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1

US-Japan Bilateral  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

205 TASF 315 TASF 301A SPED 301B SPED 151 TASF 205 TASF 301A SPED 301B SPED 205 TASF US-Japan Bilateral (301A SPED, 8 AM - noon) Workshop: Materials Thermodynamics Research 8:00 AM...

2

US-Japan Clean Energy Cooperation | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

US-Japan Clean Energy Cooperation US-Japan Clean Energy Cooperation US-Japan Clean Energy Cooperation.pdf More Documents & Publications Edward Jones, Lawrence Livermore National...

3

Rare Earth Elements:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Energy-efficient compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) use phosphor...LEDs), and compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) all utilize...conventional incandescent light bulbs with CFLs in numerous...rare earth industry and led to significant price...previous year. This led to significant price...

Gareth P. Hatch

4

Rare Earth Elements:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...were also extracted as by-products of uranium mining from conglomerates at Elliot Lake...toxic waste lakes, acrid air, and high cancer rates in the Bayan Obo area. The environmental...Major and trace element composition of the depleted MORB mantle (DMM). Earth and Planetary...

Anton R. Chakhmouradian; Frances Wall

5

Us-Japan cooperation on safeguards  

SciTech Connect

There is a long history of collaborative safeguards development between the United States and Japan. Japan has built, and continues to expand, the largest civil nuclear fuel cycle under full-scope IAEA safeguards in world. This development has posed unique challenges to the international safeguards system. Safeguards developments made through the US-Japan cooperation to address these unique challenges have significantly impacted the technologies deployed for international safeguards applications around the world.

Beddingfield, David H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, Howard O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hori, Masato [JAEA; Kawakubo, Yoko [JAEA; Mcclelland - Kerr, J [NNSA

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Rapporteur's Report - workshop on rare earth elements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Trans-Atlantic Workshop on Rare Earth Elements and Trans-Atlantic Workshop on Rare Earth Elements and Other Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future Hosted by the MIT Energy Initiative, cambridge, Massachusetts december 3, 2010 Introduction The objective of the workshop was to exchange views and information on the material security challenges of rare earths and other elements critical for clean energy generation and use. This includes the description of current research topics around the supply chain and end uses, and to identify opportunities for Trans-Atlantic research cooperation. The workshop consisted of a series of brief presentations by researchers in the US and Europe, followed by a discussion of possible areas of collaboration proposed by the co-chairs. A list of the presentations and the agenda for the day is appended with this document.

7

US-Japan_NuclearEnergyActionPlan.pdf | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

US-JapanNuclearEnergyActionPlan.pdf US-JapanNuclearEnergyActionPlan.pdf US-JapanNuclearEnergyActionPlan.pdf More Documents & Publications Fact Sheet: United States-Japan Joint...

8

Note: Portable rare-earth element analyzer using pyroelectric crystal  

SciTech Connect

We report a portable rare-earth element analyzer with a palm-top size chamber including the electron source of a pyroelectric crystal and the sample stage utilizing cathodoluminescence (CL) phenomenon. The portable rare-earth element analyzer utilizing CL phenomenon is the smallest reported so far. The portable rare-earth element analyzer detected the rare-earth elements Dy, Tb, Er, and Sm of ppm order in zircon, which were not detected by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis. We also performed an elemental mapping of rare-earth elements by capturing a CL image using CCD camera.

Imashuku, Susumu, E-mail: imashuku.susumu.2m@kyoto-u.ac.jp; Fuyuno, Naoto; Hanasaki, Kohei; Kawai, Jun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

RARE EARTH ELEMENT SENSITIVITY FACTORS IN CALCIC PLAGIOCLASE (ANORTHITE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RARE EARTH ELEMENT SENSITIVITY FACTORS IN CALCIC PLAGIOCLASE (ANORTHITE) C. Floss and B. Jolliff Mc Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130 1. Introduction The rare earth elements (REE) are sensitive indicators concentrations for each sample are listed in Table 1 and are shown in Fig. 1. Table 1. Rare Earth Element Data

10

SAFETY TRIP REPORT ON US-JAPAN EXCHANGE PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SAFETY TRIP REPORT ON US-JAPAN EXCHANGE PROGRAM (FuY 2007) #12;Report on the 12th Meeting of the Joint Working Group of the U.S.-Japan Coordinating Committee of Fusion Energy on Safety in Inter-Institutional Collaborations (U.S.-Japan Safety Monitoring Program) Meeting in Japan, March 9-22, 2008 #12;A. PURPOSE

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

11

Behavior of Rare Earth Elements in Geothermal Systems- A New  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Behavior of Rare Earth Elements in Geothermal Systems- A New Behavior of Rare Earth Elements in Geothermal Systems- A New Exploration/Exploitation Tool? Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Behavior of Rare Earth Elements in Geothermal Systems- A New Exploration/Exploitation Tool? Abstract N/A Author Department of Geology and Geological Engineering niversity of Idaho Published Publisher Not Provided, 2001 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Behavior of Rare Earth Elements in Geothermal Systems- A New Exploration/Exploitation Tool? Citation Department of Geology and Geological Engineering niversity of Idaho. 2001. Behavior of Rare Earth Elements in Geothermal Systems- A New Exploration/Exploitation Tool?. (!) : (!) . Retrieved from

12

Behavior Of Rare Earth Element In Geothermal Systems, A New  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Behavior Of Rare Earth Element In Geothermal Systems, A New Behavior Of Rare Earth Element In Geothermal Systems, A New Exploration-Exploitation Tool Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Behavior Of Rare Earth Element In Geothermal Systems, A New Exploration-Exploitation Tool Details Activities (32) Areas (17) Regions (0) Abstract: The goal of this four-year project was to provide a database by which to judge the utility of the rare earth elements (REE) in the exploration for and exploitation of geothermal fields in the United States. Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: (1) the North Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); (2) the Cascades of Oregon; (3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; (4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields

13

US & Japan TG 4 Activities of QA Forum | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Japan TG 4 Activities of QA Forum US & Japan TG 4 Activities of QA Forum Presented at the PV Module Reliability Workshop, February 26 - 27 2013, Golden, Colorado...

14

Behaviour of zirconium, niobium, yttrium and the rare earth elements in the Thor Lake rare-metal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Behaviour of zirconium, niobium, yttrium and the rare earth elements in the Thor Lake rare and the heavy rare earth elements in the world. Much of the potentially economic mineralization was concentrated of Science Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada February 2010

15

DOE Seeks Your Novel Ideas for Recovery of Rare Earth Elements...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Seeks Your Novel Ideas for Recovery of Rare Earth Elements from Coal and Coal Byproducts DOE Seeks Your Novel Ideas for Recovery of Rare Earth Elements from Coal and Coal...

16

K Series X-Ray Wavelengths in Rare Earth Elements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The K-series x-rays in ten rare earth elements have been studied with a two-meter-radius bent-quartz-crystal spectrograph. The 3.7-Mev proton beam of the A-48 accelerator (UCRL, Livermore) was used to produce the atomic excitations. The wavelengths obtained for the K?1, K?2, K?3, and K?1 lines are compared with previous wavelength measurements. Two weaker transitions, K?5 and KOIIOIII, were also observed and the energies are compared with energies obtained from tables of known atomic energy levels.

E. L. Chupp, J. W. M. Du Mond, F. J. Gordon, R. C. Jopson, and Hans Mark

1958-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Rare earth elements activate endocytosis in plant cells Lihong Wanga,b,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rare earth elements activate endocytosis in plant cells Lihong Wanga,b,1 , Jigang Lic,d,1 , Qing (sent for review May 15, 2014) It has long been observed that rare earth elements (REEs) regulate, such as rare earth elements (REEs), have been observed for a long time to be beneficial to plant growth (1, 2

Deng, Xing-Wang

18

Rare earth elements in the sediments of Lake Baikal Lawrence M. Och a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rare earth elements in the sediments of Lake Baikal Lawrence M. Och a , Beat Müller a, , Adrian Available online 3 April 2014 Editor: Carla M. Koretsky Keywords: Rare earth elements Cerium anomaly Lake to complex and cryptic redox cycles. The mobility of rare earth elements (REEs) is influenced

Wehrli, Bernhard

19

Speciation of adsorbed yttrium and rare earth elements on oxide surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Speciation of adsorbed yttrium and rare earth elements on oxide surfaces Wojciech Piasecki, Dimitri 10 June 2008 Abstract The distribution of yttrium and the rare earth elements (YREE) between natural investigate the applicability of the X-ray results to rare earth elements and to several oxides in addition

Sverjensky, Dimitri A.

20

Source and mobility of Rare Earth Elements in a sedimentary aquifer system: Aquitaine basin (Southern France)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Source and mobility of Rare Earth Elements in a sedimentary aquifer system: Aquitaine basin Geological Survey Service, Bordeaux, France, e.malcuit@brgm.fr The study of rare earth elements (REEs such as rivers and lakes and groundwaters. Rare earth elements) are of great interest because of their unique

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "us-japan rare elements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Hydrothermal transport and deposition of the rare earth elements by fluorine-bearing aqueous liquids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ARTICLE Hydrothermal transport and deposition of the rare earth elements by fluorine environmental concerns, have created a great demand for the rare earth elements (REE), and focused considerable Hydrothermal concentration of the rare earth elements (REE) to economic and potentially economic levels has

22

Iron Isotope and Rare Earth Element Patterns of the Neoproterozoic Fulu Formation, South China: Implications for Late Proterozoic Ocean Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

13 3.5. Rare Earth Element Analysis. 15 4.21 b. 5.2. Rare Earth Element Patterns24 6.Piper, D. Z. (1974). Rare earth elements in the sedimentary

Goldbaum, Elizabeth

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Use of rare earth elements as external markers for mean retention time measurements in ruminants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review Use of rare earth elements as external markers for mean retention time measurements -- The present review deals with the utilisation of rare earth (RE) elements as particulate markers for ruminant earth / retention time / feedstuff / methodology / ruminant Résumé -- Utilisation des terres rares comme

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

24

The impact of vegetation on fractionation of rare earth elements (REE) during waterrock interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The impact of vegetation on fractionation of rare earth elements (REE) during water The fractionation of the rare earth elements (REE) in river water, as well as the immobilization of REE in the river earth elements (REE) principally originate from apatite dissolution during weathering. However, stream

Mailhes, Corinne

25

CTAX: the US/Japan Cold Neutron Triple-Axis Spectromete at HFIR | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CTAX-US/Japan Cold Neutron Triple-Axis Spectrometer CTAX-US/Japan Cold Neutron Triple-Axis Spectrometer CTAX US/Japan Cold Neutron Triple-Axis Spectrometer (CG-4C). (larger image) The U.S.-Japan Cold Neutron Triple-Axis Spectrometer (CTAX) is a conventional triple-axis spectrometer with variable incident energy and variable monochromator-sample and sample-analyzer distances. The cold guide 4 bender and guide hall shielding reduce background levels at CG-4C, and the 15-cm-tall guide profile is well exploited by CG-4C's vertically focusing monochromator (PG 002). To enhance accommodation of strong magnetic fields at the sample position and to simplify future polarization analysis, the amount of ferromagnetic material has been minimized in the construction of this instrument. CG-4C is a collaboration of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Neutron

26

Rare earth element transport in the Yucca Mountain region.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In sync with environmental pollution of solutes in nature, from source, process to consequence, geochemical processes (leaching and sorption) and hydraulic transportation of the rare (more)

Zhang, Liqiong

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Watch a Rare Earth Elements Event Live This Morning | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Watch a Rare Earth Elements Event Live This Morning Watch a Rare Earth Elements Event Live This Morning Watch a Rare Earth Elements Event Live This Morning December 15, 2010 - 9:20am Addthis Ginny Simmons Ginny Simmons Former Managing Editor for Energy.gov, Office of Public Affairs From 9:30am to noon ET today you can tune into a live discussion on "rare earth materials" that are critical to the production of clean energy technologies. Tune in here. The Department of Energy's Assistant Secretary for Policy and International Affairs David Sandalow will give the keynote, speaking to the role of rare earth metals and other materials in the clean energy economy. You can check back to the Energy Blog for more info later today. Ginny Simmons is a New Media Specialist and contractor to the Office of Public Affairs.

28

Watch a Rare Earth Elements Event Live This Morning | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Watch a Rare Earth Elements Event Live This Morning Watch a Rare Earth Elements Event Live This Morning Watch a Rare Earth Elements Event Live This Morning December 15, 2010 - 9:20am Addthis Ginny Simmons Ginny Simmons Former Managing Editor for Energy.gov, Office of Public Affairs From 9:30am to noon ET today you can tune into a live discussion on "rare earth materials" that are critical to the production of clean energy technologies. Tune in here. The Department of Energy's Assistant Secretary for Policy and International Affairs David Sandalow will give the keynote, speaking to the role of rare earth metals and other materials in the clean energy economy. You can check back to the Energy Blog for more info later today. Ginny Simmons is a New Media Specialist and contractor to the Office of Public Affairs.

29

Recycling Rare Earth Elements from Industrial Wastewater with Flowerlike Nano-Mg(OH)2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recycling Rare Earth Elements from Industrial Wastewater with Flowerlike Nano-Mg(OH)2 ... The pilot-scale experiment indicated that the self-supported flowerlike nano-Mg(OH)2 had great potential to recycle REEs from industrial wastewater. ...

Chaoran Li; Zanyong Zhuang; Feng Huang; Zhicheng Wu; Yangping Hong; Zhang Lin

2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

30

Tricking Iron into Acting like a Rare-earth Element | The Ames...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tricking Iron into Acting like a Rare-earth Element By slipping iron between two nitrogen atoms in a lithium matrix, researchers are able to trick iron into having magnetic...

31

Geochemistry of dissolved rare earth elements in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Seawater samples were collected from four locations in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean during the MR02-K06 cruise of the R/V Mirai...and analyzed for dissolved rare earth elements (REEs) using inductively coupled pl...

Zhong-Liang Wang; Masatoshi Yamada

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Portable X-ray fluorescence in the assessment of rare earth element-enriched sedimentary phosphate deposits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...fluorescence in the assessment of rare earth element-enriched sedimentary...considered as potential sources of rare earth elements (REEs) and...phosphate deposit|pulps|rare earth elements|recalibration...into effluents associated with phosphogypsum stockpiles and could pose a...

G.J. Simandl; R. Fajber; S. Paradis

33

PII S0016-7037(02)00888-8 EXAFS study of rare-earth element coordination in calcite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PII S0016-7037(02)00888-8 EXAFS study of rare-earth element coordination in calcite E. J. ELZINGA,1-structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy is used to characterize the local coordination of selected rare-earth elements (Nd3 for the increased coordination for the larger rare-earth elements involves bidentate ligation from a CO3 group

Peale, Robert E.

34

Trans-Atlantic Workshop on Rare Earth Elements and Other Critical Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trans-Atlantic Workshop on Rare Earth Elements and Other Critical Trans-Atlantic Workshop on Rare Earth Elements and Other Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future Trans-Atlantic Workshop on Rare Earth Elements and Other Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future December 3, 2010 Session A: Setting the Scene - Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future Diana Bauer, Office of Policy and International Affairs, U.S. Department of Energy, Highlights of the DOE Critical Materials Strategy Antje Wittenberg, Directorate General for Enterprise and Industry, The EU Raw Materials Initiative and the Report of the Ad-hoc Group (tbc) Tom Lograsso, Ames Laboratory (Iowa State University), Future Directions in Rare Earth Research: Critical Materials for 21st Century Industry Derk Bol, Materials Innovation Institute M2i (Netherlands) M2i, Material

35

ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT The behaviour of Rare-Earth Elements, Zr and Hf during biologically-mediated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT 1 The behaviour of Rare-Earth Elements, Zr and Hf during.a,b* , Cangemi M.a , Brusca L.c , Madonia P.c , Saiano F.d , Zuddas P.e a) Department of Earth and Marine at the solid-liquid interface influencing the distribution of trace elements onto microbial surfaces. Since

36

Rare earth element partitioning between titanite and silicate melts: Henry's law revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rare earth element partitioning between titanite and silicate melts: Henry's law revisited Stefan earth elements (REE) between titanite and a range of different silicate melts. Our results show. For geochemical modelling of magmatic processes involving titanite, and indeed other accessory phases

37

A programme for electron-impact broadening parameter calculations of ionized rare-earth element lines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to provide atomic data needed for astrophysical investigations, a set of electron-impact broadening parameters for ionized rare-earth element lines should be calculated. We are going to calculate the electron-impact broadening parameters for more than 50 transitions of ionized rare-earth elements. Taking into account that the spectra of these elements are very complex, for calculation we can use the modified semiempirical approach - MSE or simplified MSE. Also, we can estimate these parameters on the basis of regularities and systematic trends.

L. C. Popovic; M. S. Dimitrijevic

1998-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

38

Global In-Use Stocks of the Rare Earth Elements: A First Estimate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since 1990, China has played a dominant role in REE mining production; other countries are almost completely dependent on imports from China with respect to rare earth resources. ... The stages within the system are linked to each other by flows, the system within a particular cycle is associated with other regions by imports and exports at each stage, and all of the rare earth elements are linked through a common processing stage. ... China has traditionally employed rare earths in applications such as metallurgical additives and alloys, petroleum refining, and glass and ceramics, but new applications in China have grown significantly since 2002. ...

Xiaoyue Du; T. E. Graedel

2011-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

39

PII S0016-7037(00)00772-4 Rare earth element variations resulting from inversion of pigeonite and subsolidus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PII S0016-7037(00)00772-4 Rare earth element variations resulting from inversion of pigeonite ion mass spectrometry study of the rare earth elements (REEs) in the minerals of two samples of lunar earth element (REE) composi- tions of the minerals in the subgroups of lunar ferroan anortho- sites

40

Maria Goeppert Mayer's Theoretical Work on Rare-Earth and Transuranic Elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After the discovery of element 93 neptunium by Edwin McMillan and Philip H. Abelson in 1941, Maria Goeppert Mayer applied the Thomas-Fermi model to calculate the electronic configuration of heavy elements and predicted the occurrence of a second rare-earth series in the vicinity of elements 91 or 92 extending to the transuranic elements. Mayer was motivated by Enrico Fermi, who was at the time contemplating military uses of nuclear energy. Historical development of nuclear science research leading to Mayer's publication is outlined. Mayer's method is introduced with the aid of a computer, which enables students to visualize her description of eigenfunctions, particularly the sudden change of spatial distribution and eigenenergy at the beginning of the rare-earth series. The impact of Mayer's work on the periodic table is discussed.

Wang, Frank Y

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "us-japan rare elements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Rare Earth Element sorption by basaltic rock: experimental data and modeling results using the "Generalised Composite approach".  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rare Earth Element sorption by basaltic rock: experimental data and modeling results using Email address : emmanuel.tertre@univ-poitiers.fr Keywords: sorption, lanthanides, basalt, surface.1016/j.gca.2007.12.015 #12;Abstract Sorption of the 14 Rare Earth Elements (REE) by basaltic rock

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

42

The effect of rare earth elements on the texture and formability of asymmetrically rolled magnesium sheet  

SciTech Connect

The lack of formability is a serious issue when considering magnesium alloys for various applications. Standard symmetric rolling introduces a strong basal texture that decreases the formability; however, asymmetric rolling has been put forward as a possible route to produce sheet with weaker texture and greater ductility. It has also been shown in recent work that weaker textures can be produced through the addition of rare earth elements to magnesium alloys. Therefore, this study has been carried out to investigate the effect of rare earth additions on the texture changes during asymmetric rolling. Two alloys have been used, AZ31B and ZEK100. The effect that the rare earth additions have on the texture of asymmetrically rolled sheet and the subsequent changes in formability will be discussed.

Alderman, Dr. Martyn [Magnesium Elektron North America; Cavin, Odis Burl [ORNL; Davis, Dr. Bruce [Magnesium Elektron North America; Muralidharan, Govindarajan [ORNL; Muth, Thomas R [ORNL; Peter, William H [ORNL; Randman, David [Magnesium Elektron North America; Watkins, Thomas R [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Separation of tervalent transplutonium and rare-earth elements using for-tveks  

SciTech Connect

The authors study the distribution of curium, americium, and certain rare-earth elements (REE) between aqueous nitric acid solutions and FOR-tveks under static and dynamic conditions. It is shown that on introducing diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid into the aqueous solution separation coefficients for the transplutonium elements and REE can be obtained which are sufficiently high for practical use. A method is proposed for the group separation of REE and transplutonium elements under dynamic conditions. On a column 22 cm high coefficients of approximately 500 are obtained for the purification of curium from cerium, more than 260 from neodymium, 250 from lanthanum, and 14 from europium and gadolinium. The possibility has been studied of separating palladium from transplutonium elements and REE and isolating it as an individual product.

Zaitsev, B.N.; Korolev, V.A.; Korovin, Y.F.; Kuzovov, Y.I.; Kvasnitskii, I.B.; Popik, V.P.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

2009 US-Japan Workshop on Advanced Simulation Methods in Plasma Physics Holistic Simulation of Auroral Arcs Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009 US-Japan Workshop on Advanced Simulation Methods in Plasma Physics Holistic Simulation convection flow generated in the vicinity of the magnetospheric equator by the solar wind is expected) simulations on the basis of the feedback instability theory attempted to demonstrate the quiet auroral arcs

Ito, Atsushi

45

2nd US-Japan Workshop on Soil-Structure Interaction, Tsukuba Science City, Japan, March 6-8, 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2nd US- Japan Workshop on Soil-Structure Interaction, Tsukuba Science City, Japan, March 6-8, 2001 with an iterative computational scheme first proposed by Seed & Idriss, 1969. Laboratory experimental data (Laird strain amplitude, overestimate the capacity of soil to dissipate energy. On the other hand, the iterative

Entekhabi, Dara

46

2009 US-Japan Workshop on Advanced Simulation Methods in Plasma Physics Plasma Particle Simulation with Adaptive Mesh Refinement Technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009 US-Japan Workshop on Advanced Simulation Methods in Plasma Physics Plasma Particle Simulation-5292, Japan 2 Kobe University, Kobe 657-8501, Japan 3 Kyoto University, Uji 611-0011, Japan 4 Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara 229-8510, Japan 5 Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, Kawaguchi 332

Ito, Atsushi

47

Pourret Olivier, Gruau Grard, Dia Aline, Davranche Mlanie, and Molnat Jrome. (2010) Colloidal control on the distribution of rare earth elements in shallow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

control on the distribution of rare earth elements in shallow groundwaters. Aquatic Geochemistry 16 (1 OF RARE EARTH ELEMENTS IN SHALLOW GROUNDWATERS Olivier Pourret1, 2, § , Gérard Gruau1,* , Aline Dia1;3 Abstract A 7-year monitoring period of rare earth element (REE) concentrations and REE pattern shapes

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

48

PII S0016-7037(02)01117-1 Diopside-bearing EL6 EET 90102: Insights from rare earth element distributions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PII S0016-7037(02)01117-1 Diopside-bearing EL6 EET 90102: Insights from rare earth element a study of the rare earth element (REE) distributions in EET 90102, with a specific emphasis on diopside or rare in other terrestrial or extra- terrestrial rocks. Typically, lithophile elements form sulfide

49

New Rare Earth Element Abundance Distributions for the Sun and Five r-Process-Rich Very Metal-Poor Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have derived new abundances of the rare-earth elements Pr, Dy, Tm, Yb, and Lu for the solar photosphere and for five very metal-poor, neutron-capture r-process-rich giant stars. The photospheric values for all five elements are in good agreement with meteoritic abundances. For the low metallicity sample, these abundances have been combined with new Ce abundances from a companion paper, and reconsideration of a few other elements in individual stars, to produce internally-consistent Ba, rare-earth, and Hf (56element distributions. These have been used in a critical comparison between stellar and solar r-process abundance mixes.

Sneden, Christopher; Cowan, John J; Ivans, Inese I; Hartog, Elizabeth A Den

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Photoeffect cross sections of several rare-earth elements for 323-keV photons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Total-attenuation cross sections of the oxides of rare-earth elements such as La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Dy, Ho, and Er, and also NaNO3 and NaNO2 have been measured in a narrow-beam geometry setup at 323 keV. The total-attenuation cross section for oxygen was obtained as the difference in NaNO3 and NaNO2 cross sections. Using this, the total-attenuation cross sections of the individual lanthanides have been obtained with the aid of the mixture rule. From these, the photoeffect cross sections were derived by subtracting the scattering contribution. These values are found to agree well with Scofields theoretical data [University of California Report No. UCRL 51326, 1973 (unpublished)].

T. K. Umesh, S. J. Anasuya, J. Shylaja Kumari, Channe Gowda, K. P. Gopinathan Nair, and Ramakrishna Gowda

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Yttrium and rare earth elements in fluids from various deep-sea hydrothermal systems  

SciTech Connect

Rare earth element (REE) and yttrium (Y) concentrations were measured in fluids collected from deep-sea hydrothermal systems including the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR), i.e., Menez Gwen, Lucky Strike, TAG, and Snakepit; the East Pacific Rise (EPR), i.e., 13{degree}N and 17--19{degree}S; and the Lau (Vai Lili) and Manus (Vienna Woods, PacManus, Desmos) Back-arc Basins (BAB) in the South-West Pacific. In most fluids, Y is trivalent and behaves like Ho. Chondrite normalized Y-REE (Y-REE{sub N}) concentrations of fluids from MAR, EPR, and two BAB sites, i.e., Vai Lili and Vienna Woods, showed common patterns with LREE enrichment and positive Eu anomalies. REE analysis of plagioclase collected at Lucky Strike strengthens the idea that fluid REE contents, are controlled by plagioclase phenocrysts. Other processes, however, such as REE complexation by ligands (Cl{sup {minus}}, F{sup {minus}}, So{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}), secondary phase precipitation, and phase separation modify REE distributions in deep-sea hydrothermal fluids. REE speciation calculations suggest that aqueous REE are mainly complexed by Cl{sup {minus}} ions in hot acidic fluids from deep-sea hydrothermal systems. REE concentrations in the fluid phases are, therefore, influenced by temperature, pH, and duration of rock-fluid interaction. Unusual Y-REE{sub N} patterns found in the PacManus fluids are characterized by depleted LREE and a positive Eu anomaly. The Demos fluid sample shows a flat Y-REE{sub N} pattern, which increases regularly from LREE to HREE with no Eu anomaly. These Manus Basin fluids also have an unusual major element chemistry with relatively high Mg, So{sub 4}, H{sub 2}S, and F contents, which may be due to the incorporation of magmatic fluids into heated seawater during hydrothermal circulation. REE distribution in PacManus fluids may stem from a subseafloor barite precipitation and the REE in Demos fluids are likely influenced by the presence of sulfate ions.

Douville, E. [Univ. Bretagne Occidentale, Brest (France). Dept. de Chimie] [Univ. Bretagne Occidentale, Brest (France). Dept. de Chimie; [IFREMER Centre de Brest, Plouzane (France); Appriou, P. [Univ. Bretagne Occidentale, Brest (France)] [Univ. Bretagne Occidentale, Brest (France); Bienvenu, P. [CEA Cadarache, Saint Paul Lez Durance (France). Lab. d`Analyses Radiochimiques et Chimiques] [CEA Cadarache, Saint Paul Lez Durance (France). Lab. d`Analyses Radiochimiques et Chimiques; Charlou, J.L.; Donval, J.P.; Fouquet, Y. [IFREMER Centre de Brest, Plouzane (France)] [IFREMER Centre de Brest, Plouzane (France); Gamo, Toshitaka [Univ. of Tokyo, Nakano, Tokyo (Japan). Ocean Research Inst.] [Univ. of Tokyo, Nakano, Tokyo (Japan). Ocean Research Inst.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Overview of the US-Japan collaborative investigation on hydrogen isotope retention in neutron-irradiated and ion-damaged tungsten  

SciTech Connect

Plasma-facing components (PFCs) will be exposed to 14 MeV neutrons from deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion reactions, and tungsten, a candidate PFC for the divertor in ITER, is expected to receive a neutron dose of 0.7 displacement per atom (dpa) by the end of operation in ITER. The effect of neutron-irradiation damage has been mainly simulated using high-energy ion bombardment. While this prior database of results is quite valuable for understanding the behavior of hydrogen isotopes in PFCs, it does not encompass the full range of effects that must be considered in a practical fusion environment due to short penetration depth, damage gradient, high damage rate, and high PKA energy spectrum of the ion bombardment. In addition, neutrons change the elemental composition via transmutations, and create a high radiation environment inside PFCs, which influence the behavior of hydrogen isotope in PFCs, suggesting the utilization of fission reactors is necessary for neutron irradiation. Therefore, the effort to correlate among high-energy ions, fission neutrons, and fusion neutrons is crucial for accurately estimating tritium retention under a neutron-irradiation environment. Under the framework of the US-Japan TITAN program, tungsten samples (99.99 at. % purity from A.L.M.T. Co.) were irradiated by neutron in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), ORNL, at 50 and 300C to 0.025, 0.3, and 1.2 dpa, and the investigation of deuterium retention in neutron-irradiation was performed in the INL Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE), the unique high-flux linear plasma facility that can handle tritium, beryllium and activated materials. This paper reports the recent results from the comparison of ion-damaged tungsten via various ion species (2.8 MeV Fe2+, 20 MeV W2+, and 700 keV H-) with that from neutron-irradiated tungsten to identify the similarities and differences among them.

Masashi Shimada; Y. Hatano; Y. Oya; T. Oda; M. Hara; G. Cao; M. Kobayashi; M. Sokolov; H. Watanabe; B. Tyburska; Y. Ueda; P. Calderoni

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Proceedings of US/Japan workshop, Q219 on high heat flux components and plasma surface interactions for next fusion devices  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the viewgraphs from the proceedings of US/Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices. Some of the general topics covered by this report are: PFC/PSI in tokamak and helical devices; development of high heat flux components; PSIS and plasma facing materials;tritium; and material damage.

Ulrickson, M.A.; Stevens, P.L.; Hino, T.; Hirohata, Y. [eds.] [eds.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Formation of partial energy gap below the structural phase transition and the rare-earth element-substitution effect on infrared phonons in ReFeAsO (Re=La, Nd, and Sm)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formation of partial energy gap below the structural phase transition and the rare-earth element phonon modes display systematic shifts toward high frequency upon rare-earth element Nd and Sm temperature Tc was raised beyond 50 K through the substitution of La by rare-earth elements. Tc is found

Wang, Wei Hua

55

New fission fragment distributions and r-process origin of the rare-earth elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutron star (NS) merger ejecta offer a viable site for the production of heavy r-process elements with nuclear mass numbers A > 140. The crucial role of fission recycling is responsible for the robustness of this site against many astrophysical uncertainties, but calculations sensitively depend on nuclear physics. In particular the fission fragment yields determine the creation of 110 140.

Goriely, S; Lemaitre, J -F; Panebianco, S; Dubray, N; Hilaire, S; Bauswein, A; Janka, H -Thomas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Rare earth element sorption onto hydrous manganese oxide A modeling study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

element sorption onto hydrous manganese oxide A modeling study Olivier Pourret1* and Mélanie Davranche2 1 models due to the lack of a comprehensive set of sorption reactions consistent with a given surface complexation model (SCM), as well as discrepancies between published sorption data and predictions using

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

57

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined by one company as a constituent of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined by one company as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite, but was not recovered as a separate element during processing. Bastnasite, a rare-earth ores and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium and yttrium

58

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnsite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnäsite at Mountain Pass, CA, but was not recovered as a separate element during processing. Bastnäsite, a rare-earth Number Normal Trade Relations 12/31/02 Thorium ores and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free. Rare-earth

59

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y O ) content, unless otherwise noted)2 3 Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined by one company as a constituent of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined by one company as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite, but was not recovered as a separate element during processing. Bastnasite, a rare-earth.20.0000 Free Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium and yttrium, whether or not intermixed or interalloyed 2805

60

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite, but was not recovered as a separate element during processing. Bastnasite, a rare-earth fluocarbonate mineral, was mined and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium and yttrium, whether or not intermixed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "us-japan rare elements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined as a constituent of the mineral  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite, but was not recovered as a separate element during processing. Bastnasite, a rare-earth fluocarbonate mineral, was mined.20.0000 Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium and yttrium, whether or not intermixed or interalloyed 2805.30.0000 5

62

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y O ) content, unless otherwise noted)2 3 Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined by one company as a constituent of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined by one company as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite, but was not recovered as a separate element during processing. Bastnasite, a rare-earth/31/96 Thorium ores and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium and yttrium

63

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y O ) content, unless otherwise noted)2 3 Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite, but was not recovered as a separate element during processing. Bastnasite, a rare-earth/31/98 Thorium ores and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium and yttrium

64

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite at Mountain Pass, CA, but was not recovered as a separate element during processing. Bastnasite, a rare-earth Number Normal Trade Relations 12/31/01 Thorium ores and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free. Rare-earth

65

Rare earth elements as tracers of sediment contamination by phosphogypsum in the Santos estuary, southern Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the Cubato region, southern Brazil, sediments are transported by several rivers from the Serra do Mar Ridge into the Santos estuary. Fertilizer plants have been operating along the margins of one of these rivers (Mogi River) producing a large volume of phosphogypsum, which is stockpiled in nearby areas. Surface sediments of the Mogi River were sampled upstream and downstream in relation to the point where the effluents of the phosphogypsum piles flow into the drainage system. In the vicinity of this point one sediment core was collected. Results show that REE, Ba, Zr and Th concentrations in the non-contaminated sediments are of the same order as those present in the upper continental crust. The contaminated samples present a composition affected by that of the phosphogypsum, marked by a higher concentration of these elements and a stronger degree of REE fractionation. These phosphogypsum characteristics are inherited from the Catalo igneous phosphate ore and were moderately modified by the industrial process of phosphoric acid production. The phosphogypsum signal decreases rapidly downstream, pointing to a limited area of influence of the stacks. The deepest sediments of the core are also free of contamination, representing a time interval prior to the deposition of phosphogypsum wastes on the banks of the estuary.

Sonia Maria Barros de Oliveira; Paulo Sergio Cardoso da Silva; Barbara Paci Mazzilli; Deborah Ines Teixeira Favaro; Catia Heloisa Saueia

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Rare Earth Elements:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...aegirine, magnetite and hematite; and (3) a massive central iron oxide facies containing 3 wt% REE2O3 (Chao et al. 1992...for several bivalent metal ions and cerium(III) with the acetylacetonate ion. Journal of Physical Chemistry 59: 235-237 Lehmann...

Anthony E. Williams-Jones; Artashes A. Migdisov; Iain M. Samson

67

Rare Earth Elements:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...start-up and processing costs because the need...way to electrical lighting in the 1930s, about...glaucoma, and other medical applications. To...energy-efficient fluorescent lighting (Gibson and Parkinson...come at such a high cost to the environment...

Anton R. Chakhmouradian; Frances Wall

68

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2007. All  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2007. All yttrium Number Normal Trade Relations 12-31-07 Thorium ores and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free. Rare-earth-bearing materials and compounds containing by weight >19% to rare-earth

69

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2009. All  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2009. All yttrium. Rare-earth metals, scandium and yttrium, whether or not intermixed or interalloyed 2805.30.0000 5.0% ad. Other rare-earth compounds, including yttrium oxide >85% Y2O3, yttrium nitrate, and other individual

70

[Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content unless otherwise noted] Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2010. All  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2010. All yttrium. Rare-earth metals, scandium and yttrium, whether or not intermixed or interalloyed 2805.30.0000 5.0% ad. Other rare-earth compounds, including yttrium oxide >85% Y2O3, yttrium nitrate, and other individual

71

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2008. All  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2008. All yttrium 12-31-08 Thorium ores and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium and compounds containing by weight >19% to rare-earth compounds, including

72

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2006. All  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2006. All yttrium-31-06 Thorium ores and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium and yttrium and compounds containing by weight >19% to rare-earth compounds, including

73

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2010. All  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2010. All yttrium Normal Trade Relations 12-31-10 Thorium ores and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free. Rare-earth-bearing materials and compounds containing by weight >19% to rare-earth compounds

74

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2003.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2003. Yttrium Relations 12/31/03 Thorium ores and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium and compounds containing by weight >19% to rare-earth compounds, including

75

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2004. Yttrium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2004. Yttrium Relations 12-31-04 Thorium ores and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium and compounds containing by weight >19% to rare-earth compounds, including

76

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2005. All  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2005. All yttrium-31-05 Thorium ores and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium and yttrium and compounds containing by weight >19% to rare-earth compounds, including

77

Am phases in the matrix of a U-Pu-Zr alloy with Np, Am, and rare-earth elements  

SciTech Connect

Phases and microstructures in the matrix of an as-cast U-Pu-Zr alloy with 3 wt% Am, 2% Np, and 8% rare-earth elements were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The matrix consists primarily of two phases, both of which contain Am: ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am) (~70 at% U, 5% Np, 14% Pu, 1% Am, and 10% Zr) and ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2 (~25% U, 2% Np, 10-15% Pu, 1-2% Am, and 55-60 at% Zr). These phases are similar to those in U-Pu-Zr alloys, although the Zr content in ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am) is higher than that in ?-(U, Pu) and the Zr content in ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2 is lower than that in ?-UZr2. Nanocrystalline actinide oxides with structures similar to UO2 occurred in some areas, but may have formed by reactions with the atmosphere during sample handling. Planar features consisting of a central zone of ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am) bracketed by zones of ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2 bound irregular polygons ranging in size from a few micrometers to a few tens of micrometers across. The rest of the matrix consists of elongated domains of ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am) and ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2. Each of these domains is a few tens of nanometers across and a few hundred nanometers long. The domains display strong preferred orientations involving areas a few hundred nanometers to a few micrometers across.

Dawn E Janney; J. Rory Kennedy; James W. Madden; Thomas P. O'Holleran

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

THE NEW ELEMENT CALIFORNIUM (ATOMIC NUMBER 98)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shell, as occurs in rare earth elements at the point ofand homologous rare earth elements in high temperaturethe homologous rare earth elements. (2) Its distinctive high

Thompson, S.G.; Street, K.,Jr.; Ghiorso, A.; Seaborg, G.T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Superconductivity up to 114 K in the Bi-Al-Ca-Sr-Cu-O compound system without rare-earth elements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Stable superconductivity up to 114 K has been reproducibly detected in Bi-Al-Ca-Sr-Cu-O multiphase systems without any rare-earth elements. Pressure has only a slight positive effect on Tc. These observations provide an extra material base for the study of the mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity and also the prospect of reduced material cost for future applications of superconductivity.

C. W. Chu; J. Bechtold; L. Gao; P. H. Hor; Z. J. Huang; R. L. Meng; Y. Y. Sun; Y. Q. Wang; Y. Y. Xue

1988-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

80

Thorium, uranium and rare earth elements content in lanthanide concentrate (LC) and water leach purification (WLP) residue of Lynas advanced materials plant (LAMP)  

SciTech Connect

Lynas Advanced Materials Plant (LAMP) has been licensed to produce the rare earths elements since early 2013 in Malaysia. LAMP processes lanthanide concentrate (LC) to extract rare earth elements and subsequently produce large volumes of water leach purification (WLP) residue containing naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). This residue has been rising up the environmental issue because it was suspected to accumulate thorium with significant activity concentration and has been classified as radioactive residue. The aim of this study is to determine Th-232, U-238 and rare earth elements in lanthanide concentrate (LC) and water leach purification (WLP) residue collected from LAMP and to evaluate the potential radiological impacts of the WLP residue on the environment. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis and ?-spectrometry were used for determination of Th, U and rare earth elements concentrations. The results of this study found that the concentration of Th in LC was 1289.7 129 ppm (5274.9 527.6Bq/kg) whereas the Th and U concentrations in WLP were determined to be 1952.917.6 ppm (7987.4 71.9 Bq/kg) and 17.2 2.4 ppm respectively. The concentrations of Th and U in LC and WLP samples determined by ?- spectrometry were 1156 ppm (4728 22 Bq/kg) and 18.8 ppm and 1763.2 ppm (7211.4 Bq/kg) and 29.97 ppm respectively. This study showed that thorium concentrations were higher in WLP compare to LC. This study also indicate that WLP residue has high radioactivity of {sup 232}Th compared to Malaysian soil natural background (63 - 110 Bq/kg) and come under preview of Act 304 and regulations. In LC, the Ce and Nd concentrations determined by INAA were 13.2 0.6% and 4.7 0.1% respectively whereas the concentrations of La, Ce, Nd and Sm in WLP were 0.36 0.04%, 1.6%, 0.22% and 0.06% respectively. This result showed that some amount of rare earth had not been extracted and remained in the WLP and may be considered to be reextracted.

AL-Areqi, Wadeeah M., E-mail: walareqi@yahoo.com; Majid, Amran Ab., E-mail: walareqi@yahoo.com; Sarmani, Sukiman, E-mail: walareqi@yahoo.com [Nuclear Science Programme, School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi (Malaysia)

2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "us-japan rare elements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Growth and microstructure of MTG REBa2Cu3O7/RE?2BaCuO5 with heavy rare earth elements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

New melt textured REBa2Cu3O7/RE?2BaCuO5 composites, have been obtained by top seeding melt-texturing growth. Two different starting mixtures of \\{REBa2Cu3O7\\} superconducting powders and insulating \\{Y2BaCuO5\\} phase were used. On one hand RE is a natural mixture of heavy rare earth elements (Y, Yb, Lu, Er, Dy, Tm, Ho) extracted from the Brazilian mineral Xenotime, and on the other hand, RE is thulium. In both cases melt textured REBa2Cu3O7/RE?2BaCuO5 composites have been obtained where RE and RE? are different mixtures of heavy rare earth/yttrium and Tm/yttrium. The composition analysis shows different areas within the RE?2BaCuO5 as a consequence of an inhomogeneous RE distribution, due to the differential solubility of each rare earth in the high temperature semisolid state. During the crystallization process a profound inversion of the rare earth composition between the superconducting matrix and the insulating precipitates occurs. Yttrium is selectively located in the 123 matrix and RE in the 211 particles. Heavy RE ions can substitute yttrium in MTG REBCO without degradation of the superconducting properties. A model for the crystallization process is proposed.

A.E. Carrillo; P. Rodr??guez Jr.; T. Puig; A. Palau; X. Obradors; H. Zheng; U. Welp; L. Chen; B.W. Veal; H. Claus; G.W. Crabtree

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Electronic Structure of the Heaviest Elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

well known grou~ 14 rare earth elements of atomic numbersproposed for the rare earth elements because these 14

Seaborg, G.T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

POWDER METALLURGICAL PROCESSING OF MAGNETOSTRICTIVE MATERIALS BASED ON RARE EARTH-IRON INTERMETALLIC COMPOUNDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R any of several rare earth elements) was discovered. Toobserved for pure rare earth elements. This and the strong

Malekzadeh, Manoochehr

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Rare-earth elements in the atmosphere of the magnetic chemically peculiar star HD 144897. New classification of the Nd III spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have obtained a UVES spectrum of a slowly rotating strongly magnetic Ap star, HD 144897, that exhibits very large overabundances of rare-earth elements. Here we present a detailed spectral analysis of this object, also taking into account effects of non-uniform vertical distribution (stratification) of chemical elements. We have determined the photospheric abundances of 40 ions. For seven elements (Mg, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe), we have obtained a stratification model that allow us to produce a satisfactory fit to the observed profiles of spectral lines of various strength. REEs abundances, that for the first time in the literature have been determined from the lines of the first and second ions, have been found typically four dex larger than solar abundances. Our analysis of REE spectral lines provide a strong support to the laboratory line classification and determination of the atomic parameters. The only remarkable exception is Nd III, for which spectral synthesis was found to be inconsistent with the ob...

Ryabchikova, T A; Kochukhov, O; Ryabtsov, A V

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Distribution of rare earth elements in marine sediments from the Strait of Sicily (western Mediterranean Sea): Evidence of phosphogypsum waste contamination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Concentrations of rare earth elements (REE), Y, Th and Sc were recently determined in marine sediments collected using a box corer along two onshoreoffshore transects located in the Strait of Sicily (Mediterranean Sea). The REE+Y were enriched in offshore fine-grained sediments where clay minerals are abundant, whereas the REE+Y contents were lower in onshore coarse-grained sediments with high carbonate fractions. Considering this distribution trend, the onshore sediments in front of the southwestern Sicilian coast represent an anomaly with high REE+Y concentrations (mean value 163.4?gg?1) associated to high Th concentrations (mean value 7.9?gg?1). Plot of shale-normalized REE+Y data of these coastal sediments showed Middle REE enrichments relative to Light REE and Heavy REE, manifested by a convexity around SmGdEu elements. These anomalies in the fractionation patterns of the coastal sediments were attributed to phosphogypsum-contaminated effluents from an industrial plant, located in the southern Sicilian coast.

G. Tranchida; E. Oliveri; M. Angelone; A. Bellanca; P. Censi; M. DElia; R. Neri; F. Placenti; M. Sprovieri; S. Mazzola

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Rare-Earth Research Meeting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rare-Earth Research Meeting ... The 27th Rare Earth Research Conference will take place at the Village at Squaw Valley in Olympic Valley, Calif.the site of the 1960 Winter Olympic Gameson June 2226, 2014. ... Rare-earth element research spans several disciplines and brings together chemists, engineers, physicists, and materials scientists. ...

SOPHIE ROVNER

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

87

THE NEW ELEMENT BERKELIUM (ATOMIC NUMBER 97)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of time from rare earth elements and from the actinidea group from the rare earth elements before using the columnpositions of some rare earth elements was obtained and these

Thompson, S.G.; Ghiorso, A.; Seaborg, G.T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Telling friends from foes : strontium isotope and trace element analysis of companion burials from Pusilh, Toledo District, Belize  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

uranium, and the rare earth elements (REE) can readilyof uranium and the rare earth elements are extremely low andconsumed in vivo. The rare earth element lanthanum, like

Somerville, Andrew D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering of Rare-Earth and Copper Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction The rare earth elements have unique andun?lled f shell of rare earth elements gives them special4d, 4f shells for rare-earth elements. This suggests that

Kvashnina, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

A regular round of talks with atomic energy ministry representatives of Russia, the U.S., Japan, South Korea and China will be held Saturday in the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) HQ in Vienna. The sides will try to reach a compromise on the pro  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A regular round of talks with atomic energy ministry representatives of Russia, the U.S., Japan, as there's a "stalemate" in regard to the new reactor: Russia, the EU and China are for ITER construction and composition of this process. However, Borovkov stressed, Russia insists on keeping the composition the same

91

Summary of a joint US-Japan study of potential approaches to reduce the attractiveness of various nuclear materials for use in a nuclear explosive device by a terrorist group  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the results of a joint US-Japan study to establish a mutual understanding, through scientific-based study, of potential approaches to reduce the attractiveness of various nuclear materials for use in a terrorist nuclear explosive device (NED). 4 approaches that can reduce materials attractiveness with a very high degree of effectiveness are: -) diluting HEU with natural or depleted U to an enrichment of less than 10% U-235; -) storing Pu in nuclear fuel that is not man portable and with a dose rate greater or equal to 10 Gy/h at 1 m; -) storing Pu or HEU in heavy items, i.e. not transportable, provided the removal of the Pu or HEU from the item requires a purification/processing capability; and -) converting Pu and HEU to very dilute forms (such as wastes) that, without any security barriers, would require very long acquisition times to acquire a Category I quantity of Pu or of HEU. 2 approaches that can reduce materials attractiveness with a high degree of effectiveness are: -) converting HEU-fueled research reactors into LEU-fueled research reactors or dilute HEU with natural or depleted U to an enrichment of less than 20% U-235; -) converting U/Al reactor fuel into U/Si reactor fuel. Other approaches have been assessed as moderately or totally inefficient to reduce the attractiveness of nuclear materials.

Bathke, C.G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Inoue, N.; Kuno, Y.; Mihara, T.; Sagara, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-49 Muramatsu, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1184 (Japan); Ebbinghaus, B.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box L-168, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Murphy, J.; Dalton, D. [National Nuclear Security Administration, Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave, SW, Washington, DC 20585 (United States); Nagayama, Y. [Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, 3-2-2 Kasumigaseki, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-8959 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

USJapan trade talks in trouble  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE annual ritual of negotiations between the United States and Japan on trade is in danger of degenerating into farce. Breaking with the past practice ... in with the US president's demands - on this occasion, that fixed proportions of Japan's domestic market for telecommunications and automobile equipment should be filled by imports from the ...

1994-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

93

It's Elemental - The Element Cerium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lanthanum Lanthanum Previous Element (Lanthanum) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Praseodymium) Praseodymium The Element Cerium [Click for Isotope Data] 58 Ce Cerium 140.116 Atomic Number: 58 Atomic Weight: 140.116 Melting Point: 1071 K (798°C or 1468°F) Boiling Point: 3697 K (3424°C or 6195°F) Density: 6.770 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: none Group Name: Lanthanide What's in a name? Named for the asteroid Ceres. Say what? Cerium is pronounced as SER-ee-em. History and Uses: Cerium was discovered by Jöns Jacob Berzelius and Wilhelm von Hisinger, Swedish chemists, and independently by Martin Heinrich Klaproth, a German chemist, in 1803. Cerium is the most abundant of the rare earth elements

94

Synthesis and luminescence properties of rare earth activated phosphors for near UV-emitting LEDs for efficacious generation of white light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of R 2 SiO 5 (R = rare earth elements)?, Mater. Res. Bull.QE Quantum Efficiency RE Rare Earth Elements RGB Red, green,transition metal or rare earth elements. The standard

Han, Jinkyu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Synthesis and characterization of visible emission from rare-earth doped aluminum nitride, gallium nitride and gallium aluminum nitride powders and thin films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

74 (19) 2821 (1999). F. H. Spedding, Rare-earth Elements, inby the use of rare- earth elements as color emitters inpowders activated with rare-earth elements Eu 3+ , Tb 3+ ,

Tao, Jonathan Huai-Tse

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Microwave Plasma Monitoring System For Real-Time Elemental Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

air for the presence of minor amounts of elements, particularly transition metals, rare earth elements, actinides, and alkali and alkaline earth elements. The invention apparatus...

97

Rare Earth Tungsten Bronzes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rare Earth Tungsten Bronzes ... Trivalent Rare Earth Ion Conduction in the Rare Earth Tungstates with the Sc2(WO4)3-Type Structure ... Trivalent Rare Earth Ion Conduction in the Rare Earth Tungstates with the Sc2(WO4)3-Type Structure ...

Werner Ostertag

1966-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

News about Rare Earths, New or Critical Materials, and Their...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

14, 2014 Could magnets in helmets reduce football concussions?, November 2014 The Rare-Earth Elements -- Vital to Modern Technologies and Lifestyles, November 2014 Energy Report:...

99

E-Print Network 3.0 - availability influences elemental Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

. In other cases, technical limitations constrain the availability of an element. Rare-earth elements... the availability of an element. The ... Source: Colorado School of Mines,...

100

The New Element Americium (Atomic Number 95)  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Several isotopes of the new element 95 have been produced and their radiations characterized. The chemical properties of this tripositive element are similar to those of the typical tripositive lanthanide rare-earth elements. Element 95 is different from the latter in the degree and rate of formation of certain compounds of the complex ion type, which makes possible the separation of element 95 from the lanthanide rare-earths. The name americium (after the Americas) and the symbol Am are suggested for the element on the basis of its position as the sixth member of the actinide rare-earth series, analogous to europium, Eu, of the lanthanide series.

Seaborg, G.T.; James, R.A.; Morgan, L.O.

1948-01-00T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "us-japan rare elements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

VISIBLE AND INFRARED RARE-EARTH ACTIVATED ELECTROLUMINESCENCE FROM ERBIUM DOPED GaN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. At the same time novel work is being conducted using rare earth elements as sources of light emission. Results. III-V semiconductors doped with rare-earth elements have also been used10VISIBLE AND INFRARED RARE-EARTH ACTIVATED ELECTROLUMINESCENCE FROM ERBIUM DOPED GaN M. Garter*, R

Steckl, Andrew J.

102

Rare muon processes  

SciTech Connect

The status of rare muon processes as tests of the standard model is reviewed with the emphasis on results that are expected from experiments in the near future.

Cooper, M.D.; The MEGA Collaboration

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Rare muon processes  

SciTech Connect

The status of rare muon processes as tests of the standard model is reviewed with the emphasis on results that are expected from experiments in the near future.

Cooper, M.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Elements & Compounds Atoms (Elements)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Elements & Compounds #12;Atoms (Elements) Molecules (Compounds) Cells Elements & Compounds #12;Nucleus Electrons Cloud of negative charge (2 electrons) Fig. 2.5: Simplified model of a Helium (He) Atom He 4.002602 2 Helium Mass Number (~atomic mass) = number of Neutrons + Protons = 4 for Helium Atomic

Frey, Terry

105

Trace element partitioning between baddeleyite and carbonatite melt at high pressures and high temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as the heavy rare earth elements (HREE) prefer to enter baddeleyite rather than carbonate melts (D>1), whereas the light rare earth elements (LREE) and other trace elements behave incompatibly (D in carbonatite melts. Baddeleyite is known to accumulate the high field strength elements (HFSE) and some rare

106

Fabrication and evaluation of rare-earth-bearing fuel slugs for sodium-cooled fast reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Separation of rare-earth (RE) elements from minor actinides is difficult in pyroprocessing, especially for light REs (e.g....

Jong Hwan Kim; Hoon Song; Ki Hwan Kim

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

The Search for Heavy Elements  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The 1994 documentary "The Search for Heavy Elements" chronicles the expansion of the periodic table through the creation at Berkeley Lab of elements heavier than uranium. The documentary features a mix of rarely-seen archival footage, historical photos, and interviews with scientists who made history, such as Glenn Seaborg and Albert Ghiorso.

None

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

108

The Search for Heavy Elements  

SciTech Connect

The 1994 documentary "The Search for Heavy Elements" chronicles the expansion of the periodic table through the creation at Berkeley Lab of elements heavier than uranium. The documentary features a mix of rarely-seen archival footage, historical photos, and interviews with scientists who made history, such as Glenn Seaborg and Albert Ghiorso.

2008-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

109

Chapter 4 - Recycling Rare Metals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The industrial system now utilizes many more elements, especially rare metals, than was the case even a half century ago. Most are not mined for themselves but are obtained as by-products or hitchhikers of the more familiar industrial metals, such as iron, aluminum, copper, nickel, and zinc. This imposes a limit on the production of by-product metals. But in some cases, demand may increase much faster than new supply. This suggests a need for recycling. But the uses of these metals are often in products, such as cell phones, that are mass-produced but where the amount in each individual product is very small. Some uses are also inherently dissipative. This makes recycling very difficult in principle. It constitutes a serious challenge for the future economy. Prices will rise.

Robert U. Ayres; Gara Villalba Mndez; Laura Talens Peir

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Journal of the Korean Physical Society, Vol. 38, No. 6, June 2001, pp. 744749 Photoemission Study of Rare-Earth Ditelluride Compounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

levels of the rare-earth elements, we found that all the rare-earth elements were trivalent. We also made for the rare-earth elements, and found that the La and Gd 3d peaks were well explained by our calculations. There was very little change in the lineshapes of the Te 3d peaks of different rare-earth elements. On the other

Oh, Se-Jung

111

DOE launches rare earth metals research hub  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ATL011113_hub ATL011113_hub 01/11/2013 DOE launches rare earth metals research hub Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov Printer-friendly Europium, a rare earth element that has the same relative hardness of lead, is used to create fluorescent lightbulbs. With no proven substitutes, europium is considered critical to the clean energy economy. Photo courtesy of the Ames Laboratory. High Resolution Image The Department of Energy has launched a research hub that focuses on solutions to the domestic shortages of rare earth metals and other materials critical for U.S. energy security. Housed at Ames Laboratory in Iowa, Lawrence Livermore has been involved in establishing this Energy Innovation Hub since its conception more than two years ago. In 2010, on behalf of DOE, LLNL hosted the first U.S.-Japan

112

Rare-Earth Surface Alloying: A New Phase for GdAu2 M. J. Verstraete,1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

refrigeration, are made pos- sible by an unusual group of elements: the rare earths (REs). The rare earthsRare-Earth Surface Alloying: A New Phase for GdAu2 M. Corso,1 M. J. Verstraete,1,2 F. Schiller,1 M. Gadolinium is a borderline rare earth, which is naturally ferromagnetic but can easily switch to different

113

Enrichment of trace elements in rare-metal bearing pegmatites of the muscovite class: Examples from the Jasper, Thomaston-Barnesville, Troup and Cherokee-Pickens districts in Georgia  

SciTech Connect

Pegmatites from four important mining districts in Georgia: the Cherokee-Pickens district (mica and beryl), the Thomaston-Barnesville (mica), Troup (beryl), and Jasper County (feldspar) districts, generally contain quartz, muscovite, K-feldspar and oligoclase and can be included in the muscovite class of pegmatites. No source intrusions are known for any of these pegmatite districts. The Thomaston-Barnesville district covers about 2,000 km[sup 2] compared to the < 100 km[sup 2] of the other three districts and includes 3--4 times as many pegmatites as each of the other districts. The more highly fractionated pegmatites represent 42 to 48 % of the total number of pegmatites sampled in each district except for the Thomaston-Barnesville district in which only 7 % are more highly fractionated. Muscovites from the more highly fractionated pegmatites in these districts contain mean trace element values of 1,118--1,732 ppm Rb, 1,867--3,083 ppm F, 91--278 ppm Li, 7.7-31 ppm Be, 122--147 ppm Ga, 122--315 ppm Nb, and 137--254 ppm Zn. These pegmatites have mean Ba/Rb and Rb/K[sub 2]O ratios of 0.01--0.21 and 129--177 ppm. Mean Ba is 19--234 ppm. Mean trace element values of muscovites from the least fractionated pegmatites are 381--675 ppm Rb, 748--1,622 ppm F, 33--221 ppm Li, 4:8--20.6 ppm Be, 56--80 ppm Ga, 32--152 ppm Nb, and 59--113 ppm Zn. These pegmatites have mean Ba/Rb and Rb/K[sub 2]O ratios of 0.44--2.83 and 39--76. Mean Ba is 218--857 ppm. In each district, the more highly fractionated pegmatites contain beryl or are in the vicinity of beryl-bearing pegmatites.

Cocker, M.D. (Georgia Geologic Survey, Atlanta, GA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

E-Print Network 3.0 - abundance element Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

160, 291- Summary: may have low abundances of high field strength elements, rare earth elements and Y. Variable vein... in subduction zones. However, abundance variations of...

115

Good Earths and Rare Earths | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Good Earths and Rare Earths Good Earths and Rare Earths Good Earths and Rare Earths April 20, 2011 - 6:17pm Addthis Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science What does this mean for me? Rare earth elements -- dysprosium, neodymium, terbium, europium and yttrium -- are essential to a wide range of green energy technologies ranging from windmills to electric vehicles One of their primary uses is in permanent magnets, which amount to over a $4 billion global industry Ames Laboratory recently discovered a way to make these magnets cheaper and greener and signed a cooperative research and development agreement with Molycorp Inc. -- the Western hemisphere's only producer of rare-earth oxides. China holds about 36 percent of world's rare-earth reserves, (compared to 13 percent in the U.S.), but it currently produces 95 percent

116

Growth and characterization of rare-earth monosulfides for cold cathode applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of chalco- genides of the rare-earth elements.4,5 The possibility was analyzed theoretically basedGrowth and characterization of rare-earth monosulfides for cold cathode applications Y. Modukuru, J phonons at 261 284 and 100 92 cm 1 with LaS NdS , respectively. These rare-earth monosulfides offer

Boolchand, Punit

117

Rare hadronic B decays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rare hadronic B-meson decays allow us to study CP violation. The class of B decays final states containing two vector mesons provides a rich set of angular correlation observables to study. This article reviews some of the recent experimental results from the BaBar and Belle collaborations.

A. J. Bevan

2006-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

118

Microsoft Word - US_Japan_REE_agenda_ver7.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agenda
 Agenda
 
 U.S.
-
Japan
Roundtable
on
Rare
Earth
Elements
Research
and
 Development
for
Clean
Energy
Technologies
 
 Thursday-Friday,
November
18-19,
2010
 Building
453,
Black
Diamond
Conference
Room
1012
 
 U.S.
Department
of
Energy
 Lawrence
Livermore
National
Laboratory
 
 THURSDAY,
November
18,
2010
 7:30

 Badging
Westgate
Badge
Office
 
 Met
by
Evelyn
Laurant
 
 8:30
-
9:00
 Welcome
and
Introduction
to
the
Roundtable
 
 Al
Ramponi,
Lawrence
Livermore
National
Laboratory
 
 Kay
Thompson
and
Diana
Bauer,
Department
of
Energy
 
 9:00
-
9:30
 A
Brief
Overview
of
the
Rare
Earths
Crisis


119

US & Japan TG 4 Activities of QA Forum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

have helped us i.e. SHARP, Onamba, Nihon Inter Electronics, Sanken Electronic and SOMA Optics. J---TG4 52 Task---4 R egion U S Posters Task---4 R egion U S * By---pass d iodes g...

120

Trace element partitioning between apatite and silicate melts Stefan Prowatke a,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). The experiments were conducted at pressures of 1.0 GPa and temperatures of 1250 °C. The rare earth elements (La polymerisation of the melt, apatite/melt partition coefficients for the rare earth elements increase for about occurring apatites contain large amounts of the rare earth elements and Sr, it has been well known

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "us-japan rare elements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Little Valley Area (Wood,...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in this paper as "Snively Hot Springs" References Scott A. Wood (2002) Behavior Of Rare Earth Element In Geothermal Systems, A New Exploration-Exploitation Tool Additional...

122

At an Elemental Crossroad: Investigating the Chemistry of Protactinium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

orbitals are the defining characteristic of the actinides as well as the rare-earth elements. This is critical because the relative energies of the orbitals that...

123

Ames Lab 101: Rare Earths  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

"Mr. Rare Earth," Ames Laboratory scientist Karl Gschneidner Jr., explains the importance of rare-earth materials in many of the technologies we use today -- ranging from computers to hybrid cars to wind turbines. Gschneidner is a world renowned rare-earths expert at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory.

Gschneidner, Karl

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

124

THE ROLE OF ACTIVE ELEMENTS AND OXIDE DISPERSIONS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF OXIDATION-RESISTANT ALLOYS AND COATINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was not confined to rare earth element additions. In fact,o-ca1led "rare-earth effect," Y being the particular elementrare earth metals as a melt deoxidant to Nichrome (Ni-20% Cr) he~ting elements

Allam, I.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Replacing the Rare Earth Intellectual Capital  

SciTech Connect

The rare earth crisis slowly evolved during a 10 to 15 year period beginning in the mid-1980s, when the Chinese began to export mixed rare earth concentrates. In the early 1990s, they started to move up the supply chain and began to export the individual rare earth oxides and metals. By the late 1990s the Chinese exported higher value products, such as magnets, phosphors, polishing compounds, catalysts; and in the 21st century they supplied finished products including electric motors, computers, batteries, liquid-crystal displays (LCDs), TVs and monitors, mobile phones, iPods and compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) light bulbs. As they moved to higher value products, the Chinese slowly drove the various industrial producers and commercial enterprises in the US, Europe and Japan out of business by manipulating the rare earth commodity prices. Because of this, the technically trained rare earth engineers and scientists who worked in areas from mining to separations, to processing to production, to manufacturing of semifinished and final products, were laid-off and moved to other fields or they retired. However, in the past year the Chinese have changed their philosophy of the 1970s and 1980s of forming a rare earth cartel to control the rare earth markets to one in which they will no longer supply the rest of the world (ROW) with their precious rare earths, but instead will use them internally to meet the growing demand as the Chinese standard of living increases. To this end, they have implemented and occasionally increased export restrictions and added an export tariff on many of the high demand rare earth elements. Now the ROW is quickly trying to start up rare earth mines, e.g. Molycorp Minerals in the US and Lynas Corp. in Australia, to cover this shortfall in the worldwide market, but it will take about five years for the supply to meet the demand, even as other mines in the ROW become productive. Unfortunately, today there is a serious lack of technically trained personnel to bring the entire rare earth industry, from mining to original equipment manufacturers (OEM), up to full speed in the next few years. Accompanying this decline in technical expertise, innovation and new products utilizing rare earth elements has slowed dramatically, and it may take a decade or more to recapture America's leading role in technological advancements of rare earth containing products. Before the disruption of the US rare earth industry, about 25,000 people were employed in all aspects of the industry from mining to OEM. Today, only about 1,500 people are employed in these fields. The ratio of non-technically trained persons to those with college degrees in the sciences or engineering varies from about 8 to 1 to about 4 to 1, depending on the particular area of the industry. Assuming an average of 6 to 1, the number of college degree scientists and engineers has decreased from about 4,000 to 250 employed today. In the magnetic industry the approximate numbers are: 6,000 total with 750 technically trained people in the 1980s to 500 totally employed today of which 75 have degrees. The paucity of scientists and engineers with experience and/or training in the various aspects of production and commercialization of the rare earths is a serious limitation to the ability of the US to satisfy its own needs for materials and technologies (1) to maintain our military strength and posture, (2) to assume leadership in critical energy technologies, and (3) to bring new consumer products to the marketplace. The lack of experts is of even greater national importance than the halting in the 1990s and the recent restart of the mining/benification/separation effort in the US; and thus governmental intervention and support for at least five to 10 years will be required to ameliorate this situation. To respond quickly, training programs should be established in conjunction with a national research center at an educational institution with a long tradition in multiple areas of rare earth and other critical elements research and technology. This center should

Gschneidner, Jr., Karl

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

A Forward Look into Rare Earth Supply and Demand: A Role for Sedimentary Phosphate Deposits?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Rare earth elements, key to many high-technology applications, are regularly making headlines, even in general public newspapers. Will the word run short of rare earth elements and of the many applications that rest on their use? In support to French and European Union policy making, as well as in support to industrial clients, BRGM is monitoring rare earth markets from the supply and the demand sides, as well as for technological shifts that drive them. Not every rare earth element is effectively rare and there are well over 400 ongoing rare earth exploration projects worldwide. Nevertheless, some rare earth elements such as dysprosium, europium and terbium are rare, in high and fast growing demand; as they either are indispensable to the production of Fe-B-Nd (Dy) permanent magnets, the highest performance magnetic material currently being available at industrial scale, or to the production of phosphors essential to the production of fluorescent compact, energy saving, light bulbs and video displays. At the current 10% compound annual growth rate of the demand for these elements, the question arises of their the future availability. Among the many rare-earth bearing minerals apatite is of particular interest as a potential source of rare earth elements, as it is a widespread mineral, forming huge deposits such as the sedimentary and magmatic phosphate deposits. An overview of the potential of sedimentary phosphate deposits as an important source for future rare earth production is presented and discussed. In addition to knowledge about the distribution and concentration of individual rare earth elements in sedimentary phosphate deposits, it is also necessary to understand the partitioning of the individual elements between phosphogypsum and phosphoric acid in the fertilizer production process, as well as available technologies to recover and separate individual rare earth elements from these materials. This could pave the way to the generation of extra added-value for phosphate producers, and to the broadening of the international production base of rare earth elements in high demand by the global economy.

Patrice Christmann

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Effect of microstructure, grain size, and rare earth doping on the electrorheological performance of nanosized particle materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and grain sizes were prepared by doping TiO2 or ZrO2 with rare earth (RE) elements, and by changingEffect of microstructure, grain size, and rare earth doping on the electrorheological performance-Hua Zhang,c Shu-Mei Chen,d Rui-Li Huange and Song Gaoa a State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Materials

Gao, Song

128

The Colorado Rare Plant Technical Committee Rare Plant Symposium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Colorado Rare Plant Technical Committee presents: 4th Annual Rare Plant Symposium Sponsored by: Colorado Native Plant Society University of Colorado Herbarium US Fish and Wildlife Service Colorado: G2G3/S2S3 Global distribution: Colorado (Larimer and Boulder counties). Possibly extending

129

Rare Isotopes in Cosmic Explosions and Accelerators on Earth  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Rare isotopes are nature?s stepping stones to produce the heavy elements, and they are produced in large quantities in stellar explosions. Despite their fleeting existence, they shape the composition of the universe and the observable features of stellar explosions. The challenge for nuclear science is to produce and study the very same rare isotopes so as to understand the origin of the elements and a range of astronomical observations. I will review the progress that has been made to date in astronomy and nuclear physics, and the prospects of finally addressing many of the outstanding issues with the future Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), which DOE will build at Michigan State University.

Hendrik Schatz

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

130

It's Elemental - The Element Europium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Samarium Samarium Previous Element (Samarium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Gadolinium) Gadolinium The Element Europium [Click for Isotope Data] 63 Eu Europium 151.964 Atomic Number: 63 Atomic Weight: 151.964 Melting Point: 1095 K (822°C or 1512°F) Boiling Point: 1802 K (1529°C or 2784°F) Density: 5.24 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: none Group Name: Lanthanide What's in a name? Named after the continent of Europe. Say what? Europium is pronounced as yoo-RO-pee-em. History and Uses: Europium was discovered by Eugène-Antole Demarçay, a French chemist, in 1896. Demarçay suspected that samples of a recently discovered element, samarium, were contaminated with an unknown element. He was able to produce

131

It's Elemental - The Element Potassium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argon Argon Previous Element (Argon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Calcium) Calcium The Element Potassium [Click for Isotope Data] 19 K Potassium 39.0983 Atomic Number: 19 Atomic Weight: 39.0983 Melting Point: 336.53 K (63.38°C or 146.08°F) Boiling Point: 1032 K (759°C or 1398°F) Density: 0.89 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 1 Group Name: Alkali Metal What's in a name? From the English word potash. Potassium's chemical symbol comes from the Latin word for alkali, kalium. Say what? Potassium is pronounced as poh-TASS-ee-em. History and Uses: Although potassium is the eighth most abundant element on earth and comprises about 2.1% of the earth's crust, it is a very reactive element

132

It's Elemental - The Element Sulfur  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phosphorus Phosphorus Previous Element (Phosphorus) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Chlorine) Chlorine The Element Sulfur [Click for Isotope Data] 16 S Sulfur 32.065 Atomic Number: 16 Atomic Weight: 32.065 Melting Point: 388.36 K (115.21°C or 239.38°F) Boiling Point: 717.75 K (444.60°C or 832.28°F) Density: 2.067 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 3 Group Number: 16 Group Name: Chalcogen What's in a name? From the Sanskrit word sulvere and the Latin word sulphurium. Say what? Sulfur is pronounced as SUL-fer. History and Uses: Sulfur, the tenth most abundant element in the universe, has been known since ancient times. Sometime around 1777, Antoine Lavoisier convinced the rest of the scientific community that sulfur was an element. Sulfur is a

133

It's Elemental - The Element Magnesium  

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Sodium Sodium Previous Element (Sodium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Aluminum) Aluminum The Element Magnesium [Click for Isotope Data] 12 Mg Magnesium 24.3050 Atomic Number: 12 Atomic Weight: 24.3050 Melting Point: 923 K (650°C or 1202°F) Boiling Point: 1363 K (1090°C or 1994°F) Density: 1.74 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 3 Group Number: 2 Group Name: Alkaline Earth Metal What's in a name? For Magnesia, a district in the region of Thessaly, Greece. Say what? Magnesium is pronounced as mag-NEE-zhi-em. History and Uses: Although it is the eighth most abundant element in the universe and the seventh most abundant element in the earth's crust, magnesium is never found free in nature. Magnesium was first isolated by Sir Humphry Davy, an

134

Rare earth focused ion beam implantation utilizing Er and Pr liquid alloy ion sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pr,10,11 Eu,12 Dy,13 Er,13­15 and Tm16 doped GaN. Rare earth elements were added during growthRare earth focused ion beam implantation utilizing Er and Pr liquid alloy ion sources L. C. Chao, B write implantation. © 1999 American Vacuum Society. S0734-211X 99 08306-7 I. INTRODUCTION Rare earth

Steckl, Andrew J.

135

Synthesis, Computations and Characterizations of Low Dimensional Rare-Earth Compounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reduced rare-earth (Ln, lanthanide elements) compounds with low-dimensional Ln-Ln-bonded structures are promising candidates for magnetic materials because Ln-Ln-bonded molecules and solids have delocalized 5d electrons that make strong magnetic...

Chen, Chun-Yu

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

136

It's Elemental - The Element Nitrogen  

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Carbon Carbon Previous Element (Carbon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Oxygen) Oxygen The Element Nitrogen [Click for Isotope Data] 7 N Nitrogen 14.0067 Atomic Number: 7 Atomic Weight: 14.0067 Melting Point: 63.15 K (-210.00°C or -346.00°F) Boiling Point: 77.36 K (-195.79°C or -320.44°F) Density: 0.0012506 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Gas Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 2 Group Number: 15 Group Name: Pnictogen What's in a name? From the Greek words nitron and genes, which together mean "saltpetre forming." Say what? Nitrogen is pronounced as NYE-treh-gen. History and Uses: Nitrogen was discovered by the Scottish physician Daniel Rutherford in 1772. It is the fifth most abundant element in the universe and makes up

137

It's Elemental - The Element Sodium  

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Neon Neon Previous Element (Neon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Magnesium) Magnesium The Element Sodium [Click for Isotope Data] 11 Na Sodium 22.98976928 Atomic Number: 11 Atomic Weight: 22.98976928 Melting Point: 370.95 K (97.80°C or 208.04°F) Boiling Point: 1156 K (883°C or 1621°F) Density: 0.97 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 3 Group Number: 1 Group Name: Alkali Metal What's in a name? From the English word soda and from the Medieval Latin word sodanum, which means "headache remedy." Sodium's chemical symbol comes from the Latin word for sodium carbonate, natrium. Say what? Sodium is pronounced as SO-dee-em. History and Uses: Although sodium is the sixth most abundant element on earth and comprises

138

It's Elemental - The Element Francium  

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Radon Radon Previous Element (Radon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Radium) Radium The Element Francium [Click for Isotope Data] 87 Fr Francium 223 Atomic Number: 87 Atomic Weight: 223 Melting Point: 300 K (27°C or 81°F) Boiling Point: Unknown Density: Unknown Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 7 Group Number: 1 Group Name: Alkali Metal Radioactive What's in a name? Named for the country of France. Say what? Francium is pronounced as FRAN-see-em. History and Uses: Francium was discovered by Marguerite Catherine Perey, a French chemist, in 1939 while analyzing actinium's decay sequence. Although considered a natural element, scientists estimate that there is no more than one ounce of francium in the earth's crust at one time. Since there is so little

139

It's Elemental - The Element Phosphorus  

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Silicon Silicon Previous Element (Silicon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Sulfur) Sulfur The Element Phosphorus [Click for Isotope Data] 15 P Phosphorus 30.973762 Atomic Number: 15 Atomic Weight: 30.973762 Melting Point: 317.30 K (44.15°C or 111.47°F) Boiling Point: 553.65 K (280.5°C or 536.9°F) Density: 1.82 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 3 Group Number: 15 Group Name: Pnictogen What's in a name? From the Greek word for light bearing, phosphoros. Say what? Phosphorus is pronounced as FOS-fer-es. History and Uses: In what is perhaps the most disgusting method of discovering an element, phosphorus was first isolated in 1669 by Hennig Brand, a German physician and alchemist, by boiling, filtering and otherwise processing as many as 60

140

It's Elemental - The Element Indium  

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Cadmium Cadmium Previous Element (Cadmium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Tin) Tin The Element Indium [Click for Isotope Data] 49 In Indium 114.818 Atomic Number: 49 Atomic Weight: 114.818 Melting Point: 429.75 K (156.60°C or 313.88°F) Boiling Point: 2345 K (2072°C or 3762°F) Density: 7.31 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 5 Group Number: 13 Group Name: none What's in a name? Named after the bright indigo line in its spectrum. Say what? Indium is pronounced as IN-dee-em. History and Uses: Indium was discovered by the German chemists Ferdinand Reich and Hieronymus Theodor Richter in 1863. Reich and Richter had been looking for traces of the element thallium in samples of zinc ores. A brilliant indigo line in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "us-japan rare elements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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141

It's Elemental - The Element Neon  

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Fluorine Fluorine Previous Element (Fluorine) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Sodium) Sodium The Element Neon [Click for Isotope Data] 10 Ne Neon 20.1797 Atomic Number: 10 Atomic Weight: 20.1797 Melting Point: 24.56 K (-248.59°C or -415.46°F) Boiling Point: 27.07 K (-246.08°C or -410.94°F) Density: 0.0008999 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Gas Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 2 Group Number: 18 Group Name: Noble Gas What's in a name? From the Greek word for new, neos. Say what? Neon is pronounced as NEE-on. History and Uses: Neon was discovered by Sir William Ramsay, a Scottish chemist, and Morris M. Travers, an English chemist, shortly after their discovery of the element krypton in 1898. Like krypton, neon was discovered through the

142

It's Elemental - The Element Technetium  

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Molybdenum Molybdenum Previous Element (Molybdenum) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Ruthenium) Ruthenium The Element Technetium [Click for Isotope Data] 43 Tc Technetium 98 Atomic Number: 43 Atomic Weight: 98 Melting Point: 2430 K (2157°C or 3915°F) Boiling Point: 4538 K (4265°C or 7709°F) Density: 11 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 5 Group Number: 7 Group Name: none Radioactive and Artificially Produced What's in a name? From the Greek word for artificial, technetos. Say what? Technetium is pronounced as tek-NEE-she-em. History and Uses: Technetium was the first artificially produced element. It was isolated by Carlo Perrier and Emilio Segrè in 1937. Technetium was created by bombarding molybdenum atoms with deuterons that had been accelerated by a

143

It's Elemental - The Element Cobalt  

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Iron Iron Previous Element (Iron) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Nickel) Nickel The Element Cobalt [Click for Isotope Data] 27 Co Cobalt 58.933195 Atomic Number: 27 Atomic Weight: 58.933195 Melting Point: 1768 K (1495°C or 2723°F) Boiling Point: 3200 K (2927°C or 5301°F) Density: 8.86 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 9 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the German word for goblin or evil spirit, kobald and the Greek word for mine, cobalos. Say what? Cobalt is pronounced as KO-bolt. History and Uses: Cobalt was discovered by Georg Brandt, a Swedish chemist, in 1739. Brandt was attempting to prove that the ability of certain minerals to color glass blue was due to an unknown element and not to bismuth, as was commonly

144

It's Elemental - The Element Bromine  

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Selenium Selenium Previous Element (Selenium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Krypton) Krypton The Element Bromine [Click for Isotope Data] 35 Br Bromine 79.904 Atomic Number: 35 Atomic Weight: 79.904 Melting Point: 265.95 K (-7.2°C or 19.0°F) Boiling Point: 331.95 K (58.8°C or 137.8°F) Density: 3.11 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Liquid Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 17 Group Name: Halogen What's in a name? From the Greek word for stench, bromos. Say what? Bromine is pronounced as BRO-meen. History and Uses: The only nonmetallic element that is a liquid at normal room temperatures, bromine was produced by Carl Löwig, a young chemistry student, the summer before starting his freshman year at Heidelberg. When he showed his

145

It's Elemental - The Element Oxygen  

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Nitrogen Nitrogen Previous Element (Nitrogen) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Fluorine) Fluorine The Element Oxygen [Click for Isotope Data] 8 O Oxygen 15.9994 Atomic Number: 8 Atomic Weight: 15.9994 Melting Point: 54.36 K (-218.79°C or -361.82°F) Boiling Point: 90.20 K (-182.95°C or -297.31°F) Density: 0.001429 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Gas Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 2 Group Number: 16 Group Name: Chalcogen What's in a name? From the greek words oxys and genes, which together mean "acid forming." Say what? Oxygen is pronounced as OK-si-jen. History and Uses: Oxygen had been produced by several chemists prior to its discovery in 1774, but they failed to recognize it as a distinct element. Joseph

146

It's Elemental - The Element Manganese  

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Chromium Chromium Previous Element (Chromium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Iron) Iron The Element Manganese [Click for Isotope Data] 25 Mn Manganese 54.938045 Atomic Number: 25 Atomic Weight: 54.938045 Melting Point: 1519 K (1246°C or 2275°F) Boiling Point: 2334 K (2061°C or 3742°F) Density: 7.3 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 7 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Latin word for magnet, magnes. Say what? Manganese is pronounced as MAN-ge-nees. History and Uses: Proposed to be an element by Carl Wilhelm Scheele in 1774, manganese was discovered by Johan Gottlieb Gahn, a Swedish chemist, by heating the mineral pyrolusite (MnO2) in the presence of charcoal later that year.

147

It's Elemental - The Element Titanium  

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Scandium Scandium Previous Element (Scandium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Vanadium) Vanadium The Element Titanium [Click for Isotope Data] 22 Ti Titanium 47.867 Atomic Number: 22 Atomic Weight: 47.867 Melting Point: 1941 K (1668°C or 3034°F) Boiling Point: 3560 K (3287°C or 5949°F) Density: 4.5 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 4 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Greek word Titans, the mythological "first sons of the Earth." Say what? Titanium is pronounced as tie-TAY-nee-em. History and Uses: Titanium was discovered in 1791 by the Reverend William Gregor, an English pastor. Pure titanium was first produced by Matthew A. Hunter, an American metallurgist, in 1910. Titanium is the ninth most abundant element in the

148

UK bridge to rare tongues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE TELEGRAPH - About Us - Advertise - Feedback - Contact Us /div> 2 Front Page > Nation > Story UK bridge to rare tongues London, Dec. 12 (PTI): Cambridge University has launched a project to provide public access to languages...

Anon.

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

149

PRESS RELEASE RARE FRUIT CONFERENCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RELEASE RARE FRUIT CONFERENCE July 9 - 13, 2014 Sponsored by the Tropical Fruit & Vegetable Society of the Redland & the Fruit & Spice Park 24801 SW 187th Avenue, Homestead, Florida

Jawitz, James W.

150

A Rare Isolated Trapezoid Fracture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wrist in suggested scaphoid fracture. Acta Radiol. 1988;29:Rare isolated trapezoid fracture: a case report. Hand. 2008;suspect and diagnose this fracture. 2,8 REFERENCES 1. Papp

Afifi, Negean; Lu, Jenny J

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

ELEMENTS, VOL. 8, PP. 355360 OCTOBER 2012355 1811-5209/12/0008-0355$2.50 DOI: 10.2113/gselements.8.5.355  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.5.355 Hydrothermal Mobilisation of the Rare Earth Elements ­ a Tale of "Ceria" and "Yttria" INTRODUCTION Our story of the hydrothermal mobility of the rare earth elements (REEs) has its origins in the 650-year-old Bastnäs base metal (Mosander 1843). As with A lthough the rare earth elements have been thought by many to be immobile

152

Process to separate transuranic elements from nuclear waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing transuranic elements from a waste chloride electrolytic salt containing transuranic elements in addition to rare earth and other fission product elements so the salt waste may be disposed of more easily and the valuable transuranic elements may be recovered for reuse. The salt is contacted with a cadmium-uranium alloy which selectively extracts the transuranic elements from the salt. The waste salt is generated during the reprocessing of nuclear fuel associated with the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR).

Johnson, Terry R. (Wheaton, IL); Ackerman, John P. (Downers Grove, IL); Tomczuk, Zygmunt (Orland Park, IL); Fischer, Donald F. (Glen Ellyn, IL)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

It's Elemental - The Element Astatine  

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Polonium Polonium Previous Element (Polonium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Radon) Radon The Element Astatine [Click for Isotope Data] 85 At Astatine 210 Atomic Number: 85 Atomic Weight: 210 Melting Point: 575 K (302°C or 576°F) Boiling Point: Unknown Density: about 7 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Semi-metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 17 Group Name: Halogen Radioactive What's in a name? From the Greek word for unstable, astatos. Say what? Astatine is pronounced as AS-teh-teen or as AS-teh-ten. History and Uses: Astatine was produced by Dale R. Carson, K.R. MacKenzie and Emilio Segrè by bombarding an isotope of bismuth, bismuth-209, with alpha particles that had been accelerated in a device called a cyclotron. This created

154

It's Elemental - The Element Copper  

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Nickel Nickel Previous Element (Nickel) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Zinc) Zinc The Element Copper [Click for Isotope Data] 29 Cu Copper 63.546 Atomic Number: 29 Atomic Weight: 63.546 Melting Point: 1357.77 K (1084.62°C or 1984.32°F) Boiling Point: 2835 K (2562°C or 4644°F) Density: 8.933 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 11 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Latin word cuprum, which means "from the island of Cyprus." Say what? Copper is pronounced as KOP-er. History and Uses: Archaeological evidence suggests that people have been using copper for at least 11,000 years. Relatively easy to mine and refine, people discovered methods for extracting copper from its ores at least 7,000 years ago. The

155

It's Elemental - The Element Gadolinium  

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Europium Europium Previous Element (Europium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Terbium) Terbium The Element Gadolinium [Click for Isotope Data] 64 Gd Gadolinium 157.25 Atomic Number: 64 Atomic Weight: 157.25 Melting Point: 1586 K (1313°C or 2395°F) Boiling Point: 3546 K (3273°C or 5923°F) Density: 7.90 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: none Group Name: Lanthanide What's in a name? Named for the mineral gadolinite which was named after Johan Gadolin, a Finnish chemist. Say what? Gadolinium is pronounced as GAD-oh-LIN-ee-em. History and Uses: Spectroscopic evidence for the existence of gadolinium was first observed by the Swiss chemist Jean Charles Galissard de Marignac in the minerals

156

It's Elemental - The Element Mercury  

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Gold Gold Previous Element (Gold) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Thallium) Thallium The Element Mercury [Click for Isotope Data] 80 Hg Mercury 200.59 Atomic Number: 80 Atomic Weight: 200.59 Melting Point: 234.32 K (-38.83°C or -37.89°F) Boiling Point: 629.88 K (356.73°C or 674.11°F) Density: 13.5336 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Liquid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 12 Group Name: none What's in a name? Named after the planet Mercury. Mercury's chemical symbol comes from the Greek word hydrargyrum, which means "liquid silver." Say what? Mercury is pronounced as MER-kyoo-ree. History and Uses: Mercury was known to the ancient Chinese and Hindus and has been found in 3500 year old Egyptian tombs. Mercury is not usually found free in nature

157

It's Elemental - The Element Hafnium  

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Lutetium Lutetium Previous Element (Lutetium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Tantalum) Tantalum The Element Hafnium [Click for Isotope Data] 72 Hf Hafnium 178.49 Atomic Number: 72 Atomic Weight: 178.49 Melting Point: 2506 K (2233°C or 4051°F) Boiling Point: 4876 K (4603°C or 8317°F) Density: 13.3 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 4 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Latin word for the city of Copenhagen, Hafnia. Say what? Hafnium is pronounced as HAF-neeem. History and Uses: Hafnium was discovered by Dirk Coster, a Danish chemist, and Charles de Hevesy, a Hungarian chemist, in 1923. They used a method known as X-ray spectroscopy to study the arrangement of the outer electrons of atoms in

158

It's Elemental - The Element Boron  

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Beryllium Beryllium Previous Element (Beryllium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Carbon) Carbon The Element Boron [Click for Isotope Data] 5 B Boron 10.811 Atomic Number: 5 Atomic Weight: 10.811 Melting Point: 2348 K (2075°C or 3767°F) Boiling Point: 4273 K (4000°C or 7232°F) Density: 2.37 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Semi-metal Period Number: 2 Group Number: 13 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Arabic word Buraq and the Persian word Burah, which are both words for the material "borax." Say what? Boron is pronounced as BO-ron. History and Uses: Boron was discovered by Joseph-Louis Gay-Lussac and Louis-Jaques Thénard, French chemists, and independently by Sir Humphry Davy, an English chemist,

159

It's Elemental - The Element Thorium  

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Actinium Actinium Previous Element (Actinium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Protactinium) Protactinium The Element Thorium [Click for Isotope Data] 90 Th Thorium 232.03806 Atomic Number: 90 Atomic Weight: 232.03806 Melting Point: 2023 K (1750°C or 3182°F) Boiling Point: 5061 K (4788°C or 8650°F) Density: 11.72 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 7 Group Number: none Group Name: Actinide Radioactive What's in a name? Named for the Scandinavian god of war, Thor. Say what? Thorium is pronounced as THOR-ee-em or as THO-ree-em. History and Uses: Thorium was discovered by Jöns Jacob Berzelius, a Swedish chemist, in 1828. He discovered it in a sample of a mineral that was given to him by the Reverend Has Morten Thrane Esmark, who suspected that it contained an

160

It's Elemental - The Element Chromium  

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Vanadium Vanadium Previous Element (Vanadium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Manganese) Manganese The Element Chromium [Click for Isotope Data] 24 Cr Chromium 51.9961 Atomic Number: 24 Atomic Weight: 51.9961 Melting Point: 2180 K (1907°C or 3465°F) Boiling Point: 2944 K (2671°C or 4840°F) Density: 7.15 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 6 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Greek word for color, chroma. Say what? Chromium is pronounced as KROH-mee-em. History and Uses: Chromium was discovered by Louis-Nicholas Vauquelin while experimenting with a material known as Siberian red lead, also known as the mineral crocoite (PbCrO4), in 1797. He produced chromium oxide (CrO3) by mixing

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "us-japan rare elements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

It's Elemental - The Element Iron  

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Manganese Manganese Previous Element (Manganese) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Cobalt) Cobalt The Element Iron [Click for Isotope Data] 26 Fe Iron 55.845 Atomic Number: 26 Atomic Weight: 55.845 Melting Point: 1811 K (1538°C or 2800°F) Boiling Point: 3134 K (2861°C or 5182°F) Density: 7.874 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 8 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Anglo-Saxon word iron. Iron's chemical symbol comes from the Latin word for iron, ferrum. Say what? Iron is pronounced as EYE-ern. History and Uses: Archaeological evidence suggests that people have been using iron for at least 5000 years. Iron is the cheapest and one of the most abundant of all metals, comprising nearly 5.6% of the earth's crust and nearly all of the

162

It's Elemental - The Element Molybdenum  

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Niobium Niobium Previous Element (Niobium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Technetium) Technetium The Element Molybdenum [Click for Isotope Data] 42 Mo Molybdenum 95.96 Atomic Number: 42 Atomic Weight: 95.96 Melting Point: 2896 K (2623°C or 4753°F) Boiling Point: 4912 K (4639°C or 8382°F) Density: 10.2 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 5 Group Number: 6 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Greek word for lead, molybdos. Say what? Molybdenum is pronounced as meh-LIB-deh-nem. History and Uses: Molybdenum was discovered by Carl Welhelm Scheele, a Swedish chemist, in 1778 in a mineral known as molybdenite (MoS2) which had been confused as a lead compound. Molybdenum was isolated by Peter Jacob Hjelm in 1781. Today,

163

It's Elemental - The Element Cesium  

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Xenon Xenon Previous Element (Xenon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Barium) Barium The Element Cesium [Click for Isotope Data] 55 Cs Cesium 132.9054519 Atomic Number: 55 Atomic Weight: 132.9054519 Melting Point: 301.59 K (28.44°C or 83.19°F) Boiling Point: 944 K (671°C or 1240°F) Density: 1.93 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 1 Group Name: Alkali Metal What's in a name? From the Latin word for sky blue, caesius. Say what? Cesium is pronounced as SEE-zee-em. History and Uses: Cesium was discovered by Robert Wilhelm Bunsen and Gustav Robert Kirchhoff, German chemists, in 1860 through the spectroscopic analysis of Durkheim mineral water. They named cesium after the blue lines they observed in its

164

It's Elemental - The Element Iridium  

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Osmium Osmium Previous Element (Osmium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Platinum) Platinum The Element Iridium [Click for Isotope Data] 77 Ir Iridium 192.217 Atomic Number: 77 Atomic Weight: 192.217 Melting Point: 2719 K (2446°C or 4435°F) Boiling Point: 4701 K (4428°C or 8002°F) Density: 22.42 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 9 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Latin word for rainbow, iris. Say what? Iridium is pronounced as i-RID-ee-em. History and Uses: Iridium and osmium were discovered at the same time by the British chemist Smithson Tennant in 1803. Iridium and osmium were identified in the black residue remaining after dissolving platinum ore with aqua regia, a mixture

165

It's Elemental - The Element Platinum  

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Iridium Iridium Previous Element (Iridium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Gold) Gold The Element Platinum [Click for Isotope Data] 78 Pt Platinum 195.084 Atomic Number: 78 Atomic Weight: 195.084 Melting Point: 2041.55 K (1768.4°C or 3215.1°F) Boiling Point: 4098 K (3825°C or 6917°F) Density: 21.46 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 10 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Spainsh word for silver, platina. Say what? Platinum is pronounced as PLAT-en-em. History and Uses: Used by the pre-Columbian Indians of South America, platinum wasn't noticed by western scientists until 1735. Platinum can occur free in nature and is sometimes found in deposits of gold-bearing sands, primarily those found in

166

It's Elemental - The Element Arsenic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Germanium Germanium Previous Element (Germanium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Selenium) Selenium The Element Arsenic [Click for Isotope Data] 33 As Arsenic 74.92160 Atomic Number: 33 Atomic Weight: 74.92160 Melting Point: 1090 K (817°C or 1503°F) Boiling Point: 887 K (614°C or 1137°F) Density: 5.776 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Semi-metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 15 Group Name: Pnictogen What's in a name? From the Latin word arsenicum, the Greek word arsenikon and the Arabic word Az-zernikh. Say what? Arsenic is pronounced as AR-s'n-ik. History and Uses: Although arsenic compounds were mined by the early Chinese, Greek and Egyptian civilizations, it is believed that arsenic itself was first identified by Albertus Magnus, a German alchemist, in 1250. Arsenic occurs

167

It's Elemental - The Element Barium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cesium Cesium Previous Element (Cesium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Lanthanum) Lanthanum The Element Barium [Click for Isotope Data] 56 Ba Barium 137.327 Atomic Number: 56 Atomic Weight: 137.327 Melting Point: 1000 K (727°C or 1341°F) Boiling Point: 2170 K (1897°C or 3447°F) Density: 3.62 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 2 Group Name: Alkaline Earth Metal What's in a name? From the Greek word for heavy, barys. Say what? Barium is pronounced as BAR-ee-em. History and Uses: Barium was first isolated by Sir Humphry Davy, an English chemist, in 1808 through the electrolysis of molten baryta (BaO). Barium is never found free in nature since it reacts with oxygen in the air, forming barium oxide

168

It's Elemental - The Element Gold  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Platinum Platinum Previous Element (Platinum) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Mercury) Mercury The Element Gold [Click for Isotope Data] 79 Au Gold 196.966569 Atomic Number: 79 Atomic Weight: 196.966569 Melting Point: 1337.33 K (1064.18°C or 1947.52°F) Boiling Point: 3129 K (2856°C or 5173°F) Density: 19.282 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 11 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Sanskrit word Jval and the Anglo-Saxon word gold. Gold's chemical symbol comes from the the latin word for gold, aurum. Say what? Gold is pronounced as GOLD. History and Uses: An attractive and highly valued metal, gold has been known for at least 5500 years. Gold is sometimes found free in nature but it is usually found

169

It's Elemental - The Element Rhenium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tungsten Tungsten Previous Element (Tungsten) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Osmium) Osmium The Element Rhenium [Click for Isotope Data] 75 Re Rhenium 186.207 Atomic Number: 75 Atomic Weight: 186.207 Melting Point: 3459 K (3186°C or 5767°F) Boiling Point: 5869 K (5596°C or 10105°F) Density: 20.8 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 7 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Latin word for the Rhine River, Rhenus. Say what? Rhenium is pronounced as REE-nee-em. History and Uses: Rhenium was discovered by the German chemists Ida Tacke-Noddack, Walter Noddack and Otto Carl Berg in 1925. They detected rhenium spectroscopically in platinum ores and in the minerals columbite ((Fe, Mn, Mg)(Nb, Ta)2O6),

170

It's Elemental - The Element Osmium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rhenium Rhenium Previous Element (Rhenium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Iridium) Iridium The Element Osmium [Click for Isotope Data] 76 Os Osmium 190.23 Atomic Number: 76 Atomic Weight: 190.23 Melting Point: 3306 K (3033°C or 5491°F) Boiling Point: 5285 K (5012°C or 9054°F) Density: 22.57 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 8 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Greek word for a smell, osme. Say what? Osmium is pronounced as OZ-mee-em. History and Uses: Osmium and iridium were discovered at the same time by the British chemist Smithson Tennant in 1803. Osmium and iridium were identified in the black residue remaining after dissolving platinum ore with aqua regia, a mixture

171

It's Elemental - The Element Antimony  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tin Tin Previous Element (Tin) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Tellurium) Tellurium The Element Antimony [Click for Isotope Data] 51 Sb Antimony 121.760 Atomic Number: 51 Atomic Weight: 121.760 Melting Point: 903.78 K (630.63°C or 1167.13°F) Boiling Point: 1860 K (1587°C or 2889°F) Density: 6.685 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Semi-metal Period Number: 5 Group Number: 15 Group Name: Pnictogen What's in a name? From the Greek words anti and monos, which together mean "not alone." Antimony's chemical symbol comes from its historic name, Stibium. Say what? Antimony is pronounced as AN-the-MOH-nee. History and Uses: Antimony has been known since ancient times. It is sometimes found free in nature, but is usually obtained from the ores stibnite (Sb2S3) and

172

Silicon Shovels for Rare-Earth Solutions  

Office of Science (SC) Website

the uses for rare-earths, but the mined and processed totals are falling short. Green energy technology needs rare earth materials for wind turbines, rechargeable...

173

It's Elemental - The Element Zinc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Copper Copper Previous Element (Copper) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Gallium) Gallium The Element Zinc [Click for Isotope Data] 30 Zn Zinc 65.38 Atomic Number: 30 Atomic Weight: 65.38 Melting Point: 692.68 K (419.53°C or 787.15°F) Boiling Point: 1180 K (907°C or 1665°F) Density: 7.134 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 12 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the German word zink. Say what? Zinc is pronounced as ZINK. History and Uses: Although zinc compounds have been used for at least 2,500 years in the production of brass, zinc wasn't recognized as a distinct element until much later. Metallic zinc was first produced in India sometime in the 1400s by heating the mineral calamine (ZnCO3) with wool. Zinc was rediscovered by

174

It's Elemental - The Element Chlorine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sulfur Sulfur Previous Element (Sulfur) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Argon) Argon The Element Chlorine [Click for Isotope Data] 17 Cl Chlorine 35.453 Atomic Number: 17 Atomic Weight: 35.453 Melting Point: 171.65 K (-101.5°C or -150.7°F) Boiling Point: 239.11 K (-34.04°C or -29.27°F) Density: 0.003214 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Gas Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 3 Group Number: 17 Group Name: Halogen What's in a name? From the Greek word for greenish yellow, chloros. Say what? Chlorine is pronounced as KLOR-een or as KLOR-in. History and Uses: Since it combines directly with nearly every element, chlorine is never found free in nature. Chlorine was first produced by Carl Wilhelm Scheele, a Swedish chemist, when he combined the mineral pyrolusite (MnO2) with

175

It's Elemental - The Element Fluorine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxygen Oxygen Previous Element (Oxygen) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Neon) Neon The Element Fluorine [Click for Isotope Data] 9 F Fluorine 18.9984032 Atomic Number: 9 Atomic Weight: 18.9984032 Melting Point: 53.53 K (-219.62°C or -363.32°F) Boiling Point: 85.03 K (-188.12°C or -306.62°F) Density: 0.001696 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Gas Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 2 Group Number: 17 Group Name: Halogen What's in a name? From the Latin and French words for flow, fluere. Say what? Fluorine is pronounced as FLU-eh-reen or as FLU-eh-rin. History and Uses: Fluorine is the most reactive of all elements and no chemical substance is capable of freeing fluorine from any of its compounds. For this reason, fluorine does not occur free in nature and was extremely difficult for

176

E-Print Network 3.0 - alloying elements al Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

attack due to impurities andor alloying elements 4... of rapidly solidified Mg-Zn rare earth element alloys in NaCl solution Corros. Sci. 49 255-62 8 ASM... Microstructure,...

177

It's Elemental - The Element Lead  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thallium Thallium Previous Element (Thallium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Bismuth) Bismuth The Element Lead [Click for Isotope Data] 82 Pb Lead 207.2 Atomic Number: 82 Atomic Weight: 207.2 Melting Point: 600.61 K (327.46°C or 621.43°F) Boiling Point: 2022 K (1749°C or 3180°F) Density: 11.342 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 14 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Anglo-Saxon word lead. Lead's chemical symbol comes from the Latin word for waterworks, plumbum. Say what? Lead is pronounced as LED. History and Uses: Lead has been known since ancient times. It is sometimes found free in nature, but is usually obtained from the ores galena (PbS), anglesite (PbSO4), cerussite (PbCO3) and minum (Pb3O4). Although lead makes up only

178

It's Elemental - The Element Iodine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tellurium Tellurium Previous Element (Tellurium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Xenon) Xenon The Element Iodine [Click for Isotope Data] 53 I Iodine 126.90447 Atomic Number: 53 Atomic Weight: 126.90447 Melting Point: 386.85 K (113.7°C or 236.7°F) Boiling Point: 457.55 K (184.4°C or 364.0°F) Density: 4.93 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 5 Group Number: 17 Group Name: Halogen What's in a name? From the Greek word for violet, iodes. Say what? Iodine is pronounced as EYE-eh-dine or as EYE-eh-din. History and Uses: Iodine was discovered by the French chemist Barnard Courtois in 1811. Courtois was extracting sodium and potassium compounds from seaweed ash. Once these compounds were removed, he added sulfuric acid (H2SO4) to

179

Exploration of R2XM2 (R=Sc, Y, Ti, Zr, Hf, rare earth; X=main group element; M=transition metal, Si, Ge): Structural Motifs, the novel Compound Gd2AlGe2 and Analysis of the U3Si2 and Zr3Al2 Structure Types  

SciTech Connect

In the process of exploring and understanding the influence of crystal structure on the system of compounds with the composition Gd{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 4} several new compounds were synthesized with different crystal structures, but similar structural features. In Gd{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 4}, the main feature of interest is the magnetocaloric effect (MCE), which allows the material to be useful in magnetic refrigeration applications. The MCE is based on the magnetic interactions of the Gd atoms in the crystal structure, which varies with x (the amount of Si in the compound). The crystal structure of Gd{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 4} can be thought of as being formed from two 3{sup 2}434 nets of Gd atoms, with additional Gd atoms in the cubic voids and Si/Ge atoms in the trigonal prismatic voids. Attempts were made to substitute nonmagnetic atoms for magnetic Gd using In, Mg and Al. Gd{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} and Gd{sub 2}InGe{sub 2} both possess the same 3{sup 2}434 nets of Gd atoms as Gd{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 4}, but these nets are connected differently, forming the Mo{sub 2}FeB{sub 2} crystal structure. A search of the literature revealed that compounds with the composition R{sub 2}XM{sub 2} (R=Sc, Y, Ti, Zr, Hf, rare earth; X=main group element; M=transition metal, Si, Ge) crystallize in one of four crystal structures: the Mo{sub 2}FeB{sub 2}, Zr{sub 3}Al{sub 2}, Mn{sub 2}AlB{sub 2} and W{sub 2}CoB{sub 2} crystal structures. These crystal structures are described, and the relationships between them are highlighted. Gd{sub 2}AlGe{sub 2} forms an entirely new crystal structure, and the details of its synthesis and characterization are given. Electronic structure calculations are performed to understand the nature of bonding in this compound and how electrons can be accounted for. A series of electronic structure calculations were performed on models with the U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} and Zr{sub 3}Al{sub 2} structures, using Zr and A1 as the building blocks. The starting point for these models was the U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} structure, and models were created to simulate the transition from the idealized U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} structure to the distorted Zr{sub 3}Al{sub 2} structure. Analysis of the band structures of the models has shown that the transition from the U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} structure to the Zr{sub 3}Al{sub 2} structure lifts degeneracies along the {Lambda} {yields} Z direction, indicating a Peierls-type mechanism for the displacement occurring in the positions of the Zr atoms.

Sean William McWhorter

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

doi:10.1016/j.gca.2004.06.037 Effect of melt composition on the partitioning of trace elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coefficients for the rare earth elements and for Th, Nb, and Ta reveal a strong influence of melt composition amounts of rare earth elements (REE) and high field strength elements (HFSE), it may significantly affectdoi:10.1016/j.gca.2004.06.037 Effect of melt composition on the partitioning of trace elements

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "us-japan rare elements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Programmatic Elements  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Guide provides acceptable methods of meeting the requirements of DOE O 151.1C for programmatic elements that sustain the emergency management program and maintain the readiness of the program to respond to an emergency. Cancels DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 5-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 5-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 5-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 5-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 7-1, and DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 7-3.

2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

182

An Equilibrium Model of Rare Event Premia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we study the asset pricing implication of imprecise knowledge about rare events. Modeling rare events as jumps in the aggregate endowment, we explicitly solve the equilibrium asset prices in a pure-exchange ...

Liu, Jun

2002-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

183

Rare Iron Oxide in Ancient Chinese Pottery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rare Iron Oxide in Ancient Chinese Pottery Rare Iron Oxide in Ancient Chinese Pottery Print Friday, 26 September 2014 14:37 Jian ware (or Tenmoku) ceramic bowls, famous for their...

184

Response Elements  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Guide provides acceptable methods for meeting the requirement of DOE O 151.1C for response elements that respond or contribute to response as needed in an emergency. Cancels DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-5, and DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-6.

2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

185

The Colorado Rare Plant Technical Committee presents: Colorado Rare Plant Symposium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Colorado Rare Plant Technical Committee presents: 5th Annual Colorado Rare Plant Symposium September 5, 2008 Montrose, Colorado Sponsored by: Colorado Rare Plant Technical CommitteeColorado Rare Plant Technical Committee Colorado Native Plant Society University of Colorado Herbarium US Fish

186

The Colorado Rare Plant Technical Committee presents: 2nd Annual Rare Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Colorado Rare Plant Technical Committee presents: 2nd Annual Rare Plant Symposium Friday, September 16th, 2005 8am-noon: 2nd Annual Colorado Rare Plant Symposium (Discuss G1 species) 6:30-7:30pm with the Colorado Native Plant Society's Annual Meeting Sponsored by: #12;The Second Annual Colorado Rare Plant

187

Process to separate transuranic elements from nuclear waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for removing transuranic elements from a waste chloride electrolytic salt containing transuranic elements in addition to rare earth and other fission product elements so the salt waste may be disposed of more easily and the valuable transuranic elements may be recovered for reuse. The salt is contacted with a cadmium-uranium alloy which selectively extracts the transuranic elements from the salt. The waste salt is generated during the reprocessing of nuclear fuel associated with the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). 2 figs.

Johnson, T.R.; Ackerman, J.P.; Tomczuk, Z.; Fischer, D.F.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

188

Process to separate transuranic elements from nuclear waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing transuranic elements from a waste chloride electrolytic salt containing transuranic elements in addition to rare earth and other fission product elements so the salt waste may be disposed of more easily and the valuable transuranic elements may be recovered for reuse. The salt is contacted with a cadmium-uranium alloy which selectively extracts the transuranic elements from the salt. The waste salt is generated during the reprocessing of nuclear fuel associated with the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). 2 figs.

Johnson, T.R.; Ackerman, J.P.; Tomczuk, Z.; Fischer, D.F.

1988-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

189

Rare Earth Metals and Alloys | Ames Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mpc » Rare Earth Metals and Alloys Mpc » Rare Earth Metals and Alloys Rare Earth Metals and Alloys Terbium (Tb) and Cerium (Ce) phosphors in your computer screen allow you to see GREEN. Europium (Eu) is the source of the RED light and BLUE emitted by our display. The Ames Laboratory has been actively involved in the preparation of very pure rare earth metals since the early 1940's when Dr. Frank H. Spedding and his group of pioneers developed the ion-exchange process, a technique that separates the "fraternal fifteen" plus yttrium and scandium. As a result of this and subsequent work, high-purity oxides are available from which high-purity rare earth metals can be prepared. In most cases, the rare earth oxides are first converted to their respective fluorides and are then reduced metallothermicaly on a kilogram

190

Improved method for preparing rare earth sesquichalcogenides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method for the preparation of high purity rare earth sesquichalcogenides is described. The rare earth, as one or more pieces of the metal, is sealed under a vacuum with a stoichiometric amount of sulfur or selenium and a small amount of iodine into a quartz reaction vessel. The sealed vessel is then heated to above the vaporization temperature of the chalcogen and below the melting temperature of the rare earth metal and maintained until the product has been formed. The iodine is then vaporized off leaving a pure product. The rare earth sulfides and selenides thus formed are useful as semiconductors and as thermoelectric generators. 3 tables.

Takeshita, T.; Beaudry, B.J.; Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.

1982-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

191

Development of the Polish wasteless technology of apatite phosphogypsum utilization with recovery of rare earths  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The most promising source of rare earth elements in Poland is apatite phosphogypsum, a waste product obtained in the process of phosphoric acid production from Kola apatite. Depending on the technology used, as the hydration ratio of calcium sulphate is changed from hemihydrate to dihydrate, the content of rare earths varies from 0.6% to 0.3% Ln2O3 respectively. Technological flow charts for recovering the rare earths as a byproduct have been developed. The basic process used in the technology consists of three steps: apatite phosphogypsum leaching with dilute sulphuric acid solution; separation of rare earth concentrates from leaching sulphuric acid by preconcentration via evaporization, liquid-liquid extraction or precipitation method; anhydrite production from purified phosphogypsum by recrystallization in concentrated sulphuric acid solution.

A. Jarosi?ski; J. Kowalczyk; Cz. Mazanek

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Pt nanoparticles modified by rare earth oxides: Electronic effect and influence to catalytic hydrogenation of 3-phenoxybenzaldehyde  

SciTech Connect

Graphical abstract: - Highlights: The rare earths modified Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were prepared by colloidal deposition method. Modification of Pt by the rare earth enhanced catalytic hydrogenation activity. The activity improvement is due to electron interaction between Pt and rare earth. The hydrogenation mechanism of rare earth modified Pt catalyst was proposed. - Abstract: The rare earth elements (La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Pr, and Gd) modified Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts were prepared by the colloidal deposition and chemical reduction methods, respectively. Pt nanoparticles with average size 3 0.5 nm were uniformly dispersed on the surface of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} for the samples prepared by the colloidal deposition method, which exhibited higher activities in the hydrogenation of 3-phenoxybenzadehyde than the corresponding samples prepared by chemical reduction method. Moreover, except Gd, the catalysts modified by rare earth elements showed better catalytic performance than unmodified Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. For PtCe/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst, when the weight percent of Pt and Ce was 0.5 and 0.25, respectively, the hydrogenation conversion of 3-phenoxybenzaldehyde was 97.3% after 6 h reaction. This activity improvement is due to the electronic interaction between Pt and rare earth elements, which was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

Mou, Zhigang; Han, Ming; Li, Gang; Du, Yukou [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Yang, Ping, E-mail: pyang@suda.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Zhang, Hailu [Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou 215123 (China); Deng, Zongwu, E-mail: zwdeng2007@sinano.ac.cn [Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou 215123 (China)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

193

Quantification of the elemental incompatibility sequence, and composition of the "superchondritic" mantle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, where REE means rare earth elements) are in chondritic proportions. In deriving BSE compositions Earth is the "chondritic" model, in which the refractory elements in the bulk Earth, and the refractory lithophile elements in the bulk silicate Earth, are assumed to be in chondritic proportions. Recent discovery

Zhang, Youxue

194

Rare is frequent and frequent is costly: rare diseases as a challenge for health care systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Of 30,000 known diseases about 6,0007,000 are defined as rare diseases, also commonly known as orphan diseases [1]. Within the European Union (EU), rare diseases are specified as indications with a prevalence of...

J.-Matthias Graf von der Schulenburg

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Diversity of accessory minerals in rare-metal-rare earth pegmatites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

About 150 accessory minerals have been identified in the rare-metal-rare earth pegmatites, including 36 OH-, F- and H2 O-bearing silicates, 27 volatile-free silicates, 31 complex oxides, and 17 carbonates. Most a...

B. M. Shmakin

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

The Colorado Rare Plant Technical Committee presents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Colorado Rare Plant Technical Committee presents: 3rd Annual Rare Plant Symposium Sponsored by: Colorado Native Plant Society University of Colorado Herbarium US Fish and Wildlife Service Colorado and Eastern Colorado (Las Animas, Weld, Kit Carson, Huerfano, Pueblo, Otero, Prowers, Fremont, and El Paso

197

Ames Lab 101: Rare-Earth Recycling  

SciTech Connect

Recycling keeps paper, plastics, and even jeans out of landfills. Could recycling rare-earth magnets do the same? Perhaps, if the recycling process can be improved. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are working to more effectively remove the neodymium, a rare earth, from the mix of other materials in a magnet.

Ryan Ott

2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

198

Stark spectroscopy on rare gas atoms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stark spectroscopy on rare gas atoms PROEFSCHRIFT ter verkrijging van de graad van doctor aan de-DATA LIBRARY TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITEIT EINDHOVEN Jiang, Tao Stark spectroscopy on rare gas atoms / by Tao Jiang / gasontladingen Subject headings : plasma diagnostics / Stark effect / optogalvanic spectroscopy / atomic emission

Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

199

Chemical Properties of the Rare Gases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... of argon of about 100 atm. I have already shown by an independent method1 that radon, too, forms a hydrate which is much more stable than those of other rare ... , forms a hydrate which is much more stable than those of other rare gases. Radon is easily held by crystals of sulphur dioxide hydrates, when they are formed from ...

B. A. NIKITIN

1937-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

200

E-Print Network 3.0 - alloying element losses Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

be toxic free. To address this point... , the alloying ele- ments aluminum and rare earth seem not to be the best adding elements. Aluminum is well known... and calcium...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "us-japan rare elements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Probing QCD with Rare Charmless $B$ Decays  

SciTech Connect

Rare charmless hadronic B decays are a good testing ground for QCD. In this paper we describe a selection of new measurements made by the BABAR and BELLE collaborations.

Gradl, Wolfgang

2006-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

202

Ames Lab 101: Rare-Earth Magnets  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Senior Scientist, Bill McCallum, briefly discusses rare-earth magnets and their uses and how Ames Lab is research new ways to save money and energy using magnets.

McCallum, Bill

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

203

Nuclear Astrophysics in Rare Isotope Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear reactions in stars are difficult to measure directly in the laboratory at the small astrophysical energies. In recent years indirect methods with rare isotopes have been developed and applied to extract low-energy astrophysical cross sections.

C. A. Bertulani

2009-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

204

THE INTERACTION OF RARE GAS METASTABLE ATOMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the study of metastable atom reactions. > 1 it- Fig, laa raetastable rare gas atom, three quantities are necessaryOF iiARE GAS METASTABLF ATOMS Andrew Zun-Foh Wang M a t e r

Wang, A.Z.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Rare decays at the LHCb experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons offer a rich playground to make precise tests of the Standard Model and look for New Physics at the level of quantum corrections. A review of recent LHCb results will be presented.

Luca Pescatore

2014-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

206

Separation of rare gases and chiral molecules by selective binding in porous organic cages  

SciTech Connect

Abstract: The rare gases krypton, xenon, and radon pose both an economic opportunity and a potential environmental hazard. Xenon is used in commercial lighting, medical imaging, and anesthesia, and can sell for $5,000 per kilogram. Radon, by contrast, Is naturally radioactive and the second largest cause of lung cancer, and radioactive xenon, 133Xe, was a major pollutant released In the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster. We describe an organic cage molecule that can capture xenon and radon with unprecedented selectivity, suggesting new technologies for environmental monitoring, removal of pollutants, or the recovery of rare, valuable elements from air.

Chen, Linjiang; Reiss, Paul S.; Chong, Samantha Y.; Holden, Daniel; Jelfs, Kim E.; Hasell, Tom; Little, Marc A.; Kewley, Adam; Briggs, Michael E.; Stephenson, Andrew; Thomas, K. M.; Armstrong, Jayne A.; Bell, Jon; Busto, Jose; Noel, Raymond; Liu, Jian; Strachan, Denis M.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Cooper, Andrew I.

2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

207

Rare Earth Phosphate Glass and Glass-Ceramic Proton Conductors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

300-500C. Doping rare earth phosphate glasses with Ce, andRare Earth Phosphate Glass and Glass-Ceramic Protonconductivity of alkaline-earth doped rare earth phosphate

De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

50th Anniversary of U.S.- Japan Health Studies | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of sessions on risk estimation, noncancer end points, molecular and genetic basis of cancer, dosimetry, and studies on offspring of the atomic bomb survivors, RERF scientists...

209

Emerging concepts in biomarker discovery; The US-Japan workshop on immunological molecular markers in oncology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

133. Pages F, Berger A, Camus M, Sanchez-Cabo F, Costes A,Lagorce- Pages C, Tosolini M, Camus M, Berger A, Wind P, etrevisited. Biochimie 2007, 141. Camus M, Tosolini M, Mlecnik

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

RARE KAON DECAYS: IL BUONO, IL BRUTTO, IL CATTIVO.  

SciTech Connect

The author briefly reviews recent progress in rare kaon decays, where he takes ''rare'' to mean those with {Beta} < {Omicron}(10{sup -7}).

REDLINGER,G.

2004-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

211

Using Rare Gas Permeation to Probe Methanol Diffusion near the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rare Gas Permeation to Probe Methanol Diffusion near the Glass Transition Temperature. Using Rare Gas Permeation to Probe Methanol Diffusion near the Glass Transition Temperature....

212

Microsoft Word - Rare Earth Update for RFI 110523final  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

J. Thijssen, LLC P: 206 229 6882 J. Thijssen, LLC P: 206 229 6882 4910 163 rd Ave NE Redmond, WA 98052 e: jant@jthijssen.com Solid Oxide Fuel Cells and Critical Materials: A Review of Implications J. Thijssen, LLC Report Number: R102 06 04D1 Date: May 10, 2011 Prepared for: National Energy Technology Laboratory, In Sub-Contract to Leonardo Technologies, Inc. Contract Number: DE-FE0004002 (Subcontract: S013-JTH-PPM4002 MOD 00) 2 Summary The US DOE has identified a number of materials that are both used by clean energy technologies and are at risk of supply disruptions in the short term. Several of these materials, especially the rare earth elements (REEs) yttrium, cerium, and lanthanum were identified by DOE as critical (USDOE 2010) and are crucial to the function and performance of solid oxide

213

Method of forming magnetostrictive rods from rare earth-iron alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Rods of magnetostrictive alloys of iron with rare earth elements are formed by flowing a body of rare earth-iron alloy in a crucible enclosed in a chamber maintained under an inert gas atmosphere, forcing such molten rare-earth-iron alloy into a hollow mold tube of refractory material positioned with its lower end portion within the molten body by means of a pressure differential between the chamber and mold tube and maintaining a portion of the molten alloy in the crucible extending to a level above the lower end of the mold tube so that solid particles of higher melting impurities present in the alloy collect at the surface of the molten body and remain within the crucible as the rod is formed in the mold tube. 5 figs.

McMasters, O.D.

1986-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

214

Microsoft Word - US-EU WORKSHOP on RARE EARTHS Program 20101206  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Trans-Atlantic Workshop Trans-Atlantic Workshop on Rare Earth Elements and Other Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future Hosted by the MIT Energy Initiative Massachusetts Institute of Technology 400 Main Street, Building E19-307, Cambridge, Massachusetts December 3, 2010 Workshop Background Rare earth elements and other critical raw materials are essential to our industrial production, particularly for clean energy options like wind turbines, solar cells, electric vehicles, and energy- efficient lighting. Wind turbines are the most rapidly growing source of electricity generation in both Europe and the United States. Solar photovoltaic cells are steadily declining in cost, and their widespread, cost-effective use on power grids is anticipated within the coming decade.

215

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Magnesium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sodium Sodium Previous Element (Sodium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Aluminum) Aluminum Isotopes of the Element Magnesium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 24 78.99% STABLE 25 10.00% STABLE 26 11.01% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 19 4.0 picoseconds Double Proton Emission 100.00% 20 90.8 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission ~ 27.00% 21 122 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 32.60% Electron Capture with delayed Alpha Decay < 0.50%

216

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Chlorine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sulfur Sulfur Previous Element (Sulfur) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Argon) Argon Isotopes of the Element Chlorine [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 35 75.76% STABLE 37 24.24% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 28 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 29 < 20 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 30 < 30 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 31 150 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 0.70% 32 298 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00%

217

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Potassium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argon Argon Previous Element (Argon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Calcium) Calcium Isotopes of the Element Potassium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 39 93.2581% STABLE 40 0.0117% 1.248×10+9 years 41 6.7302% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 32 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 33 < 25 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 34 < 25 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 35 178 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 0.37% 36 342 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00%

218

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Phosphorus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Silicon Silicon Previous Element (Silicon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Sulfur) Sulfur Isotopes of the Element Phosphorus [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 31 100% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 24 No Data Available Electron Capture (suspected) No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 25 < 30 nanoseconds Proton Emission 100.00% 26 43.7 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission No Data Available 27 260 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with

219

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Francium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radon Radon Previous Element (Radon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Radium) Radium Isotopes of the Element Francium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Francium has no naturally occurring isotopes. Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 199 12 milliseconds Alpha Decay > 0.00% Electron Capture No Data Available 200 49 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 201 62 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 201m 19 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 202 0.30 seconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 202m 0.29 seconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 203 0.55 seconds Alpha Decay <= 100.00% 204 1.8 seconds Alpha Decay 92.00%

220

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Oxygen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nitrogen Nitrogen Previous Element (Nitrogen) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Fluorine) Fluorine Isotopes of the Element Oxygen [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 16 99.757% STABLE 17 0.038% STABLE 18 0.205% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 12 1.139×10-21 seconds Proton Emission No Data Available 13 8.58 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 100.00% 14 70.620 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 15 122.24 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 16 STABLE - - 17 STABLE - - 18 STABLE - - 19 26.88 seconds Beta-minus Decay 100.00%

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "us-japan rare elements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Gallium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Zinc Zinc Previous Element (Zinc) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Germanium) Germanium Isotopes of the Element Gallium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 69 60.108% STABLE 71 39.892% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 56 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 57 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 58 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 59 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 60 70 milliseconds Electron Capture 98.40%

222

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Sodium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neon Neon Previous Element (Neon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Magnesium) Magnesium Isotopes of the Element Sodium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 23 100% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 18 1.3×10-21 seconds Proton Emission 100.00% 19 < 40 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 20 447.9 milliseconds Electron Capture with delayed Alpha Decay 20.05% Electron Capture 100.00% 21 22.49 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 22 2.6027 years Electron Capture 100.00% 23 STABLE - - 24 14.997 hours Beta-minus Decay 100.00%

223

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Neon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fluorine Fluorine Previous Element (Fluorine) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Sodium) Sodium Isotopes of the Element Neon [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 20 90.48% STABLE 21 0.27% STABLE 22 9.25% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 16 9×10-21 seconds Double Proton Emission 100.00% 17 109.2 milliseconds Electron Capture with delayed Alpha Decay No Data Available Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 100.00% 18 1.6670 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 19 17.22 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 20 STABLE - -

224

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Copper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nickel Nickel Previous Element (Nickel) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Zinc) Zinc Isotopes of the Element Copper [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 63 69.15% STABLE 65 30.85% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 52 No Data Available Proton Emission No Data Available 53 < 300 nanoseconds Electron Capture No Data Available Proton Emission No Data Available 54 < 75 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 55 27 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 15.0% 56 93 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00%

225

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Boron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beryllium Beryllium Previous Element (Beryllium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Carbon) Carbon Isotopes of the Element Boron [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 10 19.9% STABLE 11 80.1% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 6 No Data Available Double Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 7 3.255×10-22 seconds Proton Emission No Data Available Alpha Decay No Data Available 8 770 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Alpha Decay 100.00% 9 8.439×10-19 seconds Proton Emission 100.00% Double Alpha Decay 100.00%

226

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Tungsten  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tantalum Tantalum Previous Element (Tantalum) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Rhenium) Rhenium Isotopes of the Element Tungsten [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 180 0.12% >= 6.6×10+17 years 182 26.50% STABLE 183 14.31% > 1.3×10+19 years 184 30.64% STABLE 186 28.43% > 2.3×10+19 years Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 157 275 milliseconds Electron Capture No Data Available 158 1.25 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 158m 0.143 milliseconds Isomeric Transition No Data Available Alpha Decay No Data Available 159 7.3 milliseconds Alpha Decay ~ 99.90%

227

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Radon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Astatine Astatine Previous Element (Astatine) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Francium) Francium Isotopes of the Element Radon [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Radon has no naturally occurring isotopes. Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 193 1.15 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 194 0.78 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 195 6 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 195m 5 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 196 4.4 milliseconds Alpha Decay 99.90% Electron Capture ~ 0.10% 197 53 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 197m 25 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 198 65 milliseconds Alpha Decay No Data Available

228

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Boron Boron Previous Element (Boron) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Nitrogen) Nitrogen Isotopes of the Element Carbon [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 12 98.93% STABLE 13 1.07% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 8 1.981×10-21 seconds Proton Emission 100.00% Alpha Decay No Data Available 9 126.5 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 61.60% Electron Capture with delayed Alpha Decay 38.40% 10 19.308 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 11 20.334 minutes Electron Capture 100.00% 12 STABLE - -

229

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Rhenium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tungsten Tungsten Previous Element (Tungsten) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Osmium) Osmium Isotopes of the Element Rhenium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 185 37.40% STABLE 187 62.60% 4.33×10+10 years Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 159 No Data Available No Data Available No Data Available 160 0.82 milliseconds Proton Emission 91.00% Alpha Decay 9.00% 161 0.44 milliseconds Proton Emission 100.00% Alpha Decay <= 1.40% 161m 14.7 milliseconds Alpha Decay 93.00% Proton Emission 7.00% 162 107 milliseconds Alpha Decay 94.00% Electron Capture 6.00%

230

Laser Spectroscopy of Short Lived Rare Earth Isotopes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ISAC facility at TRIUMF is able to produce intense beams of mass?separated radioactive isotopes of the alkali and the rare earth elements with unprecedented intensities. This will allow our laser spectroscopy collaboration to extend the studies of exotic nuclei for these elements further away from the valley of stability into regions so far inaccessible at other facilities thus allowing a more stringent test of the descriptive and predictive power of global nuclear models. Our effort which involves groups and researchers from the U.S. (TAMU) Japan (JAERI) and Canada (TRIUMF McGill and Calgary Universities) is based on collinear laser spectroscopy in a fast beam. In this method atoms or ions are excited by laser light in collinear geometry. In this way measurements of the optical isotope shift yield the nuclear charge radii and measurements of the hyperfine structure the nuclear moments. The excitation can be done by cw?lasers or alternatively by pulsed lasers without a loss in sensitivity if bunched radioactive ion beams are available. In its basic version the resonances of the spectral lines are observed optically at right angles. However the sensitivity will be increased through modifications using particle or nuclear radiation detection. The progress and the plans of our collaboration will be described.

H. A. Schuessler; F. Buchinger; H. Iimura

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Search for rare and forbidden eta ' decays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have searched for rare and forbidden decays of the eta' meson in hadronic events at the CLEO II detector. The search is conducted on 4.80 fb(-1) of e(+)e(-) collisions at 10.6 GeV center-of-mass energy at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. We...

Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Davis, Robin E. P.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan; Zhou, X.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Mikhail Avilov Facility for Rare Isotope Beams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Challenges Chemical Challenges Radiation Challenges Summary #12; World-leading heavy ion accelerator facility for rare isotope science · Nuclear Structure · Nuclear Astrophysics · Fundamental Interactions Target vacuum vessel M. Avilov, May 2014 5th HP Targetry Workshop, FNAL, Slide 4 Target Beam dump Beam

McDonald, Kirk

233

DOE Science Showcase - Rare Earth Metal Research from DOE Databases |  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Rare Earth Metal Research from DOE Databases Rare Earth Metal Research from DOE Databases Information Bridge Energy Citations Database Highlighted documents of Rare Earth Metal research in DOE databases Information Bridge - Corrosion-resistant metal surfaces DOE R&D Project Summaries - Structural and magnetic studies on heavy rare earth metals at high pressures using designer diamonds Energy Citations Database - Intermultiplet transitions in rare-earth metals DOE Green Energy - LaNi.sub.5 is-based metal hydride electrode in Ni-MH rechargeable cells Science.gov - H.R.4866 - Rare Earths Supply-Chain Technology and Resources Transformation Act of 2010 WorldWideScience.org - China produces most of the world's rare earth metals DOepatents - Recycling of rare earth metals from rare earth-transition metal alloy scrap by liquid metal extraction

234

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Nitrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Carbon Previous Element (Carbon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Oxygen) Oxygen Isotopes of the Element Nitrogen [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 14 99.636% STABLE 15 0.364% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 10 No Data Available Proton Emission 100.00% 11 5.49×10-22 seconds Proton Emission 100.00% 12 11.000 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% 13 9.965 minutes Electron Capture 100.00% 14 STABLE - - 15 STABLE - - 16 7.13 seconds Beta-minus Decay 100.00% Beta-minus Decay with delayed Alpha Decay 1.2×10-3 % 17 4.173 seconds Beta-minus Decay 100.00%

235

Using rare earth elements to constrain particulate organic carbon flux in marginal seas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Fluxes of particulate organic carbon (POC) in the East China Sea (ECS) have been reported to decrease from the inner continental shelf towards the outer (more)

Chen, Ya-Feng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

The rare earth element distribution over Europe: geogenic and anthropogenic sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...increased risk of liver and bone cancer. REE toxicity has been investigated...such as seawater tends to be depleted in Ce on REE plots. The FOREGS...very similar to that of high uranium values described by Plant et...G., The distribution of uranium over Europe: geological and...

L. Fedele; J.A. Plant; B. De Vivo; A. Lima

237

Stark broadening data for spectral lines of rare-earth elements: Nb III  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electron-impact widths for 15 doubly charged Nb ion lines have been theoretically determined by using the modified semiempirical method. Using the obtained results, we considered the influence of the electron-impact mechanism on line shapes in spectra of chemically peculiar stars and white dwarfs.

Simi?, Zoran; Popovi?, Luka ?

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

R-Process Freezeout, Nuclear Deformation, and the Rare-Earth Element Peak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use network calculations of r-process nucleosynthesis to explore the origin of the peak in the solar r-process abundance distribution near nuclear mass number A = 160. The peak is due to a subtle interplay of nuclear deformation and beta decay, and forms not in the steady phase of the r-process, but only just prior to freezeout, as the free neutrons rapidly disappear. Its existence should therefore help constrain the conditions under which the r-process occurs and freezes out.

R. Surman; J. Engel; J. R. Bennett; B. S. Meyer

1997-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

239

Rare K decays: Challenges and Perspectives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At this stage of the LHC program, the prospect for a new physics signal in the very rare K ---> pi nu nu bar decays may be dented, but remains well alive thanks to their intrinsic qualities. First, these decays are among the cleanest observables in the quark flavor sector. When combined with their terrible suppression in the Standard Model, they thus offer uniquely sensitive probes. Second, the LHC capabilities are not ideal for all kinds of new physics, even below the TeV scale. For example, rather elusive scenarios like natural-SUSY-like hierarchical spectrum, baryon number violation, or new very light but very weakly interacting particles may well induce deviations in rare K decays. Even though experimentalists should brace themselves for tiny deviations, these modes thus have a clear role to play in the LHC era.

Christopher Smith

2014-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

240

Concerning the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

James Symons, Nuclear Science Division Director at Lawrence Berkeley Lab, and Daniela Leitner, head of operations at Berkeley Lab's 88-Inch Cyclotron, discuss major contributions to the new Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) at Michigan State University, including ion source, which will based on the VENUS source built for the 88-Inch Cyclotron, and the GRETA gamma-ray detector now under construction there.

Symons, James

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "us-japan rare elements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Automation of organic elemental analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Automation of organic elemental analysis ... Describes the development and design of an apparatus for automated organic elemental analysis. ...

Velmer B. Fish

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Josephson junction element  

SciTech Connect

A sandwich-type josephson junction element wherein a counter electrode is made of a mo-re alloy which contains 10-90 atomic-% of re. The josephson junction element has a high operating temperature, and any deterioration thereof attributed to a thermal cycle is not noted.

Kawabe, U.; Tarutani, Y.; Yamada, H.

1982-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

243

Proceedings of transuranium elements  

SciTech Connect

The identification of the first synthetic elements was established by chemical evidence. Conclusive proof of the synthesis of the first artificial element, technetium, was published in 1937 by Perrier and Segre. An essential aspect of their achievement was the prediction of the chemical properties of element 43, which had been missing from the periodic table and which was expected to have properties similar to those of manganese and rhenium. The discovery of other artificial elements, astatine and francium, was facilitated in 1939-1940 by the prediction of their chemical properties. A little more than 50 years ago, in the spring of 1940, Edwin McMillan and Philip Abelson synthesized element 93, neptunium, and confirmed its uniqueness by chemical means. On August 30, 1940, Glenn Seaborg, Arthur Wahl, and the late Joseph Kennedy began their neutron irradiations of uranium nitrate hexahydrate. A few months later they synthesized element 94, later named plutonium, by observing the alpha particles emitted from uranium oxide targets that had been bombarded with deuterons. Shortly thereafter they proved that is was the second transuranium element by establishing its unique oxidation-reduction behavior. The symposium honored the scientists and engineers whose vision and dedication led to the discovery of the transuranium elements and to the understanding of the influence of 5f electrons on their electronic structure and bonding. This volume represents a record of papers presented at the symposium.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Spomenka Kobe, Jozef Stefan Institut, Rare Earth Magnets in Europe...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Spomenka Kobe, Jozef Stefan Institut, Rare Earth Magnets in Europe Spomenka Kobe, Jozef Stefan Institut, Rare Earth Magnets in Europe SessionB4Kobe-JosefStefanInstitut.pdf...

245

The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 3  

SciTech Connect

Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 3 of 4.

Riedemann, Trevor

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 2  

SciTech Connect

Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 2 of 4.

Riedemann, Trevor

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 1  

SciTech Connect

Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 1 of 4.

Riedemann, Trevor

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 4  

SciTech Connect

Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 4 of 4.

Riedemann, Trevor

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 3  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 3 of 4.

Riedemann, Trevor

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 1  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 1 of 4.

Riedemann, Trevor

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Recovery of Trace Rare Earths from High-Level Fe3+ and Al3+ Waste of Oil Shale Ash (Fe?Al?OSA)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resources Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 5625 Renmin Street, Changchun 130022, P.R. China, and Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039, P.R. ... Rare earth elements are finding increasing use in various industries as catalysts for petroleum cracking, metallurgy, glass and ceramics, electronics, chemicals, magnets, and nuclear industries, and in the manufacture of various types of phosphors, lamps, mantles, and many others. ... (14) Considering this situation, all governments have strengthened the regulation of import and export of rare earth products and especially emphasized safety and environmental issues of chemical engineering in recent years. ...

Hualing Yang; Wei Wang; Dongli Zhang; Yuefeng Deng; Hongming Cui; Ji Chen; Deqian Li

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

252

Scintillation of rare earth doped fluoride nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect

The scintillation response of rare earth (RE) doped core/undoped (multi-)shell fluoride nanoparticles was investigated under x-ray and alpha particle irradiation. A significant enhancement of the scintillation response was observed with increasing shells due: (i) to the passivation of surface quenching defects together with the activation of the REs on the surface of the core nanoparticle after the growth of a shell, and (ii) to the increase of the volume of the nanoparticles. These results are expected to reflect a general aspect of the scintillation process in nanoparticles, and to impact radiation sensing technologies that make use of nanoparticles.

Jacobsohn, L. G.; McPherson, C. L.; Sprinkle, K. B.; Ballato, J. [Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies (COMSET), and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Yukihara, E. G. [Physics Department, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078-3072 (United States); DeVol, T. A. [Department of Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634-0905 (United States)

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

253

Rare b hadron decays at the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the completion of Run~I of the CERN Large Hadron Collider, particle physics has entered a new era. The production of unprecedented numbers of heavy-flavoured hadrons in high energy proton-proton collisions allows detailed studies of flavour-changing processes. The increasingly precise measurements allow to probe the Standard Model with a new level of accuracy. Rare $b$ hadron decays provide some of the most promising approaches for such tests, since there are several observables which can be cleanly interpreted from a theoretical viewpoint. In this article, the status and prospects in this field are reviewed, with a focus on precision measurements and null tests.

Blake, T; Hiller, G

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Final Report "Structure of Rare Isotopes"  

SciTech Connect

The Junior Investigator grant 'Structure of Rare Isotopes' (DE-FG02-07ER41529) supported research in low-energy nuclear theory from September 1, 2007 to August 31, 2010. It was the main goal of the proposed research to develop and optimize an occupation-number-based energy functional for the computation of nuclear masses, and this aim has been reached. Furthermore, progress was made in linking two and three-body forces from low-momentum interactions to pairing properties in nuclear density functionals, and in the description of deformed nuclei within an effective theory.

Papenbrock, Thomas

2012-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

255

Thematic Questions about Chemical Elements Nature of the chemical elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Be Atomic No. 1 2 3 4 Isotopes 1,2,3 3,4 6,7 9,10 Name Boron Carbon Nitrogen Oxygen Symbol B C N O Atomic No Environment Element Synthesis: Exploration of Chemical Fundamentals Element Synthesis and Isotopes · Elemental Abundance and Isotopes · distribution of elements in the universe · factors that define elemental

Polly, David

256

Rare-Earth-Free Traction Motor: Rare Earth-Free Traction Motor for Electric Vehicle Applications  

SciTech Connect

REACT Project: Baldor will develop a new type of traction motor with the potential to efficiently power future generations of EVs. Unlike todays large, bulky EV motors which use expensive, imported rare-earth-based magnets, Baldors motor could be light, compact, contain no rare earth materials, and have the potential to deliver more torque at a substantially lower cost. Key innovations in this project include the use of a unique motor design, incorporation of an improved cooling system, and the development of advanced materials manufacturing techniques. These innovations could significantly reduce the cost of an electric motor.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Coming up with platinum substitutes may be elemental  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coming up with platinum substitutes may be elemental Coming up with platinum substitutes may be elemental Community Connections: Our link to Northern New Mexico Communities Latest Issue:Dec. 2013 - Jan. 2014 All Issues » submit Coming up with platinum substitutes may be elemental Lab researchers are working with an abundant element to take their place: cobalt. February 1, 2013 dummy image Read our archives. Contacts Editor Linda Anderman Email Community Programs Office Kurt Steinhaus Email Initial findings by a Los Alamos team indicate that if a cobalt atom is captured within a complex molecule, it can mimic the reactivity of platinum group metals. Platinum and some related precious metals (palladium, iridium, rhodium and ruthenium) are frequently used as chemical catalysts and for countless laboratory processes. As rare metals, they are also expensive. To ensure

258

Element 103, Lawrencium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... formed on February 14 by bombarding 3 (Jigm. of californium (element 98) with boron-10 or boron-11 nuclei in a heavy-ion linear accelerator at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory ...

1961-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

259

High-pressure studies of rare earth material could lead to lighter, cheaper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

22013_earth 22013_earth 12/20/2013 A Lawrence Livermore researcher prepares a sample at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Spallation Neutrons and Pressure Diffractometer (SNAP). High-pressure studies of rare earth material could lead to lighter, cheaper magnets Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov Sometimes you have to apply a little pressure to get magnetic materials to reveal their secrets. By placing a permanent magnet under high pressures, Lawrence Livermore researchers are exploring how atomic structure enhances magnetic strength and resistance to demagnetization. This fundamental research into magnetic behavior has important implications for engineering stronger, cheaper magnets. Permanent magnets based on rare earth elements are in high demand for

260

Synthesis of metastable rare-earth-iron mixed oxide with the hexagonal crystal structure  

SciTech Connect

Rare-earth-iron mixed oxides with the rare earth/iron ratio=1 have either orthorhombic (o-REFeO{sub 3}) or hexagonal (h-REFeO{sub 3}) structure. h-REFeO{sub 3} is a metastable phase and the synthesis of h-REFeO{sub 3} is usually difficult. In this work, the crystallization process of the precursors obtained by co-precipitation and Pechini methods was investigated in detail to synthesize h-REFeO{sub 3}. It was found that the crystallization from amorphous to hexagonal phase and the phase transition from hexagonal to orthorhombic phase occurred at a similar temperature range for rare earth elements with small ionic radii (Er-Lu, Y). For both co-precipitation and Pechini methods, single-phase h-REFeO{sub 3} was obtained by shortening the heating time during calcination process. The hexagonal-to-orthorhombic phase transition took place by a nucleation growth mechanism and vermicular morphology of the thus-formed orthorhombic phase was observed. The hexagonal YbFeO{sub 3} had higher catalytic activity for C{sub 3}H{sub 8} combustion than orthorhombic YbFeO{sub 3}. - Graphical abstract: Although the synthesis of metastable hexagonal REFeO{sub 3} by the conventional method is difficult, we found that this phase is obtained by shortening the heating time of the precursor prepared by co-precipitation method. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis of metastable REFeO{sub 3} with hexagonal structure by the co-precipitation method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hexagonal REFeO{sub 3} is obtained for the rare earth elements with small ionic radii. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hexagonal-to-orthorhombic transformation of REFeO{sub 3}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Catalytic activity of hexagonal REFeO{sub 3} for C{sub 3}H{sub 8} combustion.

Nishimura, Tatsuya [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Hosokawa, Saburo, E-mail: hosokawa@scl.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Masuda, Yuichi; Wada, Kenji; Inoue, Masashi [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "us-japan rare elements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Searches for very rare decays of kaons  

SciTech Connect

The physics motivation for searches for very rare kaon decays, either forbidden or suppressed within the Standard Model, is briefly discussed. Simple arguments conclude that such searches probe possible new forces at a 200 TeV mass scale or constitute a precision test of the electroweak model. The examples of such process are decays of K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {mu} {sup {+-}}e{sup -+}, K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +} {mu}{sup +} e{sup -}, K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +} {mu}{sup -}, and K{sup +} {yields} {pi} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}. We present the current experimental status and describe the new efforts to reach sensitivities down to one part in 10{sup 12}. The discussion is focused on the experimental program at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory, where intense beams make such studies possible.

Lang, K. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Sandia National Laboratories: CSP: ELEMENTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CSP: ELEMENTS Sandia Researchers Win CSP:ELEMENTS Funding Award On June 4, 2014, in Advanced Materials Laboratory, Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Energy Storage, Facilities,...

263

Effect of agricultural use of phosphogypsum on trace elements in soils and vegetation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The problem of the disposal of phosphogypsum, one of the main industrial wastes of phosphorus fertilizer production, is reviewed, from the point of view of element pollution of phosphate raw materials, when it is introduced to soil. When phosphogypsum from different phosphorus producing plants in the USSR is used in agriculture, the main element-pollutants are fluorine, sulphur, strontium and rare earth elements. Their concentration in soils and vegetation exceeds Clark values by 20100 times. The necessity for complex biogeochemical investigations to identify the hazards from these chemical elements in the environment is discussed.

A.V. Gorbunov; M.V. Frontasyeva; S.F. Gundorina; T.L. Onischenko; B.B. Maksjuta; Chen Sen Pal

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Elemental sulfur recovery process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO[sub 2] in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst. 4 figures.

Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Zhicheng Hu.

1993-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

265

Jefferson Lab Laser Twinkles in Rare Color | Jefferson Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser Twinkles in Rare Color NEWPORT NEWS, VA, Dec. 21 - December is a time for twinkling lights, and scientists at the Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator...

266

Classical spin model of the relaxation dynamics of rare-earth doped permalloy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, the ultrafast dynamic behavior of rare-earth doped permalloy is investigated using an atomistic spin model with Langevin dynamics. In line with experimental work, the effective Gilbert damping is calculated from transverse relaxation simulations, which shows that rare-earth doping causes an increase in the damping. Analytic theory suggests that this increase in damping would lead to a decrease in the demagnetization time. However, longitudinal relaxation calculations show an increase with doping concentration instead. The simulations are in a good agreement with previous experimental work of Radu et al. [Radu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 117201 (2009)]. The longitudinal relaxation time of the magnetization is shown to be driven by the interaction between the transition metal and the laser-excited conduction electrons, whereas the effective damping is predominantly determined by the slower interaction between the rare-earth elements and the phonon heat bath. We conclude that for complex materials, it is evidently important not to expect a single damping parameter but to consider the energy transfer channel relevant to the technique and time scale of the measurement.

M. O. A. Ellis; T. A. Ostler; R. W. Chantrell

2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

267

Novel rare earth boron-rich solids  

SciTech Connect

A new series of boron-rich solids ReB{sub 22}C{sub 2}N (Re: Y, Ho, Er, Tm, Lu) was synthesized by traditional solid-state reaction. The crystal structure of the representative compound YB{sub 22}C{sub 2}N was solved by direct method from powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) data and transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis. The unit cell of the new structure is rhombohedral with space group R-3m (No. 166), lattice constant a = b = 5.623(0) {angstrom} and c = 44.785(3) {angstrom} with six formula units in one unit cell. The atoms of boron in the solids, like most of the boron-rich solids, exist with icosahedral and octahedral clusters, and the whole crystal shows a layered structure. The interconnected nine layers of icosahedron and three layers of octahedron in a unit cell build the whole framework of the new phase and rare earth metal atoms reside in voids of the octahedron layers. The neighboring icosahedral layers link through C-B-C chains besides the direct bonding of B-B. Both experimental and structural analysis indicated that the nitrogen atoms in the new phase can be replaced with carbon.

Zhang, Fuxiang; Leithe-Jasper, Andreas; Xu, Jun; Mori, Takao; Matsui, Yoshio, Tanaka, Takaho; Okada, Shigeru

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

HIGH-INCLINATION ATENS ARE INDEED RARE  

SciTech Connect

A recent publication by the Near-Earth Object (NEOWISE) team (Mainzer et al.) using data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer compared the spacecraft's detected near-Earth asteroid subpopulation orbital element distributions to those expected from the Bottke et al. NEO orbital model. They found a discrepency between the detected and expected Aten inclination distribution. We show that the more recent NEO orbital distribution model by Greenstreet et al., when biased using the NEOWISE detection biases, gives a better match to the NEOWISE detections for the Aten (a < 1.0 AU, Q > 0.983 AU) population in semimajor axis (a), eccentricity (e), and inclination (i) than the Bottke et al. model. A Kolmogorov-Smirnov test gives the probability of drawing the NEOWISE detections from the biased Bottke et al. model as not rejectable (at >99% confidence) for the Aten semimajor axis distribution, but is rejectable at such a high level of confidence for the Aten eccentricity and inclination distributions. For all three orbital element distributions, the biased Greenstreet et al. model provides an acceptable match to the NEOWISE Aten detections. The deficiency in the previous model is likely due to the numerical integration's accuracy having broken down in the high-speed regime for planetary encounters near the Sun, an effect which the newer model does not suffer, and thus likely is the model of preference for perihelia q < 1.0 AU.

Greenstreet, S.; Gladman, B., E-mail: sarahg@phas.ubc.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

269

Element Crossword Puzzles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Crossword Puzzles Crossword Puzzles Welcome to It's Elemental - Element Crossword Puzzles! Use the clues provided to solve each crossword puzzle. To place letters on the puzzle, first select the clue you are answering from the pull-down menu and then enter your answer in the text box. Press the 'return' key on your keyboard when you are done. Correct letters will be green while incorrect letters will be red. Good luck and have fun! If you are reading this, your browser is NOT running JavaScript. JavaScript MUST be enabled for this section of our site to work. Once you have turned JavaScript on, reload this page and this warning will go away. Puzzle 1 - It's a Gas! Puzzle 2 - Easy Symbols Puzzle 3 - Strange Symbols Puzzle 4 - Known to the Ancients Puzzle 5 - The Alkali Metals

270

Allele age and a test for selection on rare alleles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Charlesworth and P. H. Harvey Allele age and a test for selection on rare alleles Montgomery...recombination, leads to a statistical test of whether a rare allele has experienced natural selection. The test is based on finding whether there is too...

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Kinetic roughening during rare-gas homoepitaxy E. Nabighian,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kinetic roughening during rare-gas homoepitaxy E. Nabighian,1 M. C. Bartelt,2 and X. D. Zhu1,* 1 roughening, which accounts for deviations from layer- by-layer growth, is generally very sensitive substrates; see e.g., Ref. 3. A quantitative assessment of the way in which rare-gas multilayer films roughen

Zhu, Xiangdong

272

FARVAT: a family-based rare variant association test  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......family-based rare variant association test Sungkyoung Choi 1 Sungyoung Lee 1 Sven...FAmily-based Rare Variant Association Test (FARVAT). FARVAT is based on the quasi-likelihood...working matrix, our method could be a burden test or a variance component test, and could......

Sungkyoung Choi; Sungyoung Lee; Sven Cichon; Markus M. Nthen; Christoph Lange; Taesung Park; Sungho Won

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

DOE Announces RFI on Rare Earth Metals | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RFI on Rare Earth Metals RFI on Rare Earth Metals DOE Announces RFI on Rare Earth Metals May 6, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - The Department of Energy has released a Request for Information (RFI) soliciting information on rare earth metals and other materials used in the energy sector. The request is specifically focused on rare earth metals (e.g., lanthanum, cerium and neodymium) and several other metals including lithium and cobalt, but respondents are welcome to identify other materials of interest. These materials are important to the development and deployment of a variety of clean energy technologies, such as wind turbines, hybrid vehicles, solar panels and energy efficient light bulbs. In a March 17 speech, Assistant Secretary of Energy for Policy & International Affairs David Sandalow announced that DOE is developing its

274

DOE Announces RFI on Rare Earth Metals | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RFI on Rare Earth Metals RFI on Rare Earth Metals DOE Announces RFI on Rare Earth Metals May 6, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - The Department of Energy has released a Request for Information (RFI) soliciting information on rare earth metals and other materials used in the energy sector. The request is specifically focused on rare earth metals (e.g., lanthanum, cerium and neodymium) and several other metals including lithium and cobalt, but respondents are welcome to identify other materials of interest. These materials are important to the development and deployment of a variety of clean energy technologies, such as wind turbines, hybrid vehicles, solar panels and energy efficient light bulbs. In a March 17 speech, Assistant Secretary of Energy for Policy & International Affairs David Sandalow announced that DOE is developing its

275

Pyrometallurgical processes for recovery of actinide elements  

SciTech Connect

A metallic fuel alloy, nominally U-20-Pu-lOZr, is the key element of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle. Metallic fuel permits the use of an innovative, simple pyrometallurgical process, known as pyroprocessing, (the subject of this report), which features fused salt electrorefining of the spent fuel. Electrorefining separates the actinide elements from fission products, without producing a separate stream of plutonium. The plutonium-bearing product is contaminated with higher actinides and with a minor amount of rare earth fission products, making it diversion resistant while still suitable as a fuel material in the fast spectrum of the IFR core. The engineering-scale demonstration of this process will be conducted in the refurbished EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility, which has entered the start-up phase. An additional pyrometallurgical process is under development for extracting transuranic (TRU) elements from Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent fuel in a form suitable for use as a feed to the IFR fuel cycle. Four candidate extraction processes have been investigated and shown to be chemically feasible. The main steps in each process are oxide reduction with calcium or lithium, regeneration of the reductant and recycle of the salt, and separation of the TRU product from the bulk uranium. Two processes, referred to as the lithium and salt transport (calcium reductant) processes, have been selected for engineering-scale demonstration, which is expected to start in late 1993. An integral part of pyroprocessing development is the treatment and packaging of high-level waste materials arising from the operations, along with the qualification of these waste forms for disposal in a geologic repository.

Battles, J.E.; Laidler, J.J.; McPheeters, C.C.; Miller, W.E.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Plutonium and Other Transuranium Elements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Glenn T. Seaborg has assisted at the birth of three of the four new transuranium elements. ... GLENN T. SEABORG ...

GLENN T. SEABORG

1947-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

277

Synthesis of reversible sequential elements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To construct a reversible sequential circuit, reversible sequential elements are required. This work presents novel designs of reversible sequential elements such as the D latch, JK latch, and T latch. Based on these reversible latches, we construct ... Keywords: Reversible logic, sequential circuits, sequential elements

Min-Lun Chuang; Chun-Yao Wang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Chemical characterization of element 112  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... directly comparing the adsorption characteristics of 283112 to that of mercury and the noble gas radon, we find that element 112 is very volatile and, unlike ... , we find that element 112 is very volatile and, unlike radon, reveals a metallic interaction with the gold surface. These adsorption characteristics establish element 112 ...

R. Eichler; N. V. Aksenov; A. V. Belozerov; G. A. Bozhikov; V. I. Chepigin; S. N. Dmitriev; R. Dressler; H. W. Gggeler; V. A. Gorshkov; F. Haenssler; M. G. Itkis; A. Laube; V. Ya. Lebedev; O. N. Malyshev; Yu. Ts. Oganessian; O. V. Petrushkin; D. Piguet; P. Rasmussen; S. V. Shishkin; A. V. Shutov; A. I. Svirikhin; E. E. Tereshatov; G. K. Vostokin; M. Wegrzecki; A. V. Yeremin

2007-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

279

The CEBAF Element Database  

SciTech Connect

With the inauguration of the CEBAF Element Database (CED) in Fall 2010, Jefferson Lab computer scientists have taken a step toward the eventual goal of a model-driven accelerator. Once fully populated, the database will be the primary repository of information used for everything from generating lattice decks to booting control computers to building controls screens. A requirement influencing the CED design is that it provide access to not only present, but also future and past configurations of the accelerator. To accomplish this, an introspective database schema was designed that allows new elements, types, and properties to be defined on-the-fly with no changes to table structure. Used in conjunction with Oracle Workspace Manager, it allows users to query data from any time in the database history with the same tools used to query the present configuration. Users can also check-out workspaces to use as staging areas for upcoming machine configurations. All Access to the CED is through a well-documented Application Programming Interface (API) that is translated automatically from original C++ source code into native libraries for scripting languages such as perl, php, and TCL making access to the CED easy and ubiquitous.

Theodore Larrieu, Christopher Slominski, Michele Joyce

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Cerium-Based Magnets: Novel High Energy Permanent Magnet Without Critical Elements  

SciTech Connect

REACT Project: Ames Laboratory will develop a new class of permanent magnets based on the more commonly available element cerium for use in both EVs and renewable power generators. Cerium is 4 times more abundant and significantly less expensive than the rare earth element neodymium, which is frequently used in todays most powerful magnets. Ames Laboratory will combine other metal elements with cerium to create a new magnet that can remain stable at the high temperatures typically found in electric motors. This new magnetic material will ultimately be demonstrated in a prototype electric motor, representing a cost-effective and efficient alternative to neodymium-based motors.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "us-japan rare elements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

2009 US-Japan Workshop on Advanced Simulation Methods in Plasma Physics Simulation Studies on Collisionless Driven Reconnection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-consistently and simultaneously. Here, PIC and MHD algorithms are used to solve microscopic and macroscopic physics, respectively diagram of the multi-hierarchy model. Micro-Hierarchy is the domain near the neutral sheet (PIC domain) and macro-hierarchy is the outside of micro-hierarchy far away from the neutral sheet (MHD domain

Ito, Atsushi

282

2009 US-Japan Workshop on Advanced Simulation Methods in Plasma Physics Advanced Target Design for Fast Ignition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292, Japan Fast ignition is an attractive scheme in laser fusion [1]. In Fast Ignition, at first high- density fuel core plasma is assembled by implosion laser, and then, just target for Fast Ignition is a shell fitted with a reentrant gold cone to make a pass for heating laser

Ito, Atsushi

283

Department of Energy Hosts First Steering Committee Meeting on U.S.- Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy, Dennis R. Spurgeon, today hosted Director-General of Japan's Agency of Natural Resources and Energy, Harufumi...

284

Time-dependent Integrated Modeling of Burning Plasmas TTF and US-Japan Workshop on Energetic Particle Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PRINCETON PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY PPPL 1 #12;Why traditional predictions of burning plasmas are inadequate PRINCETON PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY PPPL 2 #12;Why Time-Dependent Self-Consistent Integrated Modeling of plasma conditions and current drive PRINCETON PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY PPPL 3 #12;Goals of this Talk

Budny, Robert

285

Definition: Element | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Element Element Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Element Any electrical device with terminals that may be connected to other electrical devices such as a generator, transformer, circuit breaker, bus section, or transmission line. An element may be comprised of one or more components.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Electrical elements are conceptual abstractions representing idealized electrical components, such as resistors, capacitors, and inductors, used in the analysis of electrical networks. Any electrical network can be analysed as multiple, interconnected electrical elements in a schematic diagram or circuit diagram, each of which affects the voltage in the network or current through the network. These ideal electrical elements represent real, physical electrical or electronic components but

286

Photoconductive circuit element reflectometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photoconductive reflectometer for characterizing semiconductor devices at millimeter wavelength frequencies where a first photoconductive circuit element (PCE) is biased by a direct current voltage source and produces short electrical pulses when excited into conductance by short first laser light pulses. The electrical pulses are electronically conditioned to improve the frequency related amplitude characteristics of the pulses which thereafter propagate along a transmission line to a device under test. Second PCEs are connected along the transmission line to sample the signals on the transmission line when excited into conductance by short second laser light pulses, spaced apart in time a determinable period from the first laser light pulses. Electronic filters connected to each of the second PCEs act as low-pass filters and remove parasitic interference from the sampled signals and output the sampled signals in the form of slowed-motion images of the signals on the transmission line. 4 figs.

Rauscher, C.

1987-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

287

Photoconductive circuit element reflectometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photoconductive reflectometer for characterizing semiconductor devices at millimeter wavelength frequencies where a first photoconductive circuit element (PCE) is biased by a direct current voltage source and produces short electrical pulses when excited into conductance by short first laser light pulses. The electrical pulses are electronically conditioned to improve the frequency related amplitude characteristics of the pulses which thereafter propagate along a transmission line to a device under test. Second PCEs are connected along the transmission line to sample the signals on the transmission line when excited into conductance by short second laser light pulses, spaced apart in time a variable period from the first laser light pulses. Electronic filters connected to each of the second PCEs act as low-pass filters and remove parasitic interference from the sampled signals and output the sampled signals in the form of slowed-motion images of the signals on the transmission line.

Rauscher, Christen (Alexandria, VA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Fact Sheet: Facility For Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) Applicant Selection |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility For Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) Applicant Facility For Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) Applicant Selection Fact Sheet: Facility For Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) Applicant Selection December 11, 2008 - 8:51am Addthis Based on the analyses and recommendations over the last decade, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science determined that the establishment of a Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) is a high priority for the future of U.S. nuclear science research. This determination and supporting rationale are reflected in the DOE/ National Science Foundation Nuclear Science Advisory Committee's 2007 Long Range Plan and the 2003 DOE report, "Facilities for the Future of Science: A Twenty-Year Outlook." A Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) was used to solicit applications for the conceptual design and establishment of FRIB in order

289

Engineering of microorganisms towards recovery of rare metal ions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The bioadsorption of metal ions using microorganisms is an attractive technology for the recovery of rare metal ions as well as removal of toxic heavy metal ions from aqueous solution. In initial attempts, microo...

Kouichi Kuroda; Mitsuyoshi Ueda

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

COLLOQUIUM: Facility for Rare Isotope Beams - Scientific Opportunities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2015, 4:00pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Facility for Rare Isotope Beams - Scientific Opportunities and Technical Challenges Dr. Georg Bollen Michigan State...

291

MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF DEPARTMENTAL ELEMENTS FROM: IN GRID^,,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2,2011 2,2011 MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF DEPARTMENTAL ELEMENTS FROM: IN GRID^,, DIRECT SUBJECT: Working Effectively with Contractors The Department of Energy (DOE) depends on contractors to provide vital support in achieving our mission. Their contributions are critical t o accomplishing our goals in such important areas as energy research and development, weapons production, stockpile management, and environmental remediation and restoration. Although contractors are integral to our mission accomplishment, we must respect the roles we each have in contract performance. DOE defines deliverables and the contractors determine how to best perform the work. With rare exception, DOE officials should not direct contractors' selection or termination of employees. Giving

292

E-Print Network 3.0 - astronomy-related rare books Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

astronomy-related rare books Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: astronomy-related rare books Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Rare Books...

293

U.S. Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table 11-10-2014 page...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table 11-10-2014 page 1 Disclaimer: This U.S. Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table contains a sample of the rare- earth-magnet patents issued by the U.S....

294

Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Deevi, Seetharama C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Fleischhauer, Grier S. (Midlothian, VA); Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Richmond, VA); Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton (Chesterfield, VA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Deevi, Seetharama C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Fleischhauer, Grier S. (Midlothian, VA); Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Richmond, VA); Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton (Chesterfield, VA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Resistive hydrogen sensing element  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems and methods are described for providing a hydrogen sensing element with a more robust exposed metallization by application of a discontinuous or porous overlay to hold the metallization firmly on the substrate. An apparatus includes: a substantially inert, electrically-insulating substrate; a first Pd containing metallization deposited upon the substrate and completely covered by a substantially hydrogen-impermeable layer so as to form a reference resistor on the substrate; a second Pd containing metallization deposited upon the substrate and at least a partially accessible to a gas to be tested, so as to form a hydrogen-sensing resistor; a protective structure disposed upon at least a portion of the second Pd containing metallization and at least a portion of the substrate to improve the attachment of the second Pd containing metallization to the substrate while allowing the gas to contact said the second Pd containing metallization; and a resistance bridge circuit coupled to both the first and second Pd containing metallizations. The circuit determines the difference in electrical resistance between the first and second Pd containing metallizations. The hydrogen concentration in the gas may be determined. The systems and methods provide advantages because adhesion is improved without adversely effecting measurement speed or sensitivity.

Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

The impact of trade costs on rare earth exports : a stochastic frontier estimation approach.  

SciTech Connect

The study develops a novel stochastic frontier modeling approach to the gravity equation for rare earth element (REE) trade between China and its trading partners between 2001 and 2009. The novelty lies in differentiating betweenbehind the border' trade costs by China and theimplicit beyond the border costs' of China's trading partners. Results indicate that the significance level of the independent variables change dramatically over the time period. While geographical distance matters for trade flows in both periods, the effect of income on trade flows is significantly attenuated, possibly capturing the negative effects of financial crises in the developed world. Second, the total export losses due tobehind the border' trade costs almost tripled over the time period. Finally, looking atimplicit beyond the border' trade costs, results show China gaining in some markets, although it is likely that some countries are substituting away from Chinese REE exports.

Sanyal, Prabuddha; Brady, Patrick Vane; Vugrin, Eric D.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Fact Sheet: Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) Applicant Selection |  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Fact Sheet: Fact Sheet: Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) Applicant Selection News Featured Articles Science Headlines 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Presentations & Testimony News Archives Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 12.11.08 Fact Sheet: Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) Applicant Selection Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Based on the analyses and recommendations over the last decade, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science determined that the establishment of a Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) is a high priority for the future of U.S. nuclear science research. This determination and supporting rationale are reflected in the DOE/ National

299

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- International Rare Metals Refinery Inc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Rare Metals Refinery Rare Metals Refinery Inc - NY 38 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: International Rare Metals Refinery, Inc. (NY.38 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Canadian Radium and Uranium Corporation NY.38-1 Location: 69 Kisko Avenue , Mt. Kisko , New York NY.38-1 NY.38-3 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.38-4 Site Operations: Manufactured and distributed radium and polonium products. NY.38-5 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - Site was a commercial operation not under the jurisdiction of DOE predecessor agencies NY.38-2 NY.38-4 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radium, Plutonium NY.38-5 Radiological Survey(s): Yes NY.38-1 NY.38-5 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP

300

High efficiency rare-earth emitter for thermophotovoltaic applications  

SciTech Connect

In this work, we propose a rare-earth-based ceramic thermal emitter design that can boost thermophotovoltaic (TPV) efficiencies significantly without cold-side filters at a temperature of 1573?K (1300?C). The proposed emitter enhances a naturally occurring rare earth transition using quality-factor matching, with a quarter-wave stack as a highly reflective back mirror, while suppressing parasitic losses via exponential chirping of a multilayer reflector transmitting only at short wavelengths. This allows the emissivity to approach the blackbody limit for wavelengths overlapping with the absorption peak of the rare-earth material, while effectively reducing the losses associated with undesirable long-wavelength emission. We obtain TPV efficiencies of 34% using this layered design, which only requires modest index contrast, making it particularly amenable to fabrication via a wide variety of techniques, including sputtering, spin-coating, and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

Sakr, E. S.; Zhou, Z.; Bermel, P., E-mail: pbermel@purdue.edu [Birck Nanotechnology Center, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, 1205 W. State St., West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "us-japan rare elements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner.

Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Rare earth-transition metal scrap treatment method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Rare earth-transition metal (e.g. iron) scrap (e.g. Nd-Fe-B scrap) is melted to reduce the levels of tramp oxygen and nitrogen impurities therein. The tramp impurities are reduced in the melt by virtue of the reaction of the tramp impurities and the rare earth to form dross on the melt. The purified melt is separated from the dross for reuse. The oxygen and nitrogen of the melt are reduced to levels acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. 3 figs.

Schmidt, F.A.; Peterson, D.T.; Wheelock, J.T.; Jones, L.L.; Lincoln, L.P.

1992-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

303

Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner. 1 fig.

Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

1994-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

304

Terminological aspects of data elements  

SciTech Connect

The creation and display of data comprise a process that involves a sequence of steps requiring both semantic and systems analysis. An essential early step in this process is the choice, definition, and naming of data element concepts and is followed by the specification of other needed data element concept attributes. The attributes and the values of data element concept remain associated with them from their birth as a concept to a generic data element that serves as a template for final application. Terminology is, therefore, centrally important to the entire data creation process. Smooth mapping from natural language to a database is a critical aspect of database, and consequently, it requires terminology standardization from the outset of database work. In this paper the semantic aspects of data elements are analyzed and discussed. Seven kinds of data element concept information are considered and those that require terminological development and standardization are identified. The four terminological components of a data element are the hierarchical type of a concept, functional dependencies, schematas showing conceptual structures, and definition statements. These constitute the conventional role of terminology in database design. 12 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

Strehlow, R.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)) [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kenworthey, W.H. Jr. (Department of Defense, Washington, DC (United States)) [Department of Defense, Washington, DC (United States); Schuldt, R.E. (Martin Marietta Aerospace, Denver, CO (United States)) [Martin Marietta Aerospace, Denver, CO (United States)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Iron Isotope and Rare Earth Element Patterns of the Neoproterozoic Fulu Formation, South China: Implications for Late Proterozoic Ocean Chemistry.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Neoproterozoic Era, from around 1000 to 570 million years ago, witnessed the widespread deposition of Iron Formations (IFs) in close association with global glaciations. (more)

Goldbaum, Elizabeth

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Coherent storage of microwave excitations in rare-earth nuclear spins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interfacing between various elements of a computer - from memory to processors to long range communication - will be as critical for quantum computers as it is for classical computers today. Paramagnetic rare earth doped crystals, such as Nd$^{3+}$:Y$_2$SiO$_5$ (YSO), are excellent candidates for such a quantum interface: they are known to exhibit long optical coherence lifetimes (for communication via optical photons), possess a nuclear spin (memory) and have in addition an electron spin that can offer hybrid coupling with superconducting qubits (processing). Here we study two of these three elements, demonstrating coherent storage and retrieval between electron and $^{145}$Nd nuclear spin states in Nd$^{3+}$:YSO. We find nuclear spin coherence times can reach 9 ms at $\\approx 5$ K, about two orders of magnitude longer than the electron spin coherence, while quantum state and process tomography of the storage/retrieval operation reveal an average state fidelity of 0.86. The times and fidelities are expected to further improve at lower temperatures and with more homogeneous radio-frequency excitation.

Gary Wolfowicz; Hannes Maier-Flaig; Robert Marino; Alban Ferrier; Herv Vezin; John J. L. Morton; Philippe Goldner

2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

307

Dynamic Effective-Field Scheme for Rare-Earth Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We demonstrate the importance of including the dynamical exchange-interaction term in the Hamiltonian of a rare-earth system. The probability distribution of the dynamic exchange field is derived in the molecular field approximation. The result is exemplified for the zero-field magnetization and crystal field spectroscopy of NdSb.

Albert Furrer and Heinz Heer

1973-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

308

Rare Isotope Beams for the 21st Century  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

In a scientific keynote address on Friday, June 12 at Michigan State University (MSU) in East Lansing, James Symons, Director of Berkeley Labs Nuclear Science Division (NSD), discussed the exciting research prospects of the new Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) to be built at MSUs National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory.

James Symons

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

309

Molecular Photodynamics in Rare Gas Solids V. A. Apkarian*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular Photodynamics in Rare Gas Solids V. A. Apkarian* Department of Chemistry, University Processes 1490 III. Sample Preparation and Morphology 1492 IV. Photon-Induced Dissociation 1493 V. Perfect I. Introduction A molecular level understanding of dynamics in condensed media is one of the current

Apkarian, V. Ara

310

Cathode-Luminescence of Rare Earths in Coal Ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Samples of a number of Indian coals (from Darjeeling, Assam, Raniganj, Jharia and Hyderabad) were incinerated in thin layers ... in an electric furnace at 400 C. The presence of rare earths in the ashes so obtained could not be detected by arc spectrographic analysis with a current of 10 ...

BIBHUTI MUKHERJEE

1949-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

311

Status of Rare Kaon Decay Experiments at BNL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Status of Rare Kaon Decay Experiments at BNL Toshio Numao TRIUMF June 9, at CAP2003 K #12;s d z;#12;#12;Improvements RS chamber Z resolution Energy resolution 2002 1998 #12;#12;L0- Previous search: 5.9 ? 10-7 KOPIO is waiting for us. #12;

312

HYDROLOGY AND GEOMORPHOLOGY OF A RARE FLOOD, BLACKBURN FORK,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-prediction. � Discharge measurements based on boulder size appear to give more reasonable estimates of flood dischargeHYDROLOGY AND GEOMORPHOLOGY OF A RARE FLOOD, BLACKBURN FORK, PUTNAM-JACKSON COUNTIES 18 AUGUST 2010) #12;Source: NOAA 17-18 Aug 2010 #12;#12;FLOOD DAMAGE #12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;4 bridges

Hart, Evan

313

Derivation of an optical potential for statically deformed rare-earth nuclei from a global spherical potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The coupled-channel theory is a natural way of treating nonelastic channels, in particular those arising from collective excitations characterized by nuclear deformations. A proper treatment of such excitations is often essential to the accurate description of experimental nuclear-reaction data and to the prediction of a wide variety of scattering observables. Stimulated by recent work substantiating the near validity of the adiabatic approximation in coupled-channel calculations for scattering on statically deformed nuclei, we explore the possibility of generalizing a global spherical optical model potential (OMP) to make it usable in coupled-channel calculations on this class of nuclei. To do this, we have deformed the Koning-Delaroche global spherical potential for neutrons, coupling a sufficient number of states of the ground state band to ensure convergence. We present an extensive study of the effects of collective couplings and nuclear deformations on integrated cross sections as well as on angular distributions for neutron-induced reactions on statically deformed nuclei in the rare-earth region. We choose isotopes of three rare-earth elements (Gd, Ho, W), which are known to be nearly perfect rotors, to exemplify the results of the proposed method. Predictions from our model for total, elastic and inelastic cross sections, as well as for elastic and inelastic angular distributions, are in reasonable agreement with measured experimental data. These results suggest that the deformed Koning-Delaroche potential provides a useful regional neutron optical potential for the statically deformed rare earth nuclei.

G. P. A. Nobre; A. Palumbo; F. S. Dietrich; M. Herman; D. Brown; S. Hoblit

2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

314

Elemental ABAREX -- a user's manual.  

SciTech Connect

ELEMENTAL ABAREX is an extended version of the spherical optical-statistical model code ABAREX, designed for the interpretation of neutron interactions with elemental targets consisting of up to ten isotopes. The contributions from each of the isotopes of the element are explicitly dealt with, and combined for comparison with the elemental observables. Calculations and statistical fitting of experimental data are considered. The code is written in FORTRAN-77 and arranged for use on the IBM-compatible personal computer (PC), but it should operate effectively on a number of other systems, particularly VAX/VMS and IBM work stations. Effort is taken to make the code user friendly. With this document a reasonably skilled individual should become fluent with the use of the code in a brief period of time.

Smith, A.B.

1999-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

315

The Platinum-Group Elements:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...higher Pt emissions have been measured for diesel catalysts (Moldovan et al. 2002...1031-1036 Johnson Matthey (2007) Market Data Tables. Online information www...platinum-group elements released from gasoline and diesel engine catalytic converters. Science...

Sebastien Rauch; Gregory M. Morrison

316

Canonical elements for collision orbits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I derive a set of canonical elements that are useful for collision orbits (perihelion distance approaching zero at fixed semimajor axis). The coordinates are the mean anomaly and the two spherical polar angles at aphelion.

Scott Tremaine

2000-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

317

Environmental research on actinide elements  

SciTech Connect

The papers synthesize the results of research sponsored by DOE's Office of Health and Environmental Research on the behavior of transuranic and actinide elements in the environment. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the 21 individual papers. (ACR)

Pinder, J.E. III; Alberts, J.J.; McLeod, K.W.; Schreckhise, R.G. (eds.)

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

linear-elements-code.scm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(o Linear-finite-element-operator)) ;; initialize various fields that depend on the space ;; if coefficients is not defined, we set it to arrays of floating-point ;; zeros...

319

American Elements | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Elements Place: Los Angeles, California Zip: 90024 Product: US-based manufacturer and supplier of PV feedstocks such as silicon, CIS, CIGS-based and Gallium-based materials....

320

Influence of mechanoactivation on rare earths leaching from phosphogypsum  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of mechanoactivation on the overall solubility of CaSO4 2H2O and of phosphogypsum in water and in diluted acids (10% HCl, 7% H2SO4) as well as on the leaching of rare earths from phosphogypsum have been studied. The mechanoactivation is performed in a centrifugal ball mill in air and in suspension with the acids mentioned above. Part of the experimental results are qualitatively explained considering the partial dehydration of the CaSO4 2H2O during the activation in air as well as considering the crystal structure disrupted by mechanoactivation. A dissolved fraction, considerably enriched in rare earths (compared to the initial phosphogypsum) is obtained as a result of H2SO4 treatment of the samples activated in water solution.

D. Todorovsky; A. Terziev; M. Milanova

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "us-japan rare elements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Magnetic Symmetry of Rare-Earth Orthochromites and Orthoferrites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new magnetic symmetry of the rare-earth orthochromites and orthoferrites (RMO3) below the second Nel temperature due to the reordering of the rare-earth spins is proposed. It is shown that the magnetic symmetry group is lowered to the subgroup of index two, thereby keeping the unit cell invariant. The proposed symmetry is shown to be consistent with the previously observed spin configuration of RMO3 such as GdCrO3, DyFeO3, and DyCrO3, and would also be consistent with those of other RMO3. Although symmetry arguments and the calculation of the free energy show that two spin configurations are stable, in GdCrO3, a future measurement of the magnetoelectric tensor would determine which configuration GdCrO3 has. It is further predicted that the magnetoelectric effect should be observed in any RMO3 below the second Nel temperature.

Tsuyoshi Yamaguchi and Kunir Tsushima

1973-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Non-dipole effects in photoelectron angular distributions for rare gas atoms  

SciTech Connect

The authors present a theoretical study of O(ka) and O(k{sup 2}a{sup 2}) corrections to the dipole approximation in photoionization of rare gas atoms, where k is the magnitude of the photon wave vector and a is the radius of the ionized subshell. In the dipole approximation, the photoelectron angular distribution is characterized by the single parameter {Beta}. The O(ka) corrections are characterized by two parameters {gamma} and {delta}, and the O(k{sup 2}a{sup 2}) corrections are characterized by three parameters {lambda}, {mu}, and {nu}, constrained by the relation {lambda} + {mu} + {nu} = 0 and a correction {Delta}{Beta} to the dipole parameter {Beta}. Formulas are given for the non-dipole parameters in terms of reduced matrix elements of electric and magnetic multipole operators. Tables and graphs of the seven angular distribution parameters, calculated in the relativistic independent-particle approximation (IPA), are given for electron energies ranging from 20 to 5,000 eV for all 41 subshells of the rare gas atoms He,NE,Ar,Kr, and Xe. Tables and graphs of the O(ka) parameters are also given in the energy range 2--60 eV for the n = 3 and 4 shells of Kr, and for the n = 4 and 5 shells of Xe, where interesting non-dipole effects are found. Comparisons of the IPA calculations with correlated relativistic random-phase approximation calculations are made for selected subshells of Ar and Kr, illustrating the influence of correlation on the non-dipole parameters.

Derevianko, A.; Johnson, W.R.; Cheng, K.T.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

A few new (?) facts about infinite elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Keywords: Helmholtz equation; Infinite element; hp finite elements; Echo Area. 1. .... g : ? ouinc on . ?2.1?. The Sommerfeld radiation condition represents a...

2006-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

324

Element Labs Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inc. Place: Santa Clara, California Zip: 95054 Product: Element Labs is a developer of LED video technology for entertainment, architectural, and signage. References: Element...

325

New physics in CP asymmetries and rare B decays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We review and update the effects of physics beyond the standard model on CP asymmetries in B decays. These asymmetries can be significantly altered if there are important new-physics contributions to Bq0-Bq0 mixing. This same new physics will, therefore, also contribute to rare, flavor-changing B decays. Through a study of such decays, we show that it is possible to partially distinguish the different models of new physics.

Michael Gronau and David London

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Physics and Outlook for Rare, All-neutral Eta Decays  

SciTech Connect

The $\\eta$ meson provides a laboratory to study isospin violation and search for new flavor-conserving sources of C and CP violation with a sensitivity approaching $10^{-6}$ of the isospin-conserving strong amplitude. Some of the most interesting rare $\\eta$ decays are the neutral modes, yet the effective loss of photons from the relatively common decay $\\eta \\rightarrow 3\\pi^0 \\rightarrow 6\\gamma$ (33$\\%$) has largely limited the sensitivity for decays producing 3-5$\\gamma$'s. Particularly important relevant branches include the highly suppressed $\\eta \\rightarrow \\pi^0 2\\gamma \\rightarrow 4\\gamma$, which provides a rare window on testing models of $O(p^6)$ contributions in ChPTh, and $\\eta \\rightarrow 3\\gamma$ and $\\eta \\rightarrow 2\\pi^0 \\gamma \\rightarrow 5\\gamma$ which provide direct constraints on C violation in flavor-conserving processes. The substitution of lead tungstate in the forward calorimeter of the GluEx setup in Jefferson Lab's new Hall D would allow dramatically improved measurements. The main niche of this facility, which we call the JLab Eta Factory (JEF), would be $\\eta$ decay neutral modes. However, this could likely be expanded to rare $\\eta'(958)$ decays for low energy QCD studies as well as $\\eta$ decays involving muons for new physics searches.

Mack, David J. [JLAB

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Crystal Fields in Dilute Rare-Earth Metals Obtained from Magnetization Measurements on Dilute Rare-Earth Alloys  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Crystal field parameters of Tb, Dy, and Er in Sc, Y, and Lu are summarized. These parameters are obtained from magnetization measurements on dilute single crystals, and successfully checked by a number of different methods. The crystal field parameters vary unpredictably with the rare-earth solute. B40, B60, and B66 are similar in Y and Lu. Crystal field parameters for the pure metals Tb, Dy, and Er are estimated from the crystal fields in Y and Lu.

P. Touborg and J. Hg

1974-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

328

COLLISIONS OF HALOGEN (2P) AND RARE GAS (1S) ATOMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

involving 2p excited states of alkali atoms, with groundstate rare gas atoms (RG), though other systems have been2p ) AND RARE GAS (IS) ATOMS Christopher Hank Becker (Ph. D.

Becker, Christopher Hank

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Superheavy Elements - Achievements and Challenges  

SciTech Connect

The search for superheavy elements (SHE) has yielded exciting results for both the 'cold fusion' approach with reactions employing Pb and Bi targets and the ''hot fusion'' reactions with {sup 48}Ca beams on actinide targets. The most recent activities at GSI were the successful production of a more neutron rich isotope of element 112 in the reaction {sup 48}Ca+{sup 238}U confirming earlier result from FLNR, and the attempt to synthesize an isotope with Z 120 in the reaction {sup 64}Ni+{sup 238}U. Apart from the synthesis of new elements, advanced nuclear structure studies for heavy and super heavy elements promise a detailed insight in the properties of nuclear matter under the extreme conditions of high Z and A. The means are evaporation residue(ER)-{alpha}-{alpha} and -{alpha}-{gamma} coincidence techniques applied after separation of the reaction products from the beam. Recent examples of interesting physics to be discovered in this region of the chart of nuclides are the investigation of K-isomers observed for {sup 252,254}No and indicated for {sup 270}Ds. Fast chemistry and precision mass measurements deliver in addition valuable information on the fundamental properties of the SHE.

Ackermann, Dieter [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

2009-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

330

Single element laser beam shaper  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A single lens laser beam shaper for converting laser beams from any spatial profile to a flat-top or uniform spatial profile. The laser beam shaper includes a lens having two aspheric surfaces. The beam shaper significantly simplifies the overall structure in comparison with conventional 2-element systems and therefore provides great ease in alignment and reduction of cost.

Zhang, Shukui (Yorktown, VA); Michelle D. Shinn (Newport News, VA)

2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

331

Eric Heinicke Energy Elements LLC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and East CTA Snapshots; Cost Effective Energy Saving Measures And Supplemental Issues Benchmarking and FineEric Heinicke Energy Elements LLC 702-683-5067 eric@energyelements.net NW CTA, Burkholder MS Tuning High Performance HYBRID GX Systems Cary Smith Sound Geothermal Corporation 801-942-6100 dcsmith

332

The Transuranium Elements - Present Status: Nobel Lecture  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

The discovery of the transuranium elements and the work done on them up to the present time are reviewed. The properties of these elements, their relationship to other elements, their place in the periodic table, and the possibility of production and identification of other transuranium elements are discussed briefly.

Seaborg, G. T.

1951-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

333

Crystal Fields and the Effective-Point-Charge Model in the Rare-Earth Pnictides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Neutron scattering and specific-heat studies of the crystal fields in the rare-earth monophosphides are reported. It is found that the fourth-order crystal-field parameters for the phosphides and for other rare-earth pnictides fall on a universal curve which is close to that predicted by an effective-point-charge model for the light rare earths but deviates markedly for the heavy rare earths.

R. J. Birgeneau; E. Bucher; J. P. Maita; L. Passell; K. C. Turberfield

1973-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

334

Property:GRR/Elements | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:GRR/Elements Jump to: navigation, search Property Name GRR/Elements Property Type Page Description List of elements included in this section. The value of this property is derived automatically by the portion of the element template that controls the content displayed when elements are embedded in sections. Pages using the property "GRR/Elements" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) G GRR/Elements/ + GRR/Elements/1a.21 to 1a.22 - Proposed Land Use Plan (New Plan) or Final Environmental Impact Statement (Revision) + GRR/Elements/12-FD-a.10 - Written Concurrence with the "No Effect" and/or "No Likely Adverse Effects" Determination + GRR/Elements/12-FD-a.10 - Written Concurrence with the "No Effect" and/or "No Likely Adverse Effects" Determination +

335

As China's Rare Earth R&D Becomes Ever More Rarefied, Others Tremble  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...production and slap export tariffs on some rare...paper last month, China's Ministry of Industry...idea of prohibiting export of three scarcer rare earths...company in London. China has a natural monopoly...complex hydrocarbons in petroleum refining. Military...which forced China to import processed rare earths...

Richard Stone

2009-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

336

Lattice stability of aluminum-rare earth binary systems: A first-principles approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The thermodynamics of over 330 compounds in 15 Al-RE (RE=rare earth elements) binary systems is studied via first-principles density-functional theory at low-temperature limit. The calculated phase stabilities at T=0K are in very good agreement with experimentally reported ones for the majority of the systems. For example, we show the Al2RE.cF24 structure is the most stable compound phase in each binary and it indeed has the highest (congruent) melting point in each system. In some other cases, we obtain results previously unknown experimentally. For example, we suggest that the structure of the observed compound AlTm2 is isostructural with Co2Si.oP12 (prototype Co2Si, Pearson symbol oP12), we confirm the stability of AlEu.oP20 rather than AlEu.oP18 by examining the energetics of vacancy substitution, and we predict the unreported Al-Pm phase diagram. Relative accuracy of different potentials and calculational details are addressed. This study predicts that the Al-RE phase diagrams evolve systematically across the entire RE series, interrupted by anomalies at elements Ce and especially Eu and Yb. Trends in lattice stability across the RE series are explained on the basis of interatomic bonding and strain. This study demonstrates that first-principles calculations can be employed to (1) further examine and improve the experimentally established binary-alloy phase diagrams, and (2) provide accurate enthalpy data for stable and hypothetical compounds and structures.

Michael C. Gao; Anthony D. Rollett; Michael Widom

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

337

Theory of Rayleigh waves on paramagnetic rare-earth systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present calculations of the velocity changes of Rayleigh waves in cubic, paramagnetic rare-earth systems due to magnetoelastic interactions. These interactions describe the coupling of the strain and rotational part of the deformation tensor to the incomplete 4f shell. They can be influenced by applying a magnetic field. An equation is obtained which generalizes that of Stoneley for cubic systems without magnetoelastic interactions. Special attention is paid to effects resulting from the rotational interactions. The theory is applied to CeAl2 for which experiments are available.

Robert Camley and Peter Fulde

1981-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

338

Search for New Physics in Rare Top Decays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Top physics provides a fertile ground for new-physics searches. At present, most top observables appear to be in good agreement with the respective Standard Model predictions. However, in the case of decay modes that are suppressed in the Standard Model, new-physics contributions of comparable magnitude may exist and yet go unnoticed because their impact on the total decay width is small. Hence it is interesting to probe rare top decays. This analysis focuses on the decay $t \\to b \\bar b c$. Useful observables are identified and prospects for measuring new-physics parameters are examined.

Pratishruti Saha

2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

339

Summary of the CKM 2014 working group on rare decays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rare flavour changing neutral current decays of strange, charm and beauty hadrons have been instrumental in building up a picture of flavour in the Standard Model. Increasingly precise measurements of these decays allow to search for deviations from predictions of the Standard Model that would be associated to contributions from new particles that might arise in extensions of the Standard Model. In this summary, an overview of recent experimental results and theoretical predictions is given. The new physics sensitivity and prospects for the different observables is also addressed.

Blake, Thomas; Straub, David M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Summary of the CKM 2014 working group on rare decays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rare flavour changing neutral current decays of strange, charm and beauty hadrons have been instrumental in building up a picture of flavour in the Standard Model. Increasingly precise measurements of these decays allow to search for deviations from predictions of the Standard Model that would be associated to contributions from new particles that might arise in extensions of the Standard Model. In this summary, an overview of recent experimental results and theoretical predictions is given. The new physics sensitivity and prospects for the different observables is also addressed.

Thomas Blake; Akimasa Ishikawa; David M. Straub

2015-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

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341

Multicanonical sampling of rare events in random matrices  

SciTech Connect

A method based on multicanonical Monte Carlo is applied to the calculation of large deviations in the largest eigenvalue of random matrices. The method is successfully tested with the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble, sparse random matrices, and matrices whose components are subject to uniform density. Specifically, the probability that all eigenvalues of a matrix are negative is estimated in these cases down to the values of {approx}10{sup -200}, a region where simple random sampling is ineffective. The method can be applied to any ensemble of matrices and used for sampling rare events characterized by any statistics.

Saito, Nen; Iba, Yukito; Hukushima, Koji [Graduate School of Science and Cybermedia Center, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Institute of Statistical Mathematics, 10-3 Midorimachi, Tachikawa, Tokyo 190-8562 (Japan); Department of Basic Science, University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

Subcell Structure and Two Different Superstructures of the Rare Earth Metal Silicide Carbides Y  

SciTech Connect

The title compounds crystallize with a very pronounced subcell structure that has been determined from single-crystal X-ray diffractometer data of all four compounds. Only subcell (and no superstructure) reflections have been observed for Pr{sub 3}Si{sub 2}C{sub 2}: space group Cmmm, a=396.7(1) pm, b=1645.2(3) pm, c=439.9(1) pm, R=0.019 for 309 structure factors and 20 variable parameters. In this subcell structure there are C{sub 2} pairs with split atomic positions. This structure may be considered the thermodynamically stable forms of these compounds at high temperatures. Two different superstructures with doubled a or c axes, respectively, of the subcell have been observed, where the C{sub 2} pairs have different orientations. In the structure of Tb{sub 3}Si{sub 2}C{sub 2} the a axis of the subcell is doubled. The resulting superstructure in the standard setting has the space group Pbcm: a=423.6(1) pm, b=770.7(1) pm, c=1570.2(3) pm, R=0.031 f or 1437 structure factors and 22 variable parameters. Dy{sub 3}Si{sub 2}C{sub 2} has the same superstructure: a=420.3(1) pm, b=767.5(1) pm, c=1561.1(3) pm, R=0.045, 801 F values, 22 variables. In the structure of Y{sub 3}Si{sub 2}C{sub 2} the c axis of the subcell is doubled, resulting in a body-centered space group with the standard setting Imma: a=842.6(2) pm, b=1563.4(2) pm, c=384.6(1) pm, R=0.035, 681 F values, 15 variables. In all of these structures the rare earth atoms form two-dimensionally infinite sheets of edge-sharing octahedra that contain the C{sub 2} pairs. In between these sheets there are zig-zag chains of silicon atoms with Si-Si distances varying between 246.2(3) and 253.6(3) pm, somewhat longer than the two-electron bonds of 235 pm in elemental silicon, suggesting a bond order of 0.5 for the Si-Si bonds. The C-C distances in the C{sub 2} pairs vary between 127(1) and 131(1) pm, corresponding to a bond order of approximately 2. 5. Hence, using oxidation numbers, the compounds may to a first approximation be represented by the formula (R{sup +3}){sub 3}(Si{sup {minus}3}){sub 2}(C{sub 2}){sup {minus}3}. A more detailed analysis of the interatomic distances showed that the shortest R-R distances are comparable with the R-R distances in the structures of the rare earth elements, thus indicating some R-R bonding. Therefore, the oxidation numbers of the rare earth atoms are slightly lower than +3, in agreement with the metallic conductivity of these compounds. As a consequence, considering the relatively short Si-Si bonds, the absolute value of the oxidation number of the silicon atoms may be lower than 3, resulting in a Si-Si bond order somewhat higher than 0.5.

Jeitschko, Wolfgang; Gerdes, Martin H.; Witte, Anne M.; Rodewald, Ute Ch.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Melted Murataite Ceramics Containing Simulated Actinide/Rare Earth Fraction of High Level Waste  

SciTech Connect

Murataite-based ceramics with three different chemical compositions containing simulated actinide/rare earth (RE) fraction of HLW were produced in a resistive furnace at a temperature of 1500 deg. C and two of them - in a cold crucible energized from a 5.28 MHz/10 kW high frequency generator. All the samples prepared in resistive furnace were composed of major murataite and minor perovskite, crichtonite, zirconolite, and pyrophanite/ilmenite. The samples produced in the cold crucible were composed of murataite, perovskite, crichtonite, and rutile. Higher content of perovskite and crichtonite in the cold crucible melted ceramic than in the ceramic with the same chemical composition but melted in resistive furnace may be due to higher temperature in the cold crucible (up to 1600-1650 deg. C) at which some fraction of murataite was subjected to decomposition yielding additional amount of perovskite and crichtonite. Method of melting may effect on elemental partitioning in the murataite-containing ceramics because light (Ce-group) REs enter preferably perovskite phase whereas Nd, Sm, and heavy (Y-group) REs are accommodated in the murataite polytypes. Thus, perovskite and murataite are major host phases for the Ce- and Y-group REs, respectively, whereas tetravalent actinides (U) enter murataite only.

Stefanovsky, S.V.; Ptashkin, A.G.; Knyazev, O.A.; Zen'kovskaya, M.S.; Stefanovsky, O.I. [State Unitary Enterprise SIA Radon, Moscow (Russian Federation); Yudintsev, S.V.; Nikonov, B.S.; Lapina, M.I. [Institute of Geology of Ore Deposits, Petrography, Mineralogy and Geochemistry of the Russian, Academy of Sciences (IGEM RAS), Moscow (Russian Federation)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Carbide/nitride grain refined rare earth-iron-boron permanent magnet and method of making  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of making a permanent magnet is disclosed wherein (1) a melt is formed having a base alloy composition comprising RE, Fe and/or Co, and B (where RE is one or more rare earth elements) and (2) TR (where TR is a transition metal selected from at least one of Ti, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, W, and Al) and at least one of C and N are provided in the base alloy composition melt in substantially stoichiometric amounts to form a thermodynamically stable compound (e.g. TR carbide, nitride or carbonitride). The melt is rapidly solidified in a manner to form particulates having a substantially amorphous (metallic glass) structure and a dispersion of primary TRC, TRN and/or TRC/N precipitates. The amorphous particulates are heated above the crystallization temperature of the base alloy composition to nucleate and grow a hard magnetic phase to an optimum grain size and to form secondary TRC, TRN and/or TRC/N precipitates dispersed at grain boundaries. The crystallized particulates are consolidated at an elevated temperature to form a shape. During elevated temperature consolidation, the primary and secondary precipitates act to pin the grain boundaries and minimize deleterious grain growth that is harmful to magnetic properties. 33 figs.

McCallum, R.W.; Branagan, D.J.

1996-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

345

Element Labs | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Element Labs Element Labs Address 3350 Scott Blvd Place Santa Clara, California Zip 95054 Sector Efficiency Product LED Producer Website http://www.elementlabs.com/ Coordinates 37.380364°, -121.9823779° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.380364,"lon":-121.9823779,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

346

Element Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Power Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Element Power Name Element Power Address 421 SW Sixth Avenue, Suite 1000 Place Portland, Oregon Zip 97204 Sector Wind energy Product uility-scale solar and wind projects Website http://www.elpower.com/ Coordinates 45.520812°, -122.67791° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.520812,"lon":-122.67791,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

347

Composite oxygen ion transport element  

SciTech Connect

A composite oxygen ion transport element that has a layered structure formed by a dense layer to transport oxygen ions and electrons and a porous support layer to provide mechanical support. The dense layer can be formed of a mixture of a mixed conductor, an ionic conductor, and a metal. The porous support layer can be fabricated from an oxide dispersion strengthened metal, a metal-reinforced intermetallic alloy, a boron-doped Mo.sub.5Si.sub.3-based intermetallic alloy or combinations thereof. The support layer can be provided with a network of non-interconnected pores and each of said pores communicates between opposite surfaces of said support layer. Such a support layer can be advantageously employed to reduce diffusion resistance in any type of element, including those using a different material makeup than that outlined above.

Chen, Jack C. (Getzville, NY); Besecker, Charles J. (Batavia, IL); Chen, Hancun (Williamsville, NY); Robinson, Earil T. (Mentor, OH)

2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

348

Self supporting heat transfer element  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides an improved internal heat exchange element arranged so as to traverse the inside diameter of a container vessel such that it makes good mechanical contact with the interior wall of that vessel. The mechanical element is fabricated from a material having a coefficient of thermal conductivity above about 0.8 W cm.sup.-1.degree. K.sup.-1 and is designed to function as a simple spring member when that member has been cooled to reduce its diameter to just below that of a cylindrical container or vessel into which it is placed and then allowed to warm to room temperature. A particularly important application of this invention is directed to a providing a simple compartmented storage container for accommodating a hydrogen absorbing alloy.

Story, Grosvenor Cook (Livermore, CA); Baldonado, Ray Orico (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

The Origin of the Elements  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The world around us is made of atoms. Did you ever wonder where these atoms came from? How was the gold in our jewelry, the carbon in our bodies, and the iron in our cars made? In this lecture, we will trace the origin of a gold atom from the Big Bang to the present day, and beyond. You will learn how the elements were forged in the nuclear furnaces inside stars, and how, when they die, these massive stars spread the elements into space. You will learn about the origin of the building blocks of matter in the Big Bang, and we will speculate on the future of the atoms around us today.

Murphy, Edward

2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

350

Photoconductive circuit element pulse generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pulse generator for characterizing semiconductor devices at millimeter wavelength frequencies where a photoconductive circuit element (PCE) is biased by a direct current voltage source and produces short electrical pulses when excited into conductance by short laser light pulses. The electrical pulses are electronically conditioned to improve the frequency related amplitude characteristics of the pulses which thereafter propagate along a transmission line to a device under test.

Rauscher, Christen (Alexandria, VA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Neutrino induced light element synthesis  

SciTech Connect

As the core of a massive star collapses to form a neutron star, the flux of neutrinos in the overlying shells of heavy elements becomes so great that, despite the small cross section, substantial nuclear transmutation is induced. Neutrinos, especially the higher energy {mu}- and {tau}-neutrinos, excite heavy elements and even helium to particle unbound levels. The evaporation of a single neutron or proton, and the back reaction of these nucleons on other species present, significantly alters the outcome of traditional nucleosynthesis calculations leading to a new process: {nu}-nucleosynthesis. The process was first studied by Domogatsky et al. and Woosley. Recent work by Epstein, Colgate, and Haxton and Woosley and Haxton suggested that a large number of elements could owe their existence in nature to {nu}-induced reactions in supernovae. A parametrized study of this process including shock wave propagation was carried out by Woosley et al. for selected zones of a 20 M{sub {circle dot}} star. Here we give preliminary results for a 25 M{sub {circle dot}} star, including all {nu}-reactions in all stellar zones.

Hartmann, D.H.; Mathews, G.; Weaver, T.A. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Haxton, W.C. (Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (USA). Dept. of Physics); Woosley, S.E. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA) California Univ., Santa Cruz, CA (USA). Board of Studies in Astronomy and Astrophysics)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

ARM facility captures rare tornado data [EVS News]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM facility captures rare tornado data ARM facility captures rare tornado data June 13, 2013 Every spring, tornadoes thunder across five states, from Kansas to Texas, and alerts are common. However, by Monday, May 20, it was clear that this time the alert had a different urgency to it. The turn of events leading up to the EF-5 tornado that wreaked havoc in Moore, Oklahoma, provided a unique opportunity for scientists to sample the environment preceding a severe weather event. Read more about how EVS scientist, Donna Holdridge, supported the ARM program in the full article. Raw data from the additional radiosonde launches preceding the severe weather events of May 20 in Oklahoma. The blue line identifies the temperature, which decreases with increasing altitude. The red line is the dew point, the temperature at which the air is 100% saturated with its water vapor content. Where the dew point approaches the actual temperature, the air is nearing 100% relative humidity near the ground-ideal conditions for tornado events.

353

Ab Initio Nuclear Structure and Reaction Calculations for Rare Isotopes  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a novel ab initio symmetry-adapted no-core shell model (SA-NCSM), which has opened the intermediate-mass region for ab initio investigations, thereby providing an opportunity for first-principle symmetry-guided applications to nuclear structure and reactions for nuclear isotopes from the lightest p-shell systems to intermediate-mass nuclei. This includes short-lived proton-rich nuclei on the path of X-ray burst nucleosynthesis and rare neutron-rich isotopes to be produced by the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). We have provided ab initio descriptions of high accuracy for low-lying (including collectivity-driven) states of isotopes of Li, He, Be, C, O, Ne, Mg, Al, and Si, and studied related strong- and weak-interaction driven reactions that are important, in astrophysics, for further understanding stellar evolution, X-ray bursts and triggering of s, p, and rp processes, and in applied physics, for electron and neutrino-nucleus scattering experiments as well as for fusion ignition at the National Ignition Facility (NIF).

Draayer, Jerry P [Louisiana State University

2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

354

Recent hybrid origin of three rare chinese turtles  

SciTech Connect

Three rare geoemydid turtles described from Chinese tradespecimens in the early 1990s, Ocadia glyphistoma, O. philippeni, andSacalia pseudocellata, are suspected to be hybrids because they are knownonly from their original descriptions and because they have morphologiesintermediate between other, better-known species. We cloned the allelesof a bi-parentally inherited nuclear intron from samples of these threespecies. The two aligned parental alleles of O. glyphistoma, O.philippeni, and S. pseudocellata have 5-11.5 times more heterozygouspositions than do 13 other geoemydid species. Phylogenetic analysis showsthat the two alleles from each turtle are strongly paraphyletic, butcorrectly match sequences of other species that were hypothesized frommorphology to be their parental species. We conclude that these rareturtles represent recent hybrids rather than valid species. Specifically,"O. glyphistoma" is a hybrid of Mauremys sinensis and M. cf. annamensis,"O. philippeni" is a hybrid of M. sinensis and Cuora trifasciata, and "S.pseudocellata" is a hybrid of C. trifasciata and S. quadriocellata.Conservation resources are better directed toward finding and protectingpopulations of other rare Southeast Asian turtles that do representdistinct evolutionary lineages.

Stuart, Bryan L.; Parham, James F.

2006-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

355

Grant Helps Make U.S. Rare Earth Magnets More Common | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grant Helps Make U.S. Rare Earth Magnets More Common Grant Helps Make U.S. Rare Earth Magnets More Common Grant Helps Make U.S. Rare Earth Magnets More Common August 6, 2010 - 12:12pm Addthis With sintered rare earth magnets a $4 billion worldwide market, the U.S. could be a bigger producer of these magnets - which are not actually rare - and are used in hybrid vehicle motors and wind turbine generators. | Illustration Courtesy of of Electron Energy Corporation | With sintered rare earth magnets a $4 billion worldwide market, the U.S. could be a bigger producer of these magnets - which are not actually rare - and are used in hybrid vehicle motors and wind turbine generators. | Illustration Courtesy of of Electron Energy Corporation | Kevin Craft Electron Energy Corporation is one of a kind. According to Peter Dent, vice president of business development for the

356

Critical Materials and Rare Futures: Ames Laboratory Signs a New Agreement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Critical Materials and Rare Futures: Ames Laboratory Signs a New Critical Materials and Rare Futures: Ames Laboratory Signs a New Agreement on Rare-Earth Research Critical Materials and Rare Futures: Ames Laboratory Signs a New Agreement on Rare-Earth Research June 15, 2011 - 7:07pm Addthis The plasma torch in the Retech plasma furnace is one tool used in Materials Preparation Center to create ultra-high purity metal alloy samples, particularly rare-earth metals, located at the Ames Lab. | Photo Courtesy of the Ames Lab Flickr The plasma torch in the Retech plasma furnace is one tool used in Materials Preparation Center to create ultra-high purity metal alloy samples, particularly rare-earth metals, located at the Ames Lab. | Photo Courtesy of the Ames Lab Flickr Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science

357

Grant Helps Make U.S. Rare Earth Magnets More Common | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grant Helps Make U.S. Rare Earth Magnets More Common Grant Helps Make U.S. Rare Earth Magnets More Common Grant Helps Make U.S. Rare Earth Magnets More Common August 6, 2010 - 12:12pm Addthis With sintered rare earth magnets a $4 billion worldwide market, the U.S. could be a bigger producer of these magnets - which are not actually rare - and are used in hybrid vehicle motors and wind turbine generators. | Illustration Courtesy of of Electron Energy Corporation | With sintered rare earth magnets a $4 billion worldwide market, the U.S. could be a bigger producer of these magnets - which are not actually rare - and are used in hybrid vehicle motors and wind turbine generators. | Illustration Courtesy of of Electron Energy Corporation | Kevin Craft Electron Energy Corporation is one of a kind. According to Peter Dent, vice president of business development for the

358

Solid-Liquid and Solid-Solid Transformations in the Rare-Earth Metals at High Pressures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The fusion behavior and solid-solid transformations in the rare-earth metals have been investigated at pressures in the range 6-65 kbar. The phase diagrams are presented for La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, and Tb. The initial melting slopes of Dy to Lu have been obtained. Since most of the rare-earth (R.E.) metals melt from a bcc structure, they offer a series for comparison. When the initial melting slope is plotted against atomic number they fall into groups according to their valency; the typically divalent metals Eu and Yb in one, and the typically trivalent metals La, Gd, and Lu in another. Samarium and the metals from Tb to Tm have melting slopes which are intermediate between those of the typically divalent and trivalent metals. It is suggested that these metals assume a partial divalent character in the liquid state and possibly also in the bcc phase. This suggestion derives support from the fact that the gaseous neutral atoms of the R.E. elements, with the exception of La, Gd, and Lu, have no 5d electron and are therefore divalent. Cerium exhibits a unique fusion behavior and its negative melting slope has been attributed to the tetravalency (4f?5d electron promotion) of the atoms in the liquid. For the very small melting slope of Pr, it is suggested that the atoms in the liquid have partial tetravalent character due to 4f?5d electron promotion. Comparisons with alkali metals are made and it is deduced that the R.E. metals are quite compressible at high temperatures. Pressure induced transformations in the rare-earth metals are in the sequence hcp?Sm-type?double hcp?fcc. A plausible mechanism based on the variation of ca ratio with pressure is discussed for hcp?Sm-type transformation.

A. Jayaraman

1965-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

359

Iron-Nickel-Based SuperMagnets: Multiscale Development of L10 Materials for Rare Earth-Free Permanent Magnets  

SciTech Connect

REACT Project: Northeastern University will develop bulk quantities of rare-earth-free permanent magnets with an iron-nickel crystal structure for use in the electric motors of renewable power generators and EVs. These materials could offer magnetic properties that are equivalent to todays best commercial magnets, but with a significant cost reduction and diminished environmental impact. This iron-nickel crystal structure, which is only found naturally in meteorites and developed over billions of years in space, will be artificially synthesized by the Northeastern University team. Its material structure will be replicated with the assistance of alloying elements introduced to help it achieve superior magnetic properties. The ultimate goal of this project is to demonstrate bulk magnetic properties that can be fabricated at the industrial scale.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Numerical Simulation of Detonation Initiation by the Space-Time Conservation Element and Solution Element Method.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation is focused on the numerical simulation of the detonation initiation process. The space-time Conservation Element and Solution Element (CESE) method, a novel numerical (more)

Wang, Bao

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "us-japan rare elements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Essential Grid Workflow Monitoring Elements  

SciTech Connect

Troubleshooting Grid workflows is difficult. A typicalworkflow involves a large number of components networks, middleware,hosts, etc. that can fail. Even when monitoring data from all thesecomponents is accessible, it is hard to tell whether failures andanomalies in these components are related toa given workflow. For theGrid to be truly usable, much of this uncertainty must be elim- inated.We propose two new Grid monitoring elements, Grid workflow identifiersand consistent component lifecycle events, that will make Gridtroubleshooting easier, and thus make Grids more usable, by simplifyingthe correlation of Grid monitoring data with a particular Gridworkflow.

Gunter, Daniel K.; Jackson, Keith R.; Konerding, David E.; Lee,Jason R.; Tierney, Brian L.

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Questions and Answers - Who discovered the elements?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Will scientists everfind smaller elements? Will scientists ever<br>find smaller elements? Previous Question (Will scientists ever find smaller elements?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (What are boiling and melting points?) What are boiling and melting points? Who discovered the element gold, silver, copper, neon, etc...? Below is a list of all of the known elements, who they were discovered by and the year they were discovered. Some elements, such as gold, silver and iron, have been known since ancient times, so it is impossible to credit a single person for their discovery. Other elements were discovered around the same time by two or more scientists who were working independently of each other. In these cases, each scientist is listed along with the year they made their discovery. Other elements were discovered by teams of

363

RECENT WORK WITH THE TRANSURANIUM ELEMENTS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...WITH THE TRANSURANIUM ELEMENTS Glenn T. Seaborg LAWRENCE RADIATION LABORATORY...45, 1959 PHYSICS: G. T. SEABORG 471 RECENT WORK WITH THE TRANS URANIUL'3 ELEMENTS BY GLENN T. SEABORG LAWRENCE RADIATION LABORATORY...

Glenn T. Seaborg

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Public to have rare opportunity to tour Neutron Science Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rosenfest: celebrate Louis Rosen, tour LANSCE Rosenfest: celebrate Louis Rosen, tour LANSCE Public to have rare opportunity to tour Neutron Science Center Tour attendees can expect to see many facets of the LANSCE, including areas along the linear accelerator beam line, the control room area, and one or more experimental areas. May 10, 2011 Aerial View of Neutron Science Center Aerial View of Neutron Science Center Contact James Rickman Communicatons Office (505) 665-9203 Email LANL Rosenfest will celebrate life of LANSCE founder Louis Rosen and offer tour LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, May 10, 2011-Members of the public will have an unusual opportunity to tour the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center from 1 to 5 p.m. on Friday, May 20, 2011, as part of Rosenfest, a celebration of LANSCE founder Louis Rosen and the remarkable facility he conceived. In

365

Microsoft Word - rare earth speech 3-18 6am  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REMARKS PREPARED FOR DELIVERY REMARKS PREPARED FOR DELIVERY TECHNOLOGY AND RARE EARTH METALS CONFERENCE 2010 KEYNOTE ADDRESS DAVID SANDALOW ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR POLICY & INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WASHINGTON, D.C. MARCH 17, 2010 [Acknowledgements.] 1. INTRODUCTION Thank you for the invitation to speak at this important conference. At energy conferences today, no topic is hotter than shale gas. The story is striking: recoverable reserves of shale gas have increased six-fold in the past few years, thanks to new drilling technologies. This increase has been transformational, with U.S. natural gas imports now predicted to drop steadily in the next decade and beyond, whereas just a few years ago imports were projected to climb for the foreseeable future. Large shale gas reserves are believed to exist

366

Shell model Monte Carlo investigation of rare earth nuclei  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We utilize the shell model Monte Carlo method to study the structure of rare earth nuclei. This work demonstrates the first systematic full oscillator shell with intruder calculations in such heavy nuclei. Exact solutions of a pairing plus quadrupole Hamiltonian are compared with the static path approximation in several dysprosium isotopes from A=152 to 162, including the odd mass A=153. Some comparisons are also made with Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov results from Baranger and Kumar. Basic properties of these nuclei at various temperatures and spin are explored. These include energy, deformation, moments of inertia, pairing channel strengths, band crossing, and evolution of shell model occupation numbers. Exact level densities are also calculated and, in the case of 162Dy, compared with experimental data.

J. A. White; S. E. Koonin; D. J. Dean

2000-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

367

Ab initio correlated calculations of rare-gas dimer quadrupoles  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports ab initio calculations of rare gas (RG=Kr, Ar, Ne, and He) dimer quadrupoles at the second order of Moeller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2). The study reveals the crucial role of the dispersion contribution to the RG{sub 2} quadrupole in the neighborhood of the equilibrium dimer separation. The magnitude of the dispersion quadrupole is found to be much larger than that predicted by the approximate model of Hunt. As a result, the total MP2 quadrupole moment is significantly smaller than was assumed in virtually all previous related studies. An analytical model for the distance dependence of the RG{sub 2} quadrupole is proposed. The model is based on the effective-electron approach of Jansen, but replaces the original Gaussian approximation to the electron density in an RG atom by an exponential one. The role of the nonadditive contribution in RG{sub 3} quadrupoles is discussed.

Donchev, Alexander G. [Algodign, LLC, Bolshaya Sadovaya 8, Moscow 123001 (Russian Federation)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

368

New results in rare allowed muon and pion decays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simple dynamics, few available decay channels, and highly controlled radiative and loop corrections, make pion and muon decays a sensitive means of exploring details of the underlying symmetries. We review the current status of the rare decays: pi+ -> e+ nu, pi+ -> e+ nu gamma, pi+ -> pi0 e+ nu, and mu+ -> e+ nu nu-bar gamma. For the latter we report new preliminary values for the branching ratio B(E_gamma >10 MeV, theta_(e-gamma) > 30deg) = 4.365 (9)_stat (42)_syst x 10^{-3}, and the decay parameter eta-bar = 0.006 (17)_stat (18)_syst, both in excellent agreement with standard model predictions. We review recent measurements, particularly by the PIBETA and PEN experiments, and near-term prospects for improvement. These and other similar precise low energy studies complement modern collider results materially.

D. Pocanic; E. Munyangabe; M. Bychkov; V. A. Baranov; W. Bertl; Yu. M. Bystritsky; E. Frlez; V. A. Kalinnikov; N. V. Khomutov; A. S. Korenchenko; S. M. Korenchenko; M. Korolija; T. Kozlowski; N. P. Kravchuk; N. A. Kuchinsky; M. C. Lehman; D. Mekterovic; D. Mzhavia; A. Palladino; P. Robmann; A. M. Rozhdestvensky; I. Supek; P. Truoel; Z. Tsamalaidze; A. van der Schaaf; B. Vandevender; E. P. Velicheva; V. P. Volnykh

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

369

Die Elemente der 13. Gruppe: die Borgruppe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Die 13. Gruppe enthlt die Elemente: Bor (B), Aluminium (Al), Gallium (Ga), Indium (In) und Thallium (Tl).

Prof. Dr. Waldemar Ternes

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Climbing elements in finite coxeter groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We define the notion of a climbing element in a finite real reflection group relative to a total order on the reflection set and we characterise these elements in the case where the total order arises from a bipartite Coxeter element.

Brady, Thomas; Watt, And Colum

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Fuel elements of thermionic converters  

SciTech Connect

Work on thermionic nuclear power systems has been performed in Russia within the framework of the TOPAZ reactor program since the early 1960s. In the TOPAZ in-core thermionic convertor reactor design, the fuel element`s cladding is also the thermionic convertor`s emitter. Deformation of the emitter can lead to short-circuiting and is the primary cause of premature TRC failure. Such deformation can be the result of fuel swelling, thermocycling, or increased unilateral pressure on the emitter due to the release of gaseous fission products. Much of the work on TRCs has concentrated on preventing or mitigating emitter deformation by improving the following materials and structures: nuclear fuel; emitter materials; electrical insulators; moderator and reflector materials; and gas-exhaust device. In addition, considerable effort has been directed toward the development of experimental techniques that accurately mimic operational conditions and toward the creation of analytical and numerical models that allow operational conditions and behavior to be predicted without the expense and time demands of in-pile tests. New and modified materials and structures for the cores of thermionic NPSs and new fabrication processes for the materials have ensured the possibility of creating thermionic NPSs for a wide range of powers, from tens to several hundreds of kilowatts, with life spans of 5 to 10 years.

Hunter, R.L. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Systems Assessment Dept.; Gontar, A.S.; Nelidov, M.V.; Nikolaev, Yu.V.; Schulepov, L.N. [RI SIA Lutch, Podolsk (Russian Federation)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Characterization of electrodeposited elemental boron  

SciTech Connect

Elemental boron was produced through electrowinning from potassium fluoroborate dissolved in a mixture of molten potassium fluoride and potassium chloride. The characteristics of the electrodeposited boron (raw boron) as well as the water and acid-leached product (processed boron) were studied. The chemical purity, specific surface area, size distribution of particles and X-ray crystallite size of the boron powders were investigated. The morphology of the deposits was examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The chemical state of the matrix, as well as the impurity phases present in them, was established using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In order to interpret and understand the results obtained, a thermodynamic analysis was carried out. The gas-phase corrosion in the head space as well as the chemistry behind the leaching process were interpreted using this analysis. The ease of oxidation of these powders in air was investigated using differential thermal analysis (DTA) coupled with thermogravimetry (TG). From the results obtained in this study it was established that elemental boron powder with a purity of 95-99% could be produced using a high temperature molten salt electrowinning process. The major impurities were found to be oxygen, carbon, iron and nickel.

Jain, Ashish [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India); Anthonysamy, S. [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India)], E-mail: sas@igcar.gov.in; Ananthasivan, K.; Ranganathan, R. [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India); Mittal, Vinit; Narasimhan, S.V. [Water and Steam Chemistry Division, BARC (F), Kalpakkam, 603102 (India); Vasudeva Rao, P.R. [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

373

Data transmission element for downhole drilling components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A robust data transmission element for transmitting information between downhole components, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The data transmission element components include a generally U-shaped annular housing, a generally U-shaped magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element such as ferrite, and an insulated conductor. Features on the magnetically conducting, electrically insulating element and the annular housing create a pocket when assembled. The data transmission element is filled with a polymer to retain the components within the annular housing by filling the pocket with the polymer. The polymer can bond with the annular housing and the insulated conductor but preferably not the magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element. A data transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, Jr., H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David S. (Lehi, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT); Sneddon, Cameron (Provo, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT)

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

374

Heterogeneous distribution of trace elements and fluorine in phosphogypsum by-product  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Phosphogypsum (PG), a by-product from phosphate fertilizer production, is composed mainly of gypsum (CaSO42H2O) but also contains minor quantities of trace elements (TE), rare earth elements (REE) and F. Some elements may be elevated in quantities to be of environmental concern. This study determined the distribution of TE, REE and F among three size fractions (53 ?m) in \\{PGs\\} derived from three different phosphate rock sources. Fine fraction PG (<20 ?m) composed of <10% of total PG mass but was highly enriched in TE, REE and F compared to unfractionated PG. For PG derived from Idaho rock, Se in the fine fraction was enriched 830 times over soil and 415 times over shale while Cd was enriched in the fine fraction 70-fold over shale and soil. Fluorine was elevated 37 times in the fine fraction compared to shale. The same trends were observed for PG derived from Togo and Florida rocks. Elevated elemental concentrations in fine particles and particle sorting during PG deposition may contribute to chemical heterogeneity of PG repositories, and make elements more susceptible to mobilization processes, such as leaching and erosion. Removal of fines will improve the utilization of PG in other industries, such as for use as an amendment to agricultural soils.

J.M. Arocena; P.M. Rutherford; M.J. Dudas

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

CX-000578: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: Categorical Exclusion Determination 8: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000578: Categorical Exclusion Determination Solubility of Synthesized Iron and Lead Sulfide Minerals CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12/10/2009 Location(s): Albuquerque, New Mexico Office(s): Sandia Site Office Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico proposes to prepare aqueous solutions of Na2S.9H2O (sodium sulfide nonahydrate) in an anoxic glove box, and combine the solution with aqueous solutions of iron/lead, to synthesize iron/lead sulfide minerals. The solubility of these minerals in brine would be measured. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-000578.pdf More Documents & Publications US-Japan rare elements meeting Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 11/18/10 Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media

376

Renewable Energy Community: Key Elements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future A Renewable Energy Community: Key Elements A reinvented community to meet untapped customer needs for shelter and transportation with minimal environmental impacts, stable energy costs, and a sense of belonging N. Carlisle, J. Elling, and T. Penney Technical Report NREL/TP-540-42774 January 2008 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle

377

The 5th Annual Colorado Rare Plant Symposium: G2 Plants of Colorado  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 The 5th Annual Colorado Rare Plant Symposium: G2 Plants of Colorado September 5, 2008 8 am - 4 pm they shouldn't collect because th

378

ORISE: Helping to Provide Rare Access to World-Class Computing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supercomputing ORISE peer review services helping to advance, provide rare access to world-class computing resources The Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education (ORISE)...

379

Alternative High-Performance Motors with Non-Rare Earth Materials...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Alternative High-Performance Motors with Non-Rare Earth Materials 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

380

UNIFIED FINITE ELEMENT DISCRETIZATIONS OF COUPLED DARCY-STOKES FLOW  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by using standard Stokes elements like the MINI element or the Taylor­Hood element in the entire domain elements like the Taylor­Hood element or the MINI element for the Stokes region. The similar approach], to overcome this problem. This finite element space is defined with respect to a rectangular grid. On each

Winther, Ragnar

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381

Proposed Data Elements for PARS II Web Application | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Proposed Data Elements for PARS II Web Application Proposed Data Elements for PARS II Web Application Proposed Data Elements for PARS II Web Application More Documents &...

382

Solvent extraction of rare-earth metals by carboxylic acids  

SciTech Connect

The solvent extraction of the trivalent lanthanides and yttrium from nitrate media by solutions of carboxylic acids in xylene has been studied. Commercially available carboxylic acids such as Versatic 10 and naphthenic acids were used, as well as model compounds of known structure, such as 2-ethylhexanoic and 3-cyclohexylpropanoic acids. In a few cases, extraction of the metals from sulphate and chloride solutions was also investigated. The dependence of the extraction properties of the carboxylic acids on the atomic number of the lanthanide shows a definite relationship to the steric bulk of the carboxylic acid molecule quantified by means of the steric parameter, E{sub s}{prime} of the substituent alkyl group. The stoichiometries of the extracted complexes for representative light (La), middle (Gd) and heavy (Lu) rare-earth metals were investigated by the slope-analysis technique for a sterically hindered acid (Versatic 10 acid; -E{prime}{sub s} = 3.83) and an acid with low steric hindrance (3-cyclohexylpropanoic acid; -E{prime}{sub s} = 0.28). 14 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

Preez, A.C. du; Preston, J.S. [Mintek, Randburg (South Africa)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Evidence for the Rare Decay B+ to Ds+ pi0  

SciTech Connect

The authors have searched for the rare decay B{sup +} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}. The analysis is based on a sample of 232 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. They find 19.6 signal events, corresponding to a significance of 4.7 {sigma}. The extracted signal yield including statistical and systematic uncertainties is 20.1{sub -6.0-1.5}{sup +6.8+0.4}, and they measure {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}) = (1.5{sub -0.4}{sup +0.5} {+-} 0.1 {+-} 0.2) x 10{sup -5}, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, and the last is due to the uncertainty on the D{sub s}{sup +} decay and its daughter decay branching fractions.

Aubert, B.

2006-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

384

Element One, Inc. | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Element One, Element One, Inc. America's Next Top Energy Innovator Challenge 191524 likes Element One, Inc. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Element One's detection products will change the paradigm in the way hydrogen and other hazardous gas leaks are detected, achieving a new level of safety in existing industrial and emerging consumer environments. Element One has patented the only available coatings for the detection of hydrogen that change color reversibly or non-reversibly as desired to give both current and historical information about leaked hydrogen. In 2011, Element One optioned to license three National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) patents that complement its own technologies. Completed and proposed testing of our indicators for different applications

385

Element One, Inc. | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Element One, Element One, Inc. America's Next Top Energy Innovator Challenge 191524 likes Element One, Inc. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Element One's detection products will change the paradigm in the way hydrogen and other hazardous gas leaks are detected, achieving a new level of safety in existing industrial and emerging consumer environments. Element One has patented the only available coatings for the detection of hydrogen that change color reversibly or non-reversibly as desired to give both current and historical information about leaked hydrogen. In 2011, Element One optioned to license three National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) patents that complement its own technologies. Completed and proposed testing of our indicators for different applications

386

Trace Element Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trace Element Analysis Trace Element Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Trace Element Analysis Details Activities (8) Areas (8) Regions (4) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Fluid Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Fluid Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Reconstructing the fluid circulation of a hydrothermal system Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 15.001,500 centUSD 0.015 kUSD 1.5e-5 MUSD 1.5e-8 TUSD / element Median Estimate (USD): 18.001,800 centUSD 0.018 kUSD 1.8e-5 MUSD 1.8e-8 TUSD / element High-End Estimate (USD): 106.0010,600 centUSD 0.106 kUSD 1.06e-4 MUSD 1.06e-7 TUSD / element

387

Element One, Inc. | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Element One, Element One, Inc. America's Next Top Energy Innovator Challenge 191524 likes Element One, Inc. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Element One's detection products will change the paradigm in the way hydrogen and other hazardous gas leaks are detected, achieving a new level of safety in existing industrial and emerging consumer environments. Element One has patented the only available coatings for the detection of hydrogen that change color reversibly or non-reversibly as desired to give both current and historical information about leaked hydrogen. In 2011, Element One optioned to license three National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) patents that complement its own technologies. Completed and proposed testing of our indicators for different applications

388

Partitioning of radionuclides and trace elements in phosphogypsum and its source materials based on sequential extraction methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Phosphogypsum is a waste produced by the phosphate fertilizer industry. Although phosphogypsum is mainly calcium sulphate dihydrate, it contains elevated levels of impurities, which originate from the source phosphate rock used in the phosphoric acid production. Among these impurities, radionuclides from 238U and 232Th decay series are of most concern due to their radiotoxicity. Other elements, such as rare earth elements (REE) and Ba are also enriched in the phosphogypsum. The bioavailability of radionuclides (226Ra, 210Pb and 232Th), rare earth elements and Ba to the surrounding aquatic system was evaluated by the application of sequential leaching of the phosphogypsum samples from the Brazilian phosphoric acid producers. The sequential extraction results show that most of the radium and lead are located in the iron oxide (non-CaSO4) fraction, and that only 1318% of these radionuclides are distributed in the most labile fraction. Th, REE and Ba were found predominantly in the residual phase, which corresponds to a small fraction of the phosphate rock or monazite that did not react and to insoluble compounds such as sulphates, phosphates and silicates. It can be concluded that although all these elements are enriched in the phosphogypsum samples they are not associated with CaSO4 itself and therefore do not represent a threat to the surrounding aquatic environment.

A.J.G. Santos; B.P. Mazzilli; D.I.T. Fvaro; P.S.C. Silva

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

High-temperature desulfurization of gasifier effluents with rare earth and rare earth/transition metal oxides  

SciTech Connect

We have improved the application of mixed rare-earth oxides (REOs) as hot gas desulfurization adsorbents by impregnating them on stable high surface area supports and by the inclusion of certain transition metal oxides. We report comparative desulfurization experiments at high temperature (900 K) using a synthetic biomass gasifier effluent containing 0.1 vol % H{sub 2}S, along with H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and water. More complex REO sorbents outperform the simpler CeO{sub 2}/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} mixtures, in some cases significantly. Supporting REOs on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (?20 wt % REO) or ZrO{sub 2} actually increased the sulfur capacities found after several cycles on a total weight basis. Another major increase in sulfur capacity took place when MnO{sub x} or FeO{sub x} is incorporated. Apparently most of the Mn or Fe is dispersed on or near the surface of the mixed REOs because the capacities with REOs greatly exceeded those of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported MnO{sub x} or FeO{sub x} alone at these conditions. In contrast, incorporating Cu has little effect on sulfur adsorption capacities. Both the REO and transition metal/REO adsorbents could be regenerated completely using air for at least five repetitive cycles.

Dooley, Kerry M.; Kalakota, Vikram; Adusumilli, Sumana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

The History of Element 43Technetium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The History of Element 43Technetium ... Department of Mining, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Laval University, G1K 7P4 Quebec City, Canada ...

Fathi Habashi

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Two position optical element actuator device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a two position optical element actuator device utilizing a powered means to hold an actuation arm, to which an optical element is attached, in a first position. A non-powered means drives the actuation arm to a second position, when the powered means ceases to receive power. The optical element may be a electromagnetic (EM) radiation or particle source, an instrument, or EM radiation or particle transmissive, reflective or absorptive elements. A bearing is used to transfer motion and smoothly transition the actuation arm from the first to second position.

Holdener, Fred R. (Tracy, CA); Boyd, Robert D. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

The New Element Berkelium (Atomic Number 97)  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

An isotope of the element with atomic number 97 has been discovered as a product of the helium-ion bombardment of americium. The name berkelium, symbol Bk, is proposed for element 97. The chemical separation of element 97 from the target material and other reaction products was made by combinations of precipitation and ion exchange adsorption methods making use of its anticipated (III) and (IV) oxidation states and its position as a member of the actinide transition series. The distinctive chemical properties made use of in its separation and the equally distinctive decay properties of the particular isotope constitute the principal evidence for the new element.

Seaborg, G. T.; Thompson, S. G.; Ghiorso, A.

1950-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

393

Bi-stable optical element actuator device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a bistable optical element actuator device utilizing a powered means to move an actuation arm, to which an optical element is attached, between two stable positions. A non-powered means holds the actuation arm in either of the two stable positions. The optical element may be a electromagnetic (EM) radiation or particle source, an instrument, or EM radiation or particle transmissive reflective or absorptive elements. A bearing is used to transfer motion and smoothly transition the actuation arm between the two stable positions.

Holdener, Fred R. (Tracy, CA); Boyd, Robert D. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

DOE Announces Second RFI on Rare Earth Metals | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Second RFI on Rare Earth Metals Second RFI on Rare Earth Metals DOE Announces Second RFI on Rare Earth Metals March 22, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - The Department of Energy today released a Request for Information (RFI) soliciting information from the public on rare earth metals and other materials used in the energy sector. Responses to this RFI will inform an update to DOE's Critical Materials Strategy (pdf - 5.7mb ), released December 15, 2010, that assessed the use of rare earth metals and other materials important to the development and deployment of a variety of clean energy technologies, such as wind turbines, hybrid vehicles, solar panels and energy efficient light bulbs. The updated strategy, expected later this year, will include additional analysis of rapidly-changing market conditions. It will analyze the use

395

Scoping Inventory Calculations for the Rare Isotope Accelerator  

SciTech Connect

This document is a report on our activities in FY03 exploring nuclear safety and hazard analysis issues relevant to the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA). It is not clear whether DOE will classify the RIA as an accelerator facility subject to the accelerator-specific safety requirements of DOE Order 420.2A or as a nonreactor nuclear facility subject to the requirements of 10 CFR 830. The final outcome of this issue will have significant impact on the construction and operation of the facility and the quality assurance requirements for items or services that may affect nuclear safety. The resolution of this issue will be an important earlier decision for the RIA project team and will require early consultation with the appropriate DOE authorities. For nuclear facilities, facility hazard classification depends on the inventory of releasable radionuclides; therefore, some simplistic, scoping inventory calculations for some assumed targets and beams are done to estimate the hazard category of RIA if it is declared a nuclear facility. These calculations show that for the scenarios analyzed, RIA would produce sufficient quantities of radionuclides to be classified as a Category 3 nuclear facility. Over the lifetime of RIA operations, it may be possible to build up Category 2 quantities of {sup 227}Ac and {sup 228}Th. A storage building, separate from the driver, target, and experimental buildings, used to store and isolate accumulated targets and other hardware, can mitigate the potential impact on RIA. The more onerous requirements of Category 2 facilities would only be imposed on the storage facility and not on the rest of the RIA facilities. Some of the differences in a category 2 and category 3 facility are discussed in Appendix 1.

Ahle, L E; Boles, J L

2003-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

396

Laser studies of near-resonant state-changing collisions of calcium (4s6s 1S0) with the rare gases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

State-changing collisions of Ca(4s6s 1S0) with the rare gases are studied by pulsed laser excitation and time- and wavelength-resolved detection. The total depletion rates of the 4s6s 1S0 state with different rare gases vary by over a factor 10, with the lighter rare gases being markedly more efficient than the heavier ones. Relative branching ratios to the specific near-resonant, energy-transfer product states, 4p4p 1D2 (?E=-29 cm-1), 3d4p 1F3 (?E=152 cm-1), and 4s6s 3S1 (?E=216 cm-1), are measured for He3, He4, Ne, and Xe. Transfer to the D21 state is always the major relaxation pathway. The rate constant for S13 production is immeasurably small, implying a small spin-orbit matrix element for curve crossing that leads to a spin change. The results for 4p4p 1D2 production are compared with simple theoretical calculations based on established models for near-resonant energy transfer between states which are coupled at large internuclear distance. These models successfully explain the dominant transfer to the 4p4p 1D2 state and the trends with rare gas, which are attributed largely to enhancement of the near-resonant-transfer process with increasing velocity. The effects of wave-function mixing in the isolated atom (e.g., spin mixing) on the general outcome of state-changing collisions in two-electron atoms are discussed. Two-electron atoms offer numerous possibilities for further testing of theories of near-resonant energy transfer.

Michael O. Hale and Stephen R. Leone

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Insertion Preference of Maize and Rice Miniature Inverted Repeat Transposable Elements as Revealed by the Analysis of Nested Elements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...DNA element. This element (called Midway), initially found as an 850-bp...closer examination indicates that Midway harbors another Stowaway element (Stowaway-Os25). That there are three Midway/Stowaway composite elements in the...

Ning Jiang; Susan R. Wessler

398

Appendix: Some elements of Indian Astronomy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Z Z' N S P' P O W E Q Q' 2 #12;Appendix: Some elements of Indian Astronomy to two pointsChapter 1 Appendix: Some elements of Indian Astronomy 1.1 Generalities The sky is considered) perpendicular to the Celestial axis. Let us imagine an observer (O) on Earth. Since the Earth and thus the point

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

399

The New Element Curium (Atomic Number 96)  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Two isotopes of the element with atomic number 96 have been produced by the helium-ion bombardment of plutonium. The name curium, symbol Cm, is proposed for element 96. The chemical experiments indicate that the most stable oxidation state of curium is the III state.

Seaborg, G. T.; James, R. A.; Ghiorso, A.

1948-00-00T23:59:59.000Z

400

Microcalorimeter Magnetic Sensor Geometries Using Superconducting Elements  

SciTech Connect

We describe a numerical code developed to estimate performance of magnetic microcalorimeter configurations, including superconducting elements and SQUID characteristics. We present results of a preliminary design analysis showing that composite sensors with both superconducting and paramagnetic elements should realize substantial gains in magnetic flux signal per magnetization change of the paramagnet, compared to sensors containing only paramagnet.

Boyd, S. T. P. [University of New Mexico, MSC07 4220, Albuquerque NM 87131-0001 (United States); Cantor, R. H. [STAR Cryoelectronics, 25-A Bisbee Ct., Santa Fe NM 87508-1338 (United States)

2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "us-japan rare elements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

William Fowler and Elements in the Stars  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

William Fowler and Elements in the Stars Resources with Additional Information William A. Fowler Courtesy AIP Emilio Segrè Visual Archives 'William A. Fowler ... shared the 1983 Nobel Prize in physics for his research into the creation of chemical elements inside stars ... . During his career in nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics, which spanned more that 60 years, Fowler was primarily concerned with studies of fusion reactions--how the nuclei of lighter chemical elements fuse to create the heavier ones in a process known as nucleosynthesis. In 1957, Fowler coauthored ... the seminal paper "Synthesis of the Elements in the Stars", [which] showed that all of the elements from carbon to uranium could be produced by nuclear processes in stars, starting only with the hydrogen and helium produced in the Big Bang.

402

Element 74, the Wolfram Versus Tungsten Controversy  

SciTech Connect

Two and a quarter centuries ago, a heavy mineral ore was found which was thought to contain a new chemical element called heavy stone (or tungsten in Swedish). A few years later, the metal was separated from its oxide and the new element (Z=74) was called wolfram. Over the years since that time, both the names wolfram and tungsten were attached to this element in various countries. Sixty years ago, IUPAC chose wolfram as the official name for the element. A few years later, under pressure from the press in the USA, the alternative name tungsten was also allowed by IUPAC. Now the original, official name 'wolfram' has been deleted by IUPAC as one of the two alternate names for the element. The history of this controversy is described here.

Holden,N.E.

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

403

Zeros in (inverse) bremsstrahlung matrix elements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We discuss the possibility of zeros in the nonrelativistic radiative continuum-continuum matrix element for electron-atom (inverse) bremsstrahlung. As demonstrated earlier for upward transitions from bound states, the occurrence of different signs for the free-free matrix element in limiting cases, plus the requirement of continuity, implies the existence of zeros. Using knowledge of the sign of the dipole matrix element in the soft- and hard-photon limits with one continuum electron energy held fixed, we show that zeros can occur in the s-p matrix element. We discuss the connection of our results to elastic scattering and to Ramsauer-Townsend minima. We consider the observability of zeros in this (s-p) matrix element manifested as minima in the cross sections.

C. David Shaffer; R. H. Pratt; Sung Dahm Oh

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Anisotropic magnetic properties of light rare-earth diantimonides  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented of anisotropic temperature and field-dependent magnetization M(H,T) and resistivity {rho}(H,T) measurements on high quality single crystals of the light rare-earth diantimonides RSb{sub 2}, R=La-Nd, Sm. All of these, excepting LaSb{sub 2}, magnetically order at low temperatures, and for CeSb{sub 2} and NdSb{sub 2} several magnetically ordered phases were observed in low-field magnetization and zero-field resistivity measurements. For R=Ce-Sm strong anisotropies, associated with crystalline electric field (CEF) splitting of the R{sup 3+} ion, were found in M(T) measurements both below and above magnetic ordering temperatures. Furthermore, for R=Ce-Nd metamagnetic transitions were observed in M(H) and {rho}(H) for H{parallel}(ab) in the magnetically ordered state. In addition, above 15 kG de Haas{endash}van Alphen oscillations are observed for SmSb{sub 2} and Shubnikov{endash}de Haas quantum oscillations are observed above {approximately}120kG for NdSb{sub 2} and SmSb{sub 2}. The zero-field in-plane resistivity {rho}{sub ab} of all of the compounds is metallic (d{rho}/dT{gt}0), with residual resistance ratios ranging from 40 to 750. The c-axis resistivity is also metallic, but appears to be considerably larger than the in-plane value, consistent with the diantimonides being quasi-two-dimensional materials. The magnetoresistance of all members of the series is large, approximately linear in H at moderate fields, and is also dependent on the relative orientation of the applied magnetic fields to the crystallographic axes. The extreme case of SmSb{sub 2} has [{rho}(55kG){minus}{rho}(0)]/{rho}(0){gt}50000{percent} at T=2K and H{parallel}c. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

Budko, S.L.; Canfield, P.C. [Ames Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)] [Ames Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Mielke, C.H.; Lacerda, A.H. [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Los Alamos Facility, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Los Alamos Facility, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Questions and Answers - What is an element? How many elements are there?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An example of indirect evidenceused to study atoms? An example of indirect evidence<br>used to study atoms? Previous Question (An example of indirect evidence used to study atoms?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (What is the difference between atoms and elements?) What is the difference betweenatoms and elements? What is an element? How many elements are there? An element is a substance that is made entirely from one type of atom. For example, the element hydrogen is made from atoms containing a single proton and a single electron. If you change the number of protons an atom has, you change the type of element it is. If you had very, very good eyes and could look at the atoms in a sample of hydrogen, you would notice that most of the hydrogen atoms would have no neutrons, some of them would have one neutron and a few of them would have

406

Red-Green Emitting and Superparamagnetic Nanomarkers Containing Fe3O4 Functionalized with Calixarene and Rare Earth Complexes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Red-Green Emitting and Superparamagnetic Nanomarkers Containing Fe3O4 Functionalized with Calixarene and Rare Earth Complexes ... ? Nuclear

Latif U. Khan; Hermi F. Brito; Jorma Hls; Kleber R. Pirota; Diego Muraca; Maria C.F.C. Felinto; Ercules E.S. Teotonio; Oscar L. Malta

2014-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

407

Helioseismic limit on heavy element abundance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Primary inversions of accurately measured solar oscillation frequencies coupled with the equations of thermal equilibrium and other input physics, enable us to infer the temperature and hydrogen abundance profiles inside the Sun. These profiles also help in setting constraints on the input physics as well as on heavy element abundance in the solar core. Using different treatments of plasma screening for nuclear reaction rates, limits on the cross-section of proton-proton nuclear reaction as a function of heavy element abundance in the solar core are obtained and an upper limit on heavy element abundance in the solar core is also derived from these results.

H. M. Antia; S. M. Chitre

2002-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

408

7th Annual Colorado Rare Plant Symposium Conservation Efforts and Status Review of G1 Plants of Colorado  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7th Annual Colorado Rare Plant Symposium Conservation Efforts and Status Review of G1 Plants of Colorado September 10, 2010; 9:00 am-4:00 pm UC Denver Auraria Campus Denver, Colorado Join members of the Colorado Rare Plant Technical Committee (RPTC) for the 7th Annual Colorado Rare Plant Symposium. The RPTC

409

Microsoft Word - ARPA-E_RareEarth_Workshop_Overview_v6  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ARPA-E WORKSHOP ARPA-E WORKSHOP Rare Earth and Critical Materials December 6, 2010 in Arlington, VA Background ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 2 Breakout Sessions and Participant Preparation .............................................................................................................. 8 Agenda ................................................................................................................................................................................................ 9 Contact Information ................................................................................................................................................................... 10

410

New data on mineral forms of rare metals in phosphogypsum wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Phosphogypsum is an industrial waste of the processing ... . This is a valuable and promising technogenous rare-metal feedstock. The samples of fresh and old phosphogypsum were studied using precision physical te...

A. E. Samonov

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Extremal Dependence Indices: Improved Verification Measures for Deterministic Forecasts of Rare Binary Events  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Verifying forecasts of rare events is challenging, in part because traditional performance measures degenerate to trivial values as events become rarer. The extreme dependency score was proposed recently as a nondegenerating measure for the ...

Christopher A. T. Ferro; David B. Stephenson

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Origin of enhanced magnetization in rare earth doped multiferroic bismuth ferrite  

SciTech Connect

We report structural and magnetic properties of rare earth doped Bi{sub 0.95}R{sub 0.05} FeO{sub 3} (R?=?Y, Ho, and Er) submicron particles. Rare earth doping enhances the magnetization and the magnetization shows an increasing trend with decreasing dopant ionic radii. In contrast to the x-ray diffraction pattern, we have seen a strong evidence for the presence of rare earth iron garnets R{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} in magnetization measured as a function of temperature, in selected area electron diffraction, and in Raman measurements. Our results emphasised the role of secondary phases in the magnetic property of rare earth doped BiFeO{sub 3} compounds along with the structural distortion favoring spin canting by increase in Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya exchange energy.

Nayek, C.; Thirmal, Ch.; Murugavel, P., E-mail: muruga@iitm.ac.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 36 (India); Tamilselvan, A.; Balakumar, S. [National Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Madras, Chennai 25 (India)

2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

413

Structure of the rare archaeal biosphere and seasonal dynamics of active ecotypes in surface coastal waters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Heidelberg JF Kirchman DL ( 2011 ) Activity of abundant and rare bacteria in a coastal ocean . Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 108 : 12776 12781 . 5 Lennon JT Jones SE ( 2011 ) Microbial seed banks: The ecological and evolutionary implications of dormancy...

Mylne Hugoni; Najwa Taib; Didier Debroas; Isabelle Domaizon; Isabelle Jouan Dufournel; Gisle Bronner; Ian Salter; Hlne Agogu; Isabelle Mary; Pierre E. Galand

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Facility for Rare Isotope Beams: The Journey Has Begun on DOE's latest Scientific User Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

After many years of planning, ground was officially broken on the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) in a ceremony held at the construction site on Michigan State Universitys campus.

415

Intracollisional Interference in the Spectrum of HD Mixed with Rare Gases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present the first observation and interpretation of an interference effect in the infrared absorption spectrum of HD-rare-gas mixtures. This effect, due to constructive or destructive interference between allowed and collision-induced dipoles during a collision, is referred to as "intracollisional interference." Is is manifested by the appearance of a narrow line at the R1(1) position which increases with rare-gas density. This interference has relevance to the determination of HD abundance in planetary atmospheres.

J. D. Poll; R. H. Tipping; R. D. G. Prasad; S. Paddi Reddy

1976-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

416

Compound and Elemental Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis Compound and Elemental Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Compound and Elemental Analysis Details Activities (104) Areas (69) Regions (6) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Fluid Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Fluid Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Results can aid in the determination of fluid source regions and circulation pathways. Thermal: Certain elements exhibit high spatial correlation with high-temperature geothermal systems. Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 15.001,500 centUSD 0.015 kUSD 1.5e-5 MUSD 1.5e-8 TUSD / compound Median Estimate (USD): 30.003,000 centUSD

417

Ion processing element with composite media  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion processing element employing composite media disposed in a porous substrate, for facilitating removal of selected chemical species from a fluid stream. The ion processing element includes a porous fibrous glass substrate impregnated by composite media having one or more active components supported by a matrix material of polyacrylonitrile. The active components are effective in removing, by various mechanisms, one or more constituents from a fluid stream passing through the ion processing element. Due to the porosity and large surface area of both the composite medium and the substrate in which it is disposed, a high degree of contact is achieved between the active component and the fluid stream being processed. Further, the porosity of the matrix material and the substrate facilitates use of the ion processing element in high volume applications where it is desired to effectively process a high volume flows.

Mann, Nick R. (Blackfoot, ID); Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Sebesta, Ferdinand (Prague, CZ)

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

418

Quantitative Elemental Analyses by Plasma Emission Spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Elemental Analyses by Plasma Emission Spectroscopy...Argon-supported inductively coupled plasmas operated at atmospheric pressures are excellent...HIGH-FREQUENCY ARGON PLASMA FOR OPTICAL EMISSION...EXPERIMENTAL-STUDY OF A 1-KW, 50-MHZ RF INDUCTIVELY COUPLED...

Velmer A. Fassel

1978-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

419

Quantitative Elemental Analyses by Plasma Emission Spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Elemental Analyses by Plasma Emission Spectroscopy...inductively coupled plasmas operated at atmospheric...INDUCTIVELY-COUPLED HIGH-FREQUENCY ARGON PLASMA FOR OPTICAL EMISSION...1-KW, 50-MHZ RF INDUCTIVELY COUPLED...STUDIES OF A RADIO-FREQUENCY INDUCTIVELY COUPLED...

Velmer A. Fassel

1978-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

420

Perfluorohalogenoorgano Compounds of Main Group 5 Elements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The compounds of the Main Group 5 elements phosphorus, arsenic, antimony, and bismuth, are covered to the end of 1973 in Perfluorhalogenorgano-Verbindungen der Hauptgruppenelemente, Part 3, 1975 (cited here ...

Alois Haas; Michael R. Chr. Gerstenberger

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "us-japan rare elements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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421

Transuranium Elements in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Transuranium elements, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium, are formed via neutron capture processes of actinides, and are mainly by-products of fuel irradiation during the operation of a nuclear react...

Thomas Fanghnel; Jean-Paul Glatz; Rudy J. M. Konings

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Quantum Algorithms for Element Distinctness Harry Buhrman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum Algorithms for Element Distinctness Harry Buhrman Christoph D¨urr Mark Heiligman§ Peter, France. Email: durr@lri.fr. §NSA, Suite 6111, Fort George G. Meade, MD 20755, USA. Email: mheilig

Magniez, Frédéric

423

Quantum Algorithms for Element Distinctness Harry Buhrman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum Algorithms for Element Distinctness Harry Buhrman£ Christoph D¨urr? Mark Heiligman? Peter, France. Email: durr@lri.fr. ?NSA, Suite 6111, Fort George G. Meade, MD 20755, USA. Email: mheilig

de Wolf, Ronald

424

The Mutual Adjustment of Meteorological Elements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The complete set of equations of atmospheric fluid dynamics and thermodynamics contains time derivatives of five elements: u, v, w, p, ? (or T), i.e., it is of the fifth order in time. For initial value (Cauchy) ...

S. Panchev

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

THE NEW ELEMENT CALIFORNIUM (ATOMIC NUMBER 98)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

No, 66) as the names americium (No, curium (No, andthe production of element 98. Americium, the source for theneutron-irradiated americium in which it was produced as a

Thompson, S.G.; Street, K.,Jr.; Ghiorso, A.; Seaborg, G.T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Isotope/element fractionation during surface adsorption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The adsorption of ions onto mineral surfaces accompanies isotope/element fractionation in planets and asteroids. A model based on simple classical physics is presented to predict these fractionations. The agreement between the experimentally observed isotope/element ratios and their predicted values is found to be excellent. This fractionation can be demonstrated experimentally in advanced physics laboratories using macroscopic particles. The success of the model shows students that even a very complex naturally occurring process can be explained quantitatively with simple physics.

Gamini Seneviratne; Asiri Nanayakkara

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Quadrilateral/hexahedral finite element mesh coarsening  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A technique for coarsening a finite element mesh ("FEM") is described. This technique includes identifying a coarsening region within the FEM to be coarsened. Perimeter chords running along perimeter boundaries of the coarsening region are identified. The perimeter chords are redirected to create an adaptive chord separating the coarsening region from a remainder of the FEM. The adaptive chord runs through mesh elements residing along the perimeter boundaries of the coarsening region. The adaptive chord is then extracted to coarsen the FEM.

Staten, Matthew L; Dewey, Mark W; Scott, Michael A; Benzley, Steven E

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

428

Stretchable semiconductor elements and stretchable electrical circuits  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides methods and devices for fabricating printable semiconductor elements and assembling printable semiconductor elements onto substrate surfaces. Methods, devices and device components of the present invention are capable of generating a wide range of flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices and arrays of devices on substrates comprising polymeric materials. The present invention also provides stretchable semiconductor structures and stretchable electronic devices capable of good performance in stretched configurations.

Rogers, John A. (Champaign, IL); Khang, Dahl-Young (Seoul, KR); Menard, Etienne (Durham, NC)

2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

429

A new finite element lifting surface technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Element Lifting Surface Technique. (May 1973) James David Kocurek, B. S. , Texas ASM University 1 Directed by: Dr. Balusu M. Rao A numerical lifting surface technique based on discrete vortex loading elements is developed for calculating the steady..., incompress- ; ible, aerodynamic load distribution on a general, nonplanar, ideal- 1 ized body. The method, described as the "Vortex Box" technique, has been applied to general planar wings of arbitrary straight line ' geometry and to annular wings...

Kocurek, James David

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

430

Property:GRR/SubsectionElementNumber | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SubsectionElementNumber SubsectionElementNumber Jump to: navigation, search Property Name GRR/SubsectionElementNumber Property Type Number Description The subsection element number of an element in the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap. The value of this property is derived automatically by the element template and is used in sorting elements within a section. Pages using the property "GRR/SubsectionElementNumber" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) G GRR/Elements/14-CA-b.1 - NPDES Permit Application + 1 + GRR/Elements/14-CA-b.10 - Did majority of RWQCB approve the permit + 10 + GRR/Elements/14-CA-b.11 - EPA Review of Adopted Permit + 11 + GRR/Elements/14-CA-b.12 - Were all EPA objections resolved + 12 + GRR/Elements/14-CA-b.13 - NPDES Permit issued + 13 +

431

Best Practices: Elements of a Federal Privacy Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Best Practices: Best Practices: Elements of a Federal Privacy Program Version 1.0 Sponsored By: Federal CIO Council Privacy Committee June 2010 Best Practices: Elements of a Federal Privacy Program June 2010 Page i Contents Acknowledgements __________________________________________________________________ ii Purpose ____________________________________________________________________________ 1 Introduction: Privacy Stewardship and Governance _________________________________________ 3 Element 1 -Leadership ________________________________________________________________ 6 Element 2 - Privacy Risk Management and Compliance Documentation _________________________ 9 Element 3 - Information Security _______________________________________________________ 14

432

Nuclear elements in Banach Jordan pairs Ottmar Loos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear elements in Banach Jordan pairs Ottmar Loos Abstract We introduce nuclear elements in Banach Jordan pairs, generalizing the nuclear elements Jordan pairs and show that the trace form Trintroduced in [3] may be extended to the nuclear

433

X-ray absorption and resonant x-ray emission spectra by electric quadrupole excitation in light rare-earth systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have made precise theoretical calculations for both 2p3/2?4f x-ray absorption spectra and 3d?2p3/2 resonant x-ray emission spectra involving electric quadrupole excitations at the L3 edge of light rare-earth elements from La to Eu. It is shown that the energy separation of a double-peak structure observed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) does not agree with that determined from resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy (RXES), in contrast to recent experimental results by Bartolom et al. The reason for this difference is that the energy separation in XAS is determined by the 4f-4f interaction only, while that in RXES is determined by both 4f-4f and 3d-4f interactions.

M. Nakazawa; K. Fukui; H. Ogasawara; A. Kotani; C. F. Hague

2002-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

434

A new N-hydroxyethyliminodiacetic acid modified coreshell silica phase for chelation ion chromatography of alkaline earth, transition and rare earth elements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Bare coreshell silica (1.7?m) has been modified with iminodiacetic acid functional groups via standard silane chemistry, forming a new N-hydroxyethyliminodiacetic acid (HEIDA) functionalised coreshell stationary phase. The column was applied in high-performance chelation ion chromatography and evaluated for the retention of alkaline earth, transition and heavy metal cations. The influence of nitric acid eluent concentration, addition of complexing agent dipicolinic acid, eluent pH and column temperature on the column performance was investigated. The efficiencies obtained for transition and heavy metal cations (and resultant separations) were comparable or better than those previously obtained for alternative fully porous silica based chelation stationary phases, and a similarly modified monolithic silica column, ranging from ?15 to 56?m HETP. Increasing the ionic strength of the eluent with the addition of KNO3 (0.75M) and increasing the column temperature (70C) facilitated the isocratic separation of a mixture of 14 lanthanides and yttrium in under 12min, with HETP averaging 18?m (7?m for Ce(III))

Nicola McGillicuddy; Ekaterina P. Nesterenko; Pavel N. Nesterenko; Elaine M. Stack; Jesse O. Omamogho; Jeremy D. Glennon; Brett Paull

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

The formation of scandium minerals as an example of the role of complexes in the geochemistry of rare earths and HFS elements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...References Ahrens, L.H. (1952): The use of ionization potentials 1. Ionic radii...N. (1994): Investigation by the use of profile refinement of neutron powder...observed in Alpine veins and in pegmatites. babingtonite bazzite cascandite chain silicates complexes...

Carlo Maria GRAMACCIOLI; Valeria DIELLA; Francesco DEMARTIN

436

Review of Selected Elements of Emergency Management at the Oak...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OVERSIGHT REVIEW OF SELECTED ELEMENTS OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY July 2011 i INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT REVIEW OF SELECTED ELEMENTS OF EMERGENCY...

437

OSHA Rulemaking on Basic Program Elements for Federal Employee...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

OSHA Rulemaking on Basic Program Elements for Federal Employee Occupational Safety and Health Programs and Related Matters; 29 CFR 1960 OSHA Rulemaking on Basic Program Elements...

438

Elements of a Federal Privacy Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Elements of a Federal Privacy Program Elements of a Federal Privacy Program This document serves as a best practices guide to help federal organizations implement and sustain...

439

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Rye Patch Area (DOE GTP) ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Rye Patch Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Rye Patch Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date...

440

3800 Green Series Cost Elements | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(formerly EPP) Program 3800 Green Series Cost Elements 06112014 (Rev. 7) 3800 Green Series Cost Elements More Documents & Publications 1 OPAM Policy Acquisition Guides...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "us-japan rare elements" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP)...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bliss Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity...

442

Element Labs (Texas) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Element Labs (Texas) Element Labs (Texas) Jump to: navigation, search Name Element Labs Address 9701 Metric Blvd Place Austin, Texas Zip 78758 Sector Efficiency Product LED Producer Website http://www.elementlabs.com/ Coordinates 30.376797°, -97.715649° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.376797,"lon":-97.715649,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

443

Catalyst for elemental sulfur recovery process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalytic reduction process is described for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides high activity and selectivity, as well as stability in the reaction atmosphere, for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over a metal oxide composite catalyst having one of the following empirical formulas: [(FO[sub 2])[sub 1[minus]n](RO)[sub n

Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Liu, W.

1995-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

444

Spectroscopy of element 115 decay chains  

SciTech Connect

A high-resolution a, X-ray and -ray coincidence spectroscopy experiment was conducted at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fu r Schwerionenforschung. Thirty correlated a-decay chains were detected following the fusion-evaporation reaction 48Ca + 243Am. The observations are consistent with previous assignments of similar decay chains to originate from element Z = 115. The data includes first candidates of fingerprinting the decay step Mt --> Bh with characteristic X rays. For the first time, precise spectroscopy allows the derivation of excitation schemes of isotopes along the decay chains starting with elements Z > 112. Comprehensive Monte-Carlo simulations accompany the data analysis. Nuclear structure models provide a first level interpretation.

Rudolph, Dirk [Lund University, Sweden; Forsberg, U. [Lund University, Sweden; Golubev, P. [Lund University, Sweden; Sarmiento, L. G. [Lund University, Sweden; Yakushev, A. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Andersson, L.-L. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Di Nitto, A. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Duehllmann, Ch. E. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Gates, J. M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Gregorich, K. E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Gross, Carl J [ORNL; Hessberger, F. P. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Herzberg, R.-D [University of Liverpool; Khuyagbaatar, J. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Kratz, J. V. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr [ORNL; Schaedel, M. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Aberg, S. [Lund University, Sweden; Ackermann, D. [GSI-Hemholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, Germany; Block, M. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Brand, H. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Carlsson, B. G. [Lund University, Sweden; Cox, D. [University of Liverpool; Derkx, X. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Eberhardt, K. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Even, J. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Fahlander, C. [Lund University, Sweden; Gerl, J. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Jaeger, E. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Kindler, B. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Krier, J. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Kojouharov, I. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Kurz, N. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Lommel, B. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Mistry, A. [University of Liverpool; Mokry, C. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Nitsche, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Omtvedt, J. P. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, Switzerland; Papadakis, P. [University of Liverpool; Ragnarsson, I. [Lund University, Sweden; Runke, J. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Schaffner, H. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Schausten, B. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Thoerle-Pospiech, P. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Torres, T. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Traut, T. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Trautmann, N. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Tuerler, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, Switzerland; Ward, A. [University of Liverpool; Ward, D. E. [Lund University, Sweden; Wiehl, N. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Matrix elements for rotating Morse oscillators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper formulas and recursion relations for the expectation values of the operators {1-exp[-a(r-re)]}n, (r-re)n, exp[-a(r-re)]n, and (r-re){exp[-a(r-re)]}n are derived for a rotating Morse oscillator. These equations can be used to calculate the diagonal (v=v, J=J) and off-diagonal (v?v, J?J) matrix elements. Asymptotic approximations for the diagonal elements of the (r-re)n operator, ?vJ?(r-re)?vJ? and ?vJ?(r-re)2?vJ?, are also obtained.

A. Requena; A. Lpez Pieiro; B. Moreno

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

10 Questions for a Materials Scientist: Mr. Rare Earth -- Dr. Karl A.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Materials Scientist: Mr. Rare Earth -- Dr. Karl Materials Scientist: Mr. Rare Earth -- Dr. Karl A. Gschneidner, Jr. 10 Questions for a Materials Scientist: Mr. Rare Earth -- Dr. Karl A. Gschneidner, Jr. April 3, 2013 - 12:59pm Addthis Dr. Karl Gschneidner is holding a neodymium-iron-boron magnet produced using a new, greener process. The process that Dr. Gschneidner helped develop doesn’t produce the environmentally unfriendly byproducts that result from traditional manufacturing methods. | Photo courtesy of Ames Laboratory. Dr. Karl Gschneidner is holding a neodymium-iron-boron magnet produced using a new, greener process. The process that Dr. Gschneidner helped develop doesn't produce the environmentally unfriendly byproducts that result from traditional manufacturing methods. | Photo courtesy of Ames

447

Ames Laboratory to Lead New Research Effort to Address Shortages in Rare  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratory to Lead New Research Effort to Address Shortages in Laboratory to Lead New Research Effort to Address Shortages in Rare Earth and Other Critical Materials Ames Laboratory to Lead New Research Effort to Address Shortages in Rare Earth and Other Critical Materials January 9, 2013 - 12:13pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy announced today that a team led by Ames Laboratory in Ames, Iowa, has been selected for an award of up to $120 million over five years to establish an Energy Innovation Hub that will develop solutions to the domestic shortages of rare earth metals and other materials critical for U.S. energy security. The new research center, which will be named the Critical Materials Institute (CMI), will bring together leading researchers from academia, four Department of Energy

448

High Pressure Phase Transformations in Heavy Rare Earth Metals and Connections to Actinide Crystal Structures  

SciTech Connect

High-pressure studies have been performed on heavy rare earth metals Terbium (Tb) to 155 GPa and Holmium (Ho) to 134 GPa in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature. The following crystal structure sequence was observed in both metals hcp {yields} Sm-type {yields} dhcp {yields} distorted fcc (hR-24) {yields} monoclinic (C2/m) with increasing pressure. The last transformation to a low symmetry monoclinic phase is accompanied by a volume collapse of 5 % for Tb at 51 GPa and a volume collapse of 3 % for Ho at 103 GPa. This volume collapse under high pressure is reminiscent of f-shell delocalization in light rare earth metal Cerium (Ce), Praseodymium (Pr), and heavy actinide metals Americium (Am) and Curium (Cm). The orthorhombic Pnma phase that has been reported in Am and Cm after f-shell delocalization is not observed in heavy rare earth metals under high pressures. (authors)

Vohra, Yogesh K.; Sangala, Bagvanth Reddy; Stemshorn, Andrew K. [Physics, University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), 310 Campbell Hall, 1300 University Boulevard, Birmingham, AL, 35294-1170 (United States); Hope, Kevin M. [Biology, Chemistry, and Mathematics, University of Montevallo, Harman Hall, Station 6480, Montevallo, AL, 35115 (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Reduced order prediction of rare events in unidirectional nonlinear water waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the problem of short-term prediction of rare, extreme water waves in unidirectional fields, a critical topic for ocean structures and naval operations. One possible mechanism for the occurrence of such rare, unusually-intense waves is nonlinear wave focusing. Recent results have demonstrated that random localizations of energy, induced by the dispersive mixing of different harmonics, can grow significantly due to localized nonlinear focusing. Here we show how the interplay between i) statistical properties captured through linear information such as the waves power spectrum and ii) nonlinear dynamical properties of focusing localized wave groups defines a critical length scale associated with the formation of extreme events. The energy that is locally concentrated over this length scale acts as the "trigger" of nonlinear focusing for wave groups and the formation of subsequent rare events. We use this property to develop inexpensive, short-term predictors of large water waves. Specifically, we sho...

Cousins, Will

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

DISSOLVED CONCENTRATION LIMITS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of elements with radioactive isotopes under probable repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, field measurements, and laboratory experiments. The scope of this modeling activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for 14 elements with radioactive isotopes (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium) important to calculated dose. Model outputs for uranium, plutonium, neptunium, thorium, americium, and protactinium are in the form of tabulated functions with pH and log (line integral) CO{sub 2} as independent variables, plus one or more uncertainty terms. The solubility limits for the remaining elements are either in the form of distributions or single values. The output data from this report are fundamental inputs for Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) to determine the estimated release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Consistent modeling approaches and environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models for all of the actinides. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so that they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, and activity coefficients have been quantified or otherwise addressed.

NA

2004-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

451

Knowledge of Language: Its Elements and Origins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

2 October 1981 research-article Knowledge of Language: Its Elements and Origins...language is based on the assumption that knowledge of language can be properly characterized...concepts are those of 'grammar' and 'knowledge of grammar'. The concepts of 'language...

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

RECENT WORK WITH THE TRANSURANIUM ELEMENTS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...out materials from the first test thermonuclear explosion, the "Mike" shot which...chemical investigations were completed. Thermonuclear explosions do offer good possibilities...elements in 94 96 98 W 102 104 106 108 110 thermonuclear explosions is an ATOMIC NUMBER interesting...

Glenn T. Seaborg

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

X-Ray Identification of Element 104  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The daughter x-ray identification technique has been applied to the identification of element 104. The characteristic K-series x rays from the ?-decay daughter isotope, nobelium (Z=102), have been observed in coincidence with ? particles from the decay of 4.5-sec 104257, thus providing an unequivocal determination of the parent atomic number, Z=104.

C. E. Bemis; Jr.; R. J. Silva; D. C. Hensley; O. L. Keller; Jr.; J. R. Tarrant; L. D. Hunt; P. F. Dittner; R. L. Hahn; C. D. Goodman

1973-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

454

Chaotic Boltzmann machines with two elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this brief note, we show that chaotic Boltzmann machines truly yield samples from the probabilistic distribution of the corresponding Boltzmann machines if they are composed of only two elements. This note is an English translation (with slight modifications) of the article originally written in Japanese [H. Suzuki, Seisan Kenkyu 66 (2014), 315-316].

Hideyuki Suzuki

2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

455

Seaborg Discusses Transuranium Elements in Howe Lecture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Seaborg Discusses Transuranium Elements in Howe Lecture ... THE isolation of a pure compound of americium in weighable amounts and the natural occurrence of plutonium in carnotite were announced by Glenn T. Seaborg at the second annual Harrison Howe Lecture of the Rochester Section of the AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY on Nov. 18. ...

1946-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

456

A NONCONFORMING MIXED FINITE ELEMENT METHOD FOR ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the time-harmonic Maxwell's equations in a three-dimensional, bounded ... tric conductivity from measurements of natural electric and magnetic fields on the .... Let (?s(?) s) and (?s(?) s) indicate standard, complex Sobolev spaces ..... continuity constraints at the centroids of the interfaces between adjacent elements:.

1910-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

457

CONVERGENCE OF A MULTISCALE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mar 3, 1999 ... In this paper, we consider solving a class of two-dimensional, second order, el- liptic boundary ... a standard finite element or finite difference method is used to solve the equations, the degrees of ..... terfaces. The result depends on the geometry of the jump interfaces. ...... a measure of the relative error.

1999-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

458

Near-field diffractive elements Daniel Marks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by a near-field diffractive element (NDE) that scatters the high-spatial-frequency components of the field susceptibility r , and the NDE is described by the susceptibilty r . The field obeys the equation 2 U r +k0 2 U r to first order in both the NDE and the sample susceptibilities. It is assumed that the background terms

Bhargava, Rohit

459

Amounts of Trace Elements in Marine Cephalopods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Amounts of Trace Elements in Marine Cephalopods T. Ueda * M. Nakahara...H. Suzuki ** * Division of Marine Radioecology, National Institute...Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Cooperation, Tokyo...Co and Cs in 5 species of marine cephalopods were determined......

T. Ueda; M. Nakahara; T. Ishii; Y. Suzuki; H. Suzuki

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

The New Element Californium (Atomic Number 98)  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Definite identification has been made of an isotope of the element with atomic number 98 through the irradiation of Cm{sup 242} with about 35-Mev helium ions in the Berkeley Crocker Laboratory 60-inch cyclotron. The isotope which has been identified has an observed half-life of about 45 minutes and is thought to have the mass number 244. The observed mode of decay of 98{sup 244} is through the emission of alpha-particles, with energy of about 7.1 Mev, which agrees with predictions. Other considerations involving the systematics of radioactivity in this region indicate that it should also be unstable toward decay by electron capture. The chemical separation and identification of the new element was accomplished through the use of ion exchange adsorption methods employing the resin Dowex-50. The element 98 isotope appears in the eka-dysprosium position on elution curves containing berkelium and curium as reference points--that is, it precedes berkelium and curium off the column in like manner that dysprosium precedes terbium and gadolinium. The experiments so far have revealed only the tripositive oxidation state of eka-dysprosium character and suggest either that higher oxidation states are not stable in aqueous solutions or that the rates of oxidation are slow. The successful identification of so small an amount of an isotope of element 98 was possible only through having made accurate predictions of the chemical and radioactive properties.

Seaborg, G. T.; Thompson, S. G.; Street, K. Jr.; Ghiroso, A.

1950-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Category:Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Elements | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Elements Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Elements Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png Looking for the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap? Click here for a user-friendly list of Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap pages. Add.png Add an Element Pages in this category are created or edited using the RRElement form. Pages in category "Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Elements" The following 40 pages are in this category, out of 40 total. 1 GRR/Elements/14-CA-b.1 - NPDES Permit Application GRR/Elements/14-CA-b.10 - Did majority of RWQCB approve the permit GRR/Elements/14-CA-b.11 - EPA Review of Adopted Permit GRR/Elements/14-CA-b.12 - Were all EPA objections resolved GRR/Elements/14-CA-b.13 - NPDES Permit issued GRR/Elements/14-CA-b.2 - Review of application for completeness

462

Ferroelectric tunneling element and memory applications which utilize the tunneling element  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tunneling element includes a thin film layer of ferroelectric material and a pair of dissimilar electrically-conductive layers disposed on opposite sides of the ferroelectric layer. Because of the dissimilarity in composition or construction between the electrically-conductive layers, the electron transport behavior of the electrically-conductive layers is polarization dependent when the tunneling element is below the Curie temperature of the layer of ferroelectric material. The element can be used as a basis of compact 1R type non-volatile random access memory (RAM). The advantages include extremely simple architecture, ultimate scalability and fast access times generic for all ferroelectric memories.

Kalinin, Sergei V. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Christen, Hans M. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Baddorf, Arthur P. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Meunier, Vincent (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Lee, Ho Nyung (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

463

HELSINKI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY ENE-47.153 Trace elements and alkaliTrace elements and alkali  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

elements in fossil - and waste-derived fuelsTrace elements in fossil - and waste-derived fuels Coal Peat Heavy fuel oil Pet coke MSW RDF Wood Waste wood Waste paper Scrap tyres Sew. sludge Hg 0.02-3 ~0.07 .153 Behaviour of trace elements in coalBehaviour of trace elements in coal combustion flue gasescombustion flue

Zevenhoven, Ron

464

Managing Natural and Reintroduced Rare Plant Populations within a Large Government Reservation  

SciTech Connect

California is home to many large government reservations that have been in existence for decades. Many of these reservations were formed to support various Department of Defense and Department of Energy national defense activities. Often, only a very small percentage of the reservation is actively used for programmatic activities, resulting in large areas of intact habitat. In some cases, this has benefited rare plant populations, as surrounding lands have been developed for residential or industrial use. However, land management activities such as the suppression or active use of fire and other disturbance (such as fire trail grading) can also work to either the detriment or benefit of rare plant populations at these sites. A management regime that is beneficial to the rare plant populations of interest and is at best consistent with existing site programmatic activities, and at a minimum does not impact such activities, has the best potential for a positive outcome. As a result, some species may be 'difficult' while others may be 'easy' to manage in this context, depending on how closely the species biological requirements match the programmatic activities on the reservation. To illustrate, we compare and contrast two rare annual plant species found at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Site 300. Although several populations of Amsinckia grandiflora have been restored on the site, and all populations are intensively managed, this species continues to decline. In contrast, Blepharizonia plumosa appears to take advantage of the annual controlled burns conducted on the site, and is thriving.

Carlsen, T M; Paterson, L E; Alfaro, T M

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

465

Search for supersymmetry using rare B to mumu decays at CDF run II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A search for rare B0 s -> +- and B0d -> +- decays has been performed in pp collisions at sqroot(s) = 1.96 TeV using 364 pb-1 of data collected by the CDF II experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The rate of each decay is sensitive...

Krutelyov, Vyacheslav

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

466

Magnetic properties of rare-earth antiferromagnets studied using a two-ion model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, a two-ion model for rare-earth antiferromagnets is proposed and employed to describe the magnetic behavior of HoNi2B2C and DyFe2Si2 at low temperatures. The calculated temperature dependence of the susceptibilities and magnetizations along the hard and easy directions, respectively, shows very good agreement with experimental results.

Z.-S. Liu; M. Divi; V. Sechovsk

2008-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

467

Search for Rare 3 and 4-Body D0 Decays at FNAL E791  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Limits at the 10**-4 level are reported for rare and forbidden decays of the D0 charm meson to a pair of leptons and either a vector meson or two pseudoscalar mesons. Of these searches, 18 are investigations of decays without previous published results; several others have significantly improved sensitivity over previous results.

Fermilab E791 Collaboration; D. J. Summers

2000-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

468

Conditionally Rare Taxa Disproportionately Contribute to Temporal Changes in Microbial Diversity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Kirchman DL. 2011. Activity of abundant and rare bacteria in a coastal ocean. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 108 :12776-12781. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1101405108 . 15. Jones SE and Lennon JT. 2010. Dormancy contributes to the maintenance...

Ashley Shade; Stuart E. Jones; J. Gregory Caporaso; Jo Handelsman; Rob Knight; Noah Fierer; Jack A. Gilbert

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Thermal treatment for increasing magnetostrictive response of rare earth-iron alloy rods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Magnetostrictive rods formed from rare earth-iron alloys are subjected to a short time heat treatment to increase their magnetostrictive response under compression. The heat treatment is preferably carried out at a temperature of from 900 to 1,000 C for 20 minutes to six hours.

Verhoeven, J.D.; McMasters, O.D.

1989-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

470

Ternary rare earth-lanthanide sulfides. [Re = Eu, Sm or Yb  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a new ternary rare earth sulfur compound having the formula La/sub 3-x/M/sub x/S/sub 4/, where M is europium, samarium, or ytterbium, with x = 0.15 to 0.8. The compound has good high-temperature thermoelectric properties and exhibits long-term structural stability up to 1000/sup 0/C.

Takeshita, Takuo; Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.; Beaudry, B.J.

1986-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

471

Selecting Landscape Plants: Rare and Unusual Trees Diane Relf, Extension Specialist, Horticulture, Virginia Tech  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Selecting Landscape Plants: Rare and Unusual Trees Diane Relf, Extension Specialist, Horticulture, Virginia Tech Bonnie Appleton, Extension Specialist, Horticulture, Virginia Tech There are many tree and smooth, light gray bark make it a very handsome tree. Many unusual cultivars have been elected from

Liskiewicz, Maciej

472

Hydrogen absorption characteristics of oxygen-stabilized rare-earth iron intermetallic compounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen absorption characteristics of oxygen-stabilized rare-earth iron intermetallic compounds M Abstract. -- The thermal behavior of oxygen-stabilized RjFegO^-hydrogen (R = Y, Dy, Ho) systems was studied decade to the study of the hydrogenation characte- ristics of a variety of intermetallic compounds, our

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

473

Calculation of the electron distribution function of a rare gas nuclear induced plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1101 Calculation of the electron distribution function of a rare gas nuclear induced plasma A. M of the energy spectrum of the seed electrons. As an example, this calculation is applied to the case of neon ionisantes rapides est calculable, dans sa partie à basse et moyenne énergie, sans la connaissance précise

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

474

Excess of Rare Damaging TUBA4A Variants Suggests Cytoskeletal Defects in ALS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Identifying disease genes implicated in late-onset neurodegenerative disorders can be challenging due to the lack of DNA samples from multiple affected family members. To overcome this limitation, Smith etal. (2014) report in this issue of Neuron the first exome-wide rare variant analysis in unrelated familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients associating TUBA4A with ALS.

Rosa Rademakers; Marka vanBlitterswijk

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Power and sample size calculations for designing rare variant sequenc-ing association studies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the statistical power of SKAT. Required sample size can be computed easily by inverting the power functionPower and sample size calculations for designing rare variant sequenc- ing association studies pow- erful than the collapsing based burden tests under many circumstances [4]. To design new sequence

Lin, Xihong

476

South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com Venus to cross sun in rare celestial event  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com Venus to cross sun in rare celestial event By Robert Nolin, Sun passage across the face of the sun at twilight Tuesday. It's a sight you'll never see again. Called named for the Roman goddess of love will pass between the Earth and the sun for several hours at sunset

Belogay, Eugene A.

477

MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF DEPARTMENTAL ELEMENTS FROM:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HEADS OF DEPARTMENTAL ELEMENTS HEADS OF DEPARTMENTAL ELEMENTS FROM: SUBJECT: Project Full Funding Policy in the Annual ~ u d ~ e t Request On July 18,2008, the Secretary approved the Department's Contract and Project Management Root Cause Analysis (RCA) Corrective Action Plan (CAP). This is the Department's plan to improve contract and project management and ultimately be removed from GAO's High Risk List - a list that the Department has been on since 1990. One of the key issues identified in the CAP is the Department's failure to request and obtain full funding for non-information technology capital asset projects, where appropriate. This new policy is established to reduce the inherent inefficiencies and risks ingoduced by prolonging the duration of small projects, as well as to add budget stability

478

Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

Adams, Jesse D; Sulchek, Todd A; Feigin, Stuart C

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

479

Automation of the matrix element reweighting method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Matrix element reweighting is a powerful experimental technique widely employed to maximize the amount of information that can be extracted from a collider data set. We present a procedure that allows to automatically evaluate the weights for any process of interest in the standard model and beyond. Given the initial, intermediate and final state particles, and the transfer functions for the final physics objects, such as leptons, jets, missing transverse energy, our algorithm creates a phase-space mapping designed to efficiently perform the integration of the squared matrix element and the transfer functions. The implementation builds up on MadGraph, it is completely automatized and publicly available. A few sample applications are presented that show the capabilities of the code and illustrate the possibilities for new studies that such an approach opens up.

P. Artoisenet; V. Lematre; F. Maltoni; O. Mattelaer

2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

480

Cubic rare-earth compounds: Variants of the three-state Potts model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In appropriate cubic fields rare-earth ions have sixfold degenerate ground states. When the angular momentum of the rare earth is large, the six levels are characterized by states that are directed along the cube edges. Within these states the angular momentum operators Jx, Jy, and Jz have particularly simple matrix representations. The projection of an isotropic pair coupling between the rare earths onto these sixfold degenerate states leads to an interaction Hamiltonian H=-I??ij??i?j?lilj, where ? takes on the values 1 and l the values x, y, and z. This interaction is a variant of the three-state Potts model. We add magnetic and quadrupolar anisotropy field terms to the Hamiltonian and determine the symmetry properties of the phase diagram associated with this model. For nonzero quadrupolar anisotropy fields, the model is shown to have the thermodynamic behavior of an Ising model. However, for zero fields we find a new symmetry appears and in the mean-field approximation the model has tricritical-like exponents. This simple model is able to account for the large specific-heat critical exponent ??=12 which has been observed for holmium antimonide in zero external fields. To the extent that the mean-field approximation is an accurate guide, we predict there are many cubic rare-earth compounds which exhibit tricritical-like behavior in zero field. In addition we find that for pure quadrupole coupling between rare earths in the sixfold degenerate states, the interaction Hamiltonian is exactly the three-state Potts model. In the mean-field approximation this system has a first-order phase transition. However, a small quadrupolar anisotropy field is sufficient to drive the system to a wing critical point. The specific heat has a critical exponent of ?=23or1 depending on the path taken to approach this critical point.

D. Kim; Peter M. Levy; L. F. Uffer

1975-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Trace element partitioning in Texas lignite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), but collected from the one of the secondary tanks which contains the slurry that exits the scrubber tower and is either recycled or sent to the thickener tank. 10. Bag house FGD (flue gas desulfurization system) fly ash fines (BHA): white-gray, dry, fine... Station. Concentrations of 41 elements were determined by neutron activation analysis. The particle size distribution was determined by Coulter counter analysis for the fly ash collected from the electrostatic precipitator outlets and from the flue...

Acevedo, Lillian Esther

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Muckraking elements in Frank Norris's "The Octopus.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

illegal schemes and imposes the same outrageous rates and. regu. lations as the real "octopus. " Likewise, 'Iorris creates f'ct. 'anal characters to correspond. to the real ranchers who had opposed the railroad. IIagnus and IIarran i)errick, Annixter... "mouthpieces" for the business interests which owned them, but they were necessary elements ior the great hoax to be successful. The apathetic public was unli! ely to be aware that collusion existed between industry end government and that illegal...

Leitz, Robert Charles

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Integrating local action elements for action analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a framework for human action analysis from video footage. A video action sequence in our perspective is a dynamic structure of sparse local spatial-temporal patches termed action elements, so the problems of action analysis ... Keywords: Action classification, Action distance function, Action matching, Action retrieval, Generalized Hough Transform, Implicit Shape Model, Multi-dimensional density estimation, Sparse Bayesian classifier, Spatial temporal feature

Tuan Hue Thi; Li Cheng; Jian Zhang; Li Wang; Shinichi Satoh

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Nuclear fuel elements made from nanophase materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor core fuel element is composed of nanophase high temperature materials. An array of the fuel elements in rod form are joined in an open geometry fuel cell that preferably also uses such nanophase materials for the cell structures. The particular high temperature nanophase fuel element material must have the appropriate mechanical characteristics to avoid strain related failure even at high temperatures, in the order of about 3000 F. Preferably, the reactor type is a pressurized or boiling water reactor and the nanophase material is a high temperature ceramic or ceramic composite. Nanophase metals, or nanophase metals with nanophase ceramics in a composite mixture, also have desirable characteristics, although their temperature capability is not as great as with all-ceramic nanophase material. Combinations of conventional or nanophase metals and conventional or nanophase ceramics can be employed as long as there is at least one nanophase material in the composite. The nuclear reactor so constructed has a number of high strength fuel particles, a nanophase structural material for supporting a fuel rod at high temperature, a configuration to allow passive cooling in the event of a primary cooling system failure, an ability to retain a coolable geometry even at high temperatures, an ability to resist generation of hydrogen gas, and a configuration having good nuclear, corrosion, and mechanical characteristics. 5 figs.

Heubeck, N.B.

1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

485

Method of manufacturing iron aluminide by thermomechanical processing of elemental powders  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A powder metallurgical process of preparing iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 20 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1 % rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, and/or .ltoreq.3% Cu. The process includes forming a mixture of aluminum powder and iron powder, shaping the mixture into an article such as by cold rolling the mixture into a sheet, and sintering the article at a temperature sufficient to react the iron and aluminum powders and form iron aluminide. The sintering can be followed by hot or cold rolling to reduce porosity created during the sintering step and optional annealing steps in a vacuum or inert atmosphere.

Deevi, Seetharama C. (Midlothian, VA); Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton (Chesterfield, VA); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hajaligol, Mohammed R. (Richmond, VA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Abstract 2227: An automatic pipeline to find and annotate rare subclonal somatic variants in a paired tumor/normal sample  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...5-9, 2014; San Diego, CA Abstract 2227: An automatic pipeline to find and annotate rare subclonal somatic variants in a paired...Thomas Knudsen, Dan Richards, Roald Forsberg. An automatic pipeline to find and annotate rare subclonal somatic variants in a paired...

Anika Joecker; Nathan Pearson; Cecilie Boysen; Naomi Thomson; Anne-Mette Hein; Bodil Oster; Anne Arens; Bjarne Knudsen; Thomas Knudsen; Dan Richards; Roald Forsberg

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Application of synchrotron radiation to elemental analysis  

SciTech Connect

The use of a synchrotron storage ring as a high brightness source for production of monoergic, variable energy, and highly polarized x-ray beams promises to revolutionize the field of elemental analysis. The results of exploratory work using the Cornell synchrotron facility, CHESS, will be described. Design considerations and features of the new X-Ray Microprobe Facility now under construction at the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source will be presented. This facility will be used for bulk analysis and for microanalysis with an initial spatial resolution of the order of 30 ..mu..m.

Jones, K.W.; Gordon, B.M.; Hanson, A.L.; Hastings, J.B.; Howells, M.R.; Kraner, H.W.; Chen, J.R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Superheavy Element Synthesis And Nuclear Structure  

SciTech Connect

After the successful progress in experiments to synthesize superheavy elements (SHE) throughout the last decades, advanced nuclear structure studies in that region have become feasible in recent years thanks to improved accelerator, separation and detection technology. The means are evaporation residue(ER)-alpha-alpha and ER-alpha-gamma coincidence techniques complemented by conversion electron (CE) studies, applied after a separator. Recent examples of interesting physics to be discovered in this region of the chart of nuclides are the studies of K-isomers observed in {sup 252,254}No and in {sup 270}Ds.

Ackermann, D.; Block, M.; Burkhard, H.-G.; Heinz, S.; Hessberger, F. P.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kojouharov, I.; Mann, R.; Maurer, J. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstr.1, D-64921 Darmstadt (Germany); Antalic, S.; Saro, S.; Venhart, M. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Comenius UniversitySK-84248 Bratislava (Slovakia); Hofmann, S. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstr.1, D-64921 Darmstadt (Germany); Institut fuer Physik, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet, D-60438 Frankfurt (Germany); Leino, M.; Uusitalo, J. [Department of Physics, University of JyvaeskylaeFIN-40351 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Nishio, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Popeko, A. G.; Yeremin, A. V. [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, JINR Ru-141 980 Dubna (Russian Federation)

2009-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

489

Mixed finite elements for global tide models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study mixed finite element methods for the linearized rotating shallow water equations with linear drag and forcing terms. By means of a strong energy estimate for an equivalent second-order formulation for the linearized momentum, we prove long-time stability of the system without energy accumulation -- the geotryptic state. A priori error estimates for the linearized momentum and free surface elevation are given in $L^2$ as well as for the time derivative and divergence of the linearized momentum. Numerical results confirm the theoretical results regarding both energy damping and convergence rates.

Cotter, Colin J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia Researchers Win CSP:ELEMENTS...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ClimateECAbout ECFacilitiesAdvanced Materials LaboratorySandia Researchers Win CSP:ELEMENTS Funding Award Sandia Researchers Win CSP:ELEMENTS Funding Award The Brain: Key To a...

491

On Some Versions of the Element Agglomeration AMGe Method  

SciTech Connect

The present paper deals with element-based AMG methods that target linear systems of equations coming from finite element discretizations of elliptic PDEs. The individual element information (element matrices and element topology) is the main input to construct the AMG hierarchy. We study a number of variants of the spectral agglomerate element based AMG method. The core of the algorithms relies on element agglomeration utilizing the element topology (built recursively from fine to coarse levels). The actual selection of the coarse degrees of freedom (dofs) is based on solving large number of local eigenvalue problems. Additionally, we investigate strategies for adaptive AMG as well as multigrid cycles that are more expensive than the V-cycle utilizing simple interpolation matrices and nested conjugate gradient (CG) based recursive calls between the levels. The presented algorithms are illustrated with an extensive set of experiments based on a matlab implementation of the methods.

Lashuk, I; Vassilevski, P

2007-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

492

Heavy Element Synthesis Reactions W. Loveland Oregon State University  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

heavy element synthesis reactions and heavy element properties * Hot (E*35-60 MeV) and Cold (E*15 MeV) fusion reactions * Multi-nucleon transfer reactions * Fission * Atomic...

493

Rational Wachspress-type Finite Elements on Regular Hexagons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Finite Elements on Regular Hexagons J. L. GOUT Departement de Mathematiques, Universite...Finite Elements on Regular Hexagons J. L. GOUT Departement de Mathematiques, Universite...1975) (see also Apprato, Arcangeli & Gout, 1979a, b; Gout, 1979, 1980a, b......

J. L. GOUT

494

GEO+, a finite element program on a personal computer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The following study is the first step toward implementation of a complete finite element analysis package on a personal computer for geotechnical engineering problems. A complete finite element analysis has been written in the C/C++ language...

Guillin, Clement Gerard

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

495

GNEP Element:Minimize Nuclear Waste | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minimize Nuclear Waste GNEP Element:Minimize Nuclear Waste An article describing the ways in which the GNEP plans to minimize nuclear waste. GNEP Element:Minimize Nuclear Waste...

496

Element specific measurements of the structural properties and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Element specific measurements of the structural properties and magnetism of CoxZn1-xO. Element specific measurements of the structural properties and magnetism of CoxZn1-xO....

497

Defining functional DNA elements in the human genome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the completion of the human genome sequence, attention turned to identifying and annotating its functional DNA elements. As a complement to genetic and comparative genomics approaches, the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements ...

Kellis, Manolis

498

Using NERSC Systems, Physcists Close in on a Rare-Particle Decay Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using NERSC Systems, Using NERSC Systems, Physcists Close in on a Rare-Particle Decay Process Using NERSC Systems, Physicists Close In on a Rare-Particle Decay Process Underground Experiment May Unlock the Mysteries of the Neutrino June 11, 2012 | Tags: Accelerator Science, High Energy Physics (HEP), Hopper NERSC Contact: Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 exo-1.jpg Located at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad, New Mexico, EXO-200 is a 200-kg detector using liquid xenon, enriched in the isotope 136, to detect "neutrino-less double beta decay." With help from supercomputers at the Department of Energy's National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC), the Enriched Xenon Observatory experiment (EXO-200) has placed the most stringent constraints

499

Influence of double-electron transitions on the EXAFS L edges of rare-earth systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work presents an x-ray-absorption study at the L edges of several rare-earth compounds. In both L1-edge and L3-edge spectra, anomalous features are clearly detected in the EXAFS region and have been associated with the creation of 2s4d and 2p4d double-core hole states, respectively. Comparison of theoretical calculations with the experiments are carried out using the results of explicit computation of cross sections for the allowed mainline (L edge) and double-electron (LN4,5 edges) which identify the transitions expected to be observable. In addition, the excitation energies of all of these allowed transitions are given. The influence of multielectron transitions on the EXAFS data analysis is discussed for several rare-earth-based systems. An estimate of the error introduced by neglecting the presence of double-electron transitions on coordination numbers and bond distances is given, based on these experimental data.

Jess Chaboy; Augusto Marcelli; Trevor A. Tyson

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Charge screening and magnetic anisotropy in metallic rare-earth systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The calculation of magnetic anisotropy constants is performed beyond the point-charge model for a continuous charge-density distribution of screening conduction electrons. An important role of the nonuniform electron density, in particular, of the Friedel oscillations, in the formation of crystal field is demonstrated. Such effects can modify strongly the effective ion (impurity) charge and even change its sign. This enables one to justify the anion model, which is often used for discussing experimental data on hydrogen-containing systems. Possible applications to the pure rare-earth metals and RCo5 (R=rare earth) compounds are discussed. The deformation of magnetic structure near the interstitial positive muon owing to the strong local anisotropy, and the corresponding contribution to the dipole field at the muon are considered.

V. Yu. Irkhin and Yu. P. Irkhin

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z