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Sample records for urban range test

  1. EM Tackles Cleanup at Tonopah Test Range

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NEVADA – Environmental cleanup experts spent the last weeks of summer on the Tonopah Test Range addressing contaminated equipment and debris at two historical nuclear testing locations.

  2. Tonopah Test Range capabilities: technical manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manhart, R.L.

    1982-11-01

    This manual describes Tonopah Test Range (TTR), defines its testing capabilities, and outlines the steps necessary to schedule tests on the Range. Operated by Sandia National Laboratories, TTR is a major test facility for DOE-funded weapon programs. The Range presents an integrated system for ballistic test vehicle tracking and data acquisition. Multiple radars, optical trackers, telemetry stations, a central computer complex, and combined landline/RF communications systems assure full Range coverage for any type of test. Range operations are conducted by a department within Sandia's Field Engineering Directorate. While the overall Range functions as a complete system, it is operationally divided into the Test Measurements, Instrumentation Development, and Range Operations divisions. The primary function of TTR is to support DOE weapons test activities. Management, however, encourages other Government agencies and their contractors to schedule tests on the Range which can make effective use of its capabilities. Information concerning Range use by organizations outside of DOE is presented. Range instrumentation and support facilities are described in detail. This equipment represents the current state-of-the-art and reflects a continuing commitment by TTR management to field the most effective tracking and data acquisition system available.

  3. Tonopah Test Range 2030 Meeting Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2009-04-01

    Corrective Action Sites (CASs) and Corrective Action Units (CAUs) at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) may be placed into three categories: Closed, Closed in Place, or Closure in Progress. CASs and CAUs where contaminants were either not detected or were cleaned up to within regulatory action levels are summarized. CASs and CAUs where contaminants and/or waste have been closed in place are summarized. There is also a table that summarizes the contaminant that has been closed at each site, if land-use restrictions are present, and if post-closure inspections are required.

  4. Tonopah test range - outpost of Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, L.

    1996-03-01

    Tonopah Test Range is a unique historic site. Established in 1957 by Sandia Corporation, Tonopah Test Range in Nevada provided an isolated place for the Atomic Energy Commission to test ballistics and non-nuclear features of atomic weapons. It served this and allied purposes well for nearly forty years, contributing immeasurably to a peaceful conclusion to the long arms race remembered as the Cold War. This report is a brief review of historical highlights at Tonopah Test Range. Sandia`s Los Lunas, Salton Sea, Kauai, and Edgewood testing ranges also receive abridged mention. Although Sandia`s test ranges are the subject, the central focus is on the people who managed and operated the range. Comments from historical figures are interspersed through the narrative to establish this perspective, and at the end a few observations concerning the range`s future are provided.

  5. Tonopah Test Range Environmental Restoration Corrective Action Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2010-08-04

    This report describes the status (closed, closed in place, or closure in progress) of the Corrective Action Sites and Corrective Action Units at the Tonopah Test Range

  6. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nevada Test And Training Range...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  7. Aerial Photography At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aerial Photography At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Aerial...

  8. Geodetic Survey At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geodetic Survey At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geodetic Survey At...

  9. Geographic Information System At Nevada Test And Training Range...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geographic Information System At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  10. Geothermometry At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermometry At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At...

  11. Renewable Energy and the Nevada Test and Training Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Robert Michael

    1 Renewable Energy and the Nevada Test and Training Range Wednesday, December 15, 2010 Melissa due to renewable energy infrastructure development at the Nevada Test and Training Range. Nevada has have ever-increasing renewable energy goals. However, proposals for the development of 116 renewable

  12. Tonopah Test Range Post-Closure Inspection Annual Report, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Calendar Year 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. B. Jackson

    2003-08-01

    This Post-Closure Inspection Annual Report provides documentation of the semiannual inspections conducted at the following Corrective Action Units (CAU)s: CAU 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points Landfill; CAU 404: Roller Coaster Lagoons and Trench; CAU 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area; CAU 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes; CAU 426: Cactus Spring Waste Trenches; CAU 427: Septic Waste Systems 2, 6; and CAU 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill, all located at the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada. Post-closure inspections are not required at CAU 400 but are conducted to monitor vegetation and fencing at the site. Site inspections were conducted in May and November 2002. All site inspections were made after Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) approval of the appropriate Closure Report (CR), excluding CAU 400 which did not require a CR, and were conducted in accordance with the Post-Closure Inspection Plans in the NDEP-approved CRs. Post-closure inspections conducted during 2002 identified several areas requiring maintenance/repairs. Maintenance work and proposed additional monitoring are included in the appropriate section for each CAU. This report includes copies of the Post-Closure Inspection Plans, Post-Closure Inspection Checklists, copies of the field notes, photographs, and the Post-Closure Vegetative Monitoring Report. The Post-Closure Inspection Plan for each CAU is located in Attachment A. Post-Closure Inspection Checklists are in Attachment B. Copies of the field notes from each inspection are included in Attachment C. Attachment D consists of the photographic logs and photographs of the sites. The post-closure vegetative monitoring report for calendar year 2002 is included in Attachment E.

  13. Tonopah Test Range Summary of Corrective Action Units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald B. Jackson

    2007-05-01

    Corrective Action Sites (CASs) and Corrective Action Units (CAUs) at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) may be placed into three categories: Clean Closure/No Further Action, Closure in Place, or Closure in Progress.

  14. Test particle transport from long-range collisions* F. Anderegg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    Test particle transport from long-range collisions* F. Anderegg , X.-P. Huang,a) E. M. Hollmann, C and Department of Physics, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 Received 11 November faster than the plasma. Test particle transport is then measured even though there is zero net transport

  15. BIOLOGICAL AND MICROBIAL CONTROL Host Range Testing of Diaphorencyrtus aligarhensis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoddle, Mark S.

    ,000 jobs (Richards et al. 2014). Many of California's commercial citrus orchards are in close proximity to urban areas, which can serve as reservoirs from which D. citri can migrate into produc- tion areas

  16. 1994 site environmental report, Tonopah Test Range, Tonopah, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culp, T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Forston, W. [Kirk-Mayer, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This report summarizes the environmental surveillance activities conducted by Sandia National Laboratories, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and Kirk-Mayer, Inc., for the Tonopah Test Range operated by Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia National Laboratories` responsibility for environmental surveillance results extends to those activities performed by Sandia National Laboratories or under its direction. Results from other environmental surveillance activities are included to provide a measure of completeness in reporting. Other environmental compliance programs such as the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, environmental permits, and environmental restoration and waste management programs are also included in this report, prepared for the US Department of Energy (DOE) in compliance with DOE Order 5400. 1.

  17. 1993 site environmental report Tonopah Test Range, Tonopah, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culp, T.; Howard, D.; McClellan, Y.

    1994-10-01

    This report summarizes the environmental surveillance activities conducted by Sandia National Laboratories, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and Reynolds Electrical and Engineering Company for the Tonopah Test Range operated by Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia National Laboratories` responsibility for environmental monitoring results extend to those activities performed by Sandia National Laboratories or under its direction. Results from other environmental monitoring activities are included to provide a measure of completeness in reporting. Other environmental compliance programs such as the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, environmental permits, and environmental restoration and waste management programs are also included in this report, prepared for the US Department of Energy in compliance with DOE Order 5400.1.

  18. 1998 Annual Site Environmental Report Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, D.K.; Fink, C.H.; Sanchez, R.V.

    1999-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) operates the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) for the Department of Energy (DOE) Weapons Ordnance Program. This annual report (calendar year 1998) summarizes the compliance status to environmental regulations applicable at the site including those statutes that govern air and water quality, waste management cleanup of contaminated areas, control of toxic substances, and adherence to requirements as related to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). In compliance with DOE orders, SNL also conducts environmental surveillance for radiological and nonradiological contaminants. SNL's responsibility for environmental surveillance at TTR extends only to those areas where SNL activities are carried out. Annual radiological and nonradiological routine releases and unplanned releases (occurrences) are also summarized. This report has been prepared in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE 1990a).

  19. Geographic Information System At Nevada Test And Training Range Area

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky: EnergyGateway1997) | Open Energy Information2014)

  20. High force vibration testing with wide frequency range

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Romero, Edward F.; Jepsen, Richard A.; Gregory, Danny Lynn

    2013-04-02

    A shaker assembly for vibration testing includes first and second shakers, where the first shaker includes a piezo-electric material for generating vibration. A support structure permits a test object to be supported for vibration of the test object by both shakers. An input permits an external vibration controller to control vibration of the shakers.

  1. Fallon Test Ranges Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbH JumpEllenville,PowerEvaporative||NewFale-Safe, IncFallon Naval AirTest

  2. Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI Ventures Ltd JumpNesjavellirInformationCertified TankNevada Test And

  3. Calendar Year 2004 annual site environmental report : Tonopah Test Range, Nevada & Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montoya, Amber L.; Wagner, Katrina; Goering, Teresa Lynn; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

    2005-09-01

    Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Office (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, manages TTR and KTF's operations. Sandia Corporation conducts operations at TTR in support of DOE/NNSA's Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Westinghouse Government Services subcontracts to Sandia Corporation in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia Corporation operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2004. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia Corporation is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA, Nevada Site Office (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2005) and DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 2004b).

  4. Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX): Instructions for Implementing the Test Procedure, Calibration Test Reference Results, and Example Acceptance-Range Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judkoff, R.; Polly, B.; Bianchi, M.; Neymark, J.; Kennedy, M.

    2011-08-01

    This publication summarizes building energy simulation test for existing homes (BESTEST-EX): instructions for implementing the test procedure, calibration tests reference results, and example acceptance-range criteria.

  5. Locally Testing Direct Products in the Low Error Range Weizmann Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dinur, Irit

    acceptance probability of the test. We show that even if the test passes with small probability, > 0Locally Testing Direct Products in the Low Error Range Irit Dinur Weizmann Institute Dept Given a function f : X , its -wise direct prod- uct is the function F = f : X defined by: F(x1

  6. POST-CLOSURE INSPECTION REPORT FOR THE TONOPAH TEST RANGE, NEVADA FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-06-01

    This post-closure inspection report includes the results of inspections, maintenance and repair activities, and conclusions and recommendations for Calendar Year 2005 for nine Corrective Action Units located on the Tonopah Test Range , Nevada.

  7. An Empirical Test of the Relationship between Sustainability and Urban Form Based on Indicator Comparisons using Sustainlane Sustainable City Rankings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Bo Ah

    2011-02-22

    pollution, reduce the amount of land affected by impervious surfaces such as roads and parking lots, and reduce the consumption of agricultural land (Duany & Plater-Zyberk, 1992). The compact city is now widely accepted, particularly in land use planning... (Williams et al., 2000). 2.3 Un-Sustainable Urban Form : Sprawl Across the nation, growing numbers of cities are discovering links between urban sprawl and a wide range of problems, from traffic and air pollution to central city poverty...

  8. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 424: Area 3 Landfill Complex, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    1998-08-31

    This corrective action plan provides the closure implementation methods for the Area 3 Landfill Complex, Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 424, located at the Tonopah Test Range. The Area 3 Landfill Complex consists of 8 landfill sites, each designated as a separate corrective action site.

  9. Testing Hypotheses of Vicariance in the Agamid Lizard Laudakia caucasia from Mountain Ranges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schulte, Jim

    NOTE Testing Hypotheses of Vicariance in the Agamid Lizard Laudakia caucasia from Mountain Ranges- ing Iranian plates on which the L. caucasia species group is endemic, producing mountain barriers Sea; (3) the Kopet-Dagh and Balkhan mountains of Turkmenistan and northeast Iran rise to the east

  10. Katech (Lithium Polymer) 4-Passenger NEV - Range and Battery Testing Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Francfort; D. Karner

    2005-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) received a Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) from the Korea Automotive Technology Institute (KATECH) for vehicle and battery characterization testing. The KATECH NEV (called the Invita) was equipped with a lithium polymer battery pack from Kokam Engineering. The Invita was to be baseline performance tested by AVTA’s testing partner, Electric Transportation Applications (ETA), at ETA’s contract testing facilities and test track in Phoenix, Arizona, to AVTA’s NEVAmerica testing specifications and procedures. Before and during initial constant speed range testing, the Invita battery pack experienced cell failures, and the onboard charger failed. A Kokamsupplied off-board charger was used in place of the onboard charger to successfully perform a constant speed range test on the Invita. The Invita traveled a total of 47.9 miles in 1 hour 47 minutes, consuming 91.3 amp-hours and 6.19 kilowatt-hours. The Kokam Engineering lithium polymer battery was also scheduled for battery pack characterization testing, including the C/3 energy capacity, dynamic stress, and peak power tests. Testing was stopped during the initial C/3 energy capacity test, however, because the battery pack failed to withstand cycling without cell failures. After the third discharge/charge sequence was completed, it was discovered that Cell 6 had failed, with a voltage reading of 0.5 volts. Cell 6 was replaced, and the testing sequence was restarted. After the second discharge/charge sequence was complete, it was discovered that Cell 1 had failed, with its voltage reading 0.2 volts. At this point it was decided to stop all battery pack testing. During the discharge cycles, the battery pack supplied 102.21, 94.34, and 96.05 amp-hours consecutively before Cell 6 failed. After replacing Cell 6, the battery pack supplied 98.34 and 98.11 amp-hours before Cell 1 failed. The Idaho National Laboratory managed these testing activities for the AVTA, as part of DOE’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program.

  11. Air Monitoring Network at Tonopah Test Range: Network Description and Capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey Tappen; George Nikolich; Ken Giles; David Shafer; Tammy Kluesner

    2010-05-18

    During the period April to June 2008, at the behest of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO); the Desert Research Institute (DRI) constructed and deployed two portable environmental monitoring stations at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) as part of the Environmental Restoration Project Soils Sub-Project. The TTR is located within the boundaries of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) near the northern edge, and covers an area of approximately 725.20 km2 (179,200 acres). The primary objective of the monitoring stations is to evaluate whether and under what conditions there is wind transport of radiological contaminants from one of the three Soil Sub-Project Corrective Action Units (CAUs) associated with Operation Roller Coaster on TTR. Operation Roller Coaster was a series of tests, conducted in 1963, designed to examine the stability and dispersal of plutonium in storage and transportation accidents. These tests did not result in any nuclear explosive yield. However, the tests did result in the dispersal of plutonium and contamination of surface soils in the surrounding area.

  12. Air Monitoring Network at Tonopah Test Range: Network Description, Capabilities, and Analytical Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartwell, William T.; Daniels, Jeffrey; Nikolich, George; Shadel, Craig; Giles, Ken; Karr, Lynn; Kluesner, Tammy

    2012-01-01

    During the period April to June 2008, at the behest of the Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO); the Desert Research Institute (DRI) constructed and deployed two portable environmental monitoring stations at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) as part of the Environmental Restoration Project Soils Activity. DRI has operated these stations since that time. A third station was deployed in the period May to September 2011. The TTR is located within the northwest corner of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR), and covers an area of approximately 725.20 km2 (280 mi2). The primary objective of the monitoring stations is to evaluate whether and under what conditions there is wind transport of radiological contaminants from Soils Corrective Action Units (CAUs) associated with Operation Roller Coaster on TTR. Operation Roller Coaster was a series of tests, conducted in 1963, designed to examine the stability and dispersal of plutonium in storage and transportation accidents. These tests did not result in any nuclear explosive yield. However, the tests did result in the dispersal of plutonium and contamination of surface soils in the surrounding area.

  13. Post-Closure Inspection Report for the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, for Calendar Year 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2013-01-28

    This report provides the results of the annual post-closure inspections conducted at the closed Corrective Action Units (CAUs) located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. This report covers calendar year 2012 and includes inspection and repair activities completed at the following CAUs: · CAU 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points Landfill (TTR) · CAU 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area (TTR) · CAU 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes (TTR) · CAU 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill (TTR) · CAU 487: Thunderwell Site (TTR)

  14. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2013 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizell, Steve A; Nikolich, George; Shadel, Craig; McCurdy, Greg; Etyemezian, Vicken; Miller, Julianne J

    2014-10-01

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range). This test resulted in radionuclide-contaminated soils at Clean Slate I, II, and III. This report documents observations made during on-going monitoring of radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions at stations installed adjacent to Clean Slate I and Clean Slate III and at the TTR Range Operations Control center. The primary objective of the monitoring effort is to determine if winds blowing across the Clean Slate sites are transporting particles of radionuclide-contaminated soils beyond both the physical and administrative boundaries of the sites. Results for the calendar year (CY) 2013 monitoring include: (1) the gross alpha and gross beta values from the monitoring stations are approximately equivalent to the highest values observed during the CY2012 reporting at the surrounding Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) stations (this was the latest documented data available at the time of this writing); (2) only naturally occurring radionuclides were identified in the gamma spectral analyses; (3) the ambient gamma radiation measurements indicate that the average annual gamma exposure is similar at all three monitoring stations and periodic intervals of increased gamma values appear to be associated with storm fronts passing through the area; and (4) the concentrations of both resuspended dust and saltated sand particles generally increase with increasing wind speed. However, differences in the observed dust concentrations are likely due to differences in the soil characteristics immediately adjacent to the monitoring stations. Neither the resuspended particulate radiological analyses nor the ambient gamma radiation measurements suggest wind transport of radionuclide-contaminated soils.

  15. Post-Closure Strategy for Use-Restricted Sites on the Nevada National Security Site, Nevada Test and Training Range, and Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silvas, A. J.

    2014-03-26

    The purpose of this Post-Closure Strategy is to provide a consistent methodology for continual evaluation of post-closure requirements for use-restricted areas on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR), and Tonopah Test Range (TTR) to consolidate, modify, or streamline the program. In addition, this document stipulates the creation of a single consolidated Post-Closure Plan that will detail the current post-closure requirements for all active use restrictions (URs) and outlines its implementation and subsequent revision. This strategy will ensure effective management and control of the post-closure sites. There are currently over 200 URs located on the NNSS, NTTR, and TTR. Post-closure requirements were initially established in the Closure Report for each site. In some cases, changes to the post-closure requirements have been implemented through addenda, errata sheets, records of technical change, or letters. Post-closure requirements have been collected from these multiple sources and consolidated into several formats, such as summaries and databases. This structure increases the possibility of inconsistencies and uncertainty. As more URs are established and the post-closure program is expanded, the need for a comprehensive approach for managing the program will increase. Not only should the current requirements be obtainable from a single source that supersedes all previous requirements, but the strategy for modifying the requirements should be standardized. This will enable more effective management of the program into the future. This strategy document and the subsequent comprehensive plan are to be implemented under the assumption that the NNSS and outlying sites will be under the purview of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration for the foreseeable future. This strategy was also developed assuming that regulatory control of the sites remains static. The comprehensive plan is not intended to be a permanent long-term stewardship plan. However, it is intended to clarify requirements and identify components to effectively manage the sites until regulatory requirements are met or management of the site changes. The Environmental Management Program is required to manage these sites until the NNSS Environmental Restoration program is completed, currently planned for 2030. Prior to completion of the Environmental Restoration program, additional planning will be conducted to ensure that long-term stewardship of the sites is maintained. A comprehensive post-closure plan can be transitioned effectively into any future site-wide long-term stewardship program that may be developed. Therefore, the post-closure plan will include current aspects of the post-closure program that are also important aspects of long-term stewardship, including the following: • Management of physical and engineering controls such as fences, signs, and soil covers • Management of institutional and administrative controls such as use restrictions and real estate systems • Management of monitoring and maintenance programs • Management of information related to the sites such as geographic information system data and related documentation The strategy will also allow for periodic review and modification of any aspect of the program to ensure continued effectiveness.

  16. Post-Closure Inspection Report for the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, For Calendar Year 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2011-03-30

    This report provides the results of the annual post-closure inspections conducted at the closed Corrective Action Units (CAUs) located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. This report covers calendar year 2010 and includes inspection and repair activities completed at the following seven CAUs: · CAU 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points Landfill (TTR) · CAU 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area (TTR) · CAU 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes (TTR) · CAU 426: Cactus Spring Waste Trenches (TTR) · CAU 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill (TTR) · CAU 484: Surface Debris, Waste Sites, and Burn Area (TTR) · CAU 487: Thunderwell Site (TTR)

  17. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2012 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizell, Steve A; Nikolich, George; Shadel, Craig; McCurdy, Greg; Miller, Julianne J

    2013-07-01

    In 1963, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), predecessor to the US Department of Energy (DOE), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR)). Operation Roller Coaster consisted of four tests in which chemical explosions were detonated in the presence of nuclear devices to assess the dispersal of radionuclides and evaluate the effectiveness of storage structures to contain the ejected radionuclides. These tests resulted in dispersal of plutonium over the ground surface downwind of the test ground zero. Three tests, Clean Slate 1, 2, and 3, were conducted on the TTR in Cactus Flat; the fourth, Double Tracks, was conducted in Stonewall Flat on the NTTR. DOE is working to clean up and close all four sites. Substantial cleaned up has been accomplished at Double Tracks and Clean Slate 1. Cleanup of Clean Slate 2 and 3 is on the DOE planning horizon for some time in the next several years. The Desert Research Institute installed two monitoring stations, number 400 at the Sandia National Laboratories Range Operations Center and number 401 at Clean Slate 3, in 2008 and a third monitoring station, number 402 at Clean Slate 1, in 2011 to measure radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions. The primary objectives of the data collection and analysis effort are to (1) monitor the concentration of radiological parameters in dust particles suspended in air, (2) determine whether winds are re-distributing radionuclides or contaminated soil material, (3) evaluate the controlling meteorological conditions if wind transport is occurring, and (4) measure ancillary radiological, meteorological, and environmental parameters that might provide insight to the above assessments. The following observations are based on data collected during CY2012. The mean annual concentration of gross alpha and gross beta is highest at Station 400 and lowest at Station 401. This difference may be the result of using filter media at Station 400 with a smaller pore size than the media used at the other two stations. Average annual gamma exposure at Station 401 is slightly greater than at Station 400 and 402. Average annual gamma exposure at all three TTR stations are in the upper range to slightly higher than values reported for the CEMP stations surrounding the TTR. At higher wind speeds, the saltation counts are greater at Station 401 than at Station 402 while the suspended particulate concentrations are greater at Station 402 than at Statin 401. Although these observations seem counterintuitive, they are likely the result of differences in the soil material present at the two sites. Station 401 is located on an interfluve elevated above two adjacent drainage channels where the soil surface is likely to be composed of coarser material. Station 402 is located in finer sediments at the playa edge and is also subject to dust from a dirt road only 500 m to the north. During prolonged high wind events, suspended dust concentrations at Station 401 peaked with the initial winds then decreased whereas dust concentrations at Station 402 peaked with each peak in the wind speed. This likely reflects a limited PM10 source that is quickly expended at Station 401 relative to an abundant PM10 source at Station 402. In CY2013, to facilitate comparisons between radiological analyses of collected dust, the filter media at all three stations will be standardized. In addition, a sequence of samples will be collected at Station 400 using both types of filter media to enable development of a mathematical relationship between the results derived from the two filter types. Additionally, having acquired approximately four years of observations at Stations 400 and 401 and a year of observations at Station 402, a period-of-record analysis of the radiological and airborne dust conditions will be undertaken.

  18. Calendar year 2003 : annual site enviromental report for Tonopah Test Range, Nevada and Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Katrina; Sanchez, Rebecca V.; Mayeux, Lucie; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

    2004-09-01

    Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Office (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, manages TTR and KTF's operations. Sandia Corporation conducts operations at TTR in support of DOE/NNSA's Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Westinghouse Government Services subcontracts to Sandia Corporation in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia Corporation operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2003. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia Corporation is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA, Nevada Site Office (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2003) and DOE Order 231.1 Chg 2., Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 1996).

  19. Calendar year 2002 annual site environmental report for Tonopah Test Range, Nevada and Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Katrina; Sanchez, Rebecca V.; Mayeux, Lucie; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

    2003-09-01

    Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Office (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, oversees TTR and KTF's operations. Sandia Corporation conducts operations at TTR in support of DOE/NNSA's Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Westinghouse Government Services subcontracts to Sandia Corporation in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia Corporation operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2002. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia Corporation is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA, Nevada Site Office (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE 1990) and DOE Order 231.1, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 1996).

  20. Calendar year 2007 annual site environmental report for Tonopah Test Range, Nevada and Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii,

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agogino, Karen; Sanchez, Rebecca

    2008-09-30

    Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation (Sandia), a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Offi ce (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, administers the contract and oversees contractor operations at TTR and KTF. Sandia manages and conducts operations at TTR in support of the DOE/NNSA’s Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Washington Group International subcontracts to Sandia in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2007. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA/Nevada Site Offi ce (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2007a) and DOE Manual 231.1-1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting Manual (DOE 2007).

  1. Post-Closure Inspection Report for the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, For Calendar Year 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2009-03-19

    This report provides the results of the annual post-closure inspections conducted at the closed Corrective Action Unit (CAU) sites located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. This report covers calendar year 2008 and includes inspection and repair activities completed at the following ten CAUs: #2; CAU 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points Landfill (TTR) #2; CAU 404: Roller Coaster Lagoons and Trench (TTR) #2; CAU 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area (TTR) #2; CAU 423: Area 3 Underground Discharge Point, Building 0360 (TTR) #2; CAU 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes (TTR) #2; CAU 426: Cactus Spring Waste Trenches (TTR) #2; CAU 427: Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 2, 6 (TTR) #2; CAU 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill (TTR) #2; CAU 484: Surface Debris, Waste Sites, and Burn Area (TTR) #2; CAU 487: Thunderwell Site (TTR)

  2. Design, calibration and tests of an extended-range Bonner sphere spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitaroff, Angela; Silari, Marco

    2001-01-01

    Stray radiation fields outside the shielding of hadron accelerators are of complex nature. They consist of a multiplicity of radiation components (neutrons, photons, electrons, pions, muons, ...) which extend over a wide range of energies. Since the dose equivalent in these mixed fields is mainly due to neutrons, neutron dosimetry is a particularly important task. The neutron energy in these fields ranges from thermal up to several hundreds of MeV, thus making dosimetry difficult. A well known instrument for measuring neutron energy distributions from thermal energies up to about E=10 MeV is the Bonner sphere spectrometer (BSS). It consists of a set of moderating spheres of different radii made of polyethylene, with a thermal neutron counter in the centre. Each detector (sphere plus counter) has a maximum response at a certain energy value depending on its size, but the overall response of the conventional BSS drops sharply between E=10-20 MeV. This thesis focuses on the development, the calibration and tests...

  3. Post-Closure Inspection Report for the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, for Calendar Year 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silvas, A. J.; Lantow, Tiffany A.

    2015-03-25

    This report provides the results of the annual post-closure inspections conducted at the closed Corrective Action Units (CAUs) located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. This report covers calendar year 2014 and includes inspection and repair activities completed at the following CAUs; CAU 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points Landfill (TTR); CAU 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area (TTR); CAU 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes (TTR); CAU 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill (TTR); and CAU 487: Thunderwell Site (TTR) Inspections were conducted according to the post-closure plans in the approved Closure Reports and subsequent correspondence with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. The post-closure inspection plans and subsequent correspondence modifying the requirements for each CAU are included in Appendix B. The inspection checklists are included in Appendix C. Photographs taken during inspections are included in Appendix D. The annual post-closure inspections were conducted on May 28, 2014. Maintenance was required at CAU 407. Animal burrows were backfilled and erosion repairs were performed. Vegetation monitoring was performed at CAU 407 in June 2014. The vegetation monitoring report is included in Appendix E.

  4. Urban areas may serve as habitat and corridors for dry-adapted, heat tolerant species; an example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckel, Jeffrey A.

    and assemblage composition. Since urban areas are warmer (i.e., heat island effect) we also tested if cities were be particularly successful at tracking future climate change. Keywords Urban heat island . Range shift . AntUrban areas may serve as habitat and corridors for dry-adapted, heat tolerant species; an example

  5. Geodetic Survey At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky: EnergyGateway EditOpenTechniques Jump2004) | Open Energy

  6. Geothermometry At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004)

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky:Bore TechnologiesAssessmentOpenFishOpen Energy1976)| Open

  7. Combatting urban air pollution through Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) analysis, testing, and demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    Deteriorating urban air quality ranks as a top concern worldwide, since air pollution adversely affects both public health and the environment. The outlook for improving air quality in the world`s megacities need not be bleak, however, The use of natural gas as a transportation fuel can measurably reduce urban pollution levels, mitigating chronic threats to health and the environment. Besides being clean burning, natural gas vehicles (NGVs) are economical to operate and maintain. The current cost of natural gas is lower than that of gasoline. Natural gas also reduces the vehicle`s engine wear and noise level, extends engine life, and decreases engine maintenance. Today, about 700,000 NGVs operate worldwide, the majority of them converted from gasoline or diesel fuel. This article discusses the economic, regulatory and technological issues of concern to the NGV industry.

  8. Post-Closure Inspection Report for the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, for Calendar Year 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silvas, A. J.

    2014-03-03

    This report provides the results of the annual post-closure inspections conducted at the closed Corrective Action Units (CAUs) located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. This report covers calendar year 2013 and includes inspection and repair activities completed at the following CAUs: • CAU 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points Landfill (TTR) • CAU 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area (TTR) • CAU 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes (TTR) • CAU 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill (TTR) • CAU 487: Thunderwell Site (TTR) Inspections were conducted according to the post-closure plans in the approved Closure Reports and subsequent correspondence with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. The post-closure inspection plans and subsequent correspondence modifying the requirements for each CAU are included in Appendix B. The inspection checklists are included in Appendix C. Field notes are included in Appendix D. Photographs taken during inspections are included in Appendix E. The annual post-closure inspections were conducted on May 14, 2013. Maintenance was performed at CAU 400, CAU 424, and CAU 453. At CAU 400, animal burrows were backfilled. At CAU 424, erosion repairs were completed at Landfill Cell A3-3, subsidence was repaired at Landfill Cell A3-4, and additional lava rock was placed in high-traffic areas to mark the locations of the surface grade monuments at Landfill Cell A3-3 and Landfill Cell A3-8. At CAU 453, two areas of subsidence were repaired and animal burrows were backfilled. Vegetation monitoring was performed at the CAU 400 Five Points Landfill and CAU 407 in June 2013. The vegetation monitoring report is included in Appendix F.

  9. Post-Closure Inspection Report for the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, for Calendar Year 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2010-05-28

    This report provides the results of the annual post-closure inspections conducted at the closed Corrective Action Unit (CAU) sites located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. This report covers calendar year 2009 and includes inspection and repair activities completed at the following seven CAUs: · CAU 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points Landfill (TTR) · CAU 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area (TTR) · CAU 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes (TTR) · CAU 426: Cactus Spring Waste Trenches (TTR) · CAU 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill (TTR) · CAU 484: Surface Debris, Waste Sites, and Burn Area (TTR) · CAU 487: Thunderwell Site (TTR) The annual post-closure inspections were conducted May 5–6, 2009. All inspections were conducted according to the post-closure plans in the approved Closure Reports. The post-closure inspection plan for each CAU is included in Attachment B, with the exception of CAU 400. CAU 400 does not require post-closure inspections, but inspections of the vegetation and fencing are conducted as a best management practice. The inspection checklists for each site inspection are included in Attachment C, the field notes are included in Attachment D, and the site photographs are included in Attachment E. Vegetation monitoring of CAU 400, CAU 404, CAU 407, and CAU 426 was performed in June 2009, and the vegetation monitoring report is included in Attachment F. Maintenance was performed at CAU 453. Animal burrows observed during the annual inspection were backfilled, and a depression was restored to grade on June 25, 2009. Post-closure site inspections should continue as scheduled. Vegetation survey inspections have been conducted annually at CAUs 400, 404, 407, and 426. Discontinuation of vegetation surveys is recommended at the CAU 400 Bomblet Pit and CAU 426, which have been successfully revegetated. Discontinuation of vegetation surveys is also recommended at CAU 404, which has been changed to an administrative closure with no inspections required. Vegetation monitoring at the CAU 400 Five Points Landfill and CAU 407 should continue.

  10. Post-Closure Inspection Report for the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, For Calendar Year 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2012-02-21

    This report provides the results of the annual post-closure inspections conducted at the closed Corrective Action Units (CAUs) located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. This report covers calendar year 2011 and includes inspection and repair activities completed at the following CAUs: (1) CAU 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points Landfill (TTR); (2) CAU 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area (TTR); (3) CAU 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes (TTR); (4) CAU 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill (TTR); and (5) CAU 487: Thunderwell Site (TTR) Inspections were conducted according to the post-closure plans in the approved Closure Reports. The post-closure inspection plan for each CAU is included in Appendix B. The inspection checklists are included in Appendix C, field notes are included in Appendix D, and photographs taken during inspections are included in Appendix E. The annual post-closure inspections were conducted May 3 and 4, 2011. Maintenance was performed at CAU 424, CAU 453, and CAU 487. At CAU 424, two surface grade monuments at Landfill Cell A3-3 could not be located during the inspection. The two monuments were located and marked with lava rock on July 13, 2011. At CAU 453, there was evidence of animal burrowing. Animal burrows were backfilled on July 13, 2011. At CAU 487, one use restriction warning sign was missing, and wording was faded on the remaining signs. A large animal burrow was also present. The signs were replaced, and the animal burrow was backfilled on July 12, 2011. As a best management practice, the use restriction warning signs at CAU 407 were replaced with standard Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order signs on July 13, 2011. Vegetation monitoring was performed at the CAU 400 Five Points Landfill and CAU 407 in June 2011, and the vegetation monitoring report is included in Appendix F.

  11. Urban Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigley, John M.

    2006-01-01

    property taxation regional economics residential segregationexternalities urban economics urban production externalitiesproperty taxation regional economics residential segregation

  12. Post-Closure Inspection Report for the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, For Calendar Year 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2008-06-01

    This report provides the results of the semiannual post-closure inspections conducted at the closed Corrective Action Unit (CAU) sites located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. This report covers calendar year 2007 and includes inspection and repair activities completed at the following nine CAUs: (1) CAU 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points Landfill (TTR); (2) CAU 404: Roller Coaster Lagoons and Trench (TTR); (3) CAU 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area (TTR); (4) CAU 423: Area 3 Underground Discharge Point, Building 0360 (TTR); (5) CAU 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes (TTR); (6) CAU 426: Cactus Spring Waste Trenches (TTR); (7) CAU 427: Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 2, 6 (TTR); (8) CAU 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill (TTR); and (9) CAU 487: Thunderwell Site (TTR). In a letter from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) dated December 5, 2006, NDEP concurred with the request to reduce the frequency of post-closure inspections of CAUs at TTR to an annual frequency. This letter is included in Attachment B. Post-closure inspections were conducted on May 15-16, 2007. All inspections were conducted according to the post-closure plans in the approved Closure Reports. The post-closure inspection plan for each CAU is included in Attachment B, with the exception of CAU 400. CAU 400 does not require post-closure inspections, but inspections of the vegetation and fencing are conducted as a best management practice. The inspection checklists for each site inspection are included in Attachment C, the field notes are included in Attachment D, and the site photographs are included in Attachment E. Vegetation monitoring of CAU 400, CAU 404, CAU 407, and CAU 426 was performed in May 2007, and the vegetation monitoring report is included in Attachment F. Maintenance and/or repairs were performed at CAU 453. Animal burrows observed during the annual inspection at CAU 453 were backfilled on August 1, 2007. At this time, the TTR post-closure site inspections should continue as scheduled. Any potential problem areas previously identified (e.g., areas of erosion, subsidence) should be monitored closely, and periodic vegetation surveys of the vegetated covers should continue.

  13. Post-Closure Inspection Report for the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-06-01

    This report provides the results of the semiannual post-closure inspections conducted at the closed Corrective Action Unit (CAU) sites located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. This report covers calendar year 2006 and includes inspection and repair activities completed at the following nine CAUs: CAU 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points Landfill (TTR); CAU 404: Roller Coaster Lagoons and Trench (TTR); CAU 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area (TTR); CAU 423: Area 3 Underground Discharge Point, Building 0360 (TTR); CAU 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes (TTR); CAU 426: Cactus Spring Waste Trenches (TTR); CAU 427: Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 2, 6 (TTR); CAU 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill (TTR); and CAU 487: Thunderwell Site (TTR). Post-closure inspections were conducted on May 9, 2006, May 31, 2006, and November 15, 2006. All inspections were conducted according to the post-closure plans in the approved Closure Reports. The post-closure inspection plan for each CAU is included in Attachment B, with the exception of CAU 400. CAU 400 does not require post-closure inspections, but inspections of the vegetation and fencing are conducted as a best management practice. The inspection checklists for each site inspection are included in Attachment C, the field notes are included in Attachment D, and the site photographs are included in Attachment E. Vegetation monitoring of CAU 400, CAU 404, CAU 407, and CAU 426 was performed in June 2006, and the vegetation monitoring report is included in Attachment F. Maintenance and/or repairs were performed at CAU 400, CAU 407, CAU 426, CAU 453, and CAU 487 in 2006. During the May inspection of CAU 400, it was identified that the east and west sections of chickenwire fencing beyond the standard fencing were damaged; they were repaired in June 2006. Also in June 2006, the southeast corner fence post and one warning sign at CAU 407 were reinforced and reattached, the perimeter fencing adjacent to the gate at CAU 426 was tightened, and large animal burrows observed at CAU 453 were backfilled. Cracking observed in three monuments at CAU 487 was repaired using sealant during the May 9, 2006, inspection. At this time, the TTR post-closure site inspections should continue as scheduled. Any potential problem areas previously identified (e.g., areas of erosion, subsidence) should be monitored closely, and periodic vegetation surveys of the vegetated covers should continue.

  14. Power Centrality as a relational measure of urban hierarchy : testing the splintering urbanism theory with social media data from Santiago de Chile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humeres M., Francisco J. (Francisco Javier Humeres Marfan)

    2014-01-01

    Power Centrality, a measure of node importance within a network, is borrowed from the field of Social Network Analysis and applied to the assessment of Urban Hierarchy. Based on the overlaps of human activity between places, ...

  15. POST-CLOSURE INSPECTION REPORT FOR THE TONOPAH TEST RANGE, NEVADA, FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2005-04-01

    This Post-Closure Inspection Report provides an analysis and summary of the semi-annual inspections conducted at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) during Calendar Year 2004. The report includes the inspection and/or repair activities completed at the following nine Corrective Action Units (CAUs) located at TTR, Nevada: (1) CAU 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points Landfill (TTR); (2) CAU 404: Roller Coaster Lagoons and Trench (TTR); (3) CAU 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area (TTR); (4) CAU 423: Area 3 Underground Discharge Point, Building 0360 (TTR) (5) CAU 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes (TTR); (6) CAU 426: Cactus Spring Waste Trenches (TTR); (7) CAU 427: Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 2,6 (TTR); (8) CAU 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill (TTR); and (9) CAU 487: Thunderwell Site (TTR). Site inspections were conducted on July 7,2004, and November 9-10,2004. All inspections were conducted according to the post-closure plans in the approved Closure Reports (CRs). The post-closure inspection plan for each CAU is included in Appendix B, with the exception of CAU 400 and CAU 423. CAU 400 does not require post-closure inspections, but inspections of the vegetation and fencing are conducted as a best management practice. In addition, post-closure inspections are not currently required at CAU 423; however, the CR is being revised to include inspection requirements. The inspection checklists for each site inspection are included in Appendix C, the field notes are included in Appendix D, and the site photographs are included in Appendix E. Vegetation monitoring of CAU 400, CAU 404, CAU 407, and CAU 426 was performed in June 2004, and the vegetation monitoring report is included in Appendix F. In addition, topographic survey results of two repaired landfill cells in CAU 424 are included in Appendix G. Maintenance and/or repairs were performed at the CAU 400 Five Points Landfill, CAU 407, CAU 424, CAU 427, and CAU 487. CAU 400 repairs included mending the fence, reseeding of a flood damaged area, and anchoring straw bales in the wash to help control erosion at the Five Points Landfill. CAU 407 repairs included erosion repair, reseeding the cover, and replacement of one warning sign. CAU 424 repairs included filling topographically low areas to the surrounding grade. This was performed at Landfill Cell A3-1 (CAS 03-08-001-A301) and Landfill Cell A3-4 (CAS 03-08-002-A304). CAU 427 maintenance activities included placing additional red rocks over the subsurface site markers during the July inspection to assist in locating them for future inspections. CAU 487 repairs included installing eight above-grade monuments to mark the use restriction boundaries, installing use restriction warning signs, stamping coordinates on the brass survey markers, and subsidence repair at the A-8 anomaly. With the completion of these repairs and maintenance activities, all CAUs were in excellent condition at the end of 2004. The site inspections should continue as scheduled, and any potential problem areas, such as repaired areas of erosion or subsidence, should be monitored closely for further maintenance or repair needs.

  16. Current Short-Range Tests of the Gravitational Inverse Square Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshua C. Long; John C. Price

    2003-04-04

    Motivated in large part by the possibility of observing signatures of compact extra dimensions, experimental searches for deviations from Newtonian gravity at short distances have improved in sensitivity by many orders of magnitude in the past five years. We review the essential features of the experiments responsible for the current limits on new effects in the range from a few microns to a few centimeters, and discuss prospects for the near future.

  17. Frontside-micromachined planar piezoresistive vibration sensor: Evaluating performance in the low frequency test range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Lan; Lu, Jian, E-mail: jian-lu@aist.go.jp; Takagi, Hideki; Maeda, Ryutaro [Research Center for Ubiquitous MEMS and Micro Engineering (UMEMSME), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8564 (Japan)] [Research Center for Ubiquitous MEMS and Micro Engineering (UMEMSME), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8564 (Japan)

    2014-01-15

    Using a surface piezoresistor diffusion method and front-side only micromachining process, a planar piezoresistive vibration sensor was successfully developed with a simple structure, lower processing cost and fewer packaging difficulties. The vibration sensor had a large sector proof mass attached to a narrow flexure. Optimization of the boron diffusion piezoresistor placed on the edge of the narrow flexure greatly improved the sensitivity. Planar vibration sensors were fabricated and measured in order to analyze the effects of the sensor dimensions on performance, including the values of flexure width and the included angle of the sector. Sensitivities of fabricated planar sensors of 0.09–0.46 mV/V/g were measured up to a test frequency of 60 Hz. The sensor functioned at low voltages (<3 V) and currents (<1 mA) with a high sensitivity and low drift. At low background noise levels, the sensor had performance comparable to a commercial device.

  18. A Novel Two-Step Laser Ranging Technique for a Precision Test of the Theory of Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penanen, K; Penanen, Konstantin; Chui, Talso

    2004-01-01

    All powered spacecraft experience residual systematic acceleration due to anisotropy of the thermal radiation pressure and fuel leakage. The residual acceleration limits the accuracy of any test of gravity that relies on the precise determination of the spacecraft trajectory. We describe a novel two-step laser ranging technique, which largely eliminates the effects of non-gravity acceleration sources and enables celestial mechanics checks with unprecedented precision. A passive proof mass is released from the mother spacecraft on a solar system exploration mission. Retro-reflectors attached to the proof mass allow its relative position to the spacecraft to be determined using optical ranging techniques. Meanwhile, the position of the spacecraft relative to the Earth is determined by ranging with a laser transponder. The vector sum of the two is the position, relative to the Earth, of the proof mass, the measurement of which is not affected by the residual accelerations of the mother spacecraft. We also descri...

  19. A Novel Two-Step Laser Ranging Technique for a Precision Test of the Theory of Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konstantin Penanen; Talso Chui

    2004-06-04

    All powered spacecraft experience residual systematic acceleration due to anisotropy of the thermal radiation pressure and fuel leakage. The residual acceleration limits the accuracy of any test of gravity that relies on the precise determination of the spacecraft trajectory. We describe a novel two-step laser ranging technique, which largely eliminates the effects of non-gravity acceleration sources and enables celestial mechanics checks with unprecedented precision. A passive proof mass is released from the mother spacecraft on a solar system exploration mission. Retro-reflectors attached to the proof mass allow its relative position to the spacecraft to be determined using optical ranging techniques. Meanwhile, the position of the spacecraft relative to the Earth is determined by ranging with a laser transponder. The vector sum of the two is the position, relative to the Earth, of the proof mass, the measurement of which is not affected by the residual accelerations of the mother spacecraft. We also describe the mission concept of the Dark Matter Explorers (DMX), which will demonstrate this technology and will use it to test the hypothesis that dark matter congregates around the sun. This hypothesis implies a small apparent deviation from the inverse square law of gravity, which can be detected by a sensitive experiment. We expect to achieve an acceleration resolution of $\\sim 10^{-14} m/s^2$. DMX will also be sensitive to acceleration towards the galactic center, which has a value of $\\sim 10^{-10} m/s^2$. Since dark matter dominates the galactic acceleration, DMX can also test whether dark matter obeys the equivalence principle to a level of 100 ppm by ranging to several proof masses of different composition from the mother spacecraft.

  20. U.S. Department of Energy NESHAP Annual Report for CY 2014 Sandia National Laboratories Tonopah Test Range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evelo, Stacie; Miller, Mark L.

    2015-05-01

    This National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) Annual Report has been prepared in a format to comply with the reporting requirements of 40 CFR 61.94 and the April 5, 1995 Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). According to the EPA approved NESHAP Monitoring Plan for the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), 40 CFR 61, subpart H, and the MOA, no additional monitoring or measurements are required at TTR in order to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP regulation.

  1. Industrial Sites Work Plan for Leachfield Corrective Action Units: Nevada Test Site and Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (including Record of Technical Change Nos. 1, 2, 3, and 4)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE/NV

    1998-12-18

    This Leachfield Corrective Action Units (CAUs) Work Plan has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the U.S. Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). Under the FFACO, a work plan is an optional planning document that provides information for a CAU or group of CAUs where significant commonality exists. A work plan may be developed that can be referenced by leachfield Corrective Action Investigation Plans (CAIPs) to eliminate redundant CAU documentation. This Work Plan includes FFACO-required management, technical, quality assurance (QA), health and safety, public involvement, field sampling, and waste management documentation common to several CAUs with similar site histories and characteristics, namely the leachfield systems at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and the Tonopah Test Range (TT R). For each CAU, a CAIP will be prepared to present detailed, site-specific information regarding contaminants of potential concern (COPCs), sampling locations, and investigation methods.

  2. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 408: Bomblet Target Area Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Krauss

    2010-09-01

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 408: Bomblet Target Area (TTR), Tonopah Test Range, Nevada. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. Corrective Action Unit 408 is located at the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, and consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) TA-55-002-TAB2, Bomblet Target Areas. This CAS includes the following seven target areas: • Mid Target • Flightline Bomblet Location • Strategic Air Command (SAC) Target Location 1 • SAC Target Location 2 • South Antelope Lake • Tomahawk Location 1 • Tomahawk Location 2 The purpose of this CR is to provide documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and data confirming that the closure objectives for the CAS within CAU 408 were met. To achieve this, the following actions were performed: • Review the current site conditions, including the concentration and extent of contamination. • Implement any corrective actions necessary to protect human health and the environment. • Properly dispose of corrective action and investigation wastes. • Document Notice of Completion and closure of CAU 408 issued by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. From July 2009 through August 2010, closure activities were performed as set forth in the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for CAU 408: Bomblet Target Area, Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. The purposes of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were as follows: • Identify and remove munitions of explosive concern (MEC) associated with DOE activities. • Investigate potential disposal pit locations. • Remove depleted uranium-contaminated fragments and soil. • Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. • If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent, implement appropriate corrective actions, and properly dispose of wastes. Analytes detected during the closure activities were evaluated against final action levels to determine COCs for CAU 408. Assessment of the data indicated COCs are not present at CAS TA-55-002-TAB2; therefore, no corrective action is necessary. No use restrictions are required to be placed on this CAU because the investigation showed no evidence of remaining soil contamination or remaining debris/waste upon completion of all investigation activities. The MEC was successfully removed and dispositioned as planned using current best available technologies. As MEC guidance and general MEC standards acknowledge that MEC response actions cannot determine with 100 percent certainty that all MEC and unexploded ordnance (UXO) are removed, the clean closure of CAU 408 will implement a best management practice of posting UXO hazard warning signs near the seven target areas. The signs will warn future land users of the potential for encountering residual UXO hazards. The DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, provides the following recommendations: • A Notice of Completion to the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 408. • Corrective Action Unit 408 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order.

  3. The Role of Energy Availability in Mammalian Hibernation: An Experimental Test in Free-Ranging Eastern Chipmunks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, Donald L.

    -Ranging Eastern Chipmunks Murray M. Humphries1,2, * Donald L. Kramer1 Donald W. Thomas2 1 Department of Biology temper- ature has permitted endotherms to occupy a wide range of thermal niches (Bennett 1991; Davenport

  4. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 403: Second Gas Station, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Evenson

    2009-05-01

    This document constitutes an addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 403: Second Gas Station, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, September 1998 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: • This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information • The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 03-02-004-0360, Underground Storage Tanks. This UR was established as part of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective action and is based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was reevaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove the UR because contamination is not present at the site above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining this UR will be canceled, and the postings and signage at this site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at this site that are unrelated to the FFACO UR such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at this site.

  5. CORRECTIVE ACTION DECISION DOCUMENT FOR THE AREA 3 LANDFILL COMPLEX, TONOPAH TEST RANGE, CAU 424, REVISION 0, MARCH 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE /NV

    1998-03-03

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) has been prepared for the Area 3 Landfill Complex (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] 424) in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996. Corrective Action Unit 424 is located at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and is comprised of the following Corrective Action Sites (CASs), each an individual landfill located around and within the perimeter of the Area 3 Compound (DOE/NV, 1996a): (1) Landfill A3-1 is CAS No. 03-08-001-A301. (2) Landfill A3-2 is CAS No. 03-08-002-A302. (3) Landfill A3-3 is CAS No. 03-08-002-A303. (4) Landfill A3-4 is CAS No. 03-08-002-A304. (5) Landfill A3-5 is CAS No. 03-08-002-A305. (6) Landfill A3-6 is CAS No. 03-08-002-A306. (7) Landfill A3-7 is CAS No. 03-08-002-A307. (8) Landfill A3-8 is CAS No. 03-08-002-A308. The purpose of this CADD is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for each CAS. The scope of this CADD consists of the following: (1) Develop corrective action objectives. (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria. (3) Develop corrective action alternatives. (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria. (6) Recommend and justify a preferred corrective action alternative for each CAS. In June and July 1997, a corrective action investigation was performed as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) for CAU No. 424: Area 3 Landfill Complex, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (DOE/NV, 1997). Details can be found in Appendix A of this document. The results indicated four groupings of site characteristics as shown in Table ES-1. Based on the potential exposure pathways, the following corrective action objectives have been identified for CAU No. 424: (1) Prevent or mitigate human exposure to subsurface soils containing waste. (2) Remediate the site per applicable state and federal regulations (NAC, 1996c). (3) Prevent adverse impacts to groundwater quality. Based on the review of existing data, future land use, and current operations at the TTR, the following alternatives were developed for consideration at the Area 3 Landfill Complex CAU: Alternative 1 - No Action; Alternative 2 - Administrative Closure; Alternative 3 - Partial Excavation, Backfill, and Recontouring The corrective action alternatives were evaluated based on four general corrective action standards and five remedy-selection decision factors. Based on the results of this evaluation, preferred alternatives were selected for each CAS as indicated in Table ES-2. The preferred corrective action alternatives were evaluated on their technical merits, focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, and safety. The alternatives were judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated. These alternatives meet all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site and will reduce potential future exposure pathways to the contents of the landfills. During corrective action implementation, these alternatives will present minimal potential threat to site workers who come in contact with the waste. However, procedures will be developed and implemented to ensure worker health and safety.

  6. Urbanizing terrains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romanos, Christoforos

    2008-01-01

    Urban "sprawl"in the East Attica area of Athens has dramatically changed the former rural economy in a manner consistent with the urbanizing terrain's underlying properties: agricultural subdivisions, existing centres, ...

  7. The Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Achievement and the Wide Range Achievement Test: convergent and discriminant validity for blacks and whites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jenson, Glenn Martin

    1983-01-01

    of normal children only) and one sample of severely learning disabled (SLD). The third grade sample had 67 subjects with a mean WISC-R intelligence quotient (IQ) of 108. 2 and a standard deviation (SD) of 13. 2. The fifth grade sample had 82 subjects... with a mean WISC-R IQ of 106. 2 and an SD of 10. 9. Both samples were administered the following tests: Iowa Tests of Basic Skills (ITBS) (Hieronymous & Lindquist, 1971), KeyMath Diagnostic Arithmetic Test (Connolly, Nachtman, & Pritchett, 1976...

  8. A novel variable-distance antenna test range and high spatial resolution corroboration of the inverse square law for 433.5 MHz radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Haën, Christoph; Erhardt, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    A novel, low-budget, open-air, slant-geometry antenna test range for UHF radiation is presented. It was designed primarily to facilitate variation of the distance between emitter and receiver antennas, but has also the potential for adaptation to simultaneous variation of distance and receiver antenna orientation. In support of the validity of the range the inverse square law for 433.5 MHz radiation between two naked half-wave dipole antennas was tested with high spatial resolution from close to the far field limit outward to 46 wavelengths. Sine amplitude input voltage at the receiver antenna varied with the distance to the power -0.9970 +/- 0.0051 (R^2 = 0.992), thus corroborating the inverse square law for transmission power at the lowest frequency for which thus far data have been published. Keywords: inverse square law; dipole antenna; test facility; electromagnetic propagation; UHF measurements; distance dependence.

  9. Hydrologic transport of depleted uranium associated with open air dynamic range testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico, and Eglin Air Force Base, Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, N.M.; Vanta, E.B.

    1995-05-01

    Hydrologic investigations on depleted uranium fate and transport associated with dynamic testing activities were instituted in the 1980`s at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Eglin Air Force Base. At Los Alamos, extensive field watershed investigations of soil, sediment, and especially runoff water were conducted. Eglin conducted field investigations and runoff studies similar to those at Los Alamos at former and active test ranges. Laboratory experiments complemented the field investigations at both installations. Mass balance calculations were performed to quantify the mass of expended uranium which had transported away from firing sites. At Los Alamos, it is estimated that more than 90 percent of the uranium still remains in close proximity to firing sites, which has been corroborated by independent calculations. At Eglin, we estimate that 90 to 95 percent of the uranium remains at test ranges. These data demonstrate that uranium moves slowly via surface water, in both semi-arid (Los Alamos) and humid (Eglin) environments.

  10. Search for Lorentz invariance violation through tests of the gravitational inverse square law at short-ranges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shao, Cheng-Gang; Tan, Wen-Hai; Yang, Shan-Qing; Luo, Jun; Tobar, Michael Edmund

    2015-01-01

    A search for sidereal variations in the non-Newtonian force between two tungsten plates separated at millimeter ranges sets experimental limits on Lorentz invariance violation involving quadratic couplings of Riemann curvature. We show that the Lorentz invariance violation force between two finite flat plates is dominated by the edge effects, which includes a suppression effect leading to lower limits than previous rough estimates. From this search, we determine the current best constraints of the Lorentz invariance violating coefficients at a level of $10^{-8}$ m$^{2}$.

  11. Radiological survey and evaluation of the fallout area from the Trinity test: Chupadera Mesa and White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, W.R.; Rodgers, J.C.

    1985-06-01

    Current radiological conditions were evaluated for the site of the first nuclear weapons test, the Trinity test, and the associated fallout zone. The test, located on White Sands Missile Range, was conducted as part of the research with nuclear materials for the World War II Manhattan Engineer District atomic bomb project. Some residual radioactivity attributable to the test was found in the soils of Ground Zero on White Sands Missile Range and the areas that received fallout from the test. The study considered relevant information including historical records, environmental data extending back to the 1940s, and new data acquired by field sampling and measurements. Potential exposures to radiation were evaluated for current land uses. Maximum estimated doses on Chupadera Mesa and other uncontrolled areas are less than 3% of the DOE Radiation Protection Standards (RPSs). Radiation exposures during visits to the US Army-controlled Ground Zero area are less than 1 mrem per annual visit or less than 0.2% of the RPS for a member of the public. Detailed data and interpretations are provided in appendixes. 14 figs., 45 tabs.

  12. Urban ideograms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luarasi, Skender, 1976-

    2005-01-01

    This thesis offers the concept of Urban Ideograms. It is developed and crystallized through a strategic gathering and selection of specific textual and contextual information from various sources, such as the drawings of ...

  13. Flexible urbanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anandam, Anahita

    2006-01-01

    This thesis seeks to find a new approach/method towards urbanization in existing low density neighborhoods in major metropolitan cities in the United States. The near South side of the city of Chicago (a city that carries ...

  14. Streamlined approach for environmental restoration plan for corrective action unit 430, buried depleted uranium artillery round No. 1, Tonopah test range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    This plan addresses actions necessary for the restoration and closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) No. 430, Buried Depleted Uranium (DU) Artillery Round No. 1 (Corrective Action Site No. TA-55-003-0960), a buried and unexploded W-79 Joint Test Assembly (JTA) artillery test projectile with high explosives (HE), at the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in south-central Nevada. It describes activities that will occur at the site as well as the steps that will be taken to gather adequate data to obtain a notice of completion from Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). This plan was prepared under the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) concept, and it will be implemented in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Industrial Sites Quality Assurance Project Plan.

  15. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 541: Small Boy Nevada National Security Site and Nevada Test and Training Range, Nevada with ROTC 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2014-09-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 541 is co-located on the boundary of Area 5 of the Nevada National Security Site and Range 65C of the Nevada Test and Training Range, approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 541 is a grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 541, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 05-23-04, Atmospheric Tests (6) - BFa Site • 05-45-03, Atmospheric Test Site - Small Boy These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the investigation report. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 1, 2014, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Air Force; and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 541. The site investigation process also will be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The potential contamination sources associated with CASs 05-23-04 and 05-45-03 are from nuclear testing activities conducted at the Atmospheric Tests (6) - BFa Site and Atmospheric Test Site - Small Boy sites. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 541 will be evaluated based on information collected from field investigations. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose at sample locations to the dose-based final action level. The total effective dose will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS.

  16. Radiological and Environmental Monitoring at the Clean Slate I and III Sites, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, With Emphasis on the Implications for Off-site Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizell, Steve A; Etyemezian, Vic; McCurdy, Greg; Nikolich, George; Shadel, Craig; Miller, Julianne J

    2014-09-01

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]) implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range [NAFR]). Operation Roller Coaster consisted of four tests in which chemical explosions were detonated in the presence of nuclear devices to assess the dispersal of radionuclides and evaluate the effectiveness of storage structures to contain the ejected radionuclides. These tests resulted in the dispersal of plutonium over the ground surface downwind of the test ground zero (GZ). Three tests—Clean Slate I, II, and III—were conducted on the TTR in Cactus Flat. The fourth, Double Tracks, was conducted in Stonewall Flat on the NTTR. The Desert Research Institute (DRI) installed two monitoring stations in 2008, Station 400 at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Range Operations Center (ROC) and Station 401 at Clean Slate III. Station 402 was installed at Clean Slate I in 2011 to measure radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions. The monitoring activity was implemented to determine if radionuclide contamination in the soil at the Clean Slate sites was being transported beyond the contamination area boundaries. Some of the data collected also permits comparison of radiological exposure at the TTR monitoring stations to conditions observed at Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) stations around the NTTR. Annual average gross alpha values from the TTR monitoring stations are higher than values from the surrounding CEMP stations. Annual average gross beta values from the TTR monitoring stations are generally lower than values observed for the surrounding CEMP stations. This may be due to use of sample filters with larger pore space because when glass-fiber filters began to be used at TTR Station 400, gross beta values increased. Gamma spectroscopy typically identified only naturally occurring radionuclides. The radionuclides cesium-134 and -137 were identified in only two samples at each station collected in the weeks following the destruction of the nuclear power reactor in Fukushima, Japan, on March 11, 2011. Observed gamma energy values never exceeded the local background by more than 4 ?R/h. The higher observed gamma values were coincident with wind from any of the cardinal directions, which suggests that there is no significant transport from the Clean Slate contamination areas. Annual average daily gamma values at the TTR stations are higher than at the surrounding CEMP stations, but they are equivalent to or just slightly higher than the background estimates made at locations at equivalent elevations, such as Denver, Colorado. Winds in excess of approximately 15 mph begin to resuspend soil particles and create dust, but dust generation is also affected by soil temperature, relative humidity, and soil water content. Power curves provide good predictive equations for dust concentration as a function of wind speed. However, winds in the highest wind speed category occur infrequently. iii

  17. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 410: Waste Disposal Trenches, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada: Revision No. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2003-12-22

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report (CADD/CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 410: Waste Disposal Trenches, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 410 consists of five Corrective Action Sites (CASs): TA-21-003-TANL; 09-21-001-TA09; TA-19-002-TAB2; TA-21-002-TAAL; and 03-19-001. The CADD and CR have been combined into one report because no further action is recommended for this CAU. The corrective action alternative recommended for CAU 410 is Clean Closure; therefore, no corrective action or corrective action plan is required. No use restrictions are required to be placed on this CAU because the investigation showed no evidence of remaining soil contamination or remaining debris/waste upon completion of all investigation activities.

  18. Post-Closure Inspection Report for Corrective Action Unit 424: Area 3 Landfill Complex, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Calendar Year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. B. Campbell

    2001-06-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 424, the Area 3 Landfill Complex at Tonopah Test Range, consists of eight landfill sites, Corrective Action Sites (CASS), seven of which are landfill cells that were closed previously by capping. (The eighth CAS, A3-7, was not used as a landfill site and was closed without taking any corrective action.) Figure 1 shows the locations of the landfill cells. CAU 424 closure activities included removing small volumes of soil containing petroleum hydrocarbons, repairing cell covers that were cracked or had subsided, and installing above-grade and at-grade monuments marking the comers of the landfill cells. Post-closure monitoring requirements for CAU 424 are detailed in Section 5.0, Post-Closure Inspection Plan contained, in the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 424: Area 3 Landfill Complex, Tonopah Test Range. Nevada, report number DOE/NV--283. The Closure Report (CR) was approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in July 1999. The CR includes compaction and permeability results of soils that cap the seven landfill cells. Post-closure monitoring consists of the following: (1) Site inspections done twice a year to evaluate the condition of the unit; (2) Verification that the site is secure; (3) Notice of any subsidence or deficiencies that may compromise the integrity of the unit; (4) Remedy of any deficiencies within 90 days of discovery; and (5) Preparation and submittal of an annual report. Site inspections were conducted on June 20, 2000, and November 20, 2000. The inspections were preformed after the NDEP approval of the CR. This report includes copies of the inspection checklist and photographs, and recommendations and conclusions. The Post-Closure Inspection Checklists are found in Attachment A, a copy of the field notes is found in Attachment B, and copies of the inspection photographs are found in Attachment C.

  19. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 408: Bomblet Target Area Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Krauss

    2010-03-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 408, Bomblet Target Area (TTR). Corrective Action Unit 408 is located at the Tonopah Test Range and is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 408 comprises Corrective Action Site TA-55-002-TAB2, Bomblet Target Areas. Clean closure of CAU 408 will be accomplished by removal of munitions and explosives of concern within seven target areas and potential disposal pits. The target areas were used to perform submunitions related tests for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The scope of CAU 408 is limited to submunitions released from DOE activities. However, it is recognized that the presence of other types of unexploded ordnance and munitions may be present within the target areas due to the activities of other government organizations. The CAU 408 closure activities consist of: • Clearing bomblet target areas within the study area. • Identifying and remediating disposal pits. • Collecting verification samples. • Performing radiological screening of soil. • Removing soil containing contaminants at concentrations above the action levels. Based on existing information, contaminants of potential concern at CAU 408 include unexploded submunitions, explosives, Resource Conservation Recovery Act metals, and depleted uranium. Contaminants are not expected to be present in the soil at concentrations above the action levels; however, this will be determined by radiological surveys and verification sample results.

  20. CORRRECTIVE ACTION DECISION DOCUMENT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 427: AREA 3 SEPTIC WASTE SYSTEMS 2 AND 6, TONOPAH TEST RANGE, NEVADA, REVISION 0, JUNE 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE /NV

    1998-06-23

    This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for the Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 2 and 6 (Corrective Action Unit 427) in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996 (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Unit 427 is located at the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, and is comprised of the following Corrective Action Sites, each an individual septic waste system (DOE/NV, 1996a): (1) Septic Waste System 2 is Corrective Action Site Number 03-05-002-SW02. (2) Septic Waste System 6 is Corrective Action Site Number 03-05-002-SW06. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for each Corrective Action Site. The scope of this Correction Action Decision Document consists of the following tasks: (1) Develop corrective action objectives. (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria. (3) Develop corrective action alternatives. (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria. (5) Recommend and justify a preferred corrective action alternative for each CAS. From November 1997 through January 1998, a corrective action investigation was performed as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit No. 427: Area 3 Septic Waste System Numbers 2 and 6, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (DOE/NV, 1997b). Details can be found in Appendix A of this document. The results indicated that contamination is present in some portions of the CAU and not in others as described in Table ES-1 and shown in Figure A.2-2 of Appendix A. Based on the potential exposure pathways, the following corrective action objectives have been identified for Corrective Action Unit 427: (1) Prevent or mitigate human exposure to subsurface soils containing TPH at concentrations greater than 100 milligrams per kilogram (NAC, 1996b). (2) Close Sep tic Tank 33-5 in accordance with Nevada Administrative Code 459 (NAC, 1996c). (3) Prevent adverse impacts to groundwater quality. Based on the review of existing data, future land use, and current operations at the Tonopah Test Range, the following alternatives were developed for consideration at the Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 2 and 6: Alternative 1 - No Further Action; Alternative 2 - Closure of Septic Tank 33-5 and Administrative Controls; Alternative 3 - Closure of Septic Tank 33-5, Excavation, and Disposal The corrective action alternatives were evaluated based on four general corrective action standards and five remedy selection decision factors. Based on the results of this evaluation, the preferred alternative for Corrective Action Unit 427 is Alternative 2, Closure of Septic Tank 33-5 and Administrative Controls. The preferred corrective action alternative was evaluated on technical merit, focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, and safety. The alternative was judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated. The alternative meets all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site and will reduce potential future exposure pathways to the contaminated soils. During corrective action implementation, this alternative will present minimal potential threat to site workers who come in contact with the waste. However, procedures will be developed and implemented to ensure worker health and safety.

  1. Post-Closure Inspection Report for Corrective Action Unit 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes Tonopah Test Range, Nevada Calendar Year 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. B. Campbell

    2002-02-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 424, the Area 3 Landfill Complexes at Tonopah Test Range, consists of eight Corrective Action Sites (CASs), seven of which are landfill cells that were closed previously by capping. (The eighth CAS, A3-7, was not used as a landfill site and was closed without taking any corrective action.) Figure 1 shows the general location of the landfill cells. Figure 2 shows in more detail the location of the eight landfill cells. CAU 424 closure activities included removing small volumes of soil containing petroleum hydrocarbons, repairing cell covers that were cracked or had subsided, and installing above-grade and at-grade monuments marking the comers of the landfill cells. Post-closure monitoring requirements for CAU 424 are detailed in Section 5.0, Post-Closure Inspection Plan, contained in the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, report number DOE/NV--283, July 1999. The Closure Report (CR) was approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in July 1999. The CR includes compaction and permeability results of soils that cap the seven landfill cells. As stated in Section 5.0 of the NDEP-approved CR, post-closure monitoring at CAU 424 consists of the following: (1) Site inspections conducted twice a year to evaluate the condition of the unit. (2) Verification that landfill markers and warning signs are in-place, intact, and readable. (3) Notice of any subsidence, erosion, unauthorized use, or deficiencies that may compromise the integrity of the landfill covers. (4) Remedy of any deficiencies within 90 days of discovery. (5) Preparation and submittal of an annual report. Site inspections were conducted on May 16, 2001, and November 6, 2001. The inspections were preformed after the NDEP approval of the CR. This report includes copies of the inspection checklist, photographs, recommendations, and conclusions. The Post-Closure Inspection Checklists are found in Attachment A, a copy of the field notes is found in Attachment B, and copies of the inspection photographs are found in Attachment C.

  2. Cultivation, Capital, and Contamination: Urban Agriculture in Oakland, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClintock, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    flatlands urban agriculture. The rolling range and orchardsurban areas, Pb arsenate (PbHAsO 4 ) was commonly applied as a pesticide in orchards (

  3. Post-Closure Inspection Report for Corrective Action Unit 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Calendar Year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. B. Campbell

    2001-06-01

    Post-closure monitoring requirements for the Area 9 Unexploded Ordnance Landfill (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] 453) (Figure 1) are described in Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, report number DOE/NV--284. The Closure Report (CR) was submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) on August 5,1999. The CR (containing the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan) was approved by the NDEP on September 10,1999. Post-closure monitoring at CAU 453 consists of the following: (1) Site inspections done twice a year to evaluate the condition of the unit; (2) Verification that the site is secure; (3) Notice of any subsidence or deficiencies that may compromise the integrity of the unit; (4) Remedy of any deficiencies within 90 days of discovery; and (5) Preparation and submittal of an annual report. Site inspections were conducted on June 20, 2000 and November 21, 2000. Both site inspections were conducted after NDEP approval of the CR, and in accordance with the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan in the NDEP-approved CR. This report includes copies of the inspection checklists, photographs, recommendations, and conclusions. The Post-Closure Inspection Checklists are found in Attachment A, a copy of the field notes is found in Attachment B, and inspection photographs are found in Attachment C.

  4. Post-Closure Inspection Report for Corrective Action Unit 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Calendar Year 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. B. Campbell

    2002-01-01

    Post-closure monitoring requirements for the Area 9 Unexploded Ordinance Landfill (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] 453) (Figure 1) are described in Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, report number DOE/NV--284, August 1999. The Closure Report (CR) was submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) on August 5 , 1999. The CR (containing the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan) was approved by the NDEP on September 10,1999. As stated in Section 5.0 of the NDEP-approved CR, post-closure monitoring at CAU 453 consists of the following: (1) Visual site inspections are conducted twice a year to evaluate the condition of the cover. (2) Verification that the site is secure and the condition of the fence and posted warning signs. (3) Notice of any subsidence, erosion, unauthorized excavation, etc., deficiencies that may compromise the integrity of the unit. (4) Remedy of any deficiencies within 90 days of discovery. (5) Preparation and submittal of an annual report. Site inspections were conducted on May 15, 2001 and November 6, 2001. Both site inspections were conducted in accordance with the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan in the NDEP-approved CR. This report includes copies of the inspection checklists, photographs, recommendations, and conclusions. The Post-Closure Inspection Checklists are found in Attachment A, a copy of the field notes is found in Attachment B, and inspection photographs are found in Attachment C.

  5. Assessment of Geothermal Resource Potential at a High-Priority Area on the Utah Testing and Training Range–South (UTTR–S)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard P. Smith, PhD., PG; Robert P. Breckenridge, PhD.; Thomas R. Wood, PhD.

    2012-04-01

    Field investigations conducted during 2011 support and expand the conclusion of the original Preliminary Report that discovery of a viable geothermal system is possible in the northwestern part of the Utah Testing and Training Range-South (UTTR-S), referred to henceforth as Focus Area 1. The investigations defined the southward extent of the Wendover graben into and near Focus Area 1, enhanced the understanding of subsurface conditions, and focused further geothermal exploration efforts towards the northwestern-most part of Focus Area 1. Specifically, the detailed gravity survey shows that the Wendover graben, first defined by Cook et al. (1964) for areas north of Interstate Highway 80, extends and deepens southwest-ward to the northwest corner of Focus Area 1. At its deepest point, the intersection with a northwest-trending graben there is favorable for enhanced permeability associated with intersecting faults. Processing and modeling of the gravity data collected during 2011 provide a good understanding of graben depth and distribution of faults bounding the graben and has focused the interest area of the study. Down-hole logging of temperatures in wells made available near the Intrepid, Inc., evaporation ponds, just north of Focus Area 1, provide a good understanding of the variability of thermal gradients in that area and corroborate the more extensive temperature data reported by Turk (1973) for the depth range of 300-500 m. Moderate temperature gradients in the northern part of the Intrepid area increase to much higher gradients and bottom-hole temperatures southeastward, towards graben-bounding faults, suggesting upwelling geothermal waters along those faults. Water sampling, analysis, and temperature measurements of Blue Lakes and Mosquito Willey's springs, on the western boundary of Focus Area 1, also show elevated temperatures along the graben-bounding fault system. In addition, water chemistry suggests origin of those waters in limestone rocks beneath the graben in areas with temperatures as high as 140 C (284 F). In conclusion, all of the field data collected during 2011 and documented in the Appendices of this report indicate that there is reasonable potential for a viable geothermal resource along faults that bound the Wendover graben. Prospects for a system capable of binary electrical generation are especially good, and the possibility of a flash steam system is also within reason. The next steps should focus on securing the necessary funding for detailed geophysical surveys and for drilling a set of temperature gradient wells to further evaluate the resource, and to focus deep exploration efforts in the most promising areas.

  6. Metromorphosis : evolution on the urban island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vezina, Kenrick (Kenrick Freitas)

    2011-01-01

    Cities are very much alive. Like islands, they provide a natural testing ground for evolution. With more than half of the world's population living in urban areas now, the influence cities have on the planet's life is ...

  7. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 490: Station 44 Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (with Record of Technical Change No.1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

    2000-06-09

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 490 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Active Unit 490 consists of four Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 03-56-001-03BA, Fire Training Area (FTA); RG-56-001-RGBA, Station 44 Burn Area; 03-58-001-03FN, Sandia Service Yard; and 09-54-001-09L2, Gun Propellant Burn Area. These CASs are located at the Tonopah Test Range near Areas 3 and 9. Historically, the FTA was used for training exercises where tires and wood were ignited with diesel fuel. Records indicate that water and carbon dioxide were the only extinguishing agents used during these training exercises. The Station 44 Burn Area was used for fire training exercises and consisted of two wooden structures. The two burn areas (ignition of tires, wood, and wooden structures with diesel fuel and water) were limited to the building footprints (10 ft by 10 ft each). The Sandia Service Yard was used for storage (i.e., wood, tires, metal, electronic and office equipment, construction debris, and drums of oil/grease) from approximately 1979 to 1993. The Gun Propellant Burn Area was used from the 1960s to 1980s to burn excess artillery gun propellant, solid-fuel rocket motors, black powder, and deteriorated explosives; additionally, the area was used for the disposal of experimental explosive items. Based on site history, the focus of the field investigation activities will be to: (1) determine the presence of contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) at each CAS, (2) determine if any COPCs exceed field-screening levels and/or preliminary action levels, and (3) determine the nature and extent of contamination with enough certainty to support selection of corrective action alternatives for each CAS. The scope of this CAIP is to resolve the question of whether or not potentially hazardous wastes were generated at three of the four CASs within CAU 490, and whether or not potentially hazardous and radioactive wastes were generated at the fourth CAS in CAU 490 (CAS 09-54-001-09L2). Suspected CAS-specific COPCs include volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, explosives, and uranium and plutonium isotopes. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  8. Building an urban image

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russin, Andrew J

    1992-01-01

    This design project explores the principles of "urban legibility" and "shared space". The readability, or imageability (in Kevin Lynch's term) of a city results from the recognition of larger urban patterns, organizations, ...

  9. Model-based testing for space-time interaction using point processes: An application to psychiatric hospital admissions in an urban area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Sebastian; Rössler, Wulf; Held, Leonhard

    2015-01-01

    Spatio-temporal interaction is inherent to cases of infectious diseases and occurrences of earthquakes, whereas the spread of other events, such as cancer or crime, is less evident. Statistical significance tests of space-time clustering usually assess the correlation between the spatial and temporal (transformed) distances of the events. Although appealing through simplicity, these classical tests do not adjust for the underlying population nor can they account for a distance decay of interaction. We propose to use the framework of an endemic-epidemic point process model to jointly estimate a background event rate explained by seasonal and areal characteristics, as well as a superposed epidemic component representing the hypothesis of interest. We illustrate this new model-based test for space-time interaction by analysing psychiatric inpatient admissions in Zurich, Switzerland (2007-2012). Several socio-economic factors were found to be associated with the admission rate, but there was no evidence of genera...

  10. The Urban Heat Island's Effect on the diurnal temperature range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merkin, Ryan, 1974-

    2004-01-01

    (cont.) representing Phoenix and its rural equivalent is presented through a comparison with estimated energy fluxes for Houston, TX.

  11. Modeling impact of urban air pollution on health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    Modeling impact of urban air pollution on health: Preliminary results and testing a methodology with hospitals for the study of air pollution impact on specific deceases (old people admitted in emergency morbidity data and pollutants concentrations at the regional/urban scale Health and air quality in France

  12. AN URBAN SURFACE EXCHANGE PARAMETERISATION FOR MESOSCALE MODELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AN URBAN SURFACE EXCHANGE PARAMETERISATION FOR MESOSCALE MODELS ALBERTO MARTILLI1, , ALAIN CLAPPIER. A scheme to represent the impact of urban buildings on airflow in mesoscale atmospheric models is presented the presence of the buildings. The parameterisation is introduced into a mesoscale model and tested

  13. Successful streets : performance measures, community engagement, and urban street design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinemann, Jeremy R

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, local transportation agencies have increasingly re-designed urban arterials, their cities' major surface streets, to better accommodate a wide range of users. At the same time, a growing number of ...

  14. Urban mechanics : the parking garage as an instrument of legibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, Marcus E. (Marcus Eugene)

    2012-01-01

    No typology has fragmented urban space more than the parking garage. In fact, the city of Houston's parking contingent practice has a resulted in a garage on 30% of the downtown district.The range from a few underground ...

  15. Public Transport and Sustainable Urbanism: Global Lesson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cervero, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Public Transport and Sustainable Urbanism: Global Lessonsviable and sustainable form of urbanism. Notes J. Kenworthy

  16. Alternative Fuels, Vehicle Technologies and Urban Logistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witt, Maggie

    2012-01-01

    Technologies and Urban Logistics Policy Note prepared byvehicle technologies, urban logistics, and VMT reduction. It

  17. Structuring institutional analysis for urban ecosystems: A key to sustainable urban forest management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Tom

    Structuring institutional analysis for urban ecosystems: A key to sustainable urban forest in urban settings with a specific focus on sustainable urban forest management. We conclude that urban management . Urban forest policy. Institutional analysis . Ecosystem services . Public goods . Sustainability

  18. TRIPZOOM: A System to Motivate Sustainable Urban Mobility Paul Holleis, Marko Luther,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TRIPZOOM: A System to Motivate Sustainable Urban Mobility Paul Holleis, Marko Luther, Gregor Broll real world tests in several cities. Keywords - sustainable traffic; urban mobility; personal mobile of cities provides new chal- lenges for urban planning, especially related to transportation. Many existing

  19. Urban Scaling in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bettencourt, Luis M A

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decades, in disciplines as diverse as economics, geography, and complex systems, a perspective has arisen proposing that many properties of cities are quantitatively predictable due to agglomeration or scaling effects. Using new harmonized definitions for functional urban areas, we examine to what extent these ideas apply to European cities. We show that while most large urban systems in Western Europe (France, Germany, Italy, Spain, UK) approximately agree with theoretical expectations, the small number of cities in each nation and their natural variability preclude drawing strong conclusions. We demonstrate how this problem can be overcome so that cities from different urban systems can be pooled together to construct larger datasets. This leads to a simple statistical procedure to identify urban scaling relations, which then clearly emerge as a property of European cities. We compare the predictions of urban scaling to Zipf's law for the size distribution of cities and show that while the for...

  20. Urban Retrofit: A Whole-Watershed Approach to Urban Stormwater Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lithander, Becky

    2012-01-01

    Creek  Watershed:  Urban  Stormwater  Management  Opportuni?Creek  Watershed:  Urban  Stormwater  Management  Opportuni?Creek  Watershed:  Urban  Stormwater  Management  Opportuni?

  1. Exploring urban resilience : violence and infrastructure provision in Karachi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raman, Prassanna

    2012-01-01

    The Urban Resilience and Chronic Violence project at MIT extends the scientific concept of resilience to the analysis of chronic conflict. This thesis builds upon the project by testing the usefulness of a socio-spatial ...

  2. Airborne Pollution In urban environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broday, David

    Airborne Pollution In urban environments What are the real health effects of urban pollution Air Pollution- relevant Human Exposure in Urban Environments" Funded under the "City of Tomorrow" programme of the European Union: Contract number EVK4-CT-2002-00090 URBAN POLLUTION Airborne pollutants

  3. Managing Stormwater for Urban Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Managing Stormwater for Urban Sustainability Using Trees and Structural Soils A new space.B. Dickinson (Eds.) 2008. Managing Stormwater for Urban Sustainability using Trees and Structural Soils Forest Service Urban & Community Forestry Program on the recommendation of the National Urban & Community

  4. Urban Surfaces and Heat Island Mitigation Potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, Hashem

    2008-01-01

    Finster. 2000. “The Urban Heat Island, Photochemical Smog,2001. “EPA/NASA Urban Heat Island Pilot Project,” GlobalSystem Urban Surfaces and Heat Island Mitigation Potentials

  5. Architecture & Urban Planning College of Architecture & Urban Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cafarella, Michael J.

    &AB Junghans Wind and Architecture 33454 P LEC 005 T 330-630PM 2108 A&AB Kim Bioclimatic Bldg Enclosure Sys 506Architecture & Urban Planning College of Architecture & Urban Planning Architecture (ARCH) 201

  6. Urban Form and Air Pollution in US Urban Areas!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Urban Form and Air Pollution in US Urban Areas! Center for Transportation Studies Research of Minnesota Grant No. 0853467 #12;Air Pollution Impacts on Health 2 EPA, 2010 Ozone PM2.5 PM10 Lead Nitrogen #12;Purpose and Research Questions 4 Purpose: Explore relationship between air pollution and urban

  7. RANGE-ENERGY TABLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rich, Marvin

    2010-01-01

    Particles. II. PROTON RANGE-ENERGY DATA Stopping Medium: Be2301 III. PION RANGE-ENERGY DATA Mev. Pion Kinetic Energy2301 IV. DEUTERON RANGE-ENERGY DATA Deuteron Kinetic Energy

  8. THE URBAN BOUNDARY-LAYER FIELD CAMPAIGN IN MARSEILLE (UBL/CLU-ESCOMPTE): SET-UP AND FIRST RESULTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Abstract. The UBL/CLU (urban boundary layer/couche limite urbaine) observation and modelling campaign to the heat and moisture exchanges between the urban canopy and the atmosphere during periods of low wind mapping of urban land cover, land-use and aerodynamic parameters used in UBL models, and (iv) testing

  9. Monroe Urbanized Area MTP 2035 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monroe Urbanized Area Metropolitan Planning Organization

    2010-10-31

    /plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Monroe Urbanized Area MTP 2035 The 2035 Metropolitan Transportation Plan for the Monroe Urbanized Area Developed for The Monroe Urbanized Area Metropolitan Planning Organization and The Louisiana Department... of Transportation and Development Developed by In association with Neel-Schaffer, Inc. **DRAFT** Adopted Date Here This document was prepared in cooperation with: The Monroe Urbanized Area MPO Technical Advisory Committee and The Louisiana...

  10. An Urban Parameterization for a Global Climate Model. Part II: Sensitivity to Input Parameters and the Simulated Urban Heat Island in Offline Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleson, Keith W.; Bonan, Gordon B.; Feddema, Johannes J.; Vertenstein, M.

    2008-01-01

    -Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 An Urban Parameterization for a Global Climate Model. Part II: Sensitivity to Input Parameters and the Simulated Urban Heat Island in Offline Simulations K. W. OLESON AND G. B. BONAN Climate and Global Dynamics... Model. Here the robustness of the model is tested through sensitivity studies and the model’s ability to simulate urban heat islands in different environments is evaluated. Findings show that heat storage and sensible heat flux are most sensitive...

  11. A global map of urban extent from nightlights

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, Yuyu; Smith, Steven J.; Zhao, Kaiguang; Imhoff, Marc L.; Thomson, Allison M.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Asrar, Ghassem R.; Zhang, Xuesong; He, Chunyang; Elvidge, Christopher

    2015-05-13

    Urbanization, one of the major human induced land-cover and land-use changes, has a profound impact on the Earth system including biodiversity, the cycling of water and carbon and exchange of energy and water between Earth’s surface and atmosphere, all affecting weather and climate. Accurate information on urban areas and their spatial distribution at the regional and global scales is important for scientific understanding of their contribution to the changing Earth system, and for practical management and policy decisions. We developed a method to map the urban extent from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program/Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS) nighttime stable-light data atmore »the global level and derived a new global map of 1-km urban extent for year 2000. Based on this map, we found that globally, urban land area is about 0.5% of total land area but ranges widely at regional level from 0.1% in Oceania to 2.3% in Europe. At the country level, urban land area varies from lower than 0.01% to higher than 10%, but is lower than 1% for most (70%) countries. Urbanization follows land mass distribution, as anticipated, with the highest concentration found between 30°N to 45°N latitude and the largest longitudinal peak around 80°W. Based on a sensitivity analysis and comparison with other global urban area products, we found that our global product of urban area provides a reliable estimate of global urban areas and offer the potential of capturing more accurately their spatial and temporal dynamics.« less

  12. Urban health and health inequalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urban health and health inequalities and the role of urban forestry in Britain: A review Liz O'Brien Kathryn Williams Amy Stewart 2010 #12;Urban health and woodlands Contents Executive Summary 4 1.1.3 Definition of terms 9 3. The policy context: health and forestry policies 11 3.1 Health policies 11 3

  13. Lead exposure at uncovered outdoor firing ranges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, R.L.; Hicks, A.M.; O'Leary, L.M.; London, S. (University of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles (USA))

    1991-06-01

    Excessive lead exposure in shooting instructors at indoor firing ranges and covered outdoor firing ranges has been documented. The City of Los Angeles assessed exposure of its full-time shooting instructors at uncovered outdoor ranges via air monitoring and blood lead-level measurements. Results of these tests revealed that significant lead exposure and absorption can occur at outdoor firing ranges. The use of copper-jacketed ammunition may decrease air lead levels and decrease lead absorption by range instructors.

  14. Urban Surfaces and Heat Island Mitigation Potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashem; Akbari, Hashem; Shea Rose, Leanna

    2007-06-14

    Data on materials and surface types that comprise a city, i.e. urban fabric, are needed in order to estimate the effects of light-colored surfaces (roofs and pavements) and urban vegetation (trees, grass, shrubs) on the meteorology and air quality of a city. We discuss the results of a semi-automatic statistical approach used to develop data on surface-type distribution and urban-fabric makeup using aerial color orthophotography, for four metropolitan areas of Chicago, IL, Houston, TX, Sacramento, CA, and Salt Lake City, UT. The digital high resolution (0.3 to 0.5-m) aerial photographs for each of these metropolitan areas covers representative urban areas ranging from 30 km{sup 2} to 52 km{sup 2}. Major land-use types examined included: commercial, residential, industrial, educational, and transportation. On average, for the metropolitan areas studied, vegetation covers about 29-41% of the area, roofs 19-25%, and paved surfaces 29-39%. For the most part, trees shade streets, parking lots, grass, and sidewalks. At ground level, i.e., view from below the tree canopies, vegetation covers about 20-37% of the area, roofs 20-25%, and paved surfaces 29-36%.

  15. The urban coffee shop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chadios, Konstantinos

    2005-01-01

    This thesis is an investigation of the role of the coffee shop in the urban environment throughout history. Coffee shops spread from the Arab world to Europe and then to the U.S. at the end of the seventeenth century. ...

  16. Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus) Productivity and Home Range Characteristics in a Shortgrass Prairie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    reuse. Ninety-five percent adaptive kernel mean home range size did not differ between ages or sexes and transformed into an urban wildlife refuge through cooperative efforts by the United States Army, Shell Oil and was designated to be an urban wildlife refuge in 1992. The climate is semi-arid, with low humidity, light

  17. Defining urban and rural regions by multifractal spectrums of urbanization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yanguang

    2015-01-01

    The spatial pattern of urban-rural regional system is associated with the dynamic process of urbanization. How to characterize the urban-rural terrain using quantitative measurement is a difficult problem remaining to be solved. This paper is devoted to defining urban and rural regions using ideas from fractals. A basic postulate is that human geographical systems are of self-similar patterns associated with recursive processes. Then multifractal geometry can be employed to describe or define the urban and rural terrain with the level of urbanization. A space-filling index of urban-rural region based on the generalized correlation dimension is presented to reflect the degree of geo-spatial utilization in terms of urbanization. The census data of America and China are adopted to show how to make empirical analyses of urban-rural multifractals. This work is not so much a positive analysis as a normative study, but it proposes a new way of investigating urban and rural regional systems using fractal theory.

  18. Transport Infrastructure and the Environment: Sustainable Mobility and Urbanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cervero, Robert

    2013-01-01

    ideas for advancing sustainable urbanism and mobility willand sustainable transport and urbanism everywhere --the Environment: Sustainable Mobility and Urbanism Robert

  19. Urbanism in the Age of Climate Change, by Peter Calthorpe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Hyungkyoo

    2013-01-01

    Waldheim 2006), Sustainable Urbanism (Farr 2008), EcologicalFarr, Douglas. 2008. Sustainable Urbanism: Urban Design withof Urbanism on the New Urbanist Frontier: Sustainable

  20. SUSTAINABLE URBAN WATER MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Suman

    consumption Vehicle production 0.77 0.59 0.79 0.32 4.35 0.44 12.25 2.45 3.85 0.97 (Source: Harto, C; et al% Mining; 1% Decentralized Water Production (LID) Decentralized Energy Production Urban Farming #12;Water Footprint of Agricultural Products #12;`Water for Energy' and `Energy for Water' in US Water for Energy

  1. Modeling urban runoff characteristics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Alfred

    1987-01-01

    , commercial, and industrial developments (Jones 1970). From a hydrologic viewpoint, urban developments are characterized by impervious surfaces occupying surfaces that were once pervious. Impervious surfaces can exist in two general forms: (I) single... which reduces both infiltration and depression storage. These factors coupled with hydraulic channel improvements cause a decrease in the time of concentration, a decrease in the hydrograph base length, an increase in the runoff volume...

  2. URBAN FORM AND LIFE-CYCLE ENERGY CONSUMPTION:1 CASE STUDIES AT THE CITY SCALE2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kockelman, Kara M.

    1 URBAN FORM AND LIFE-CYCLE ENERGY CONSUMPTION:1 CASE STUDIES AT THE CITY SCALE2 3 Brice G. Nichols it should31 be included in planning analyses. Overall, average life-cycle per-capita energy use ranges from residential and commercial sectors are affected by density.37 38 Keywords: urban energy use, city-level scale

  3. DC's Marble ceiling : urban height and its regulation in Washington, DC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trueblood, Andrew Tyson

    2009-01-01

    Washington, DC has a unique urban form that is the result of a century-old law. Through the narrow lens of DC's height limit, I survey a range of topics related to urban height, starting with a review of its history of ...

  4. Session 2: Modelling air pollution across a range of scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Session 2: Modelling air pollution across a range of scales Ruth Doherty, Massimo Vieno, Ian Mac) EMEP2009 (less complex) Observations Modelling regional air pollution #12;Nested regions: 50 to 5 to 1 km2 O3 concentration (ppb) NO2 concentration (µg m-3) #12;Modelling Urban air pollution Regional

  5. Urban Ecosystems ISSN 1083-8155

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angilletta, Michael

    1 23 Urban Ecosystems ISSN 1083-8155 Urban Ecosyst DOI 10.1007/s11252-015-0460-x Urban heat island at link.springer.com". #12;Urban heat island mitigation strategies and lizard thermal ecology: landscaping. Urban heat island (UHI) effects may further exacerbate the impacts of climate change on organisms

  6. Coupling traffic models on networks and urban dispersion models for simulating sustainable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceragioli, Francesca

    models for modeling and testing different traffic scenarios, in order to define the impact on air quality it with the urban dispersion model Sirane. Keywords: urban air quality, macroscopic traffic models, road networks, pollutant dispersion models, traffic emissions control. AMS subject classification: 35L65, 35L67, 60K30, 90B

  7. Response of a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine to Time Varying Wind Conditions found within the Urban

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullis, Stephen

    Response of a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine to Time Varying Wind Conditions found within the Urban, 2010 PP 389­401 389 ABSTRACT Experimental testing of a vertical axis wind turbine within the urban of the turbine. Temporal variation of the wind with respect to the direction and velocity fluctuations

  8. UrbanSolutionsCenter Urban Uses for Dairy Manure Compost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UrbanSolutionsCenter Urban Uses for Dairy Manure Compost Background Construction of new homes with time and with heat and drought stress. Dairy manure compost (DMC) is readily available for amending regulatory agencies are developing mechanisms for using composted dairy manure to remedy disturbed soils

  9. Architecture & Urban Planning College of Architecture & Urban Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cafarella, Michael J.

    Architecture & Urban Planning College of Architecture & Urban Planning Architecture (ARCH) 201 ARR Newell 213 Bldgs, Cities,People 4.00 26819 S LEC 001 TTH 1130-1PM UMMA AUD Zimmerman Architecture Bioclimatic Bldg Enclosure Sys 506 Spec Topics Des Fund 3.00 ADVISORY 23543 P RW SEM 001 M 9-12PM 1227 A&AB Mc

  10. Architecture & Urban Planning College of Architecture & Urban Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cafarella, Michael J.

    Architecture & Urban Planning College of Architecture & Urban Planning Architecture (ARCH) 201, Scherer Intro to Robotics Fabrication 421 Geometric Modeling 3.00 ADVISORY 25595 P RW LEC 001 TH 9-12PMShed 27543 P LEC 004 M 1-4PM 2222 A&AB Junghans Wind and Architecture 28434 P W LEC 005 T 9-12PM 2108 A

  11. High-resolution urban thermal sharpener (HUTS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominguez, Anthony; Kleissl, Jan; Luvall, Jeffrey C; Rickman, Douglas L

    2011-01-01

    C.  A. , 2005.  Urban heat  islands developing in coastal the  Phoenix Urban Heat Island (UHI) experiment: effects at growth of the urban heat island of Houston, Texas,  Remote 

  12. High-resolution urban thermal sharpener (HUTS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominguez, Anthony; Kleissl, Jan; Luvall, Jeffrey C; Rickman, Douglas L

    2011-01-01

    C.  A. , 2005.  Urban heat  islands developing in coastal growth of the urban heat island of Houston, Texas,  Remote the  Phoenix Urban Heat Island (UHI) experiment: effects at 

  13. Detroit's Urban Regime: Composition and Consequence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Leda Mclntyre; Hall, Melvin F.

    1993-04-01

    This article examines the urban regime in Detroit, Michigan, specifically examining how the regime makes decisions about redevelopment and major capital projects. Detroit's urban regime, which emergedfrom the urban unrest of the 1960s, mobilizes...

  14. Habitable piers : an alternative for urban expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Chin Yuan, M. Arch. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    1990-01-01

    This thesis is an investigation into an alternative way of urban expansion for a seaside community. This thesis proposes a habitable urban environment on the water by creating for an exchange between the built urban landscape ...

  15. Waller Creek Urban Redevelopment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, S.

    2013-01-01

    Winkler Melba Whatley Waller Creek Conservancy Directors – November 2013 ESL-KT-13-12-51 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 CITY COUNCIL APPROVES DESIGN PLAN... Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Thomas Phifer ESL-KT-13-12-51 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 8Waller Creek and a Chain of Parks Palm Park Shaded Respite The Narrows Intensified Urbanity The Refuge...

  16. Finding Multiple Lanes in Urban Road Networks with Vision and Lidar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Albert S.

    This paper describes a system for detecting and estimating the properties of multiple travel lanes in an urban road network from calibrated video imagery and laser range data acquired by a moving vehicle. The system operates ...

  17. Toward Urban Model Acquisition from Geo-Located Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teller, Seth

    a novel sensor, and as- sociated geometric algorithms, to achieve fully automated reconstruction from close-range color images of textured geometric models representing built urban structures. The sensor is a geo-located camera, which annotates each acquired digital image with metadata recording the date

  18. The impacts of urbanization on endangered florida key deer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harveson, Patricia Moody

    2006-04-12

    of peninsular Florida. Key deer range is restricted to the Lower Florida Keys with approximately 60% residing on Big Pine Key and 15% residing on No Name Key which have undergone rapid human population growth and development over the past 30 years. Urban...

  19. Toward an Integrated Paradigm: Further Thoughts on the Three Urbanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelbaugh, Douglas

    2007-01-01

    a richer, more sustainable, more enduring urbanism? Everydaysustainable and voluntary process. 16 Otherwise, New Urbanism

  20. A Blueprint for Urban Sustainability: Integrating Sustainable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Blueprint for Urban Sustainability: Integrating Sustainable Energy Practices into Metropolitan Planning, May 2004 A Blueprint for Urban Sustainability: Integrating Sustainable...

  1. 11/17/14 Urbanization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    · In cities, natural resource production is displaced, meaning that urban effects extend well beyond city resource production is displaced, meaning that urban effects extend well beyond city boundaries · Species;11/17/14 3 · Locations of cities exaggerate local effects on wildlife - coasts, river mouths, lakeshores

  2. U.S. Department of Energy -- Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Testing and Demonstration Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. Francfort; Donald Karner; John G. Smart

    2009-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) tests plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) in closed track, dynamometer and onroad testing environments. The onroad testing includes the use of dedicated drivers on repeated urban and highway driving cycles that range from 10 to 200 miles, with recharging between each loop. Fleet demonstrations with onboard data collectors are also ongoing with PHEVs operating in several dozen states and Canadian Provinces, during which trips- and miles-per-charge, charging demand and energy profiles, and miles-per-gallon and miles-per-kilowatt-hour fuel use results are all documented, allowing an understanding of fuel use when vehicles are operated in charge depleting, charge sustaining, and mixed charge modes. The intent of the PHEV testing includes documenting the petroleum reduction potential of the PHEV concept, the infrastructure requirements, and operator recharging influences and profiles. As of May 2008, the AVTA has conducted track and dynamometer testing on six PHEV conversion models and fleet testing on 70 PHEVs representing nine PHEV conversion models. A total of 150 PHEVs will be in fleet testing by the end of 2008, all with onboard data loggers. The onroad testing to date has demonstrated 100+ miles per gallon results in mostly urban applications for approximately the first 40 miles of PHEV operations. The primary goal of the AVTA is to provide advanced technology vehicle performance benchmark data for technology modelers, research and development programs, and technology goal setters. The AVTA testing results also assist fleet managers in making informed vehicle purchase, deployment and operating decisions. The AVTA is part of DOE’s Vehicle Technologies Program. These AVTA testing activities are conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory and Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation, with Argonne National Laboratory providing dynamometer testing support. The proposed paper and presentation will discuss PHEV testing activities and results. INL/CON-08-14333

  3. Solar hydrogen for urban trucks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Provenzano, J.: Scott, P.B.; Zweig, R.

    1997-12-31

    The Clean Air Now (CAN) Solar Hydrogen Project, located at Xerox Corp., El Segundo, California, includes solar photovoltaic powered hydrogen generation, compression, storage and end use. Three modified Ford Ranger trucks use the hydrogen fuel. The stand-alone electrolyzer and hydrogen dispensing system are solely powered by a photovoltaic array. A variable frequency DC-AC converter steps up the voltage to drive the 15 horsepower compressor motor. On site storage is available for up to 14,000 standard cubic feet (SCF) of solar hydrogen, and up to 80,000 SCF of commercial hydrogen. The project is 3 miles from Los Angeles International airport. The engine conversions are bored to 2.9 liter displacement and are supercharged. Performance is similar to that of the Ranger gasoline powered truck. Fuel is stored in carbon composite tanks (just behind the driver`s cab) at pressures up to 3600 psi. Truck range is 144 miles, given 3600 psi of hydrogen. The engine operates in lean burn mode, with nil CO and HC emissions. NO{sub x} emissions vary with load and rpm in the range from 10 to 100 ppm, yielding total emissions at a small fraction of the ULEV standard. Two trucks have been converted for the Xerox fleet, and one for the City of West Hollywood. A public outreach program, done in conjunction with the local public schools and the Department of Energy, introduces the local public to the advantages of hydrogen fuel technologies. The Clean Air Now program demonstrates that hydrogen powered fleet development is an appropriate, safe, and effective strategy for improvement of urban air quality, energy security and avoidance of global warming impact. Continued technology development and cost reduction promises to make such implementation market competitive.

  4. Reconsidering Sustainable Development: Urbanization, Political-Economy, and Deliberative Democracy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roman-Alcalá, Antonio M.M.

    2013-01-01

    What can we learn for urban energy planning and urbanizationWhat can we learn for urban energy planning and urbanizationEnergy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions. ” Journal for Urban Planning

  5. Rethinking the nonmetropolitan turnaround: renewed rural growth or extended urbanization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaodong

    2007-04-25

    was rural, the dominant pattern of urbanization was rural-urban migration. When the majority of the population became urban, the dominant urbanization pattern reversed to urbanrural migration because urban centers had reached beyond their optimal density...

  6. Disaster incubation, cumulative impacts and the urban/ex-urban/rural dynamic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulvihill, Peter R. . E-mail: prm@yorku.ca; Ali, S. Harris . E-mail: hali@yorku.ca

    2007-05-15

    This article explores environmental impacts and risks that can accumulate in rural and ex-urban areas and regions and their relation to urban and global development forces. Two Southern Ontario cases are examined: an area level water disaster and cumulative change at the regional level. The role of disaster incubation analysis and advanced environmental assessment tools are discussed in terms of their potential to contribute to more enlightened and effective assessment and planning processes. It is concluded that conventional approaches to EA and planning are characteristically deficient in addressing the full range of impacts and risks, and particularly those originating from pathogens, dispersed and insidious sources. Rigorous application of disaster incubation analysis and more advanced forms of EA has considerable potential to influence a different pattern of planning and decision making.

  7. Short communication Study of pollution dispersion in urban areas using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Peter K.N.

    wind directions and wind speeds. 2. Model validation The developed models have to be verified before they can be applied to real life simulations. To test the performance of the present wind field modelShort communication Study of pollution dispersion in urban areas using Computational Fluid Dynamics

  8. Urban hydrological modeling of the Malden River using the Storm Water Management Model (SWMM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Sara (Sara Elizabeth)

    2015-01-01

    The portion of the Malden River in Malden, Massachusetts, has a long history of industrial activity and urbanization, which has degraded the water quality and ecosystem of the River. Following years of water quality testing, ...

  9. Hybrid Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Testing Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald Karner

    2007-12-01

    The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) conducts hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) testing in order to provide benchmark data for technology modeling and research and development programs, and to be an independent source of test data for fleet managers and other early adaptors of advanced-technology vehicles. To date, the AVTA has completed baseline performance testing on 12 HEV models and accumulated 2.7 million fleet testing miles on 35 HEVs. The HEV baseline performance testing includes dynamometer and closed-track testing to document HEV performance in a controlled environment. During fleet testing, two of each HEV model accumulate 160,000 test miles within 36 months, during which maintenance and repair events and fuel use were recorded. Three models of PHEVs, from vehicle converters Energy CS and Hymotion and the original equipment manufacturer Renault, are currently in testing. The PHEV baseline performance testing includes 5 days of dynamometer testing with a minimum of 26 test drive cycles, including the Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule, the Highway Fuel Economy Driving Schedule, and the US06 test cycle, in charge-depleting and charge-sustaining modes. The PHEV accelerated testing is conducted with dedicated drivers for 4,240 miles, over a series of 132 driving loops that range from 10 to 200 miles over various combinations of defined 10-mile urban and 10-mile highway loops, with 984 hours of vehicle charging. The AVTA is part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. These AVTA testing activities were conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory and Electric Transportation Applications, with dynamometer testing conducted at Argonne National Laboratory. This paper discusses the testing methods and results.

  10. Upstream urbanization exacerbates urban heat island effects Da-Lin Zhang,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Da-Lin

    Upstream urbanization exacerbates urban heat island effects Da-Lin Zhang,1 Yi-Xuan Shou,1; published 19 December 2009. [1] Urban Heat Island (UHI) effects adversely impact weather, air quality find that upstream urbanization exacerbates UHI effects and that meteorological consequences of extra-urban

  11. RANGE-ENERGY TABLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rich, Marvin

    2010-01-01

    Mev gm/ era Mev gm/crn" Mev-cnf/gm 5. 817 x 10" 1. 685 x 10"2301 RANGE OF DEUTERONS IN CARBON J T Mev R gm/cm - dT "dTi T Mev R gm/cm - dT dF Mev- Mev-cn^gm cm/gm 5. 517 x lu" 3.

  12. Test Preparation Options Free Test Prep Websites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stowell, Michael

    Test Preparation Options Free Test Prep Websites ACT: http: http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/sat/prep_one/test.html http://www.number2.com://testprep.princetonreview.com/CourseSearch/Search.aspx?itemCode=17&productType=F&rid=1&zip=803 02 Test Prep Classes Front Range Community College: Classes

  13. Range gated imaging experiments using gated intensifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, T.E. Jr.; Yates, G.J.; Cverna, F.H.; Gallegos, R.A.; Jaramillo, S.A.; Numkena, D.M.; Payton, J.; Pena-Abeyta, C.R.

    1999-03-01

    A variety of range gated imaging experiments using high-speed gated/shuttered proximity focused microchannel plate image intensifiers (MCPII) are reported. Range gated imaging experiments were conducted in water for detection of submerged mines in controlled turbidity tank test and in sea water for the Naval Coastal Sea Command/US Marine Corps. Field experiments have been conducted consisting of kilometer range imaging of resolution targets and military vehicles in atmosphere at Eglin Air Force Base for the US Air Force, and similar imaging experiments, but in smoke environment, at Redstone Arsenal for the US Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM). Wavelength of the illuminating laser was 532 nm with pulse width ranging from 6 to 12 ns and comparable gate widths. These tests have shown depth resolution in the tens of centimeters range from time phasing reflected LADAR images with MCPII shutter opening.

  14. Information Resources for URBAN FARMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    .5 .U72 A55 2012 Anger, Judith et al. EDIBLE CITIES: URBAN PERMACULTURE FOR GARDENS, YEARS, BALCONIES: A GUIDE TO HOME- SCALE PERMACULTURE. White River Junction, VT: Chelsea Green, 2009. S 494.5 .P47 H46 2009

  15. Urban Reclamation in São Paulo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eskinazi, Victor

    2009-01-01

    The urbanized terrain of São Paulo is characterized by wasteful landscapes on peripheral areas of the metropolitan agglomeration, and decaying landscapes of waste in the core of the city. If on the one hand, the increasingly ...

  16. Claiming the urban industrial landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linton, Cynthia Mayhew

    1992-01-01

    This thesis presents a propositIOn about a prevalent urban condition, that of marginal, left over, or disused space. It contends that these spaces, generally viewed as negative attributes by their communities have inherent ...

  17. Climate Change and Urban Trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    Climate Change and Urban Trees: effects on disease and insect pests Drew C. Zwart, Ph.D. Bartlett · Other climate related impacts on plant health: Elevated atmospheric CO2 (no real question about

  18. Light beam range finder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A "laser tape measure" for measuring distance which includes a transmitter such as a laser diode which transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal. A receiver samples reflections from objects within the field of the sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing, in response to a receive timing signal. The receiver generates a sample signal in response to the samples which indicates distance to the object causing the reflections. The timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the reflection such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence in sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The transmit timing signal causes the transmitter to transmit the sequence of electromagnetic pulses at a pulse repetition rate, and the received timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that reflections are sampled at the pulse repetition rate and with different delays in the range of delays, such that the sample signal represents received reflections in equivalent time. The receiver according to one aspect of the invention includes an avalanche photodiode and a sampling gate coupled to the photodiode which is responsive to the received timing signal. The transmitter includes a laser diode which supplies a sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses. A bright spot projected on to the target clearly indicates the point that is being measured, and the user can read the range to that point with precision of better than 0.1%.

  19. Light beam range finder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1998-06-16

    A ``laser tape measure`` for measuring distance is disclosed which includes a transmitter such as a laser diode which transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal. A receiver samples reflections from objects within the field of the sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing, in response to a receive timing signal. The receiver generates a sample signal in response to the samples which indicates distance to the object causing the reflections. The timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the reflection such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence in sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The transmit timing signal causes the transmitter to transmit the sequence of electromagnetic pulses at a pulse repetition rate, and the received timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that reflections are sampled at the pulse repetition rate and with different delays in the range of delays, such that the sample signal represents received reflections in equivalent time. The receiver according to one aspect of the invention includes an avalanche photodiode and a sampling gate coupled to the photodiode which is responsive to the received timing signal. The transmitter includes a laser diode which supplies a sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses. A bright spot projected on to the target clearly indicates the point that is being measured, and the user can read the range to that point with precision of better than 0.1%. 7 figs.

  20. Carbon sequestration and greenhouse gas emissions in urban turf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Townsend-Small, Amy; Czimczik, Claudia I

    2010-01-01

    Carbon sequestration and greenhouse gas emissions in urbanCarbon sequestration and greenhouse gas emissions in urbanCarbon sequestration and greenhouse gas emissions in urban

  1. Transport Infrastructure and the Environment: Sustainable Mobility and Urbanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cervero, Robert

    2013-01-01

    the Environment: Sustainable Mobility and Urbanism Robertthe Environment: Sustainable Mobility and Urbanism RobertGlobal South on more sustainable mobility and urbanization

  2. Indonesia-Promoting Low Emission Urban Development Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Indonesia-Promoting Low Emission Urban Development Strategies in Emerging Economy Countries (URBAN-LEDS) Jump to: navigation, search Name Indonesia-Promoting Low Emission Urban...

  3. Urban Microclimate, a Study of Energy Balance and Fluid Dynamics /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghoobian, Neda

    2013-01-01

    The International Urban Energy Balance Models ComparisonT. Williamson, Urban surface energy balance models: modelof the international urban energy balance model comparison,

  4. Economic Growth in Urban Regions: Implications for Future Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cervero, Robert

    2006-01-01

    diesels) and “sustainable urbanism” (e.g. , TOD). To bringto embrace sustainable transport and urbanism can be thea program of sustainable mobility, urbanism, and finance. 2.

  5. Urban Microclimate, a Study of Energy Balance and Fluid Dynamics /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghoobian, Neda

    2013-01-01

    The International Urban Energy Balance Models ComparisonT. Williamson, Urban surface energy balance models: modelthree-dimensional urban energy balance model for studying

  6. Study reveals urban smoke absorbs sunlight, exacerbating climate...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    urban smoke absorbs sunlight Study reveals urban smoke absorbs sunlight, exacerbating climate warming Cloaking urban areas and wildfire zones, tiny smoke particles suspended in...

  7. Neutron range spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manglos, S.H.

    1988-03-10

    A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are colliminated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. 1 fig.

  8. Long Range Development Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and-E CChinaC L S CLogin HelpLoisLong Range

  9. Modeling and Remote Sensing of Urban Land-Atmosphere Interactions with a Focus on Urban Irrigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vahmani, Pouya

    2014-01-01

    representation of both water and energy fluxes is criticalemployed to quantify water and energy cycle fluxes in urban2008), Linking urban water balance and energy balance models

  10. Test Automation Test Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousavi, Mohammad

    Test Automation Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2013 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Outline Test Automation Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Why? Challenges of Manual Testing Test-case design: Choosing inputs

  11. A window on urban sustainability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stigt, Rien van; Driessen, Peter P.J.; Spit, Tejo J.M.

    2013-09-15

    Sustainable urban development requires the integration of environmental interests in urban planning. Although various methods of environmental assessment have been developed, plan outcomes are often disappointing due to the complex nature of decision-making in urban planning, which takes place in multiple arenas within multiple policy networks involving diverse stakeholders. We argue that the concept of ‘decision windows’ can structure this seemingly chaotic chain of interrelated decisions. First, explicitly considering the dynamics of the decision-making process, we further conceptualized decision windows as moments in an intricate web of substantively connected deliberative processes where issues are reframed within a decision-making arena, and interests may be linked within and across arenas. Adopting this perspective in two case studies, we then explored how decision windows arise, which factors determine their effectiveness and how their occurrence can be influenced so as to arrive at more sustainable solutions. We conclude that the integration of environmental interests in urban planning is highly dependent on the ability of the professionals involved to recognize and manipulate decision windows. Finally, we explore how decision windows may be opened. -- Highlights: • Decision-making about sustainable urban development occurs in networks. • The concept of ‘decision windows’ was further elaborated. • Decision windows help understand how environmental interests enter decision-making. • Decision windows can, to some extent, be influenced.

  12. Urban weather generator user interface development : towards a usable tool for integrating urban heat island effect within urban design process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakano, Aiko

    2015-01-01

    Urban Weather Generator (UWG) is the urban design simulation tool that provides climate-specific advice for cityscape geometry and land use to assist the development of energy-efficient cities that are also thermally ...

  13. Neutron range spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manglos, Stephen H. (East Syracuse, NY)

    1989-06-06

    A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are collimnated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. The computer solves the following equation in the analysis: ##EQU1## where: N(x).DELTA.x=the number of neutron interactions measured between a position x and x+.DELTA.x, A.sub.i (E.sub.i).DELTA.E.sub.i =the number of incident neutrons with energy between E.sub.i and E.sub.i +.DELTA.E.sub.i, and C=C(E.sub.i)=N .sigma.(E.sub.i) where N=the number density of absorbing atoms in the position sensitive counter means and .sigma. (E.sub.i)=the average cross section of the absorbing interaction between E.sub.i and E.sub.i +.DELTA.E.sub.i.

  14. On-road evaluation of advanced hybrid electric vehicles over a wide range of ambient temperatures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, R.; Duoba, M. J.; Bocci, D.; Lohse-Busch, H.

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEV's) have become a production viable and effective mode of efficient transportation. HEV's can provide increased fuel economy over convention technology vehicle, but these advantages can be affected dramatically by wide variations in operating temperatures. The majority of data measured for benchmarking HEV technologies is generated from ambient test cell temperatures at 22 C. To investigate cold and hot temperature affects on HEV operation and efficiency, an on-road evaluation protocol is defined and conducted over a six month study at widely varying temperatures. Two test vehicles, the 2007 Toyota Camry HEV and 2005 Ford Escape HEV, were driven on a pre-defined urban driving route in ambient temperatures ranging from -14 C to 31 C. Results from the on-road evaluation were also compared and correlated to dynamometer testing of the same drive cycle. Results from this on-road evaluation show the battery power control limits and engine operation dramatically change with temperature. These changes decrease fuel economy by more than two times at -14 C as compared to 25 C. The two vehicles control battery temperature in different manners. The Escape HEV uses the air conditioning system to provide cool air to the batteries at high temperatures and is therefore able to maintain battery temperature to less than 33 C. The Camry HEV uses cabin air to cool the batteries. The observed maximum battery temperature was 44 C.

  15. Containers : project for a new urbanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghasemkhani, Yashar

    2011-01-01

    This project investigates the possibilities of a new urbanism in vast territories of urban industrial and logistics landscapes, which have become a significant feature of the American city. It is a search for a hybrid ...

  16. URBANISM AND ENERGY IN DEVELOPING REGIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    Global Urban Population 9b TREND CHANGES IN ENERGY CONSUMPTIONGlobal Urban Population 9a 9b Trend Changes i n Energy ConsumptionEnergy Consumption i n C i t i e s Competition i n the Forthcoming Global

  17. Field crossings : hybridizing the urban park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cyphers, Scott M

    2003-01-01

    The growth and identity of urban open space is a vital issue facing our cities today. The development and revitalization of old industrial centers in the United States has prompted urban transformations in usage, densification ...

  18. Urban regeneration : enabled by mobility centric architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Higgins, Wayne Charles

    2010-01-01

    The primary goal of this thesis is to develop a new urban architectural prototype to reinvigorate the British New Town. New models of adaptable, sustainable, architecture and urban design are explored with the ultimate ...

  19. Urban waterfront : problems and potentials of Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hossain, Mohammad Iqbal

    1984-01-01

    The essence of this thesis is based on the fact that downtown waterfronts are special urban areas in a city. These areas offer unique opportunities for providing cultural and recreational public amenities to urban life. ...

  20. The Origins of the Urban Crisis: Race

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landweber, Laura

    racial- ized poverty. He challenged the conventional wisdom that urban decline was the result of failed the roots of urban poverty in a hidden history of racial violence, discrimination, and deindustri- alization

  1. Urban Forestry & Urban Greening 7 (2008) 195206 Nitrogen fertilization during planting and establishment of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    2008-01-01

    Urban Forestry & Urban Greening 7 (2008) 195­206 Nitrogen fertilization during planting forest increasingly consists of planted trees, especially as native forest fragments yield to urban little for the first few years after planting. Stressful urban sites exacerbate this effect and many

  2. Urban Retrofit: A Whole-Watershed Approach to Urban Stormwater Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lithander, Becky

    2012-01-01

    use  reduction  and   heat  island  mitigation.  These  providing  urban  heat-­?island   mitigation  which  

  3. Roles of Urban Tree Canopy and Buildings in Urban Heat Island Effects: Parameterization and Preliminary Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickerson, Russell R.

    and Forecasting model and an urban canopy model (WRF-UCM). By parameterizing the effects of these natural surfacesRoles of Urban Tree Canopy and Buildings in Urban Heat Island Effects: Parameterization (Manuscript received 28 October 2011, in final form 16 April 2012) ABSTRACT Urban heat island (UHI) effects

  4. Center for Sustainable Urban LandscapesCenter for Sustainable Urban Landscapes At a glance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Center for Sustainable Urban LandscapesCenter for Sustainable Urban Landscapes At a glance After rehabilitation, visit www.cnre.vt.edu/urbanforestry/SRES The Center for Sustainable Urban Landscapes (CSUL and never attain their full potential. Soil rehabilitation methods are needed to improve urban soil

  5. Urban Forestry at Virginia Tech Promoting sustainable urban forests through education and research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Urban Forestry at Virginia Tech Promoting sustainable urban forests through education and research's undergraduate curriculum holds Society of American Foresters Specialized Accreditation in Urban Forestry. This accreditation assures that the curriculum has both breadth and depth specifically in urban forestry and meets

  6. Impact of Upstream Urbanization on the Urban Heat Island Effects along the WashingtonBaltimore Corridor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Da-Lin

    of Washington, D.C. Results from a coupled ultrahigh-resolution mesoscale­urban canopy model with 2001 National of the urban­bay interaction reveals the importance of horizontal wind direction in determining the intensityImpact of Upstream Urbanization on the Urban Heat Island Effects along the Washington

  7. Metro Vancouver: Designing for Urban Food Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roehr, Daniel; Kunigk, Isabel

    2009-01-01

    urbanism, which would provide for the integration of sustainableurbanism and municipal supported agriculture: a new food system path for sustainable

  8. Towards Militaristic Urban Planning: the Genealogy of the Post-Colonial European Approach to Social and Urban Insecurity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hedjazi, Alexandre B; Fekkak, Hatem

    2012-01-01

    Urban Planning: the Genealogy of the Post-Colonial Europeanexperience, the British genealogy of city planning and urban

  9. Cornell's Urban Sustainability Initiatives ACSF Lunch Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Cornell's Urban Sustainability Initiatives ACSF Lunch Summary Compiled by Marianne Krasny (NTRES was to outline steps that Cornell could take to define an urban sustainability initiative in collaboration of our student body, it is important for Cornell to more broadly address urban sustainability issues. Our

  10. Lake Charles Urbanized Area MTP 2034 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lake Charles Urbanized Area Metropolitan Planning Organization

    2009-08-04

    CONSTRAINED AND UNCONSTRAINED PLAN PROJECTS . C-1 ? Lake Charles Urbanized Area MTP 2034 ? Page v Alliance Transportation Group, Inc. Adopted August 4, 2009 Table of Tables Table 2-1 Stakeholders Present... ......................................................................................................... 3-1 ? Lake Charles Urbanized Area MTP 2034 ? Page iii Alliance Transportation Group, Inc. Adopted August 4, 2009 LAKE CHARLES URBANIZED AREA TRAVEL DEMAND MODEL .............................................................. 3-2 SOCIOECONOMIC...

  11. Compact range for variable-zone measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burnside, Walter D. (Columbus, OH); Rudduck, Roger C. (Columbus, OH); Yu, Jiunn S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1988-01-01

    A compact range for testing antennas or radar targets includes a source for directing energy along a feedline toward a parabolic reflector. The reflected wave is a spherical wave with a radius dependent on the distance of the source from the focal point of the reflector.

  12. Decontamination of Terrorist-Dispersed Radionuclides from Surfaces in Urban Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, Robert; Sutton, Mark; Gates-Anderson, Dianne; Gray, Jeremy; Hu, Qinhong; McNab, Walt; Viani, Brian

    2008-01-15

    Research is currently underway at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to advance the basic scientific knowledge of radionuclide-substrate interactions in the urban environment. Investigations have focused on more optimized decontamination agents for cesium (Cs) and americium (Am) specifically for use in mass transit infrastructure and urban environments. This project is designed to enhance the capability of the United States to effectively respond to a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD) attack. The work addresses recognized data gaps by advancing the basic scientific knowledge of radionuclide-substrate interactions in the urban environment and provides a solution to a national need. The research is focused in four major areas: (1) a better understanding of urban surface conditions that influence the efficacy of decontamination processes, (2) development of prototype decontamination agents for Am and Cs optimized for use in urban environments, (3) the development of capabilities to realistically contaminate surfaces at both the real world and laboratory scale and (4) a validated model for radionuclide-surface interactions. The decontamination of urban surfaces following the detonation of an RDD presents a number of challenges. The following key points are found to be critical for the efficiency of decontamination agents in an urban environment: - Particle size and surface deposition of radionuclide particles on urban surface materials. - Interactions between radionuclides and urban materials. - The presence of grime and carbonation/alteration layers on the surface of urban surfaces. - Post-detonation penetration of radionuclides strongly affected by the dynamic wetting/drying processes. A laboratory scale contamination system has been developed allowing for samples to be contaminated and radionuclide interactions to be studied. In combination with laboratory scale experiments, a real scale outdoor test is scheduled for the spring of 2007. In conclusion, integrated laboratory, field, and numerical approaches are utilized to better understand the radionuclide behavior and the development/utility of decontamination agents.

  13. Estimation of two-parameter multilevel item response models with predictor variables: simulation and substantiation for an urban school district 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natesan, Prathiba

    2009-05-15

    IRT models. However, models such as 2-PL MLIRT models have not been studied yet. This dissertation consists of two studies, a simulation and a substantiation for an urban school district dataset. The simulation study tested the performance...

  14. An Examination of the Professional Challenges, Job Satisfaction, and Intention to Leave the Profession of Urban Elementary Special Education Teachers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meloncon, Brenda

    2012-10-19

    the antecedents to an urban elementary special education teacher's intentions to leave the special education profession. Five professional challenges were developed from extant literature to test their influence on job satisfaction and three constructs from...

  15. Flux Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds from an Urban Tower Platform in Houston, Texas: Trends and Tracers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hale, Martin C

    2014-05-08

    and traffic counts except during variable working hours. To assign measured fluxes to local sources, we tested a bulk flux footprint model (Kormann and Meixner model) designed for uniform emission surface areas in this urban, heterogeneous landscape. Tracer...

  16. Advanced Technology Vehicle Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Francfort

    2004-06-01

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is to increase the body of knowledge as well as the awareness and acceptance of electric drive and other advanced technology vehicles (ATV). The AVTA accomplishes this goal by testing ATVs on test tracks and dynamometers (Baseline Performance testing), as well as in real-world applications (Fleet and Accelerated Reliability testing and public demonstrations). This enables the AVTA to provide Federal and private fleet managers, as well as other potential ATV users, with accurate and unbiased information on vehicle performance and infrastructure needs so they can make informed decisions about acquiring and operating ATVs. The ATVs currently in testing include vehicles that burn gaseous hydrogen (H2) fuel and hydrogen/CNG (H/CNG) blended fuels in internal combustion engines (ICE), and hybrid electric (HEV), urban electric, and neighborhood electric vehicles. The AVTA is part of DOE's FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program.

  17. Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 9

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 9 PNWD-SA-7032 / 9 What are the Steps in Using the VSP Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 10 PNWD-SA-7032 / 10 Hypotheses Being TestedHypotheses Being Tested is false., i.e., on showing that the segment does not need to be bumped out. #12;Range Sustainability (VSP

  18. Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Range Cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Range Cattle Research and Education Center Field Day at the Range Cattle Research and Education Center in Ona, Florida. The laboratory provides forage testing digestible nutrients (TDN). Mail samples to Forage Extension Laboratory, UF/IFAS, Range Cattle REC, 3401

  19. Sustainable Urbanism: Vision and Planning Process Through an Examination of Two Model Neighborhood Developments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasioumi, Eirini

    2011-01-01

    the 1990s. Routledge. Sustainable Urbanism Davoudi, S. 2001.Council. 2008. Sustainable Urbanism: Urban Design withVauban area). Sustainable Urbanism Stadt Freiburg Im

  20. Effective range function below threshold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Deloff

    2000-06-26

    We demonstrate that the kernel of the Lippmann-Schwinger equation, associated with interactions consisting of a sum of the Coulomb plus a short range nuclear potential, below threshold becomes degenerate. Taking advantage of this fact, we present a simple method of calculating the effective range function for negative energies. This may be useful in practice since the effective range expansion extrapolated to threshold allows to extract low-energy scattering parameters: the Coulomb-modified scattering length and the effective range.

  1. DOE completes environmental assessment on INL National Security Test Range

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent Bonding Low-Cost2 DOE HQ FReportDOE4Wells |

  2. Title Preactivity Survey Report for Five Tonopah Test Range Explosive...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    were surveyed around the Five Points Landfill, including the 50-m buffer (Figure 4). The landfill appears to have been constructed in a natural wash. Closure activities at this...

  3. Lunar Laser Ranging Test of the Invariance of c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Y. Gezari

    2010-06-22

    The speed of laser light pulses launched from Earth and returned by a retro-reflector on the Moon was calculated from precision round-trip time-of-flight measurements and modeled distances. The measured speed of light (c) in the moving observers rest frame was found to exceed the canonical value c = 299,792,458 m/s by 200+/-10 m/s, just the speed of the observatory along the line-of-sight due to the rotation of the Earth during the measurements. This is a first-order violation of local Lorentz invariance; the speed of light seems to depend on the motion of the observer after all, as in classical wave theory, and implies that a preferred reference frame exists for the propagation of light. However, the present experiment cannot identify the physical system to which such a reference frame might be tied.

  4. 1995 Site environmental report Tonopah Test Range, Tonopah, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culp, T. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Forston, W. [Kirk-Mayer, Inc., Tonopah, NV (United States)

    1996-09-01

    This report summarizes the environmental surveillance activities conducted by Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia National Laboratories` responsibility for environmental surveillance results extends to those activities performed by Sandia National Laboratories or under its direction. Results from other organizations environmental surveillance activities are included to provide a measure of completeness. Other environmental compliance programs such as the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, environmental permits, and environmental restoration and waste management programs are also included in this report, prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in compliance with DOE Order 5400.1.

  5. Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to: navigation,National MarineUSAID ClimateState Lands

  6. THE MEXICO CITY INITIATIVE: RESEARCH AND DOCUMENTATION OF EVERYDAY URBANISM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, X. Shirley

    sustainable urbanism. Innovations in Everyday Urbanism. At the same time as risk problematizes the urbanTHE MEXICO CITY INITIATIVE: RESEARCH AND DOCUMENTATION OF EVERYDAY URBANISM An expanding metropolis, physically expanding, environmentally fragile, and socially complex locale that has faced new urban

  7. An urban weather generator coupling a building simulation program with an urban canopy model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bueno Unzeta, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    The increase in air temperature observed in urban environments compared to the undeveloped rural surroundings, known as the Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect, is being intensely studied, due to its adverse environmental and ...

  8. Boundaries to membranes : the urban project revisited : an urban strategy for Rio de Janeiro, Zona Norte

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dudek, Phebe (Phebe Helena Melania)

    2014-01-01

    This thesis investigates urban boundaries in the North Zone of Rio de Janeiro. The Zona Norte transitioned in the last hundred years from a rural outskirts area of Rio, into its industrial hinterland, into a fully urbanized ...

  9. Managing change: tensions between urban morphology and everyday life in the heterotopic urban context of Tainan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Wei-Kuang

    2011-06-29

    Urban conservation and development practices are often in conflict. This thesis examines this general claim in the context of rapid urban development in East Asia through an analysis of the postcolonial historic city of ...

  10. SproutslO Urban Microfarm : interactive indoor farming system for urban use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farah, Jennifer Broutin

    2013-01-01

    SproutslO Urban Microfarm is an interactive farming system that enables people to reliably grow and access healthy produce in urban areas. The introduction of a localized system with the capacity to induce scalar impact ...

  11. Urban Parks: The Value of Small Urban Parks, Plazas and Other Outdoor Spaces 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shafer, Carl Scott; Jacob, John

    2006-11-27

    People need parks. Great urban parks are places where communities come together, people interact, and social capital develops. Learn the characteristics of great urban parks and how they are created....

  12. Debris flows from small catchments of the Ma Ha Tuak Range, metropolitan Phoenix, Arizona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    Debris flows from small catchments of the Ma Ha Tuak Range, metropolitan Phoenix, Arizona Ronald I from tiny but steep mountain catchments throughout metropolitan Phoenix, Arizona, USA. Urban growth downtown Phoenix, was selected to determine the feasibility of using the varnish microlaminations (VML

  13. High-resolution urban thermal sharpener (HUTS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominguez, Anthony; Kleissl, Jan; Luvall, Jeffrey C; Rickman, Douglas L

    2011-01-01

    of zoning in urban ecosystems with remote sensing, Remote Sensing of Environment  Yaghoobian, N. , J.  of thermal imagery.  Remote Sensing of Environment 107 , 

  14. Strategies for systemic urban constructed wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balderas-Guzmán, Celina

    2013-01-01

    As a result of ubiquitous impermeable surfaces, conventional water management and stormwater infrastructure, and the resultant degradation of natural hydrologic networks, most American urban areas have suffered severely ...

  15. Parcel delivery and urban logistics-changes in urban courier, express and parcel services: the French (DUCRET, Raphalle; DELAITRE, Loc)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Parcel delivery and urban logistics- changes in urban courier, express and parcel services PARCEL DELIVERY AND URBAN LOGISTICS- CHANGES IN URBAN COURIER, EXPRESS AND PARCEL SERVICES: THE FRENCH new logistic organisations. The purpose of this paper is to give an updated overview of the urban

  16. Scaling the Daytime Urban Heat Island and Urban-Breeze Circulation JULIA HIDALGO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that describe the shape of the urban heat island and the horizontal and vertical wind intensity and profiles. 1 an atmospheric numerical model coupled with an urban surface energy balance (SEB) model. For example, simulations atmospheric Nonhydrostatic Meso- scale (Meso-NH) model (Lafore et al. 1998) with a Town Energy Balance urban

  17. do you know your RANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Garlyn O.

    1957-01-01

    need a good knowledge of range man- asemen2 b~f~re m~kjng CID?E CD~~B~~DDS DY range plots as is required in Part 111. An ex- ample of Part I11 is on page 12. The four range plots are placed just exactly like placing a class of livestock at a stock... good cover of native grass. Grass is a product which is harvested and marketed as meat, ~uool, mohair and wildlife. When you market animals you are paid for the number of poz~nds rather than the number of head you sell. By practicing good range m...

  18. Urban Microclimate, a Study of Energy Balance and Fluid Dynamics /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghoobian, Neda

    2013-01-01

    of outdoor urban spaces, The role of materials, Solar Energyof outdoor urban spaces, The role of materials, Sol. Energy.outdoor urban spaces, the role of materials. Sol. Energy 77,

  19. Countermeasures to Urban Heat Islands: A Global View

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier, Alan

    2006-01-01

    Countermeasures to Urban Heat Islands: A Global View Alanurban climate is the phenomenon of the urban heat island.The urban heat island phenomenon was first observed over one

  20. Master of Urban Affairs & Policy: Economic/ Community Development Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Haiying

    Master of Urban Affairs & Policy: Economic/ Community Development Policy Student Name Relations __________ URPA 5311 Social Policy Formation and Analysis __________ URPA 5312 Urban Economic Policy __________ Research and Analysis Courses (12 hours) URPA 5302 Foundations of Urban Research

  1. Faculty perceptions of presidential leadership in urban school reform 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClendon, Rodney Prescott

    2009-06-02

    The study examined urban university faculty members’ perceptions of their presidents’ leadership role in urban school reform. The population for this study consisted of faculty members from five urban research universities. All of the universities...

  2. Optical bullet-tracking algorithms for weapon localization in urban environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, R S; Breitfeller, E F

    2006-03-31

    Localization of the sources of small-arms fire, mortars, and rocket propelled grenades is an important problem in urban combat. Weapons of this type produce characteristic signatures, such as muzzle flashes, that are visible in the infrared. Indeed, several systems have been developed that exploit the infrared signature of muzzle flash to locate the positions of shooters. However, systems based on muzzle flash alone can have difficulty localizing weapons if the muzzle flash is obscured or suppressed. Moreover, optical clutter can be problematic to systems that rely on muzzle flash alone. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed a projectile tracking system that detects and localizes sources of small-arms fire, mortars and similar weapons using the thermal signature of the projectile rather than a muzzle flash. The thermal signature of a projectile, caused by friction as the projectile travels along its trajectory, cannot be concealed and is easily discriminated from optical clutter. The LLNL system was recently demonstrated at the MOUT facility of the Aberdeen Test Center [1]. In the live-fire demonstration, shooters armed with a variety of small-arms, including M-16s, AK-47s, handguns, mortars and rockets, were arranged at several positions in around the facility. Experiments ranged from a single-weapon firing a single-shot to simultaneous fire of all weapons on full automatic. The LLNL projectile tracking system was demonstrated to localize multiple shooters at ranges up to 400m, far greater than previous demonstrations. Furthermore, the system was shown to be immune to optical clutter that is typical in urban combat. This paper describes the image processing and localization algorithms designed to exploit the thermal signature of projectiles for shooter localization. The paper begins with a description of the image processing that extracts projectile information from a sequence of infrared images. Key to the processing is an adaptive spatio-temporal filter developed to suppress scene clutter. The filtered image sequence is further processed to produce a set of parameterized regions, which are classified using several discriminate functions. Regions that are classified as projectiles are passed to a data association algorithm that matches features from these regions with existing tracks, or initializes new tracks as needed. A Kalman filter is used to smooth and extrapolate existing tracks. Shooter locations are determined by solving a combinatorial least-squares solution for all bullet tracks. It also provides an error ellipse for each shooter, quantifying the uncertainty of shooter location. The paper concludes with examples from the live-fire exercise at the Aberdeen Test Center.

  3. Extended range chemical sensing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hughes, R.C.; Schubert, W.K.

    1994-01-18

    An apparatus is described for sensing chemicals over extended range of concentrations. In particular, first and second sensors each having separate, but overlapping ranges for sensing concentrations of hydrogen are provided. Preferably, the first sensor is a MOS solid state device wherein the metal electrode or gate is a nickel alloy. The second sensor is a chemiresistor comprising a nickel alloy. 6 figures.

  4. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range Experiment Station Ash Leachate Can Reduce Surface Erosion leachate can reduce surface erosion. Res. Note PSW-342, 4 p., illus. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Exp from north- western California, ash leachate flocculated the clay frac- tions. As a result, the soil

  5. Rapid urbanization and changes in spatiotemporal characteristics of precipitation in Beijing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AghaKouchak, Amir

    ., 2011], and urban heat islands [Oke, 1973]. The hydrological impacts of urbanization and heat island

  6. Model for Sustainable Urban Design With Expanded Sections on Distributed Energy Resources, February 2004

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Document describing a model design for urban development and redevelopment that will reduce urban energy consumption

  7. An analytical approximation for the macropscopic fundamental diagram of urban traffic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daganzo, Carlos F; Geroliminis, Nikolas

    2008-01-01

    Future Urban Transport, University of California, Berkeley,Future Urban Transport, University of California, Berkeley,

  8. Range Searching in Categorical Data: Colored Range Searching on Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agarwal, Pankaj K.

    , gsat @cs.duke.edu ¾ AT&T Labs, Shannon Laboratory, 180 Park Ave., Florham Park, NJ 07932. muthu each stock has a category that is the industry sector it belongs to, and we consider a range

  9. Model for Sustainable Urban Design With Expanded Sections on...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Model for Sustainable Urban Design With Expanded Sections on Distributed Energy Resources, February 2004 Model for Sustainable Urban Design With Expanded Sections on Distributed...

  10. Guidelines and Toolkits for Urban Transport Development in Medium...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Guidelines and Toolkits for Urban Transport Development in Medium Sized Cities in India Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Guidelines and Toolkits for Urban...

  11. Urban Microclimate, a Study of Energy Balance and Fluid Dynamics /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghoobian, Neda

    2013-01-01

    efforts to reduce urban heat island, Build Environ. 49 (saving potentials of heat-island reduction strategies,Taha, Mitigation of urban heat islands: materials, utility

  12. Essays on Urban Transportation and Transportation Energy Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Chun Kon

    2008-01-01

    energy can be approached in two ways: one is through urban planningenergy, it may be approached in two ways: one is through urban planning

  13. Cultivation, Capital, and Contamination: Urban Agriculture in Oakland, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClintock, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    urban gardens. Land Contamination & Reclamation 12 Schiff,Potentially toxic metal contamination of urban soils andAlloway, B. J. 2004. Contamination of soils in domestic

  14. Urban Microclimate, a Study of Energy Balance and Fluid Dynamics /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghoobian, Neda

    2013-01-01

    to mitigate urban heat islands. Atmos. Environ. 32, 95–saving potentials of heat-island reduction strategies.of surface urban heat islands under “ideal” conditions at

  15. Evaluating Exhaust Emission Performance of Urban Buses Using...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exhaust Emission Performance of Urban Buses Using Transient Heavy-Duty Chassis Dynamometer Evaluating Exhaust Emission Performance of Urban Buses Using Transient Heavy-Duty Chassis...

  16. Village Vices: The Contradiction of New Urbanism and Sustainability [Portfolio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durack, Ruth

    2001-01-01

    Urbanism and its dubious claims to sustainability, and to draw attention to an altogether more sustainablesustainable form. Admittedly, we cannot accurately evaluate the impacts of New Urbanism

  17. Migration and the City: Urban Effects of the Morisco Expulsion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valencia, Adriana

    2011-01-01

    Migration and the City: Urban Effects of the MoriscoJames Monroe Spring 2011 Migration and the City: Urbanby Adriana Valencia Abstract Migration and the City: Urban

  18. Urban Form, Wind, Comfort, and Sustainability: The San Francisco Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Hyungkoo

    2014-01-01

    small subset of San Francisco’s diverse urban form and windsmall. The boundary layer changes in the vertical wind profile over urban,

  19. "Dangerous" urban trees & community health & safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    "Dangerous" urban trees & community health & safety Norman Dandy Forest Research #12;Urban trees application 4. When tree is deemed `dead, dying or dangerous' ­ no consent is needed under either forestry. Full assessment of `dead, dying or dangerous' requires `expert' knowledge Liability + lack

  20. UF in Brazil Urban, Medical, & Agricultural Entomology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    UF in Brazil Urban, Medical, & Agricultural Entomology Summer B: August 9 - 21, 2015 Explore aspects in Brazil and the United States. Course Information College of Agricultural and Life Sciences: Urban, Medical and Agricultural Entomology in Brazil Total Number of Credits Offered: 3 About

  1. Understanding Road Usage Patterns in Urban Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    decreases the roads' level of service, while at the same time increasing both fuel consump- tion5Understanding Road Usage Patterns in Urban Areas Pu Wang1,2 , Timothy Hunter4 , Alexandre M. Bayen4 patterns in urban road usage. We find that the major usage of each road segment can be traced to its own

  2. Reconnecting urban communities : Northeastern University Housing Project, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Jing, 1972-

    1999-01-01

    This design thesis studies the potential of urban design and urban housing to weave vacant lands, their urban context and the urban communities surrounding them. It focuses on an urban housing project adjacent to Northeastern ...

  3. Discussion of long-range weather prediction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canavan, G.H.

    1998-09-10

    A group of scientists at Los Alamos have held a series of discussions of the issues in and prospects for improvements in Long-range Weather Predictions Enabled by Proving of the Atmosphere at High Space-Time Resolution. The group contained the requisite skills for a full evaluation, although this report presents only an informal discussion of the main technical issues. The group discussed all aspects of the proposal, which are grouped below into the headings: (1) predictability; (2) sensors and satellites, (3) DIAL and atmospheric sensing; (4) localized transponders; and (5) summary and integration. Briefly, the group agreed that the relative paucity of observations of the state of the atmosphere severely inhibits the accuracy of weather forecasts, and any program that leads to a more dense and uniform observational network is welcome. As shown in Long-range Weather more dense and uniform observational network is welcome. As shown in Long-range Weather Predictions, the pay-back of accurate long-range forecasts should more than justify the expenditure associated with improved observations and forecast models required. The essential step is to show that the needed technologies are available for field test and space qualification.

  4. Mode coherence at megameter ranges in the North Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wage, Kathleen

    Mode coherence at megameter ranges in the North Pacific Ocean Kathleen E. Wage, Matthew A and the Acoustical Society of America. #12;Mode coherence at megameter ranges in the North Pacific Ocean Kathleen E Thermometry of Ocean Climate ATOC and Alternate Source Test AST experiments. Vertical line arrays at Hawaii

  5. An indoorâ??outdoor building energy simulator to study urban modification effects on building energy use â?? Model description and validation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghoobian, Neda; Kleissl, Jan

    2012-01-01

    improve building energy simulation in  an  urban context, 38] J.A.  Clarke, Energy Simulation in Building Design, J.  Neymark, Building Energy Simulation Test (BESTEST) and 

  6. Urban Land and Housing Markets in the Punjab, Pakistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David E. Dowall; Peter Ellis

    2007-01-01

    Planning Support provided by the California Resource Agency and the California Energy Commission Institute of Urban

  7. Economic Growth in Urban Regions: Implications for Future Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cervero, Robert

    2006-01-01

    to pursue a program of sustainable mobility, urbanism, andthe Challenges to Sustainable Mobility”, the World Business

  8. Urban Form, Wind, Comfort, and Sustainability: The San Francisco Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Hyungkoo

    2014-01-01

    sustainable transportation modes. 2.2 Vernacular Urban Form and Historical Attempts Vernacular settlements and architecture

  9. Enhancing Resource Sustainability by Transforming Urban and Suburban Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Sustainable Transportation, Smart Growth, and New Urbanismsustainable transportation,” “smart growth,” and “new urbanism

  10. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of forest stands is valuable for studies of the physical environment. Energy balance research centers on howPACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range Experiment Station FOREST SERVICE U.S. DEPARTMENT in relation to climatic and stand variables USDA FOREST SERVICE RESEARCH PAPER PSW- 71 /1971 #12;CONTENTS

  11. Forest and Range Experiment Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    wider range of suppliers. As working circles beyond the size of a single National Forest have recently. Alternatives for expansion of working circles must be assessed in light of present Forest Service timber management policy and the impacts of timber supply. These alternates include (a) combination of National

  12. Upstream Urbanization Exacerbates Urban Heat Island Effects Da-Lin Zhang*, Yi-Xuan Shou, & Russell R. Dickerson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickerson, Russell R.

    1 Upstream Urbanization Exacerbates Urban Heat Island Effects Da-Lin Zhang*, Yi-Xuan Shou, Maryland 20742 Email: dalin@atmos.umd.edu The adverse impacts of urbanization on climate and weather through urban heat island (UHI) effects and greenhouse emissions are issues of growing concern1

  13. Beyond opposites : an urban initiative in Seoul

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moon, Hoon

    1993-01-01

    The thesis began with the understanding of urban, cultural, and social conditions of Seoul. The choice of the existing bridge as the point of departure has meaning in two layers. layer one: the need for more space in the ...

  14. Counter urban transformation in Istanbul Beyoglu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uzunyayla, Sakine Dicle

    2014-01-01

    Urban transformation has become central to the Turkish government's neo-liberal program of commercial development for Istanbul. These transformations have provoked public discontent and passionate responses, the largest ...

  15. Multilevel comparison of large urban systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pumain, Denise; Cottineau, Clémentine; Vacchiani-Marcuzzo, Céline; Ignazzi, Antonio; Bretagnolle, Anne; Delisle, François; Cura, Robin; Lizzi, Liliane; Baffi, Solène

    2015-01-01

    For the first time the systems of cities in seven countries or regions among the largest in the world (China, India, Brazil, Europe, the Former Soviet Union (FSU), the United States and South Africa) are made comparable through the building of spatio-temporal standardised statistical databases. We first explain the concept of a generic evolutionary urban unit ("city") and its necessary adaptations to the information provided by each national statistical system. Second, the hierarchical structure and the urban growth process are compared at macro-scale for the seven countries with reference to Zipf's and Gibrat's model: in agreement with an evolutionary theory of urban systems, large similarities shape the hierarchical structure and growth processes in BRICS countries as well as in Europe and United States, despite their positions at different stages in the urban transition that explain some structural peculiarities. Third, the individual trajectories of some 10,000 cities are mapped at micro-scale following a...

  16. Ecotransology : integrated design for urban mobility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joachim, Mitchell Whitney

    2006-01-01

    This thesis demonstrates a rethinking of urban mobility through ecological design. Human mobility and ecological accountability are inextricably linked in city design; our current world ecological crisis underscores this ...

  17. A design project for an urban frontier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hahn, Robert Louis

    1992-01-01

    The interplay between the form and infrastructure of modern cities produces spatial and temporal dimensions which allow for erratic growth and fragmentary perception. Though their origins can be clearly seen in urban ...

  18. Browse : re-forming the urban library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baron, Sandra Ann

    2007-01-01

    The urban library has persisted as a cultural entity, largely because its interiorized form functions as a vault, creating a clear, although often intimidating, boundary between library program and the public realm. While ...

  19. Urban Decontamination Experience at Pripyat Ukraine - 13526

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paskevych, Sergiy; Voropay, Dmitry; Schmieman, Eric

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes the efficiency of radioactive decontamination activities of the urban landscape in the town of Pripyat, Ukraine. Different methods of treatment for various urban infrastructure and different radioactive contaminants are assessed. Long term changes in the radiation condition of decontaminated urban landscapes are evaluated: 1. Decontamination of the urban system requires the simultaneous application of multiple methods including mechanical, chemical, and biological. 2. If a large area has been contaminated, decontamination of local areas of a temporary nature. Over time, there is a repeated contamination of these sites due to wind transport from neighboring areas. 3. Involvement of earth-moving equipment and removal of top soil by industrial method achieves 20-fold reduction in the level of contamination by radioactive substances, but it leads to large amounts of waste (up to 1500 tons per hectare), and leads to the re-contamination of treated areas due to scatter when loading, transport pollutants on the wheels of vehicles, etc.. (authors)

  20. The urban garden : Port Alliance, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manning, Isaac Hall, 1958-

    1990-01-01

    This thesis focuses on of three urban parks; Central Park i n New York , the Fens to Franklin Park in Boston, and Rock Creek Park in washington, designed by Frederick Law Olmsted and the growth of the cities around them. ...

  1. Sustainable and equitable urban environments in Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Badshah, Akhtar

    1993-01-01

    This study identifies some of the factors and conditions that can encourage the development of sustainable and equitable urban environments. It argues that cities will continue to grow and that it is not productive to view ...

  2. Team MIT Urban Challenge Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, John

    2007-12-14

    This technical report describes Team MIT?s approach to theDARPA Urban Challenge. We have developed a novel strategy forusing many inexpensive sensors, mounted on the vehicle periphery,and calibrated with a new cross-­modal ...

  3. Urban solarium : thermal performance in Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, Juliet Chia-Wen

    2012-01-01

    This thesis addresses the issue of energy efficiency through the lens of thermal performance in the context of urban housing in the city of Boston. Located in the historic brick row house neighborhood of the South End, the ...

  4. Artificial Immune System based urban traffic control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Negi, Pallav

    2007-09-17

    Borrowing ideas from natural immunity, Artificial Immune Systems (AIS) offer a novel approach to solving many diagnosis, optimization and control problems. In the course of this research this paradigm was applied to the problem of optimizing urban...

  5. Urban Parks: Volunteers and Civic Engagement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuett, Michael A.

    2007-03-02

    When citizens are engaged with urban park and recreation departments, everyone benefits. This publication describes successful programs that involve community volunteers, and explains what managers can do to engage citizens in such programs....

  6. 2014 Urban Forest Symposium Tom Hinckley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    2014 Urban Forest Symposium Tom Hinckley Professor Emeritus May 24, 2014 #12;Questions, temperature, ppt, extremes) #12;Simple Model: Carbon and Stress Leaf GrowthCarbon Production Carbon Storage, solarization · Growing season ­ Soil moisture ­ Atmospheric (wind, temperature, humidity, radiation) ­ Outcomes

  7. ANALYSIS OF 3-D URBAN DATABASES WITH RESPECT TO POLLUTION DISPERSION FOR A NUMBER OF EUROPEAN AND AMERICAN CITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. RATTI; ET AL

    2001-03-01

    Models to estimate pollution dispersion and wind flow in cities (both at the city-scale and above) require a parametrical description of the urban canopy. For instance, two key parameters are the aerodynamic roughness length z{sub 0} and the zero-plane displacement height z{sub d}, which are related, amongst others, to the surface drag coefficient, the scale and intensity of turbulence, the depth of the roughness sub-layer and the wind speed profile. The calculation of z{sub 0} and z{sub d}, however, is not straightforward. The classical way to estimate them in open terrain is based on the measurement of wind profile data from a tall mast or, less accurately, on the inference from published roughness values for similar terrain elsewhere (Davenport, 1960; Davenport et al., 2000). Both methods, however, are very difficult to apply to cities, due to the considerable height where wind measurements should be taken (well above the urban canopy) and to the irregularities of urban texture. A promising alternative that has become available in recent years, due to increasing computing resources and the availability of high-resolution 3-D databases in urban areas, is based on the calculation of z{sub 0} and z{sub d} from the analysis and measure of the city geometry (urban morphometry). This method is reviewed for instance in Grimmond and Oke (1999), where values are calculated using different formulas and then compared with the results of field measurements. Urban morphometry opens up a new range of parameters that can easily be calculated in urban areas and used as input for meso-scale and urban dispersion models. This paper reviews a number of them and shows how they could be calculated from urban Digital Elevation Models (DEM) using image-processing techniques. It builds up on the recent work by Ratti et al. 2000, extending the number of case studies cities: London, Toulouse, Berlin, Salt Lake City and Los Angeles.

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (AVTA) Data and Results The Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) supports work to develop test procedures and carry out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies...

  9. Range determination for scannerless imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muguira, Maritza Rosa (Albuquerque, NM); Sackos, John Theodore (Albuquerque, NM); Bradley, Bart Davis (Albuquerque, NM); Nellums, Robert (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01

    A new method of operating a scannerless range imaging system (e.g., a scannerless laser radar) has been developed. This method is designed to compensate for nonlinear effects which appear in many real-world components. The system operates by determining the phase shift of the laser modulation, which is a physical quantity related physically to the path length between the laser source and the detector, for each pixel of an image.

  10. Range gated strip proximity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance.

  11. Range gated strip proximity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-12-03

    A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance. 6 figs.

  12. Integrated canopy, building energy and radiosity model for 3D urban design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burdet, Etienne; Morand, Denis; Diab, Youssef

    2014-01-01

    We present an integrated, three dimensional, model of urban canopy, building energy and radiosity, for early stage urban designs and test it on four urban morphologies. All sub-models share a common descriptions of the urban morphology, similar to 3D urban design master plans and have simple parameters. The canopy model is a multilayer model, with a new discrete layer approach that does not rely on simplified geometry such as canyon or regular arrays. The building energy model is a simplified RC equivalent model, with no hypotheses on internal zoning or wall composition. We use the CitySim software for the radiosity model. We study the effects of convexity, the number of buildings and building height, at constant density and thermal characteristics. Our results suggest that careful three dimensional morphology design can reduce heat demand by a factor of 2, especially by improving insolation of lower levels. The most energy efficient morphology in our simulations has both the highest surface/volume ratio and ...

  13. Performance Measures for Complete, Green Streets: A Proposal for Urban Arterials in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macdonald, Elizabeth; Sanders, Rebecca; Anderson, Alia

    2010-01-01

    through the urban heat island effect. Harmful environmentalcontribute to the urban heat island effect, which increaseswater pollution, mitigate urban heat island effects, reduce

  14. Regional climate effects of irrigation and urbanization in the western united states: a model intercomparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    water, and the urban heat island. ” International Journal ofthe nocturnal urban heat island: Comparison of scale modelexchange, and the urban heat island have been extensively

  15. Accessible Cities and Regions: A Framework for Sustainable Transport and Urbanism in the 21st Century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cervero, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Framework for Sustainable Transport and Urbanism in the 21stfor advancing sustainable transport and urbanism in comingcurrency as a sustainable form of urbanism that directly

  16. 2015 The Center for Urban Entrepreneurship & Economic Development A NATIONAL URBAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a significant impact on economic development. Project Overview The Best Practices in Urban Innovation project), education, workforce development, urban policy, and environmental justice issues. The Project had five in other places - Ability to make a sustained and sustainable impact For instance, the Center

  17. From Camp Dwellers to Urban Refugees?: Urbanization and Marginalization of Refugee Camps in Lebanon.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    - 1 - From Camp Dwellers to Urban Refugees?: Urbanization and Marginalization of Refugee Camps villes invisibles 1. Introduction Palestinian refugees in Lebanon are marginalized in their host society with the relationship between the refugees' own socio-political dynamic, political actors, and space. The migrations

  18. Urban driving cycle results of retrofitted diesel oxidation catalysts on heavy duty vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, K.F. [Engine Control Systems Ltd., Aurora, Ontario (Canada); Rideout, G.

    1996-09-01

    This paper presents the emissions testing results of various heavy duty engines and vehicles with and without retrofitted diesel oxidation catalyst technology. 1987 Cummins L10 and 1991 DDC 6V92TA DDECII engine results over the US Heavy Duty Transient Test are presented for comparison to chassis test results. The vehicles in this study include two urban buses, two school buses and three heavy duty trucks. The Central Business District, New York Bus and New York Composite urban driving cycles have been used to evaluate baseline emissions and the catalyst performance on a heavy duty chassis dynamometer. The results demonstrate that 25--45% particulate reduction is readily achievable on a wide variety of heavy duty vehicles. Significant carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon reductions were also observed.

  19. Extended-range tiltable micromirror

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allen, James J. (Albuquerque, NM); Wiens, Gloria J. (Newberry, FL); Bronson, Jessica R. (Gainesville, FL)

    2009-05-05

    A tiltable micromirror device is disclosed in which a micromirror is suspended by a progressive linkage with an electrostatic actuator (e.g. a vertical comb actuator or a capacitive plate electrostatic actuator) being located beneath the micromirror. The progressive linkage includes a pair of torsion springs which are connected together to operate similar to a four-bar linkage with spring joints. The progressive linkage provides a non-linear spring constant which can allow the micromirror to be tilted at any angle within its range substantially free from any electrostatic instability or hysteretic behavior.

  20. Range Fuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,Energy LLCALLETEREFU Elektronik GmbHRahusRamkyRange Fuels Jump

  1. Range Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎Wind Farm Jump to:Randsburg,Range

  2. Live Fire Range Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-08-01

    The Central Training Academy (CTA) is a DOE Headquarters Organization located in Albuquerque, New Mexico, with the mission to effectively and efficiently educate and train personnel involved in the protection of vital national security interests of DOE. The CTA Live Fire Range (LFR), where most of the firearms and tactical training occurs, is a complex separate from the main campus. The purpose of the proposed action is to expand the LFR to allow more options of implementing required training. The Department of Energy has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for the proposed construction and operation of an expanded Live Fire Range Facility at the Central Training Academy in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  3. Escherichia coli Regrowth and Macroinvertebrate Health in Urban and Rural Streams 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCrary, Kathryn Jordan

    2012-07-16

    Over the last few decades, increased urbanization has led to a new recognition in stream health – the urban stream or the urban stream syndrome. Understanding urban water quality is important for identifying those factors ...

  4. Lakeside: Merging Urban Design with Scientific Analysis

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Guzowski, Leah; Catlett, Charlie; Woodbury, Ed

    2014-11-18

    Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Chicago are developing tools that merge urban design with scientific analysis to improve the decision-making process associated with large-scale urban developments. One such tool, called LakeSim, has been prototyped with an initial focus on consumer-driven energy and transportation demand, through a partnership with the Chicago-based architectural and engineering design firm Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, Clean Energy Trust and developer McCaffery Interests. LakeSim began with the need to answer practical questions about urban design and planning, requiring a better understanding about the long-term impact of design decisions on energy and transportation demand for a 600-acre development project on Chicago's South Side - the Chicago Lakeside Development project.

  5. Lakeside: Merging Urban Design with Scientific Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guzowski, Leah; Catlett, Charlie; Woodbury, Ed

    2014-10-08

    Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Chicago are developing tools that merge urban design with scientific analysis to improve the decision-making process associated with large-scale urban developments. One such tool, called LakeSim, has been prototyped with an initial focus on consumer-driven energy and transportation demand, through a partnership with the Chicago-based architectural and engineering design firm Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, Clean Energy Trust and developer McCaffery Interests. LakeSim began with the need to answer practical questions about urban design and planning, requiring a better understanding about the long-term impact of design decisions on energy and transportation demand for a 600-acre development project on Chicago's South Side - the Chicago Lakeside Development project.

  6. Silicon Chips and Spatial Structure: The Industrial Basis of Urbanization In Santa Clara County, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saxenian, AnnaLee

    1981-01-01

    From Orchards to Suburbs: The Logic of Urban Development in68 From Orchards to Suburbs: The Logic of Urban Development

  7. Urban Microclimate, a Study of Energy Balance and Fluid Dynamics /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghoobian, Neda

    2013-01-01

    13 Dec [18] Connolly, Heat Island and Smog Reduction Act ofUrban climates and heat islands: Albedo, evapotranspiration,efforts to reduce urban heat island, Build Environ. 49 (

  8. Transportation planning for mega events : a model of urban change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kassens, Eva

    2009-01-01

    My study is about opportunities for revolutionary developments in urban transport. Often, we think of transport and urban development as an evolutionary process, yet there exist a few opportunities for cities to revolutionize ...

  9. Boston's urban wilds : the persistence of an idea over time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bird, Caroline J. (Caroline Jennifer)

    2014-01-01

    Many city natural areas programs are constricted due to limited resources for the acquisition and management of land. Boston's urban wilds offer an alternative model for the protection of urban open space that focuses on ...

  10. Crowdsourcing urban air temperatures from smartphone battery?temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Overeem, A.

    Accurate air temperature observations in urban areas are important for meteorology and energy demand planning. They are indispensable to study the urban heat island effect and the adverse effects of high temperatures on ...

  11. Political participation and transformation in urban China, 1993 and 2002 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lou, Diqing

    2008-10-10

    My dissertation examines political participation in non-democratic countries. Specifically, it looks into China's urban political participation in the past decade and examines how Chinese urban citizens are mobilized to ...

  12. Predicting traffic speed in urban transportation subnetworks for multiple horizons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaillet, Patrick

    such as route guidance, urban traffic control and management, and sustainable mobility [1]­[3]. Consequently Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems, MIT, Cambridge, MA. 4 Center for Future Urban Mobility

  13. Framing dispersal : urban strategies for Mexico City's sprawl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozlowski, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Within the framework of Mexico City's urban sprawl, this thesis investigates one specific type of territorial occupation: the urbanization of subsidized housing developments on the periphery, which accounts for 17% of the ...

  14. The Greenness of Cities: Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Urban Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glaeser, Edward L.; Kahn, Matthew E.

    2008-01-01

    Damage Costs of Carbon Dioxide Emissions: An Assessment ofThe Greenness of Cities: Carbon Dioxide Emissions and UrbanTHE GREENNESS OF CITIES: CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSIONS AND URBAN

  15. Digital places : rethinking urban elements : the case of the tower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gichuhi, Christopher M. (Christopher Mwethera), 1976-

    2004-01-01

    Problem - How can we make working, living and all aspects of our life in the urban tower more palatable? How can we create environment at the urban tower scale. With technology as one of the biggest drivers of social and ...

  16. Approximate translation : media, narrative, and experience in urban design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crisman, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Approximate translation is developed as a design process through which the place-embedded history of an urban environment can be understood, allowing for better design and intervention in that urban environment. Generally, ...

  17. Modernity of Chinese urban neighborhoods : toward new spatial forms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi, Qian, 1973-

    2002-01-01

    There is always a general dilemma about how to balance technology and humanity in urban neighborhood development. Modem technology creates many new spatial forms for Chinese urban neighborhoods, but it also destroys many ...

  18. Parameterization of Urban Characteristics for Global Climate Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Trisha L.

    2011-10-31

    The data presented here are part of a global dataset developed specifically for use in climate models to simulate urban climates for specific regions of the globe. Article abstract: To help understand potential effects of urbanization on climates...

  19. Manufactured landscape : strategies for peri-urbanism in Dongguan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Chit Ying Natalie

    2011-01-01

    Thirty years of Open Door Policy has brought about a series of urban restructuring of cities in the Pearl River Delta of China. The Peri Urban fabric of the these cities are formed as a result of complex orchestration of ...

  20. IS URBAN LOGISTICS POOLING VIABLE? A MULTISTAKEHOLDER MULTICRITERIA ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    IS URBAN LOGISTICS POOLING VIABLE? A MULTISTAKEHOLDER MULTICRITERIA ANALYSIS Jesus Gonzalez. Urban consolidation and logistics sharing. III. Multi-stakeholder mutli-criteria methodology. A of application. V. Conclusion. ABSTRACT Collaborative transportation and logistics pooling are relatively new

  1. Architecture of the rail : exploring the potential of urban infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iboshi, Gregory Kenji

    1994-01-01

    This thesis is the pursuit of a sensitivity for the relationship between urban infrastructure and architectural form, an attempt to restore a quality of "publicness" in the urban landscape through the implementation of a ...

  2. Stadium development and urban renewal : a look at Washington, DC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rizzo, James W. (James Watson)

    2008-01-01

    This thesis investigates the factors, related to urban stadium development, that act as a catalyst for subsequent local urban renewal. Over the recent decades there has been substantial debate related to stadium or arena ...

  3. Camera for the invisible : toward a toolkit for urban exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Jay (Jay Saul)

    2008-01-01

    We are disconnected from our environment. We can't reconnect because we can't even see the Nature within our urban surroundings. Inspired by urban explorers and Nature Awareness traditions, I will develop methodologies and ...

  4. Exploding the edge : inversions into the urban landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chia, Katherine Kai-sun

    1991-01-01

    This thesis explores the relationship between building and green space in a dense urban environment in order to create a humane contemplative experience of individual and collective memory. The urban environment has the ...

  5. Mapping urban perception : how do we know where we are?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Shan, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01

    How do we remember urban space? How can we measure what is remembered? This thesis presents a new approach to study urban spatial perception in an efficient, automated, and scalable way. It explores the use of novel tools ...

  6. Urban acupuncture as a strategy for São Paulo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shieh, Leonardo

    2006-01-01

    This work is the study of one city, São Paulo, and one idea, how small and precise architectural interventions can be catalytic to major urban transformations. The largest urban agglomeration in the southern hemisphere is ...

  7. A study of the Oklahoma City urban heat island using ground measurements and remote sensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, M. J. (Michael J.); Ivey, A. (Austin); McPherson, T. N. (Timothy N.); Boswell, D. (David); Pardyjak, E. R. (Eric R.)

    2004-01-01

    Measurements of temperature and position were collected during the night from an instrumented van on routes through Oklahoma City and the rural outskirts. The measurements were taken as part of the Joint URBAN 2003 Tracer Field Experiment conducted in Oklahoma City from June 29, 2003 to July 30, 2003 (Allwine et al., 2004). The instrumented van was driven over four primary routes that included legs from the downtown core to four different 'rural' areas. Each route went through residential areas and most often went by a line of permanently fixed temperature probes (Allwine et al., 2004) for cross-checking purposes. Each route took from 20 to 40 minutes to complete. Based on seven nights of data, initial analyses indicate that there was a temperature difference of 0.5-6.5 C between the urban core and nearby 'rural' areas. Analyses also suggest that there were significant fine scale temperature differences over distances of tens of meters within the city and in the nearby rural areas. The temperature measurements that were collected are intended to supplement the meteorological measurements taken during the Joint URBAN 2003 Field Experiment, to assess the importance of the urban heat island phenomenon in Oklahoma City, and to test new urban canopy parameterizations that have been developed for regional scale meteorological codes (e.g., Chin et al., 2000; Holt and Shi, 2004). In addition to the ground measurements, skin temperature measurements were also analyzed from remotely sensed images taken from the Earth Observing System's Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER). A surface kinetic temperature thermal infrared image captured by the ASTER of the Oklahoma City area on July 21, 2001 was analyzed within ESRI's ArcGIS 8.3 to correlate variations in temperature with land use type. Analysis of this imagery suggests distinct variations in temperature across different land use categories. Through the use of remotely sensed imagery we hope to better understand the development of the urban heat island analysis.

  8. Volker Urban | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two0 -UsingHeat & CoolVolker Urban Volker Urban Volker

  9. Old Space, New Urbanism: Israeli Perspective on the Spatial Turn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haas, Oded

    2010-01-01

    orchards and fields of evacuated Arab dwellings were appropriated to resolve housing distress in the bursting city until urban

  10. USING GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE TO MANAGE URBAN STORMWATER QUALITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minor, Emily

    USING GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE TO MANAGE URBAN STORMWATER QUALITY: A Review of Selected Practices.................................................................30 The International Stormwater BMP Database..................................................34

  11. Laser Ranging for Gravitational, Lunar, and Planetary Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen M. Merkowitz; Philip W. Dabney; Jeffrey C. Livas; Jan F. McGarry; Gregory A. Neumann; Thomas W. Zagwodzki

    2007-12-20

    More precise lunar and Martian ranging will enable unprecedented tests of Einstein's theory of General Relativity and well as lunar and planetary science. NASA is currently planning several missions to return to the Moon, and it is natural to consider if precision laser ranging instruments should be included. New advanced retroreflector arrays at carefully chosen landing sites would have an immediate positive impact on lunar and gravitational studies. Laser transponders are currently being developed that may offer an advantage over passive ranging, and could be adapted for use on Mars and other distant objects. Precision ranging capability can also be combined with optical communications for an extremely versatile instrument. In this paper we discuss the science that can be gained by improved lunar and Martian ranging along with several technologies that can be used for this purpose.

  12. A tiered approach for the human health risk assessment for consumption of vegetables from with cadmium-contaminated land in urban areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swartjes, Frank A. Versluijs, Kees W.; Otte, Piet F.

    2013-10-15

    Consumption of vegetables that are grown in urban areas takes place worldwide. In developing countries, vegetables are traditionally grown in urban areas for cheap food supply. In developing and developed countries, urban gardening is gaining momentum. A problem that arises with urban gardening is the presence of contaminants in soil, which can be taken up by vegetables. In this study, a scientifically-based and practical procedure has been developed for assessing the human health risks from the consumption of vegetables from cadmium-contaminated land. Starting from a contaminated site, the procedure follows a tiered approach which is laid out as follows. In Tier 0, the plausibility of growing vegetables is investigated. In Tier 1 soil concentrations are compared with the human health-based Critical soil concentration. Tier 2 offers the possibility for a detailed site-specific human health risk assessment in which calculated exposure is compared to the toxicological reference dose. In Tier 3, vegetable concentrations are measured and tested following a standardized measurement protocol. To underpin the derivation of the Critical soil concentrations and to develop a tool for site-specific assessment the determination of the representative concentration in vegetables has been evaluated for a range of vegetables. The core of the procedure is based on Freundlich-type plant–soil relations, with the total soil concentration and the soil properties as variables. When a significant plant–soil relation is lacking for a specific vegetable a geometric mean of BioConcentrationFactors (BCF) is used, which is normalized according to soil properties. Subsequently, a ‘conservative’ vegetable-group-consumption-rate-weighted BioConcentrationFactor is calculated as basis for the Critical soil concentration (Tier 1). The tool to perform site-specific human health risk assessment (Tier 2) includes the calculation of a ‘realistic worst case’ site-specific vegetable-group-consumption-rate-weighted BioConcentrationFactor. -- Highlights: • A scientifically-based and practical procedure has been developed for assessing the human health risks from the consumption of vegetables. • Uptake characteristics of cadmium in a series of vegetables is represented by a vegetable-group-consumption-rate-weighted BioConcentrationFactor. • Calculations and measurement steps are combined.

  13. Sustainable Urbanism : an examination of environmentally responsible neighborhood developments in Europe and lessons for sustainable urban planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasioumi, Eirini

    2010-01-01

    The emergence of the sustainable development concept at the end of the 1980s triggered the intensification of the environmental sustainability discourse in urban design and planning. The vision of sustainable urbanism ...

  14. Hydrological urbanism in China's Pearl River Delta : how water landscape shapes the urban form in a changing climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Wenji, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2015-01-01

    When standing among urban villages, residential towers and warehouses in an urbanizing city in the Pearl River delta (PRD), it is hard to imagine that just forty years ago this area was filled with streams, ponds and rice ...

  15. Urban Consortium Energy Task Force - Year 21 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2003-04-01

    The Urban Consortium Energy Task Force (UCETF), comprised of representatives of large cities and counties in the United States, is a subgroup of the Urban Consortium, an organization of the nation's largest cities and counties joined together to identify, develop and deploy innovative approaches and technological solutions to pressing urban issues.

  16. Persistent pollutants urban rivers sediment survey: implications for pollution control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Persistent pollutants urban rivers sediment survey: implications for pollution control C. Wilson.heal@ed.ac.uk) Abstract The impacts of diffuse urban sources of pollution on watercourses are quantified. A survey of nine urban streams in Scotland for persistent pollutants in stream sediments is described, together

  17. Wind power resource assessment in complex urban environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind power resource assessment in complex urban environments: MIT campus case-study using CFD in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methods holds potential for the advancement of wind energy resource assessment in complex urban terrain by modeling wind circulation around urban obstacles. The geometry

  18. The Urbanism track draws on the Dutch tradition of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    and plan for more sustainable development. This track differs from other urban design or planning to make and organize sustainable urban Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment MSc Programme in the Laboratory Urban Transformations and Sustainability on an individual graduation project on a topic

  19. ORIGINAL PAPER Economic development, urban expansion, and sustainable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Yehua Dennis

    ORIGINAL PAPER Economic development, urban expansion, and sustainable development in Shanghai Wenze-Verlag 2012 Abstract Studies of urbanization effects in Chinese cities from the aspect of the coupled urban expansion and examined the dynamic relationship between economic growth and envi- ronment

  20. Evaluation of Environmental Quality and Evolution in Urban Soils of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Report on Evaluation of Environmental Quality and Evolution in Urban Soils of Qingdao City Y. Cai and Evolution in Urban Soils of Qingdao City ­ p. 0/2 #12;1. Problems Report on Evaluation of Environmental Quality and Evolution in Urban Soils of Qingdao City ­ p. 1/2 #12;1. Problems What we know about

  1. URBAN LOGISTICS BY RAIL AND WATERWAYS IN FRANCE AND JAPAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 URBAN LOGISTICS BY RAIL AND WATERWAYS IN FRANCE AND JAPAN Main author: Diana Diziain, Greater-Est, France KEYWORDS: rail, waterways, intermodal logistics, urban freight, city logistics ABSTRACT been carried out on intermodal logistic policies at national scales. However, in urban areas, the use

  2. TRANSPORTATION NODES, REAL ESTATE AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT The Metamorphosis Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tufto, Jarle

    1 TRANSPORTATION NODES, REAL ESTATE AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT The Metamorphosis Project Norwegian POTENTIALS FOR PROJECT- AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT AT TRANSPORTATION NODES · TO QUICKLY DEVELOP AN ARCHITECTURAL? · DEVELOP AN URBAN AND ARCHITECTURAL CONCEPT AND PROGRAM · DESIGN AND PRESENT THE PROJECT #12;6 PHOENICIAN

  3. Inhalation of Vehicle Emissions in Urban Environments Julian David Marshall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mlllet, Dylan B.

    Inhalation of Vehicle Emissions in Urban Environments by Julian David Marshall B.S.E. (Princeton Spring 2005 #12;3 Inhalation of Vehicle Emissions in Urban Environments Copyright 2005 By Julian David Marshall #12;1 ABSTRACT Inhalation of Vehicle Emissions in Urban Environments by Julian David Marshall

  4. SCHOOL OF URBAN AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS Graduate Certificate in Urban Nonprofit Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Haiying

    5357 Strategic Management and Planning in Public and Nonprofit Sectors Management Certificate Coordinator: Dr. Karabi Bezboruah, bezborua@uta.edu The certificate in Urban Nonprofit Management at UTA prepares students who are working

  5. Urban square as theater : issues of continuity and discontinuity in urban design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, Buo-yuan

    1993-01-01

    This thesis tries to establish some criteria for designing a good urban square, with concern for the static and dynamic approaches. The former refers to aesthetic issues, and the latter refers to social and contextual ones. ...

  6. Food urbanism : urban agriculture as a strategy to facilitate social mobility in informal settlements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amirtahmasebi, Rana

    2008-01-01

    Can community-based urban agriculture generate stronger communities? How is this possible? This thesis explores the possibility of community development through application of community gardens in an informal settlement ...

  7. THE URBAN HISTORY GROUP Annual Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banaji,. Murad

    -75........................................................................................................4 Urban form as knowledge: the production and consumption of the built environment.5 `Injurious' vistas-70.......... ..........................................................................................12 A space to congregate, educate and exhibit: sites of knowledge production and consumption....... ............................................................................................8 The production and use of cartographic knowledge in Edinburgh, 1880-1920 .............9 The MESH

  8. Urban PDE dynamics: Situating PRIPODE research in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    urban policymakers 1. Water & sanitation 2. Waste disposal 3. Slum & Informal settlements 4. Air;8 Environment Environmental Health Focus "Health provides an important tracer to indicate the quality pollution #12;9 Water & Sanitation Source: UN Statistics Division 2005 Total House Connections MDG Target 10

  9. NFWF Five Star & Urban Waters Restoration Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) is accepting applications for up to $2.1 million to develop community capacity to sustain local natural resources for future generations by providing modest financial assistance to diverse local partnership for wetland, riparian, forest and coastal habitat restoration, urban wildlife conservation, stormwater management as well as outreach, education and stewardship.

  10. Carbon Dioxide Reduction Through Urban Forestry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    accounting process; evaluate the cost-effectiveness of urban forestry programs with CO2 reduction measures carbon dioxide (CO2 ) reduction. The calculation of CO2 reduction that can be made with the use climate. With these Guidelines, they can: report current and future CO2 reductions through a standardized

  11. Urban fox squirrel ecology and management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCleery, Robert Alan

    2007-09-17

    I studied the habitat selection, survival, and anti-predator behaviors of the fox squirrel (Siurus niger) across the urban-rural gradient in College Station, Texas. From two years of tracking the radio locations of 82 fox squirrels, my data...

  12. Urban dispersion : challenges for fast response modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, M. J. (Michael J.)

    2004-01-01

    There is renewed interest in urban dispersion modeling due to the need for tools that can be used for responding to, planning for, and assessing the consequences of an airborne release of toxic materials. Although not an everyday phenomenon, releases of hazardous gases and aerosols have occurred in populated urban environments and are potentially threatening to human life. These releases may stem from on-site accidents as in the case of industrial chemical releases, may result during transport of hazardous chemicals as in tanker truck or railroad spills, or may be premeditated as in a chemical, biological, or radiological (CBR) agent terrorist attack. Transport and dispersion in urban environments is extremely complicated. Buildings alter the flow fields and deflect the wind, causing updrafts and downdrafts, channeling between buildings, areas of calm winds adjacent to strong winds, and horizontally and vertically rotating-eddies between buildings, at street corners, and other places within the urban canopy (see review by Hosker, 1984). Trees, moving vehicles, and exhaust vents among other things further complicate matters. The distance over which chemical, biological, or radiological releases can be harmful varies from tens of meters to many kilometers depending on the amount released, the toxicity of the agent, and the atmospheric conditions. As we will show later, accounting for the impacts of buildings on the transport and dispersion is crucial in estimating the travel direction, the areal extent, and the toxicity levels of the contaminant plume, and ultimately for calculating exposures to the population.

  13. MyUni Tests Tests.............................................................................................................................................. 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasuriya, Sanjeeva

    MyUni ­ Tests Tests.............................................................................................................................................. 2 Test question types.................................................................................................................... 2 Create a test

  14. The different urban efforts to revitalize urban neighborhoods in the United States and the United Kingdom: comparative case study based on governmental responses focusing on urban neighborhood revitalization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Youngho

    2008-10-10

    stream_source_info Ko Youngho.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 132275 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Ko Youngho.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 THE DIFFERENT URBAN EFFORTS......................................................................... 3 II FORCES OF URBAN AND NEIGHBORHOOD CHANGE ............. 6 Demographic Change to Social Change......................................... 6 Causes of Urban Neighborhood Change........................................ 8 Stages...

  15. Radar range measurements in the atmosphere.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-02-01

    The earth's atmosphere affects the velocity of propagation of microwave signals. This imparts a range error to radar range measurements that assume the typical simplistic model for propagation velocity. This range error is a function of atmospheric constituents, such as water vapor, as well as the geometry of the radar data collection, notably altitude and range. Models are presented for calculating atmospheric effects on radar range measurements, and compared against more elaborate atmospheric models.

  16. Car-Free Housing Developments: Toward Sustainable Smart Growth and Urban Regeneration Through Car-Free Zoning, Car-Free Redevelopment, Pedestrian Improvement Districts, and New Urbanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kushner, James A.

    2005-01-01

    Sustainable Smart Growth and Urban Regeneration Through Car-Free Zoning, Car-Free Redevelopment, Pedestrian Improvement Districts, and New Urbanism

  17. Paradoxical Interpretations of Urban Scaling Laws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cottineau, Clementine; Arcaute, Elsa; Batty, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Scaling laws are powerful summaries of the variations of urban attributes with city size. However, the validity of their universal meaning for cities is hampered by the observation that different scaling regimes can be encountered for the same territory, time and attribute, depending on the criteria used to delineate cities. The aim of this paper is to present new insights concerning this variation, coupled with a sensitivity analysis of urban scaling in France, for several socio-economic and infrastructural attributes from data collected exhaustively at the local level. The sensitivity analysis considers different aggregations of local units for which data are given by the Population Census. We produce a large variety of definitions of cities (approximatively 5000) by aggregating local Census units corresponding to the systematic combination of three definitional criteria: density, commuting flows and population cutoffs. We then measure the magnitude of scaling estimations and their sensitivity to city defin...

  18. Financing Sustainable Urban Transport | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable Urban Transport Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL

  19. Nuclear Physics Long Range Plan | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Physics Long Range Plan June 26, 2014 For a couple of years now, we have been waiting to get started on the next nuclear physics long range plan (LRP). What does that mean?...

  20. Viking Range: Order (2014-CE-23014)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Viking Range, LLC to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Viking Range had failed to certify that certain models of cooking products comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  1. American Range: Order (2014-CE-23006)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered American Range Corporation to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding American Range had failed to certify that certain models of cooking products comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  2. Autonomous UAV-Based Mapping of Large-Scale Urban Firefights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snarski, S; Scheibner, K F; Shaw, S; Roberts, R S; LaRow, A; Oakley, D; Lupo, J; Neilsen, D; Judge, B; Forren, J

    2006-03-09

    This paper describes experimental results from a live-fire data collect designed to demonstrate the ability of IR and acoustic sensing systems to detect and map high-volume gunfire events from tactical UAVs. The data collect supports an exploratory study of the FightSight concept in which an autonomous UAV-based sensor exploitation and decision support capability is being proposed to provide dynamic situational awareness for large-scale battalion-level firefights in cluttered urban environments. FightSight integrates IR imagery, acoustic data, and 3D scene context data with prior time information in a multi-level, multi-step probabilistic-based fusion process to reliably locate and map the array of urban firing events and firepower movements and trends associated with the evolving urban battlefield situation. Described here are sensor results from live-fire experiments involving simultaneous firing of multiple sub/super-sonic weapons (2-AK47, 2-M16, 1 Beretta, 1 Mortar, 1 rocket) with high optical and acoustic clutter at ranges up to 400m. Sensor-shooter-target configurations and clutter were designed to simulate UAV sensing conditions for a high-intensity firefight in an urban environment. Sensor systems evaluated were an IR bullet tracking system by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and an acoustic gunshot detection system by Planning Systems, Inc. (PSI). The results demonstrate convincingly the ability for the LLNL and PSI sensor systems to accurately detect, separate, and localize multiple shooters and the associated shot directions during a high-intensity firefight (77 rounds in 5 sec) in a high acoustic and optical clutter environment with no false alarms. Preliminary fusion processing was also examined that demonstrated an ability to distinguish co-located shooters (shooter density), range to <0.5 m accuracy at 400m, and weapon type.

  3. Range Fuels Commercial-Scale Biorefinery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Range Fuels commercial-scale biorefinery will use a variety of feedstocks to create cellulosic ethanol, methanol, and power.

  4. TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS COLLECTED FROM AN INSTRUMENTED VAN IN SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH AS PART OF URBAN 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.J. BROWN; E.R. PARDYJAK

    2001-08-01

    Measurements of temperature and position were collected during the night from an instrumented van on routes through Salt Lake City and the rural outskirts. The measurements were taken as part of the Department of Energy Chemical and Biological National Security Program URBAN 2 Field Experiment conducted in October 2000 (Shinn et al., 2000 and Allwine et al., 2001a). The instrumented van was driven over three primary routes, two including downtown, residential, and ''rural'' areas and a third that went by a line of permanently fixed temperature probes (Allwine et al., 2001b) for cross-checking purposes. Each route took from 45 to 60 minutes to complete. Based on four nights of data, initial analyses indicate that there was a temperature difference of 2-5 C between the urban core and nearby ''rural'' areas. Analyses also suggest that there were significant fine scale temperature differences over distances of tens of meters within the city and in the nearby rural areas. The temperature measurements that were collected are intended to supplement the meteorological measurements taken during the URBAN2000 Field Experiment, to assess the importance of the urban heat island phenomenon in Salt Lake City, and to test the urban canopy parameterizations that have been developed for regional scale meteorological codes as part of the DOE CBNP program.

  5. Gas Test Loop Booster Fuel Hydraulic Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gas Test Loop Hydraulic Testing Staff

    2006-09-01

    The Gas Test Loop (GTL) project is for the design of an adaptation to the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to create a fast-flux test space where fuels and materials for advanced reactor concepts can undergo irradiation testing. Incident to that design, it was found necessary to make use of special booster fuel to enhance the neutron flux in the reactor lobe in which the Gas Test Loop will be installed. Because the booster fuel is of a different composition and configuration from standard ATR fuel, it is necessary to qualify the booster fuel for use in the ATR. Part of that qualification is the determination that required thermal hydraulic criteria will be met under routine operation and under selected accident scenarios. The Hydraulic Testing task in the GTL project facilitates that determination by measuring flow coefficients (pressure drops) over various regions of the booster fuel over a range of primary coolant flow rates. A high-fidelity model of the NW lobe of the ATR with associated flow baffle, in-pile-tube, and below-core flow channels was designed, constructed and located in the Idaho State University Thermal Fluids Laboratory. A circulation loop was designed and constructed by the university to provide reactor-relevant water flow rates to the test system. Models of the four booster fuel elements required for GTL operation were fabricated from aluminum (no uranium or means of heating) and placed in the flow channel. One of these was instrumented with Pitot tubes to measure flow velocities in the channels between the three booster fuel plates and between the innermost and outermost plates and the side walls of the flow annulus. Flow coefficients in the range of 4 to 6.5 were determined from the measurements made for the upper and middle parts of the booster fuel elements. The flow coefficient for the lower end of the booster fuel and the sub-core flow channel was lower at 2.3.

  6. Balanced Transport and Sustainable Urbanism: Enhancing Mobility and Accessibility through Institutional, Demand Management, and Land-Use Initiatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cervero, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Transport and Sustainable Urbanism: Enhancing Mobility andparagons of sustainable transport and urbanism from whichhallmark of sustainable transport and urbanism. 3.1 Zürich:

  7. CUTE: A Concolic Unit Testing Engine for C Koushik Sen, Darko Marinov, Gul Agha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sen, Koushik

    will be observed during the testing. In order to improve the range of behaviors observed (or test coverage

  8. Urban Physiology: City Ants Possess High Heat Tolerance Michael J. Angilletta Jr1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angilletta, Michael

    on a global scale, leading to urban heat islands as much as 12uC hotter than their surroundings. Optimality, and the unusual pattern of convection [1]. Urban heat islands--increased temperatures within urban areas-- scale [6­8]. Urban heat islands should not only concern ecologists who wish to manage urban populations

  9. Kauai Test Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hay, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    The Kauai Test Facility (KTF) is a Department of Energy rocket launch facility operated by Sandia National Laboratories. Originally it was constructed in support of the high altitude atmospheric nuclear test phase of operation Dominic in the early 1960's. Later, the facility went through extensive improvement and modernization to become an integral part of the Safeguard C readiness to resume nuclear testing program. Since its inception and build up, in the decade of the sixties and the subsequent upgrades of the seventies, range test activities have shifted from full scale test to emphasis on research and development of materials and components, and to making high altitude scientific measurements. Primarily, the facility is intended to be utilized in support of development programs at the DOE weapons laboratories, however, other organizations may make use of the facility on a non-interface basis. The physical components at KTF and their operation are described.

  10. Performance Testing of a Small Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine , S. Tullis2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullis, Stephen

    Performance Testing of a Small Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine R. Bravo1 , S. Tullis2 , S. Ziada3 of electric production [1]. Although most performance testing for small-scale wind turbines is conducted vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWT) in urban settings, full-scale wind tunnel testing of a prototype 3.5 k

  11. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Urbane...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    slabs and foundation walls, advanced framed walls, high-efficiency heat pumps, and ducts in conditioned space. Urbane Homes - Louisville, KY More Documents & Publications High...

  12. USDA National Urban and Community Forestry Challenge Cost Share...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Urban and Community Forestry Challenge Cost Share Grant Program to assist the U.S. Forest Service in establishing the grant categories and recommendations of final proposals...

  13. Long-term energy consumptions of urban transportation: A prospective...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    can significantly curb the trajectories of energy consumption and the ensuing carbon dioxide emissions, if and only if they are implemented in the framework of appropriate urban...

  14. Sustainable Urban Development: A Literature Review and Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wheeler, Stephen

    1996-01-01

    Introduction I. What is Sustainable Development in General?PAGE Definitions of Sustainable Development Perspectiveson Sustainable Development Perspectives on Sustainable Urban

  15. Energy Department Announces the SUN Project, Empowering Urban...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    between the U.S. Department of Energy and the American Indian Science and Engineering Society to engage urban Native American youth in science, technology, engineering,...

  16. taking charge : optimizing urban charging infrastructure for shared electric vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramani, Praveen

    2012-01-01

    This thesis analyses the opportunities and constraints of deploying charging infrastructure for shared electric vehicles in urban environments. Existing electric vehicle charging infrastructure for privately owned vehicles ...

  17. Decentralizing urbanization : harnessing the potential of small cities in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suri, Sagarika

    2011-01-01

    Perceived as symbols of national development or degeneration, megacities continue to dominate discourse and action related to urbanization, particularly in developing countries like India. Simultaneously, a large portion ...

  18. Planning Kabul: The politics of urbanization in Afghanistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calogero, Pietro Anders

    2011-01-01

    of urban apartheid? ” Planning theory 8:88-100. Yiftachel,of the colonized. ” City Planning Kabul: BibliographyCalif. : Sage Publications. Planning Kabul: Planning as

  19. Urban Bias, Rural Sexual Minorities, and the Courts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luke, Boso

    2013-01-01

    titil- lated the rural community and jurors of PendletonAdolescents in Rural Communities in British Columbia, 99 Ain minority, poor, and rural communities. Urban bias both

  20. Adapting Urban Transport to Climate Change- Module 5f - Sustainable...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Urban Transport to Climate Change- Module 5f - Sustainable transport: a sourcebook for policy-makers in developing cities Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name:...

  1. Intake fraction of nonreactive vehicle emissions in US urban areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, Julian D.; Teoh, Soon-Kay; Nazaroff, William W.

    2006-01-01

    and trends in motor vehicle emissions to monthly urbanExposure to motor vehicle emissions: An intake fractionpollutants: Motor vehicle emissions in the South Coast Air

  2. Intake fraction of nonreactive vehicle emissions in US urban areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, J D; Teoh, S K; Nazaroff, William W

    2005-01-01

    fraction of nonreactive vehicle emissions JD Marshall et al.and trends in motor vehicle emissions to monthly urbanExposure to motor vehicle emissions: An intake fraction

  3. Consequences of Urban Stability Conditions for Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations of Urban Dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundquist, J K; Chan, S T

    2005-11-30

    The validity of omitting stability considerations when simulating transport and dispersion in the urban environment is explored using observations from the Joint URBAN 2003 field experiment and computational fluid dynamics simulations of that experiment. Four releases of sulfur hexafluoride, during two daytime and two nighttime intensive observing periods, are simulated using the building-resolving computational fluid dynamics model, FEM3MP to solve the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations with two options of turbulence parameterizations. One option omits stability effects but has a superior turbulence parameterization using a non-linear eddy viscosity (NEV) approach, while the other considers buoyancy effects with a simple linear eddy viscosity (LEV) approach for turbulence parameterization. Model performance metrics are calculated by comparison with observed winds and tracer data in the downtown area, and with observed winds and turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) profiles at a location immediately downwind of the central business district (CBD) in the area we label as the urban shadow. Model predictions of winds, concentrations, profiles of wind speed, wind direction, and friction velocity are generally consistent with and compare reasonably well with the field observations. Simulations using the NEV turbulence parameterization generally exhibit better agreement with observations. To further explore this assumption of a neutrally-stable atmosphere within the urban area, TKE budget profiles slightly downwind of the urban wake region in the 'urban shadow' are examined. Dissipation and shear production are the largest terms which may be calculated directly. The advection of TKE is calculated as a residual; as would be expected downwind of an urban area, the advection of TKE produced within the urban area is a very large term. Buoyancy effects may be neglected in favor of advection, shear production, and dissipation. For three of the IOPs, buoyancy production may be neglected entirely, and for one IOP, buoyancy production contributes approximately 25% of the total TKE at this location. For both nighttime releases, the contribution of buoyancy to the total TKE budget is always negligible though positive. Results from the simulations provide estimates of the average TKE values in the upwind, downtown, downtown shadow, and urban wake zones of the computational domain. These values suggest that building-induced turbulence can cause the average turbulence intensity in the urban area to increase by as much as much as seven times average 'upwind' values, explaining the minimal role of buoyant forcing in the downtown region. The downtown shadow exhibits an exponential decay in average TKE, while the distant downwind wake region approaches the average upwind values. For long-duration releases in downtown and downtown shadow areas, the assumption of neutral stability is valid because building-induced turbulence dominates the budget. However, further downwind in the urban wake region, which we find to be approximately 1500 m beyond the perimeter of downtown Oklahoma City, the levels of building-induced turbulence greatly subside, and therefore the assumption of neutral stability is less valid.

  4. Test Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Test Images. I hope to have a set of test images for the course soon. Some images are available now; some will have to wait until I can find another 100-200

  5. Meatiness Testing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the ignition phenomena of selected polymeric materials using the Hot Wire Ignition Test. This test is prescribed by Underwriters Laboratories as one of various requirements ...

  6. Infrastructure Ecology for Sustainable and Resilient Urban Infrastructure Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeong, Hyunju; Pandit, Arka; Crittenden, John; Xu, Ming; Perrings, Charles; Wang, Dali; Li, Ke; French, Steve

    2010-10-01

    The population growth coupled with increasing urbanization is predicted to exert a huge demand on the growth and retrofit of urban infrastructure, particularly in water and energy systems. The U.S. population is estimated to grow by 23% (UN, 2009) between 2005 and 2030. The corresponding increases in energy and water demand were predicted as 14% (EIA, 2009) and 20% (Elcock, 2008), respectively. The water-energy nexus needs to be better understood to satisfy the increased demand in a sustainable manner without conflicting with environmental and economic constraints. Overall, 4% of U.S. power generation is used for water distribution (80%) and treatment (20%). 3% of U.S. water consumption (100 billion gallons per day, or 100 BGD) and 40% of U.S. water withdrawal (340 BGD) are for thermoelectric power generation (Goldstein and Smith, 2002). The water demand for energy production is predicted to increase most significantly among the water consumption sectors by 2030. On the other hand, due to the dearth of conventional water sources, energy intensive technologies are increasingly in use to treat seawater and brackish groundwater for water supply. Thus comprehending the interrelation and interdependency between water and energy system is imperative to evaluate sustainable water and energy supply alternatives for cities. In addition to the water-energy nexus, decentralized or distributed concept is also beneficial for designing sustainable water and energy infrastructure as these alternatives require lesser distribution lines and space in a compact urban area. Especially, the distributed energy infrastructure is more suited to interconnect various large and small scale renewable energy producers which can be expected to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In the case of decentralized water infrastructure, on-site wastewater treatment facility can provide multiple benefits. Firstly, it reduces the potable water demand by reusing the treated water for non-potable uses and secondly, it also reduces the wastewater load to central facility. In addition, lesser dependency on the distribution network contributes to increased reliability and resiliency of the infrastructure. The goal of this research is to develop a framework which seeks an optimal combination of decentralized water and energy alternatives and centralized infrastructures based on physical and socio-economic environments of a region. Centralized and decentralized options related to water, wastewater and stormwater and distributed energy alternatives including photovoltaic (PV) generators, fuel cells and microturbines are investigated. In the context of the water-energy nexus, water recovery from energy alternatives and energy recovery from water alternatives are reflected. Alternatives recapturing nutrients from wastewater are also considered to conserve depleting resources. The alternatives are evaluated in terms of their life-cycle environmental impact and economic performance using a hybrid life cycle assessment (LCA) tool and cost benefit analysis, respectively. Meeting the increasing demand of a test bed, an optimal combination of the alternatives is designed to minimize environmental and economic impacts including CO2 emissions, human health risk, natural resource use, and construction and operation cost. The framework determines the optimal combination depending on urban density, transmission or conveyance distance or network, geology, climate, etc. Therefore, it will be also able to evaluate infrastructure resiliency against physical and socio-economic challenges such as population growth, severe weather, energy and water shortage, economic crisis, and so on.

  7. Automated Feature-Based Range Registration of Urban Scenes of Large Scale Ioannis Stamos and Marius Leordeanu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oishi, Takeshi

    - base laser sensing, air-borne laser sensing, ground and air- borne image sensing. A typical 3D modeling as de- scribed in [6]. The automation of the process of establish- ing point correspondences

  8. Verification Testing Test Driven Development Testing with JUnit Verification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Dennis

    Verification Testing Test Driven Development Testing with JUnit Verification Any activity should be verified. #12;Verification Testing Test Driven Development Testing with JUnit Approaches to verification 1 Testing 2 Static Analysis · Peer review · Insepction/Walk-through/Structured review · Formal

  9. Opportunities for Saving Energy and Improving Air Quality in Urban Heat Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, Hashem

    2008-01-01

    Special Issue on Urban Heat Islands and Cool Communities,Special Issue on Urban Heat Islands and Cool Communities,Energy Effects of Urban Heat Islands and their Mitigation: A

  10. Biomass, Carbon Sequestration, and Avoided Emissions:  Assessing the Role of Urban Trees in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    Urban heat threat rank, using urban heat island and climateProtection Agency. 2013. Heat Island Impacts. http://threat rank, using urban heat island and climate data. % of

  11. Quantifying exchange processes in the urban canopy layers of dense neighborhoods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Terianne C

    2015-01-01

    There is a global trend towards urbanization, particularly in developing regions that are home to new and rapidly growing cities. In the center of large, dense urban areas, weak exchange between the urban canopy layer (UCL) ...

  12. Radiative forcing and temperature response to changes in urban albedos and associated CO2 offsets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menon, Surabi

    2010-01-01

    basis of the urban heat island, Quart. J. Roy. Meteor.of cool materials as a heat island mitigation strategy, J.Similar to the urban heat island effect, where urban areas

  13. Effects of temperature and fertilization on nitrogen cycling and community composition of an urban lawn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BIJOOR, NEETAS; CZIMCZIK, CLAUDIAI; PATAKI, DIANEE; BILLINGS, SHARONA

    2008-01-01

    change and the urban heat island effect (Arnfield, 2003) maychange as well as the urban heat island effect may result inland cover, the urban heat island effect as well as climate

  14. Cave and City: A Procedural Reconstruction of the Urban Topography of Magnesia on the Maeander

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldana, Marie

    2015-01-01

    P. (2001). The Historical Topography of Ephesos. In UrbanismReconstruction of the Urban Topography of Magnesia on theReconstruction of the Urban Topography of Magnesia on the

  15. Vertical Village : towards a new typology of high-density low-income urban housing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harper, Caleb Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Apocalyptic global urbanization is old news. For generations statistically supported oracles have warned against the rising tide of rapid urban growth, one must only casually search the keywords "urban slum" on Goggle to ...

  16. Prfungsordnung der Universitt Stuttgart fr den Masterstudiengang Integrated Urbanism and Sustainable Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reyle, Uwe

    Integrated Urbanism and Sustainable Design beschlossen. Der Rektor der Universität Stuttgart hat dieser die Modulprüfungen. #12;2 Präambel Der Masterstudiengang Integrated Urbanism and Sustainable Design1 Prüfungsordnung der Universität Stuttgart für den Masterstudiengang Integrated Urbanism

  17. TITLE: Cornell's Urban Sustainability Initiatives HOST: Marianne Krasny, Helene Dillard and Marvin Pritts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    TITLE: Cornell's Urban Sustainability Initiatives HOST: Marianne Krasny, Helene Dillard and Marvin take to define an urban sustainability initiative in collaboration with ACSF. In particular, we broadly address urban sustainability issues. Our initiative dovetails with concerns Cornell University

  18. Rail + Property Development: A model of sustainable transit finance and urbanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cervero, Robert; Murakami, Jin

    2008-01-01

    Development and Sustainable Urbanism While R+P projects arehigh-quality and sustainable urbanism is an important by-A model of sustainable transit finance and urbanism Robert

  19. Urbanism and/or Architecture: Toward a Theory of Norm and Scale [Awards Juror Commentaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelbaugh, Douglas

    2006-01-01

    consequences of our architecture and urbanism, or natureable to premiate good architecture and good urbanism in theUrbanism and/or Architecture: Toward a Theory of Norm and

  20. Smart Beijing: Correlation of Urban Electrical Energy Consumption with Urban Environmental Sensing for Optimizing Distribution Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beigl, Michael

    parameters (air quality, noise pollution, traffic levels, water quality, etc.) in a distributed manner and create anomolies in pollution levels in specific locations, such as sporting events, rallies and fairs pollution and a series of other social problems. The urban electrical energy development has also been

  1. Cleanly -Trashducation Urban System Half the world's population is expected to live in urban

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    present Cleanly, an urban trashducation system aimed at creating awareness of garbage production Rued Langgaards Vej 7, DK-2300, Denmark jdhr@itu.dk Katerina Poteriaykina University of Haifa to address it. The CHI com- munity has looked into related solutions to create awareness about the energy

  2. Range Design Criteria- June 4, 2012

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This document contains the currently-approved firearms "Range Design Criteria" referred to on DOE O 473.3, Protection Program Operations

  3. Housing and urban development research reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    The sixth in a series of documents published by the Department of Housng and Urban Development (HUD) to assist in the formulation of policy decision contains 247 abstracts entered in the HUD USER automated data base during the past six months, bringing the data base total to 3,583 documents. There are 45 subject areas in the main section, with the abstracts in each area arranged alphabetically by title. Each abstract is identified by an order number and is followed by descriptive keywords. Other listings of the documents are alphabetical, numerical, by personal or corporate author, by contract and grant number, and by subject index.

  4. Converting urban tree maintenance residue to energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphey, W.K.; Massey, J.G.; Sumrall, A.

    1980-01-01

    Three methods of utilizing urban wood waste collected by a tree maintenance firm in Houston, Texas (handling 30,000 ton waste/year) are examined: (a) hauling to a remote landfill; (b) chipping and hauling to a (local) power plant and converting to electricity; and (c) chipping and selling to an outside firm for use as boiler fuel. Breakdown of costs are given for each method in monetary and energy terms. Method (b) was the cheapest, producing a net energy gain (870 million Btu/day), but the firm chose method (c), since it realized a direct monetary return.

  5. DURA URBAN HOUSE | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i pStateDOEAnalysis,Department of U.S.DURA URBAN HOUSE People from many

  6. DURA URBAN HOUSE | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i pStateDOEAnalysis,Department of U.S.DURA URBAN HOUSE People from

  7. Polymer Testing 26 (2007) 614618 Short Communication: Test Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natelson, Douglas

    2007-01-01

    rights reserved. Keywords: Non-destructive testing; Terahertz spectroscopy; Polymeric compounds; Additive range between 100 GHz and a few THz is a promising technique for non- destructive testing of polymeric to be a promising non-destructive technique for quality control in compounding processes. r 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All

  8. Large eddy simulation of atmospheric boundary layer flow in urban terrain : implications for transport of pollution and heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Long

    2011-01-01

    such as the urban heat island and increase in urban energyloads and the urban heat island-the effects of albedo,modeling of urban heat islands. Final report prepared by

  9. Large eddy simulation of atmospheric boundary layer flow in urban terrain : implications for transport of pollution and heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Long

    2011-01-01

    loads and the urban heat island-the effects of albedo,modeling of urban heat islands. Final report prepared byeffects such as the urban heat island and increase in urban

  10. Technifying Public Space and Publicizing Infrastructures: Exploring New Urban Political Ecologies through the Square of General Vara del Rey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominguez Rubio, Fernando; Fogue, Uriel

    2013-01-01

    energy production, a process that has been removed from urban public spacesand discrete spaces within the urban fabric. While energyenergy by International Journal of Urban and Regional Research 37.3 © 2013 Urban Research Publications Limited Technifying public space

  11. Large eddy simulation of atmospheric boundary layer flow in urban terrain : implications for transport of pollution and heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Long

    2011-01-01

    loads and the urban heat island-the effects of albedo,modeling of urban heat islands. Final report prepared byespecially the urban heat island (UHI) and urban air

  12. A Web Based Geographic Information Platform to Support Urban Adaptation to Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nugent, Philip J; Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Parish, Esther S; Mei, Rui; Ernst, Kathleen M; Absar, Mariya

    2015-01-01

    The urban climate is changing rapidly. Therefore, climate change and its projected impacts on environmental conditions must be considered in assessing and comparing urban planning alternatives. In this paper, we present an integrated framework for urban climate adaptation tool (Urban-CAT) that will help cities to plan for, rather than react to, possible risks. Urban-CAT will be developed as a scenario planning tool that is locally relevant to existing urban decision-making processes.

  13. Tunnel and Subsurface Void Detection and Range to Target Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillip B. West

    2009-06-01

    Engineers and technicians at the Idaho National Laboratory invented, designed, built and tested a device capable of detecting and measuring the distance to, an underground void, or tunnel. Preliminary tests demonstrated positive detection of, and range to, a void thru as much as 30 meters of top-soil earth. Device uses acoustic driving point impedance principles pioneered by the Laboratory for well-bore physical properties logging. Data receipts recorded by the device indicates constructive-destructive interference patterns characteristic of acoustic wave reflection from a downward step-change in impedance mismatch. Prototype tests demonstrated that interference patterns in receipt waves could depict the patterns indicative of specific distances. A tool with this capability can quickly (in seconds) indicate the presence and depth/distance of a void or tunnel. Using such a device, border security and military personnel can identify threats of intrusion or weapons caches in most all soil conditions including moist and rocky.

  14. Testing of GFL Geosiphon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steimke, J.L.

    2001-07-10

    A full-scale, transparent replica of a GeoSiphon was constructed in the TFL to test a new concept, using a solar powered vacuum pump to remove accumulated gases from the air chamber. It did not have a treatment cell containing iron filings as do the actual TNX GeoSiphons in the field, but it was accurate in all other respects. The gas generation that is observed in an actual GeoSiphon was simulated by air injection at the inlet of the TFL GeoSiphon. After facility shakedown, three stages of testing were conducted: verification testing, parametric testing and long term testing. In verification testing, the TFL GeoSiphon was used to reproduce a particular test at TNX in which the water flowrate decreased gradually as the result of air accumulation at the crest of a siphon without an air chamber. For this test the vacuum pump was not used and the air chamber was initially filled with air rather than water. Agreement between data from the TNX GeoSiphon and the TFL GeoSiphon was good, which gave confidence that the TFL GeoSiphon was a good hydraulic representation of the TNX GeoSiphon. For the remaining tests, the solar powered vacuum pump and air chamber were used. In parametric testing, steady state runs were made for water flowrates ranging from 1 gpm to 19 gpm, air injection rates ranging from 0 to 77 standard cc/min and outfall line angles ranging from vertical to 60 degrees from vertical. In all cases, the air chamber and vacuum pump removed nearly all of the air and the GeoSiphon operated without problems. In long term testing, the GeoSiphon was allowed to run continuously for 21 days at one set of conditions. During this time the solar cell kept the storage battery fully charged at all times and the control circuit for the vacuum pump operated reliably. The solar panel was observed to have a large excess capacity when used with the vacuum pump. With two changes, the concept of using a solar powered vacuum pump attached to an air chamber should be ready for long term use in the field. Those changes are to insulate the air chamber of the GeoSiphon so it will not freeze in the winter and to make the tank from steel rather than transparent plastic.

  15. Incorporating Urban Systems in Global Climate Models: The Role of GIScience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feddema, Johannes J.

    2006-11-15

    city with H/W=0.5,?,3.0 Simulated Urban Heat Island ? NCEP atmospheric forcing ? Rural grassland ? Default city with H/W=0.5,?,3.0 With Q f Without Q f Variability in Simulated Heat Island caused by Climate and Rural Environment ?Atmospheric forcing... from CAM (offline model) ?Default city with H/W=0.5,?,3.0 ?Rural environment from CLM Surface Data Model Validation: ? At a given height to width ratio, a wide range of heat islands is simulated depending on prevailing meteorological conditions...

  16. Specters in the Sand: The Urban Hauntings in Alicia Gaspar de Alba’s Desert Blood: The Juárez Murders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocegueda, Isela

    2008-01-01

    Specters in the Sand: The Urban Hauntings in Alicia Gasparentitled “Specters in the Sand: The Urban Hauntings in

  17. Formulating and Implementing Profiling over Adaptive Ranges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherwood, Tim

    be implemented for range-adaptive profiling. RAP can be used on various profiles, such as PCs, load values may easily be lost in a sea of data. We present range-adaptive profiling (RAP) as a new and general value locality. We propose two methods of implementation of RAP, one in software and the other

  18. Inhalation of motor vehicle emissions: effects of urban population and land area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, Julian D.; McKone, Thomas E.; Deakin, Elizabeth; Nazaroff, William W.

    2006-01-01

    height (e.g. , via the urban heat island effect). Exposuree.g. , habitat loss, urban heat island effects, and global

  19. Development and Pilot Application of the California Urban and Biodiversity Analysis (CURBA) Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, John D.; Monzon, Juan Pablo; Reilly, Michael; Cogan, Chris

    1998-01-01

    projected urban growth are R o w & Field Crops, Orchards &Urban or Built- up Land Agricultural Land Row and Field Crops Irrigated Hayfield Pasture Orchard

  20. Opportunities for Saving Energy and Improving Air Quality in Urban Heat Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, Hashem

    2008-01-01

    saving potentials of heat-island reduction strategies,”Special Issue on Urban Heat Islands and Cool Communities,Special Issue on Urban Heat Islands and Cool Communities,

  1. Assessment of MeMS Sensors in an Urban Traffic Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varaiya, Pravin

    2004-01-01

    BERKELEY Assessment of MeMS Sensors in an Urban Traf?cAND HIGHWAYS Assessment of MeMS Sensors in an Urban Traffic

  2. Framework for integration of urban planning, strategic environmental assessment and ecological planning for urban sustainability within the context of China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He Jia; Bao Cunkuan; Shu Tingfei; Yun Xiaoxue; Jiang Dahe; Brwon, Lex

    2011-11-15

    Sustainable development or sustainability has been highlighted as an essential principle in urban master planning, with increasing recognition that uncontrollable urbanization may well give rise to various issues such as overexploitation of natural resources, ecosystem destruction, environmental pollution and large-scale climate change. Thus, it is deemed necessary to modify the existing urban and regional administrative system so as to cope with the challenges urban planning is being confronted with and realize the purpose of urban sustainability. This paper contributed to proposing a mechanism which helps to make urban planning with full consideration of issues with respect to sustainable development. We suggested that the integration of urban planning, SEA and ecological planning be a multi-win strategy to offset deficiency of each mentioned political tool being individually applied. We also proposed a framework where SEA and ecological planning are fully incorporated into urban planning, which forms a two-way constraint mechanism to ascertain environmental quality of urban planning, although in practice, planning and SEA processes may conditionally be unified. Moreover, as shown in the case study, the integration of the three political tools may be constrained due to slow changes in the contextual factors, in particular the political and cultural dimensions. Currently within the context of China, there may be three major elements which facilitate integration of the three political tools, which are (1) regulatory requirement of PEIA on urban planning, (2) the promotion or strong administrative support from government on eco-district building, and (3) the willingness of urban planners to collaborate with SEA experts or ecologists.

  3. Effective range from tetramer dissociation data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hadizadeh, M R; Tomio, Lauro; Delfino, A; Frederico, T

    2012-01-01

    The shifts in the four-body recombination peaks, due to lowest order range corrections in the zero range results close to the unitary limit, are obtained and used to extract the corresponding effective range of a given atomic system. From the experimental values of the tetramer dissociation positions of an ultracold gas of cesium atoms close to broad Feshbach resonances, the effective ranges are extracted, with a weighted average given by 3.9$\\pm 0.8 R_{{vdW}}$, where $R_{{vdW}}$ is the van der Waals length scale. This result is consistent with the van der Waals potential tail for the $Cs_2$ system. The method can be generally applied to other cold atom experimental setups to determine the corresponding effective range.

  4. Sustainable Decentralized Model for Solid Waste Management in Urban India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Sustainable Decentralized Model for Solid Waste Management in Urban India Hita Unnikrishnan, Brunda the sustenance of a decentralized solid waste management system in urban India. Towards this end, two a national legislation ­ the Municipal Solid Waste (Management and Handling) rules, 2000 (Ministry

  5. UrbanSolutionsCenter Soil Organic Matter and Compost Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UrbanSolutionsCenter Soil Organic Matter and Compost Utilization Background High clay content soils is yard waste compost, and composting is becoming increasingly common in urban areas due to municipal yard waste collection and composting programs such as the one in Plano, Texas. Wastewater biosolids

  6. Energy Usage Attitudes of Urban India IBM Research India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Energy Usage Attitudes of Urban India Mohit Jain IBM Research India mohitjain@in.ibm.com Deepika@cs.cmu.edu Amarjeet Singh IIIT Delhi, India amarjeet@iiitd.ac.in Abstract-- Though rapid increase in energy factors affecting energy consumption in urban India. However, the small numbers of participants in those

  7. John Accordino Center for Urban and Regional Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammack, Richard

    elimination in the Brazilian Amazon Damian Pitt Urban and Regional Studies/Planning L. Douglas Wilder SchoolJohn Accordino Center for Urban and Regional Analysis L. Douglas Wilder School of Government of Government and Public Affairs Optimizing the grid integration of distributed solar energy through smart grid

  8. CARPOOL: Extending Free Internet Access over DTN in Urban Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsaoussidis, Vassilis

    - tolerant access to the Internet for everyone, and (iii) has energy- efficient design that delegates allCARPOOL: Extending Free Internet Access over DTN in Urban Environments Ioannis Komnios and Vassilis-tolerant Internet access to all. Targeting an urban scenario, where means of public transport, such as buses

  9. Main Campus Urban Forest and Landscape Management Policy Policy Statement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    Main Campus Urban Forest and Landscape Management Policy Policy Statement: Clemson University and recreation. This Main Campus Urban Forest and Landscape Management Policy enables that commitment through procedures and requirements for achieving the purpose of this policy and its implementation ("Main Campus

  10. Interactive Urban Development Control with Collaborative Virtual Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Hamish

    a collaborative virtual environment system can be constructed, applied and used in the context of urban planning medium that also allows interactions with 3D representations of the environment being worked onInteractive Urban Development Control with Collaborative Virtual Environments Tina Manoharana

  11. Urban Pollution Control Strategies Reading: pages 422-437

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    ATOC 3500 Urban Pollution Control Strategies Reading: pages 422-437 Details to come #12;#12;Urban Pollution Control Strategies What we know so far: · Different regions have different issues, but two types, warm, NOx, HCs, ozone, CO) · Pollution is made worse by meteorological conditions called "inversions

  12. Fuel cells: providing heat and power in the urban environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    Fuel cells: providing heat and power in the urban environment Jim Halliday, Alan Ruddell, Jane;Fuel cells: providing heat and power in the urban environment Tyndall Centre Technical Report No. 32 efficiencies, and therefore reduced CO2 emissions, compared to conventional centralised generation. Fuel cell

  13. Sediment management in sustainable urban drainage system ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sediment management in sustainable urban drainage system ponds K.V. Heal*, D.A. Hepburn** and R.lunn@strath.ac.uk) Abstract Since removal and disposal of sustainable urban drainage system (SUDS) sediment can incur high maintenance costs, assessments of sediment volumes, quality and frequency of removal are required. Sediment

  14. Saga of Glass Damage in Urban Environments Continues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kareem, Ahsan

    Saga of Glass Damage in Urban Environments Continues: Consequences of Aerodynamics and Debris Laboratory University of Notre Dame The Saga of Glass Damage in Urban Environments Continues: Consequences east of the city of Houston. Initial reconnaissance suggested that the observed glass/cladding damage

  15. Urban logistics pooling viabililty analysis via a multicriteria multiactor method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Urban logistics pooling viabililty analysis via a multicriteria multiactor method Jesus Gonzalez transportation and logistics pooling are relatively new concepts in research, but are very popular in practice. In the last years, collaborative transportation seems a good city logistics alternative to classical urban

  16. Urban Land Use and Transportation Center University of California, Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Urban Land Use and Transportation Center University of California, Davis The Urban Land Use and Transportation Center (ULTRANS) at the UC Davis Institute of Transportation Studies (ITS-Davis) is tackling-Davis researchers have provided strong input to the design and analysis of the entire array of California's proposed

  17. Approaching Urban Disaster Reality: The ResQ Firesimulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebel, Bernhard

    on a realistic physical model of heat development and heat transport in urban fires. It allows to simulate threeApproaching Urban Disaster Reality: The ResQ Firesimulator Timo A. N¨ussle, Alexander Kleiner different ways of heat transport (radiation, convection, direct transport) and the influence of wind

  18. CUTE: A Concolic Unit Testing Engine for C Koushik Sen, Darko Marinov, Gul Agha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sen, Koushik

    . In order to improve the range of behaviors observed (or test coverage), several techniques have been

  19. COMPARATIVE STUDY ON EXHAUST EMISSIONS FROM DIESEL- AND CNG-POWERED URBAN BUSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    COROLLER, P; PLASSAT, G

    2003-08-24

    Couple years ago, ADEME engaged programs dedicated to the urban buses exhaust emissions studies. The measures associated with the reduction of atmospheric and noise pollution has particular importance in the sector of urban buses. In many cases, they illustrate the city's environmental image and contribute to reinforcing the attractiveness of public transport. France's fleet in service, presently put at about 14,000 units, consumes about 2 per cent of the total energy of city transport. It causes about 2 per cent of the HC emissions and from 4 to 6 per cent of the NOx emissions and particles. These vehicles typically have a long life span (about 15 years) and are relatively expensive to buy, about 150.000 euros per unit. Several technical solutions were evaluated to quantify, on a real condition cycle for buses, on one hand pollutants emissions, fuel consumption and on the other hand reliability, cost in real existing fleet. This paper presents main preliminary results on urban buses exhaust emission on two different cases: - existing Diesel buses, with fuel modifications (Diesel with low sulphur content), Diesel with water emulsion and bio-Diesel (30% oil ester in standard Diesel fuel); renovating CNG powered Euro II buses fleet, over representative driving cycles, set up by ADEME and partners. On these cycles, pollutants (regulated and unregulated) were measured as well as fuel consumption, at the beginning of a program and one year after to quantify reliability and increase/decrease of pollutants emissions. At the same time, some after-treatment technologies were tested under real conditions and several vehicles. Information such as fuel consumption, lubricant analysis, problem on the technology were following during a one year program. On the overall level, it is the combination of various action, pollution-reduction and renewal that will make it possible to meet the technological challenge of reducing emissions and fuel consumption by urban bus networks.

  20. URBAN ATMOSPHERIC OBSERVATORY (UAO) FIRST PLANNING WORKSHOP, JANUARY 27-28-2003. WORKSHOP SUMMARY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    REYNOLDS,R.M.; LEE,H.N.

    2003-03-27

    The Urban Atmospheric Observatory (UAO) First Planning Workshop was held on 27-28 January 2003 at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) in downtown Manhattan, New York City. The meeting was well attended by local, state, and national administrators, as well as scientists and engineers from the national laboratories and academia. The real-time intensive UAO is a necessary step toward the development and validation of new technologies in support of the New York City emergency management and anti-terrorism effort. The real-time intensive UAO will be a dense array of meteorological instrumentation, remote sensing and satellite products and model output, as well as radiation detection, gamma spectrometer and aerosol measurements focused onto a small area in the heart of Manhattan. Such a test-bed, developed in a somewhat homogeneous urban area, and with a well-developed communication and data collection backbone, will be of immense utility for understanding how models of all scales can be improved and how they can best be integrated into the city's emergency program. The goal of the First Planning Workshop was to bring together a small group of experts in the fields of urban meteorology, modeling from mesoscale to fine-mesh computational fluid dynamics, instrumentation, communications and visualization, in order to (1) establish the importance of the observational program, (2) define the most efficient and cost-effective design for the program, (3) define needed intensive observational efforts and establish a schedule, and (4) define the importance of the UAO in emergency operations. The workshop achieved its goals with the enthusiastic participation of over forty persons. There was a synthesis of ideas towards a world-class facility that would benefit both immediate emergency management activities and, over an extended time, the entire field of urban meteorology and contaminant dispersion modeling.

  1. Neutron scattering and extra short range interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Nesvizhevsky; G. Pignol; K. V. Protasov

    2007-11-14

    The available data on neutron scattering were analyzed to constrain a hypothetical new short-range interaction. We show that these constraints are several orders of magnitude better than those usually cited in the range between 1 pm and 5 nm. This distance range occupies an intermediate space between collider searches for strongly coupled heavy bosons and searches for new weak macroscopic forces. We emphasise the reliability of the neutron constraints in so far as they provide several independent strategies. We have identified the most promising way to improve them.

  2. Techniques for optically compressing light intensity ranges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rushford, Michael C.

    1989-01-01

    A pin hole camera assembly for use in viewing an object having a relatively large light intensity range, for example a crucible containing molten uranium in an atomic vapor laser isotope separator (AVLIS) system is disclosed herein. The assembly includes means for optically compressing the light intensity range appearing at its input sufficient to make it receivable and decipherable by a standard video camera. A number of different means for compressing the intensity range are disclosed. These include the use of photogray glass, the use of a pair of interference filters, and the utilization of a new liquid crystal notch filter in combination with an interference filter.

  3. Techniques for optically compressing light intensity ranges

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rushford, M.C.

    1989-03-28

    A pin hole camera assembly for use in viewing an object having a relatively large light intensity range, for example a crucible containing molten uranium in an atomic vapor laser isotope separator (AVLIS) system is disclosed herein. The assembly includes means for optically compressing the light intensity range appearing at its input sufficient to make it receivable and decipherable by a standard video camera. A number of different means for compressing the intensity range are disclosed. These include the use of photogray glass, the use of a pair of interference filters, and the utilization of a new liquid crystal notch filter in combination with an interference filter. 18 figs.

  4. Generic air sampler probe tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, J.A.; Ligotke, M.W.

    1995-11-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the best nozzle and probe designs for new air sampling systems to be installed in the ventilation systems of some of the waste tanks at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. Isokinetic nozzle probes and shrouded probes were tested. The test aerosol was sodium-fluorescein-tagged oleic acid. The test parameters involved particle sizes from 1 to 15 {mu}m, air velocities from 3 to 15 m/s. The results of the tests show that shrouded probes can deliver samples with significantly less particle-size bias then the isokinetic nozzle probes tested. Tests were also conducted on two sample flow splitters to determine particle loss as a function of aerodynamic particle size. The particle size range covered in these tests was 5 to 15 {mu}m. The results showed little particle loss, but did show a bias in particle concentration between the two outlets of each splitter for the larger particle sizes.

  5. Modeled regional climate change and California endemic oak ranges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kueppers, Lara M.

    pressure from cutting for fuel, grazing, conversion of woodlands to vineyards and orchards, water resource development, competition with inva- sive grasses, and urban expansion (1). Here, we report how the regional

  6. Laser Range Finder Mapping of Floating Vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hui, Corinna

    2009-01-01

    Using laser range finders as a method of navigation is popular with mobile land robots; however, there has been little research using it with water vehicles. Therefore, this thesis explores the usage and data flow of a ...

  7. Long range transport of acid rain precursors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, James A.

    1983-01-01

    A model of the long range transport of primary and secondary pollutants derived by Fay and Rosenzweig (1) is applied to the problem of the transport of acid rain precursors. The model describes the long term average (annual ...

  8. Tracking Dynamic Boundary Fronts Using Range Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramamritham, Krithi

    , tracking forest fires and environmental phenomena. Consider a poisonous gas or plume monitoring ap De- tection and Ranging) are being used for detecting forest fires [6], [7] in the last few years

  9. Systematic ranging and late warning asteroid impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farnocchia, D; Micheli, M

    2015-01-01

    We describe systematic ranging, an orbit determination technique especially suitable to assess the near-term Earth impact hazard posed by newly discovered asteroids. For these late warning cases, the time interval covered by the observations is generally short, perhaps a few hours or even less, which leads to severe degeneracies in the orbit estimation process. The systematic ranging approach gets around these degeneracies by performing a raster scan in the poorly-constrained space of topocentric range and range rate, while the plane of sky position and motion are directly tied to the recorded observations. This scan allows us to identify regions corresponding to collision solutions, as well as potential impact times and locations. From the probability distribution of the observation errors, we obtain a probability distribution in the orbital space and then estimate the probability of an Earth impact. We show how this technique is effective for a number of examples, including 2008 TC3 and 2014 AA, the only tw...

  10. Long range interactions in nanoscale science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajter, Richard F.

    Our understanding of the “long range” electrodynamic, electrostatic, and polar interactions that dominate the organization of small objects at separations beyond an interatomic bond length is reviewed. From this basic-forces ...

  11. Underwater vehicle localization using range measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papadopoulos, Ge?rgios

    2010-01-01

    This thesis investigates the problem of cooperative navigation of autonomous marine vehicles using range-only acoustic measurements. We consider the use of a single maneuvering autonomous surface vehicle (ASV) to aid the ...

  12. Active dendrites enhance neuronal dynamic range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonardo L. Gollo; Osame Kinouchi; Mauro Copelli

    2009-08-08

    Since the first experimental evidences of active conductances in dendrites, most neurons have been shown to exhibit dendritic excitability through the expression of a variety of voltage-gated ion channels. However, despite experimental and theoretical efforts undertaken in the last decades, the role of this excitability for some kind of dendritic computation has remained elusive. Here we show that, owing to very general properties of excitable media, the average output of a model of active dendritic trees is a highly non-linear function of their afferent rate, attaining extremely large dynamic ranges (above 50 dB). Moreover, the model yields double-sigmoid response functions as experimentally observed in retinal ganglion cells. We claim that enhancement of dynamic range is the primary functional role of active dendritic conductances. We predict that neurons with larger dendritic trees should have larger dynamic range and that blocking of active conductances should lead to a decrease of dynamic range.

  13. Programmable near-infrared ranging system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Everett, Jr., Hobart R. (San Diego, CA)

    1989-01-01

    A high angular resolution ranging system particularly suitable for indoor plications involving mobile robot navigation and collision avoidance uses a programmable array of light emitters that can be sequentially incremented by a microprocessor. A plurality of adjustable level threshold detectors are used in an optical receiver for detecting the threshold level of the light echoes produced when light emitted from one or more of the emitters is reflected by a target or object in the scan path of the ranging system.

  14. Strain-controlled bulge test B. Erdem Alacaa)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alaca, B. Erdem

    mechanical tests,6­8 creep and viscoelas- tic tests,9,10 and high-temperature testing11 were re- ported. All cover a wide spectrum ranging from 10-8 s-1 (creep testing) to 108 s-1 (hypervelocity impact testing).12Strain-controlled bulge test B. Erdem Alacaa) and K. Bugra Toga College of Engineering, Koc

  15. AVTA: 2014 Chevrolet Cruze Diesel Vehicle Testing Reports

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. ...

  16. AVTA: 2013 Ford C-Max Energi PHEV Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road....

  17. AVTA: 2012 Nissan Leaf All-Electric Vehicle Testing Reports

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. ...

  18. AVTA: 2013 Ford Focus All-Electric Vehicle Testing Reports

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. ...

  19. AVTA: GE Smart Grid Capable AC Level 2 Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. ...

  20. AVTA: 2013 Ford Fusion Energi PHEV Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. ...

  1. Long-Range Dependence: Now you see it, now Thomas Karagiannis Michalis Faloutsos Rudolf H. Riedi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riedi, Rudolf H.

    to make heavy use of novel concepts such as self-similarity and Long-Range Dependence (LRD). Despite engineering" approach: we observe the results of the estimators on a series of artificial and real sig- nals-range dependence. More specifi- cally, we test the estimators with three different types of data. · Synthetic data

  2. Development and Testing of an UltraBattery-Equipped Honda Civic Hybrid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sally Sun; Tyler Gray; Pattie Hovorka; Jeffrey Wishart; Donald Karner; James Francfort

    2012-08-01

    The UltraBattery Retrofit Project DP1.8 and Carbon Enriched Project C3, performed by ECOtality North America (ECOtality) and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Advanced Lead Acid Battery Consortium (ALABC), are established to demonstrate the suitability of advanced lead battery technology in hybrid electrical vehicles (HEVs). A profile, termed the “Simulated Honda Civic HEV Profile” (SHCHEVP) has been developed in Project DP1.8 in order to provide reproducible laboratory evaluations of different battery types under real-world HEV conditions. The cycle is based on the Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule and Highway Fuel Economy Test cycles and simulates operation of a battery pack in a Honda Civic HEV. One pass through the SHCHEVP takes 2,140 seconds and simulates 17.7 miles of driving. A complete nickel metal hydride (NiMH) battery pack was removed from a Honda Civic HEV and operated under SHCHEVP to validate the profile. The voltage behavior and energy balance of the battery during this operation was virtually the same as that displayed by the battery when in the Honda Civic operating on the dynamometer under the Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule and Highway Fuel Economy Test cycles, thus confirming the efficacy of the simulated profile. An important objective of the project has been to benchmark the performance of the UltraBatteries manufactured by both Furukawa Battery Co., Ltd., Japan (Furakawa) and East Penn Manufacturing Co., Inc. (East Penn). Accordingly, UltraBattery packs from both Furakawa and East Penn have been characterized under a range of conditions. Resistance measurements and capacity tests at various rates show that both battery types are very similar in performance. Both technologies, as well as a standard lead-acid module (included for baseline data), were evaluated under a simple HEV screening test. Both Furakawa and East Penn UltraBattery packs operated for over 32,000 HEV cycles, with minimal loss in performance; whereas the standard lead-acid unit experienced significant degradation after only 6,273 cycles. The high-carbon, ALABC battery manufactured in Project C3 also was tested under the advanced HEV schedule. Its performance was significantly better than the standard lead-acid unit, but was still inferior compared with the UltraBattery. The batteries supplied by Exide as part of the C3 Project performed well under the HEV screening test, especially at high temperatures. The results suggest that higher operating temperatures may improve the performance of lead-acid-based technologies operated under HEV conditions—it is recommended that life studies be conducted on these technologies under such conditions.

  3. Global Cooling: Effect of Urban Albedo on Global Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashem; Menon, Surabi; Rosenfeld, Arthur

    2007-05-22

    In many urban areas, pavements and roofs constitute over 60% of urban surfaces (roof 20-25%, pavements about 40%). The roof and the pavement albedo can be increased by about 0.25 and 0.10, respectively, resulting in a net albedo increase for urban areas of about 0.1. Many studies have demonstrated building cooling-energy savings in excess of 20% upon raising roof reflectivity from an existing 10-20% to about 60%. We estimate U.S. potential savings in excess of $1 billion (B) per year in net annual energy bills. Increasing albedo of urban surfaces can reduce the summertime urban temperature and improve the urban air quality. Increasing the urban albedo has the added benefit of reflecting more of the incoming global solar radiation and countering the effect of global warming. We estimate that increasing albedo of urban areas by 0.1 results in an increase of 3 x 10{sup -4} in Earth albedo. Using a simple global model, the change in air temperature in lowest 1.8 km of the atmosphere is estimated at 0.01K. Modelers predict a warming of about 3K in the next 60 years (0.05K/year). Change of 0.1 in urban albedo will result in 0.01K global cooling, a delay of {approx}0.2 years in global warming. This 0.2 years delay in global warming is equivalent to 10 Gt reduction in CO2 emissions.

  4. Test Comparability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Christine; Shulenburger, David E.

    2010-01-01

    stream_size 3106 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Test Comparability ChangeJuly (2).pdf.txt stream_source_info Test Comparability ChangeJuly (2).pdf.txt Content-Encoding UTF-8 Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8... KU ScholarWorks | http://kuscholarworks.ku.edu Test Comparability 2010 by Christine Keller and David Shulenburger This work has been made available by the University of Kansas Libraries’ Office of Scholarly Communication and Copyright. Please share...

  5. Researcher explores economics of U.S. urban water demand 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2009-01-01

    stream_source_info Researcher explores economics of U.S. urban water demand.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 3811 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Researcher explores economics of U.S. urban water demand....pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Story by Kathy Wythe tx H2O | pg. 24 Researcher explores economics of U.S. urban water demand Photo by: Danielle Supercinski tx H2O | pg. 25 With projected demands for future water supplies...

  6. Sustainable urban development under climate change and resource scarcity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olazabal, Marta

    2015-06-09

    , urban land is estimated to occupy between 0.2 and 2.4 per cent3 Seto et al. 2011 of the earth’s surface ( ) and shelter more than 50 per cent of the world’s population (UN 2011). Half of this urban population is living in cities with less than 500... of resources, security to Cities as hubs of development: Employment generation, centralization of services Rural-urban migration: Cities occupy around 3 % of the Earth’s land, but house ~50% of the world population Rapid urbanisation is exerting...

  7. Impacts of landscape structure on surface urban heat islands: A case study of Shanghai, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jianguo "Jingle"

    Impacts of landscape structure on surface urban heat islands: A case study of Shanghai, China in revised form 6 June 2011 Accepted 9 July 2011 Available online 5 August 2011 Keywords: Urban heat island of the ecological consequences of urbanization is the urban heat island (UHI) effect, which leads to higher

  8. Personal, Public: Using DIY to explore citizen-led efforts in urban computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulos, Eric

    , urban planning, cameras, photography, throwies, public performance, story telling ACM Classification. Such hybrid digital-physical approaches to urban computing are not uncommon. Recent work exists in, among] and urban sensing to aid urban planning at the city level [2]. However, they have traditionally been

  9. How Can China Lighten Up? Urbanization, Industrialization and Energy Demand Scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel T.

    2010-01-01

    urban form development to reduce overall metabolic energy consumption, further aggressive increases in equipment energy efficiency

  10. Water, Neighborhoods and Urban Design: Micro-Utilities and the Fifth Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elmer, Vicki; Fraker, Harrison

    2011-01-01

    Urban Water Management, IWA Publishing, London, (p. McKinsey & Company (2009). Unlocking Energy Efficiency

  11. The role of Urban Upgrading in Latin America as warfare tool against the “Slums Wars”

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semper, Jota

    2012-01-01

    ROZEMA, RALPH. 2008. “Urban DDR-processes: ParamilitariesDemobilization and Reintegration (DDR) with the paramilitary

  12. Carbon storage and sequestration by trees in urban and community areas of the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon storage and sequestration by trees in urban and community areas of the United States David J forestry Tree cover Forest inventory a b s t r a c t Carbon storage and sequestration by urban trees to determine total urban forest carbon storage and annual sequestration by state and nationally. Urban whole

  13. City-wide relationships between green spaces, urban land use and topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queensland, University of

    City-wide relationships between green spaces, urban land use and topography Richard G. Davies in urban form and topography. The total area of buildings and length of the road network are equally strong-cover. Topography. Urban form Urban Ecosyst (2008) 11:269­287 DOI 10.1007/s11252-008-0062-y R. G. Davies :O. Barbosa

  14. Urban sustainability: an inevitable goal of landscape Received: 10 December 2009 / Accepted: 12 December 2009 /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jianguo "Jingle"

    EDITORIAL Urban sustainability: an inevitable goal of landscape research Jianguo Wu Received: 10 sustainability, whereas others regard urban sustainability as an oxymoron. Is urbanization a problem or part of the solution for sustainability? Why is it relevant to landscape ecology? The dualistic nature of urbanization

  15. Effects of restricted recharge in an urban karst system Laura Toran, Kathleen Gross, Youa Yang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toran, Laura

    are not well understood. Case studies have suggested that urbanization can uncover sinkholes and dolines (Green

  16. A Case Study of Participatory Data Transfer for Urban Temperature Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahabi, Cyrus

    A Case Study of Participatory Data Transfer for Urban Temperature Monitoring Houtan Shirani-Mehr1 data transfer with a sample urban sensing application, namely, an urban temperature monitoring: Participatory Data Transfer, Sensor Placement, Aggregator Placement, Urban Temperature Monitoring 1 Introduction

  17. Urban Ecosyst (2006) 9:243257 DOI 10.1007/s11252-006-9354-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jianguo "Jingle"

    2006-01-01

    - or late-spring bloomers, and wind-pollinated plants. Researchers attribute advanced flowering in urban; therefore, many researchers study urbanized areas as small-scale experiments, or models, of global climateUrban Ecosyst (2006) 9:243­257 DOI 10.1007/s11252-006-9354-2 Effects of urbanization on plant

  18. On the Decomposition of Cell Phone Activity Patterns and their Connection with Urban Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markopoulou, Athina

    databases; J.4 [Social and Behavioral Sciences]: So- ciology--Smart Cities, Urban Planning Keywords Mobile

  19. A single-chip real-Time range finder 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sicheng

    2004-09-30

    of global focus currents measured for all 12 rows when testing board2 was put 210cm away with f -stop =1:4. : 119 73 Formation of defocused image on a vertical plane. ::::::::::: 132 xviii FIGURE Page 74 Formation of defocused image on a tilted plane... precision with low cost and excellent speed per- formance in short-to-medium range coverage. Therefore, it is particularly useful for collision avoidance. v To my parents and dear wife vi ACKNOWLEDGMENTS First of all I would like to express my sincere...

  20. Chaos synchronization in long-range coupled map lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Anteneodo; A. M. Batista; R. L. Viana

    2004-01-22

    We investigate the synchronization phenomenon in coupled chaotic map lattices where the couplings decay with distance following a power-law. Depending on the lattice size, the coupling strength and the range of the interactions, complete chaos synchronization may be attained. The synchronization domain in parameter space can be analytically delimited by means of the condition of negativity of the largest transversal Lyapunov exponent. Here we analyze in detail the role of all the system parameters in the ability of the lattice to achieve complete synchronization, testing analytical results with the outcomes of numerical experiments.

  1. A Wide Range Neutron Detector for Space Nuclear Reactor Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nassif, Eduardo; Sismonda, Miguel; Matatagui, Emilio; Pretorius, Stephan

    2007-01-30

    We propose here a versatile and innovative solution for monitoring and controlling a space-based nuclear reactor that is based on technology already proved in ground based reactors. A Wide Range Neutron Detector (WRND) allows for a reduction in the complexity of space based nuclear instrumentation and control systems. A ground model, predecessor of the proposed system, has been installed and is operating at the OPAL (Open Pool Advanced Light Water Research Reactor) in Australia, providing long term functional data. A space compatible Engineering Qualification Model of the WRND has been developed, manufactured and verified satisfactorily by analysis, and is currently under environmental testing.

  2. Test Automation Ant JUnit Test Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousavi, Mohammad

    Test Automation Ant JUnit Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2012 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Ant JUnit Outline Test Automation Ant JUnit Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Ant JUnit Why? Challenges of Manual Testing

  3. Supersymmetric inversion of effective-range expansions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bikashkali Midya; Jérémie Evrard; Sylvain Abramowicz; O. L. Ramírez Suárez; Jean-Marc Sparenberg

    2015-05-26

    A complete and consistent inversion technique is proposed to derive an accurate interaction potential from an effective-range function for a given partial wave in the neutral case. First, the effective-range function is Taylor or Pad\\'e expanded, which allows high precision fitting of the experimental scattering phase shifts with a minimal number of parameters on a large energy range. Second, the corresponding poles of the scattering matrix are extracted in the complex wave-number plane. Third, the interaction potential is constructed with supersymmetric transformations of the radial Schr\\"odinger equation. As an illustration, the method is applied to the experimental phase shifts of the neutron-proton elastic scattering in the $^1S_0$ and $^1D_2$ channels on the $[0-350]$ MeV laboratory energy interval.

  4. Topological phases with long-range interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Zhe-Xuan; Hu, Anzi; Wall, Michael L; Foss-Feig, Michael; Gorshkov, Alexey V

    2015-01-01

    Topological phases of matter are primarily studied in quantum many-body systems with short-range interactions. Whether various topological phases can survive in the presence of long-range interactions, however, is largely unknown. Here we show that a paradigmatic example of a symmetry-protected topological phase, the Haldane phase of an antiferromagnetic spin-1 chain, surprisingly remains intact in the presence of arbitrarily slowly decaying power-law interactions. The influence of long-range interactions on the topological order is largely quantitative, and we expect similar results for more general systems. Our conclusions are based on large-scale matrix-product-state simulations and two complementary effective-field-theory calculations. The striking agreement between the numerical and analytical results rules out finite-size effects. The topological phase considered here should be experimentally observable in a recently developed trapped-ion quantum simulator.

  5. Topological phases with long-range interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhe-Xuan Gong; Mohammad F. Maghrebi; Anzi Hu; Michael L. Wall; Michael Foss-Feig; Alexey V. Gorshkov

    2015-05-12

    Topological phases of matter are primarily studied in quantum many-body systems with short-range interactions. Whether various topological phases can survive in the presence of long-range interactions, however, is largely unknown. Here we show that a paradigmatic example of a symmetry-protected topological phase, the Haldane phase of an antiferromagnetic spin-1 chain, surprisingly remains intact in the presence of arbitrarily slowly decaying power-law interactions. The influence of long-range interactions on the topological order is largely quantitative, and we expect similar results for more general systems. Our conclusions are based on large-scale matrix-product-state simulations and two complementary effective-field-theory calculations. The striking agreement between the numerical and analytical results rules out finite-size effects. The topological phase considered here should be experimentally observable in a recently developed trapped-ion quantum simulator.

  6. Extended range radiation dose-rate monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Valentine, Kenneth H. (Knoxville, TN)

    1988-01-01

    An extended range dose-rate monitor is provided which utilizes the pulse pileup phenomenon that occurs in conventional counting systems to alter the dynamic response of the system to extend the dose-rate counting range. The current pulses from a solid-state detector generated by radiation events are amplified and shaped prior to applying the pulses to the input of a comparator. The comparator generates one logic pulse for each input pulse which exceeds the comparator reference threshold. These pulses are integrated and applied to a meter calibrated to indicate the measured dose-rate in response to the integrator output. A portion of the output signal from the integrator is fed back to vary the comparator reference threshold in proportion to the output count rate to extend the sensitive dynamic detection range by delaying the asymptotic approach of the integrator output toward full scale as measured by the meter.

  7. Construction of a polarization sensitive planar antenna for microwaves in the centimeter range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Construction of a polarization sensitive planar antenna for microwaves in the centimeter range the construction of the actual antenna circuit took place, a number of tests were performed to develop of various techniques. Following these tests, a prototype antenna circuit was constructed and measurements

  8. Safety assessment of outdoor live fire range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1989-05-01

    The following Safety Assessment (SA) pertains to the outdoor live fire range facility (LFR). The purpose of this facility is to supplement the indoor LFR. In particular it provides capacity for exercises that would be inappropriate on the indoor range. This SA examines the risks that are attendant to the training on the outdoor LFR. The outdoor LFR used by EG&G Mound is privately owned. It is identified as the Miami Valley Shooting Grounds. Mondays are leased for the exclusive use of EG&G Mound.

  9. Recent Advances in Test Planning for Modular Testing of Core-Based SOCs1 Vikram Iyengar?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

    . In this paper, we sur- vey recent advances in test planning that address the problems of test access by research groups in industry and academia, as well as a wide range of methodologies for the optimization management of the test resources for core-based SOCs. This involves the design of core test wrappers and TAMs

  10. Edens islands rooms : the project of the urban interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahindroo, Amrita

    2011-01-01

    The privately owned public interior, defined here as an enclosed urban space owned by a private entity, has been a recurrent character of many 20th century liberal cities. It has today found an epitome in the mega-structural ...

  11. AN INVESTIGATION OF REMOTELY SENSED URBAN HEAT ISLAND CLIMATOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Leiqiu

    2014-08-31

    Satellite remotely sensed temperatures are widely used for urban heat island (UHI) studies. However, the abilities of satellite surface and atmospheric data to assess the climatology of UHI face many unknowns and challenges. ...

  12. PPD 227 Urban Planning and Development University of Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine

    PPD 227 Urban Planning and Development University of Southern California Sol Price School of Public; and by appointment Mi Young Kim, Teaching Assistant miyoungk@usc.edu Tuesdays 10-11am; RGL 2nd floor corridor tables

  13. San Antonio/Bexar County, Texas Urban Waters Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    San Antonio/Bexar County, Texas Urban Waters Project 2014 Work Plan Date: Project Location: San............................................................................... Project 2: Olmos Basin/San Antonio Zoo Water Quality and Ecosystem Restoration....... Project 3: Eastside.................................................................................................. Project 4: San Pedro Creek Restoration

  14. Measuring Edinburgh’s Surface Urban Heat Island 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackinnon, Kerr A H

    2013-10-27

    This project investigated Edinburgh’s surface urban heat island (SUHI) in relation to land cover and land use. Thermal channels of Landsat TM, Landsat ETM+ and ASTER imagery captured between 1999 and 2011 provide land surface temperatures (LST...

  15. Countermeasures to Urban Heat Islands: A Global View

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier, Alan

    2006-01-01

    the urban heat island and justify countermeasures. Thus, theand southern Europe. The heat island (and air pollution)that reduce the heat island and cool a city make sense

  16. An urban infill : a residual site in Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savvides, Andreas L. (Andreas Loucas)

    1996-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the treatment of residual sites in the context of the urban environment and in particular with the wounds inflicted by the passage of the Massachusetts Turnpike through the city of Boston. The ...

  17. Urban redevelopment in sunbelt cities : strategies and approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, James A. (James Andrew), 1959-

    1996-01-01

    Most Sunbelt cities reflect the suburbanization that characterized urban growth and development over the past forty years. Given this dispersion, these cities often contain large areas of strategically located land that ...

  18. CUE SRP (2010) Page 1 CENTRE FOR URBAN ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salustri, Filippo A.

    2010-01-01

    CUE SRP (2010) Page 1 CENTRE FOR URBAN ENERGY Student Research Awards Program Application Family agency, please identify the agency in the space provided below. I have read the proposed project

  19. A Simulation-Based Optimization Framework for Urban Transportation Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bierlaire, Michel

    This paper proposes a simulation-based optimization (SO) method that enables the efficient use of complex stochastic urban traffic simulators to address various transportation problems. It presents a metamodel that integrates ...

  20. The engineers and the urban system, 1968-1974/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Alexander Hilton

    2012-01-01

    The social policy agenda of the Great Society was shaped by the recognition that if broad social improvement was to be achieved in urban America, social planning and state intervention based on systemically acquired expertise ...

  1. Athens 1833-1979 : the dynamics of urban growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loukopoulos, Dimitris

    1980-01-01

    His thesis deals with the urban development of the city of Athens since its foundation as the capital of the newborn Greek State (1833) , until our days. The study focuses on two particular characteristics that dominate ...

  2. VELO[city] : rethinking the multi-modal urban station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickson, Amanda, 1974-

    2003-01-01

    Train travel was once integral to the urban condition. Railway stations and rural depots were designed as machines for efficiency and it was within the station that one could escape the chaos of the city to become a part ...

  3. Bazaar [+] : addressing critical adjacencies in Mumbai's urban farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhat, Arjun (Arjun Devadas)

    2008-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the city of Mumbai, and evolves the notion of how "critical adjacency" has been instrumental in guiding the city's urban transformations into modernity. Presently, Mumbai experiences some of the ...

  4. Behavioral ecology of striped skunk: factors influencing urban rabies management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruffino, Denise Marie

    2009-05-15

    within urban areas by using short grass area baiting strategies during the fall season, using dip net capturing for faster surveillance collection, and by initiating a rabies education program targeted at Texas’ primary care physicians and their staff....

  5. Planning by contract? : negotiated regulation in urban development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marantz, Nicholas J

    2014-01-01

    At the turn of the twenty-first century, a new term entered the lexicon of urban redevelopment: the community benefits agreement (CBA). Although the term has been applied to a variety of arrangements, it frequently refers ...

  6. The urbanization of insurgency : shifts in the geography of conflict

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calluzzo, Nicholas T

    2010-01-01

    The 20th century witnessed the steady decline of the ability of states, particularly great powers, to defeat insurgencies. During the same period, the world has become both more populous and more urban. As people have taken ...

  7. Parametric Urban Regulation Models for Predicting Development Performances 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jong Bum

    2014-12-23

    are significant indicators for predicting environmental footprints for the resource managements (Fischer and Guy, 2009; Lang, 1994; Punter, 1997). The prescriptive urban regulations such as FBC are less rigid in limiting density than the conventional zoning...

  8. Rightsizing Shrinking Cities: The Urban Design Dimension [book chapter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Brent D.

    2012-01-01

    Recently urban policy makers have begun to make “rightsizing” a watchword for the perceived mismatch between shrinking city populations, physical and infrastructural plants, and bud gets. Built for a population in some ...

  9. Between external and internal space : an urban transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappelletti Daniele

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this dissertation is to explore the evolution of both architecture and urban space, in terms of mutual relationship between solids and voids, with particular attention to two transitional moments of ancient and ...

  10. Urban oasis : the central market redevelopment of Hong Kong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwok, Sean Zee, 1975-

    2001-01-01

    In the ultra-urban centers of today, "nature" has become a precious resource that often gets sacrificed in the name of progress and development. The presence of nature has become increasingly elusive in the concrete jungle ...

  11. Reconsidering Sustainable Development: Urbanization, Political-Economy, and Deliberative Democracy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roman-Alcalá, Antonio M.M.

    2013-01-01

    247-268. Mollison, B.  Permaculture: A Designer’s Manual.teaching farming and permaculture skills at various urbanBerkeley Undergraduate Journal Permaculture, a set of design

  12. Building Energy Supply Infrastructures and Urban Sustained Development of Shenyang 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, G.; Wang, Y.; Gao, Y.

    2006-01-01

    in the current situation of Shenyang's building energy supply take a back seat to urban sustained development. Recent strategies and suggestions for Shenyang building energy consumption have been presented....

  13. Intensifying urban thresholds : building continuity for New Bedfords's waterfront

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollister, Susan Elizabeth

    1994-01-01

    This thesis explores issues of urban form through an understanding of vernacular traditions in a local context. The exploration consists of looking at the characteristics of a particular place in an attempt to understand ...

  14. Happiness on Tap: Piped Water Adoption in Urban Morocco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devoto, Florencia

    2011-04-01

    We study the demand for household water connections in urban Morocco, and the effect of such connections on household welfare. In the northern city of Tangiers, among homeowners without a private connection to the city’s ...

  15. Adaptation and adaptability : expectant design for resilience in coastal urbanity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruskeepää, Laura A. Delaney (Laura Ashley Delaney)

    2011-01-01

    What is the nature of and possibility for urban resiliency through adaptation? Adaptation implies responsiveness to phenomena that are disruptive to a system's functioning; it is a willful evolution in response to changed ...

  16. Fast shadow detection for urban autonomous driving applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Sooho

    This paper presents shadow detection methods for vision-based autonomous driving in an urban environment. Shadows misclassified as objects create problems in autonomous driving applications. Real-time efficient algorithms ...

  17. Regulated Public Environments: The New Geography of US Urban Poverty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rongerude, Jane

    2006-01-01

    Housing and Urban Development (HUD)’s HOPE VI program as aHOPE VI on August 10, 1992. HUD describes HOPE VI as “theneeds of their residents (HUD website). ” The four main

  18. A National Assessment of the Intrastructure for Urban Wildlife Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Michaela Rene

    2014-08-01

    ecosystems. Universities and state wildlife agencies are the main driving forces for research and management, and it is crucial that these institutions provide support for managing wildlife in urban environments. Universities (n = 73) and state wildlife...

  19. Using design structure matrices to improve decentralization urban transportation systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunn, Travis P

    2005-01-01

    Management of large, complex, urban transportation systems involves numerous stakeholders due to the decentralized ownership and operation of distinct pieces of the physical network. In order to deliver better service to ...

  20. Sustainable urban mobility : exploring the role of the built environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zegras, Pericles Christopher, 1968-

    2005-01-01

    This dissertation examines the concept of sustainable mobility within an urban context. In essence, the research aims to answer the question, "What role does a city's built environment play, if any, in the sustainability ...