin Spectral Element Technique for Heterogeneous

  16. Submitted to: Finite Elements in Analysis and Design Finite Element Analysis over Tangled Simplicial Meshes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suresh, Krishnan

    Submitted to: Finite Elements in Analysis and Design 1 Finite Element Analysis over Tangled In modern finite element analysis (FEA), a mesh is said to be `tangled' if it contains one or more inverted are also illustrated. 1. INTRODUCTION In modern finite element analysis (FEA), the underlying mesh

  17. Data transmission element for downhole drilling components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, Jr., H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David S. (Lehi, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT); Sneddon, Cameron (Provo, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT)

    2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A robust data transmission element for transmitting information between downhole components, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The data transmission element components include a generally U-shaped annular housing, a generally U-shaped magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element such as ferrite, and an insulated conductor. Features on the magnetically conducting, electrically insulating element and the annular housing create a pocket when assembled. The data transmission element is filled with a polymer to retain the components within the annular housing by filling the pocket with the polymer. The polymer can bond with the annular housing and the insulated conductor but preferably not the magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element. A data transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe.

  18. Homogeneous blue pattern: A rare presentation in an acral congenital melanocytic nevus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Malvehy J. Homogeneous blue pattern in an acral congenitalof a plantar combined blue nevus: a simulator of melanoma.Homogeneous blue pattern: A rare presentation in an acral

  19. Synthesis, Characterization and Structural Transformation of A Condensed Rare Earth Metal Coordination Polymer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing

    Synthesis, Characterization and Structural Transformation of A Condensed Rare Earth Metal metals under hydrothermal conditions.5 In this work, 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid has been selected

  20. Grant Helps Make U.S. Rare Earth Magnets More Common | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    magnets - which are not actually rare - and are used in hybrid vehicle motors and wind turbine generators. | Illustration Courtesy of of Electron Energy Corporation | With sintered...

  1. Element Abundances at High Redshifts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Max Pettini

    1999-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    I review measurements of element abundances in different components of the high redshift universe, including the Lyman alpha forest, damped Lyman alpha systems, and Lyman break galaxies. Although progress is being made in all three areas, recent work has also produced some surprises and shown that established ideas about the nature of the damped Lyman alpha systems in particular may be too simplistic. Overall, our knowledge of metal abundances at high z is still very sketchy. Most significantly, there seems to be an order of magnitude shortfall in the comoving density of metals which have been measured up to now compared with those produced by the star formation activity seen in Lyman break galaxies. At least some of the missing metals are likely to be in hot gas in galactic halos and proto-clusters.

  2. Trace element geochemistry of ordinary chondrite chondrules: the type I/type II chondrule dichotomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacquet, Emmanuel; Gounelle, Matthieu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report trace element concentrations of silicate phases in chondrules from LL3 ordinary chondrites Bishunpur and Semarkona. Results are similar to previously reported data for carbonaceous chondrites, with rare earth element (REE) concentrations increasing in the sequence olivine ~ 10 K/h) than type I chondrules. Appreciable Na concentrations (3-221 ppm) are measured in olivine from both chondrule types; type II chondrules seem to have behaved as closed systems, which may require chondrule formation in the vicinity of protoplanets or planetesimals. At any rate, higher solid concentrations in type II chondrule forming regions may explain the higher oxygen fugacities they record compared to type I chondrules. Type I and type II chondrules formed in different environments and the correlation between high solid concentrations and/or oxygen fugacities with rapid cooling rates is a key constraint that chondrule formation models must account for.

  3. Proposed Data Elements for PARS II Web Application | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Proposed Data Elements for PARS II Web Application Proposed Data Elements for PARS II Web Application Proposed Data Elements for PARS II Web Application More Documents &...

  4. Probing rare physical trajectories with Lyapunov weighted dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien Tailleur; Jorge Kurchan

    2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The transition from order to chaos has been a major subject of research since the work of Poincare, as it is relevant in areas ranging from the foundations of statistical physics to the stability of the solar system. Along this transition, atypical structures like the first chaotic regions to appear, or the last regular islands to survive, play a crucial role in many physical situations. For instance, resonances and separatrices determine the fate of planetary systems, and localised objects like solitons and breathers provide mechanisms of energy transport in nonlinear systems such as Bose-Einstein condensates and biological molecules. Unfortunately, despite the fundamental progress made in the last years, most of the numerical methods to locate these 'rare' trajectories are confined to low-dimensional or toy models, while the realms of statistical physics, chemical reactions, or astronomy are still hard to reach. Here we implement an efficient method that allows one to work in higher dimensions by selecting trajectories with unusual chaoticity. As an example, we study the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam nonlinear chain in equilibrium and show that the algorithm rapidly singles out the soliton solutions when searching for trajectories with low level of chaoticity, and chaotic-breathers in the opposite situation. We expect the scheme to have natural applications in celestial mechanics and turbulence, where it can readily be combined with existing numerical methods

  5. Hydrothermal method of synthesis of rare-earth tantalates and niobates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nyman, May D; Rohwer, Lauren E.S.; Martin, James E

    2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydrothermal method of synthesis of a family of rare-earth Group 5 oxides, where the Group 5 oxide is a niobate or tantalate. The rare-earth Group 5 oxides can be doped with suitable emitter ions to form nanophosphors.

  6. Rare-Event Simulation for Many-Server Queues Jose Blanchet and Henry Lam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanchet, Jose H.

    Rare-Event Simulation for Many-Server Queues Jose Blanchet and Henry Lam Abstract We develop rare-event simulation methodology for the analysis of loss events in a many- server loss system. We focus on the scenario when both the number of servers and the number of customers in the system go to infinity

  7. Theoretical Population Biology 52, 216 223 (1997) On the Genealogy of a Rare Allele

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical Population Biology 52, 216 223 (1997) On the Genealogy of a Rare Allele Bruce Rannala 31, 1996 The gene genealogy is derived for a rare allele that is descended from a mutant ancestor is described for rapidly simulating these coalescence times. The relationship between the genealogical

  8. Dialing in color with rare earth metals: facile photoluminescent production of true white light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tew, Gregory N.

    Dialing in color with rare earth metals: facile photoluminescent production of true white light of lanthanide ions which is the focus of this report. Rare earth metal complexes have relatively good Combining polymeric architectures with metal ions produces hybrid materials with extremely rich properties

  9. Rare target enrichment for ultrasensitive PCR detection using cotrehybridization and duplex-specific nuclease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, George

    Rare target enrichment for ultrasensitive PCR detection using cot­rehybridization and duplex­rehybridization Cot analysis Target enrichment Duplex-specific nuclease PCR sensitivity PCR diagnostics a b s t r a c to ultrasensitive PCR detection, using enrichment of rare target nucleic acid from abundant background by combining

  10. Three key elements necessary for successful testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehlig-Economides, C.A.; Hegeman, P. (Schlumberger Oilfield Services, Houston, TX (United States)); Clark, G. (Schlumberger Oilfield Services, Aberdeen (United Kingdom))

    1994-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Real-time surface readout during data acquisition, downhole shutting, and appropriate pressure gauges are three key elements for successful well tests. These elements are often overlooked in designing and implementing a successful well test. This second in a series of three articles on well testing shows how these elements affected the testing of an example well. Also reviewed are the capabilities of several new testing tools and techniques.

  11. Trace element analysis of Texas lignite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahar, Sean

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    or in the planning stages, Near surface lignite re- sources are estimated to be 21 billion metric tons in Texas, while deep basin reserves are estimated at 31 billion metric tons. Near (3] surface reserves alone could fulfill Texas' electrical needs for 100 years... for environmental and health concerns trace element characterization of lignites is important. A needed avenue of research is charact- erization of trace element pathways in lignite fired power plants. :hat is to say what percentage of a certain element...

  12. Finite element approximation of coupled seismic and ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    zyserman

    layer, having a thickness of about 10 nm. Finite element approximation of coupled seismic and electromagnetic waves in gas hydrate-bearing sediments – p.

  13. Electronic Structure of the Heaviest Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seaborg, G.T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    uranium resemble those of these 4d and 5d elements and for this reason most of the textbooks and standard works on chemistry

  14. Low exchange element for nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brogli, Rudolf H. (Aarau, CH); Shamasunder, Bangalore I. (Encinitas, CA); Seth, Shivaji S. (Encinitas, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A flow exchange element is presented which lowers temperature gradients in fuel elements and reduces maximum local temperature within high temperature gas-cooled reactors. The flow exchange element is inserted within a column of fuel elements where it serves to redirect coolant flow. Coolant which has been flowing in a hotter region of the column is redirected to a cooler region, and coolant which has been flowing in the cooler region of the column is redirected to the hotter region. The safety, efficiency, and longevity of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor is thereby enhanced.

  15. Finite Element Modeling of Drilling Using DEFORM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardner, Joel D.; Dornfeld, David

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vijayaraghavan, A. (2005), “Drilling of Fiber- ReinforcedFINITE ELEMENT MODELING OF DRILLING USING DEFORM J. Gardner,of Comprehensive Drilling Simulation Tool” ABSTRACT DEFORM-

  16. Method of lightening radiation darkened optical elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reich, Frederich R. (Richland, WA); Schwankoff, Albert R. (W. Richland, WA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of lightening a radiation-darkened optical element in wich visible optical energy or electromagnetic radiation having a wavelength in the range of from about 2000 to about 20,000 angstroms is directed into the radiation-darkened optical element; the method may be used to lighten radiation-darkened optical element in-situ during the use of the optical element to transmit data by electronically separating the optical energy from the optical output by frequency filtering, data cooling, or interlacing the optic energy between data intervals.

  17. Two position optical element actuator device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holdener, Fred R. (Tracy, CA); Boyd, Robert D. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a two position optical element actuator device utilizing a powered means to hold an actuation arm, to which an optical element is attached, in a first position. A non-powered means drives the actuation arm to a second position, when the powered means ceases to receive power. The optical element may be a electromagnetic (EM) radiation or particle source, an instrument, or EM radiation or particle transmissive, reflective or absorptive elements. A bearing is used to transfer motion and smoothly transition the actuation arm from the first to second position.

  18. Spectral analysis method for detecting an element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blackwood, Larry G [Idaho Falls, ID; Edwards, Andrew J [Idaho Falls, ID; Jewell, James K [Idaho Falls, ID; Reber, Edward L [Idaho Falls, ID; Seabury, Edward H [Idaho Falls, ID

    2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for detecting an element is described and which includes the steps of providing a gamma-ray spectrum which has a region of interest which corresponds with a small amount of an element to be detected; providing nonparametric assumptions about a shape of the gamma-ray spectrum in the region of interest, and which would indicate the presence of the element to be detected; and applying a statistical test to the shape of the gamma-ray spectrum based upon the nonparametric assumptions to detect the small amount of the element to be detected.

  19. PARTIALLY PENALIZED IMMERSED FINITE ELEMENT METHODS ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    each interface element, it uses IFE functions constructed with piecewise ...... strate this, we plot errors of a classic bilinear IFE solution and a NPP IFE solution in.

  20. Office of Enterprise Assessments Review of Field Element Line...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    action management, and continuous improvement (lessons learnedoperating experiencebest practices). For each assurance element, SFO defined sub-elements and associated...

  1. Functional integral transition elements of a massless oscillator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Modanese

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The massless harmonic oscillator is a rare example of a system whose Feynman path integral can be explicitly computed and receives its main contributions from regions of the functional space that are far from the classical and semiclassical configurations near the stationary point of the action. The functional average $\\langle q_m^2 \\rangle$ of the square of the coordinate at a time $t_m$ which is intermediate between the initial and final time gives a measure of the amplitude of quantum fluctuations with respect to the classical path. This average, or "transition element", is divergent in the massless limit, signaling a quantum runaway. We show that the divergence is not due to the continuum limit and formulate the conjecture that the divergent contributions come from regions where the action $S$ is constant and therefore the interference factor $e^{-iS/\\hbar}$ does not oscillate. For most systems these regions have zero functional measure and thus give a null contribution to the path integral, but this is not the case for the massless oscillator. We study the simplest functional subspace with constant action, namely the one with $S=0$, which is connected to the classical solutions but extends to infinity, like an hyperplane through the origin; this subspace turns out to be infinite-dimensional. Some possible applications and developments are mentioned.

  2. A multiresolution finite element method based on a new locking-free rectangular Mindlin plate element

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xia, Yi-Ming

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A locking-free rectangular Mindlin plate element with a new multi-resolution analysis (MRA) is proposed and a multireolution finite element method is hence presented. The MRA framework is formulated out of a mutually nesting displacement subspace sequence. The MRA endows the proposed element with the resolution level (RL) to adjust the element node number, thus modulating structural analysis accuracy accordingly. As a result, the traditional 4-node rectangular Mindlin plate element and method is a mono-resolution one and also a special case of the proposed element and method. The meshing for the monoresolution plate element model is based on the empiricism while the RL adjusting for the multiresolution is laid on the rigorous mathematical basis. The accuracy of a structural analysis is actually determined by the RL, not by the mesh. The rational MRA enables the implementation of the multiresolution Mindlin plate element method to be more rational and efficient than that of the conventional monoresolution or o...

  3. 3-D Finite Element Electromagnetic and Stress Analyses of the JET LB-SRP Divertor Element (Tungsten Lamella Design)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    3-D Finite Element Electromagnetic and Stress Analyses of the JET LB-SRP Divertor Element (Tungsten Lamella Design)

  4. Modeling and Driving Piezoelectric Resonant Blade Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for extracting the parameters of the PRB equivalent circuit model: two are direct methods and one is basedrf rjf Figure 3. Equivalent circuit model of the PRB element. Cin is the dielectric capacitance element will bend the van attached to it and the whole structure will vibrate. Optimum operation

  5. The New Element Curium (Atomic Number 96)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Seaborg, G. T.; James, R. A.; Ghiorso, A.

    1948-00-00T23:59:59.000Z

    Two isotopes of the element with atomic number 96 have been produced by the helium-ion bombardment of plutonium. The name curium, symbol Cm, is proposed for element 96. The chemical experiments indicate that the most stable oxidation state of curium is the III state.

  6. The Superheavy Elements and Anti-Gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anastasovski, Petar K. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, Saints Cyril and Methodius University, Skopje (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of)

    2004-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The essence of any propulsion concept is to overcome gravity. Anti-gravity is a natural means to achieve this. Thus, the technology to pursue anti-gravity, by using superheavy elements, may provide a new propulsion paradigm. The theory of superluminal relativity provides a hypothesis for existence of elements with atomic number up to Z = 145, some of which may possess anti-gravity properties. Analysis results show that curved space-time exists demonstrating both gravitic and anti-gravitic properties not only around nuclei but inside the nuclei as well. Two groups of elements (Z < 64 and 63 < Z <145) exist that demonstrate these capabilities. The nuclei of the first group of elements have the masses with only the property of gravity. The nuclei of the elements of the second group have the masses with both properties: gravity and anti-gravity in two different ranges of curved space-time around the nuclei.. The hypothetical element with Z = 145 is the unique among all elements whose nucleus has only anti-gravity property. It is proposed that this element be named Hawking, in honour of Stephen W. Hawking.

  7. Finite element decomposition of the human neocortex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chow, Seeling

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Relationships between iso-parametric curves and principal curvature directions, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . ?. ???, . ?. . . . . . . . . . ??. ?. 25 Reparameterizing macro elements for finite element decomposition... visualization and functional analysis, building 3D surface models through serial reconstruction has received much attention in biomedical research [3], [8], [50]. Surface reconstruction techniques include volume rendering, iso-surface algorithms, parametric...

  8. INTRODUCTION TO THE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    in popularity with the finite difference method in the areas of heat transfer and fluid mechanics. 1DRAFT Chapter 1 INTRODUCTION TO THE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD 1.1 Historical perspective: the origins of the finite el- ement method The finite element method constitutes a general tool for the numerical solution

  9. Spectroscopic Studies of Extremly Metal-Poor Stars with Subaru/HDS:II.The r-process Elements, Including Thorium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Honda; W. Aoki; T. Kajino; H. Ando; T. C. Beers; H. Izumiura; K. Sadakane; M. Takada-Hidai

    2004-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the abundance analyses for the neutron-capture elements, and discuss the observed abundance distributions in very metal-poor stars with excesses of r-process elements. As has been found by previous abundance studies, the star-to-star scatter in the abundances of neutron-capture elements are very large. The abundance patterns of the heavy neutron-capture elements (56 $\\leq$ Z $\\leq$ 70) in seven objects with moderate to large excesses of the neutron-capture elements are similar to that of the solar system r-process component. These results strongly suggest that the heavy neutron-capture elements in these objects are primarily synthesized by the r-process. On the other hand, the abundance ratios of the light neutron-capture elements (38 $\\leq$ Z $\\leq$ 46) exhibit a rather large dispersion. Our inspection of the correlation between Sr and Ba abundances in very metal-poor stars reveals that the dispersion of the Sr abundances clearly decreases with increasing Ba abundance. This results support previous suggestions that the light neutron-capture elements are likely to have been produced in different astrophysical sites from those associated with the production of the heavier ones. The Th/Eu abundance ratios (log(Th/Eu)) measured for the seven r-process-enhanced stars range from -0.10 to -0.59. Since these very metal-poor stars are believed to be formed in the early Galaxy, this result means that a small dispersion appears in the abundance ratios between Th and rare-earth elements, such as Eu, in very metal-poor stars. In order to apply the Th/Eu ratios to estimates of stellar ages, further understanding for the Th production by the r-process nucleosynthesis is required.

  10. Element 74, the Wolfram Versus Tungsten Controversy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holden,N.E.

    2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Two and a quarter centuries ago, a heavy mineral ore was found which was thought to contain a new chemical element called heavy stone (or tungsten in Swedish). A few years later, the metal was separated from its oxide and the new element (Z=74) was called wolfram. Over the years since that time, both the names wolfram and tungsten were attached to this element in various countries. Sixty years ago, IUPAC chose wolfram as the official name for the element. A few years later, under pressure from the press in the USA, the alternative name tungsten was also allowed by IUPAC. Now the original, official name 'wolfram' has been deleted by IUPAC as one of the two alternate names for the element. The history of this controversy is described here.

  11. Control volume finite element method with multidimensional edge element Scharfetter-Gummel upwinding. Part 1, formulation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a new formulation of the Control Volume Finite Element Method (CVFEM) with a multidimensional Scharfetter-Gummel (SG) upwinding for the drift-diffusion equations. The formulation uses standard nodal elements for the concentrations and expands the flux in terms of the lowest-order Nedelec H(curl; {Omega})-compatible finite element basis. The SG formula is applied to the edges of the elements to express the Nedelec element degree of freedom on this edge in terms of the nodal degrees of freedom associated with the endpoints of the edge. The resulting upwind flux incorporates the upwind effects from all edges and is defined at the interior of the element. This allows for accurate evaluation of integrals on the boundaries of the control volumes for arbitrary quadrilateral elements. The new formulation admits efficient implementation through a standard loop over the elements in the mesh followed by loops over the element nodes (associated with control volume fractions in the element) and element edges (associated with flux degrees of freedom). The quantities required for the SG formula can be precomputed and stored for each edge in the mesh for additional efficiency gains. For clarity the details are presented for two-dimensional quadrilateral grids. Extension to other element shapes and three dimensions is straightforward.

  12. Probabilistic finite element analysis of a craniofacial finite element model Michael A. Berthaume a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Probabilistic finite element analysis of a craniofacial finite element model Michael A. Berthaume a s t r a c t We employed a probabilistic finite element analysis (FEA) method to determine how 2011 Accepted 18 January 2012 Available online 27 January 2012 Keywords: Probabilistic analysis Finite

  13. Monolithic integration of rare-earth oxides and semiconductors for on-silicon technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dargis, Rytis, E-mail: dargis@translucentinc.com; Clark, Andrew; Erdem Arkun, Fevzi [Translucent, Inc., 952 Commercial St., Palo Alto, California 94303 (United States); Grinys, Tomas; Tomasiunas, Rolandas [Institute of Applied Research, Vilnius University, Sauletekio al. 10, LT-10223 Vilnius (Lithuania); O'Hara, Andy; Demkov, Alexander A. [Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, C1600, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several concepts of integration of the epitaxial rare-earth oxides into the emerging advanced semiconductor on silicon technology are presented. Germanium grows epitaxially on gadolinium oxide despite lattice mismatch of more than 4%. Additionally, polymorphism of some of the rare-earth oxides allows engineering of their crystal structure from hexagonal to cubic and formation of buffer layers that can be used for growth of germanium on a lattice matched oxide layer. Molecular beam epitaxy and metal organic chemical vapor deposition of gallium nitride on the rare-earth oxide buffer layers on silicon is discussed.

  14. Dynamic polarizabilities of rare-earth-metal atoms and dispersion coefficients for their interaction with helium atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Xi

    Dynamic polarizabilities of rare-earth-metal atoms and dispersion coefficients; published 29 March 2007 The dynamic scalar and tensor polarizabilities of the rare-earth-metal atoms coefficients for the interactions of the rare-earth-metal atoms with helium atoms. The static polarizabilities

  15. Amount of research interest in rare and common neurological conditions: bibliometric study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Shahi, Rustam; Will, Robert G; Warlow, Charles P

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neurologists are often accused of being interested in only rare incurable diseases. Although this may have been true in the past, today's neurologists claim to be more concerned with common disorders—but are they ...

  16. Green exciplex emission from a bilayer light-emitting diode containing a rare earth ternary complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yanyi

    Green exciplex emission from a bilayer light-emitting diode containing a rare earth ternary complex form 18 October 2001 Abstract A bilayer organic light-emitting diode using a blue-fluorescent yttrium

  17. Engineering broadband and anisotropic photoluminescence emission from rare earth doped tellurite thin film photonic crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanhoutte, Michiel

    Broadband and anisotropic light emission from rare-earth doped tellurite thin films is demonstrated using Er[superscript 3+]-TeO[subscript 2] photonic crystals (PhCs). By adjusting the PhC parameters, photoluminescent light ...

  18. U.S. Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table © 2-4-2015 page 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to a temperature equal to or lower than a sintering temperature of the magnet base material, wherein: a) a content of a rare earth in a metallic state in the magnet base...

  19. The effect of machine and material parameters on rare earth roller separation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Esther, S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study addresses the affect of machine and material factors on the separation of PET plastic and aluminum on the Rare Earth Roller magnetic separator. The purposes of this study are to gain a better understanding of ...

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Non-Rare Earth Motor Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about non-rare earth...

  1. BNL workshop on rare K decays and CP violation, August 25-27, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains viewgraphs on the following topics: rare and forbidden K decays; CP violation in the K system; the status of current experiments at BNL, CERN, FNAL, and KEK; and future experiments and facilities.

  2. Origin of enhanced magnetization in rare earth doped multiferroic bismuth ferrite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nayek, C.; Thirmal, Ch.; Murugavel, P., E-mail: muruga@iitm.ac.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 36 (India); Tamilselvan, A.; Balakumar, S. [National Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Madras, Chennai 25 (India)

    2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We report structural and magnetic properties of rare earth doped Bi{sub 0.95}R{sub 0.05} FeO{sub 3} (R?=?Y, Ho, and Er) submicron particles. Rare earth doping enhances the magnetization and the magnetization shows an increasing trend with decreasing dopant ionic radii. In contrast to the x-ray diffraction pattern, we have seen a strong evidence for the presence of rare earth iron garnets R{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} in magnetization measured as a function of temperature, in selected area electron diffraction, and in Raman measurements. Our results emphasised the role of secondary phases in the magnetic property of rare earth doped BiFeO{sub 3} compounds along with the structural distortion favoring spin canting by increase in Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya exchange energy.

  3. High-energy scattering in the saturation regime including running coupling and rare fluctuation effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiang Wenchang [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Bielefeld, D-33501 Bielefeld (Germany)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The analytic form of the asymptotic behavior of the S matrix in the saturation regime including the running coupling is obtained. To get this result, we solve the Balitsky and Kovchegov-Weigert evolution equations in the saturation regime, which include running coupling corrections. We study also the effect of rare fluctuations on top of the running coupling. We find that the rare fluctuations are less important in the running coupling case as compared to the fixed coupling case.

  4. High energy scattering in the saturation regime including running coupling and rare fluctuation effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenchang Xiang

    2008-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The analytic result for the $S$-matrix in the saturation regime including the running coupling is obtained. To get this result we solve the Balitsky and Kovchegov-Weigert evolution equations in the saturation regime, which include running coupling corrections. We study also the effect of rare fluctuations on top of the running coupling. We find that the rare fluctuations are less important in the running coupling case as compared to the fixed coupling case.

  5. Ion processing element with composite media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mann, Nick R. (Blackfoot, ID); Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Sebesta, Ferdinand (Prague, CZ)

    2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion processing element employing composite media disposed in a porous substrate, for facilitating removal of selected chemical species from a fluid stream. The ion processing element includes a porous fibrous glass substrate impregnated by composite media having one or more active components supported by a matrix material of polyacrylonitrile. The active components are effective in removing, by various mechanisms, one or more constituents from a fluid stream passing through the ion processing element. Due to the porosity and large surface area of both the composite medium and the substrate in which it is disposed, a high degree of contact is achieved between the active component and the fluid stream being processed. Further, the porosity of the matrix material and the substrate facilitates use of the ion processing element in high volume applications where it is desired to effectively process a high volume flows.

  6. Magnetic bearing element with adjustable stiffness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact magnetic bearing element is provided which is made of permanent magnet discs configured to be capable of the adjustment of the bearing stiffness and levitation force over a wide range.

  7. Transition Matrix Elements for Pion Photoproduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohamed E. Kelabi

    2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We have obtained the transition matrix elements for pion photoproduction by considering the number of gamma matrices involved. The approach based on the most general conditions of gauge invariance, current conservation and transversality. The approach is fairly consistent with literatures.

  8. Proton decay matrix elements from lattice QCD 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooney, Paul

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results for the matrix elements relevant for proton decay in Grand Unified Theories (GUTs), using two methods. In the indirect method, we rely on an effective field theory description of proton decay, where ...

  9. Magnetostatics of synthetic ferrimagnet elements Olivier Fruchart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    coupled antiferromagnetically thanks to the RKKY interaction present in an ultrathin metal spacer layer in flat elements as dipolar field are very short-ranged in two dimensions12 . In this Letter we re- port

  10. Quadrilateral/hexahedral finite element mesh coarsening

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Staten, Matthew L; Dewey, Mark W; Scott, Michael A; Benzley, Steven E

    2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique for coarsening a finite element mesh ("FEM") is described. This technique includes identifying a coarsening region within the FEM to be coarsened. Perimeter chords running along perimeter boundaries of the coarsening region are identified. The perimeter chords are redirected to create an adaptive chord separating the coarsening region from a remainder of the FEM. The adaptive chord runs through mesh elements residing along the perimeter boundaries of the coarsening region. The adaptive chord is then extracted to coarsen the FEM.

  11. Finite Element Analysis of the Schroedinger Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avtar S. Sehra

    2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is to test the application of the finite element method to quantum mechanical problems, in particular for solving the Schroedinger equation. We begin with an overview of quantum mechanics, and standard numerical techniques. We then give an introduction to finite element analysis using the diffusion equation as an example. Three numerical time evolution methods are considered: the (tried and tested) Crank-Nicolson method, the continuous space-time method, and the discontinuous space-time method.

  12. Stretchable semiconductor elements and stretchable electrical circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A. (Champaign, IL); Khang, Dahl-Young (Seoul, KR); Menard, Etienne (Durham, NC)

    2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides methods and devices for fabricating printable semiconductor elements and assembling printable semiconductor elements onto substrate surfaces. Methods, devices and device components of the present invention are capable of generating a wide range of flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices and arrays of devices on substrates comprising polymeric materials. The present invention also provides stretchable semiconductor structures and stretchable electronic devices capable of good performance in stretched configurations.

  13. 2009 US-Japan Workshop on Advanced Simulation Methods in Plasma Physics MHD Simulations of the Solar Astmosphere: Effects of Weak Ionization and Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Atsushi

    of the Solar Astmosphere: Effects of Weak Ionization and Radiation Hiroaki Isobe1 1 Unit of Synergetic Studies subject in solar physics is to understand the variety of dynamics and structure formation a key role in many cases. In this talk I will first review the plasma parameters in the solar atmosphere

  14. Elemental Solubility Tendency for the Phases of Uranium by Classical Models Used to Predict Alloy Behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Blackwood; Travis Koenig; Saleem Drera; Brajenda Mishra; Davis Olson; Doug Porter; Robert Mariani

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditional alloy theory models, specifically Darken-Gurry and Miedema’s analyses, that characterize solutes in solid solvents relative to physical properties of the elements have been used to assist in predicting alloy behavior. These models will be applied relative to the three solid phases of uranium: alpha (orthorhombic), beta (tetragonal), and gamma (bcc). These phases have different solubilities for specific alloy additions as a function of temperature. The Darken-Gurry and Miedema models, with modifications based on concepts of Waber, Gschneider, and Brewer will be used to predict the behavior of four types of solutes: 1) Transition metals that are used for various purposes associated with the containment as alloy additions in the uranium fuel 2) Transuranic elements in the uranium 3) Rare earth fission products (lanthanides) 4) Transition metals and other fission products Using these solute map criteria, elemental behavior will be predicted as highly soluble, marginally soluble, or immiscible (compound formers) and will be used to compare solute effects during uranium phase transformations. The overlapping of these solute maps are convenient first approximation tools for predicting alloy behavior.

  15. A Family of Uniform Strain Tetrahedral Elements and a Method for Connecting Dissimilar Finite Element Meshes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dohrmann, C.R.; Heinstein, M.W.; Jung, J.; Key, S.W.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a collection of papers on a family of uniform strain tetrahedral finite elements and their connection to different element types. Also included in the report are two papers which address the general problem of connecting dissimilar meshes in two and three dimensions. Much of the work presented here was motivated by the development of the tetrahedral element described in the report "A Suitable Low-Order, Eight-Node Tetrahedral Finite Element For Solids," by S. W. Key {ital et al.}, SAND98-0756, March 1998. Two basic issues addressed by the papers are: (1) the performance of alternative tetrahedral elements with uniform strain and enhanced uniform strain formulations, and (2) the proper connection of tetrahedral and other element types when two meshes are "tied" together to represent a single continuous domain.

  16. Stacked switchable element and diode combination with a low breakdown switchable element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Qi (Littleton, CO); Ward, James Scott (Englewood, CO); Hu, Jian (Englewood, CO); Branz, Howard M. (Boulder, CO)

    2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A device (10) comprises a semiconductor diode (12) and a switchable element (14) positioned in stacked adjacent relationship. The semiconductor diode (12) and the switchable element (14) are electrically connected in series with one another. The switchable element (14) is switchable from a low-conductance state to a high-conductance state in response to the application of a low-density forming current and/or a low voltage.

  17. Nuclear elements in Banach Jordan pairs Ottmar Loos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nuclear elements in Banach Jordan pairs Ottmar Loos Abstract We introduce nuclear elements in Banach Jordan pairs, generalizing the nuclear elements Jordan pairs and show that the trace form Trintroduced in [3] may be extended to the nuclear

  18. 12.479 Trace-Element Geochemistry, Fall 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Frederick August

    Focuses on element distribution in rocks and minerals using data obtained from natural and experimental systems. Emphasizes models describing trace-element partitioning and applications of trace-element geochemistry to ...

  19. 3.3 Construction of vector edge elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Figure 3.1: Linear tetrahedral element. 3.3 Construction of vector edge elements. Let us first consider the linear tetrahedral element, as seen in Figure 3.1. Within.

  20. Element-based concrete design with three-dimensional finite element models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, M.; Huberty, K.; Winch, S. [Nuclear Power Technologies Div., Sargent and Lundy, 55 East Monroe, Chicago, IL 60603 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A shell element based design of a typical shear wall using analytical results from a three-dimensional finite element model subjected to a combination of vertical and lateral loads is evaluated. The axial and flexural force resultants from each element for every load combination are used to calculate the required reinforcing for each element. Strength for axial loads (P) and out-of-plane flexure (M) in structural walls is determined according to the same P-M interaction procedures used for columns. After each element has been evaluated, a required reinforcing map for each face of each element in the wall is presented along with a constructible reinforcement pattern enveloping the required reinforcing. In order to determine whether the element-based approach meets the requirements of the section cut approach to design, which is typically employed in manual calculations, the total in-plane moment (M) and total vertical axial force (P) across the entire length of the wall is calculated and the P-M points are plotted on an in-plane P-M interaction diagram. It is concluded that element-based design for a structural wall ensures that reinforcement is provided where required by the three-dimensional finite element analysis while still providing sufficient reinforcing to satisfy the section cut approach to design. (authors)

  1. X-ray resonant magnetic scattering and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism branching ratios, L[subscript 3] / L[subscript 2], for heavy rare earths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Yongbin; Kim, Jong-Woo; Goldman, Alan I.; Harmon, Bruce N. (Iowa State)

    2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study we have used first principles electronic structure methods to investigate the detailed contributions to the L{sub 3}/L{sub 2} branching ratio in the heavy rare earth elements. The calculations use the full potential, relativistic, linear augmented plane wave method with the LSDA+U approach for consideration of the local 4f electronic orbitals. With no spin orbit coupling (SOC) in the conducting bands, and with the same radial function for the 2p{sub 3/2} and 2p{sub 1/2} core states, the branching ratio (BR) is exactly 1:-1 for the x-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectra of the ferromagnetic heavy rare earth metals. However, with full SOC the BR ranges from 1.5 to 6.0 in going from Gd to Er. The energy and spin dependence of the 5d radial functions are important. The results point to problems with modified atomic models which have been proposed to explain the BR. Recent x-ray resonant magentic scattering experiments on (Gd,Tb,Dy,Ho,Er,Tm)Ni{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} are discussed.

  2. The alteration of metamict zircon and its role in the remobilization of high-field strength elements in the Georgeville granite, Nova Scotia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, A.J.; Wirth, R.; Thomas, R. (SFX); (GFZ)

    2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure and composition of metamict zircon from the Georgeville epizonal A-type granite in the Antigonish Highlands, Nova Scotia, were determined using EMPA, SXRF, LA-ICP-MS, Raman microspectroscopy and TEM data. Individual crystals of zircon are variably altered and consist of four domains distinguished on the basis of texture and composition. Domain A consists of zircon and zirconium oxide nanocrystals in an amorphous matrix and is trace-element-enriched. Replacement of domain A in proximity to microfractures produced a porous and relatively trace-element-poor zircon (domain B) with disseminated Th-U- and Y-enriched inclusions (domain C). Domain D consists of amorphous zirconium silicate that is depleted in trace elements but enriched in Hf. It is found in fractures, together with minor amounts of thorite and thorianite. It Domain D is anhydrous and free of inclusions and pore spaces and has a composition similar to highly crystalline zircon. Micro- and nanoscale element-distribution maps indicate that high-field-strength trace elements in metamict zircon were redistributed during alteration by diffusion and by dissolution-and-reprecipitation processes near microfractures and other fluid channelways. The anomalous chondrite-normalized rare-earth-element patterns and Nd isotopic signature of the granite is attributed largely to the preferential transport and deposition of rare-earth elements during subsolidus re-equilibration of metamict zircon. Hydrothermally deposited zirconium silicate (domain D) has a composition similar to that of highly crystalline Hf-rich zircon but is completely amorphous. This observation emphasizes the need to verify the structural integrity and aqueous durability of hydrothermally deposited zircon before it is used to reconstruct hydrothermal processes.

  3. Properties of Group Five and Group Seven transactinium elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilk, Philip A.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Group Five and Group Seven Transactinium Elementsof Group Five and Group Seven Transactinium Elements byof Group Five and Group Seven Transactinium Elements by

  4. adaptive finite element: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    properties and performance of the adaptive finite element approach to the design of nano-photonic components. Central issues are the construction of vectorial finite elements...

  5. adaptive finite elements: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    properties and performance of the adaptive finite element approach to the design of nano-photonic components. Central issues are the construction of vectorial finite elements...

  6. Feasibility of the detection of trace elements in particulate...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of trace elements in particulate matter using online High-Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometry. Feasibility of the detection of trace elements in particulate matter using online...

  7. Status of Segmented Element Thermoelectric Generator for Vehicle...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Segmented Element Thermoelectric Generator for Vehicle Waste Heat Recovery Status of Segmented Element Thermoelectric Generator for Vehicle Waste Heat Recovery Discusses progress...

  8. 3800 Green Series Cost Elements | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (formerly EPP) Program 3800 Green Series Cost Elements 06112014 (Rev. 7) 3800 Green Series Cost Elements More Documents & Publications 1 OPAM Policy Acquisition Guides...

  9. The Impacts of Commercial Electric Utility Rate Structure Elements...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The Impacts of Commercial Electric Utility Rate Structure Elements on the Economics of Photovoltaic Systems The Impacts of Commercial Electric Utility Rate Structure Elements on...

  10. axial element protein: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ser-142 (14). Ser-129 is believed to be a substrate for glycogen synthase kinase 3 Brownfield, Mark S. 84 Elements & Compounds Atoms (Elements) Biology and Medicine Websites...

  11. EIS-0423: Storage and Management of Elemental Mercury | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    23: Storage and Management of Elemental Mercury EIS-0423: Storage and Management of Elemental Mercury Summary This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts associated with the...

  12. MOLYBDENUM, RUTHENIUM, AND THE HEAVY r-PROCESS ELEMENTS IN MODERATELY METAL-POOR MAIN-SEQUENCE TURNOFF STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Ruth C. [Astrophysical Advances, 607 Marion Place, Palo Alto, CA 94301 (United States)

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ratios of elemental abundances observed in metal-poor stars of the Galactic halo provide a unique present-day record of the nucleosynthesis products of its earliest stars. While the heaviest elements were synthesized by the r- and s-processes, dominant production mechanisms of light trans-ironic elements were obscure until recently. This work investigates further our 2011 conclusion that the low-entropy regime of a high-entropy wind (HEW) produced molybdenum and ruthenium in two moderately metal-poor turnoff stars that showed extreme overabundances of those elements with respect to iron. Only a few, rare nucleosynthesis events may have been involved. Here we determine abundances for Mo, Ru, and other trans-Fe elements for 28 similar stars by matching spectral calculations to well-exposed near-UV Keck HIRES spectra obtained for beryllium abundances. In each of the 26 turnoff stars with Mo or Ru line detections and no evidence for s-process production (therefore old), we find Mo and Ru to be three to six times overabundant. In contrast, the maximum overabundance is reduced to factors of three and two for the neighboring elements zirconium and palladium. Since the overproduction peaks sharply at Mo and Ru, a low-entropy HEW is confirmed as its origin. The overabundance level of the heavy r-process elements varies significantly, from none to a factor of four, but is uncorrelated with Mo and Ru overabundances. Despite their moderate metallicity, stars in this group trace the products of different nucleosynthetic events: possibly very few events, possibly events whose output depended on environment, metallicity, or time.

  13. doi:10.1016/S0016-7037(03)00495-2 Carbonate Complexation of Yttrium and the Rare Earth Elements in Natural Waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    1 [MCO3 ][H ][M3 ] 1 [HCO3 ] 1 and CO3 H 2 [M(CO3)2 ][H ]2 [M3 ] 1 [HCO3 ] 2 , have very similar dependencies on ionic strength because the reaction MCO3 HCO3 ºM(CO3)2 H is isocoulombic. Potentiometric complexation is gener- ally dominated by the formation of carbonate complexes MCO3 and M(CO3)2 (Byrne

  14. Computer modelling of the reduction of rare earth dopants in barium aluminate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rezende, Marcos V. dos S; Valerio, Mario E.G. [Department of Physics, Federal University of Sergipe, 49100-000 Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil); Jackson, Robert A., E-mail: r.a.jackson@chem.keele.ac.uk [School of Physical and Geographical Sciences, Keele University, Keele, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Long lasting phosphorescence in barium aluminates can be achieved by doping with rare earth ions in divalent charge states. The rare earth ions are initially in a trivalent charge state, but are reduced to a divalent charge state before being doped into the material. In this paper, the reduction of trivalent rare earth ions in the BaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} lattice is studied by computer simulation, with the energetics of the whole reduction and doping process being modelled by two methods, one based on single ion doping and one which allows dopant concentrations to be taken into account. A range of different reduction schemes are considered and the most energetically favourable schemes identified. - Graphical abstract: The doping and subsequent reduction of a rare earth ion into the barium aluminate lattice. Highlights: > The doping of barium aluminate with rare earth ions reduced in a range of atmospheres has been modelled. > The overall solution energy for the doping process for each ion in each reducing atmosphere is calculated using two methods. > The lowest energy reduction process is predicted and compared with experimental results.

  15. A fast multipole boundary element method for modeling 2-D multiple crack problems with constant elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yijun

    A fast multipole boundary element method for modeling 2-D multiple crack problems with constant 3 April 2014 Accepted 20 May 2014 Keywords: Fast multipole BEM 2-D multi-crack problems Constant elements Crack opening displacements Stress intensity factors a b s t r a c t A fast multipole boundary

  16. Spectroscopy of element 115 decay chains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudolph, Dirk [Lund University, Sweden; Forsberg, U. [Lund University, Sweden; Golubev, P. [Lund University, Sweden; Sarmiento, L. G. [Lund University, Sweden; Yakushev, A. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Andersson, L.-L. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Di Nitto, A. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Duehllmann, Ch. E. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Gates, J. M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Gregorich, K. E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Gross, Carl J [ORNL; Hessberger, F. P. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Herzberg, R.-D [University of Liverpool; Khuyagbaatar, J. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Kratz, J. V. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr [ORNL; Schaedel, M. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Aberg, S. [Lund University, Sweden; Ackermann, D. [GSI-Hemholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, Germany; Block, M. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Brand, H. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Carlsson, B. G. [Lund University, Sweden; Cox, D. [University of Liverpool; Derkx, X. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Eberhardt, K. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Even, J. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Fahlander, C. [Lund University, Sweden; Gerl, J. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Jaeger, E. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Kindler, B. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Krier, J. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Kojouharov, I. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Kurz, N. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Lommel, B. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Mistry, A. [University of Liverpool; Mokry, C. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Nitsche, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Omtvedt, J. P. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, Switzerland; Papadakis, P. [University of Liverpool; Ragnarsson, I. [Lund University, Sweden; Runke, J. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Schaffner, H. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Schausten, B. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Thoerle-Pospiech, P. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Torres, T. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Traut, T. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Trautmann, N. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Tuerler, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, Switzerland; Ward, A. [University of Liverpool; Ward, D. E. [Lund University, Sweden; Wiehl, N. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-resolution a, X-ray and -ray coincidence spectroscopy experiment was conducted at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fu r Schwerionenforschung. Thirty correlated a-decay chains were detected following the fusion-evaporation reaction 48Ca + 243Am. The observations are consistent with previous assignments of similar decay chains to originate from element Z = 115. The data includes first candidates of fingerprinting the decay step Mt --> Bh with characteristic X rays. For the first time, precise spectroscopy allows the derivation of excitation schemes of isotopes along the decay chains starting with elements Z > 112. Comprehensive Monte-Carlo simulations accompany the data analysis. Nuclear structure models provide a first level interpretation.

  17. Catalyst for elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Liu, W.

    1995-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A catalytic reduction process is described for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides high activity and selectivity, as well as stability in the reaction atmosphere, for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over a metal oxide composite catalyst having one of the following empirical formulas: [(FO[sub 2])[sub 1[minus]n](RO)[sub n

  18. Trace element analysis of Texas lignite 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahar, Sean

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Gluskoter, and N. F. Shimp: Occurence and Distribution of Potentiall Volatile Trace Elements in Coal. Illinois State Geological Survey. Urbana, IL. (July, 1974). 39 [26] Andren, A. W. , D. H. Klein, and Y. Talmi: Selenium in Coal- Fired Plant Emissions.... Envir. Sci. and Tech. , 9:856, (Sept. , 1975). [27] Gluskoter, H. J. , R. R. Ruch, W. G. Miller, R. A. Cahill, G. B. Breher and J, K. Kuhn: Trace Elements in Coal: Occur- rence and Distribution. Illinois State Geological Sur- vey. Urbane, Illinois...

  19. Broadband diffractive lens or imaging element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ceglio, Natale M. (Livermore, CA); Hawryluk, Andrew M. (Modesto, CA); London, Richard A. (Oakland, CA); Seppala, Lynn G. (Livermore, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A broadband diffractive lens or imaging element produces a sharp focus and/or a high resolution image with broad bandwidth illuminating radiation. The diffractive lens is sectored or segmented into regions, each of which focuses or images a distinct narrowband of radiation but all of which have a common focal length. Alternatively, a serial stack of minus filters, each with a diffraction pattern which focuses or images a distinct narrowband of radiation but all of which have a common focal length, is used. The two approaches can be combined. Multifocal broadband diffractive elements can also be formed.

  20. Broadband diffractive lens or imaging element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ceglio, N.M.; Hawryluk, A.M.; London, R.A.; Seppala, L.G.

    1993-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A broadband diffractive lens or imaging element produces a sharp focus and/or a high resolution image with broad bandwidth illuminating radiation. The diffractive lens is sectored or segmented into regions, each of which focuses or images a distinct narrowband of radiation but all of which have a common focal length. Alternatively, a serial stack of minus filters, each with a diffraction pattern which focuses or images a distinct narrowband of radiation but all of which have a common focal length, is used. The two approaches can be combined. Multifocal broadband diffractive elements can also be formed. Thin film embodiments are described. 21 figures.

  1. Broadband diffractive lens or imaging element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ceglio, Natale M. (Livermore, CA); Hawryluk, Andrew M. (Modesto, CA); London, Richard A. (Oakland, CA); Seppala, Lynn G. (Livermore, CA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A broadband diffractive lens or imaging element produces a sharp focus and/or a high resolution image with broad bandwidth illuminating radiation. The diffractive lens is sectored or segmented into regions, each of which focuses or images a distinct narrowband of radiation but all of which have a common focal length. Alternatively, a serial stack of minus filters, each with a diffraction pattern which focuses or images a distinct narrowband of radiation but all of which have a common focal length, is used. The two approaches can be combined. Multifocal broadband diffractive elements can also be formed. Thin film embodiments are described.

  2. Reduced order prediction of rare events in unidirectional nonlinear water waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cousins, Will

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the problem of short-term prediction of rare, extreme water waves in unidirectional fields, a critical topic for ocean structures and naval operations. One possible mechanism for the occurrence of such rare, unusually-intense waves is nonlinear wave focusing. Recent results have demonstrated that random localizations of energy, induced by the dispersive mixing of different harmonics, can grow significantly due to localized nonlinear focusing. Here we show how the interplay between i) statistical properties captured through linear information such as the waves power spectrum and ii) nonlinear dynamical properties of focusing localized wave groups defines a critical length scale associated with the formation of extreme events. The energy that is locally concentrated over this length scale acts as the "trigger" of nonlinear focusing for wave groups and the formation of subsequent rare events. We use this property to develop inexpensive, short-term predictors of large water waves. Specifically, we sho...

  3. Synthesis, structural characterization and magnetic properties of RE{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} (RE=rare-earth metal)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suen, Nian-Tzu; Tobash, Paul H. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Bobev, Svilen, E-mail: bobev@udel.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of rare-earth metal-magnesium-germanides RE{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} (RE=Y, Nd, Sm, Gd-Tm, Lu) has been synthesized by reactions of the corresponding elements at high temperature. Their structures have been established by single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction and belong to the Mo{sub 2}FeB{sub 2} structure type (space group P4/mbm (No. 127), Z=2; Pearson symbol tP10). Temperature dependent DC magnetization measurements indicate Curie-Weiss paramagnetism in the high-temperature regime for all members of the family, excluding Y{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2}, Sm{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2}, and Lu{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2}. At cryogenic temperatures (ca. 60 K and below), most RE{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} phases enter into an antiferromagnetic ground-state, except for Er{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} and Tm{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2}, which do not undergo magnetic ordering down to 5 K. The structural variations as a function of the decreasing size of the rare-earth metals, following the lanthanide contraction, and the changes in the magnetic properties across the series are discussed as well. - Graphical Abstract: The structure of RE{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} (RE=Y, Nd, Sm, Gd-Tm, Lu) can be best viewed as 2-dimensional slabs of Mg and Ge atoms (anionic sub-lattice), and layers of rare-earth metal atoms (cationic sub-lattice) between them. Within this description, one should consider the Ge-Ge dumbbells (formally Ge{sup 6-}{sub 2}), interconnected with square-planar Mg atom as forming flat [MgGe{sub 2}] layers (z=0), stacked along the c-axis with the layers at z=1/2, made of rare-earth metal cations (formally RE{sup 3+}). Highlights: > RE{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} (RE=Y, Nd, Sm, Gd-Tm, Lu) are new ternary germanides. > Their structures can be recognized as a 1:1 intergrowth of CsCl- and AlB{sub 2}-like slabs. > Ge atoms are covalently bound into Ge{sub 2} dumbbells. > Most RE{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} phases are antiferromagnetically ordered at cryogenic temperatures.

  4. Two types of rare earth-organic frameworks constructed by racemic tartaric acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang Zhanguo [Zhejiang Key Laboratory for Reactive Chemistry on Solid Surfaces, Institute of Physical Chemistry, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua, Zhejiang 321004 (China); Lv Yaokang [Zhejiang Key Laboratory for Reactive Chemistry on Solid Surfaces, Institute of Physical Chemistry, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua, Zhejiang 321004 (China); Department of Chemistry, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Cheng Jianwen [Zhejiang Key Laboratory for Reactive Chemistry on Solid Surfaces, Institute of Physical Chemistry, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua, Zhejiang 321004 (China); Feng Yunlong, E-mail: sky37@zjnu.edu.cn [Zhejiang Key Laboratory for Reactive Chemistry on Solid Surfaces, Institute of Physical Chemistry, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua, Zhejiang 321004 (China)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrothermal reactions of rare earth oxides with racemic tartaric acid (H{sub 2}tar) yielded 7 rare earth(III) MOFs with general formulas [R{sub 2}(tar){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub n} (R=Y (1), Sm (4), Eu (5), Tb (6), Dy (7)) and [R{sub 2}(tar){sub 2}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4})(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub n}{center_dot}4nH{sub 2}O (R=La (2), Nd (3)). X-ray powder diffraction analysis and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveal that they present two different structural types. MOFs 1, 4, 5, 6 and 7 are isostructural and crystallize in the orthorhombic non-centrosymmetric space group Iba2, and feature unusual fsc-3,4-Iba2 topology. MOFs 2 and 3 are isostructural and crystallize in monoclinic P2{sub 1}/c space group and display rare fsx-4,5-P2{sub 1}/c topology containing hydrophilic channels bounded by triple helical chains along a axis. MOFs 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 exhibit intense lanthanide characteristic photoluminescence at room temperature. - Graphical Abstract: [R{sub 2}(tar){sub 2}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4})(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub n}{center_dot}4nH{sub 2}O (R=La (2), Nd (3)) display rare fsx-4,5-P2{sub 1}/c topology containing hydrophilic channels bounded by triple helical chains along a axis. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two types of rare earth MOFs were synthesized by hydrothermal conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MOFs feature unusual fsc-3,4-Iba2 and rare fsx-4,5-P2{sub 1}/c topology structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MOFs exhibit intense lanthanide characteristic photoluminescence.

  5. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C5, supplkment au no 5, Tome 40, Mai 1979, page C5-65 THE ELECTRON/C STRUCTURE OF RARE-EARTHS.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    /C STRUCTURE OF RARE-EARTHS. Band structures of rare earth metals(*) B. N. Harmon Ames Laboratory structure of the rare earth metals. The first calculations for the paramagnetic state of these fascinating structure of rare earth metals. The reviews by Dimmock [I] and Freeman [2] are well known. In addition a new

  6. Strange matrix elements of the nucleon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, R; Woloshyn, R M; Lewis, Randy

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results for the disconnected contributions to matrix elements of the vector current and scalar density have been obtained for the nucleon from the Wilson action at beta=6 using a stochastic estimator technique and 2000 quenched configurations. Various methods for analysis are employed and chiral extrapolations are discussed.

  7. Generalized finite element method for Helmholtz equation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hidajat, Realino Lulie

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    reduces the pollution effect due to wave number and we are able to obtain a highly accurate solution with a much smaller number of degrees-of-freedom compared with the classical Finite Element Method. The q-convergence of the handbook functions...

  8. DISSOLVED CONCENTRATION LIMITS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NA

    2004-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of elements with radioactive isotopes under probable repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, field measurements, and laboratory experiments. The scope of this modeling activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for 14 elements with radioactive isotopes (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium) important to calculated dose. Model outputs for uranium, plutonium, neptunium, thorium, americium, and protactinium are in the form of tabulated functions with pH and log (line integral) CO{sub 2} as independent variables, plus one or more uncertainty terms. The solubility limits for the remaining elements are either in the form of distributions or single values. The output data from this report are fundamental inputs for Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) to determine the estimated release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Consistent modeling approaches and environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models for all of the actinides. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so that they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, and activity coefficients have been quantified or otherwise addressed.

  9. Two-element free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shih, C.; Yariv, A.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction between the electrons and the radiation in a free-electrons laser leads to a shift and a spread of the electron velocity distribution. The electron dynamics of a two-element system are studied in the small signal region. It is found that the efficiency and gain can be increased through introduction of an adjustable drift distance between two identical wigglers.

  10. The New Element Californium (Atomic Number 98)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Seaborg, G. T.; Thompson, S. G.; Street, K. Jr.; Ghiroso, A.

    1950-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Definite identification has been made of an isotope of the element with atomic number 98 through the irradiation of Cm{sup 242} with about 35-Mev helium ions in the Berkeley Crocker Laboratory 60-inch cyclotron. The isotope which has been identified has an observed half-life of about 45 minutes and is thought to have the mass number 244. The observed mode of decay of 98{sup 244} is through the emission of alpha-particles, with energy of about 7.1 Mev, which agrees with predictions. Other considerations involving the systematics of radioactivity in this region indicate that it should also be unstable toward decay by electron capture. The chemical separation and identification of the new element was accomplished through the use of ion exchange adsorption methods employing the resin Dowex-50. The element 98 isotope appears in the eka-dysprosium position on elution curves containing berkelium and curium as reference points--that is, it precedes berkelium and curium off the column in like manner that dysprosium precedes terbium and gadolinium. The experiments so far have revealed only the tripositive oxidation state of eka-dysprosium character and suggest either that higher oxidation states are not stable in aqueous solutions or that the rates of oxidation are slow. The successful identification of so small an amount of an isotope of element 98 was possible only through having made accurate predictions of the chemical and radioactive properties.

  11. Trace elements and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Trace elements and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in snow and ice sampled at Colle designed, built and tested. Melt water from inner part of ice core section was pumped to an ICP-SFMS and ICP-OES. Melt water from outer section was on-line extracted by solid-phase cartridges for semi

  12. Neutron based elemental characterization of coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dep, L.; Vourvopoulos, G. [Western Kentucky Univ., Bowling Green, KY (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An elemental characterization system based on a 14 MeV neutron generator is described. The results of sulfur content measurement in coal with a precision acceptable to the coal industry are presented. The preliminary results of measuring carbon, oxygen, and sodium are shown.

  13. Plutonium-the element of surprise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    Plutonium-the element of surprise G.R.ChoppinandB.E.Stout This year marked the soth annivrsary ol the original isolation o{ plutonium, making ita relativenewcomerto the PeriodicTable.Ovrthe past 50 years plutonium has become more familiar to tho generslpublic than manyothor,olderelem6nts

  14. Interfacing Superconducting Qubits and Telecom Photons via a Rare-Earth Doped Crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher O'Brien; Nikolai Lauk; Susanne Blum; Giovanna Morigi; Michael Fleischhauer

    2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a scheme to couple short single photon pulses to superconducting qubits. An optical photon is first absorbed into an inhomogeneously broadened rare-earth doped crystal using controlled reversible inhomogeneous broadening. The optical excitation is then mapped into a spin state using a series of $\\pi$-pulses and subsequently transferred to a superconducting qubit via a microwave cavity. To overcome the intrinsic and engineered inhomogeneous broadening of the optical and spin transitions in rare earth doped crystals, we make use of a special transfer protocol using staggered $\\pi$-pulses. We predict total transfer efficiencies on the order of 90%.

  15. Origin of Low-Lying Enhanced E1 Strength in Rare-Earth Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spieker, M; Zilges, A; Iachello, F

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The experimental $E1$ strength distribution below 4 MeV in rare-earth nuclei suggests a local breaking of isospin symmetry. In addition to the octupole states, additional $1^-$ states with enhanced E1 strength have been observed in rare-earth nuclei by means of ($\\gamma,\\gamma'$) experiments. By reproducing the experimental results, the spdf interacting boson model calculations provide further evidence for the formation of an $\\alpha$ cluster in medium-mass nuclei and might provide a new understanding of the origin of low-lying E1 strength.

  16. Metal enhanced fluorescence in rare earth doped plasmonic core-shell nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Derom, S; Pillonnet, A; Benamara, O; Jurdyc, A M; Girard, C; Francs, G Colas des

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically and numerically investigate metal enhanced fluorescence of plasmonic core-shell nanoparticles doped with rare earth (RE) ions. Particle shape and size are engineered to maximize the average enhancement factor (AEF) of the overall doped shell. We show that the highest enhancement (11 in the visible and 7 in the near-infrared) are achieved by tuning either the dipolar or quadrupolar particle resonance to the rare earth ions excitation wavelength. Additionally, the calculated AEFs are compared to experimental data reported in the literature, obtained in similar conditions (plasmon mediated enhancement) or when a metal-RE energy transfer mechanism is involved.

  17. Origin of Low-Lying Enhanced E1 Strength in Rare-Earth Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Spieker; S. Pascu; A. Zilges; F. Iachello

    2015-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The experimental $E1$ strength distribution below 4 MeV in rare-earth nuclei suggests a local breaking of isospin symmetry. In addition to the octupole states, additional $1^-$ states with enhanced E1 strength have been observed in rare-earth nuclei by means of ($\\gamma,\\gamma'$) experiments. By reproducing the experimental results, the spdf interacting boson model calculations provide further evidence for the formation of an $\\alpha$ cluster in medium-mass nuclei and might provide a new understanding of the origin of low-lying E1 strength.

  18. Rare-earth innovation to improve nylon manufacturing | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnicalPurchase, Delivery,AssistanceRare Earth MetalsRare-earth

  19. Finite Element Analysis in Functional BRIAN G. RICHMOND,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finite Element Analysis in Functional Morphology BRIAN G. RICHMOND,1 * BARTH W. WRIGHT,1 IAN GROSSE element analysis. © 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Key words: finite-element analysis; mastication; primates; biome This article reviews the fundamental principles of the finite element method and the three basic steps (model

  20. Modeling Elastic Properties in Finite-Element Analysis: How Much

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling Elastic Properties in Finite- Element Analysis: How Much Precision Is Needed to Produce analysis was investigated using a finite-element model of a Macaca fascicularis skull. Four finite-element realistically using the orthotropic elastic properties employed in analysis 4. Results suggest that finite-element

  1. Techniques for Modeling Muscle-Induced Forces in Finite Element

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumont, Elizabeth R.

    program was written to interface with a commercial finite element analysis tool to automatically apply: finite element analysis; muscle force; skull; muscle loading alogorithm, biting Finite element analysisTechniques for Modeling Muscle- Induced Forces in Finite Element Models of Skeletal Structures IAN

  2. Scalability Analysis of Partitioning Strategies for Finite Element Graphs. \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Vipin

    Scalability Analysis of Partitioning Strategies for Finite Element Graphs. \\Lambda Grama Y. Ananth Y. Grama ananth@cs:umn:edu Abstract Issues of partitioning Finite Element Graphs are central for implementing the Finite Element Method (FEM). Parallel formulations of finite element techniques require

  3. Math/AMath 595: Finite Element Methods (Winter 2001)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stein, William

    for Elliptic Problems by Philippe G. Ciarlet (1978). 3. An Analysis of the Finite Element Method by GilbertMath/AMath 595: Finite Element Methods (Winter 2001) Lectures: MW 3:30{4:50, room 121 RAI Professor Element Methods by Susanne C. Brenner and L. Ridgway Scott (1994). 2. The Finite Element Method

  4. Stochastic variation in reproductive success of a rare frog, Rana sevosa: implications for conservation and for monitoring amphibian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richter, Stephen C.

    Stochastic variation in reproductive success of a rare frog, Rana sevosa: implications and Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History, University of Oklahoma, 2401 Chautauqua, Norman, OK

  5. Constraints on the Mass and Mixing of the 4th Generation Quark From Direct CP Violation$?^{\\prime}/?$ and Rare K Decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao-Shang Huang; Wu-Jun Huo; Yue-Liang Wu

    2000-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the $\\epsilon^{\\prime} /\\epsilon$ for $K\\to \\pi\\pi$ in a sequential fourth generation model. By giving the basic formulae for $\\epsilon^{\\prime}/\\epsilon$ in this model, we analyze the numerical results which are dependent of $m_{t^{\\prime}}$ and imaginary part of the fourth CKM factor, ${Im}V^{*}_{t^{'}s}V_{t^{'}d}$ (or $V^{*}_{t^{'}s}V_{t^{'}d}$ and the fourth generation CKM matrix phase $\\theta$). We find that, unlike the SM, when taking the central values of all parameters for $\\epsilon^{\\prime}/\\epsilon$, the values of $\\epsilon^{\\prime}/ \\epsilon$ can easily fit to the current experimental data for all values of hadronic matrix elements estimated from various approaches. Also, we show that the experimental values of $\\epsilon^{\\prime}/\\epsilon$ and rare K decays can provide a strong constraint on both mass and mixing of the fourth generation quark. When taking the values of hadronic matrix elements from the lattice or 1/N expansion calculations, a large region of the up-type quark mass $m_{t^{\\prime}}$ is excluded.

  6. Ferroelectric tunneling element and memory applications which utilize the tunneling element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kalinin, Sergei V. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Christen, Hans M. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Baddorf, Arthur P. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Meunier, Vincent (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Lee, Ho Nyung (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A tunneling element includes a thin film layer of ferroelectric material and a pair of dissimilar electrically-conductive layers disposed on opposite sides of the ferroelectric layer. Because of the dissimilarity in composition or construction between the electrically-conductive layers, the electron transport behavior of the electrically-conductive layers is polarization dependent when the tunneling element is below the Curie temperature of the layer of ferroelectric material. The element can be used as a basis of compact 1R type non-volatile random access memory (RAM). The advantages include extremely simple architecture, ultimate scalability and fast access times generic for all ferroelectric memories.

  7. HELSINKI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY ENE-47.153 Trace elements and alkaliTrace elements and alkali

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    elements in fossil - and waste-derived fuelsTrace elements in fossil - and waste-derived fuels Coal Peat Heavy fuel oil Pet coke MSW RDF Wood Waste wood Waste paper Scrap tyres Sew. sludge Hg 0.02-3 ~0.07 .153 Behaviour of trace elements in coalBehaviour of trace elements in coal combustion flue gasescombustion flue

  8. Synthesis, Structures, and Magnetic Properties of Rare-Earth Cobalt Arsenides, RCo2As2 (R = La, Ce, Pr, Nd)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Corey [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Tan, Xiaoyan [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Kovnir, Kirill [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Garlea, Vasile O [ORNL] [ORNL; Shatruk, Michael [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four rare-earth cobalt arsenides, RCo2As2 (R = La, Ce, Pr, Nd), were obtained by reactions of constituent elements in molten Bi. The use of Bi flux also allowed the growth of representative single crystals. All compounds are isostructural and belong to the ThCr2Si2 structure type (space group I4/mmm). The formation of Co vacancies is observed in all structures, while the structures of La- and Ce-containing compounds also show incorporation of minor Bi defects next to the R crystallographic site. Correspondingly, the general formula of these materials can be written as R1 xBixCo2 As2, with x/ = 0.03/0.1, 0.05/0.15, 0/0.2, and 0/0.3 for R = La, Ce, Pr, and Nd, respectively. All compounds exhibit high-temperature ferromagnetic ordering of Co magnetic moments in the range of 150-200 K. Electronic band structure calculations revealed a high peak in the density of states at the Fermi level, thus supporting the itinerant nature of magnetism in the Co sublattice. The magnetic ordering in the lanthanide sublattice takes place at lower temperatures, with the R moments aligning antiparallel to the Co moments to give a ferrimagnetic ground state. The measurements on oriented single crystals demonstrated significant magnetic anisotropy in the ferrimagnetic state, with the preferred moment alignment along the c axis of the tetragonal lattice. Neutron powder diffraction failed to reveal the structure of magnetically ordered states, but confirmed the presence of Co vacancies. X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy on Ce1.95Bi0.05Co1.85As2 showed the average oxidation state of Ce to be +3.06. Solid state NMR spectroscopy revealed a substantially reduced hyperfine field on the Co atoms in the vicinity of Bi defects.

  9. The Rare decay K+ ---> pi+ nu anti-nu at the next-to-next-to-leading order in QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buras, A.J.; /Munich, Tech. U.; Gorbahn, M.; /Durham U., IPPP; Haisch, U.; Nierste, U.; /Fermilab

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors calculate the complete next-to-next-to-leading order QCD correction of the charm quark contribution to the branching ratio for the rare decay K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}} in the standard model. The inclusion of these {Omicron}({alpha}{sub s}) contributions leads to a significant reduction of the theoretical uncertainty from {+-} 10.1% down to {+-} 2.4% in the relevant parameter P{sub c}, implying the left over scale uncertainties in {Beta}(K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}) and in the determination of |V{sub td}|, sin 2{beta} and {gamma} from the K {yields} {pi}{nu}{bar {nu}} system to be {+-} 1.3%, {+-} 1.0%, {+-} 0.006 and {+-} 1.2{sup o}, respectively. for the charm quark {ovr MS} mass m{sub c}(m{sub c}) = (1.30 {+-} 0.05) GeV and |V{sub us}| = 0.2248 the next-to-leading order value P{sub c} = 0.37 {+-} 0.06 is modified to P{sub c} = 0.37 {+-} 0.04 at the next-to-next-to-leading order level with the latter error fully dominated by the uncertainty in m{sub c}(m{sub c}). Adding the recently calculated long-distance contributions we find {Beta}(K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}) = (8.0 {+-} 1.1) x 10{sup -11} with the quoted error almost entirely due to the present uncertainties in m{sub c}(m{sub c}) and the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa elements.

  10. Neutrino Physics Neutrinos rarely interact despite their vast abundance in nature. To give a sense of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter 1 Neutrino Physics Neutrinos rarely interact despite their vast abundance in nature later in 1933, Enrico Fermi devised a theory for beta decays which 1 #12;Chapter 1: Neutrino Physics 2 indicated oscillations [6]. This chapter will describe neutrino physics and some of the experiments

  11. Prospects for and Status of CUORE ? The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman, E B

    2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    CUORE (Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events) is a next generation experiment designed to search for the neutrinoless DBD of {sup 130}Te using a bolometric technique. The present status of the CUORE is presented along with the latest results from its prototype, CUORICINO.

  12. South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com Venus to cross sun in rare celestial event

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com Venus to cross sun in rare celestial event By Robert Nolin, Sun passage across the face of the sun at twilight Tuesday. It's a sight you'll never see again. Called named for the Roman goddess of love will pass between the Earth and the sun for several hours at sunset

  13. Hydrogen absorption characteristics of oxygen-stabilized rare-earth iron intermetallic compounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrogen absorption characteristics of oxygen-stabilized rare-earth iron intermetallic compounds M Abstract. -- The thermal behavior of oxygen-stabilized RjFegO^-hydrogen (R = Y, Dy, Ho) systems was studied decade to the study of the hydrogenation characte- ristics of a variety of intermetallic compounds, our

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - adding rare earths Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    au n04, Tome 24, a v r i l 1989 Summary: obtenus. Les constantes de Verdet de ces aerogels o n t Bt6 determinees. Abstract - Rare-earth s i l i c... a t e s and TMOS. The...

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - adjustable rare earth Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    au n04, Tome 24, a v r i l 1989 Summary: obtenus. Les constantes de Verdet de ces aerogels o n t Bt6 determinees. Abstract - Rare-earth s i l i c... a t e s and TMOS. The...

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - aged rare earth Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    au n04, Tome 24, a v r i l 1989 Summary: obtenus. Les constantes de Verdet de ces aerogels o n t Bt6 determinees. Abstract - Rare-earth s i l i c... a t e s and TMOS. The...

  17. Searches for D0 - Anti-D0 Mixing, Rare Charm And Tau Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swain, Sanjay K.; /SLAC

    2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss the results on D{sup 0}-{bar D}{sup 0} mixing through hadronic as well as semi-leptonic charm decays, rare flavor-changing neutral currents in the charm sector and the lepton flavor violating {tau} decaying to charged lighter leptons. The results from both BABAR and Belle are presented in this review.

  18. The 6th Annual Colorado Rare Plant Symposium: G2 Plants of Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The 6th Annual Colorado Rare Plant Symposium: G2 Plants of Colorado September 11, 2009 8 am - 4 pm, endangered, candidate, and petitioned plant species. The second symposium, held in Pagosa Springs in 2005, covered the globally critically imperiled (G1) plant species of Colorado that are not federally listed

  19. Metal-atom fluorescence from the quenching of metastable rare gases by metal carbonyls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollingsworth, W.E.

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A flowing afterglow apparatus was used to study the metal fluorescence resulting from the quenching of metastable rare-gas states by metal carbonyls. The data from the quenching or argon, neon, and helium by iron and nickel carbonyl agreed well with a restricted degree of freedom model indicating a concerted bond-breaking dissociation.

  20. Posterior Circulation Stroke After Bronchial Artery Embolization. A Rare but Serious Complication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laborda, Alicia [Universidad de Zaragoza, Departamento de Pediatria, Radiologia y Medicina Fisica, Grupo de Investigacion en Tecnicas Minimamente Invasivas, GITMI (Spain); Tejero, Carlos [Hospital Clinico Universitario Lozano Blesa, Servicio de Neurologia (Spain); Fredes, Arturo, E-mail: fredesarturo@gmail.com [Universidad de Zaragoza, Hospital Quiron, Departamento de Pediatria, Radiologia y Medicina Fisica, Grupo de Investigacion en Tecnicas Minimamente Invasivas, GITMI (Spain); Cebrian, Luis; Guelbenzu, Santiago; Gregorio, Miguel Angel de, E-mail: mgregori@unizar.es [Universidad de Zaragoza, Departamento de Pediatria, Radiologia y Medicina Fisica, Grupo de Investigacion en Tecnicas Minimamente Invasivas, GITMI (Spain)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Bronchial artery embolization (BAE) is the treatment of choice for massive hemoptysis with rare complications that generally are mild and transient. There are few references in the medical literature with acute cerebral embolization as a complication of BAE. We report a case of intracranial posterior territory infarctions as a complication BAE in a patient with hemoptysis due to bronchiectasis.

  1. B --> rho K* decays and other rare vector-vector modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Vasseur

    2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent analyses of the following rare vector-vector decays of the B meson are presented: rho K*, omega K*, omega rho, omega omega, and omega phi charmless final states. The latest results indicate that the fraction of longitudinal polarization is about 0.5 in penguin-dominated modes and close to 1 for tree-dominated modes.

  2. Search for Rare 3 and 4-Body D0 Decays at FNAL E791

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermilab E791 Collaboration; D. J. Summers

    2000-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Limits at the 10**-4 level are reported for rare and forbidden decays of the D0 charm meson to a pair of leptons and either a vector meson or two pseudoscalar mesons. Of these searches, 18 are investigations of decays without previous published results; several others have significantly improved sensitivity over previous results.

  3. Thermal treatment for increasing magnetostrictive response of rare earth-iron alloy rods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Verhoeven, J.D.; McMasters, O.D.

    1989-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetostrictive rods formed from rare earth-iron alloys are subjected to a short time heat treatment to increase their magnetostrictive response under compression. The heat treatment is preferably carried out at a temperature of from 900 to 1,000 C for 20 minutes to six hours.

  4. Ternary rare earth-lanthanide sulfides. [Re = Eu, Sm or Yb

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Takeshita, Takuo; Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.; Beaudry, B.J.

    1986-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a new ternary rare earth sulfur compound having the formula La/sub 3-x/M/sub x/S/sub 4/, where M is europium, samarium, or ytterbium, with x = 0.15 to 0.8. The compound has good high-temperature thermoelectric properties and exhibits long-term structural stability up to 1000/sup 0/C.

  5. Survey of Rare Plants San Juan Public Lands in Dolores and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Forest--are in the process of revising their management plan. Since one of their missions has beenSurvey of Rare Plants San Juan Public Lands in Dolores and Montezuma Counties, Colorado Colorado #12;EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The San Juan Public Lands agencies--Bureau of Land Management and San Juan

  6. aqueous rare-earth electrolyte: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aqueous rare-earth electrolyte First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Hydrothermal transport...

  7. Rare Plants of the Redwood Forest and Forest Management Effects1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    on their life history and habitat requirements, as well as the type, intensity, and frequency of disturbance disturbances and short rotation periods. What does this repeated disturbance mean for rare plants associated behavior of invasive exotics. Individual species will have different responses to disturbance based

  8. Rare sulfur and triple oxygen isotope geochemistry of volcanogenic sulfate aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bindeman, Ilya N.

    Rare sulfur and triple oxygen isotope geochemistry of volcanogenic sulfate aerosols I.N. Bindeman a of Technology, Pasadena, CA, USA c Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, McGill University, Montreal, Que., Canada d Department of Geology and Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, University of Maryland

  9. Automation of the matrix element reweighting method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Artoisenet; V. Lemaître; F. Maltoni; O. Mattelaer

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Matrix element reweighting is a powerful experimental technique widely employed to maximize the amount of information that can be extracted from a collider data set. We present a procedure that allows to automatically evaluate the weights for any process of interest in the standard model and beyond. Given the initial, intermediate and final state particles, and the transfer functions for the final physics objects, such as leptons, jets, missing transverse energy, our algorithm creates a phase-space mapping designed to efficiently perform the integration of the squared matrix element and the transfer functions. The implementation builds up on MadGraph, it is completely automatized and publicly available. A few sample applications are presented that show the capabilities of the code and illustrate the possibilities for new studies that such an approach opens up.

  10. Tipping elements in the Earth's climate system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lenton, T.M. [Univ. of East Anglia and Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research, Norwich (GB). School of Environmental Sciences; Held, H.; Lucht, W.; Rahmstorf, S. [Potsdam Inst. for Climate Impact Research (Germany); Kriegler, E. [Potsdam Inst. for Climate Impact Research (Germany)]|[Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Engineering and Public Policy; Hall, J.W. [Newcastle Univ. and Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research (GB). School of Civil Engineering and Geosciences; Schellnhuber, H.J. [Potsdam Inst. for Climate Impact Research (Germany)]|[Oxford Univ. and Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research (GB). Environmental Change Inst.

    2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The term 'tipping point' commonly refers to a critical threshold at which a tiny perturbation can qualitatively alter the state or development of a system. Here the authors introduce the term 'tipping element' to describe large-scale components of the Earth system that may pass a tipping point. They critically evaluate potential policy-relevant tipping elements in the climate system under anthropogenic forcing, drawing on the pertinent literature and a recent international workshop to compile a short list, and they assess where their tipping points lie. An expert elicitation is used to help rank their sensitivity to global warming and the uncertainty about the underlying physical mechanisms. Then the authors explain how, in principle, early warning systems could be established to detect the proximity of some tipping points.

  11. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adams, Jesse D; Sulchek, Todd A; Feigin, Stuart C

    2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  12. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adams, Jesse D; Sulchek, Todd A; Feigin, Stuart C

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  13. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adams, Jesse D. (Reno, NV); Sulchek, Todd A. (Oakland, CA); Feigin, Stuart C. (Reno, NV)

    2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  14. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adams, Jesse D.; Sulchek, Todd A.; Feigin, Stuart C.

    2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  15. Continuous, real time microwave plasma element sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woskov, Paul P. (4 Ledgewood Dr., Bedford, MA 01730); Smatlak, Donna L. (10 Village Hill Rd., Belmont, MA 02178); Cohn, Daniel R. (26 Walnut Hill Rd., Chestnut Hill, MA 02167); Wittle, J. Kenneth (1740 Conestoga Rd., Chester Springs, PA 19425); Titus, Charles H. (323 Echo Valley La., Newton Square, PA 19072); Surma, Jeffrey E. (806 Brian La., Kennewick, WA 99337)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microwave-induced plasma for continuous, real time trace element monitoring under harsh and variable conditions. The sensor includes a source of high power microwave energy and a shorted waveguide made of a microwave conductive, refractory material communicating with the source of the microwave energy to generate a plasma. The high power waveguide is constructed to be robust in a hot, hostile environment. It includes an aperture for the passage of gases to be analyzed and a spectrometer is connected to receive light from the plasma. Provision is made for real time in situ calibration. The spectrometer disperses the light, which is then analyzed by a computer. The sensor is capable of making continuous, real time quantitative measurements of desired elements, such as the heavy metals lead and mercury.

  16. Finite element analysis of human joints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bossart, P.L.; Hollerbach, K.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our work focuses on the development of finite element models (FEMs) that describe the biomechanics of human joints. Finite element modeling is becoming a standard tool in industrial applications. In highly complex problems such as those found in biomechanics research, however, the full potential of FEMs is just beginning to be explored, due to the absence of precise, high resolution medical data and the difficulties encountered in converting these enormous datasets into a form that is usable in FEMs. With increasing computing speed and memory available, it is now feasible to address these challenges. We address the first by acquiring data with a high resolution C-ray CT scanner and the latter by developing semi-automated method for generating the volumetric meshes used in the FEM. Issues related to tomographic reconstruction, volume segmentation, the use of extracted surfaces to generate volumetric hexahedral meshes, and applications of the FEM are described.

  17. Continuous, real time microwave plasma element sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woskov, P.P.; Smatlak, D.L.; Cohn, D.R.; Wittle, J.K.; Titus, C.H.; Surma, J.E.

    1995-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Microwave-induced plasma is described for continuous, real time trace element monitoring under harsh and variable conditions. The sensor includes a source of high power microwave energy and a shorted waveguide made of a microwave conductive, refractory material communicating with the source of the microwave energy to generate a plasma. The high power waveguide is constructed to be robust in a hot, hostile environment. It includes an aperture for the passage of gases to be analyzed and a spectrometer is connected to receive light from the plasma. Provision is made for real time in situ calibration. The spectrometer disperses the light, which is then analyzed by a computer. The sensor is capable of making continuous, real time quantitative measurements of desired elements, such as the heavy metals lead and mercury. 3 figs.

  18. Apollo 16: a trace element perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jovanovic, S.; Reed, G.W. Jr.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief summary of some inferences regarding the Apollo 16 site that can be arrived at from incompatible element-geochemical data is presented. We use a set of elements not exploited to address some of the questions about the geology of the Apollo 16 site and the evolution of the highlands crust. Others have recognized the great difficulty in disentangling the complex history of the highlands on the basis of petrographic and compositional data. We have previously attempted to reconcile a relatively few interelement relationships with information from many other sources. The Apollo 16 site and the significance of Apollo 16 samples have been examined from the perspectives of data on Cl, P, Ru and Os for the most part and also, in a few cases, data on the heavy metals Pb, Tl and Bi.

  19. Hydrothermal synthesis, characterization and up/down-conversion luminescence of barium rare earth fluoride nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, Li-Ping; Zhang, Qiang [Department of Chemistry, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse (Tongji University) (China); Yan, Bing, E-mail: byan@tongji.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse (Tongji University) (China)

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: Lanthanide ions doped bare earth rare earth fluoride nanocrystals are synthesized by hydrothermal technology and characterized. The down/up-conversion luminescence of them are discussed. - Highlights: • Mixed hydrothermal system H{sub 2}O–OA (EDA)–O-A(LO-A) is used for synthesis. • Barium rare earth fluoride nanocrystals are synthesized comprehensively. • Luminescence for down-conversion and up-conversion are obtained for these systems. - Abstract: Mixed hydrothermal system H{sub 2}O–OA (EDA)–O-A(LO-A) is developed to synthesize barium rare earth fluorides nanocrystals (OA = oleylamine, EDA = ethylenediamine, O-A = oleic acid and LO-A = linoleic acid). They are presented as BaREF{sub 5} (RE = Ce, Pr, Nd, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Y, Tm, Lu) and Ba{sub 2}REF{sub 7} (RE = La, Sm, Ho, Er, Yb). The influence of reaction parameters (rare earth species, hydrothermal system and temperature) is checked on the phase and shape evolution of the fluoride nanocrystals. It is found that reaction time and temperature of these nanocrystals using EDA (180 °C, 6 h) is lower than those of them using OA (220 °C, 10 h). The photoluminescence properties of these fluorides activated by some rare earth ions (Nd{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}) are studied, and especially up-conversion luminescence of the four fluoride nanocrystal systems (Ba{sub 2}LaF{sub 7}:Yb, Tm(Er), Ba{sub 2}REF{sub 7}:Yb, Tm(Er) (RE = Gd, Y, Lu)) is observed.

  20. DISSOLVED CONCENTRATION LIMITS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Bernot

    2005-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of elements with radioactive isotopes under probable repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, field measurements, and laboratory experiments. The scope of this activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for elements with radioactive isotopes (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium) relevant to calculated dose. Model outputs for uranium, plutonium, neptunium, thorium, americium, and protactinium are provided in the form of tabulated functions with pH and log fCO{sub 2} as independent variables, plus one or more uncertainty terms. The solubility limits for the remaining elements are either in the form of distributions or single values. Even though selection of an appropriate set of radionuclides documented in Radionuclide Screening (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160059]) includes actinium, transport of Ac is not modeled in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) model because of its extremely short half-life. Actinium dose is calculated in the TSPA-LA by assuming secular equilibrium with {sup 231}Pa (Section 6.10); therefore, Ac is not analyzed in this report. The output data from this report are fundamental inputs for TSPA-LA used to determine the estimated release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Consistent modeling approaches and environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models for the actinides discussed in this report. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, and activity coefficients have been quantified or otherwise addressed.