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1

Exploration for uranium deposits, Grants mineral belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uranium ore deposits in the Grants mineral belt, New Mexico, occur in fluvial sandstones in the Morrison Formation (Jurassic). Uranium mineralization is concentrated by a dark-gray to black substance that has been identified as humate, which is derived from decaying vegetation. Black ore is truncated by overlying sandstone in at least three ore deposits, documenting an early age for mineralization. Ore deposits in the Grants mineral belt vary greatly in size and shape, tend to occur in clusters, and often present difficult drill targets. Current exploration is largely a matter of drilling in stages to distinguish favorable from unfavorable ground on a wide spacing, to seek mineralization in favorable ground, and to conduct close-spaced drilling in mineralized areas. Criteria for favorability differ among exploration groups but generally include 1) presence of a host sandstone, 2) anomalous mineralization, 3) color of the host rock, 4) presence of carbonaceous matter, and 5) position of the area relative to mineralized trends. A description of the drilling sequence, from ore discovery to the development of a mine at the Johnny M deposit (in the east part of the Ambrosia Lake district), exemplifies the problem of predicting where orebodies may occur. A study of the drill data at the Johnny M indicates the uranium ore is not related to specific geologic features other than humate, which is commonly associated with coalified plant fragments in mudstone-rich parts of the host sandstone.

Fitch, D.C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Geochronologic studies in the Grants mineral belt  

SciTech Connect

Geologic observation coupled with radiometric age dating can be used to assess ages of ore formation and, in some cases, ages of sedimentation in the Grants mineral belt. Rb-Sr studies indicate the earliest mineralization is trend ore at Ambrosia Lake and Smith Lake, dated at 139 +- 9.5 m.y. This date is similar to that for barren-rock montmorillonite from the Jackpile sandstone (Late Jurassic): 142 +- 14 m.y.; it may be used, with caution, to indicate the minimum age of sedimentation for the Morrison Formation. Geologic evidence indicates epigenetic rather than syngenetic ore formation. Barren-rock montmorillonites from Ambrosia Lake yield a poorly defined isochron of 132 +- 26 m.y. Early formed ore at the Jackpile-Paguate mine, Laguna district, was remobilized and reprecipitated at 113 +- 7 m.y. This date is older than the range of dates for the Dakota Formation (Cretaceous) and Mancos Shale. The 113 +- 7 m.y. mid-Cretaceous date for the Jackpile-Paguate ore is consistent with geologic evidence; geologic control suggests that other ore deposits are post-Late Jurassic but pre-Dakota Formation. Based on geologic evidence, mineralization in the Dakota Formation is thought to be very young. Laramide mineralization (60 to 70 m.y.) is evidenced by the presence of some stack ore. At least one uranium deposit, located partly in oxidized ground at the main redox front of the Grants mineral belt, may represent Tertiary mineralization; the clay-mineral Rb-Sr systematics of this deposit have been severely perturbed. Younger mineralization is indicated by U-Pb dates on uranophane (9 to 10 m.y.), and Pleistocene mineralization is noted for some ore. U-Pb dates of U/sup 4 +/ -rich ore minerals cluster between 80 and 100 m.y., although some are as old as 140 to 150 m.y. K-Ar dates on clay minerals range from 49 to 138 m.y. The reasons for this scatter are not known, although loss of radiogenic /sup 40/Ar due to burial is probable.

Brookins, D.G.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Uranium Leasing Program | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Uranium Leasing Program Uranium Leasing Program Abandoned Mine Reclamation, Uravan Mineral Belt, Colorado Abandoned Mine Reclamation, Uravan Mineral Belt, Colorado LM currently...

4

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Uravan Mill Site - CO 02  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Uravan Mill Site - CO 02 Uravan Mill Site - CO 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Uravan Mill Site (CO.02 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Naturita, Colorado, Processing Site Documents Related to Uravan Mill Site Data Validation Package for the July and October 2008 Water Sampling at the Naturita Processing and Disposal Sites Data Validation Report for the July 2009 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Naturita, Colorado, Processing Site; LMS/NAP/S00709; October 2009 2012 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites-Naturita, Colorado,

5

Radioactive mineral occurences of Colorado and bibliography. [2500 citations in bibliography  

SciTech Connect

This two-part report provides an essentially complete listing of radioactive occurrences in Colorado, with a comprehensive bibliography and bibliographic cross-indexes. Part 1 lists approximately 3000 known radioactive occurrences with their locations and brief accounts of the geology, mineralogy, radioactivity, host rock, production data, and source of data for each. The occurrences are classified by host rock and plotted on U.S. Geological Survey 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ topographic quadrangle maps with a special 1 : 100,000-scale base map for the Uravan mineral belt. Part 2 contains the bibliography of approximately 2500 citations on radioactive mineral occurrences in the state, with cross-indexes by county, host rock, and the special categories of ''Front Range,'' ''Colorado Plateau,'' and ''thorium.'' The term ''occurrence'' as used in this report is defined as any site where the concentration of uranium or thorium is at least 0.01% or where the range of radioactivity is greater than twice the background radioactivity. All citations and occurrence data are stored on computer diskettes for easy retrieval, correction, and updating.

Nelson-Moore, J.L.; Collins, D.B.; Hornbaker, A.L.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Uranium Leasing Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

» Uranium Leasing Program » Uranium Leasing Program Uranium Leasing Program Abandoned Mine Reclamation, Uravan Mineral Belt, Colorado Abandoned Mine Reclamation, Uravan Mineral Belt, Colorado LM currently manages the Uranium Leasing Program and continues to administer 31 lease tracts, all located within the Uravan Mineral Belt in southwestern Colorado. Twenty-nine of these lease tracts are actively held under lease and two lease tracts have been placed in inactive status indefinitely. Administrative duties include the ongoing monitoring and oversight of leaseholders' activities and the annual inspection of these lease tracts to identify and correct safety hazards or other environmental compliance issues. Program Summary Current Status The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has extended the public comment

7

Laterally bendable belt conveyor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An endless, laterally flexible and bendable belt conveyor particularly adapted for coal mining applications in facilitating the transport of the extracted coal up- or downslope and around corners in a continuous manner is disclosed. The conveying means includes a flat rubber belt reinforced along the middle portion thereof along which the major portion of the belt tension is directed so as to cause rotation of the tubular shaped belt when trammed around lateral turns thus preventing excessive belt bulging distortion between adjacent belt supports which would inhibit belt transport. Pretension induced into the fabric reinforced flat rubber belt by conventional belt take-up means supports the load conveyed when the belt conveyor is making lateral turns. The carrying and return portions of the belt are supported and formed into a tubular shape by a plurality of shapers positioned along its length. Each shaper is supported from above by a monorail and includes clusters of idler rollers which support the belt. Additional cluster rollers in each shaper permit the belt supporting roller clusters to rotate in response to the belt's operating tension imposed upon the cluster rollers by induced lateral belt friction forces. The freely rotating roller clusters thus permit the belt to twist on lateral curves without damage to itself while precluding escape of the conveyed material by effectively enclosing it in the tube-shaped, inner belt transport length.

Peterson, William J. (Coraopolis, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Reexamining the Cold Conveyor Belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite the popularity of the conveyor-belt model for portraying the airflow through midlatitude cyclones, questions arise as to the path of the cold conveyor belt, the lower-tropospheric airflow poleward of and underneath the warm front. Some ...

David M. Schultz

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Kuiper Belt Occultation Predictions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Here we present observations of 7 large Kuiper Belt Objects. From these observations, we extract a point source catalog with $\\sim0.01"$ precision, and astrometry of our target Kuiper Belt Objects with $0.04-0.08"$ precision within that catalog. We have developed a new technique to predict the future occurrence of stellar occultations by Kuiper Belt Objects. The technique makes use of a maximum likelihood approach which determines the best-fit adjustment to cataloged orbital elements of an object. Using simulations of a theoretical object, we discuss the merits and weaknesses of this technique compared to the commonly adopted ephemeris offset approach. We demonstrate that both methods suffer from separate weaknesses, and thus, together provide a fair assessment of the true uncertainty in a particular prediction. We present occultation predictions made by both methods for the 7 tracked objects, with dates as late as 2015. Finally, we discuss observations of three separate close passages of Quaoar to field star...

Fraser, Wesley C; Trujillo, Chad; Stephens, Andrew W; Kavelaars, JJ; Brown, Michael E; Bianco, Federica B; Boyle, Richard P; Brucker, Melissa J; Hetherington, Nathan; Joner, Michael; Keel, William C; Langill, Phil P; Lister, Tim; McMillan, Russet J; Young, Leslie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

San Juan Montana Thrust Belt WY Thrust Belt Black Warrior  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

San San Juan Montana Thrust Belt WY Thrust Belt Black Warrior Paradox - San Juan NW (2) Uinta- Piceance Paradox - San Juan SE (2) Florida Peninsula Appalachian- NY (1) Appalachian OH-PA (2) Appalachian Eastern PA (3) Appalachian Southern OH (4) Appalachian Eastern WV (5) Appalachian WV-VA (6) Appalachian TN-KY (7) Piceance Greater Green River Eastern OR-WA Ventura Williston Williston NE (2) Williston NW (1) Williston South (3) Eastern Great Basin Ventura West, Central, East Eastern OR-WA Eastern Great Basin Appalachian Denver Florida Peninsula Black Warrior W Y T h ru st B e lt Powder River Paradox- Uinta- Grtr Green River MT Thrust Belt Powder River North (1) Powder River South (2) Denver North (1) Denver South (3) Denver Middle (2) TX CA MT AZ ID NV NM CO IL OR UT KS WY IA NE SD MN ND OK FL WI MO AL WA GA AR LA MI IN PA NY NC MS TN KY VA OH SC

11

Soil Minerals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soil Minerals Soil Minerals Nature Bulletin No. 707 March 2, 1963 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor SOIL MINERALS We all depend upon the land Our food is obtained from plants and animals -- bread and meat, potatoes and fish, fruit and eggs and milk and the rest of it. Our livestock feed on plants and plant products such as grass and grain. Plants, by means of their root systems, take moisture and nutrients from the soils on which they grow. Their food values, for us or for animals that furnish us food, depend upon the available nutrients in those soils. Soils contain solids, water and air. The solids, the bulk of a soil -- except in purely organic types such as peat and muck -- are mostly mineral materials. Ordinarily they also contain some organic material: decayed and decaying remains of plants and animals.

12

SunBelt Biofuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SunBelt Biofuels SunBelt Biofuels Jump to: navigation, search Logo: SunBelt Biofuels Name SunBelt Biofuels Place Soperton, Georgia Zip 30457 Sector Biomass Product Freedom Giant Miscanthus Website http://www.sunbeltbiofuelsllc. Coordinates 32.3771182°, -82.5923554° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.3771182,"lon":-82.5923554,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

13

Corn Belt Power Coop | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Corn Belt Power Coop Corn Belt Power Coop Place Iowa Utility Id 4363 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO Other Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Corn_Belt_Power_Coop&oldid=41053

14

Mineral Wool Production Monitoring Using Neural Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Homogeneity of the primary layer in mineral wool production process is required for high quality products. State-of-the-art measurement techniques for the evaluation of primary layer homogeneity are very slow and can only be applied after the product is manufactured. We present here a method that enables on-line monitoring and control and is based on experimental modeling using neural networks. The experimental method is based on image acquisition and image processing of the mineral wool primary layer structure. As a estimator of the mineral wool primary layer structure and quality, the weight of the primary wool layer is used, measured by an on- line weighting device in four locations of the conveyor belt. The instrumentation of on- line weighting device was upgraded for the purpose of the present experiment and enabled high speed acquisition of all measurement channels. The structure of the mineral wool primary layer was measured by visualization of the modified entrance to the on- line balance using a CCD camera. All data channels were simultaneously sampled. Radial basis neural networks are used for prediction. The structure of the mineral wool primary layer is predicted on the basis of experimentally provided weights data. The learning set consists of weights- images pairs. The prediction of the mineral wool primary layer structure consists of providing only weights. A good agreement between statistical properties of measured and modeled structures of the primary wool layer like spatial homogeneity of the primary mineral wool layer thickness, is shown. The results of the study confirm that the time- delayed vector of weights bears enough information for the monitoring of the production process. The modeling of primary mineral wool structure is of lesser quality due to high dimensionality of the modeled variable.

Marko Ho?evar; Brane irok; Bogdan Blagojevi?

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Numerical Investigations of Kuiper Belt Binaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observations of the Kuiper Belt indicate that a larger than expected percentage of KBO's (approximately 8 out of 500) are in binary pairs. The formation and survival of such objects presents a conundrum [1]. Two competing theories have been postulated to try to solve this problem. One entails the physical collision of bodies [2] while the other utilizes dynamical friction or a third body to dissipate excess momentum and energy from the system [3]. Although in general known binaries tend to differ significantly in mass, such as seen in the Earth-Moon or asteroid binary systems [4], Kuiper binaries discovered to date tend to instead be of similar size [5, 6]. This paper investigates the stability, development and lifetimes for Kuiper Belt binaries by tracking their orbital dynamics and subsequent evolution. Section two details the numerical model while Section three discusses the initial conditions. Finally, in Section four the results are discussed with Section five containing the conclusions.

R. C. Nazzario; T. W. Hyde

2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

16

Urban Decline in Rust-Belt Cities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many Rust-Belt cities have seen almost half their populations move from inside the city borders to the surrounding suburbs and elsewhere since the 1970s. As populations shifted, neighborhoods changedin their average income, educational profi le, and housing prices. But the shift did not happen in every neighborhood at the same rate. Recent research has uncovered some of the patterns characterizing the process. Most major Rust-Belt cities have seen their populations shrink since their heydays, and with that decline, the average income of the remaining residents has fallen as well. Cities such as Buffalo, Cleveland, Detroit, and Pittsburgh have each lost more than 40 percent of their populations over the last four decades. However, the losses have not been uniform across neighborhoods. Some neighborhoods have declined more rapidly than others. The uneven population decline across neighborhoods implies that the distributions of income, house prices, and human capital have also shifted within cities and the larger

Daniel Hartley

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

The Kuiper Belt and Other Debris Disks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the current knowledge of the Solar system, focusing on bodies in the outer regions, on the information they provide concerning Solar system formation, and on the possible relationships that may exist between our system and the debris disks of other stars. Beyond the domains of the Terrestrial and giant planets, the comets in the Kuiper belt and the Oort cloud preserve some of our most pristine materials. The Kuiper belt, in particular, is a collisional dust source and a scientific bridge to the dusty "debris disks" observed around many nearby main-sequence stars. Study of the Solar system provides a level of detail that we cannot discern in the distant disks while observations of the disks may help to set the Solar system in proper context.

Jewitt, David; Lacerda, Pedro

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Corn Belt Energy Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Corn Belt Energy Corporation Corn Belt Energy Corporation Place Illinois Utility Id 4362 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png INDUSTRIAL SUBSTATION RATE ("ISR") Industrial RATE 1 RESIDENTIAL & FARM SERVICE Residential RATE 10 ELECTRIC HEAT FOR RESIDENTIAL & FARM SERVICE Residential RATE 11 RESIDENTIAL & FARM SERVICE - INTERRUPTIBLE Residential RATE 12 RESIDENTIAL ELECTRICALLY HEATED APARTMENTS Residential

19

LABORATORY MODELLING OF THE EARTH RADIATION BELT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Method of the laboratory modelling of the Earth radiation belt is presented. Method can be used for the estimation of consequences of global energetic and communication projects realizations. The radiation belt of the Earth is the inner part of the magnetosphere, in which the geomagnetic field hold charged particles with kinetic energy from 10 KeV to 100 MeV. This belt play the essential role for the sun radiation regime for the Earth and for the electromagnetic waves propagation. As it is well known, even small alteration of solar activity influent essential upon the biological and ecological balance at the Earth for all levels- from viruses and micro-organisms to biological societies and ecological systems at all. The most bright indicator of the solar activity alteration are changes of the pathogenic organisms activity as a result of a displacement of biological equilibrium. But the other phenomena, which are not connected with pathogenic biological objects are very important for thelife on the Earth and ecological balance too, although they can not be so obviously observed.

Dr. Alexander Luchinskiy A; Prof Dr; Yakov S. Shifrin

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Los Alamos provides HOPE for radiation belt storm probes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HOPE for radiation belt storm probes HOPE for radiation belt storm probes Los Alamos provides HOPE for radiation belt storm probes The HOPE analyzer is one of a suite of instruments that was successfully launched as part of the Radiation Belt Storm Probe mission. August 30, 2012 Artist's rendering showing two spacecraft representing the not-yet-designed Radiation Belt Storm Probes that will study the sun and its effects on Earth. PHOTO CREDIT: Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory Artist's rendering showing two spacecraft representing the not-yet-designed Radiation Belt Storm Probes that will study the sun and its effects on Earth. PHOTO CREDIT: Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory Contact James E. Rickman Communications Office (505) 665-9203 Email "Today we are boldly going where no spacecraft ever wants to go."

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uravan mineral belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

New compounds will help coal operators comply with BELT standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

US coal producers will soon have a new set of conveyor belting standards, which are currently proposed as a rulemaking by the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA), to bring higher levels of resistance to propagation of fire by a secondary source. The new test being put into effect is known as a Belt Evaluation Laboratory Test (BELT). The article, submitted by Fenner Dunlop, discusses the company's testing procedures and the development of conveyors to comply with regulations. 2 photos.

NONE

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

22

Mysterious electron stash found hidden among Van Allen belts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

findings, discovered by NASA's Van Allen Probes (formerly known as the Radiation Belt Storm Probes), were outlined Thursday in Science Express and during a press conference at...

23

Magnetic refrigeration apparatus with belt of ferro or paramagnetic material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A magnetic refrigerator operating in the 12 to 77 K range utilizes a belt which carries ferromagnetic or paramagnetic material and which is disposed in a loop which passes through the center of a solenoidal magnet to achieve cooling. The magnetic material carried by the belt, which can be blocks in frames of a linked belt, can be a mixture of substances with different Curie temperatures arranged such that the Curie temperatures progressively increase from one edge of the belt to the other. This magnetic refrigerator can be used to cool and liquefy hydrogen or other fluids.

Barclay, J.A.; Stewart, W.F.; Henke, M.D.; Kalash, K.E.

1986-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

24

Corn Belt Energy Corporation- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Corn Belt Energy Corporation (CBEC), in association with the Wabash Valley Power Association, provides its customers with the "Power Moves" energy efficiency rebate program. Through this program,...

25

WATER ICE IN THE KUIPER BELT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examine a large collection of low-resolution near-infrared spectra of Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs) and centaurs in an attempt to understand the presence of water ice in the Kuiper Belt. We find that water ice on the surface of these objects occurs in three separate manners: (1) Haumea family members uniquely show surfaces of nearly pure water ice, presumably a consequence of the fragmentation of the icy mantle of a larger differentiated proto-Haumea; (2) large objects with absolute magnitudes of H ice-perhaps mixed with ammonia-that appears to be related to possibly ancient cryovolcanism on these large objects; and (3) smaller KBOs and centaurs which are neither Haumea family members nor cold-classical KBOs appear to divide into two families (which we refer to as 'neutral' and 'red'), each of which is a mixture of a common nearly neutral component and either a slightly red or very red component that also includes water ice. A model suggesting that the difference between neutral and red objects due to formation in an early compact solar system either inside or outside, respectively, of the {approx}20 AU methanol evaporation line is supported by the observation that methanol is only detected on the reddest objects, which are those which would be expected to have the most of the methanol containing mixture.

Brown, M. E.; Fraser, W. C. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Schaller, E. L., E-mail: mbrown@caltech.edu [NASA Dryden Aircraft Operations Facility, Palmdale, CA 93550 (United States)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

26

INCLINATION MIXING IN THE CLASSICAL KUIPER BELT  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the long-term evolution of the inclinations of the known classical and resonant Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs). This is partially motivated by the observed bimodal inclination distribution and by the putative physical differences between the low- and high-inclination populations. We find that some classical KBOs undergo large changes in inclination over gigayear timescales, which means that a current member of the low-inclination population may have been in the high-inclination population in the past, and vice versa. The dynamical mechanisms responsible for the time variability of inclinations are predominantly distant encounters with Neptune and chaotic diffusion near the boundaries of mean motion resonances. We reassess the correlations between inclination and physical properties including inclination time variability. We find that the size-inclination and color-inclination correlations are less statistically significant than previously reported (mostly due to the increased size of the data set since previous works with some contribution from inclination variability). The time variability of inclinations does not change the previous finding that binary classical KBOs have lower inclinations than non-binary objects. Our study of resonant objects in the classical Kuiper Belt region includes objects in the 3:2, 7:4, 2:1, and eight higher-order mean motion resonances. We find that these objects (some of which were previously classified as non-resonant) undergo larger changes in inclination compared to the non-resonant population, indicating that their current inclinations are not generally representative of their original inclinations. They are also less stable on gigayear timescales.

Volk, Kathryn; Malhotra, Renu, E-mail: kvolk@lpl.arizona.edu [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

27

Characterization of Minerals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 7, 2013 ... A Minimum Pollution, Low Energy Process for the Recovery of Cobalt and Copper from Complex Sulphide Minerals: Yotamu Hara1; 1Leeds...

28

The Warped Plane of the Classical Kuiper Belt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By numerically integrating the orbits of the giant planets and of test particles for four billion years, we follow the evolution of the location of the midplane of the Kuiper belt. The Classical Kuiper belt conforms to a warped sheet that precesses with a 1.9 Myr period. The present-day location of the Kuiper belt plane can be computed using linear secular perturbation theory: the local normal to the plane is given by the theory's forced inclination vector, which is specific to every semi-major axis. The Kuiper belt plane does not coincide with the invariable plane, but deviates from it by up to a few degrees in stable zones. A Kuiper belt object keeps its free inclination relative to the Kuiper belt plane nearly constant, even while the plane departs from the trajectory predicted by linear theory. The constancy of free inclination simply reflects the undamped amplitude of free oscillation. Current observations of Classical Kuiper belt objects are consistent with the plane being warped by the giant planets al...

Chiang, Eugene

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

HIGH-ALBEDO C-COMPLEX ASTEROIDS IN THE OUTER MAIN BELT: THE NEAR-INFRARED SPECTRA  

SciTech Connect

Primitive, outer-belt asteroids are generally of low albedo, reflecting carbonaceous compositions like those of CI and CM meteorites. However, a few outer-belt asteroids having high albedos are known, suggesting the presence of unusually reflective surface minerals or, conceivably, even exposed water ice. Here, we present near-infrared (1.1-2.5 {mu}m) spectra of four outer-belt C-complex asteroids with albedos {>=}0.1. We find no absorption features characteristic of water ice (near 1.5 and 2.0 {mu}m) in the objects. Intimate mixture models set limits to the water ice by weight {<=}2%. Asteroids (723) Hammonia and (936) Kunigunde are featureless and have (60%-95%) amorphous Mg pyroxenes that might explain the high albedos. Asteroid (1276) Ucclia also shows a featureless reflection spectrum with (50%-60%) amorphous Mg pyroxenes. Asteroid (1576) Fabiola shows a possible weak, broad absorption band (1.5-2.1 {mu}m). The feature can be reproduced by (80%) amorphous Mg pyroxenes or orthopyroxene (crystalline silicate), either of which is likely to cause its high albedo. We discuss the origin of high-albedo components in primitive asteroids.

Kasuga, Toshihiro [Public Relations Center, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Usui, Fumihiko; Hasegawa, Sunao [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara 252-5210 (Japan); Ootsubo, Takafumi [Astronomical Institute, Tohoku University, 6-3 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Kuroda, Daisuke, E-mail: toshi.kasuga@nao.ac.jp [Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 3037-5 Honjo, Kamogata, Asakuchi, Okayama 719-0232 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Warm Conveyor Belts in Idealized Moist Baroclinic Wave Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This idealized modeling study of moist baroclinic waves addresses the formation of moist ascending airstreams, so-called warm conveyor belts (WCBs), their characteristics, and their significance for the downstream flow evolution. Baroclinic wave ...

Sebastian Schemm; Heini Wernli; Lukas Papritz

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

A 15-Year Climatology of Warm Conveyor Belts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents the first climatology of so-called warm conveyor belts (WCBs), strongly ascending moist airstreams in extratropical cyclones that, on the time scale of 2 days, rise from the boundary layer to the upper troposphere. The ...

Sabine Eckhardt; Andreas Stohl; Heini Wernli; Paul James; Caroline Forster; Nicole Spichtinger

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Climatology of Tropical System Rainfall on the Eastern Corn Belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the frequency of greater than 2.54 cm (1 in) daily rainfall totals averaged within a climate division (CD) associated with tropical systems that moved through the Eastern Corn Belt region during the growing season. These ...

Alex Haberlie; Kari Gale; David Changnon; Mike Tannura

33

Corn Belt Energy Coop- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Corn Belt Energy, through the Wabash Valley Power Association, offersbusiness, school, and farm customers a variety of energy efficient rebates and incentives through its "Power Moves" program....

34

Air Temperature Model Evaluation in the North Mediterranean Belt Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comparative assessment of air temperature models, using hourly and daily air temperature measurements in 34 different stations in the north Mediterranean belt, is presented. Four air temperature models were used to estimate hourly and daily ...

Julia Bilbao; Argimiro H. de Miguel; Harry D. Kambezidis

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Minerals Yearbook, 1988. Boron  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

U.S. production and sales of boron minerals and chemicals decreased during the year. Glass-fiber insulation was the largest use for borates, followed by sales to distributors, textile-grade glass fibers, and borosilicate glasses. California was the only domestic source of boron minerals. The report discusses the following: domestic data coverage; legislation and government programs; domestic production; comsumption and uses; prices; foreign trade; world capacity; world review--Argentina, Chile, France, Italy, Turkey, United Kingdom; Technology.

Lyday, P.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

51 - 20360 of 28,560 results. 51 - 20360 of 28,560 results. Article DOE Completes Disposal Operations In Panel 5 of the WIPP Underground CARLSBAD, N.M. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced that disposal operations in Panel 5 of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) underground repository are complete. Last month, the final contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste shipment was emplaced in the panel, which took just over two years to fill. http://energy.gov/em/articles/doe-completes-disposal-operations-panel-5-wipp-underground Page Uranium Leasing Program LM currently manages the Uranium Leasing Program and continues to administer 31 lease tracts, all located within the Uravan Mineral Belt in southwestern Colorado. Twenty-nine of these lease tracts... http://energy.gov/lm/services/property-management/uranium-leasing-program

37

DOE Prepares Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Uranium  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Prepares Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Prepares Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Uranium Leasing Program DOE Prepares Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Uranium Leasing Program January 18, 2012 - 3:13pm Addthis DOE Prepares Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Uranium Leasing Program What does this project do? Goal 4. Optimize the use of land and assets The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management is responsible for administering the DOE Uranium Leasing Program (ULP) and its 31 uranium lease tracts located in the Uravan Mineral Belt of southwestern Colorado. The ULP began in 1948 when Congress authorized the U.S. Atomic Energy Commis-sion (AEC), a predecessor agency of DOE, to withdraw lands from the public domain for the sole purpose of exploring for, developing,

38

Angle stations in or for endless conveyor belts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In an angle station for an endless conveyor belt, there are presented to each incoming run of the belt stationary curved guide members (18, 19) of the shape of a major segment of a right-circular cylinder and having in the part-cylindrical portion (16 or 17) thereof rectangular openings (15) arranged in parallel and helical paths and through which project small freely-rotatable rollers (14), the continuously-changing segments of the curved surfaces of which projecting through said openings (15) are in attitude to change the direction of travel of the belt (13) through 90.degree. during passage of the belt about the part-cylindrical portion (16 or 17) of the guide member (18 or 19). The rectangular openings (15) are arranged with their longer edges lengthwise of the diagonals representing the mean of the helix but with those of a plurality of the rows nearest to each end of the part-cylindrical portion (16 or 17) slightly out of axial symmetry with said diagonals, being slightly inclined in a direction about the intersections (40) of the diagonals of the main portion of the openings, to provide a "toe-in" attitude in relation to the line of run of the endless conveyor belt.

Steel, Alan (Glasgow, GB6)

1987-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

39

Corn Belt Energy Coop - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Corn Belt Energy Coop - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Corn Belt Energy Coop - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Illinois) Corn Belt Energy Coop - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Illinois) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Custom Project: $0.06 per kWh reduced or 50% of project cost, up to $50,000 Program Info State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Air Cooled Unitary Packaged AC/Split Systems: $60 - $75/ton Air Source Heat Pumps: $60 - $75/ton Geothermal Heat Pumps: $60 - $75/ton Packaged Terminal Heat Pump: $50/ton Room A/C: $20 Air Economizer: $150 - $180 Night Covers: $6 Programmable Thermostat: $20 - $25

40

Wheat Belt Public Power Dist | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Belt Public Power Dist Belt Public Power Dist Jump to: navigation, search Name Wheat Belt Public Power Dist Place Nebraska Utility Id 20509 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location WECC/MRO NERC MRO Yes NERC WECC Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png DISTRIBUTION HEAVY INDUSTRIAL (E-2) Commercial GENERAL PURPOSE - LARGE COMMERCIAL Industrial GENERAL PURPOSE - LARGE COMMERCIAL Commercial GENERAL PURPOSE - SMALL Residential GENERAL PURPOSE - SMALL COMMERCIAL Commercial IRRIGATION Multi Phase Commercial LARGE POWER Industrial

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uravan mineral belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

MINERAL COUNTY COMMISSIONERS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Board of Board of MINERAL COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Telephone: 702-945-2446 Fax: 702-945-0706 P.O. Box 4150 Hawthorne, Nevada 89415 JACKIE WALLIS, Chairman GOVERNING BOARD FOR THE TOWNS OF DAN DILLARD, Vice Chairman HAWTHORNE, LUNING AND MINA BOB LYBARGER, Member LIQUOR BOARD GAMING BOARD U.S. Department of Energy Office of General Counsel, GC-52 1000 Independence Ave. S.W. Washington, DC 20585 Dear Sirs: Attached are the comments for modification of the Price-Anderson Act Notice of Inquiry(NOI) provided to the Board of Mineral County Commissioners, in a letter dated January

42

A Stochastic Model for the Angular Momentum Budget of Latitude Belts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The stochastic model of Weickmann et al. for the global angular momentum budget is modified to become applicable to latitude belts. In particular, a Langevin equation is added for the flux divergence of angular momentum in a belt. The friction ...

Joseph Egger

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

CO2 Mineral Sequestration Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequestration Studies Sequestration Studies Introduction, Issues and Plans Philip Goldberg National Energy Technology Laboratory Workshop on CO 2 Sequestration with Minerals August 8, 2001 Mineral Sequestration Program Research effort seeks to refine and validate a promising CO 2 sequestration technology option, mineral sequestration also known as mineral carbonation Goals: * Understand the fundamental mechanisms involved in mineral carbonation * Generate data to support process development * Operate continuous, integrated small-scale process unit to support design Current Partnerships In order to effectively develop Mineral Sequestration, a multi-laboratory Working Group was formed in the Summer of 1998, participants include: * Albany Research Center * Arizona State University * Los Alamos National Laboratory

44

Bioleaching of Minerals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bioleaching is the term used to describe the microbial dissolution of metals from minerals. The commercial bioleaching of metals, particularly those hosted in sulfide minerals, is supported by the technical disciplines of biohydrometallurgy, hydrometallurgy, pyrometallurgy, chemistry, electrochemistry, and chemical engineering. The study of the natural weathering of these same minerals, above and below ground, is also linked to the fields of geomicrobiology and biogeochemistry. Studies of abandoned and disused mines indicate that the alterations of the natural environment due to man's activities leave as remnants microbiological activity that continues the biologically mediated release of metals from the host rock (acid rock drainage; ARD). A significant fraction of the world's copper, gold and uranium is now recovered by exploiting native or introduced microbial communities. While some members of these unique communities have been extensively studied for the past 50 years, our knowledge of the composition of these communities, and the function of the individual species present remains relatively limited. Nevertheless, bioleaching represents a major strategy in mineral resource recovery whose importance will increase as ore reserves decline in quality, become more difficult to process (due to increased depth, increased need for comminution, for example), and as environmental considerations eliminate traditional physical processes such as smelting, which have served the mining industry for hundreds of years.

F. Roberto

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Dotiki saves money and time with power tool and belt fasteners  

SciTech Connect

The use of a Hilti power tool to improve belt splice installations to minimise downtime is described. 3 photos.

Bargo, K.

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

US Minerals Databrowser | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

US Minerals Databrowser AgencyCompany Organization Jonathan Callahan Resource Type Maps Website http:mazamascience.comMiner References US Minerals Databrowser1 The US...

47

Effective Conveyor Belt Inspection for Improved Mining Productivity  

SciTech Connect

This document details progress on the project entitled ''Effective Conveyor Belt Inspection for Improved Mining Productivity'' during the period from November 15, 2004 to May 14, 2004. Highlights include fabrication of an improved LED lightbar, fabrication of a line-scan sensor head for the Smart-Camera based prototype, and development of prototype vulcanized splice detection algorithms.

Chris Fromme

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Effective Conveyor Belt Inspection for Improved Mining Productivity  

SciTech Connect

This document details progress on the project entitled ''Effective Conveyor Belt Inspection for Improved Mining Productivity'' during the period from November 15, 2004 to May 14, 2004. Highlights include fabrication of an improved LED lightbar, fabrication of a line-scan sensor head for the Smart-Camera based prototype, and development of prototype vulcanized splice detection algorithms.

Chris Fromme

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

A HYPOTHESIS FOR THE COLOR DIVERSITY OF THE KUIPER BELT  

SciTech Connect

We propose a chemical and dynamical process to explain the surface colors of the Kuiper belt. In our hypothesis, the initial bulk compositions of the bodies themselves can be quite diverse-as is seen in comets-but the early surface compositions are set by volatile evaporation after the objects are formed. Strong gradients in surface composition, coupled with UV and particle irradiation, lead to the surface colors that are seen today. The objects formed in the inner part of the primordial belt retain only H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} as the major ice species on their surfaces. Irradiation of these species plausibly results in the dark neutrally colored centaurs and Kuiper belt objects (KBOs). Object formed further in the disk retain CH{sub 3}OH, which has been shown to lead to brighter redder surfaces after irradiation, as seen in the brighter redder centaurs and KBOs. Objects formed at the current location of the cold classical Kuiper belt uniquely retain NH{sub 3}, which has been shown to affect irradiation chemistry and could plausibly lead to the unique colors of these objects. We propose observational and experimental tests of this hypothesis.

Brown, M. E.; Fraser, W. C. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Schaller, E. L., E-mail: mbrown@caltech.edu [NASA Dryden Aircraft Operations Facility, Palmdale, CA 93550 (United States)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Crop-Hail Damage in the Midwest Corn Belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crop-hail damage in the ten Midwest corn belt states is examined during the period 195781. Estimates of crop losses due to hail are made from hail insurance data for each state and each significant crop in the region. The crop-hail losses are ...

Harry J. Hillaker Jr.; Paul J. Waite

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Mapping evaporate minerals by ASTER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaporate minerals are important industrial raw materials that have been used in diverse industries for many years. As one of the most extensively used evaporate minerals, gypsum is an important raw material in the construction, agriculture, textile, ...

N. Serkan Oztan; M. Lutfi Suzen

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Mineral Sequestration Utilizing Industrial By-Products, Residues, and Minerals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

J. Fauth and Yee Soong J. Fauth and Yee Soong U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Pittsburgh PA, 15236-0940 Mineral Sequestration Workshop National Energy Technology Laboratory August 8, 2001 Mineral Sequestration Utilizing Industrial By-Products, Residues, and Minerals Mineral Sequestration Workshop, U.S. Department of Energy, NETL, August 8, 2001 Overview * Introduction - Objective - Goals - NETL Facilities * Effect of Solution Chemistry on Carbonation Efficiency - Buffered Solution + NaCl - Buffered Solution + MEA * Effect of Pretreatment on Carbonation Efficiency - Thermal Treatments - Chemical Treatments * Carbonation Reaction with Ultramafic Minerals - Serpentine - Olivine Mineral Sequestration Workshop, U.S. Department of Energy, NETL, August 8, 2001 Overview * Carbonation Reaction with Industrial By-products

53

Hearing protection for miners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A NIOSH analysis showed that at age 50 approximately 90% of coal miners have a hearing impairment, yet noise included hearing loss is 100% preventable. The article discusses requirements of the MSHA regulations, 30 CFR Part 62 - occupational noise exposure (2000) and a 2008-MSHA document describing technologically achievable and promising controls for several types of mining machinery. Hearing protection is still required for exposure to greater than 90 dBA. These are now commercially available ways to determine how much attenuation an individual gets from a given hearing protector, known as 'fit testing'. 3 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab., 1 photo.

Schulz, T. [Sperian Hearing Protection (United States)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

Detection of Small Kuiper Belt Objects by Stellar Occultations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Knowledge of the Kuiper Belt is currently limited to those objects that can be detected directly. Objects with diameters less than $\\sim$10km reflect too little light to be detected. These smaller bodies could contain most of the mass in the Kuiper Belt while the abundance of these bodies may constrain the distribution of mass. The overall size distribution of bodies within the Kuiper Belt can also be inferred from the relative abundances of sub-km and larger bodies. Stellar occultations are already used to study dark objects in the Solar System, such as asteroids or planetary rings. Occultation by a KBO of a size comparable to, or larger than, that of the Fresnel Scale will result in Fresnel diffraction. Detection of diffraction effects requires fast multiple-star photometry, which will be conducted in July 2007 using the Orthogonal Parallel Transfer Imaging Camera (OPTIC) mounted on the University of Hawaii 2.2m telescope on Mauna Kea. This paper details how knowledge of the mass and structure of the outer Solar System may be obtained through the detection of serendipitous stellar occultations.

R. Stevenson

2007-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

55

Detection of Small Kuiper Belt Objects by Stellar Occultations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Knowledge of the Kuiper Belt is currently limited to those objects that can be detected directly. Objects with diameters less than $\\sim$10km reflect too little light to be detected. These smaller bodies could contain most of the mass in the Kuiper Belt while the abundance of these bodies may constrain the distribution of mass. The overall size distribution of bodies within the Kuiper Belt can also be inferred from the relative abundances of sub-km and larger bodies. Stellar occultations are already used to study dark objects in the Solar System, such as asteroids or planetary rings. Occultation by a KBO of a size comparable to, or larger than, that of the Fresnel Scale will result in Fresnel diffraction. Detection of diffraction effects requires fast multiple-star photometry, which will be conducted in July 2007 using the Orthogonal Parallel Transfer Imaging Camera (OPTIC) mounted on the University of Hawaii 2.2m telescope on Mauna Kea. This paper details how knowledge of the mass and structure of the outer ...

Stevenson, R

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Digital field trip to the Central Nevada Thrust Belt  

SciTech Connect

Hydrocarbon exploration in the Central Nevada Thrust Belt is still in its infancy. However, this thrust belt contains all the elements necessary for hydrocarbon accumulations: thick, organically-rich shales; reefs, regional unconformities, karst surfaces, porous sandstones, and extensive and pervasive fractures; anticlines tens of miles long by miles wide; thrust faults that juxtapose potential source and reservoir rocks; and oil seeps. Along a fairway from Las Vegas to Elko, for example, thick Mississippian shales contain 4-6% total organic carbon and are oil-prone and thermally mature. This presentation from a laptop computer and LCD projector is a multimedia version of our October 12-14, 1995 field trip to document the hydrocarbon potential of the thrust belt in Clark, Lincoln, and Nye Counties. Outcrop images were recorded by a digital camera that has a resolution equivalent to a 14 inch computer screen; these images were then downloaded to the computer. All of the images were processed digitally on location to enhance picture quality and color contrast. Many were annotated on location with our observations, measurements, and interpretations. These field annotations are supplemented in this presentation by laboratory analyses. The presentation includes full-color, annotated outcrop images, sounds, and animations. The results show the viability of the new, inexpensive digital cameras to geologic field work in which a multimedia report, ready for presentation to management, can be generated in the field.

Chamberlain, A.K. (Cedar Strat Corp., Hiko, NV (United States)); Hook, S.C. (Texaco E P Technology Department, Houston, TX (United States)); Frost, K.R. (Texaco Exploration and Production, Inc., Houston, TX (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Minerals yearbook: The mineral industry of Mexico. 1988 international review  

SciTech Connect

Mexico is one of the major mineral-producing countries in the world, continuing in 1988 a role that the nation had assumed since the first European settlement of the Western Hemisphere. With respect to nonfuel minerals, Mexico was the world's leading producer of bismuth and silver; was among the top 5 producers of barite, fluorspar, graphite, molybdenum, and strontium; and was among the top 10 producers of antimony, white arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, manganese, mercury, salt, selenium, sulfur, and zinc. In the mineral fuels sector, Mexico was the sixth largest producer of crude oil and ranked eighth in terms of proven oil reserves. In addition, Mexico was the largest foreign supplier of crude oil and cement to the United States. Topics discussed in the report include: Government policies and programs; Production; Trade; Commodity review--Metals, Industrial minerals, and Mineral fuels.

Machamer, J.F.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

NETL Mineral Carbonation Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview Overview Mineral Carbonation Workshop August 8, 2001 Carl O. Bauer, Associate Laboratory Director Descriptor - include initials, /org#/date We Are: * One of DOE's 15 national laboratories * Government owned and operated * Sites in Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia * Over 1,100 federal and support contractor employees * FY01 budget of $774 million July 2001 Descriptor - include initials, /org#/date Sites in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Oklahoma Morgantown, WV Pittsburgh, PA Tulsa, OK Descriptor - include initials, /org#/date Our Mission * Resolve the environmental, supply, and reliability constraints of producing and using fossil resources to provide Americans with a stronger economy, healthier environment, and more secure future * Support development and deployment of environmental technologies that reduce

59

Keck Pencil-Beam Survey for Faint Kuiper Belt Objects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of a pencil-beam survey of the Kuiper Belt using the Keck 10-m telescope. A single 0.01 square degree field is imaged 29 times for a total integration time of 4.8 hr. Combining exposures in software allows the detection of Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) having visual magnitude V < 27.9. Two new KBOs are discovered. One object having V = 25.5 lies at a probable heliocentric distance d = 33 AU. The second object at V = 27.2 is located at d = 44 AU. Both KBOs have diameters of about 50 km, assuming comet-like albedos of 4%. Data from all surveys are pooled to construct the luminosity function from red magnitude R = 20 to 27. The cumulative number of objects per square degree, N (< R), is fitted to a power law of the form log_(10) N = 0.52 (R - 23.5). Differences between power laws reported in the literature are due mainly to which survey data are incorporated, and not to the method of fitting. The luminosity function is consistent with a power-law size distribution for objects having dia...

Chiang, E I

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

A Collisional Family in the Classical Kuiper Belt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dynamical evolution of Classical Kuiper Belt Objects (CKBOs) divides into two parts, according to the secular theory of test particle orbits. The first part is a forced oscillation driven by the planets, while the second part is a free oscillation whose amplitude is determined by the initial orbit of the test particle. We extract the free orbital inclinations and free orbital eccentricities from the osculating elements of 125 known CKBOs. The free inclinations of 32 CKBOs strongly cluster about 2 degrees at orbital semi-major axes between 44 and 45 AU. We propose that these objects comprise a collisional family, the first so identified in the Kuiper Belt. Members of this family are plausibly the fragments of an ancient parent body having a minimum diameter of \\~800 km. This body was disrupted upon colliding with a comparably sized object, and generated ejecta having similar free inclinations. Our candidate family is dynamically akin to the Koronis family of asteroids; both families exhibit a wider range i...

Chiang, E I

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uravan mineral belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

A Collisional Family in the Classical Kuiper Belt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dynamical evolution of Classical Kuiper Belt Objects (CKBOs) divides into two parts, according to the secular theory of test particle orbits. The first part is a forced oscillation driven by the planets, while the second part is a free oscillation whose amplitude is determined by the initial orbit of the test particle. We extract the free orbital inclinations and free orbital eccentricities from the osculating elements of 125 known CKBOs. The free inclinations of 32 CKBOs strongly cluster about 2 degrees at orbital semi-major axes between 44 and 45 AU. We propose that these objects comprise a collisional family, the first so identified in the Kuiper Belt. Members of this family are plausibly the fragments of an ancient parent body having a minimum diameter of \\~800 km. This body was disrupted upon colliding with a comparably sized object, and generated ejecta having similar free inclinations. Our candidate family is dynamically akin to a sub-family of Koronis asteroids located at semi-major axes less than 2.91 AU; both families exhibit a wider range in free eccentricity than in free inclination, implying that the relative velocity between parent and projectile prior to impact lay mostly in the invariable plane of the solar system. We urge more discoveries of new CKBOs to test the reality of our candidate family and physical studies of candidate family members to probe the heretofore unseen interior of a massive, primitive planetesimal.

E. I. Chiang

2002-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

62

Geomorphometric features and tectonic activities in sub-Himalayan thrust belt, Pakistan, from satellite data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sub-Himalayan thrust belt is an active thrust wedge which progresses southward over the north-dipping Indian plate. The north-south compression resulted in severe deformation of sedimentary rocks in this belt. Distinct thrust geometries and topography ... Keywords: DEM, Himayayas, Landsat ETM+, Tectonics, Topography

Lize Chen; Shuhab D. Khan

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Research on Magnetic Signal Extracting and Filtering of Coal Mine Wire Rope Belt Conveyer Defects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of wire rope conveyer belt with high load operating and complex conditions of coal mine, it is prone to cause conveyer belt horizontal rupture. It will bring tremendous hazards for coal mine safe production. Defects of wire rope and joints displacement ...

Qinghua Mao; Hongwei Ma; Xuhui Zhang; Dawei Zhang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

New Directions in Polyvanadate Chemistry:From Cages and Clusters to Baskets, Belts, Bowls, and Barrels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New Directions in Polyvanadate Chemistry:From Cages and Clusters to Baskets, Belts, Bowls recently ex- panded beyond classical cage/cluster structures to include hitherto unknown basket, belt, bowl. Klemperer, T. A. Marquart, 0.M. Yaghi Department of Chemistry and Beckman Insitute for Advanced Science

Yaghi, Omar M.

65

A Tropical "NAT-like" belt observed from space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The optical properties of cold tropical tropopause clouds are examined on a global scale, using two years of space-borne lidar observations from CALIPSO (June 2006 ? May 2008). The linear depolarization ratio, color ratio and backscatter signal are analyzed in tropical clouds colder than 200 K in a way similar to recent studies of Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs). It is found that the three categories of particles encountered in PSC (Ice, Sulfate Ternary Solutions or STS, and Nitric Acid Trihydrate or NAT) do also occur in tropical cold cloud layers. Particles with optical properties similar to NAT are few, but they cover the tropical belt and represent about 20% of cold cloud tropical particles. The optical behavior of these particles requires them to be small, non-spherical, optically thin, and persistent in the TTL at temperatures colder than 200 K; NAT particles and very small ice crystals meet these criteria.

Chepfer, Hlne; 10.1029/2008GL036289

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

On the Plutinos and Twotinos of the Kuiper Belt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We illuminate dynamical properties of Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) in the 3:2 (``Plutino'') and 2:1 (``Twotino'') Neptunian resonances within the model of resonant capture and migration. We analyze a series of numerical integrations, each involving the 4 migratory giant planets and 400 test particles distributed throughout trans-Neptunian space, to measure efficiencies of capture as functions of migration speed. Snapshots of the spatial distribution of resonant KBOs reveal that Twotinos cluster +/- 75 degrees away from Neptune's longitude, while Plutinos cluster +/- 90 degrees away. Longitudinal clustering persists even for surveys that are not volume-limited in their ability to detect resonant KBOs. Remarkably, between -90 degrees and -60 degrees of Neptune's longitude, we find the sky density of Twotinos to nearly equal that of Plutinos, despite the greater average distance of Twotinos. We couple our findings to observations to crudely estimate that the intrinsic Twotino population is within a factor of 3 of ...

Chiang, E I

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

MINERAL: A program for the propagation of analytical uncertainty through mineral formula recalculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MINERAL (MINeral ERror AnaLysis) is a MATLAB^(R) based program that performs mineral formula recalculations and calculates the error on formula unit cations though the propagation of analytical uncertainties. The program is focused on 9 common mineral ... Keywords: Error, Mineral recalculation, Uncertainty

Sarah M. H. De Angelis; Owen K. Neill

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

CRYSTAL CHEMISTRY OF HYDROUS MINERALS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen has long been appreciated for its role in geological processes of the Earth's crust. However, its role in Earth's deep interior has been neglected in most geophysical thinking. Yet it is now believed that most of our planet's hydrogen may be locked up in high pressure phases of hydrous silicate minerals within the Earth's mantle. This rocky interior (approximately 7/8 of Earth's volume) is conjectured to contain 1-2 orders of magnitude more water than the more obvious oceans (the ''hydrosphere'') and atmosphere. This project is aimed at using the capability of neutron scattering from hydrogen to study the crystal chemistry and stability of hydrogen-bearing minerals at high pressures and temperatures. At the most basic level this is a study of the atomic position and hydrogen bond itself. We have conducted experimental runs on hydrous minerals under high pressure and high temperature conditions. The crystallographic structure of hydrous minerals at extreme conditions and its structural stability, and hydrogen bond at high P-T conditions are the fundamental questions to be addressed. The behavior of the hydrous minerals in the deep interior of the Earth has been discussed.

Y. ZHAO; ET AL

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Stationary Barotropic Flow Induced by a Mountain over a Tropical Belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stationary solutions in the presence of bottom topography are computed for a tropical atmospheric belt. A primitive divergent barotropic model is assumed. An iterative time-averaging method proposed by Edelmann (1972b) is used for the purpose of ...

Fredrick H. M. Semazzi

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Late Cretaceous extension in the hinterland of the Sevier thrust belt,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Late Cretaceous extension in the hinterland of the Sevier thrust belt, Late Cretaceous extension in the hinterland of the Sevier thrust belt, northwestern Utah and southern Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Late Cretaceous extension in the hinterland of the Sevier thrust belt, northwestern Utah and southern Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Cover rocks of the Raft River metamorphic core complex, located in the Sevier belt hinterland, preserve a structural and metamorphic history that predates the middle Tertiary extension of the region. In the eastern Raft River Mountains, Cambrian-Permian rocks form two allochthons that occur in the hanging wall of the mid-Miocene Raft River detachment fault. Dramatically attenuated, metamorphosed Cambrian-Pennsylvanian strata

71

The Diurnal Cycle of LandAtmosphere Interactions across Oklahomas Winter Wheat Belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manuscript documents the impact of Oklahomas winter wheat belt (WWB) on the near-surface atmosphere by comparing the diurnal cycle of meteorological conditions within the WWB relative to conditions in adjacent counties before and after the ...

Matthew J. Haugland; Kenneth C. Crawford

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Circulation Regimes of Rainfall Anomalies in the African-South Asian Monsoon Belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study explores the spatial differentiation of climate anomalies and associated circulation mechanisms across the African-South Asian monsoon belt through empirical analyses mainly for the period 194883. Observations include surface ship ...

Uma S. Bhatt

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

The New Horizons Pluto Kuiper belt Mission: An Overview with Historical Context  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NASAs New Horizons (NH) Pluto-Kuiper belt (PKB) mission was launched on 19 January 2006 on a Jupiter Gravity Assist (JGA) trajectory toward the Pluto system for a 14 July 2015 closest approach; Jupiter

S. Alan Stern A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Frequency of Precipitation across the Northern U.S. Corn Belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Knowledge of the frequency of precipitation events can aid in managing water resources, but little is known concerning the regional variability in the frequency of daily precipitation events in the northern U.S. Corn Belt. The frequency ...

B. S. Sharratt; J. Zandlo; G. Spoden

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

VP 100: Brevini Wind Factory Helps Rust Belt Town's Economy | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VP 100: Brevini Wind Factory Helps Rust Belt Town's Economy VP 100: Brevini Wind Factory Helps Rust Belt Town's Economy VP 100: Brevini Wind Factory Helps Rust Belt Town's Economy October 5, 2010 - 10:00am Addthis Brevini Wind is building a 127,000-square foot state-of-the-art factory in Muncie, Ind.| Photo courtesy of Brevini Wind Brevini Wind is building a 127,000-square foot state-of-the-art factory in Muncie, Ind.| Photo courtesy of Brevini Wind Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE What are the key facts? Brevini Wind awarded $12.8 million tax credit to build wind gear box plant Company will tap into manufacturing workforce, creating 450 jobs in next two years Faced with a recession and an auto industry that ran out gas, many manufacturing towns in the Rust Belt have reinvented themselves. Some found

76

High temperature mineral fiber binder  

SciTech Connect

A modified phenol formaldehyde condensate is reacted with boric acid and cured in the presence of a polyfunctional nitrogeneous compound to provide a binder for mineral wool fibers which is particularly suited for thermal insulation products intended for high temperature service.

Miedaner, P.M.

1980-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

77

Water Ice on the Satellite of Kuiper Belt Object 2003 EL61  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have obtained a near infrared spectrum of the brightest satellite of the large Kuiper Belt Object, 2003 EL61. The spectrum has absorption features at 1.5 and 2.0 microns, indicating that water ice is present on the surface. We find that the satellite's absorption lines are much deeper than water ice features typically found on Kuiper Belt Objects. We argue that the unusual spectrum indicates that the satellite was likely formed by impact and not by capture.

K. M Barkume; M. E. Brown; E. L. Schaller

2006-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

78

COLOR DEPENDENCE IN THE SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF MAIN BELT ASTEROIDS REVISITED  

SciTech Connect

The size distribution of the asteroid belt is examined with 16956 main belt asteroids detected in data taken from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey in two filters (g' and r'). The cumulative H (absolute magnitude) distribution is examined in both filters, and both match well to simple power laws down to H = 17, with slopes in rough agreement with those reported the literature. This implies that disruptive collisions between asteroids are gravitationally dominated down to at least this size, and probably sub-kilometer scales. The slopes of these distributions appear shallower in the outer belt than the inner belt, and the g' distributions appear slightly steeper than the r'. The slope shallowing in the outer belt may reflect a real compositional difference: the inner asteroid belt has been suggested to consist mostly of stony and/or metallic S-type asteroids, whereas carbonaceous C-types are thought to be more prevalent further from the Sun. No waves are seen in the size distribution above H = 15. Since waves are expected to be produced at the transition from gravitationally-dominated to internal strength-dominated collisions, their absence here may imply that the transition occurs at sub-kilometer scales, much smaller than the H = 17 (diameter {approx} 1.6 km) cutoff of this study.

August, Tyler M.; Wiegert, Paul A., E-mail: tx_august@laurentian.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

79

A tropical NAT-like belt observed from space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The optical properties of cold tropical tropopause clouds are examined on a global scale, using two years of space-borne lidar observations from CALIPSO (June 2006- May 2008). The linear depolarization ratio, color ratio and backscatter signal are analyzed in tropical clouds colder than 200 K in a way similar to recent studies of Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs). It is found that the three categories of particles encountered in PSC (Ice, Sulfate Ternary Solutions or STS, and Nitric Acid Trihydrate or NAT) do also occur in tropical cold cloud layers. Particles with optical properties similar to NAT are few, but they cover the hal-00439695, version 1- 8 Dec 2009 tropical belt and represent about 20 % of cold cloud tropical particles all year long. The optical behavior of these particles requires them to be very small, non-spherical, optically thin, and persistent in the TTL at temperatures colder than 200 K; NAT particles and very small ice crystals meet these criteria and are right now the best candidates to explain the presented observations. 2

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Mineral Transformation and Biomass Accumulation Associated With  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mineral Transformation and Biomass Accumulation Associated With Uranium Bioremediation at Rifle transformation and biomass accumulation, both of which can alter the flow field and potentially bioremediation to understand the biogeochemical processes and to quantify the biomass and mineral transformation/ accumulation

Hubbard, Susan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uravan mineral belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Independent Mineral Processing Project Technical Due Diligence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Independent Mineral Processing Project Technical Due Diligence ... CRIMM Energy-saving Magnetic Separation Equipment and Industrial...

82

Quarterly minerals outlook, June 1983  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An overview is presented of the mineral industry of Wyoming. Petroleum production shows a slight annual decline. Many producers have been shutting in their natural gas wells due to the sharp decline in demand. Activities in the base, precious, and ferrous metals industry are summarized. Uranium and trona production is down from the previous year. Other minerals mentioned are gypsum, limestone, bentonite, and phosphorus. Production of coal is given by county. Electric utilities have not used all the coal they bought last year, and construction of several power plants have been delayed indefinitely. Underground coal gasification projects are mentioned. Tables present production forecasts for coal to 1990, for oil and gas to 1988, and for uranium and trona to 1987. 5 tables.

Glass, G.B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Wyoming mineral development monitoring system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The monitoring system covers, or will cover, all segments of the mineral industry except oil and gas exploration under one of eight main sections: coal uranium, bentonite, power plants, refineries, gas plants, synthetic fuels, trona, and others. Projects are grouped alphabetically by county and indexed by county, commodity, and company. Index maps all the location of projects within the state. A notebook format allows easy updating of information on ownership, production, numbers of employees, contracts, etc.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Accuracy in quantitative phase analysis of complex mineral ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Soil formed on a parent material rich in ferromagnesian minerals and amorphous soil minerals Petroleum shale Nickel laterite Bauxite ...

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

85

Minerals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Title, Author, Publisher, Product Type, In Stock, Date Published. Add to Cart, Image, Click on Title to view details, Member (Student) Price, Non-member Price.

86

Simulation of dynamics of radiation belt electrons during geomagnetic storms driven by high speed solar wind streams.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Satellite observations have shown that fluxes of relativistic electrons in the earth's radiation belts can vary by orders of magnitude during periods of high solar (more)

Yu, Bin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Mineral Separation Techniques in Gold Recovery from Refractory Ores  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Au-Rich Volcanogenic Massive Sulphide Deposits of the Flin Flon Belt, Manitoba and Saskatchewan Banro Corporation: Investing in Long-Term Community...

88

STIS Coronagraphic Imaging of Fomalhaut: Main Belt Structure and the Orbit of Fomalhaut b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present new optical coronagraphic data of the bright star Fomalhaut obtained with the HST in 2010/2012 using STIS. Fomalhaut b is recovered at both epochs to high significance. The observations include the discoveries of tenuous nebulosity beyond the main dust belt detected to at least 209 AU projected radius and a ~50 AU wide azimuthal gap in the belt northward of Fom b. The morphology of Fomalhaut b appears elliptical in the STIS detections. We show that residual noise in the processed data can plausibly result in point sources appearing extended. A MCMC analysis demonstrates that the orbit of Fom b is highly eccentric, with e=0.8+/-0.1, a=177+/-68 AU, and q = 32+/-24 AU. Fom b is apsidally aligned with the belt and 90% of allowed orbits have mutual inclination 36 deg or less. Fomalhaut b's orbit is belt-crossing in projection, but only 12% of possible orbits have nodes within a 25 AU wide belt annulus (133-158 AU). The high e invokes a dynamical history where Fom b may have experienced a significant dyn...

Kalas, Paul; Fitzgerald, Michael P; Clampin, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

THE SURFACE COMPOSITION OF LARGE KUIPER BELT OBJECT 2007 OR10  

SciTech Connect

We present photometry and spectra of the large Kuiper belt object 2007 OR10. The data show significant near-infrared absorption features due to water ice. While most objects in the Kuiper belt with water ice absorption this prominent have the optically neutral colors of water ice, 2007 OR10 is among the reddest Kuiper belt objects known. One other large Kuiper belt object-Quaoar-has similar red coloring and water ice absorption, and it is hypothesized that the red coloration of this object is due to irradiation of the small amounts of methane able to be retained on Quaoar. 2007 OR10, though warmer than Quaoar, is in a similar volatile retention regime because it is sufficiently larger that its stronger gravity can still retain methane. We propose, therefore, that the red coloration on 2007 OR10 is also caused by the retention of small amounts of methane. Positive detection of methane on 2007 OR10 will require spectra with higher signal to noise. Models for volatile retention on Kuiper belt objects appear to continue to do an excellent job reproducing all of the available observations.

Brown, M. E.; Fraser, W. C. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Burgasser, A. J., E-mail: aburgasser@ucsd.edu [Center for Astrophysics and Space Science, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

90

Lightning-induced coupling of the radiation belts to geomagnetically conjugate ionospheric regions  

SciTech Connect

Very low frequency (VLF) radio observations in Antarctica and North America provide the first evidence that bursts of energetic electrons from the earth's radiation belts commonly precipitate into geomagnetically conjugate ionospheric regions in response to lightning. The electrons, with energies ranging from tens of keV to over one MeV, appear to be scattered out of their otherwise stable trap in the earth's magnetic field by magnetospheric interactions with a regularly observed class of transient, lightning-generated VLF radio waves known as ducted whistlers. The precipitating electrons ionize atmospheric molecules at altitudes between 40 and 90 km, creating transient enhancements of ionization levels in conjugate locations. These ionospheric disturbances can be detected by their characteristic perturbations, sometimes called 'Trimpi events,' of the amplitude and phase of VLF transmitter signals propagating subionospherically within 200 to 250 km of the disturbed areas. The first detailed, one-to-one comparison of such signal perturbations, monitored in conjugate regions, with the multipath structure, arrival azimuths, and predicted electron scattering of simultaneously observed ducted whistlers suggests that every ducted whistler precipitates bursts of radiation belt electrons. If so, the estimated rate at which ducted whistlers contribute to radiation belt losses is comparable to that predicted for plasmaspheric hiss, a different class of magnetospheric wave that is often considered to control the structure of the belts. Lightning could therefore play a significant role in the maintenance of radiation belt equilibrium.

Burgess, W.C.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

NEP for a Kuiper Belt Object Rendezvous Mission  

SciTech Connect

Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) are a recently-discovered set of solar system bodies which lie at about the orbit of Pluto (40 AU) out to about 100 astronomical units (AU). There are estimated to be about 100,000 KBOS with a diameter greater than 100 km. KBOS are postulated to be composed of the pristine material which formed our solar system and may even have organic materials in them. A detailed study of KBO size, orbit distribution, structure, and surface composition could shed light on the origins of the solar system and perhaps even on the origin of life in our solar system. A rendezvous mission including a lander would be needed to perform chemical analysis of the surface and sub-surface composition of KBOS. These requirements set the size of the science probe at around a ton. Mission analyses show that a fission-powered system with an electric thruster could rendezvous at 40 AU in about 13.0 years with a total {Delta}V of 46 krnk. It would deliver a 1000-kg science payload while providing ample onboard power for relaying data back to earth. The launch mass of the entire system (power, thrusters, propellant, navigation, communication, structure, science payload, etc.) would be 7984 kg if it were placed into an earth-escape trajectory (C=O). Alternatively, the system could be placed into a 700-km earth orbit with more propellant,yielding a total mass in LEO of 8618 kg, and then spiral out of earth orbit to arrive at the KBO in 14.3 years. To achieve this performance, a fission power system with 100 kW of electrical power and a total mass (reactor, shield, conversion, and radiator) of about 2350 kg. Three possible configurations are proposed: (1) a UZrH-fueled, NaK-cooled reactor with a steam Rankine conversion system, (2) a UN-fueled gas-cooled reactor with a recuperated Brayton conversion system, and (3) a UN-fueled heatpipe-cooled reactor with a recuperated Brayton conversion system. (Boiling and condensation in the Rankine system is a technical risk at present.) All three of these systems have the potential to meet the weight requirement for the trip and to be built in the near term.

HOUTS,MICHAEL G.; LENARD,ROGER X.; LIPINSKI,RONALD J.; PATTON,BRUCE; POSTON,DAVID I.; WRIGHT,STEVEN A.

1999-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

92

A RESOLVED MILLIMETER EMISSION BELT IN THE AU Mic DEBRIS DISK  

SciTech Connect

We present imaging observations at 1.3 mm of the debris disk surrounding the nearby M-type flare star AU Mic with beam size 3'' (30 AU) from the Submillimeter Array. These data reveal a belt of thermal dust emission surrounding the star with the same edge-on geometry as the more extended scattered light disk detected at optical wavelengths. Simple modeling indicates a central radius of {approx}35 AU for the emission belt. This location is consistent with the reservoir of planetesimals previously invoked to explain the shape of the scattered light surface brightness profile through size-dependent dust dynamics. The identification of this belt further strengthens the kinship between the debris disks around AU Mic and its more massive sister star {beta} Pic, members of the same {approx}10 Myr old moving group.

Wilner, David J.; Andrews, Sean M.; MacGregor, Meredith A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Meredith Hughes, A. [Department of Astronomy, 601 Campbell Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

93

Kuiper Belt Object Occultations: Expected Rates, False Positives, and Survey Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A novel method of generating artificial scintillation noise is developed and used to evaluate occultation rates and false positive rates for surveys probing the Kuiper Belt with the method of serendipitous stellar occultations. A thorough examination of survey design shows that: (1) diffraction-dominated occultations are critically (Nyquist) sampled at a rate of 2 Fsu^{-1}, corresponding to 40 s^{-1} for objects at 40 AU, (2) occultation detection rates are maximized when targets are observed at solar opposition, (3) Main Belt Asteroids will produce occultations lightcurves identical to those of Kuiper Belt Objects if target stars are observed at solar elongations of: 116 deg 7-8 sigma should be adopted to ensure that viable candidate events can be disentangled from false positives.

Bickerton, Steven; Kavelaars, JJ

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

EXPLORATION OF THE KUIPER BELT BY HIGH-PRECISION PHOTOMETRIC STELLAR OCCULTATIONS: FIRST RESULTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report here the first detection of hectometer-size objects by the method of serendipitous stellar occultation. This method consists of recording the diffraction shadow created when an object crosses the observers line of sight and occults the disk of a background star. One of our detections is most consistent with an object between Saturn and Uranus. The two other diffraction patterns detected are caused by Kuiper Belt objects beyond 100 AU from the Sun and hence are the farthest known objects in the solar system. These detections show that the Kuiper Belt is much more extended than previously believed and that the outer part of the disk could be composed of smaller objects than the inner part. This gives critical clues to understanding the problem of the formation of the outer planets of the solar system. Key words: Kuiper Belt occultations solar system: formation 1.

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Gravity survey of the southwestern part of the sourthern Utah geothermal belt  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A gravity survey covering an area of 6200 km/sup 2/ was made over the southwestern part of the southern Utah geothermal belt. The objective of the gravity survey is to delineate the geologic structures and assist in the understanding of the geothermal potential of the area. A total of 726 new gravity stations together with 205 existing gravity stations, are reduced to give: (1) a complete Bouguer gravity anomaly map, and (2) a fourth-order residual gravity anomaly map; both maps have a 2-mgal contour interval. The complete Bouguer gravity anomaly map shows an east-trending regional gravity belt with a total relief of about 70 mgal which crosses the central portion of the survey area. The gravity belt is attributed to a crustal lateral density variation of 0.1 gm/cc from a depth of 5 to 15 km.

Green, R.T.; Cook, K.L.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

KUIPER BELT OBJECT OCCULTATIONS: EXPECTED RATES, FALSE POSITIVES, AND SURVEY DESIGN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel method of generating artificial scintillation noise is developed and used to evaluate occultation rates and false positive rates for surveys probing the Kuiper Belt with the method of serendipitous stellar occultations. A thorough examination of survey design shows that (1) diffraction-dominated occultations are critically (Nyquist) sampled at a rate of 2 Fsu{sup -1}, corresponding to 40 s{sup -1} for objects at 40 AU, (2) occultation detection rates are maximized when targets are observed at solar opposition, (3) Main Belt asteroids will produce occultations light curves identical to those of Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) if target stars are observed at solar elongations of: 116{sup 0} {approx}7-8{sigma} should be adopted to ensure that viable candidate events can be disentangled from false positives.

Bickerton, S. J. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Welch, D. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada); Kavelaars, J. J. [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada)], E-mail: bick@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: welch@physics.mcmaster.ca, E-mail: JJ.Kavelaars@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

97

Mining and minerals policy: 1976 bicentennial edition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report is organized into three basic parts. The first part, the Executive Summary, provides a brief description of the major topics and lists the issues and recommendations. The report then is divided into two sections. Section I, Summary, is comprised of three chapters: Increased Energy Security; Metals and Nonmetallic Minerals; and Trends and Events. Section II, Issues in Energy and Minerals Policy, is comprised of seven chapters: Federal Leasing; The Federal Role in Reducing the Fiscal Impacts of Energy Development; Availability of Federal Lands for Mineral Exploration and Development; Environmental Issues and the Mineral Industry; Developments in International Minerals Trade and Investment; Ocean Mining; and The Development of New Tools for Energy and Minerals Policy Analysis. (MCW)

Not Available

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Planck intermediate results. XII: Diffuse Galactic components in the Gould Belt System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We perform an analysis of the diffuse low-frequency Galactic components in the Southern part of the Gould Belt system ($130^\\circ\\leq l\\leq 230^\\circ$ and $-50^\\circ\\leq b\\leq -10^\\circ$). Strong UV flux coming from the Gould Belt super-association is responsible for bright diffuse foregrounds that we observe from our position inside the system and that can help us improve our knowledge of the Galactic emission. Free-free emission and anomalous microwave emission (AME) are the dominant components at low frequencies ($\

Ade, P A R; Alves, M I R; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Battaner, E; Bedini, L; Benabed, K; Benot, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bonaldi, A; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Chen, X; Chiang, L -Y; Christensen, P R; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Coulais, A; Cuttaia, F; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dobler, G; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Dor, O; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Enlin, T A; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Gnova-Santos, R T; Ghosh, T; Giard, M; Giardino, G; Giraud-Hraud, Y; Gonzlez-Nuevo, J; Grski, K M; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Harrison, D; Hernndez-Monteagudo, C; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Jaffe, T R; Jaffe, A H; Juvela, M; Keihnen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lhteenmki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lawrence, C R; Leach, S; Leonardi, R; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vrnle, M; Lubin, P M; Macas-Prez, J F; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marshall, D J; Martin, P G; Martnez-Gonzlez, E; Masi, S; Massardi, M; Matarrese, S; Mazzotta, P; Melchiorri, A; Mennella, A; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschnes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Nrgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Osborne, S; Oxborrow, C A; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Peel, M; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reach, W T; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rubio-Martn, J A; Rusholme, B; Salerno, E; Sandri, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Spencer, L; Stolyarov, V; Sudiwala, R; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Tibbs, C T; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Valenziano, L; Van Tent, B; Varis, J; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Ysard, N; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

MILLIMETER IMAGING OF THE {beta} PICTORIS DEBRIS DISK: EVIDENCE FOR A PLANETESIMAL BELT  

SciTech Connect

We present observations at 1.3 mm wavelength of the {beta} Pictoris debris disk with beam size 4.''3 x 2.''6 (83 x 50 AU) from the Submillimeter Array. The emission shows two peaks separated by {approx}7'' along the disk plane, which we interpret as a highly inclined dust ring or belt. A simple model constrains the belt center to 94 {+-} 8 AU, close to the prominent break in slope of the optical scattered light. We identify this region as the location of the main reservoir of dust-producing planetesimals in the disk.

Wilner, David J.; Andrews, Sean M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hughes, A. Meredith [Department of Astronomy, 601 Campbell Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Critical Minerals Policy Act (S. 1113)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 23, 2012 ... surveys and production to research and recycling and, in particular, to see that additional critical mineral supplies can ... Exploration. Strategic...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uravan mineral belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Roadmap to the Project: Uranium Miners Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

suggested revisions of criteria for the compensation of lung cancer among underground uranium miners from the eligible regions of the U.S. Radioactive radon (more specifically...

102

Introducing International Minerals Innovation Institute of Saskatchewan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cross Pollination between Industry and Engineering Programs/Students in Manitoba Improving the Health & Performance of Miners Working at Moderate to

103

Mineral Processing Technology DevelopmentChallenges and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cross Pollination between Industry and Engineering Programs/Students in Manitoba Improving the Health & Performance of Miners Working at Moderate to

104

World Economics of Selected Industrial Minerals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jan 1, 1971 ... It is a very interesting field, different in many respects from metals and certainly far different from petroleum. The minerals chosen are celestite,...

105

Multiphase Sequestration Geochemistry: Model for Mineral Carbonation  

SciTech Connect

Carbonation of formation minerals converts low viscosity supercritical CO2 injected into deep saline reservoirs for geologic sequestration into an immobile form. Until recently the scientific focus of mineralization reactions with reservoir rocks has been those that follow an aqueous-mediated dissolution/precipitation mechanism, driven by the sharp reduction in pH that occurs with CO2 partitioning into the aqueous phase. For sedimentary basin formations the kinetics of aqueous-mediated dissolution/precipitation reactions are sufficiently slow to make the role of mineralization trapping insignificant over a century period. For basaltic saline formations aqueous-phase mineralization progresses at a substantially higher rate, making the role of mineralization trapping significant, if not dominant, over a century period. The overlooked mineralization reactions for both sedimentary and basaltic saline formations, however, are those that occur in liquid or supercritical CO2 phase; where, dissolved water appears to play a catalyst role in the formation of carbonate minerals. A model is proposed in this paper that describes mineral carbonation over sequestration reservoir conditions ranging from dissolved CO2 in aqueous brine to dissolved water in supercritical CO2. The model theory is based on a review of recent experiments directed at understanding the role of water in mineral carbonation reactions of interest in geologic sequestration systems occurring under low water contents.

White, Mark D.; McGrail, B. Peter; Schaef, Herbert T.; Hu, Jian Z.; Hoyt, David W.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Wurstner, Signe K.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Carbon Dioxide Sequestration: Aqueous Mineral Carbonation Studies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

appears independent of test time * Agitation phenomena (?) Solid product passes EPA TCLP Pittsburgh, PA, August 8, 2001 National Energy Technology Laboratory: Mineral...

107

Minerals yearbook: Mineral industries of Africa. Volume 3. 1992 international review  

SciTech Connect

The 53 countries that constituted Africa in 1992 accounted for a significant portion of total world output of a number of mineral commodities. Among the most significant mineral commodities produced in Africa were andalusite, antimony, asbestos, bauxite, chromite, coal, cobalt, copper, diamond, fluorspar, gold, lithium minerals, manganese, phosphate, platinum-group metals, the titanium minerals-ilmenite and rutile, vanadium, vermiculite, uranium, and zircon. Chromite, cobalt, and manganese, were not mined in the Untied States.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

AN ASTEROID BELT INTERPRETATION FOR THE TIMING VARIATIONS OF THE MILLISECOND PULSAR B1937+21  

SciTech Connect

Pulsar timing observations have revealed companions to neutron stars that include other neutron stars, white dwarfs, main-sequence stars, and planets. We demonstrate that the correlated and apparently stochastic residual times of arrival from the millisecond pulsar B1937+21 are consistent with the signature of an asteroid belt having a total mass {approx}< 0.05 M{sub Circled-Plus }. Unlike the solar system's asteroid belt, the best fit pulsar asteroid belt extends over a wide range of radii, consistent with the absence of any shepherding companions. We suggest that any pulsar that has undergone accretion-driven spin-up and subsequently evaporated its companion may harbor orbiting asteroid mass objects. The resulting timing variations may fundamentally limit the timing precision of some of the other millisecond pulsars. Observational tests of the asteroid belt model include identifying periodicities from individual asteroids, which are difficult; testing for statistical stationarity, which becomes possible when observations are conducted over a longer observing span; and searching for reflected radio emission.

Shannon, R. M.; Cordes, J. M. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)] [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Metcalfe, T. S. [Space Science Institute, 4750 Walnut Street Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)] [Space Science Institute, 4750 Walnut Street Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Lazio, T. J. W. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, M/S 138-308, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)] [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, M/S 138-308, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Cognard, I.; Desvignes, G.; Theureau, G. [LPC2E/CNRS-Universite d'Orleans, Orleans, F-45071, Cedex 2 (France)] [LPC2E/CNRS-Universite d'Orleans, Orleans, F-45071, Cedex 2 (France); Janssen, G. H.; Purver, M. B.; Stappers, B. W. [University of Manchester and Jodrell Bank Observatory, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)] [University of Manchester and Jodrell Bank Observatory, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Jessner, A.; Kramer, M.; Lazaridis, K., E-mail: ryan.shannon@csiro.au, E-mail: cordes@astro.cornell.edu [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastonomie, Bonn, D-53121 (Germany)

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

109

The Impact of Oklahoma's Winter Wheat Belt on the Mesoscale Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oklahoma Mesonet data were used to measure the impact of Oklahoma's winter wheat belt on the mesoscale environment from 1994 to 2001. Statistical analyses of monthly means of near-surface air temperatures demonstrated that 1) a well-defined cool ...

Renee A. McPherson; David J. Stensrud; Kenneth C. Crawford

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Streamer Belt Structure at Solar Minima John D. Richardson and Karolen I. Paularen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, formin hocks, which modify the solar wind flow and transfer kinetic energy into thermal energy, m heatingStreamer Belt Structure at Solar Minima a C John D. Richardson and Karolen I. Paularen enter from IMP 8 and Voyager 2 demonstrating the character o he current (1996) solar minimum and compare

Richardson, John

111

Young close-by neutron stars: the Gould Belt vs. the Galacic disc  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and in the Belt and have been estimated from available SN progenitors counts (Tammann et al., 1994 and Grenier formation in . 1 kpc around the Sun. Originally this idea has been suggested by Grenier (2000) and Gehrels their cooling model to our disposal. SP thanks Isabelle Grenier for discus- sions. The work of MP and SP

Popov, Sergei

112

Precipitation of relativistic electrons of the Van Allen belts into the proton aurora  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Van Allen electron belts consist of two regions encircling the earth in which relativistic electrons are trapped in the earth's magnetic field. Populations of relativistic electrons in the Van Allen belts vary greatly with geomagnetic disturbance and they are a major source of damage to space vehicles. In order to know when and by how much these populations of relativistic electrons increase, it is important to elucidate not only the cause of acceleration of relativistic electrons but also the cause of their loss from the Van Allen belts. Here we show the first evidence that left-hand polarized electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) plasma waves can cause the loss of relativistic electrons into the atmosphere, on the basis of results of an excellent set of ground and satellite observations showing coincident precipitation of ions with energies of tens of keV and of relativistic electrons into an isolated proton aurora. The proton aurora was produced by precipitation of ions with energies of tens of keV due to EMIC waves near the plasma pause, which is a manifestation of wave-particle interactions. These observations clarify that ions with energies of tens of keV affect the evolution of relativistic electrons in the Van Allen belts via parasitic resonance with EMIC waves, an effect that was first theoretically predicted in the early 1970's.

Jordanova, Vania K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miyoshi, Y [NAGOYA UNIV; Sakaguchi, K [NAGOYA UNIV; Shiokawa, K [NAGOYA UNIV; Evans, D S [SEC/NOAA; Albert, Jay [AFRL; Connors, M [UNIV OF ATHABASCA

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

High-temperature deformation in the Neoproterozoic transpressional Ribeira belt, southeast Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-temperature deformation in the Neoproterozoic transpressional Ribeira belt, southeast Brazil^ncias da Universidade de Sa~o Paulo, Rua do Lago 562, Cep: 05508-080, Sa~o Paulo, SP, Brazil b Laboratoire Geologia, Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto, 35400-000, Ouro Pre^to, MG, Brazil Received 5 April 2001

Bascou, Jérôme

114

Factors controlling the evolution of the Perdido Fold Belt, northwestern Gulf of Mexico, determined  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Factors controlling the evolution of the Perdido Fold Belt, northwestern Gulf of Mexico, determined) is a prominent salt- cored deep water structure in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. It is characterized of the Gulf of Mexico show that toe-of-slope folding is a viable mechanism to develop diapirs in the deep salt

Beaumont, Christopher

115

Reconnaissance geological and mineral resource map of northern Sierra Madre Occidental, Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The northern Sierra Madre Occidental (SMO) map (scale 1:500,000) comprises 305,000 km/sup 2/ in the states of Chihuahau and Sonora. The centrally-located plateau section is divided into an upper, predominantly rhyolitic sequence, overlying an andesite-rich interval, directly correlatable with Tertiary volcanic units in central and southern SMO, respectively (Clark, 1983; 1984). Precambrian rocks occur in both flanks of SMO, either in the subsurface or surface exposures. They are succeeded by Early and Late Paleozoic sedimentary strata in Sonora and by a more discontinuous sequence in western Chihuahua. Mesozoic strata are dominated by Cretaceous carbonate sequences in central Chihuahua, and by late Triassic - Early Jurassic continental and Jurassic magmatic arc deposits in Sonora. Late Mesozoic - Early Cenozoic batholiths were emplaced in numerous localities in Sonora, whereas only isolated granitoid stocks are exposed in Chihuahua. Widespread lavas of basaltic composition are Late Tertiary to Quaternary in age. Late Cenozoic unconsolidated clastic deposits fill basins and constitute the coastal plain on the west. The main mineralizing epoch occurred in Late Cretaceous - Early Tertiary time, is aligned in northwesterly-trending belts and included numerous porphyry (Cu-Mo) deposits, scattered contact metasomatic (Cu-W) ores and a fissure-vein (Ag-Au) assemblage in the western margin; a (Pb-Zn-Ag) assemblage in fissure-veins and manto-chimney deposits, manganese and volcanogenic uranium ores in the eastern flank. Important industrial minerals and rocks include graphite, fluorspar and building materials.

Clark, K.F.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Nevada Division of Minerals | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada Division of Minerals Nevada Division of Minerals Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Nevada Division of Minerals Name Nevada Division of Minerals Address 400 W. King St. #106 Place Carson City, Nevada Zip 89703 Website http://minerals.state.nv.us/ Coordinates 39.16409°, -119.7699779° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.16409,"lon":-119.7699779,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

117

Illinois mineral industry in 1984 and review of preliminary mineral production data for 1985. Illinois mineral notes  

SciTech Connect

The annual output and value of Illinois minerals extracted, processed, and manufactured into products in 1984 are summarized in the report. Materials used in manufacturing were not necessarily extracted within the state. Coal continued to be the leading commodity in terms of value; oil ranked second; stone and sand and gravel ranked third and fourth; fluorspar was fifth. Nationally, Illinois ranked eighteenth in value of nonfuel mineral production. It remained the principal U.S. producer of fluorspar, tripoli, and industrial sand and led in the manufacture of iron-oxide pigments. In stone and peat production, the state ranked fourth. Preliminary data for 1985 indicate that the value of minerals mined was $2,947.8 million, a decrease of 6.1 percent from the $3,138.0 million in 1984. Detailed production summaries and analyses--including maps, tables, and graphs--for all mineral commodities are based on data available for 1984.

Samson, I.E.; Bhagwat, S.B.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Vietnam National Coal Mineral Industries Group Vinacomin | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coal Mineral Industries Group Vinacomin Jump to: navigation, search Name Vietnam National Coal-Mineral Industries Group (Vinacomin) Place Vietnam Product Vietnam-based project...

119

Oil, Gas, and Minerals, Exploration and Production, Lease of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil, Gas, and Minerals, Exploration and Production, Lease of Public Land (Iowa) Oil, Gas, and Minerals, Exploration and Production, Lease of Public Land (Iowa) Eligibility Utility...

120

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- International Minerals and...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

International Minerals and Chemical Corp - Pilot Plant - FL 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: International Minerals and Chemical Corp - Pilot Plant (FL.02) Designated Name: Not...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uravan mineral belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Relations Of Ammonium Minerals At Several Hydrothermal Systems...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

minerals at known hydrothermal systems is critical for the proper interpretation of remote sensing data and for testing of possible links to mineralization. Submicroscopic...

122

"Terrywallaceite" now in official roster of known minerals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

metallic-black crystals of Terrywallaceite were found in the Julcani Mining District of Peru. June 8, 2011 The mineral "Terrywallaceite" The mineral "Terrywallaceite" I am honored...

123

Underground radio technology saves miners and emergency response...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Underground radio technology saves miners and emergency response personnel Underground radio technology saves miners and emergency response personnel Founded through LANL, Vital...

124

Minerals on School and Public Lands  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Commissioner of School and Public Lands is authorized to lease the mineral interests of such lands for development. Section 5-7 of the SD Codified Laws describes provisions for the leasing of...

125

Hydrothermal alteration mineral mapping using hyperspectral imagery...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

front of the Stillwater Mountain Range inDixie Valley, Nevada. Analysis of this data set reveals that severaloutcrops of these altered minerals exist in the area, and thatone...

126

Oil, Gas, and Metallic Minerals (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Operators of oil, gas, and metallic mineral exploration and production operations are required to obtain a drilling permit from the Iowa Department of Natural Resources and file specific forms with...

127

Sustainable growth and valuation of mineral reserves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The annual change in the value of an in-ground mineral is equal to the increase or decrease of inventories ("reserves"), multiplied by the market value of a reserve unit. The limited shrinking resource base does not exist. ...

Adelman, Morris Albert

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Water and Energy in Mineral Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The theme will be "Water and energy in mineral processing". ... Analysis of Polymer Adsorption on Hematite Using Zeta Potential Distributions ... Trends with Selection and Sizing Large Flotation Circuits- What's Available in the Market Place.

129

Mineral Leases by Political Subdivisions (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation authorizes local political subdivisions to lease lands they own for the development of mineral interests, including coal and lignite. A public hearing process is required prior to...

130

Absorbents for Mineral Oil Spill Cleanup  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residual mineral oil on the ground surface following electrical equipment spills is often removed using a surface application of an absorbent material. Traditional absorbent products include clays, sawdust-like products, silica-based products, and various organic industry byproduct materials. After the material has had time to absorb the mineral oil on the ground surface, it is removed and normally sent to a landfill with a liner and leachate collection system designed to Subtitle D standards for municip...

2011-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

131

Minerals yearbook: Mineral industries of Africa. Volume 3. 1990 international review  

SciTech Connect

The 53 countries that constituted Africa in 1990 accounted for a significant portion of total world output of a number of mineral commodities. Among the most significant to be produced in Africa were andalusite, antimony, asbestos, bauxite, chromite, coal, cobalt, copper, diamond, fluorspar, gold, lithium minerals, manganese, phosphate, platinum-group metals, the titanium minerals--ilmenite and rutile, vanadium, vermiculite, uranium, and zircon. Several of these, chromite, cobalt, diamond, and manganese, were not produced in the United States.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Detectability of Occultation of Stars by Objects in the Kuiper Belt and Oort Cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The serendipitous detection of stellar occultations by Outer Solar System objects is a powerful method for ascertaining the small end ($r \\lesssim 15$ km) of the size distribution of Kuiper Belt Objects and may potentially allow the exploration of objects as far out as the Oort Cloud. The design and implementation of an occultation survey is aided by a detailed understanding of how diffraction and observational parameters affect the detection of occultation events. In this study, stellar occultations are simulated, accounting for diffraction effects, finite source sizes, finite bandwidths, stellar spectra, sampling, and signal-to-noise. Finally, the possibility of detecting small Outer Solar System objects from the Kuiper Belt all the way out to the Oort Cloud is explored for three photometric systems: a proposed space telescope, Whipple (Kaplan et al. 2003), the Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey (Lehner et al. 2006), and the Multi Mirror Telescope (Bianco 2007).

T. C. Nihei; M. J. Lehner; F. B. Bianco; S. -K. King; J. M. Giammarco; C. Alcock

2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

133

Volterra network modeling of the nonlinear finite-impulse reponse of the radiation belt flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show how a general class of spatio-temporal nonlinear impulse-response forecast networks (Volterra networks) can be constructed from a taxonomy of nonlinear autoregressive integrated moving average with exogenous inputs (NAR-MAX) input-output equations, and used to model the evolution of energetic particle f uxes in the Van Allen radiation belts. We present initial results for the nonlinear response of the radiation belts to conditions a month earlier. The essential features of spatio-temporal observations are recovered with the model echoing the results of state space models and linear f nite impulse-response models whereby the strongest coupling peak occurs in the preceding 1-2 days. It appears that such networks hold promise for the development of accurate and fully data-driven space weather modelling, monitoring and forecast tools.

Taylor, M.; Daglis, I. A.; Anastasiadis, A. [Institute for Space Applications and Remote Sensing(ISARS), National Observatory of Athens (NOA), Metaxa and Vasillis Pavlou Street, Penteli, Athens 15236 (Greece); Vassiliadis, D. [Department of Physics, Hodges Hall, PO Box 6315, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-6315 (United States)

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

134

Mineral and water resources of Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The mineral and water resources of Nevada are summarily described in this report. Following a general description of the mineral industry and of the geology of the State as a whole, the occurrence, distribution, and relative importance of individual commodities are discussed in some detail. All mineral commodities are described that are known to occur in Nevada and that might have economic significance in the foreseeable future, whether or not they have been mined. In the description of the geology of the State, a section on economic geology describes the distribution of the metallic and nonmetallic mineral deposits both areally and with respect to the general geologic features. A knowledge of the pattern of distribution of known mineral deposits of various types is essential to the successful search for new ore bodies. A section on mineral exploration discusses the methods and problems of exploration, and also considers which commodities in Nevada offer the greatest promise of new discoveries in the future. Water resources are described rather fully in this report; water in this generally arid part of the Great Basin is vital to the economy of the State and to the well-being of its people. Sources of waterpower and geothermal power are also discussed. (auth)

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Illinois mineral industry in 1978, and review of preliminary mineral production data for 1979  

SciTech Connect

This annual report of mineral production in Illinois in 1978 summarizes the output and value of minerals mined, and processed in Illinois, and of mineral products manufactured but not necessarily mined in Illinois. The total value of production in all three categories was $3170.7 million. The total value of mineral materials mined was $1637.0 million, with the mineral fuels-coal, crude oil, and natural gas-contributing 80.7 percent of the total value. Processed mineral materials were valued at $1206.9 million, and mineral products manufactured totaled $326.8 million in 1978. Coal continued to be the leading commodity in terms of value; oil ranked second; stone and sand and gravel, used largely for construction, ranked third and fourth; and fluorspar was fifth. Illinois remained the leading US producer of fluorspar, tripoli, and industrial sand, and ranked third in stone and peat, fifth in bituminous coal, sixth in total sand and gravel. Preliminary data indicate that the value of minerals mined in 1979 reached an all time high of $2131.0 million, from $1637.0 million in 1978. Detailed production summaries and analyses-including maps, tables, and graphs-are given for all mineral commodities.

Samson, I.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

A density-temperature description of the outer electron radiation belt during geomagnetic storms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electron flux measurements from 7 satellites in geosynchronous orbit from 1990-2007 are fit with relativistic bi-Maxwellians, yielding a number density n and temperature T description of the outer electron radiation belt. For 54.5 spacecraft years of measurements the median value ofn is 3.7x10-4 cm-3 and the median value ofT is 142 keY. General statistical properties of n, T, and the 1.1-1.5 MeV flux J are investigated, including local-time and solar-cycle dependencies. Using superposed-epoch analysis triggered on storm onset, the evolution of the outer electron radiation belt through high-speed-steam-driven storms is investigated. The number density decay during the calm before the storm is seen, relativistic-electron dropouts and recoveries from dropout are investigated, and the heating of the outer electron radiation belt during storms is examined. Using four different triggers (SSCs, southward-IMF CME sheaths, southward-IMF magnetic clouds, and minimum Dst), CME-driven storms are analyzed with superposed-epoch techniques. For CME-driven storms an absence of a density decay prior to storm onset is found, the compression of the outer electron radiation belt at time of SSC is analyzed, the number-density increase and temperature decrease during storm main phase is seen, and the increase in density and temperature during storm recovery phase is observed. Differences are found between the density-temperature and the flux descriptions, with more information for analysis being available in the density-temperature description.

Borovsky, Joseph E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cayton, Thomas E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Denton, Michael H [LANCASTER UNIV

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Thermal and Structural Constraints on the Tectonic Evolution of the Idaho-Wyoming-Utah Thrust Belt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The timing of motion on thrust faults in the Idaho-Wyoming-Utah (IWU) thrust belt comes from synorogenic sediments, apatite thermochronology and direct dating of fault rocks coupled with good geometrical constraints of the subsurface structure. The thermal history comes from the analyses of apatite thermochronology, thermal maturation of hydrocarbon source rocks and isotope analysis of fluid inclusions from syntectonic veins. New information from zircon fission track and zircon (U-Th)/He analysis provide constraints on the thermal evolution of the IWU thrust belt over geological time. These analyses demonstrate that the time-temperature pathway of the rocks sampled never reached the required conditions to reset the thermochronometers necessary to provide new timing constraints. Previous thermal constraints for maximum temperatures of IWU thrust belt rocks, place the lower limit at ~110C and the upper limit at ~328C. New zircon fission track results suggest an upper limit at ~180C for million year time scales. ID-TIMS and LA-ICPMS of syntectonic calcite veins suggest that new techniques for dating times of active deformation are viable given that radiogenic isotope concentrations occur at sufficient levels within the vein material.

Chapman, Shay Michael

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Examining the specific entropy (density of adiabatic invariants) of the outer electron radiation belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using temperature and number-density measurements of the energetic-electron population from multiple spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit, the specific entropy S = T/n{sup 2/3} of the outer electron radiation belt is calculated. Then 955,527 half-hour-long data intervals are statistically analyzed. Local-time and solar-cycle variations in S are examined. The median value of the specific entropy (2.8 x 10{sup 7} eVcm{sup 2}) is much larger than the specific entropy of other particle populations in and around the magnetosphere. The evolution of the specific entropy through high-speed-stream-driven geomagnetic storms and through magnetic-cloud-driven geomagnetic storms is studied using superposed-epoch analysis. For high-speed-stream-driven storms, systematic variations in the entropy associated with electron loss and gain and with radiation-belt heating are observed in the various storm phases. For magnetic-cloud-driven storms, multiple trigger choices for the data superpositions reveal the effects of interplanetary shock arrival, sheath driving, cloud driving, and recovery phase. The specific entropy S = T/n{sup 2/3} is algebraically expressed in terms of the first and second adiabatic invariants of the electrons: this allows a relativistic expression for S in terms of T and n to be derived. For the outer electron radiation belt at geosynchronous orbit, the relativistic corrections to the specific entropy expression are -15%.

Borovsky, Joseph E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Denton, Michael H [LANCASTER UNIV

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

The New Horizons Pluto Kuiper belt Mission: An Overview with Historical Context  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NASA's New Horizons (NH) Pluto-Kuiper belt (PKB) mission was launched on 19 January 2006 on a Jupiter Gravity Assist (JGA) trajectory toward the Pluto system for a 14 July 2015 closest approach; Jupiter closest approach occurred on 28 February 2007. It was competitively selected by NASA for development on 29 November 2001. New Horizons is the first mission to the Pluto system and the Kuiper belt; and will complete the reconnaissance of the classical planets. The ~400 kg spacecraft carries seven scientific instruments, including imagers, spectrometers, radio science, a plasma and particles suite, and a dust counter built by university students. NH will study the Pluto system over a 5-month period beginning in early 2015. Following Pluto, NH will go on to reconnoiter one or two 30-50 kilometer diameter Kuiper belt Objects (KBOs), if NASA approves an extended mission. If successful, NH will represent a watershed development in the scientific exploration of a new class of bodies in the solar system - dwarf planet...

Stern, S Alan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

The New Horizons Pluto Kuiper belt Mission: An Overview with Historical Context  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NASA's New Horizons (NH) Pluto-Kuiper belt (PKB) mission was launched on 19 January 2006 on a Jupiter Gravity Assist (JGA) trajectory toward the Pluto system for a 14 July 2015 closest approach; Jupiter closest approach occurred on 28 February 2007. It was competitively selected by NASA for development on 29 November 2001. New Horizons is the first mission to the Pluto system and the Kuiper belt; and will complete the reconnaissance of the classical planets. The ~400 kg spacecraft carries seven scientific instruments, including imagers, spectrometers, radio science, a plasma and particles suite, and a dust counter built by university students. NH will study the Pluto system over a 5-month period beginning in early 2015. Following Pluto, NH will go on to reconnoiter one or two 30-50 kilometer diameter Kuiper belt Objects (KBOs), if NASA approves an extended mission. If successful, NH will represent a watershed development in the scientific exploration of a new class of bodies in the solar system - dwarf planets, of worlds with exotic volatiles on their surfaces, of rapidly (possibly hydrodynamically) escaping atmospheres, and of giant impact derived satellite systems. It will also provide the first dust density measurements beyond 18 AU, cratering records that shed light on both the ancient and present-day KB impactor population down to tens of meters, and a key comparator to the puzzlingly active, former dwarf planet (now satellite of Neptune) called Triton, which is as large as Eris and Pluto.

S. Alan Stern

2007-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uravan mineral belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

A POSSIBLE DIVOT IN THE SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF THE KUIPER BELT'S SCATTERING OBJECTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Via joint analysis of a calibrated telescopic survey, which found scattering Kuiper Belt objects, and models of their expected orbital distribution, we explore the scattering-object (SO) size distribution. Although for D > 100 km the number of objects quickly rise as diameters decrease, we find a relative lack of smaller objects, ruling out a single power law at greater than 99% confidence. After studying traditional ''knees'' in the size distribution, we explore other formulations and find that, surprisingly, our analysis is consistent with a very sudden decrease (a divot) in the number distribution as diameters decrease below 100 km, which then rises again as a power law. Motivated by other dynamically hot populations and the Centaurs, we argue for a divot size distribution where the number of smaller objects rises again as expected via collisional equilibrium. Extrapolation yields enough kilometer-scale SOs to supply the nearby Jupiter-family comets. Our interpretation is that this divot feature is a preserved relic of the size distribution made by planetesimal formation, now ''frozen in'' to portions of the Kuiper Belt sharing a ''hot'' orbital inclination distribution, explaining several puzzles in Kuiper Belt science. Additionally, we show that to match today's SO inclination distribution, the supply source that was scattered outward must have already been vertically heated to the of order 10 Degree-Sign .

Shankman, C.; Gladman, B. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agriculture Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Kaib, N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Queens University (Canada); Kavelaars, J. J. [National Research Council of Canada, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Petit, J. M. [Institut UTINAM, CNRS-Universite de Franche-Comte, Besancon (France)

2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

142

Method for the Production of Mineral Wool and Iron from Serpentine Ore  

mineral wools. The mineral wool product yields advantages similar to asbestos while eliminating its inherent detriments.

143

THE BLACK-EARED MINER A DECADE OF RECOVERY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE BLACK-EARED MINER A DECADE OF RECOVERY David Baker-Gabb 2007 #12;Copyright © 2007. All or otherwise without prior written permission. The Black-eared Miner. A Decade of Recovery. © 2007 Black-eared Miner Recovery Team. Recommended citation: Baker-Gabb, D. (2007). The Black-eared Miner. A Decade

Frappell, Peter

144

A Method for Detecting Miners in Underground Coal Mine Videos  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detecting miners in underground coal mine videos is significant for the production safety. But, the miners are very similar to the background in underground coal mine videos, it is difficult to detect. In this paper, we proposed a method to detect miners ... Keywords: moving detection, miner detection, underground coal mine video

Limei Cai; Jiansheng Qian

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Yemen Ministry of Oil and Minerals | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yemen Ministry of Oil and Minerals Yemen Ministry of Oil and Minerals Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Yemen Ministry of Oil and Minerals Country Yemen Name Yemen Ministry of Oil and Minerals Website http://www.mom.gov.ye/en/ References Yemen Ministry of Oil and Minerals Website[1] The Yemen Ministry of Oil and Minerals Website contains some content in English. Associated Organizations Yemeni Company for Oil-Product Distribution Petroleum Exploration and Production Authority Safr Company for Scouting Production Operations Organization of Oil Scouting Aden Refinery Company Yemen Company for Oil Refining Yemen Investments Company for Oil & Mineral Geological Land Survey & Mineral Wealth Organization References ↑ "Yemen Ministry of Oil and Minerals Website" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Yemen_Ministry_of_Oil_and_Minerals&oldid=334954"

146

Mining and Minerals Policy Act of 1970 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Minerals Policy Act of 1970 and Minerals Policy Act of 1970 Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Mining and Minerals Policy Act of 1970 Year 1970 Url Actof1970.jpg Description An amendment to the Mineral Leasing Act References Mining and Minerals Policy Act of 1970[1] The Mining and Minerals Policy Act of 1970 (30 U.S.C. § 21 et seq.) - An amendment to the Mineral Leasing Act, this statute encompasses both hard rock mining and oil and gas and established modern federal policy regarding mineral resources in the United States. The Act articulates a national interest to foster and encourage private enterprise while mitigating adverse environmental impacts. References ↑ "Mining and Minerals Policy Act of 1970" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Mining_and_Minerals_Policy_Act_of_1970&oldid=334610"

147

MINERAL RESOURCES Mineral Resources is divided into two subsections: general and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: subsidies and tax incentives; regulations; research programs; and mining laws. The energy minerals; geothermal energy; coal; and other miscellaneous energy technology. General Folder 363. Mineral Resources-1965. Statement of Assistant Secretary of Interior C. Girard Davidson before the House Subcommittee on Mines

US Army Corps of Engineers

148

CO2 Mineral Sequestration Studies in US  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mineral Sequestration Studies in US Mineral Sequestration Studies in US Philip Goldberg 1 , Zhong-Ying Chen 2 , William O'Connor 3 , Richard Walters 3 , and Hans Ziock 4 1 National Energy Technology Laboratory, P.O. Box 10940, Pittsburgh, PA 15236, goldberg@netl.doe.gov, (412)386-5806 2 Science Applications International Corporation, 1710 Goodridge Dr. McLean, VA, zhong- ying.chen@saic.com, (703)676-7328 3 Albany Research Center, Albany, OR oconner@arc.doe.gov, walters@alrc.doe, (541)967-5834 4 Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, ksl@lanl.gov, ziock@lanl.gov, (505)667- 7265 Abstract Carbon sequestration by reacting naturally occurring Mg and Ca containing minerals with CO 2 to form carbonates has many unique advantages. Most notably is the fact that carbonates have a lower energy state than CO

149

Illinois mineral industry in 1981-83 and review of preliminary mineral production data for 1984. Illinois mineral notes  

SciTech Connect

The output and value of minerals mined, processed, and manufactured into products in Illinois are summarized in this report for 1981-83. Materials used in manufacturing were not necessarily extracted within the state. Coal continued to be the leading commodity in terms of value. Oil ranked second; stone, third; sand and gravel, fourth; and fluorspar, fifth.

Samson, I.E.; Bhagwat, S.B.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Formation of Kuiper-belt binaries through multiple chaotic scattering encounters with low-mass intruders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The discovery that many trans-neptunian objects exist in pairs, or binaries, is proving invaluable for shedding light on the formation, evolution and structure of the outer Solar system. Based on recent systematic searches it has been estimated that up to 10% of Kuiper-belt objects might be binaries. However, all examples discovered to-date are unusual, as compared to near-Earth and main-belt asteroid binaries, for their mass ratios of order unity and their large, eccentric orbits. In this article we propose a common dynamical origin for these compositional and orbital properties based on four-body simulations in the Hill approximation. Our calculations suggest that binaries are produced through the following chain of events: initially, long-lived quasi-bound binaries form by two bodies getting entangled in thin layers of dynamical chaos produced by solar tides within the Hill sphere. Next, energy transfer through gravitational scattering with a low-mass intruder nudges the binary into a nearby non-chaotic, stable zone of phase space. Finally, the binary hardens (loses energy) through a series of relatively gentle gravitational scattering encounters with further intruders. This produces binary orbits that are well fitted by Kepler ellipses. Dynamically, the overall process is strongly favored if the original quasi-bound binary contains comparable masses. We propose a simplified model of chaotic scattering to explain these results. Our findings suggest that the observed preference for roughly equal mass ratio binaries is probably a real effect; that is, it is not primarily due to an observational bias for widely separated, comparably bright objects. Nevertheless, we predict that a sizeable population of very unequal mass Kuiper-belt binaries is likely awaiting discovery.

Sergey A. Astakhov; Ernestine A. Lee; David Farrelly

2005-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

151

Faulting, fracturing, and sealing in foreland thrust belts: Examples from the subalpine chains  

SciTech Connect

The hydrocarbon potential of foreland thrust belts arises from source and reservoir rocks juxtaposed by the movement of thrust sheets, promoting maturation by loading and generating structural traps. Deformation in thrust belts can be localized on fault zones or distributed throughout thrust sheets; different deformation mechanisms operate to increase and decrease permeability. Migration and reservoir properties may be enhanced or reduced by faulting and fault-related deformation. These processes are examined in detail using examples from the northwest subalpine chains of France, a fold-and-thrust belt of well-differentiated Mesozoic shales and carbonates. Seeps of bitumen in foreland basin sediments indicate some migration of hydrocarbons along faults linking probable source and reservoir areas. Detailed examination of fault rocks and thrust sheets shows that fracture formation is an important strain mechanism which has the potential to form regions of enhanced permeability in structures such as hanging wall anticlines. However, the fractures observed are in general recemented, forming with crack-seal crystal growth. The faults themselves are complex zones up to tens of meters thick of subparallel anastomosing gouge, fractures, stylolites, and crystalline calcite, indicating synchronous cataclasis and pressure solution. The range of scales of fracturing suggests stick-slip (microseismic) fault activity. Permeability of the fault zones is enhanced during seismic fault slip and is otherwise steadily decreased by pressure solution and calcite deposition. The available migration pathways, and hence the location of potential reservoirs, is controlled by the timing, mechanisms, and extent of fault activity in this common and productive tectonic regime.

Bowler, S.; Butler, R.W.H.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Passenger vehicle tire rolling resistance can be predicted from a flat-belt test rig  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rolling resistance of fifteen different types of tire was determined on-road by coastdown tests, using several vehicles variously fitted with 14 and 15 inch wheels. Corrections for tire pressure, and for external temperature, were deduced by data regression. The rolling resistance of the same tires was measured on a flat-belt tire test machine, and correction for tire pressure was determined in a like manner. In this paper, the results, in terms of the characteristic rolling resistance, are compared between rig and road. The various test procedures are discussed.

Ivens, J.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Property:MineralManager | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MineralManager MineralManager Jump to: navigation, search Property Name MineralManager Property Type Page Pages using the property "MineralManager" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) B BLM-NV-WN-ES-08-01-1310, NV-020-08-01 + BLM + C CA-017-05-051 + BLM + CA-170-02-15 + BLM + CA-650-2005-086 + BLM + CA-670-2010-107 + BLM + CA-670-2010-CX + BLM + D DOE-EA-1733 + California + DOE-EA-1759 + Naknek Electric Association + DOE-EA-1849 + BLM + DOE-EIS-0298 + BLM + DOI-BLM-CA-C050-2009-0005-EA + BLM + DOI-BLM-CA-EA-2002-??? + BLM + DOI-BLM-CA-ES-2013-002+1793-EIS + BLM +, BLM + DOI-BLM-ID-220-2009-EA-3709 + BLM + DOI-BLM-ID-B010-2010-0083-CX + BLM + DOI-BLM-ID-I020-2012-0017-CX + BLM + DOI-BLM-ID-T020-2012-0003-CX + BLM + DOI-BLM-NM-L000-2012-0020-DNA + BLM +

154

Effects of physical and geochemical heterogeneities on mineral transformation and biomass accumulation during uranium bioremediation at Rifle, Colorado  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009. Mineral transformation and biomass accumulation duringof mineral precipitates and biomass during bioremediation aton mineral transformation and biomass accumulation during

Li, Li

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

A single sub-km Kuiper Belt object from a stellar Occultation in archival data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Kuiper belt is a remnant of the primordial Solar System. Measurements of its size distribution constrain its accretion and collisional history, and the importance of material strength of Kuiper belt objects (KBOs). Small, sub-km sized, KBOs elude direct detection, but the signature of their occultations of background stars should be detectable. Observations at both optical and X-ray wavelengths claim to have detected such occultations, but their implied KBO abundances are inconsistent with each other and far exceed theoretical expectations. Here, we report an analysis of archival data that reveals an occultation by a body with a 500 m radius at a distance of 45 AU. The probability of this event to occur due to random statistical fluctuations within our data set is about 2%. Our survey yields a surface density of KBOs with radii larger than 250 m of 2.1^{+4.8}_{-1.7} x 10^7 deg^{-2}, ruling out inferred surface densities from previous claimed detections by more than 5 sigma. The fact that we detected only ...

Schlichting, H E; Wenz, M; Sari, R; Gal-Yam, A; Livio, M; Nelan, E; Zucker, S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

ALICE: The Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph aboard the New Horizons Pluto-Kuiper Belt Mission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The New Horizons ALICE instrument is a lightweight (4.4 kg), low-power (4.4 Watt) imaging spectrograph aboard the New Horizons mission to Pluto/Charon and the Kuiper Belt. Its primary job is to determine the relative abundances of various species in Pluto's atmosphere. ALICE will also be used to search for an atmosphere around Pluto's moon, Charon, as well as the Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) that New Horizons hopes to fly by after Pluto-Charon, and it will make UV surface reflectivity measurements of all of these bodies as well. The instrument incorporates an off-axis telescope feeding a Rowland-circle spectrograph with a 520-1870 angstroms spectral passband, a spectral point spread function of 3-6 angstroms FWHM, and an instantaneous spatial field-of-view that is 6 degrees long. Different input apertures that feed the telescope allow for both airglow and solar occultation observations during the mission. The focal plane detector is an imaging microchannel plate (MCP) double delay-line detector with dual solar-blind opaque photocathodes (KBr and CsI) and a focal surface that matches the instrument's 15-cm diameter Rowland-circle. In what follows, we describe the instrument in greater detail, including descriptions of its ground calibration and initial in flight performance.

S. Alan Stern; David C. Slater; John Scherrer; John Stone; Greg Dirks; Maarten Versteeg; Michael Davis; G. R. Gladstone; Joel Wm. Parker; Leslie A. Young; O. H. W. Siegmund

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

157

ALICE: The Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph aboard the New Horizons Pluto-Kuiper Belt Mission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The New Horizons ALICE instrument is a lightweight (4.4 kg), low-power (4.4 Watt) imaging spectrograph aboard the New Horizons mission to Pluto/Charon and the Kuiper Belt. Its primary job is to determine the relative abundances of various species in Pluto's atmosphere. ALICE will also be used to search for an atmosphere around Pluto's moon, Charon, as well as the Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) that New Horizons hopes to fly by after Pluto-Charon, and it will make UV surface reflectivity measurements of all of these bodies as well. The instrument incorporates an off-axis telescope feeding a Rowland-circle spectrograph with a 520-1870 angstroms spectral passband, a spectral point spread function of 3-6 angstroms FWHM, and an instantaneous spatial field-of-view that is 6 degrees long. Different input apertures that feed the telescope allow for both airglow and solar occultation observations during the mission. The focal plane detector is an imaging microchannel plate (MCP) double delay-line detector with dual solar-...

Stern, S Alan; Scherrer, John; Stone, John; Dirks, Greg; Versteeg, Maarten; Davis, Michael; Gladstone, G R; Parker, Joel Wm; Young, Leslie A; Siegmund, O H W

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Fluidization Technologies for the Mineral, Materials, and Energy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Symposium. Meeting, 2014 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium, Fluidization Technologies for the Mineral, Materials, and Energy Industries.

159

Calculation of fluid-mineral equilibria using the simplex algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: CHILLER, K-feldspar, PATH, SIMCALC, SIMPLEX, equilibria, fluid-mineral, geochemistry, hydrolysis, mass transfer, paragenesis

J. R. Wood

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

On the generation of large amplitude spiky solitons by ultralow frequency earthquake emission in the Van Allen radiation belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The parametric coupling between earthquake emitted circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation and ponderomotively driven ion-acoustic perturbations in the Van Allen radiation belt is considered. A cubic nonlinear Schroedinger equation for the modulated radiation envelope is derived, and then solved analytically. For ultralow frequency earthquake emissions large amplitude spiky supersonic bright solitons or subsonic dark solitons are found to be generated in the Van Allen radiation belt, detection of which can be a tool for the prediction of a massive earthquake may be followed later.

Mofiz, U. A. [School of Science and Technology, Bangladesh Open University, Gazipur-1705 (Bangladesh)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uravan mineral belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Mineral Oil Transport and Fate Investigation at Franklin Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents results of an investigation to evaluate the fate and transport of mineral oil in the subsurface of a substation. Understanding subsurface migration of mineral oil will help utilities who are involved in cleanup of past mineral oil spills and leaks.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

162

West Virginia University College of Engineering and Mineral Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of designing and managing a modern coal or mineral mining operation, or continuing into research, banking, law or consulting. Fields of Study Surface Mining - Extracting minerals and coal from the earth's surface safely of extracting minerals from the earth. Materials Handling - Efficiently and safely moving people, equipment

Mohaghegh, Shahab

163

INITIAL PLANETESIMAL SIZES AND THE SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF SMALL KUIPER BELT OBJECTS  

SciTech Connect

The Kuiper Belt is a remnant from the early solar system and its size distribution contains many important constraints that can be used to test models of planet formation and collisional evolution. We show, by comparing observations with theoretical models, that the observed Kuiper Belt size distribution is well matched by coagulation models, which start with an initial planetesimal population with radii of about 1 km, and subsequent collisional evolution. We find that the observed size distribution above R {approx} 30 km is primordial, i.e., it has not been modified by collisional evolution over the age of the solar system, and that the size distribution below R {approx} 30 km has been modified by collisions and that its slope is well matched by collisional evolution models that use published strength laws. We investigate in detail the resulting size distribution of bodies ranging from 0.01 km to 30 km and find that its slope changes several times as a function of radius before approaching the expected value for an equilibrium collisional cascade of material strength dominated bodies for R {approx}< 0.1 km. Compared to a single power-law size distribution that would span the whole range from 0.01 km to 30 km, we find in general a strong deficit of bodies around R {approx} 10 km and a strong excess of bodies around 2 km in radius. This deficit and excess of bodies are caused by the planetesimal size distribution left over from the runaway growth phase, which left most of the initial mass in small planetesimals while only a small fraction of the total mass is converted into large protoplanets. This excess mass in small planetesimals leaves a permanent signature in the size distribution of small bodies that is not erased after 4.5 Gyr of collisional evolution. Observations of the small Kuiper Belt Object (KBO) size distribution can therefore test if large KBOs grew as a result of runaway growth and constrained the initial planetesimal sizes. We find that results from recent KBO occultation surveys and the observed KBO size distribution can be best matched by an initial planetesimal population that contained about equal mass per logarithmic mass bin in bodies ranging from 0.4 km to 4 km in radius. We further find that we cannot match the observed KBO size distribution if most of the planetesimal mass was contained in bodies that were 10 km in radius or larger simply because their resulting size distribution cannot be sufficiently depleted over 4.5 Gyr to match observations.

Schlichting, Hilke E. [UCLA, Department of Earth and Space Science, 595 Charles E. Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Fuentes, Cesar I.; Trilling, David E., E-mail: hilke@ucla.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northern Arizona University, P.O. Box 6010, Flagstaff, AZ 86011 (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Tribology of earthmoving, mining, and minerals processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Earthmoving, mining, and minerals processing each involve frequent, and often severe, mechanical interactions between metals, and between metals and abrasive nonmetallic and metallic materials (i.e., mineral bearing ores). The abrasive nature of ores causes significant wear to extracting, handling, and processing equipment. Consequently, wear in earthmoving, mining, and minerals processing operations results in the removal of large amounts of material from the wear surfaces of scraping, digging, and ore processing equipment. From an energy point of view, material wear of this nature is classified as an indirect tribological loss (Imhoff et al., 1985). Additionally, a significant amount of energy is expended to overcome frictional forces in the operation of all earthmoving, mining, and minerals processing machinery (i.e., a direct tribological loss). However, in these particular processes, wear losses are more than five times those of frictional losses. In general, the amount of material lost from a particular component in these operations, before it becomes unserviceable, is far greater than that which can be tolerated in typical metal-to-metal wear situations (e.g., lubricated bearing-shaft wear couples in machinery). Consequently, much of the equipment used in earthmoving, mining, and ore processing makes use of easily replaceable or repairable, and preferably low-cost, wear components. The mechanisms by which metal-to-metal and abrasive wear occurs, and the relationships between material properties and wear behavior, are reasonably well-understood in general terms. However, the specific wear mechanisms/wear material interactions that occur during earthmoving, digging, and the processing of ore are more complex, and depend on the wear material, and on the nature of abrasive, the type of loading, and the environment. As a result of this general knowledge, reliable predictions can be made regarding the performance of particular materials under a range of in-service operating conditions. This knowledge has allowed the rational selection of wear-resistant materials for use as earthmoving, mining, and minerals processing components, and new wear-resistant materials can be designed using our knowledge of the impact and abrasion mechanisms encountered in the day-to-day operation of components used in these operations.

Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Wilson, Rick D.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Indian Mineral Development Act of 1982 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mineral Development Act of 1982 Mineral Development Act of 1982 Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Indian Mineral Development Act Year 1982 Url IndianDevelopment1982.jpg Description Provides for tribes to enter into energy development agreements with DOI approval References Indian Mineral Development Act of 1982[1] Bureau of Indian Affairs[2] The Indian Mineral Development Act of 1982 (IMDA) 25 U.S.C. Secs. 2101-2108 was enacted to provide Indian tribes with flexibilty in the development and sale of mineral resources. S.Rep. No. 97-472, 97th Cong.2d Sess. 2 (1982). Foremost among the beneficial effects of IMDA was the opportunity for Indian tribes to enter into joint venture agreements with mineral developers. The contractual relationships permitted by IMDA were designed to meet two objectives: First, to further the policy of self-determination

166

Relations Of Ammonium Minerals At Several Hydrothermal Systems In The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Relations Of Ammonium Minerals At Several Hydrothermal Systems In The Relations Of Ammonium Minerals At Several Hydrothermal Systems In The Western Us Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Relations Of Ammonium Minerals At Several Hydrothermal Systems In The Western Us Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Ammonium bound to silicate and sulfate minerals has recently been located at several major hydrothermal systems in the western U.S. utilizing newly-discovered near-infrared spectral properties. Knowledge of the origin and mineralogic relations of ammonium minerals at known hydrothermal systems is critical for the proper interpretation of remote sensing data and for testing of possible links to mineralization. Submicroscopic analysis of ammonium minerals from two mercury- and gold-bearing

167

Advanced Research Power Program--CO2 Mineral Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequestration Sequestration Robert Romanosky National Energy Technology Laboratory Mineral Carbonation Workshop August 8, 2001 Advanced Research Power Program Descriptor - include initials, /org#/date Mineral Sequestration Research Research effort seeks to refine and validate a promising CO 2 sequestration technology option, mineral sequestration also known as mineral carbonation Descriptor - include initials, /org#/date What is Mineral Carbonation * Reaction of CO 2 with Mg or Ca containing minerals to form carbonates * Lowest energy state of carbon is a carbonate and not CO 2 * Occurs naturally in nature as weathering of rock * Already proven on large scale - Carbonate formation linked to formation of the early atmosphere Descriptor - include initials, /org#/date Advantages of Mineral Carbonation

168

Warm conveyor belts in the ERA-Interim data set (1979-2010). Part I: Climatology and potential vorticity evolution.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A global climatology of warm conveyor belts (WCBs) is presented for the years 1979-2010, based upon trajectories calculated with ERA-Interim reanalyses. WCB trajectories are identified as strongly ascending air parcels (600 hPa in 2 days) near ...

Erica Madonna; Heini Wernli; Hanna Joos; Olivia Martius

169

1Electricity from Sunlight: The RBSP Spacecraft Solar Panels NASA's twin Radiation Belts Storm Probe (RBSP) spacecraft will be  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

satellite to the nearest hundred watts? Space Math http://spacemath.gsfc.nasa.gov #12;Answer Key 1 Problem 11Electricity from Sunlight: The RBSP Spacecraft Solar Panels NASA's twin Radiation Belts Storm of the 10 solar cells in square-meters? Problem 3 ­ The amount of electrical power generated by a solar

170

A Pacific Moisture Conveyor Belt and Its Relationship to a Significant Precipitation Event in the Semiarid Southwestern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study the term moisture conveyor belt (MCB) is defined as an elongated band of enhanced poleward water vapor fluxes (WVFs) above the PBL that is rooted in the Tropics. This new terminology is illustrated through an exemplary detailed case ...

Peter Knippertz; Jonathan E. Martin

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

LANL LDRD-funded project: Test particle simulations of energetic ions in natural and artificial radiation belts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We summarize the scientific problem and work plan for the LANL LDRD-funded project to use a test particle code to study the sudden de-trapping of inner belt protons and possible cross-L transport of debris ions after a high altitude nuclear explosion (HANE). We also discuss future application of the code for other HANE-related problems.

Cowee, Misa [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liu, Kaijun [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Friedel, Reinhard H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reeves, Geoffrey D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

172

Dynamic Aspects of the Impact of the Use of Perfect Climate Forecasts in the Corn Belt Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A general equilibrium model is linked to a decision model to determine the impact of perfect growing season forecasts for corn produced in the Corn Belt region over a 10-yr period. Five different timing scenarios are examined to determine the ...

James W. Mjelde; John B. Penson Jr.; Clair J. Nixon

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

HEPPA 2011 Session 3. 3.6 Radiation belt electron precipitation due to geomagnetic storms: significance to middle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEPPA 2011 Session 3. 3.6 Radiation belt electron precipitation due to geomagnetic storms, Sodankyl¨a, Finland Geomagnetic storms triggered by coronal mass ejections and high-speed solar-90 km altitudes) as a result of a single geomagnetic storm. The study condi- tions were chosen

Ulich, Thomas

174

The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: SCUBA-2 observations of radiative feedback in NGC1333  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present observations of NGC1333 from SCUBA-2 on JCMT, observed as a JCMT Gould Belt Survey pilot project during the shared risk campaign when the first of four arrays was installed at each of 450 and 850 microns. Temperature maps are derived from 450 micron and 850 micron ratios under the assumption of constant dust opacity spectral index beta=1.8. Temperatures indicate that the dust in the northern (IRAS 6/8) region of NGC1333 is hot, 20-40 K, due to heating by the B star SVS3, other young stars in the IR/optically visible cluster, and embedded protostars. Other luminous protostars are also identified by temperature rises at the 17" resolution of the ratio maps (0.02 pc assuming a distance of 250 pc for Perseus). The extensive heating raises the possibility that the radiative feedback may lead to increased masses for the next generation of stars.

Hatchell, J; Drabek, E; Curtis, E; Richer, J; Nutter, D; Di Francesco, J

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Ralph: A Visible/Infrared Imager for the New Horizons Pluto/Kuiper Belt Mission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The New Horizons instrument named Ralph is a visible/near infrared multi-spectral imager and a short wavelength infrared spectral imager. It is one of the core instruments on New Horizons, NASA's first mission to the Pluto/Charon system and the Kuiper Belt. Ralph combines panchromatic and color imaging capabilities with IR imaging spectroscopy. Its primary purpose is to map the surface geology and composition of these objects, but it will also be used for atmospheric studies and to map the surface temperature. It is a compact, low-mass (10.5 kg), power efficient (7.1 W peak), and robust instrument with good sensitivity and excellent imaging characteristics. Other than a door opened once in flight, it has no moving parts. These characteristics and its high degree of redundancy make Ralph ideally suited to this long-duration flyby reconnaissance mission.

Reuter, Dennis C; Scherrer, John; Jennings, Donald E; Baer, James; Hanley, John; Hardaway, Lisa; Lunsford, Allen; McMuldroch, Stuart; Moore, Jeffrey; Olkin, Cathy; Parizek, Robert; Reitsma, Harold; Sabatke, Derek; Spencer, John; Stone, John; Throop, Henry; Van Cleve, Jeffrey; Weigle, Gerald E; Young, Leslie A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Ralph: A Visible/Infrared Imager for the New Horizons Pluto/Kuiper Belt Mission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The New Horizons instrument named Ralph is a visible/near infrared multi-spectral imager and a short wavelength infrared spectral imager. It is one of the core instruments on New Horizons, NASA's first mission to the Pluto/Charon system and the Kuiper Belt. Ralph combines panchromatic and color imaging capabilities with IR imaging spectroscopy. Its primary purpose is to map the surface geology and composition of these objects, but it will also be used for atmospheric studies and to map the surface temperature. It is a compact, low-mass (10.5 kg), power efficient (7.1 W peak), and robust instrument with good sensitivity and excellent imaging characteristics. Other than a door opened once in flight, it has no moving parts. These characteristics and its high degree of redundancy make Ralph ideally suited to this long-duration flyby reconnaissance mission.

Dennis C. Reuter; S. Alan Stern; John Scherrer; Donald E. Jennings; James Baer; John Hanley; Lisa Hardaway; Allen Lunsford; Stuart McMuldroch; Jeffrey Moore; Cathy Olkin; Robert Parizek; Harold Reitsma; Derek Sabatke; John Spencer; John Stone; Henry Throop; Jeffrey Van Cleve; Gerald E. Weigle; Leslie A. Young

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

177

Precipitation of radiation belt electrons by EMIC waves, observed from ground and space  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show evidence that left-hand polarised electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) plasma waves can cause the loss of relativistic electrons into the atmosphere. Our unique set of ground and satellite observations shows coincident precipitation of ions with energies of tens of keY and of relativistic electrons into an isolated proton aurora. The coincident precipitation was produced by wave-particle interactions with EMIC waves near the plasmapause. The estimation of pitch angle diffusion coefficients supports that the observed EMIC waves caused coincident precipitation ofboth ions and relativistic electrons. This study clarifies that ions with energies of tens of ke V affect the evolution of relativistic electrons in the radiation belts via cyclotron resonance with EMIC waves, an effect that was first theoretically predicted in the early 1970's.

Jordanova, Vania K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miyoski, Y [NAGOYA UNIV; Sakaguchi, K [NAGOYA UNIV; Shiokawa, K [NAGOYA UNIV; Evans, D S [NOAA, BOULDER; Albert, Jay [AFRL; Connors, M [UNIV OF ATHABASCA

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Non-diffusive resonant acceleration of electrons in the radiation belts  

SciTech Connect

We describe a mechanism of resonant electron acceleration by oblique high-amplitude whistler waves under conditions typical for the Earth radiation belts. We use statistics of spacecraft observations of whistlers in the Earth radiation belts to obtain the dependence of the angle {theta} between the wave-normal and the background magnetic field on magnetic latitude {lambda}. According to this statistics, the angle {theta} already approaches the resonance cone at {lambda}{approx}15 Degree-Sign and remains close to it up to {lambda}{approx}30 Degree-Sign -40 Degree-Sign on the dayside. The parallel component of the electrostatic field of whistler waves often increases around {lambda}{approx}15 Degree-Sign up to one hundred of mV/m. We show that due to this increase of the electric field, the whistler waves can trap electrons into the potential well via wave particle resonant interaction corresponding to Landau resonance. Trapped electrons then move with the wave to higher latitudes where they escape from the resonance. Strong acceleration is favored by adiabatic invariance along the increasing magnetic field, which continuously transfers the parallel energy gained to perpendicular energy, allowing resonance to be reached and maintained. The concomitant increase of the wave phase velocity allows for even stronger relative acceleration at low energy <50keV. Each trapping-escape event of electrons of {approx}10keV to 100 keV results in an energy gain of up to 100 keV in the inhomogeneous magnetic field of the Earth dipole. For electrons with initial energy below 100 keV, such rapid acceleration should hasten their drop into the loss-cone and their precipitation into the atmosphere. We discuss the role of the considered mechanism in the eventual formation of a trapped distribution of relativistic electrons for initial energies larger than 100 keV and in microbursts precipitations of lower energy particles.

Artemyev, A. V.; Krasnoselskikh, V. V.; Agapitov, O. V. [LPC2E/CNRS, University of Orleans, Orleans (France); Mourenas, D. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Rolland, G. [CNES, Toulouse (France)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

179

Roadmap to the Project: Uranium Miners Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Roadmap DOE Roadmap Experiments List Oral Histories Records Series Descriptions Overview Documents Declassified Documents Project Events ACHRE Report Uranium Miners Resources Building Public Trust Department of Defense Report FINAL REPORT OF THE RADIATION EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT COMMITTEE SUBMITTED TO THE HUMAN RADIATION INTERAGENCY WORKING GROUP JULY, 1996 CONTENTS Executive Summary Proposed Amendments to the Statute Recommended Modifications to the Department of Justice Regulations Introduction Issues Relating to Compensation for Lung Cancer Statutory and Regulatory Framework for Compensation Fairness of the Present Statutory Compensation Criteria Alternative Compensation Criteria Description of the Relative Risk Model Used to Derive Proposed Alternative Criteria, and Model Parameters

180

Mineral revenues: the 1983 report on receipts from Federal and Indian leases with summary data from 1920 to 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tables and figures abound for: mineral revenue management in 1983; offshore federal mineral revenues; onshore federal mineral revenues; Indian mineral revenues; distribution of federal and Indian mineral revenues; plus appended lease management data. (PSB)

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uravan mineral belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

New Geophysical Technique for Mineral Exploration and Mineral Discrimination Based on Electromagnetic Methods  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research during the first two years of the project was focused on developing the foundations of a new geophysical technique for mineral exploration and mineral discrimination, based on electromagnetic (EM) methods. The developed new technique is based on examining the spectral induced polarization effects in electromagnetic data using effective-medium theory and advanced methods of 3-D modeling and inversion. The analysis of IP phenomena is usually based on models with frequency dependent complex conductivity distribution. In this project, we have developed a rigorous physical/mathematical model of heterogeneous conductive media based on the effective-medium approach. The new generalized effective-medium theory of IP effect (GEMTIP) provides a unified mathematical method to study heterogeneity, multi-phase structure, and polarizability of rocks. The geoelectrical parameters of a new composite conductivity model are determined by the intrinsic petrophysical and geometrical characteristics of composite media: mineralization and/or fluid content of rocks, matrix composition, porosity, anisotropy, and polarizability of formations. The new GEMTIP model of multi-phase conductive media provides a quantitative tool for evaluation of the type of mineralization, and the volume content of different minerals using electromagnetic data. We have developed a 3-D EM-IP modeling algorithm using the integral equation (IE) method. Our IE forward modeling software is based on the contraction IE method, which improves the convergence rate of the iterative solvers. This code can handle various types of sources and receivers to compute the effect of a complex resistivity model. We have demonstrated that the generalized effective-medium theory of induced polarization (GEMTIP) in combination with the IE forward modeling method can be used for rock-scale forward modeling from grain-scale parameters. The numerical modeling study clearly demonstrates how the various complex resistivity models manifest differently in the observed EM data. These modeling studies lay a background for future development of the IP inversion method, directed at determining the electrical conductivity and the intrinsic chargeability distributions, as well as the other parameters of the relaxation model simultaneously. The new technology introduced in this project can be used for the discrimination between uneconomic mineral deposits and the location of zones of economic mineralization and geothermal resources.

Michael S. Zhdanov

2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

182

Mineral Test Hole Regulatory Act (Tennessee) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mineral Test Hole Regulatory Act (Tennessee) Mineral Test Hole Regulatory Act (Tennessee) Mineral Test Hole Regulatory Act (Tennessee) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Tennessee Department Of Environment and Conservation The Mineral Hole Regulatory Act is applicable to any person (individual, corporation, company, association, joint venture, partnership, receiver, trustee, guardian, executor, administrator, personal representative or private organization of any kind) who wishes to drill a mineral test hole (any hole in excess of one hundred (100) feet drilled during the exploration for minerals but shall exclude auger drilling in surficial or

183

Thermally Speciated Mercury in Mineral Exploration | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermally Speciated Mercury in Mineral Exploration Thermally Speciated Mercury in Mineral Exploration Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Thermally Speciated Mercury in Mineral Exploration Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author S.C. Smith Conference IGES; Dublin, CA; 2003/09/01 Published IGES, 2003 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Citation S.C. Smith. 2003. Thermally Speciated Mercury in Mineral Exploration. In: Programs & Abstracts: Soil and Regolith Geochemistry in the Search for Mineral Deposits. IGES; 2003/09/01; Dublin, CA. Dublin, CA: IGES; p. 78 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Thermally_Speciated_Mercury_in_Mineral_Exploration&oldid=681717" Categories: References Geothermal References

184

Radioactive Mineral Occurences in Nevada | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Radioactive Mineral Occurences in Nevada Radioactive Mineral Occurences in Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Radioactive Mineral Occurences in Nevada Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Larry J. Garside Organization Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology Published Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 1973 Report Number Open File Report 94-2 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Radioactive Mineral Occurences in Nevada Citation Larry J. Garside (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology). 1973. Radioactive Mineral Occurences in Nevada. Reno, NV: Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology. Report No.: Open File Report 94-2. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Radioactive_Mineral_Occurences_in_Nevada&oldid=690513"

185

Roadmap to the Project: Uranium Miners Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY EXECUTIVE SUMMARY On October 15, 1990, Congress passed the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act of 1990 (RECA), which provided for compassionate payments to individuals who suffered from specified diseases presumably as a result of exposure to radiation in connection with the federal government's nuclear weapons testing program. Among those eligible for compensation under the Act are individuals who were employed in underground uranium mines in Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Utah or Wyoming during the 1947 to 1971 time period, who were exposed to specified minimum levels of radon, and who contracted specified lung disorders. The Department of Justice administers the RECA through the Radiation Exposure Compensation Program (Program). The provisions of the RECA defining compensation for uranium miners have been characterized by critics as unfair and inconsistent with current scientific information. The regulations of the Department of Justice implementing the statute have also been criticized as being unnecessarily stringent and unreasonably burdensome. These criticisms were noted, and in some cases affirmed, by the President's Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments, charged by the President to investigate the history of human radiation experimentation conducted by the federal government during the Cold War period. In its Final Report, issued on October 3, 1995, the Advisory Committee recommended, among other things, that the Administration review the provisions of RECA governing compensation for uranium miners and the implementing regulations to ensure that they are fair, consistent with current scientific evidence, and compatible with the objectives of the Act.

186

Biogas yield and quality improvement and purification with natural minerals.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Research goal and objective. To investigate the possibilities of the use of mineral raw materials of local origin for the purification of biogas produced from (more)

?iutelyt?, R?ta

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Heavy Minerals Inc - IL...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Subject: FUSRAP Considered Site Recommendation; July 9, 1990. IL.14-2 - Heavy Minerals Co. Letter; Wyatt to Faulkner; Subject: Crude Thorium Hydroxide Proposal; December 1, 1954...

188

Investigation on Mineral, Microstructure and Activity of Coal Gangue ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, seven coal gangue samples covering a wide range of chemical composition were collected from Shanxi Province, China. The mineral composition...

189

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Minerals: GHG Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Read the Industrial Minerals Association - North America (IMA-NA) 2011 Greenhouse Gas and Energy Survey Industry Summary for the period from 2000 to 2010 (PDF 16 KB)...

190

Hyperspectral mineral mapping in support of geothermal exploration...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2004 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Hyperspectral mineral mapping in support of geothermal exploration- Examples...

191

Epithermal Gold Mineralization and a Geothermal Resource at Blue...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1991 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Epithermal Gold Mineralization and a Geothermal Resource at Blue Mountain,...

192

Mineralization of Synthetic Polymer Scaffolds: A Bottom-Up ...  

Mineralization of Synthetic Polymer Scaffolds: A Bottom-Up Approach for the Development of Artificial Bone Jie Song,*,, Viengkham Malathong, and Carolyn R ...

193

Improving the Health & Performance of Miners Working at Moderate ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cross Pollination between Industry and Engineering Programs/Students in Manitoba Improving the Health & Performance of Miners Working at Moderate to

194

Optimization on Compression Strength of Resin Mineral Composite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Using natural granite particles as aggregate and organic resin as binder, resin mineral composite (RMC) has good vibration damping properties...

195

Climate VISION: PrivateSector Initiatives: Minerals - Industry...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

together to achieve common goals. Industrial minerals - ball clay, bentonite, borates, feldspar, industrial sand, mica, soda ash and talc - are a miraculous gift from times past....

196

Reclamation of Land Used for Mineral Mining (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation aims to provide for the rehabilitation and conservation of land affected by the mining of minerals through proper planning, proper use of appropriate methods of mining,...

197

Application of Biomass Waste Materials in the Nano Mineral Synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some of the biomass waste material were effectively applied to the nano-sized minerals synthesis under conrolled boundry experimenta conditions.

198

Energy Efficiency in Mineral Processing Industry Using High ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Energy Efficiency in Mineral Processing Industry Using High ... These studies were prepared by Tetra Tech on eight different projects at...

199

A Review Of Water Contents Of Nominally Anhydrous Natural Minerals...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A Review Of Water Contents Of Nominally Anhydrous Natural Minerals In The Mantles Of Earth, Mars And The Moon Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal...

200

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Minerals: GHG Inventory...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GHG Inventory Protocols Read the Industrial Minerals Association - North America (IMA-NA) Borates and Soda Ash Sections Greenhouse Gas Inventory Protocol (PDF 75 KB) Download...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uravan mineral belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Heterogeneous Reactions on Mineral Dust: Surface Reactions of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactions on Mineral Dust: Surface Reactions of Sulfur Dioxide, Ozone, Nitric and Acetic Acid on Oxide and Carbonate Particles Speaker(s): Vicki Grassian Date: June 14,...

202

Climate VISION: PrivateSector Initiatives: Minerals - Resources...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

of IntentAgreements Work Plans GHG Information GHG Inventory Protocols Resources & Links Energy Management Industry Associations Software Tools Results Minerals - Resources &...

203

STRATIGRAPHY OF COUNTER-POINT-BAR AND EDDY-ACCRETION DEPOSITS IN LOW-ENERGY MEANDER BELTS OF THE PEACE-ATHABASCA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STRATIGRAPHY OF COUNTER-POINT-BAR AND EDDY-ACCRETION DEPOSITS IN LOW-ENERGY MEANDER BELTS-7th Ave. SW, Nexen Inc., Calgary, AB, T2P 3P7, Canada ABSTRACT: Previously termed concave bank

204

Warm conveyor belts in the ERA-Interim data set (1979-2010). Part II: Moisture origin and relevance for precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of moisture for extratropical atmospheric dynamics is particularly pronounced within warm conveyor belts (WCBs), which are characterized by intense latent heat release and precipitation formation. Based on the WCB climatology for the ...

Stephan Pfahl; Erica Madonna; Maxi Boettcher; Hanna Joos; Heini Wernli

205

Synoptic Circulation and Land Surface Influences on Convection in the Midwest U.S. Corn Belt during the Summers of 1999 and 2000. Part I: Composite Synoptic Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Midwest U.S. Corn Belt, the 1999 and 2000 summer seasons (15 June15 September) expressed contrasting spatial patterns and magnitudes of precipitation (1999: dry; 2000: normal to moist). Distinct from the numerical modeling approach often ...

Andrew M. Carleton; David L. Arnold; David J. Travis; Steve Curran; Jimmy O. Adegoke

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

New Geophysical Technique for Mineral Exploration and Mineral Discrimination Based on Electromagnetic Methods  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research during the first year of the project was focused on developing the foundations of a new geophysical technique for mineral exploration and mineral discrimination, based on electromagnetic (EM) methods. The proposed new technique is based on examining the spectral induced polarization effects in electromagnetic data using modern distributed acquisition systems and advanced methods of 3-D inversion. The analysis of IP phenomena is usually based on models with frequency dependent complex conductivity distribution. One of the most popular is the Cole-Cole relaxation model. In this progress report we have constructed and analyzed a different physical and mathematical model of the IP effect based on the effective-medium theory. We have developed a rigorous mathematical model of multi-phase conductive media, which can provide a quantitative tool for evaluation of the type of mineralization, using the conductivity relaxation model parameters. The parameters of the new conductivity relaxation model can be used for discrimination of the different types of rock formations, which is an important goal in mineral exploration. The solution of this problem requires development of an effective numerical method for EM forward modeling in 3-D inhomogeneous media. During the first year of the project we have developed a prototype 3-D IP modeling algorithm using the integral equation (IP) method. Our IE forward modeling code INTEM3DIP is based on the contraction IE method, which improves the convergence rate of the iterative solvers. This code can handle various types of sources and receivers to compute the effect of a complex resistivity model. We have tested the working version of the INTEM3DIP code for computer simulation of the IP data for several models including a southwest US porphyry model and a Kambalda-style nickel sulfide deposit. The numerical modeling study clearly demonstrates how the various complex resistivity models manifest differently in the observed EM data. These modeling studies lay a background for future development of the IP inversion method, directed at determining the electrical conductivity and the intrinsic chargeability distributions, as well as the other parameters of the relaxation model simultaneously. The new technology envisioned in this proposal, will be used for the discrimination of different rocks, and in this way will provide an ability to distinguish between uneconomic mineral deposits and the location of zones of economic mineralization and geothermal resources.

Michael S. Zhdanov

2005-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

207

Growth and Characterization of Complex Mineral Surfaces  

SciTech Connect

Precipitation of mineral aggregates near the Earth's surface or in subsurface fractures and cavities often produces complex microstructures and surface morphologies. Here we demonstrate how a simple surface normal growth (SNG) process may produce microstructures and surface morphologies very similar to those observed in some natural carbonate systems. A simple SNG model was used to fit observed surfaces, thus providing information about the growth history and also about the frequency and spatial distribution of nucleation events during growth. The SNG model can be extended to systems in which the symmetry of precipitation is broken, for example by fluid flow. We show how a simple modification of the SNG model in which the local growth rate depends on the distance from a fluid source and the local slope or fluid flow rate, produces growth structures with many similarities to natural travertine deposits.

P. Meakin; E. Jettestuen; B. Jamtveit; Y. Y. Podladchikov; S. deVilliers; H. E. F. Amundsen

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Twin-belt continuous caster with containment and cooling of the exiting cast product for enabling high-speed casting of molten-center product  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In continuously casting molten metal into cast product by a twin-belt machine, it is desirable to achieve dramatic increases in speed (linear feet per minute) at which cast product exits the machine, particularly in installations where steel cast product is intended to feed a downstream regular rolling mill (as distinct from a planetary mill) operating in tandem with the twin-belt caster. Such high-speed casting produces product with a relatively thin shell and molten interior, and the shell tends to bulge outwardly due to metallostatic head pressure of the molten center. A number of cooperative features enable high-speed, twin-belt casting: (1) Each casting belt is slidably supported adjacent to the caster exit pulley for bulge control and enhanced cooling of cast product. (2) Lateral skew steering of each belt provides an effective increase in moving mold length plus a continuity of heat transfer not obtained with prior art belt steering apparatus. (3) The exiting slab is contained and supported downstream from the casting machine to prevent bulging of the shell of the cast product, and (4) spray cooling is incorporated in the exit containment apparatus for secondary cooling of cast product.

Dykes, Charles D. (303 Shore Rd., Milton, VT); Daniel, Sabah S. (303 Shore Rd., Pittsburgh, PA); Wood, J. F. Barry (303 Shore Rd., Burlington, VT 05401)

1990-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

209

Physical Properties of Kuiper Belt and Centaur Objects: Constraints from Spitzer Space Telescope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detecting heat from minor planets in the outer solar system is challenging, yet it is the most efficient means for constraining the albedos and sizes of Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) and their progeny, the Centaur objects. These physical parameters are critical, e.g., for interpreting spectroscopic data, deriving densities from the masses of binary systems, and predicting occultation tracks. Here we summarize Spitzer Space Telescope observations of 47 KBOs and Centaurs at wavelengths near 24 and 70 microns. We interpret the measurements using a variation of the Standard Thermal Model (STM) to derive the physical properties (albedo and diameter) of the targets. We also summarize the results of other efforts to measure the albedos and sizes of KBOs and Centaurs. The three or four largest KBOs appear to constitute a distinct class in terms of their albedos. From our Spitzer results, we find that the geometric albedo of KBOs and Centaurs is correlated with perihelion distance (darker objects having smaller perihelia), and that the albedos of KBOs (but not Centaurs) are correlated with size (larger KBOs having higher albedos). We also find hints that albedo may be correlated with with visible color (for Centaurs). Interestingly, if the color correlation is real, redder Centaurs appear to have higher albedos. Finally, we briefly discuss the prospects for future thermal observations of these primitive outer solar system objects.

John Stansberry; Will Grundy; Mike Brown; Dale Cruikshank; John Spencer; David Trilling; Jean-Luc Margot

2007-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

210

The JCMT Legacy Survey of the Gould Belt: a first look at Taurus with HARP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As part of a JCMT Legacy Survey of star formation in the Gould Belt, we present early science results for Taurus. CO J=3-2 maps have been secured along the north-west ridge and bowl, collectively known as L 1495, along with deep 13CO and C18O J=3-2 maps in two sub-regions. With these data we search for molecular outflows, and use the distribution of flows, HH objects and shocked H2 line emission features, together with the population of young stars, protostellar cores and starless condensations to map star formation across this extensive region. In total 21 outflows are identified. It is clear that the bowl is more evolved than the ridge, harbouring a greater population of T Tauri stars and a more diffuse, more turbulent ambient medium. By comparison, the ridge contains a much younger, less widely distributed population of protostars which, in turn, is associated with a greater number of molecular outflows. We estimate the ratio of the numbers of prestellar to protostellar cores in L 1495 to be ~ 1.3-2.3, and...

Davis, C J; Hatchell, J; Wouterloot, J G A; Buckle, J V; Nutter, D; Fich, M; Brunt, C; Butner, H; Cavanagh, B; Curtis, E I; Duarte-Cabral, A; Di Francesco, J; Etxaluze, M; Friberg, P; Friesen, R; Fuller, G A; Graves, S; Greaves, J S; Hogerheijde, M R; Johnstone, D; Matthews, B; Matthews, H; Rawlings, J M C; Richer, J S; Roberts, J; Sadavoy, S; Simpson, R J; Tothill, N; Tsamis, Y; Viti, S; Ward-Thompson, D; White, Glenn J; Yates, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

A BATSE investigation of radiation belt electrons precipitated by VLF waves. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Compton Observatory commonly encounters fluxes of energetic electrons which have been scattered from the inner radiation belt to the path of the satellite by resonant interactions with VLF waves from powerful man-made transmitters. The present investigation was motivated by the fact that in the Fall of 1993, the Gamma Ray Observatory was boosted from a 650 km altitude circular orbit to a 750 km altitude circular orbit. This was an opportunity, for the first time, to make observations at two different altitudes using the same instrument. The authors have examined DISCLA data from the Burst & Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) experiment from 1 Sep. 1993 to 29 Jan. 1994. During the period of study they identified 48 instances of the satellite encountering a cloud of energetic electrons which had been scattered by VLF transmitters. They find that boosting the altitude of the circular orbit from 650 km to 750 km increased the intensity of cyclotron resonance scattered electrons by a factor of two. To search for long term changes in the cyclotron resonance precipitation, the authors have compared the approx. 750 km altitude data from 106 days at the end of 1993 with data at the same altitudes and time of year in 1991. The cyclotron resonance events in 1991 were three times more frequent and 25% of those cases were more intense than any seen in the 1993 data. They attribute this difference to increased level of geomagnetic activity in 1991 near the Solar Maximum.

Datlowe, D.W.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

ON A POSSIBLE SIZE/COLOR RELATIONSHIP IN THE KUIPER BELT  

SciTech Connect

Color measurements and albedo distributions introduce non-intuitive observational biases in size-color relationships among Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) that cannot be disentangled without a well characterized sample population with systematic photometry. Peixinho et al. report that the form of the KBO color distribution varies with absolute magnitude, H. However, Tegler et al. find that KBO color distributions are a property of object classification. We construct synthetic models of observed KBO colors based on two B-R color distribution scenarios: color distribution dependent on H magnitude (H-Model) and color distribution based on object classification (Class-Model). These synthetic B-R color distributions were modified to account for observational flux biases. We compare our synthetic B-R distributions to the observed ''Hot'' and ''Cold'' detected objects from the Canada-France Ecliptic Plane Survey and the Meudon Multicolor Survey. For both surveys, the Hot population color distribution rejects the H-Model, but is well described by the Class-Model. The Cold objects reject the H-Model, but the Class-Model (while not statistically rejected) also does not provide a compelling match for data. Although we formally reject models where the structure of the color distribution is a strong function of H magnitude, we also do not find that a simple dependence of color distribution on orbit classification is sufficient to describe the color distribution of classical KBOs.

Pike, R. E.; Kavelaars, J. J., E-mail: repike@uvic.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Building materials using binders and solid combustible minerals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Local materials including low-quality solid combustible minerals and their wastes, are being used to cheapen building costs. The author reviews the use of solid combustible minerals and their carbonaceous wastes as nonbaking binders of the lime-pozzolana type in the production of building and other materials.

Gorlov, E.G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Mineral formation during simulated leaks of Hanford waste tanks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mineral formation during simulated leaks of Hanford waste tanks Youjun Deng a , James B. Harsh a at the US DOE Hanford Site, Washington, caus- ing mineral dissolution and re-precipitation upon contact mimicking tank leak conditions at the US DOE Hanford Site. In batch experiments, Si-rich solutions

Flury, Markus

215

Reduction of carbon dioxide emissions by mineral carbonation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study investigates the technologies that have the potential to provide feasible reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) from a reference power plant. Particular focus has been given to mineral carbonation (at 1 bar) in which magnesium (Mg) and/or ... Keywords: carbon dioxide, emissions, mineral carbonation

C. J. Sturgeon; M. G. Rasul; Ashfaque Ahmed Chowdhury

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Use of hybrid intelligent computing in mineral resources evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mineral resources are a formal quantification of naturally occurring materials. Estimation of resource parameters such as grade and thickness may be carried out using different methodologies. In this paper, a soft methodology, which is artificial neural ... Keywords: Fuzzy-neural network, Grade estimation, Hybrid modelling, Mineral resource

B. Tutmez

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Isotope Geochemistry Of Minerals And Fluids From Newberry Volcano, Oregon |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotope Geochemistry Of Minerals And Fluids From Newberry Volcano, Oregon Isotope Geochemistry Of Minerals And Fluids From Newberry Volcano, Oregon Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Isotope Geochemistry Of Minerals And Fluids From Newberry Volcano, Oregon Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Isotopic compositions were determined for hydrothermal quartz, calcite, and siderite from core samples of the Newberry 2 drill hole, Oregon. The Δ15O values for these minerals decrease with increasing temperatures. The values indicate that these hydrothermal minerals precipitated in isotopic equilibrium with water currently present in the reservoirs. The Δ18O values of quartz and calcite from the andesite and basalt flows (700-932 m) have isotopic values which require that the equilibrated water Δ18O values increase slightly (- 11.3 to -9.2‰) with

218

Epithermal Gold Mineralization and a Geothermal Resource at Blue Mountain,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Epithermal Gold Mineralization and a Geothermal Resource at Blue Mountain, Epithermal Gold Mineralization and a Geothermal Resource at Blue Mountain, Humboldt County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Epithermal Gold Mineralization and a Geothermal Resource at Blue Mountain, Humboldt County, Nevada Abstract Shallow exploration drilling on the west flank of Blue Mountain discovered sub economic gold mineralization and a spatially associated active geothermal system. The gold mineralization is an unusual example of an acid sulfate type epithermal system developed in pre Tertiary sedimentary host rocks. The geothermal system is largely unexplored but is unusual in that surface manifestation s typically associated with active geothermal system are not present. Authors Andrew J. Parr and Timothy J. Percival

219

Hydrothermal alteration mineral mapping using hyperspectral imagery in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

alteration mineral mapping using hyperspectral imagery in alteration mineral mapping using hyperspectral imagery in Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Hydrothermal alteration mineral mapping using hyperspectral imagery in Dixie Valley, Nevada Abstract Hyperspectral (HyMap) data was used to map the location ofoutcrops of high temperature, hydrothermally alterated minerals(including alunite, pyrophyllite, and hematite) along a 15 kmswath of the eastern front of the Stillwater Mountain Range inDixie Valley, Nevada. Analysis of this data set reveals that severaloutcrops of these altered minerals exist in the area, and thatone outcrop, roughly 1 square kilometer in area, shows abundanthigh temperature alteration. Structural analysis of the alteredregion using a

220

Mineral Leasing Act of 1920 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Leasing Act of 1920 Leasing Act of 1920 Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Mineral Leasing Act of 1920 Year 1920 Url MineralLeasingAct.jpg Description The Mineral Leasing Act established the authority of the Secretary of the Interior to oversee oil and gas operations on federal land. References Federal Oil and Gas Statutes[1] Mineral Leasing Act of 1920 (30 U.S.C. § 181 et seq.) - The Mineral Leasing Act established the authority of the Secretary of the Interior to oversee oil and gas operations on federal land. "The Secretary of the Interior is authorized to prescribe necessary and proper rules and regulations and to do any and all things necessary to carry out and accomplish the purposes of this Act." 30 U.S.C. § 189 References ↑ "Federal Oil and Gas Statutes"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uravan mineral belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From Yellowstone  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From Yellowstone Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From Yellowstone Drill Cores Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From Yellowstone Drill Cores Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Oxygen and carbon isotope ratios were measured for hydrothermal minerals (silica, clay and calcite) from fractures and vugs in altered rhyolite, located between 28 and 129 m below surface (in situ temperatures ranging from 81 to 199°C) in Yellowstone drill holes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism of formation of these minerals. The Δ18O values of the thirty-two analyzed silica samples (quartz, chalcedony, α-cristobalite, and β-cristobalite) range from -7.5 to +2.8‰. About one

222

Minerals on Public Lands (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minerals on Public Lands (Texas) Minerals on Public Lands (Texas) Minerals on Public Lands (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Program Info State Texas Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Texas General Land Office Any tract of land that belongs to the state, including islands, salt and freshwater lakes, bays, inlets, marshes, and reefs owned by the state within tidewater limits, the part of the Gulf of Mexico within the state's jurisdiction, unsold surveyed public school land, rivers and channels that belong to the state, and land sold with a reservation of minerals to the state are subject to prospect by any person for those minerals which are

223

Cementation process for minerals recovery from Salton Sea geothermal brines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential for minerals recovery from a 1000-MWe combined geothermal power and minerals recovery plant in the Salton Sea is examined. While the possible value of minerals recovered would substantially exceed the revenue from power production, information is insufficient to carry out a detailed economic analysis. The recovery of precious metals - silver, gold, and platinum - is the most important factor in determining the economics of a minerals recovery plant; however, the precious metals content of the brines is not certain. Such a power plant could recover 14 to 31% of the US demand for manganese and substantial amounts of zinc and lead. Previous work on minerals extraction from Salton Sea brines is also reviewed and a new process, based on a fluidized-bed cementation reaction with metallic iron, is proposed. This process would recover the precious metals, lead, and tin present in the brines.

Maimoni, A.

1982-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

224

Probabilistic neural networks applied to mineral potential mapping for platinum group elements in the Serra Leste region, Carajs Mineral Province, Brazil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work presents an application of probabilistic neural networks to map the potential for platinum group elements (PGE) mineralization sites in the northeast portion of the Carajas Mineral Province (CMP), Brazilian Amazon. Geological and geophysical ... Keywords: Carajs Mineral Province, Leave-one-out test, Mineral potential mapping, Probabilistic neural network

Emilson Pereira Leite; Carlos Roberto de Souza Filho

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

The estimation of the number of underground coal miners and the annual dose to coal miners in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces an estimation method for the number of underground coal miners and the annual dose to coal miners in China. It shows that there are about 6 million underground miners at present and the proportion is about 1, 1 and 4 million for national key coal mines, state-owned local coal mines, and township and private-ownership coal mines, respectively. The collective dose is about 1.65 X 10{sup 4} person-Sv y{sup -1}, of which township and private-ownership coal mines contribute about 91%. This paper also points out that the 2000 UNSCEAR report gives the number of miners of coal production and their collective dose, which are underestimated greatly because the report only includes the number of underground miners in national key coal mines, which only accounts for 1/6 of the workers all working under the best ventilation conditions in China.

Liu, F.D.; Pan, Z.Q.; Liu, S.L.; Chen, L.; Ma, J.Z.; Yang, M.L.; Wang, N.P. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

226

Chemically Accelerated Carbon Mineralization: Chemical and Biological Catalytic Enhancement of Weathering of Silicate Minerals as Novel Carbon Capture and Storage  

SciTech Connect

IMPACCT Project: Columbia University is developing a process to pull CO2 out of the exhaust gas of coal-fired power plants and turn it into a solid that can be easily and safely transported, stored above ground, or integrated into value-added products (e.g. paper filler, plastic filler, construction materials, etc.). In nature, the reaction of CO2 with various minerals over long periods of time will yield a solid carbonatethis process is known as carbon mineralization. The use of carbon mineralization as a CO2 capture and storage method is limited by the speeds at which these minerals can be dissolved and CO2 can be hydrated. To facilitate this, Columbia University is using a unique process and a combination of chemical catalysts which increase the mineral dissolution rate, and the enzymatic catalyst carbonic anhydrase which speeds up the hydration of CO2.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Waste treatment by selective mineral ion exchanger  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

STMI, subsidiary company of the AREVA Group with over 40 years in the D and D business, has been continuously innovating and developing new decontamination techniques, with the objectives of achieving more efficient decontaminations on a growing spectrum of media. In the field of liquid waste treatment, STMI manufactures uses and commercialises selective inorganic ion exchangers (RAN). These are hydrated synthetic inorganic compounds prepared from very pure raw materials. Different types of RANs (POLYAN, OXTAIN, Fe-Cu, Fe-CoK, Si-Fe-CoK) can be used to trap a large number of radioactive elements in contaminated effluents. Different implementations could be applied depending on technical conditions. STMI's offers consist in building global solution and preliminary design of installation either in dispersed form (batch) or in column (cartridge filtration). Those products are used all over the world not only in the nuclear business (Canada, US, Belgium, France...) but also in other fields. Indeed, it provides competitive solutions to many domains of application especially water pollution control, liquid waste treatment in the nuclear business by decreasing the activity level of waste. The following paper will focus on the theoretical principle of the mineral exchanger, its implementation and the feed back collected by STMI. (author)

Polito, Aurelie [Areva NC - BUA STMI, 1 route de la Noue - 91196 Gif sur Yvette, Cedex (France)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Integrating Steel Production with Mineral Carbon Sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of the project were (i) to develop a combination iron oxide production and carbon sequestration plant that will use serpentine ores as the source of iron and the extraction tailings as the storage element for CO2 disposal, (ii) the identification of locations within the US where this process may be implemented and (iii) to create a standardized process to characterize the serpentine deposits in terms of carbon disposal capacity and iron and steel production capacity. The first objective was not accomplished. The research failed to identify a technique to accelerate direct aqueous mineral carbonation, the limiting step in the integration of steel production and carbon sequestration. Objective (ii) was accomplished. It was found that the sequestration potential of the ultramafic resource surfaces in the US and Puerto Rico is approximately 4,647 Gt of CO2 or over 500 years of current US production of CO2. Lastly, a computer model was developed to investigate the impact of various system parameters (recoveries and efficiencies and capacities of different system components) and serpentinite quality as well as incorporation of CO2 from sources outside the steel industry.

Klaus Lackner; Paul Doby; Tuncel Yegulalp; Samuel Krevor; Christopher Graves

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

SkyMine Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Topical Report addresses accomplishments achieved during Phase 1 of the SkyMine{reg_sign} Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project. The primary objectives of this project are to design, construct, and operate a system to capture CO{sub 2} from a slipstream of flue gas from a commercial coal-fired cement kiln, convert that CO{sub 2} to products having commercial value (i.e., beneficial use), show the economic viability of the CO{sub 2} capture and conversion process, and thereby advance the technology to a point of readiness for commercial scale demonstration and proliferation. The project will also substantiate market opportunities for the technology by sales of chemicals into existing markets, and identify opportunities to improve technology performance and reduce costs at commercial scale. The primary objectives of Phase 1 of the project were to elaborate proven SkyMine{reg_sign} process chemistry to commercial pilot-scale operation and complete the preliminary design ('Reference Plant Design') for the pilot plant to be built and operated in Phase 2. Additionally, during Phase 1, information necessary to inform a DOE determination regarding NEPA requirements for the project was developed, and a comprehensive carbon lifecycle analysis was completed. These items were included in the formal application for funding under Phase 2. All Phase 1 objectives were successfully met on schedule and within budget.

Joe Jones; Clive Barton; Mark Clayton; Al Yablonsky; David Legere

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

230

Assessment of industrial minerals and rocks in the controlled area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain in Nye County, Nevada, is a potential site for a permanent repository for high-level nuclear waste in Miocene ash flow tuff. The Yucca Mountain controlled area occupies approximately 98 km{sup 2} that includes the potential repository site. The Yucca Mountain controlled area is located within the southwestern Nevada volcanic field, a large area of Miocene volcanism that includes at least four major calderas or cauldrons. It is sited on a remnant of a Neogene volcanic plateau that was centered around the Timber Mountain caldera complex. The Yucca Mountain region contains many occurrences of valuable or potentially valuable industrial minerals, including deposits with past or current production of construction aggregate, borate minerals, clay, building stone, fluorspar, silicate, and zeolites. The existence of these deposits in the region and the occurrence of certain mineral materials at Yucca Mountain, indicate that the controlled area may have potential for industrial mineral and rock deposits. Consideration of the industrial mineral potential within the Yucca Mountain controlled area is mainly based on petrographic and lithologic studies of samples from drill holes in Yucca Mountain. Clay minerals, zeolites, fluorite, and barite, as minerals that are produced economically in Nevada, have been identified in samples from drill holes in Yucca Mountain.

Castor, S.B. [Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, Reno, NV (United States); Lock, D.E. [Mackay School of Mines, Reno, NV (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Predicting methane accumulations generated from humic Carboniferous coals in the Donbas fold belt (Ukraine)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The numerical modeling of the Ukrainian part of the Donbas fold belt indicates that the coalification pattern was controlled mainly by the maximum burial depth of coal seams and the heat flow (HF) (40-75 mW/m{sup 2}) during the Permian. The coalification pattern was overprinted by magmatic events during the Late Permian in the south syncline (150 mW/m{sup 2}) and during the Permian-Triassic in the north of the Krasnoarmeisk region (120 mW/m{sup 2}). The coalification pattern shows a strong increase in vitrinite reflectance values toward the east and southeastern parts of the study area likely caused by (1) an eastward increase in burial depth, (2) a probable eastward increase in HF, and, (3) probable magmatic activity. An increase in total erosion toward the eastern and southeastern parts was also observed with a maximum erosional amount of approximately 8 km (5 mi) in the southeastern part of the study area. The basin modeling of this area predicts that the main phase of hydrocarbon generation occurred during the Carboniferous-Early Permian subsidence. The magmatic events that occurred during the Permian-Triassic caused renewed pulses of hydrocarbon generation. A large amount of the generated hydrocarbons was lost to the surface because of a lack of seals. However, the numerical simulation predicts accumulations of about 2 tcf (57 billion m{sup 3}) of methane generated from Carboniferous coals in the south and main synclines, where Lower Permian seal rocks are preserved. Finally, this study provides data on methane resources along the northern flank

Alsaab, D.; Elie, M.; Izart, A.; Sachsenhofer, R.F.; Privalov, V.A. [Paradigm Co., Nancy (France)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

232

Quantitative room-temperature mineralization of airborne formaldehyde using  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantitative room-temperature mineralization of airborne formaldehyde using Quantitative room-temperature mineralization of airborne formaldehyde using manganese oxide catalysts Title Quantitative room-temperature mineralization of airborne formaldehyde using manganese oxide catalysts Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2011 Authors Sidheswaran, Meera A., Hugo Destaillats, Douglas P. Sullivan, Joern Larsen, and William J. Fisk Journal Applied Catalysis B - Environmental Issue 107 Pagination 34-41 Date Published 2011 Keywords commercial building ventilation & indoor environmental quality group, commercial building ventilation and indoor environmental quality group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, indoor environment department, indoor environment group DOI 10.1016/j.apcatb.2011.06.032 Attachment Size

233

Mineral transformation and biomass accumulation associated with uranium bioremediation at Rifle, Colorado  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

phase transformation and biomass accumulation associatedMineral Transformation and Biomass Accumulation Associatedof new mineral phases and biomass. Word count: 5496 (text) +

Li, L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

The influence of macrostructure and other physical characteristics on compressive parameters of mineral wool products.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The dissertation investigates the influence of macrostructure and other physical properties on mineral wool compressive parameters. The subject of the research is rigid mineral wool (more)

Buska,; Andrius

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Carbonate Mineralization of Volcanic Province Basalts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flood basalts are receiving increasing attention as possible host formations for geologic sequestration of anthropogenic CO2, with studies underway in the United States, India, Iceland, and Canada. As an extension of our previous experiments with Columbia River basalt, basalts from the eastern United States, India, and South Africa were reacted with aqueous dissolved CO2 and aqueous dissolved CO2-H2S mixtures under supercritical CO2 (scCO2) conditions to study the geochemical reactions resulting from injection of CO2 in such formations. The results of these studies are consistent with cation release behavior measured in our previous experiments (in press) for basalt samples tested in single pass flow through dissolution experiments under dilute solution and mildly acidic conditions. Despite the basalt samples having similar bulk chemistry, mineralogy and apparent dissolution kinetics, long-term static experiments show significant differences in rates of mineralization as well as compositions and morphologies of precipitates that form when the basalts are reacted with CO2-saturated water. For example, basalt from the Newark Basin in the United States was by far the most reactive of any basalt tested to date. Carbonate reaction products for the Newark Basin basalt were globular in form and contained significantly more Fe than the secondary carbonates that precipitated on the other basalt samples. In comparison, the post-reacted samples associated with the Columbia River basalts from the United States contained calcite grains with classic dogtooth spar morphology and trace cation substitution (Mg and Mn). Carbonation of the other basalts produced precipitates with compositions that varied chemically throughout the entire testing period. Examination of polished cross sections of the reacted grains by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy show precipitate overgrowths with varying chemical compositions. Compositional differences in the precipitates suggest changes in fluid chemistry unique to the dissolution behavior of each basalt sample reacted with CO2-saturated water. The Karoo basalt from South Africa appeared the least reactive, with very limited mineralization occurring during the testing with CO2-saturated water. The relative reactivity of different basalt samples were unexpectedly different in the experiments conducted using aqueous dissolved CO2-H2S mixtures versus those reacted with aqueous dissolved CO2 mixtures. For example, the Karoo basalt was highly reactive in the presence of aqueous dissolved CO2-H2S, as evident by small nodules of carbonate coating the basalt grains after 181 days of testing. However the most reactive basalt in CO2-H2O, Newark Basin, formed limited amounts of carbonate precipitates in the presence of aqueous dissolved CO2-H2S mixture. Basalt reactivity in CO2-H2O mixtures appears to be controlled by the composition of the glassy mesostasis, which is the most reactive component in the basalt rock. With the addition of H2S to the CO2-H2O system, basalt reactivity appears to be controlled by precipitation of coatings of insoluble Fe sulfides.

Schaef, Herbert T.; McGrail, B. Peter; Owen, Antionette T.

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

236

Geology and Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology and Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada Geology and Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geology and Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada Abstract Churchill County, in west-central Nevada, is an area of varied topography and geology that has had a rather small total mineral production. The western part of the county is dominated by the broad low valley of the Carson Sink, which is underlain by deposits of Lake Lahontan. The bordering mountain ranges to the west and south are of low relief and underlain largely by Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary units. Pre-Tertiary rocks are extensively exposed east of the Carson Sink in the Stillwater Range, Clan Alpine Mountains, Augusta Mountains, and New Pass Mountains. The eastern

237

Carbon Dioxide Sequestration by Direct Mineral Carbonation: Results...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequestration by Direct Mineral Carbonation: Results from Recent Studies and Current Status W.K. OConnor (oconnor@alrc.doe.gov) D.C. Dahlin (dahlin@alrc.doe.gov) D.N Nilsen...

238

Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Earth is a dynamic planet in which convection takes place on the scale of thousands of kilometers. Because Earth is mostly solid (except for its liquid-iron outer core), this convection causes deformation of solid rocks by plastic flow. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have discovered that seismic waves travel faster in certain directions. This seismic anisotropy appears to be related to the deformation of the constituent minerals. To understand the deformation mechanisms of mineral phases at this depth, researchers from Yale and UC Berkeley re-created the ultrahigh pressures of the deep Earth at ALS Beamline 12.2.2 while conducting in situ x-ray diffraction experiments to probe changes in crystal orientations.

239

Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Earth is a dynamic planet in which convection takes place on the scale of thousands of kilometers. Because Earth is mostly solid (except for its liquid-iron outer core), this convection causes deformation of solid rocks by plastic flow. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have discovered that seismic waves travel faster in certain directions. This seismic anisotropy appears to be related to the deformation of the constituent minerals. To understand the deformation mechanisms of mineral phases at this depth, researchers from Yale and UC Berkeley re-created the ultrahigh pressures of the deep Earth at ALS Beamline 12.2.2 while conducting in situ x-ray diffraction experiments to probe changes in crystal orientations.

240

Stewart Mineral Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mineral Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Mineral Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Stewart Mineral Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Stewart Mineral Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Weed, California Coordinates 41.4226498°, -122.3861269° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uravan mineral belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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241

Research on Using Carbide Slag to Mineralize the Carbon Dioxide ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... we come up with the crafts of using waste calcium carbide to mineralize CO2 in electrolytic aluminum waste gas, design and make out Venturi gas-liquid-solid...

242

Removal of mineral matter including pyrite from coal  

SciTech Connect

Mineral matter, including pyrite, is removed from coal by treatment of the coal with aqueous alkali at a temperature of about 175.degree. to 350.degree. C, followed by acidification with strong acid.

Reggel, Leslie (Pittsburgh, PA); Raymond, Raphael (Bethel Park, PA); Blaustein, Bernard D. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1976-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

243

Mercury Contents of Natural Thermal and Mineral Fluids, In- U...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Office, 1970 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Mercury Contents of Natural Thermal and Mineral Fluids, In- U.S. Geological...

244

CRITICAL MINERALS AND EMERGING ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES Statement of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as in compact-fluorescent light bulbs. These technological developments raise two concerns. First Minerals, and the U.S. Economy2 It was in this light that the standing Committee on Earth Resources

245

Phosphate-mineral interactions and potential consequences for nutrient cycling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biogeochemical cycling of phosphate is a key component in the overall production rate of coastal ecosystems. Mineral phases in the near-shore sediments play a significant role in the return of phosphate remineralized in ...

Oates, Richard Hunter

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Foote Mineral Co - PA 27  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Foote Mineral Co - PA 27 Foote Mineral Co - PA 27 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Foote Mineral Co. (PA.27 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Exton , Pennsylvania PA.27-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 PA.27-1 Site Operations: Processed rare earth, principally zirconium and monazite sand was processed on a pilot-plant scale. PA.27-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Limited quantity of material handled - Potential for contamination considered remote PA.27-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Zirconium, Possibly Uranium PA.27-1 PA.27-2 PA.27-3 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to Foote Mineral Co.

247

Indian Mineral Leasing Act of 1938 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Act of 1938 Act of 1938 Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Indian Mineral Leasing Act Year 1938 Url IndianMineralLeasing1938.jpg Description Provides for leasing of minerals on tribal lands References IMLA[1] United States v. Navajo Nation[2] The Indian Mineral Leasing Act of 1938 (IMLA) provides that "[u]nallotted lands within any Indian reservation," or otherwise under federal jurisdiction, "may, with the approval of the Secretary [of the Interior (Secretary)] ... , be leased for mining purposes, by authority of the tribal council or other authorized spokesmen for such Indians." 25 U.S.C. § 396a. The Act aims to provide Indian tribes with a profitable source of revenue and to foster tribal self-determination by giving Indians a greater

248

Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Earth is a dynamic planet in which convection takes place on the scale of thousands of kilometers. Because Earth is mostly solid (except for its liquid-iron outer core), this convection causes deformation of solid rocks by plastic flow. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have discovered that seismic waves travel faster in certain directions. This seismic anisotropy appears to be related to the deformation of the constituent minerals. To understand the deformation mechanisms of mineral phases at this depth, researchers from Yale and UC Berkeley re-created the ultrahigh pressures of the deep Earth at ALS Beamline 12.2.2 while conducting in situ x-ray diffraction experiments to probe changes in crystal orientations.

249

Hyperspectral mineral mapping in support of geothermal exploration-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

mineral mapping in support of geothermal exploration- mineral mapping in support of geothermal exploration- Examples from Long Valley Caldera, CA and Dixie Valley, NV, USA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Hyperspectral mineral mapping in support of geothermal exploration- Examples from Long Valley Caldera, CA and Dixie Valley, NV, USA Abstract N/A Authors B. A. Martini, E. A. Silver, W. L. Pickles and P. A. Cocks Conference Geothermal Resources Council Annual Meeting; Morelia, Mexico; 2004 Published Geothermal Resources Council Annual Meeting;, 2004 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Hyperspectral mineral mapping in support of geothermal exploration- Examples from Long Valley Caldera, CA and Dixie Valley, NV, USA

250

Inducing Mineral Precipitation in Groundwater by Addition of Phosphate  

SciTech Connect

Induced precipitation of phosphate minerals to scavenge trace metals and radionuclides from groundwater is a potential remediation approach for contaminated aquifers. Phosphate minerals can sequester trace elements by primary mineral formation, solid solution formation and/or adsorption, and they are poorly soluble under many environmental conditions, making them attractive for long-term sustainable remediation. The success of such engineered schemes will depend on the particular mineral phases generated, their rates of formation, and their long term stability. The purpose of this study was to examine the precipitation of calcium phosphate minerals under conditions representative of a natural groundwater. Because microorganisms are present in groundwater, and because some proposed schemes for induced phosphate mineral precipitation rely on the stimulation of native groundwater populations, we also tested the effect of bacterial cells (initial densities of 105 and 107 ml-1) within the precipitation medium. We also tested the effect of a trace mixture of propionic, isovaleric, formic and butyric acids (total concentration 0.035 mM). The experiments showed that the general progression of mineral precipitation was similar under all of the conditions, with initial formation of amorphous calcium carbonate, and transformation to poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite (HAP) by the end of the week-long experiments. The presence of the bacterial cells appeared to delay precipitation, although by the end of 7 days the overall extent of precipitation was similar for all of the treatments. The stoichiometry of the final precipitates as well as results of Rietveld refinement of x-ray diffraction data indicated that the treatments including organic acids and bacterial cells resulted in increased distortion of the HAP crystal lattice, with the higher concentration of cells resulting in the greatest distortion. Uptake of Sr into the phosphate minerals was decreased in the treatments with cells and organic acids, compared to the control. The results of the experiments enable a greater understanding of the challenges associated with phosphate-based remediation schemes for contaminated environments.

Karen E. Wright; Yoshiko Fujita; Thomas Hartmann; Mark Conrad

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Absorbents for Mineral Oil Spill Cleanup, Phase 3: Field Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residual mineral oil on the ground surface following electrical equipment spills is often removed using a surface application of an absorbent material. Traditional absorbent products include clays, sawdust-like products, silica-based products, and various organic industry byproduct materials. This project was performed in three phases. Phase 1 included testing to measure overall mineral oil absorption efficiency of 24 absorbents. In Phase 2, absorbents studied in Phase 1 were further ...

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

252

Source category survey: mineral wool manufacturing industry. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report contains background information which was used for determining the need for new source performance standards (NSPS) for the mineral wool manufacturing industry in accordance with Section 111 of the Clean Air Act. Air pollution emissions and growth trends of the mineral wool industry are examined. Manufacturing processes, control strategies, and state and local air pollution regulations are discussed. The impact of a potential NSPS on particulate and carbon monoxide emissions is calculated.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Mineral processing techniques for recycling investment casting shell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Albany Research Center of the U.S. Department of Energy used materials characterization and minerals beneficiation methods to separate and beneficially modify spent investment-mold components to identify recycling opportunities and minimize environmentally sensitive wastes. The physical and chemical characteristics of the shell materials were determined and used to guide bench-scale research to separate reusable components by mineral-beneficiation techniques. Successfully concentrated shell materials were evaluated for possible use in new markets.

Dahlin, Cheryl L.; Nilsen, David N.; Dahlin, David C.; Hunt, Alton H.; Collins, W. Keith

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Selective flotation of phosphate minerals with hydroxamate collectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for separating phosphate minerals from a mineral mixture, particularly from high-dolomite containing phosphate ores. The method involves conditioning the mineral mixture by contacting in an aqueous in environment with a collector in an amount sufficient for promoting flotation of phosphate minerals. The collector is a hydroxamate compound of the formula; ##STR1## wherein R is generally hydrophobic and chosen such that the collector has solubility or dispersion properties it can be distributed in the mineral mixture, typically an alkyl, aryl, or alkylaryl group having 6 to 18 carbon atoms. M is a cation, typically hydrogen, an alkali metal or an alkaline earth metal. Preferably, the collector also comprises an alcohol of the formula, R'--OH wherein R' is generally hydrophobic and chosen such that the collector has solubility or dispersion properties so that it can be distributed in the mineral mixture, typically an alkyl, aryl, or alkylaryl group having 6 to 18 carbon atoms.

Miller, Jan D. (Salt Lake City, UT); Wang, Xuming (Salt Lake City, UT); Li, Minhua (Salt Lake City, UT)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Iowa State Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute  

SciTech Connect

During 1990--1991, the Iowa State Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute (ISMMRRI) has worked diligently to further the objectives of the Mineral Institute Program. About 70% of our Allotment Grant funding goes toward research and education of graduate students within the participating departments of the university. It is our goal to encourage graduate students in diverse fields such as agronomy, engineering, geology, landscape architecture, and many others to pursue a career in mining- and mineral-related fields by preparing them to either enter the private or public sectors. During the 1990 calendar year, ISMMRRI granted research assistantships to 17 graduate students to perform research in topics relating to mineral exploration, characterization and processing, extractive metallurgy, mining engineering, fuel science, mineral waste management, and mined-land reclamation. Research areas include the following: Fluid-inclusion studies on fluorspar mineral deposits in an actively mined region; Geochemical modeling of gold and gold-telluride deposits; Characterization of coal particles for surface-based beneficiation; Impact of surface mining and reclamation of a gypsum deposit area on the surrounding community; Stress-strain response of fine coal particles during transport and storage; Recovery of metal values from mining wastes using bioleaching; Coal beneficiation utilizing triboelectric charging in a fast fluidized bed; and Mathematical modeling of breakage for optimum sizing during crushing of rock.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Electron loss rates from the outer radiation belt caused by the filling of the outer plasmasphere: the calm before the storm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements from 7 spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit are analyzed to determine the decay rate of the number density of the outer electron radiation belt prior to the onset of high-speed-stream-driven geomagnetic storms. Superposed-data analysis is used wan(?) a collection of 124 storms. When there is a calm before the storm, the electron number density decays exponentially before the storm with a 3.4-day e-folding time: beginning about 4 days before storm onset, the density decreases from {approx}4x10{sup -4} cm{sup -3} to {approx}1X 10{sup -4} cm{sup -3}. When there is not a calm before the storm, the number-density decay is very smalL The decay in the number density of radiation-belt electrons is believed to be caused by pitch-angle scattering of electrons into the atmospheric loss cone as the outer plasmasphere fills during the calms. While the radiation-belt electron density decreases, the temperature of the electron radiation belt holds approximately constant, indicating that the electron precipitation occurs equally at all energies. Along with the number density decay, the pressure of the outer electron radiation belt decays and the specific entropy increases. From the measured decay rates, the electron flux to the atmosphere is calculated and that flux is 3 orders of magnitude less than thermal fluxes in the magnetosphere, indicating that the radiation-belt pitch-angle scattering is 3 orders weaker than strong diffusion. Energy fluxes into the atmosphere are calculated and found to be insufficient to produce visible airglow.

Borovsky, Joseph E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Denton, Michael H [LANCASTER UNIV

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Minerals yearbook: Mineral industries of the Middle East. Volume 3. 1989 international review  

SciTech Connect

The production and processing of crude petroleum and natural gas are the dominant economic sectors of the Middle East. The 15 countries that constitute the region accounted for 26% of world crude petroleum output, 17% of world natural gas plant liquid production, and almost 5% of world dry natural gas production. About 66% of total world crude petroleum reserves and 31% of total world natural gas reserves are in the Middle East. U.S. imports of mineral-based materials from the region were primarily energy products. U.S. net oil imports from the Middle East, which include crude petroleum, natural gas liquids, and petroleum refinery products, were about 26% of total U.S. net oil imports or about 680 million barrels in 1989.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Coke mineral transformations in the experimental blast furnace  

SciTech Connect

Blast furnace efficiency may be improved by optimizing coke reactivity. Some but not all forms of mineral matter in the coke modify its reactivity, but changes in mineral matter that occur within coke while in the blast furnace have not been fully quantified. To determine changes in mineral matter forms in the blast furnace, coke samples from a dissection study in the LKAB experimental blast furnace (EBF) were characterized using SEM/EDS analysis, EPMA (microprobe), and low-temperature ashing/quantitative XRD analysis. Variations in alkali concentration, particularly potassium, dominated the compositional changes. At high concentrations of potassium, the mineral matter was largely potassium-bearing but even more potassium was diffused throughout the coke and not associated with mineral matter. There was little difference in potassium concentration between the core and surface of the coke pieces, suggesting that potassium diffused rapidly through the whole coke. Iron, calcium, silicon, and aluminum concentrations were relatively constant in comparison, although the mineralogy of all elements changed significantly with changing temperature. 23 refs., 20 figs., 9 tabs.

Kelli Kazuberns; Sushil Gupta; Mihaela Grigore; David French; Richard Sakurovs; Mats Hallin; Bo Lindblom; Veena Sahajwalla [University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia). Cooperative Research Centre for Coal in Sustainable Development (CCSD)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

259

Buckhorn Mineral Wells Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Buckhorn Mineral Wells Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Buckhorn Mineral Wells Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Buckhorn Mineral Wells Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Mesa, Arizona Coordinates 33.4222685°, -111.8226402° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

260

Mineral Recovery from Geothermal Fluids | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mineral Recovery from Geothermal Fluids Mineral Recovery from Geothermal Fluids Jump to: navigation, search Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects for Mineral Recovery from Geothermal Fluids Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026 further results","default":"","geoservice":"google","zoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","forceshow":true,"showtitle":true,"hidenamespace":false,"template":false,"title":"","label":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"locations":[{"text":"

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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261

Underground radio technology saves miners and emergency response personnel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Underground radio technology saves miners and emergency response Underground radio technology saves miners and emergency response personnel Underground radio technology saves miners and emergency response personnel Founded through LANL, Vital Alert Technologies, Inc. (Vital Alert) has launched a wireless, two-way real-time voice communication system that is effective through 1,000+ feet of solid rock. April 3, 2012 Vital Alert's C1000 mine and tunnel radios use magnetic induction, advanced digital communications techniques and ultra-low frequency transmission to wirelessly provide reliable 2-way voice, text, or data links through rock strata and other solid media. Vital Alert's C1000 mine and tunnel radios use magnetic induction, advanced digital communications techniques and ultra-low frequency transmission to wirelessly provide reliable 2-way voice, text, or data links through rock

262

Hyperspectral Mineral Mapping For Geothermal Exploration On The Pyramid  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hyperspectral Mineral Mapping For Geothermal Exploration On The Pyramid Hyperspectral Mineral Mapping For Geothermal Exploration On The Pyramid Lake Paiute Reservation, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Hyperspectral Mineral Mapping For Geothermal Exploration On The Pyramid Lake Paiute Reservation, Nevada Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Over 2000 km2 (772 mi2) of 5 m resolution Hymap hyperspectral data was acquired over the Pyramid Lake Paiute Reservation in the Fall of 2004. Subsequent image processing and data analysis has identified reflectance spectra for alunite, kaolinite/halloysite, illite, gypsum, vegetation, and carbonate. A portable spectrometer is being used for in situ validation, along with laboratory measurements and X-ray diffraction analyses of samples collected in the field. We are in the process of

263

STATE OF OREGON DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND MINERAL INDUSTRIES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OREGON OREGON DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND MINERAL INDUSTRIES Portland, Oregon 97201 910 State Office Building r DOE/ID/12526--T2 OPEN-FILE REPORT 0-86-3 DE87 013077 INVESTIGATION OF THE TEIERMAL REGIME AND GEOLOGIC HISTORY OF THE DRILLING IN THE CASCADE RANGE CASCADE VOLCANIC ARC: FIRST PHASE OF A PROGRAM FOR SCIENTIFIC Prepared by George R . Priest Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries Preparation and publication of this document were supported b the Ore on Department of Geology and Mineral Industries and Grant No. DE-%G07-841&.2526 from the U . S . Department of Energy DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees,

264

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- International Minerals and Chemical  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

International Minerals and Chemical International Minerals and Chemical Corp - Pilot Plant - FL 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: International Minerals and Chemical Corp - Pilot Plant (FL.02) Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Mulberry , Florida FL.02-1 Evaluation Year: 1985 FL.02-2 Site Operations: Erected and operated a pilot plant to process material from the leached zone of the Florida pebble phosphate field for the recovery of uranium and other saleable products and also conducted experimental investigations to recover uranium from phosphates. FL.02-3 FL.02-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority FL.02-6 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium FL.02-3 FL.02-4 Radiological Survey(s): Yes FL.02-1

265

Lung cancer epidemiology in New Mexico uranium miners  

SciTech Connect

This investigation assesses the health effects of radon progeny exposure in New Mexico uranium miners. Cumulative exposures sustained by most New Mexico miners are well below those received earlier in the Colorado Plateau. This project utilizes the research opportunity offered by New Mexico miners to address unresolved issues related to radon progeny exposure: (1) the lung cancer risk of lower levels of exposure, (2) interaction between radon progeny exposure and cigarette smoking in the causation of lung cancer, (3) the relationship between lung cancer histologic type and radon progeny exposure, and (4) possible effects of radon progeny exposure other than lung cancer. A cohort study of 3800 men with at least one year of underground uranium mining experience in New Mexico is in progress. Results are discussed.

Samet, J.M.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Hyperspectral Mineral Mapping In Support Of Geothermal Exploration-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mineral Mapping In Support Of Geothermal Exploration- Mineral Mapping In Support Of Geothermal Exploration- Examples From Long Valley Caldera, Ca And Dixie Valley, Nv, Usa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Hyperspectral Mineral Mapping In Support Of Geothermal Exploration- Examples From Long Valley Caldera, Ca And Dixie Valley, Nv, Usa Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Growing interest and exploration dollars within the geothermal sector have paved the way for increasingly sophisticated suites of geophysical and geochemical tools and methodologies. The efforts to characterize and assess known geothermal fields and find new, previously unknown resources has been aided by the advent of higher spatial resolution airborne geophysics (e.g. aeromagnetics), development of new seismic

267

Iowa State Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute  

SciTech Connect

This final report describes the activities of the Iowa State Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute (ISMMRRI) at Iowa State University for the period July 1, 1989, to June 30, 1990. Activities include research in mining- and mineral-related areas, education and training of scientists and engineers in these fields, administration of the Institute, and cooperative interactions with industry, government agencies, and other research centers. During this period, ISMMRRI has supported research efforts to: (1) Investigate methods of leaching zinc from sphalerite-containing ores. (2) Study the geochemistry and geology of an Archean gold deposit and of a gold-telluride deposit. (3) Enchance how-quality aggregates for use in construction. (4) Pre-clean coal by triboelectric charging in a fluidized-bed. (5) Characterize the crystal/grain alignment during processing of yttrium-barium-copper-perovskite (1-2-3) superconductors. (5) Study the fluid inclusion properties of a fluorite district. (6) Study the impacts of surface mining on community planning. (7) Assess the hydrophobicity of coal and pyrite for beneficiation. (8) Investigate the use of photoacoustic absorption spectroscopy for monitoring unburnt carbon in the exhaust gas from coal-fired boilers. The education and training program continued within the interdepartmental graduate minor in mineral resources includes courses in such areas as mining methods, mineral processing, industrial minerals, extractive metallurgy, coal science and technology, and reclamation of mined land. In addition, ISMMRRI hosted the 3rd International Conference on Processing and Utilization of High-Sulfur Coals in Ames, Iowa. The Institute continues to interact with industry in order to foster increased cooperation between academia and the mining and mineral community.

Not Available

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Evaluation of a Process-Based Agro-Ecosystem Model (Agro-IBIS) across the U.S. Corn Belt: Simulations of the Interannual Variability in Maize Yield  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process-based terrestrial ecosystem model, Agro-IBIS, was used to simulate maize yield in a 13-state region of the U.S. Corn Belt from 1958 to 1994 across a 0.5 terrestrial grid. For validation, county-level census [U.S. Department of ...

Christopher J. Kucharik

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Reproducing MEES Is Strictly Prohibited MEES 47:11 15 March 2004 The Value Of Extra-Heavy Crude Oil From The Orinoco Belt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be recoverable. (This figure, to give us an idea of its magnitude, is equal to the proven crude oil reserves, with the exception of a few deposits in the Machete area, the type of crude found in the Orinoco Oil Belt is mobile essentially contains extra-heavy crude: crude oil of less than 10º API (in other words crude that is heavier

O'Donnell, Tom

270

Oregon State Department of Geology and Mineral Industries | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

State Department of Geology and Mineral Industries State Department of Geology and Mineral Industries Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Oregon State Department of Geology and Mineral Industries Name Oregon State Department of Geology and Mineral Industries Address Ste. 965 Northeast Oregon Street Place Portland, OR Zip 97232 Website http://www.oregongeology.org/s Coordinates 45.5286301°, -122.656652° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.5286301,"lon":-122.656652,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

271

Fluidization Technologies for the Mineral, Materials, and Energy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluidized Bed Applications for the Minerals Industry and Renewable Energy: Marcus ... adaptation and scale-up to meet specific customer/market requirements. ... In the course of developing a new industrial process, information produced at the ... Chemical analysis of the reduced ore sample, the metal sample and the slag...

272

Division of Energy and Mineral Development | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Division of Energy and Mineral Development Division of Energy and Mineral Development Jump to: navigation, search Logo: IEED Division of Energy and Mineral Development Name IEED Division of Energy and Mineral Development Address 13922 Denver West Parkway, Ste. 200 Place Lakewood, CO Zip 80401-3142 Phone number (303) 969-5270 Website http://www.bia.gov/WhoWeAre/AS Coordinates 39.745142°, -105.154088° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.745142,"lon":-105.154088,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

273

SoS Minerals Expert Group Science and Implementation Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resources, including wind and solar; a growth in the use electric and hybrid vehicles; and increasing energy of these minerals and elements, governed by the imperative to decrease environmental impact. Figure 1 Historical compounded by low substitutability and recycling rates (commonly

Brierley, Andrew

274

Commissioning Of The MINER{nu}A Tracking Prototype  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MINER{nu}A is a neutrino scattering experiment that uses the NuMI beamline at Fermilab. A Tracking Prototype was assembled, commissioned and tested at Fermilab before moving it into the NuMI beamline. A description of some of the main commissioning activities is presented here.

Castorena, J.; Felix, J.; Higuera, A.; Urrutia, Z. [Universidad De Guanajuato, Division De Ciencias E Ingenierias, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Zavala, G. [Universidad De Guanajuato, DCEA, Guanajuato, Guanajuato (Mexico)

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

275

Coop: 02-2011 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND MINERAL RESOURCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

work assignment: List any suggestions for improvement of the Co-op Program: Fall 2011 1 May 2011 hour that you performed is a value to your employer? PROGRAM ASSESSMENT 1 2 3 4 5 1. Was the work that you wereCoop: 02-2011 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND MINERAL RESOURCES COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM STUDENT

Mohaghegh, Shahab

276

A method for permanent CO2 mineral carbonation  

SciTech Connect

The Albany Research Center (ARC) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been conducting research to investigate the feasibility of mineral carbonation as a method for carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration. The research is part of a Mineral Carbonation Study Program within the Office of Fossil Energy in DOE. Other participants in this Program include DOE?s Los Alamos National Laboratory and National Energy Technology Laboratory, Arizona State University, and Science Applications International Corporation. The research has focused on ex-situ mineral carbonation in an aqueous system. The process developed at ARC reacts a slurry of magnesium silicate mineral with supercritical CO2 to produce a solid magnesium carbonate product. To date, olivine and serpentine have been used as the mineral reactant, but other magnesium silicates could be used as well. The process is designed to simulate the natural serpentinization reaction of ultramafic minerals, and consequently, these results may also be applicable to strategies for in-situ geological sequestration. Baseline tests were begun in distilled water on ground products of foundry-grade olivine. Tests conducted at 150 C and subcritical CO2 pressures (50 atm) resulted in very slow conversion to carbonate. Increasing the partial pressure of CO2 to supercritical (>73 atm) conditions, coupled with agitation of the slurry and gas dispersion within the water column, resulted in significant improvement in the extent of reaction in much shorter reaction times. A change from distilled water to a bicarbonate/salt solution further improved the rate and extent of reaction. When serpentine, a hydrated mineral, was used instead of olivine, extent of reaction was poor until heat treatment was included prior to the carbonation reaction. Removal of the chemically bound water resulted in conversion to carbonate similar to those obtained with olivine. Recent results have shown that conversions of nearly 80 pct are achievable after 30 minutes at test conditions of 155 C and 185 atm CO2 in a bicarbonate/salt solution. The results from the current studies suggest that reaction kinetics can be further improved. Future tests will examine additional pressure/temperature regimes, various pretreatment options,and solution modifications.

Dahlin, David C.; O'Connor, William K.; Nilsen, David N.; Rush, G.E.; Walters, Richard P.; Turner, Paul C.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Uranium Mines and Uranium Mineral Localities Visited Country State/Province County/District Mine Name U Minerals Present  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Uranium Mines and Uranium Mineral Localities Visited Country State/Province County/District Mine USA New Mexico Grants Zia Mines Tyuyamunite 1999 USA Arizona Gila Hope Mine Uraninite 2001 USA Arizona Gila Red Bluff Mine Uraninite 2001 USA Wyoming Fremont Congo (Section 16 Mine) Carnotite 2003 USA

278

Geophysical technique for mineral exploration and discrimination based on electromagnetic methods and associated systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Mineral exploration needs a reliable method to distinguish between uneconomic mineral deposits and economic mineralization. A method and system includes a geophysical technique for subsurface material characterization, mineral exploration and mineral discrimination. The technique introduced in this invention detects induced polarization effects in electromagnetic data and uses remote geophysical observations to determine the parameters of an effective conductivity relaxation model using a composite analytical multi-phase model of the rock formations. The conductivity relaxation model and analytical model can be used to determine parameters related by analytical expressions to the physical characteristics of the microstructure of the rocks and minerals. These parameters are ultimately used for the discrimination of different components in underground formations, and in this way provide an ability to distinguish between uneconomic mineral deposits and zones of economic mineralization using geophysical remote sensing technology.

Zhdanov; Michael S. (Salt Lake City, UT)

2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

279

Rend Lake College celebrates the opening of a new coal miner training facility  

SciTech Connect

The Coal Miner Training Center at Rend Lake College recently hosted the Illinois Mining Institute's annual conference and a regional mine rescue competition. The article gives an outline of the coal miner training and refresher course offered. 3 photos.

Buchsbaum, L.

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th EditionChapter 8 Minerals of Agricultural Importance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopic Analysis of Agriculture Products, 4th Edition Chapter 8 Minerals of Agricultural Importance Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 8 Minerals of Agric

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uravan mineral belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Abiotic/Biotic Degradation and Mineralization of N-Nitrosodimethylamine in Aquifer Sediments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) degradation rate and mineralization rate were measured in two aquifer sediments that received treatments to create oxic, reducing, and sequential reducing/oxic environments. Chemically reduced sediments rapidly abiotically degraded NDMA to nontoxic dimethylamine (DMA) to parts per trillion levels, then degraded to further products. NDMA was partially mineralized in reduced sediments (6 to 28 percent) at a slow rate (half-life 3,460 h) by an unknown abiotic/biotic pathway. In contrast, NDMA was mineralized more rapidly (half-life 342 h) and to a greater extent (30 to 81 percent) in oxic sediments with propane addition, likely by a propane monooxygenase pathway. NDMA mineralization in sequential reduced sediment followed by oxic sediment treatment did result in slightly more rapid mineralization and a greater mineralization extent relative to reduced systems. These increases were minor, so aerobic NDMA mineralization with oxygen and propane addition was the most viable in situ NDMA mineralization strategy.

Szecsody, James E.; McKinley, James P.; Breshears, Andrew T.; Crocker, Fiona H.

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

282

RIETVELD REFINEMENT OF REAL STRUCTURE PARAMETERS OF DISORDERED CLAY MINERALS IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-conventional hydrocarbons in Germany) Germany's potential for shale oil and shale gas NIKO seal gas-rich shale shale: sedimentary rock which contains quartz, carbonates and clay minerals #12;clay minerals in shales quartz

Magee, Joseph W.

283

Finding a Link between Microbes and Mineral Deposits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Finding a Link between Microbes and Mineral Deposits Finding a Link between Microbes and Mineral Deposits Contamination around mining sites is a significant problem worldwide. Acid mine drainage, for example, is a threat to surface and groundwater near mines. It occurs when metal-sulfide ores are exposed to air and water and the sulfide is transformed to sulfuric acid. Moreover, metals such as zinc are toxic and can leach into groundwater and contaminate wells and other drinking water supplies. Results of EDX (bottom left) and x-ray microprobe fluorescence (top right) analysis of specific biomineralized zinc sulfide precipitates. The sensitivity of the x-ray microprobe enables identification of arsenic and selenium constituents in the zinc sulfide precipitate. Above: Results of EDX (bottom left) and x-ray microprobe fluorescence (top

284

Minerals and Mining Program (South Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Mining Program (South Dakota) and Mining Program (South Dakota) Minerals and Mining Program (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Fed. Government Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources The Minerals and Mining Program has the authority to oversee mining activities in the state and issue regulations pertaining to the permitting and environmental impact mitigation of, and reclamation following, exploration, mining, and oil and gas production. Exploration and mining activities require permits, and mines require licenses for construction and

285

A Novel Approach to Experimental Studies of Mineral DIsoolution Kinetics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Novel ApproAch to experimeNtAl Novel ApproAch to experimeNtAl StudieS of miNerAl diSSolutioN KiNeticS Background DOE is conducting pilot CO 2 injection tests to evaluate the concept of geologic sequestration. One strategy that has the potential to enhance CO 2 solubility and reduce the risk of CO 2 leaking back to the surface is dissolution of indigenous minerals in the geological formation and formation of secondary carbonate precipitates. This both increases the brine pH and immobilizes the CO 2 . Clearly, the rates at which these dissolution and precipitation reactions occur directly determine the efficiency of this option. However, one of the fundamental problems in modern geochemistry is the persistent two to five orders of magnitude discrepancy between laboratory-measured and field-derived

286

Interaction Between Toxic Metals and Complex Biofilm/Mineral/Solution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

highlights highlights title by Alexis S. Templeton, Thomas P. Trainor, and Gordon E. Brown, Jr., Stanford University Sorption reactions on particle surfaces can dramatically affect the speciation, cycling and bioavailability of essential micronutrients (i.e. PO43-, Cu, Zn etc.) and toxic metals and metalloids (i.e. Pb, Hg, Se, As) in soils and aquatic environments. Considerable attention has been focused on understanding metal sorption reactions at a molecular/mechanistic level and the effects of metal concentration, pH, ionic strength, and complexing ligands on the ways in which metal ions bind to the surfaces of common mineral phases such as Fe-, Mn- and Al-(hydr)oxides and clays. However, a significant fraction of mineral surfaces in natural environments are extensively colonized by microbial organisms, which can also be potent sorbents for metals due to the large number of reactive functional groups that decorate the cell walls and outer membranes of bacterial surfaces.

287

Production of mineral wool from lignite coal slag  

SciTech Connect

This is a report of research conducted at the University of North Dakota concerning the utilization of the ''molten state'' condition of lignite coal slag for the fabrication of a mineral wool insulant. The research was funded by the Mercer County Energy Development Board with monies allocated from the Department of Energy. The objective of the research was to investigate, on a preliminary basis, some critical criteria such as the chemical nature of the raw material, the ability of the slag to be fiberized, as well as the possibilities that such a insulant could indeed have a market in the immediate area. In essence it was felt that a mineral wool product could be produced at coal fired power plants which burn lignite at a minimal cost. The major cost saving would come from the fact that the raw material that would be used would not have to have a great deal of energy added at the expense of the consumer.

Manz, O.E.; Eaton, L.C.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Miner County, South Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Miner County, South Dakota: Energy Resources Miner County, South Dakota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 44.0643951°, -97.6982272° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.0643951,"lon":-97.6982272,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

289

Hydrodesulfurization and hydrodenitrogenation catalysts obtained from coal mineral matter  

SciTech Connect

A hydrotreating catalyst is prepared from coal mineral matter obtained by low temperature ashing coals of relatively low bassanite content by the steps of: (a) depositing on the low temperature ash 0.25-3 grams of an iron or nickel salt in water per gram of ash and drying a resulting slurry; (b) crushing and sizing a resulting solid; and (c) heating the thus-sized solid powder in hydrogen.

Liu, Kindtoken H. D. (Newark, DE); Hamrin, Jr., Charles E. (Lexington, KY)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Data report: resource ratings of the RARE II tracts in the Idaho-Wyoming-Utah and the central Appalachian thrust belts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The assessment forms contained in this report constitute the data used in two resource assessments described in A Systematic Method for Resource Rating with Two Applications to Potential Wilderness Areas (Voelker et al. 1979). The assessments were performed for two geologic subprovinces containing proposed wilderness areas identified in the Forest Service Roadless Area Review and Evaluation (RARE II) program. The subprovinces studied are the Idaho-Wyoming-Utah thrust belt and the central Appalachians thrust belt. Each assessment form contains location data, resource ratings, and supporting information for a single tract. A unique dual rating that reflects geologic favorability and certainty of resource occurrence is assigned to each resource category evaluated. Individual ratings are synthesized into an overall tract-importance rating. Ratings created by others are included for comparative purposes wherever available. Supporting information consists of commentary and references that explain and document the ratings listed.

Voelker, A.H.; Wedow, H.; Oakes, E.; Scheffler, P.K.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

THE TAOS PROJECT: UPPER BOUNDS ON THE POPULATION OF SMALL KUIPER BELT OBJECTS AND TESTS OF MODELS OF FORMATION AND EVOLUTION OF THE OUTER SOLAR SYSTEM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have analyzed the first 3.75 years of data from the Taiwanese American Occultation Survey (TAOS). TAOS monitors bright stars to search for occultations by Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs). This data set comprises 5 x 10{sup 5} star hours of multi-telescope photometric data taken at 4 or 5 Hz. No events consistent with KBO occultations were found in this data set. We compute the number of events expected for the Kuiper Belt formation and evolution models of Pan and Sari, Kenyon and Bromley, Benavidez and Campo Bagatin, and Fraser. A comparison with the upper limits we derive from our data constrains the parameter space of these models. This is the first detailed comparison of models of the KBO size distribution with data from an occultation survey. Our results suggest that the KBO population is composed of objects with low internal strength and that planetary migration played a role in the shaping of the size distribution.

Bianco, F. B. [Department of Physics, University of California Santa Barbara, Mail Code 9530, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9530 (United States); Zhang, Z.-W.; King, S.-K.; Wang, J.-H.; Lee, T.; Lin, H.-C. [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Lehner, M. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Mondal, S. [Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences (ARIES), Manora Peak, Nainital 263 129 (India); Giammarco, J. [Department of Astronomy and Physics, Eastern University, 1300 Eagle Road, Saint Davids, PA 19087 (United States); Holman, M. J.; Alcock, C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Coehlo, N. K. [Department of Statistics, University of California-Berkeley, 367 Evans Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Axelrod, T. [Steward Observatory, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Room N204, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Byun, Y.-I.; Kim, D.-W. [Department of Astronomy, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Chen, W. P. [Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, 300 Jhongda Road, Jhongli 32054, Taiwan (China); Cook, K. H. [Institute for Geophysics and Planetary Physics, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Dave, R. [Initiative in Innovative Computing at Harvard, 60 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); De Pater, I. [Department of Astronomy, University of California-Berkeley, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lissauer, J. J. [Space Science and Astrobiology Division 245-3, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)], E-mail: fbianco@lcogt.net (and others)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

292

Mineral Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mineral Hot Springs Geothermal Area Mineral Hot Springs Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mineral Hot Springs Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.78833333,"lon":-114.7216667,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

293

New Mexico Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New Mexico Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department New Mexico Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department Jump to: navigation, search Name New Mexico Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department Address 1220 South St. Francis Drive Place Santa Fe, NM Zip 87505 Phone number (505) 476-3200 Website http://www.emnrd.state.nm.us/E Coordinates 35.669674°, -105.957212° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.669674,"lon":-105.957212,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

294

Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Upper Burbank Disposal Cell, Uravan, Colorado, DOE/AL/62350-250, Revision 1, July 1999  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LONG-TERM SURVEILLANCE PLAN LONG-TERM SURVEILLANCE PLAN FOR THE UPPER BURBANK DISPOSAL CELL URAUAN, COLORADO July 1999 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Restoration Dhrision U MTRA Project Team Albuquerque, New Mexico DOElAU62350-250 REV. 1 Prepared by Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. Albuquerque, New Mexico This page intentionally left blank LONG-TERM GURMIWNCE P U N FOR THE UPPER BURBANK DrsPosAL CEU. WYAAI. COhORAOD TABLE OF DONENTe TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 PURPOSEANDSCOPE .............................................................................................. 1-1 2 . 1 1 FINAL SlTE CONDITIONS ................... ...-.... ...............................................*.............. 2-1 ..................................................................... ................... 2

295

Developing a Mechanistic Understanding of Lamellar Hydroxide Mineral Carbonation Reaction Processes to Reduce CO2 Mineral Sequestration Process Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mechanistic Understanding of Lamellar Hydroxide Mechanistic Understanding of Lamellar Hydroxide Mineral Carbonation Reaction Processes to Reduce CO 2 Mineral Sequestration Process Cost Michael J. McKelvy (mckelvy@asu.edu; 480-965-4535), Andrew V. G. Chizmeshya (chizmesh@asu.edu; 480-965-6072), Hamdallah Bearat (Hamdallah.Bearat@asu.edu; 480-965-2624), Renu Sharma (Renu.Sharma@asu.edu; 480-965-4541), and Ray W. Carpenter (carpenter@asu.edu; 480-965-4549) Center for Solid State Science and Science and Engineering of Materials PhD Program, P.O. Box 871704, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 USA ABSTRACT The potential environmental effects of increasing atmospheric CO 2 levels are of major worldwide concern. One alternative for managing CO 2 emissions is carbon sequestration: the capture and secure confinement of CO

296

A Search for Occultations of Bright Stars by Small Kuiper Belt Objects using Megacam on the MMT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We conducted a search for occultations of bright stars by Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) to estimate the density of sub-km KBOs in the sky. We report here the first results of this occultation survey of the outer solar system conducted in June 2007 and June/July 2008 at the MMT Observatory using Megacam, the large MMT optical imager. We used Megacam in a novel shutterless continuous--readout mode to achieve high precision photometry at 200 Hz. We present an analysis of 220 star hours at signal-to-noise ratio of 25 or greater. The survey efficiency is greater than 10% for occultations by KBOs of diameter d>=0.7 km, and we report no detections in our dataset. We set a new 95% confidence level upper limit for the surface density \\Sigma_N(d) of KBOs larger than 1 km: \\Sigma_N(d>=1 km) = 0.7 km) <= 4.8e8 deg^-2.

Bianco, Federica B; McLeod, Brian A; Alcock, Charles R; Holman, Matthew J; Lehner, Matthew J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

A Summary of Information on the Behavior of the Yakima Fold Belt as a Structural Entity -- Topical Report  

SciTech Connect

This document is one in a series of topical reports compiled by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to summarize technical information on selected topics important to the performance of a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) of the Hanford Site. The purpose of this report is to summarize available data and analyses relevant to the Yakima Fold Belt (YFB) that may bear on the question of whether or not the YFB behaves as a single seismotectonic province in which activity along one fold structure is representative of behavior along all other fold structures. This topic has met with a fairly high level of contention in the expert community and has the potential to result in significant impacts on an evaluation of seismic hazard at the Hanford Site. This report defines the relevant alternative conceptual models relevant to this technical issue and the arguments and data that support those models. It provides a brief description of the technical issue and principal uncertainties; a general overview on the nature of the technical issue, along with alternative conceptual models, supporting arguments and information, and uncertainties; and finally, it suggests some possible approaches for reducing uncertainties regarding this issue.

Last, George V.; Winsor, Kelsey; Unwin, Stephen D.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

PRELIMINARY ANALYSIS OF WISE/NEOWISE 3-BAND CRYOGENIC AND POST-CRYOGENIC OBSERVATIONS OF MAIN BELT ASTEROIDS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present preliminary diameters and albedos for 13511 Main Belt asteroids (MBAs) that were observed during the 3-Band Cryo phase of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE; after the outer cryogen tank was exhausted) and as part of the NEOWISE Post-Cryo Survey (after the inner cryogen tank was exhausted). With a reduced or complete loss of sensitivity in the two long wavelength channels of WISE, the uncertainty in our fitted diameters and albedos is increased to {approx}20% for diameter and {approx}40% for albedo. Diameter fits using only the 3.4 and 4.6 {mu}m channels are shown to be dependent on the literature optical H absolute magnitudes. These data allow us to increase the number of size estimates for large MBAs which have been identified as members of dynamical families. We present thermal fits for 14 asteroids previously identified as the parents of a dynamical family that were not observed during the fully cryogenic mission.

Masiero, Joseph R.; Mainzer, A. K.; Bauer, J. M.; Cabrera, M. S. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., MS 321-520, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Grav, T. [Planetary Science Institute, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Cutri, R. M. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Nugent, C., E-mail: Joseph.Masiero@jpl.nasa.gov [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

A BATSE investigation of radiation belt electrons precipitated by VLF waves. Final report, 2 May 1994-24 April 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Compton Observatory commonly encounters fluxes of energetic electrons which have been scattered from the inner radiation belt to the path of the satellite by resonant interactions with VLF waves from powerful man-made transmitters. The present investigation was motivated by the fact that in the Fall of 1993, the Gamma Ray Observatory was boosted from a 650 km altitude circular orbit to a 750 km altitude circular orbit. This was an opportunity, for the first time, to make observations at two different altitudes using the same instrument. The authors have examined DISCLA data from the Burst & Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) experiment from 1 Sep. 1993 to 29 Jan. 1994. During the period of study they identified 48 instances of the satellite encountering a cloud of energetic electrons which had been scattered by VLF transmitters. They find that boosting the altitude of the circular orbit from 650 km to 750 km increased the intensity of cyclotron resonance scattered electrons by a factor of two. To search for long term changes in the cyclotron resonance precipitation, the authors have compared the approx. 750 km altitude data from 106 days at the end of 1993 with data at the same altitudes and time of year in 1991. The cyclotron resonance events in 1991 were three times more frequent and 25% of those cases were more intense than any seen in the 1993 data. The authors attribute this difference to increased level of geomagnetic activity in 1991 near the Solar Maximum.

Datlowe, D.W.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

A Summary of Coupled, Uncoupled, and Hybrid Tectonic Models for the Yakima Fold Belt--Topical Report  

SciTech Connect

This document is one in a series of topical reports compiled by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to summarize technical information on selected topics important to the performance of a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis of the Hanford Site. The purpose of this report is to summarize the range of opinions and supporting information expressed by the expert community regarding whether a coupled or uncoupled model, or a combination of both, best represents structures in the Yakima Fold Belt. This issue was assessed to have a high level of contention with up to moderate potential for impact on the hazard estimate. This report defines the alternative conceptual models relevant to this technical issue and the arguments and data that support those models. It provides a brief description of the technical issue and principal uncertainties; a general overview on the nature of the technical issue, along with alternative conceptual models, supporting arguments and information, and uncertainties; and finally, suggests some possible approaches for reducing uncertainties regarding this issue.

Chamness, Michele A.; Winsor, Kelsey; Unwin, Stephen D.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uravan mineral belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Select Minerals and Potable Use of Reclaimed Wastewaters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The long-observed relationships of an influence of drinking water mineral content on heart-circulatory deaths are developed to indicate that sodium -- when present in sufficiently high concentrations -- may be detrimental to human health. An hypothesis is presented that suggests that drinking water sodium contributes more to the health effects picture than is ordinarily attributed to this normally minor avenue of ingestion by virtue of its influence on taste behavior. Mechanisms of action for metals as they relate to cancer and for sulfates as they relate to urinary calculi were also observed in the literature.

Wolf, H.

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Geothermal alteration of clay minerals and shales: diagenesis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to perform a critical review of the data on the mineral and chemical alterations that occur during diagenesis and low-grade metamorphism of shale and other clay-rich rocks - conditions similar to those expected from emplacement of heat-producing radioactive waste in a geologic repository. The conclusions drawn in this document are that the following type of alterations could occur: smectite alteration, ion mobilization, illitic shales, kaolinite reactions, chlorite reactions, organic reactions, paleotemperatures, low temperature shales, high temperature shales, and phase equilibrium changes.

Weaver, C.E.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

NOVEL IN-SITU METAL AND MINERAL EXTRACTION TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect

This white paper summarizes the state of art of in-situ leaching of metals and minerals, and describes a new technology concept employing improved fragmentation of ores underground in order to prepare the ore for more efficient in-situ leaching, combined with technology to continuously improve solution flow patterns through the ore during the leaching process. The process parameters and economic benefits of combining the new concept with chemical and biological leaching are described. A summary is provided of the next steps required to demonstrate the technology with the goal of enabling more widespread use of in-situ leaching.

Glenn O'Gorman; Hans von Michaelis; Gregory J. Olson

2004-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

304

GRR/Section 3-HI-b - State Mineral Leasing Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 3-HI-b - State Mineral Leasing Process GRR/Section 3-HI-b - State Mineral Leasing Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-HI-b - State Mineral Leasing Process 03HIBStateMineralLeasingProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Engineering Division Regulations & Policies Hawaii Administrative Rules Title 13, Subtitle 7, Chapter 183 Hawaii Revised Statutes 182 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03HIBStateMineralLeasingProcess.pdf 03HIBStateMineralLeasingProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) Engineering

305

Carbon dioxide sequestration in cement kiln dust through mineral carbonation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon sequestration through the formation of carbonates is a potential means to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Alkaline industrial solid wastes typically have high mass fractions of reactive oxides that may not require preprocessing, making them an attractive source material for mineral carbonation. The degree of mineral carbonation achievable in cement kiln dust (CKD) under ambient temperatures and pressures was examined through a series of batch and column experiments. The overall extent and potential mechanisms and rate behavior of the carbonation process were assessed through a complementary set of analytical and empirical methods, including mass change, thermal analysis, and X-ray diffraction. The carbonation reactions were carried out primarily through the reaction of CO{sub 2} with Ca(OH){sub 2}, and CaCO{sub 3} was observed as the predominant carbonation product. A sequestration extent of over 60% was observed within 8 h of reaction without any modifications to the waste. Sequestration appears to follow unreacted core model theory where reaction kinetics are controlled by a first-order rate constant at early times; however, as carbonation progresses, the kinetics of the reaction are attenuated by the extent of the reaction due to diffusion control, with the extent of conversion never reaching completion. 35 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Deborah N. Huntzinger; John S. Gierke; S. Komar Kawatra; Timothy C. Eisele; Lawrence L. Sutter [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

306

Ex Situ Bioremediation of Mineral Oil in Soils: Land Treatment and Composting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mineral oil dielectric fluid (MODF) has replaced PCB oil as the insulating medium in electrical transformers. Although eliminating PCBs has reduced the environmental impact resulting from transformer leaks, soil contaminated with mineral oil still often requires remediation. This study evaluated the feasibility of ex situ biotreatment by land farming and composting for Southern Company Services/Georgia Power. Research results indicate that composting does not enhance the biodegradation of mineral oil com...

1998-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

307

Mineral resource potential and geology of the Challis National Forest, Idaho  

SciTech Connect

This book presents an assessment of the mineral potential of the Challis National Forest based on geological, geochemical, and geophysical data compiled at a 1:250,000 scale and on published information on mineral deposits and occurrences. More than half of the forest has a high to moderate resource potential for one or more of the following commodities: Ag, Au, Ba, Bi, Cu, Mo, Nb, Pb, REE, Ta, Th, Sb, Sn, U, V, W, Zn, fluorspar, geothermal energy, and common variety minerals.

Worl, R.G.; Wilson, A.B.; Smith, C.L.; Kleinkopf, M.D.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Quantitative determination of mineral composition by powder x-ray diffraction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An external standard intensity ratio method is used for quantitatively determining mineralogic compositions of samples by x-ray diffraction. The method uses ratios of x-ray intensity peaks from a single run. Constants are previously determined for each mineral which is to be quantitatively measured. Ratios of the highest intensity peak of each mineral to be quantified in the sample and the highest intensity peak of a reference mineral contained in the sample are used to calculate sample composition.

Pawloski, G.A.

1984-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

309

Quantitative determination of mineral composition by powder X-ray diffraction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An external standard intensity ratio method is used for quantitatively determining mineralogic compositions of samples by x-ray diffraction. The method uses ratios of x-ray intensity peaks from a single run. Constants are previously determined for each mineral which is to be quantitatively measured. Ratios of the highest intensity peak of each mineral to be quantified in the sample and the highest intensity peak of a reference mineral contained in the sample are used to calculate sample composition.

Pawloski, Gayle A. (Livermore, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

I HEAVY MINERALS CO. 836 South Michigan Avenue Chic&o-5, Illinois  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

, .' " I HEAVY MINERALS CO. 836 South Michigan Avenue Chic&o-5, Illinois December 1, 1954 , etomic Energy Commiesion Raw Materials Division Washington, D. C. - - Attention: Mr....

311

Rock, Mineral, Coal, Oil, and Gas Resources on State Lands (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This chapter authorizes and regulates prospecting permits and mining leases for the exploration and development of rock, mineral, oil, coal, and gas resources on state lands.

312

Quantitative room-temperature mineralization of airborne formaldehyde using manganese oxide catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

extent of mineralization Carbon dioxide levels produced as athe formation of carbon dioxide and water. The concentrationformaldehyde and carbon dioxide concentrations were recorded

Sidheswaran, Meera A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Heterogeneous chemistry of atmospheric mineral dust particles and their resulting cloud-nucleation properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

global emissions of reactive chlorine from anthropogenic andnatural sources: Reactive Chlorine Emissions Inventory, J.Mineral dust is a sink for chlorine in the marine boundary

Sullivan, Ryan Christopher

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Three Packets of Minerals of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements and Chemical Compounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The concepts of alpha- and beta-packets of the periodic table of chemical elements and chemical compounds are defined. The first of the 47 minerals alpha-packets is composed. In it all minerals are arranged in increasing Iav index of proportionality of atomic weights of composing chemical elements, the same way as chemical elements are located in increasing atomic weights in the Periodic table. The packet includes 93 known minerals and two compounds - N2O5 and CO2 - being actually minerals. Beta-packet of oxides and hydroxides minerals includes 88 known minerals and five chemical compounds - N2O5, CO2, CO, SO3 and SO2. Two minerals of the packet have not been determined yet. Besides, beta-packet of minerals with sulfur, selenium or arsenic is composed, with one mineral not defined yet. The results of the calculations can be used for further development of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements and Chemical Compounds and their properties investigation.

Labushev, Mikhail M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Three Packets of Minerals of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements and Chemical Compounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The concepts of alpha- and beta-packets of the periodic table of chemical elements and chemical compounds are defined. The first of the 47 minerals alpha-packets is composed. In it all minerals are arranged in increasing Iav index of proportionality of atomic weights of composing chemical elements, the same way as chemical elements are located in increasing atomic weights in the Periodic table. The packet includes 93 known minerals and two compounds - N2O5 and CO2 - being actually minerals. Beta-packet of oxides and hydroxides minerals includes 88 known minerals and five chemical compounds - N2O5, CO2, CO, SO3 and SO2. Two minerals of the packet have not been determined yet. Besides, beta-packet of minerals with sulfur, selenium or arsenic is composed, with one mineral not defined yet. The results of the calculations can be used for further development of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements and Chemical Compounds and their properties investigation.

Mikhail M. Labushev

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

316

Thermogravimetric Study of Effect of Mineral Content and Maceral Composition on Illinois Coal Gasification.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The effects of mineral and maceral composition on Illinois coal gasification were studied by thermogravimetric analysis and semi-batch reactor. Macerals were separated from coal samples. (more)

Zhang, Quan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

1983 annual report on Alaska's mineral resources. Geological Survey Circular 908  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes activity during 1982 in Alaska relating to oil and gas, uranium, coal and peat, geothermal resources, and non-fuel, critical and strategic minerals. (ACR)

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Method for the Production of Mineral Wool andIron from ...  

Method for the Production of Mineral Wool and Iron from Serpentine Ore Overview This invention discloses a method to fabricate a product that has the potential

319

Insight in the Organic-Mineral Interface Structure of Intact Human ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Here, we will present our recent results on a solid state NMR investigation of the structure of the organic-mineral interface in intact human bone samples.

320

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- International Minerals and Chemicals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and and Chemicals Corp - Bonnie Mill Plant - FL 03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: International Minerals and Chemicals Corp., Bonnie Mill Plant (FL.03) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: CF Industries Bonnie Uranium Plant FL.03-2 Location: Approximately 2 miles south of Highway 60 between Mulberry and Bartow , Bartow , Florida FL.03-2 Evaluation Year: 1985 FL.03-2 Site Operations: Recovered uranium concentrates from phosphate solutions produced at this plant. FL.03-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority FL.03-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium FL.03-2 Radiological Survey(s): Yes FL.03-4 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uravan mineral belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Buckhorn Mineral Wells Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Buckhorn Mineral Wells Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Mesa, Arizona Coordinates 33.4222685°, -111.8226402° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

322

Plutonium Oxidation and Subsequent Reduction by Mn (IV) Minerals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plutonium sorbed to rock tuff was preferentially associated with manganese oxides. On tuff and synthetic pyrolusite (Mn{sup IV}O{sub 2}), Pu(IV) or Pu(V) was initially oxidized, but over time Pu(IV) became the predominant oxidation state of sorbed Pu. Reduction of Pu(V/VI), even on non-oxidizing surfaces, is proposed to result from a lower Gibbs free energy of the hydrolyzed Pu(IV) surface species versus that of the Pu(V) or Pu(VI) surface species. This work suggests that despite initial oxidation of sorbed Pu by oxidizing surfaces to more soluble forms, the less mobile form of Pu, Pu(IV), will dominate Pu solid phase speciation during long term geologic storage. The safe design of a radioactive waste or spent nuclear fuel geologic repository requires a risk assessment of radionuclides that may potentially be released into the surrounding environment. Geochemical knowledge of the radionuclide and the surrounding environment is required for predicting subsurface fate and transport. Although difficult even in simple systems, this task grows increasingly complicated for constituents, like Pu, that exhibit complex environmental chemistries. The environmental behavior of Pu can be influenced by complexation, precipitation, adsorption, colloid formation, and oxidation/reduction (redox) reactions (1-3). To predict the environmental mobility of Pu, the most important of these factors is Pu oxidation state. This is because Pu(IV) is generally 2 to 3 orders of magnitude less mobile than Pu(V) in most environments (4). Further complicating matters, Pu commonly exists simultaneously in several oxidation states (5, 6). Choppin (7) reported Pu may exist as Pu(IV), Pu(V), or Pu(VI) oxic natural groundwaters. It is generally accepted that plutonium associated with suspended particulate matter is predominantly Pu(IV) (8-10), whereas Pu in the aqueous phase is predominantly Pu(V) (2, 11-13). The influence of the character of Mn-containing minerals expected to be found in subsurface repository environments on Pu oxidation state distributions has been the subject of much recent research. Kenney-Kennicutt and Morse (14), Duff et al. (15), and Morgenstern and Choppin (16) observed oxidation of Pu facilitated by Mn(IV)-bearing minerals. Conversely, Shaughnessy et al. (17) used X-ray Absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) to show reduction of Pu(VI) by hausmannite (Mn{sup II}Mn{sub 2}{sup III}O{sub 4}) and manganite ({gamma}-Mn{sup III}OOH) and Kersting et al., (18) observed reduction of Pu(VI) by pyrolusite (Mn{sup IV}O{sub 2}). In this paper, we attempt to reconcile the apparently conflicting datasets by showing that Mn-bearing minerals can indeed oxidize Pu, however, if the oxidized species remains on the solid phase, the oxidation step competes with the formation of Pu(IV) that becomes the predominant solid phase Pu species with time. The experimental approach we took was to conduct longer term (approximately two years later) oxidation state analyses on the Pu sorbed to Yucca Mountain tuff (initial analysis reported by Duff et al., (15)) and measure the time-dependant changes in the oxidation state distribution of Pu in the presence of the Mn mineral pyrolusite.

KAPLAN, DANIEL

2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

323

MINER{nu}A, a Neutrino--Nucleus Interaction Experiment  

SciTech Connect

With the fantastic results of KamLAND and SNO for neutrino physics, a new generation of neutrino experiments are being designed and build, specially to study the neutrino oscillations to resolve most of the incognita still we have in the neutrino physics. At FERMILAB we have the experiments MINOS and, in a near future, NO{nu}A, to study this kind of oscillations. One big problem these experiments will have is the lack of a good knowledge of the Physics of neutrino interactions with matter, and this will generate big systematic errors. MINER{nu}A, also at FERMILAB, will cover this space studying with high statistics and great precision the neutrino--nucleus interactions.

Solano Salinas, C. J.; Chamorro, A.; Romero, C. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria (Peru)

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

324

A study of dermatitis in trona miners and millers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trona (sodium sesquicarbonate) is mined from an underground deposit in Wyoming and processed for use in the manufacture of glass, paper, and detergents, and in chemical applications. Trona dust is alkaline (pH 10.5) and may have an irritant effect on the respiratory airways, mucous membranes, and the skin. One hundred forty-two underground miners and 88 surface workers from one trona facility participated voluntarily in an epidemiologic and clinical study. Their mean age was 37.6 and their mean working period, 10.0 years. One half of the study participants complained of skin symptoms; dermatologic symptoms increased from twofold to fifteenfold after the subjects began trona mining. Trona dermatitis consists of pruritic, erythematous, raised, dry, and fissured lesions commonly affecting the hands, arms, and legs. A dose-response relationship was observed among underground workers. Patch testing with 10% aqueous trona and sodium carbonate was negative, suggesting that the dermatitis was primarily irritant in nature.

Rom, W.N.; Moshell, A.; Greaves, W.; Bang, K.M.; Holthouser, M.; Campbell, D.; Bernstein, R.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

A Novel Approach to Experimental Studies of Mineral Dissolution Kinetics  

SciTech Connect

Currently, DOE is conducting pilot CO{sub 2} injection tests to evaluate the concept of geological sequestration. The injected CO{sub 2} is expected to react with the host rocks and these reactions can potentially alter the porosity, permeability, and mechanical properties of the host or cap rocks. Reactions can also result in precipitation of carbonate-containing minerals that favorably and permanently trap CO{sub 2} underground. Many numerical models have been used to predict these reactions for the carbon sequestration program. However, a firm experimental basis for predicting silicate reaction kinetics in CO{sub 2} injected geological formations is urgently needed to assure the reliability of the geochemical models used for the assessments of carbon sequestration strategies. The funded experimental and theoretical study attempts to resolve this outstanding scientific issue by novel experimental design and theoretical interpretation of silicate dissolution rates at conditions pertinent to geological carbon sequestration. In this four year research grant (three years plus a one year no cost extension), seven (7) laboratory experiments of CO{sub 2}-rock-water interactions were carried out. An experimental design allowed the collection of water samples during experiments in situ and thus prevented back reactions. Analysis of the in situ samples delineated the temporal evolution of aqueous chemistry because of CO{sub 2}-rock-water interactions. The solid products of the experiments were retrieved at the end of the experimental run, and analyzed with a suite of advanced analytical and electron microscopic techniques (i.e., atomic resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron microprobe, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)). As a result, the research project probably has produced one of the best data sets for CO{sub 2}-rock-water interactions in terms of both aqueous solution chemistry and solid characterization. Three experiments were performed using the Navajo sandstone. Navajo sandstone is geologically equivalent to the Nugget sandstone, which is a target formation for a regional partnership injection project. Our experiments provided the experimental data on the potential CO{sub 2}-rock-water interactions that are likely to occur in the aquifer. Geochemical modeling was performed to interpret the experimental results. Our single mineral (feldspar) experiments addressed a basic research need. i.e., the coupled nature of dissolution and precipitation reactions, which has universal implication to the reaction kinetics as it applied to CO{sub 2} sequestration. Our whole rock experiments (Navajo sandstone) addressed the applied research component, e.g., reacting Navajo sandstone with brine and CO{sub 2} has direct relevance on the activities of a number of regional partnerships. The following are the major findings from this project: (1) The project generated a large amount of experimental data that is central to evaluating CO{sub 2}-water-rock interactions and providing ground truth to predictive models, which have been used and will inevitably be increasingly more used in carbon sequestration. (2) Results from the feldspar experiments demonstrated stronger coupling between dissolution and precipitation reactions. We show that the partial equilibrium assumption did not hold in the feldspar hydrolysis experiments (Zhu and Lu, submitted, Appendix A-2). The precipitation of clay minerals influenced dissolution of primary silicate in a much stronger way as previously envisioned. Therefore, our experimental data indicated a much more complex chemical kinetics as it has been applied to carbon sequestration program in terms of preliminary predictive models of CO{sub 2}-rock-water interactions. Adopting this complexity (strong coupling) may influence estimates of mineral trapping and porosity/permeability for geological carbon sequestration. In general, our knowledge of the coupling of different reactions is poor, and we must consider the uncertainties resultin

Chen Zhu

2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

326

Uranium mineralization in fluorine-enriched volcanic rocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several uranium and other lithophile element deposits are located within or adjacent to small middle to late Cenozoic, fluorine-rich rhyolitic dome complexes. Examples studied include Spor Mountain, Utah (Be-U-F), the Honeycomb Hills, Utah (Be-U), the Wah Wah Mountains, Utah (U-F), and the Black Range-Sierra Cuchillo, New Mexico (Sn-Be-W-F). The formation of these and similar deposits begins with the emplacement of a rhyolitic magma, enriched in lithophile metals and complexing fluorine, that rises to a shallow crustal level, where its roof zone may become further enriched in volatiles and the ore elements. During initial explosive volcanic activity, aprons of lithicrich tuffs are erupted around the vents. These early pyroclastic deposits commonly host the mineralization, due to their initial enrichment in the lithophile elements, their permeability, and the reactivity of their foreign lithic inclusions (particularly carbonate rocks). The pyroclastics are capped and preserved by thick topaz rhyolite domes and flows that can serve as a source of heat and of additional quantities of ore elements. Devitrification, vapor-phase crystallization, or fumarolic alteration may free the ore elements from the glassy matrix and place them in a form readily leached by percolating meteoric waters. Heat from the rhyolitic sheets drives such waters through the system, generally into and up the vents and out through the early tuffs. Secondary alteration zones (K-feldspar, sericite, silica, clays, fluorite, carbonate, and zeolites) and economic mineral concentrations may form in response to this low temperature (less than 200 C) circulation. After cooling, meteoric water continues to migrate through the system, modifying the distribution and concentration of the ore elements (especially uranium).

Burt, D.M.; Sheridan, M.F.; Bikun, J.; Christiansen, E.; Correa, B.; Murphy, B.; Self, S.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Oxidative Mineralization and Characterization of Polyvinyl Alcohol Solutions for Wastewater Treatment  

SciTech Connect

The principal objectives of this study are to identify an appropriate polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) oxidative mineralization technique, perform compatibility and evaporation fate tests for neat and mineralized PVA, and determine potential for PVA chemical interferences which may affect ion exchange utilization for radioactive wastewater processing in the nuclear industry.

Oji, L.N.

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

Objective selection of suitable unit cell size in data-driven modeling of mineral prospectivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In GIS-based data-driven modeling of mineral prospectivity, a suitably fine unit cell size is used for spatial representation of known occurrences of mineral deposits of the type sought (D) in a study area (T). However, until now, the unit cell size ... Keywords: Fractal analysis, GIS, Point pattern analysis, Spatial contrast, Weights-of-evidence

Emmanuel John M. Carranza

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Mineral paragenesis and textures associated with sandstone-hosted roll-front uranium deposits, NW China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mineral paragenesis and textures associated with sandstone-hosted roll-front uranium deposits, NW, People's Republic of China c Northwest Institute of Uranium Geology, China National Nuclear Corporation, Wuyiyi and Shihongtan sandstone-hosted roll-front uranium deposits, northwest China. The mineralization

Fayek, Mostafa

330

Borehole Miner - Extendible Nozzle Development for Radioactive Waste Dislodging and Retrieval from Underground Storage Tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes development of borehole-miner extendible-nozzle water-jetting technology for dislodging and retrieving salt cake, sludge} and supernate to remediate underground storage tanks full of radioactive waste. The extendible-nozzle development was based on commercial borehole-miner technology.

CW Enderlin; DG Alberts; JA Bamberger; M White

1998-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

331

Discovery of Mineralization Predication Classification Rules by Using Gene Expression Programming Based on PCA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Classification is one of the fundamental tasks in geology field. In this paper, we propose an evolutionary approach for discovering classification rules of mineralization predication from distinct combinations of geochemistry elements by using gene expression ... Keywords: GEP, Principal Component Analysis, mineralization predication

Dongmei Zhang; Yue Huang; Jing Zhi

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

THE HUBBLE WIDE FIELD CAMERA 3 TEST OF SURFACES IN THE OUTER SOLAR SYSTEM: THE COMPOSITIONAL CLASSES OF THE KUIPER BELT  

SciTech Connect

We present the first results of the Hubble Wide Field Camera 3 Test of Surfaces in the Outer Solar System. The purpose of this survey was to measure the surface properties of a large number of Kuiper Belt objects and attempt to infer compositional and dynamical correlations. We find that the Centaurs and the low-perihelion scattered disk and resonant objects exhibit virtually identical bifurcated optical color distributions and make up two well-defined groups of objects. Both groups have highly correlated optical and NIR colors that are well described by a pair of two-component mixture models that have different red components but share a common neutral component. The small, H{sub 606} {approx}> 5.6 high-perihelion excited objects are entirely consistent with being drawn from the two branches of the mixing model, suggesting that the color bifurcation of the Centaurs is apparent in all small excited objects. On the other hand, objects larger than H{sub 606} {approx} 5.6 are not consistent with the mixing model, suggesting some evolutionary process avoided by the smaller objects. The existence of a bifurcation amongst all excited populations argues that the two separate classes of object existed in the primordial disk before the excited Kuiper Belt was populated. The cold classical objects exhibit a different type of surface that has colors that are consistent with being drawn from the red branch of the mixing model, but with much higher albedos.

Fraser, Wesley C.; Brown, Michael E., E-mail: fraserw@gps.caltech.edu [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

333

GRR/Section 3-AK-d - State Noncompetitive Mineral Leasing Process | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 3-AK-d - State Noncompetitive Mineral Leasing Process GRR/Section 3-AK-d - State Noncompetitive Mineral Leasing Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-AK-d - State Noncompetitive Mineral Leasing Process 03AKDStateNoncompetitiveMineralLeasingProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Natural Resources Alaska Division of Oil and Gas Regulations & Policies Alaska Land Act: AS 38.05 Alaska Statutes Alaska Administrative Code Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03AKDStateNoncompetitiveMineralLeasingProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

334

Mercury Contents of Natural Thermal and Mineral Fluids, In- U.S. Geological  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mercury Contents of Natural Thermal and Mineral Fluids, In- U.S. Geological Mercury Contents of Natural Thermal and Mineral Fluids, In- U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 713 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Book Section: Mercury Contents of Natural Thermal and Mineral Fluids, In- U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 713 Abstract Abstract unavailable. Authors D.E. White, M.E. Hinkle and I. Barnes Published U.S. Government Printing Office, 1970 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Mercury Contents of Natural Thermal and Mineral Fluids, In- U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 713 Citation D.E. White,M.E. Hinkle,I. Barnes. 1970. Mercury Contents of Natural Thermal and Mineral Fluids, In- U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 713.

335

GRR/Section 3-AK-a - State Competitive Mineral Leasing Process | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 3-AK-a - State Competitive Mineral Leasing Process GRR/Section 3-AK-a - State Competitive Mineral Leasing Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-AK-a - State Competitive Mineral Leasing Process 03AKAStateCompetitiveMineralLeasingProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Natural Resources Alaska Division of Oil and Gas Regulations & Policies Alaska Land Act: AS 38.05 Alaska Statutes Alaska Administrative Code Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03AKAStateCompetitiveMineralLeasingProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

336

Mineral Leasing Act for Acquired Lands of 1947 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Acquired Lands of 1947 Acquired Lands of 1947 Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Mineral Leasing Act for Acquired Lands of 1947 Year 1947 Url Acquiredlands.jpg Description (30 U.S.C. § 351 et seq.) - Extends the provisions of the Mineral Leasing Act and the authority of the Secretary of the Interior over oil and gas operations to federal "acquired lands." References Mineral Leasing Act for Acquired Lands of 1947 [1] The Mineral Leasing Act for Acquired Lands of 1947 (30 U.S.C. § 351 et seq.) - Extends the provisions of the Mineral Leasing Act and the authority of the Secretary of the Interior over oil and gas operations to federal "acquired lands." "To promote the mining of coal, phosphate, sodium, potassium, oil, oil shale, gas, and sulfur on lands acquired by the United States."

337

Combined SWIR and LWIR Mineral Mapping Using MASTER/ASTER | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SWIR and LWIR Mineral Mapping Using MASTER/ASTER SWIR and LWIR Mineral Mapping Using MASTER/ASTER Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Combined SWIR and LWIR Mineral Mapping Using MASTER/ASTER Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This research uses multispectral short-waveinfrared (SWIR) and long-wave-infrared (LWIR) remote sensing to map mineralogy associated with hot springs and epithermal mineral deposits. Selected sites around the world covering a range of active/inactive hot springs and deposit types are being studied using the ODIS/ASTER airborne simulator (MASTER) and the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER). MASTER and ASTER data analysis contribute to mineral mapping in the VNIR/SWIR, however, their main contribution is improved mapping of

338

A Review Of Water Contents Of Nominally Anhydrous Natural Minerals In The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A Review Of Water Contents Of Nominally Anhydrous Natural Minerals In The A Review Of Water Contents Of Nominally Anhydrous Natural Minerals In The Mantles Of Earth, Mars And The Moon Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Review Of Water Contents Of Nominally Anhydrous Natural Minerals In The Mantles Of Earth, Mars And The Moon Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Olivine, pyroxene and garnet are nominally anhydrous but can accommodate tens to hundreds of parts per million (ppm) H2O or "water" in the form of protons incorporated in defects in their mineral structure. This review concerns the amount of water in nominally anhydrous minerals from mantle and mantle-derived rocks: peridotites, eclogites, megacrysts, basalts and kimberlites. Trends between internal and external parameters

339

Discovery, Mineral Paragenesis and Origin of Wadalite in Meteorites  

SciTech Connect

The mineral wadalite (ideal and simplified formula: Ca{sub 6}Al{sub 5}Si{sub 2}O{sub 16}Cl{sub 3}) has been discovered for the first time in a meteorite, specifically in the coarse-grained, igneous Type B calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) from the CV carbonaceous chondrite Allende. We report the results of electron microprobe, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy analyses of wadalite-bearing assemblages in the Allende CAIs and propose that wadalite formed by metamorphic reaction between akermanitic melilite and anorthite, likely mediated by chlorine-bearing fluids. Petrographic relationships support the likelihood of multistage alterations by fluids of different chemistries interspersed or coinciding with thermal metamorphic episodes on the Allende parent asteroid. Fluid involvement in metamorphism of Allende CAIs implies that these objects experienced open-system alteration after accretion into the CV chondrite parent asteroid which may have resulted in disturbances of their oxygen- and magnesium-isotope systematics.

Ishii, H A; Krot, A N; Bradley, J P; Keil, K; Nagashima, K; Teslich, N; Jacobsen, B; Yin, Q

2009-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

340

Mineralization of hydrocarbons in soils under decreasing oxygen availability  

SciTech Connect

Techniques for remediation of soils contaminated with hydrocarbons (HCs) can be improved when the factors that control the decomposition rate are identified. In this study, the effect of O{sub 2} availability on the decomposition rate of hydrocarbons in soils is examined. A kinetic second-order model with the O{sub 2} concentration and biomass concentration as rate-controlling variables is used to quantify HC decomposition, O{sub 2} consumption, and CO{sub 2} production. Concentrations O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} are calculated analytically as a function of time in a three-phase closed system. These calculations are compared with measurements of repetitive O{sub 2}-depletion experiments in closed jars containing a layer of soil contaminated with HCs. About 80% of the HC decrease could be attributed to mineralization, while the other 20% was assumed to be converted into biomass and metabolites. After calibration, model calculations agree with the experimental results, which makes the concept of O{sub 2} concentration and biomass concentration as rate-controlling variables plausible. The parameter values that are obtained by calibration have a clear biochemical significance. It is concluded that attention has to be paid to the O{sub 2} supply in closed-jar experiments to avoid erroneous interpretation of the results. 34 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

Freijer, J.I. [Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

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341

Mineral ecophysiological evidence for microbial activity in banded iron formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The phosphorus composition of banded-iron formations (BIFs) has been used as a proxy for Precambrian seawater composition and the paleoeredox state of Earth's surface environment. However, it is unclear whether the phosphorus in BIFs originally entered the sediment as a sorbed component of the iron oxyhydroxide particles, or whether it was incorporated into the biomass of marine phytoplankton. We conducted high-resolution mineral analyses and report here the first detection of an Fe(III) acetate salt, as well as nanocrystals of apatite in association with magnetite, in the 2.48 Ga Dales Gorge Member of the Brockman Iron Formation (a BIF), Hamersley, Western Australia. The clusters of apatite are similar in size and morphology to biogenic apatite crystals resulting from biomass decay in Phanerozoic marine sediments, while the formation of an Fe(III) acetate salt and magnetite not only implies the original presence of biomass in the BIF sediments, but also that organic carbon likely served as an electron donor during bacterial Fe(III) reduction. This study is important because it suggests that phytoplankton may have played a key role in the transfer of phosphorus (and other trace elements) from the photic zone to the seafloor.

Li, Dr. Yi-Liang [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Konhauser, Dr, Kurt [University of Alberta; Cole, David R [ORNL; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

National Mineral Development Corporation Ltd NMDC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Corporation Ltd NMDC Development Corporation Ltd NMDC Jump to: navigation, search Name National Mineral Development Corporation Ltd. (NMDC) Place Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India Zip 500028 Sector Solar, Wind energy Product Hyderabad-based BSE listed iron ore producer and exporter. The firm also owns wind project and is planning to foray into solar sector. Coordinates 17.6726°, 77.5971° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":17.6726,"lon":77.5971,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

343

O and Pb isotopic analyses of uranium minerals by ion microprobe and UPb ages from the Cigar Lake deposit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

O and Pb isotopic analyses of uranium minerals by ion microprobe and U­Pb ages from the Cigar Lake intergrown uranium minerals and oxygen isotopic analyes of uraninite from the unconformity-type Cigar Lake uranium deposit. Secondary uranium minerals intergrown with uraninite, such as coffinite, USiO4ÁnH2O

Fayek, Mostafa

344

Wall-rock alteration and uranium mineralization in parts of Thomas Range Mining District, San Juan County, Utah, and its significance in mineral exploration  

SciTech Connect

Several important uranium deposits associated with fluorspar and beryllium are located in parts of Thomas Range area. the mineralization is found in dolomites and dolomitic limestones of Paleozoic age and sandstones, tuffs, and rhyolites belonging to the Tertiary Spor Mountain and Topaz Mountain Formations. The pipes, veins, and nodules of fluorspar are replaced by uranium. Veins and disseminations of radioactive fluorspar and opal and overgrowths of secondary minerals are found in rhyolites, tuffs, carbonate rocks, and breccias. The radioactivity in sandstones and conglomerates emanates from weeksite, beta-uranophane, zircon, gummite, and zircon. It also occurs as highly oxidized rare aphanitic grains disseminated in a few ore deposits. The results of the present investigations may influence the initiation of future exploration programs in the Thomas Range mining district. Hydrothermal fluids of deep-seated magmatic origin rich in U, V, Th, Be, and F reacted with the country rocks. The nature and sequence of wall-rock alteration and its paragenetic relationship with the ores have been determined. The mineralization is confined to the altered zones. The ore bodies in the sedimentary rocks and the breccias are located in the fault zones. More than 1000 faults are present in the area, greatly complicating mineral prospecting. The wall-rock alteration is very conspicuous and can be used as a valuable tool in mineral exploration.

Mohammad, H.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

MICROSCOPIC METABOLISM OF CALCIUM IN BONE. III. MICRORADIOGRAPHIC MEASUREMENTS OF MINERAL DENSITY  

SciTech Connect

The range of microscopic calcium densities in man and in dog does not change wiih the age of the individual. The ranges, however. are not the same in the two species. New bone mineral in the dog is formed at higher density than similar mineral in man, and highly mineralized bone in the dog is more dense than the most dense bone in man. Thus species differcnces in calcium metabolism of bone do exist and should not be overlooked in the intercomparison of the uptake and retention of the alkaline earths in mammalian skeletons. (auth)

Rowland, R.E.; Jowsey, J.; Marshall, J.H.

1959-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Micro-Analysis of Actinide Minerals for Nuclear Forensics and Treaty Verification  

SciTech Connect

Micro-Raman spectroscopy has been demonstrated to be a viable tool for nondestructive determination of the crystal phase of relevant minerals. Collecting spectra on particles down to 5 microns in size was completed. Some minerals studied were weak scatterers and were better studied with the other techniques. A decent graphical software package should easily be able to compare collected spectra to a spectral library as well as subtract out matrix vibration peaks. Due to the success and unequivocal determination of the most common mineral false positive (zircon), it is clear that Raman has a future for complementary, rapid determination of unknown particulate samples containing actinides.

M. Morey, M. Manard, R. Russo, G. Havrilla

2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

347

Holocene surface faulting along the west flank of the Santa Rosa Range (Nevada-Oregon) and the possible northern extension of the Central Nevada Seismic Belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 130 km long Santa Rose Range fault system extends northward from a point about 70 km north of the 1915 Pleasant Valley earthquake fault ruptures to Blue Mountain Pass, Oregon. The authors have examined 1:12,000 low-sun-angle aerial photographs and conducted surveys of scarp morphology to investigate the neotectonic evolution and paleoseismicity of this possible northern extension of the Central Nevada Seismic Belt. Two adjoining segments of the fault zone are separated by a right step in the range-front and apparent absence of Holocene scarps. Each segment records evidence of a Holocene faulting event. The southern 31 km segment between Frey Ranch and the Willow Creek fan shows both small scarps (Valley and larger scarps which oversteepen the base of the adjacent range-front to slopes of 20[degree] to 24[degree]. The northern 42 km segment between Flat Creek and Oregon Canyon Creek shows a recent offset which rejuvenates older (pre-Lahontan) fault scarps and also cuts Holocene terraces along the base of the piedmont pediment. Based on preliminary morphometric data, the maximum vertical displacement (3--4 m) and age of the faulting (early Holocene) are similar in both segments but it is not known whether both segments ruptured contemporaneously. Except for the lack of large historical surface faulting the main neotectonic and geomorphic features of the Santa Rose Range fault zone are similar to that of the Dixie Valley and Pleasant Valley regions of the Central Nevada Seismic Belt. Hence, the occurrence of a large earthquake rupture along this range-front in the near future should not be viewed as a surprise.

Michetti, A.M. (CNR/GNDT, Rome (Italy) Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States). Center for Neotectonic Studies); Wesnousky, S.G. (Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States). Center for Neotectonic Studies)

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Method for the Production of Mineral Wool andIron from Serpentine Ore  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Production of Mineral Wool and Iron from the Production of Mineral Wool and Iron from Serpentine Ore Overview This invention discloses a method to fabricate a product that has the potential to replace asbestos, which harbors health and environmental risks, with magnesium silicate-based mineral wools. The mineral wool product yields advantages similar to asbestos while eliminating its inherent detriments. Since the late 19th century and into the late 20th century, asbestos has been a commonly used building material for home and industrial use. The popularity of its use can be traced to advantages of high resistance to heat, aversion to electrical and chemical damage, high mechanical strength, and excellent acoustical properties. Despite those advantages, asbestos has been directly

349

Bashfords Hot Mineral Spa Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bashfords Hot Mineral Spa Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Bashfords Hot Mineral Spa Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Bashfords Hot Mineral Spa Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Bashfords Hot Mineral Spa Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Niland, California Coordinates 33.2400366°, -115.5188756° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

350

The impact of powder X-ray diffraction on mineral science ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Iron/Mn ores 55% Fe(Sishen) 20% Fe(Labrador trough) Fluorspar 9-10% (USGS) Ilmenite/rutile 8% (Hard Rock) 2-3% (Heavy minerals ...

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

351

Revenue ruling 73-538: the service's assault on percentage depletion for ''D'' miners  

SciTech Connect

In this article, the author examines the Internal Revenue Service's ruling that storage and loading for shipment at the mine site are nonmining processes for ores and minerals described in section 613(c)(4)(D) of the Internal Revenue Code. He explains the tax consequences of the ruling and discusses the correctness of the position taken by the Internal Revenue Service in light of the relevant case law and the language and legislative history of the statute. The effect of the ruling is to reduce the percentage depletion deduction available to many miners of ores and minerals described in section 613(c)(4)(D), including miners of lead, zinc, copper, gold, silver, uranium, fluorspar, potash, soda ash, garnet and tungsten. (JMT)

Barnes, D.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Early solar system garnet-like mineral named for Livermore cosmochemis...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a piece of the meteorite Allende, which contains some of the oldest objects in the solar system. A new mineral, hutcheonite, is named in honor of Hutcheon. Photos by Julie...

353

Astoria Mineral Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Astoria Mineral Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Astoria Mineral Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Astoria Mineral Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Astoria Mineral Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Jackson, Wyoming Coordinates 43.4799291°, -110.7624282° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

354

La Vide Mineral Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vide Mineral Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Vide Mineral Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name La Vide Mineral Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility La Vide Mineral Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Brea, California Coordinates 33.9166805°, -117.9000604° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

355

Resource Management Services: Mineral Resources, Parts 550-559 (New York) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mineral Resources, Parts 550-559 (New Mineral Resources, Parts 550-559 (New York) Resource Management Services: Mineral Resources, Parts 550-559 (New York) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation This section establishes a Bureau of Mineral Resources within the Department of Environmental Conservation, which has the authority to regulate the exploration and mining for oil and gas resources in New York State. The regulations include permitting and reporting requirements for exploration or production well drilling or deepening, well spacing, drilling practices, well plugging and abandonment, secondary recovery and

356

The Role of Mineral Aerosol in Tropospheric Chemistry in East AsiaA Model Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed gas-phase chemistry mechanism is combined with dust surface uptake processes to explore possible impacts of mineral dust on tropospheric chemistry. The formations of sulfate and nitrate on dust are studied along with the dust effects ...

Yang Zhang; Gregory R. Carmichael

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

MultiMediaMiner: a system prototype for multimedia data mining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multimedia data mining is the mining of high-level multimedia information and knowledge from large multimedia databases. A multimedia data mining system prototype, MultiMediaMiner, has been designed and developed. It includes the construction of a multimedia ...

Osmar R. Zaane; Jiawei Han; Ze-Nian Li; Sonny H. Chee; Jenny Y. Chiang

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

MOLECULAR MODELING STUDY OF SULFATE AND PHOSPHATE ADSORPTION AT THE MINERAL-WATER INTERFACE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MOLECULAR MODELING STUDY OF SULFATE AND PHOSPHATE ADSORPTION AT THE MINERAL-WATER INTERFACE © 2007 Kristian W. Paul All Rights Reserved i #12;MOLECULAR MODELING STUDY OF SULFATE AND PHOSPHATE

Sparks, Donald L.

359

Strategic Selection of Sustainable Development of Mineral Resources in China's Mining Cities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Degree of sustainable development of mineral resources (DSDMR) is the basis and security of mining cities sustainable development. Thus, how to promote the DSDMR of mining cities has been widespread concerned by people. This paper tries to search ...

Jiye Xiang

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Synthesis of SiC ceramics by the carbothermal reduction of mineralized wood with silica  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the synthesis of SiC by the carbothermal reduction of mineralized wood with silica in acidic condition. The biomorphic cellular SiC ceramics were prepared by controlling the amount of silica and the size of SiC nanoparticles. Up to 20wt% of SiO2 was mineralized into wood cellular structures and the hierarchical structures such as cells, lumen, and pits were mainly retained after the thermal treatment at 1400 C.

Shin, Yongsoon; Wang, Chong M.; Exarhos, Gregory J.

2005-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uravan mineral belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMED MINERAL WASTE FORMS: CHARACTERIZATION AND DURABILITY TESTING  

SciTech Connect

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a potential technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of high sodium low activity wastes (LAW) such as those existing at the Hanford site, at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and the Savannah River Site (SRS). The addition of clay, charcoal, and a catalyst as co-reactants with the waste denitrates the aqueous wastes and forms a granular mineral waste form that can subsequently be made into a monolith for disposal if necessary. The waste form produced is a multiphase mineral assemblage of Na-Al-Si (NAS) feldspathoid minerals with cage and ring structures and iron bearing spinel minerals. The mineralization occurs at moderate temperatures between 650-750 C in the presence of superheated steam. The cage and ring structured feldspathoid minerals atomically bond radionuclides like Tc-99 and Cs-137 and anions such as SO{sub 4}, I, F, and Cl. The spinel minerals stabilize Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous species such as Cr and Ni. Granular mineral waste forms were made from (1) a basic Hanford Envelope A low activity waste (LAW) simulant and (2) an acidic INL simulant commonly referred to as sodium bearing waste (SBW) in pilot scale facilities at the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science and Technology Applications Research (STAR) facility in Idaho Falls, ID. The FBSR waste forms were characterized and the durability tested via ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency Test), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and the Single Pass Flow Through (SPFT) test. The results of the SPFT testing and the activation energies for dissolution are discussed in this study.

Jantzen, C; Troy Lorier, T; John Pareizs, J; James Marra, J

2006-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

362

FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMED MINERAL WASTE FORMS: CHARACTERIZATION AND DURABILITY TESTING  

SciTech Connect

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a potential technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of high sodium low activity wastes (LAW) such as those existing at the Hanford site, at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and the Savannah River Site (SRS). The addition of clay, charcoal, and a catalyst as co-reactants with the waste denitrates the aqueous wastes and forms a granular mineral waste form that can subsequently be made into a monolith for disposal if necessary. The waste form produced is a multiphase mineral assemblage of Na-Al-Si (NAS) feldspathoid minerals with cage and ring structures and iron bearing spinel minerals. The mineralization occurs at moderate temperatures between 650-750 C in the presence of superheated steam. The cage and ring structured feldspathoid minerals atomically bond radionuclides like Tc-99 and Cs-137 and anions such as SO4, I, F, and Cl. The spinel minerals stabilize Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous species such as Cr and Ni. Granular mineral waste forms were made from (1) a basic Hanford Envelope A low-activity waste (LAW) simulant and (2) an acidic INL simulant commonly referred to as sodium bearing waste (SBW) in pilot scale facilities at the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science and Technology Applications Research (STAR) facility in Idaho Falls, ID. The FBSR waste forms were characterized and the durability tested via ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency Test), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and the Single Pass Flow Through (SPFT) test. The results of the SPFT testing and the activation energies for dissolution are discussed in this study.

Jantzen, C; Troy Lorier, T; John Pareizs, J; James Marra, J

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

363

Mineral Oil Spill Evaluation System-Multi Phase (MOSES-MP), Version 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The MOSES-MP software is used to determine whether a spill of mineral oil from electrical equipment is likely to reach nearby surface water via overland flow or to migrate through the subsurface to underlying groundwater. The program consists of two integrated modules: the Mineral Oil Spill Evaluation System (MOSES) module calculates the probabilities and volumes of oil reaching a water body, and the Multiphase (MP) module simulates transport through soils to groundwater. In addition to ...

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

364

Iowa State Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute. Final report, July 1, 1990--June 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect

During 1990--1991, the Iowa State Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute (ISMMRRI) has worked diligently to further the objectives of the Mineral Institute Program. About 70% of our Allotment Grant funding goes toward research and education of graduate students within the participating departments of the university. It is our goal to encourage graduate students in diverse fields such as agronomy, engineering, geology, landscape architecture, and many others to pursue a career in mining- and mineral-related fields by preparing them to either enter the private or public sectors. During the 1990 calendar year, ISMMRRI granted research assistantships to 17 graduate students to perform research in topics relating to mineral exploration, characterization and processing, extractive metallurgy, mining engineering, fuel science, mineral waste management, and mined-land reclamation. Research areas include the following: Fluid-inclusion studies on fluorspar mineral deposits in an actively mined region; Geochemical modeling of gold and gold-telluride deposits; Characterization of coal particles for surface-based beneficiation; Impact of surface mining and reclamation of a gypsum deposit area on the surrounding community; Stress-strain response of fine coal particles during transport and storage; Recovery of metal values from mining wastes using bioleaching; Coal beneficiation utilizing triboelectric charging in a fast fluidized bed; and Mathematical modeling of breakage for optimum sizing during crushing of rock.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Mineral Sequestration of Carbon Dixoide in a Sandstone-Shale System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A conceptual model of CO2 injection in bedded sandstone-shale sequences has been developed using hydrogeologic properties and mineral compositions commonly encountered in Gulf Coast sediments. Numerical simulations were performed with the reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport code TOUGHREACT to analyze mass transfer between sandstone and shale layers and CO2 immobilization through carbonate precipitation. Results indicate that most CO2 sequestration occurs in the sandstone. The major CO2 trapping minerals are dawsonite and ankerite. The CO2 mineral-trapping capacity after 100,000 years reaches about 90 kg per cubic meter of the medium. The CO2 trapping capacity depends on primary mineral composition. Precipitation of siderite and ankerite requires Fe+2 supplied mainly by chlorite and some by hematite dissolution and reduction. Precipitation of dawsonite requires Na+ provided by oligoclase dissolution. The initial abundance of chlorite and oligoclase therefore affects the CO2 mineral trapping capacity. The sequestration time required depends on the kinetic rate of mineral dissolution and precipitation. Dawsonite reaction kinetics is not well understood, and sensitivity regarding the precipitation rate was examined. The addition of CO2 as secondary carbonates results in decreased porosity. The leaching of chemical constituents from the interior of the shale causes slightly increased porosity. The limited information currently available for the mineralogy of natural high-pressure CO2 gas reservoirs is also generally consistent with our simulation. The ''numerical experiments'' give a detailed understanding of the dynamic evolution of a sandstone-shale geochemical system.

Xu, Tianfu; Apps, John A.; Pruess, Karsten

2004-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

366

A new model to simulate the elastic properties of mineralized collagen fibril  

SciTech Connect

Bone, because of its hierarchical composite structure, exhibits an excellent combination of stiffness and toughness, which is due substantially to the structural order and deformation at the smaller length scales. Here, we focus on the mineralized collagen fibril, consisting of hydroxyapatite plates with nanometric dimensions aligned within a protein matrix, and emphasize the relationship between the structure and elastic properties of a mineralized collagen fibril. We create two- and three-dimensional representative volume elements to represent the structure of the fibril and evaluate the importance of the parameters defining its structure and properties of the constituent mineral and collagen phase. Elastic stiffnesses are calculated by the finite element method and compared with experimental data obtained by synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The computational results match the experimental data well, and provide insight into the role of the phases and morphology on the elastic deformation characteristics. Also, the effects of water, imperfections in the mineral phase and mineral content outside the mineralized collagen fibril upon its elastic properties are discussed.

Yuan, F.; Stock, S.R.; Haeffner, D.R.; Almer, J.D.; Dunand, D.C.; Brinson, L.C. (NWU)

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

367

Mineral Nutrient Recovery from Pyrolysis Co-Products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pyrolysis is the thermo-chemical degradation of biomass in an oxygen-free environment to product liquid, gaseous, and solid co-products. The liquid co-product, known as bio-oil, can be used as a transportation fuel. The gaseous co-product, known as synthesis gas, can be used to power the pyrolysis reactor or other machinery. The solid co-product, known as bio-char, has been studied as an amendment to enhance soil physical and chemical properties and nutrient status. Although previous publications have described the beneficial effects of pyrolysis bio-char on soil physical and chemical properties, relatively little has been published on the recovery of mineral nutrients from pyrolysis co-products. This work quantified the recovery of feedstock nutrients (P, K, Ca, and Mg) and micronutrients (Na, Zn, Fe, Cu, and Mn) from pyrolysis co-products from various feedstocks using three distinct pyrolysis reactor designs. The reactors comprised a laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactor and two fluidized-bed reactors located in College Station, TX and Wyndmoor, PA. Nutrient recoveries, on a feedstock basis, were calculated for a comparison of reactor efficiencies. In addition to nutrient recoveries, physical and chemical properties of input biomass and of bio-char generated by each reactor were characterized through ultimate and proximate analyses. For the fixed-bed reactor, results revealed variation among feedstocks for the recoveries of feedstock sources of macronutrients and Na, Fe, and Cu in pyrolysis co-products. Variation among species was also detected for the recoveries of feedstock sources of P, K, Ca, Mg, and Fe in pyrolysis co-products for samples pyrolyzed using the Wyndmoor reactor. For the College Station reactor, recoveries of feedstock sources of P, K, Ca, and Mg in pyrolysis co-products did not vary among species, but Zn did vary. Ultimate and proximate analyses of biomass and bio-chars generated by the three reactors revealed variation among species. Additionally, the results showed that the recovery of feedstock nutrients varied by reactor design. Statistical analysis revealed high correlations and linear relationships between the recovery of nutrients and reactor mass and energy efficiency and feedstock fiber properties.

Wise, Jatara Rob

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Mineral balance in juvenile horses in race training  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study was conducted to further elucidate the requirements for Ca, P and Mg during exercise induced skeletal modeling and remodeling in juvenile racehorses. Nineteen long yearlings were fed rations containing differing amounts of Ca, P and Mg. Total collections of feces and urine were performed on days 0, 64 and 128 of the trial, and mineral absorption and retention were determined. The horses were maintained in a typical race training protocol to mimic the nutritional stresses placed on long yearlings during strenuous exercise. Calcium absorption and retention were lower (P < .05) at d 64 than d 0 and d 128. However, the efficiency of retaining absorbed Ca was higher at d 64 than d 128. Thus lower calcium retention at d 64 was due to reduced absorption. At d 64, Ca absorption and Ca retention were not maximized at Ca intake of 160 mg/kg/d. At d 128, calcium absorption was maximal at a daily intake of 124.2 mg/kg/d and retention was maximal at a daily intake of 122.7 mg/kg/d. These are 38% and 36% over current NRC (1989) recommendations respectively. Phosphorus absorption and retention were not maximized at the highest intakes fed (66 mg/kg/d) which is 32% over current NRC (1989) recommendations. Phosphorus absorption was reduced at d 64. Urinary excretion of P was least at d 128, but P retention values did not reach d 0 values by d 128. There was a trend for reduced Mg absorption at d 64, and Mg retention was significantly reduced at d 64. At d 64, Mg retention was maximized at a daily intake of 35.6 mg/kg/d which is 66% over NRC (1989) recommendations. The intake of Mg and the efficiency of Mg retention was increased from d 64 to 128, but Mg retention was not maximized even at the highest daily intake of Mg (44 mg/kg/d), over two times the current NRC (1989) recommendations. These data verify that early race training affects the dietary requirements for Ca, P and Mg. More research is needed to define these requirements exactly.

Stephens, Tonya Leigh

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

ENHANCING THE ATOMIC-LEVEL UNDERSTANDING OF CO2 MINERAL SEQUESTRATION MECHANISMS VIA ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL MODELING  

SciTech Connect

Fossil fuels currently provide 85% of the world's energy needs, with the majority coming from coal, due to its low cost, wide availability, and high energy content. The extensive use of coal-fired power assumes that the resulting CO{sub 2} emissions can be vented to the atmosphere. However, exponentially increasing atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels have brought this assumption under critical review. Over the last decade, this discussion has evolved from whether exponentially increasing anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions will adversely affect the global environment, to the timing and magnitude of their impact. A variety of sequestration technologies are being explored to mitigate CO{sub 2} emissions. These technologies must be both environmentally benign and economically viable. Mineral carbonation is an attractive candidate technology as it disposes of CO{sub 2} as geologically stable, environmentally benign mineral carbonates, clearly satisfying the first criteria. The primary challenge for mineral carbonation is cost-competitive process development. CO{sub 2} mineral sequestration--the conversion of stationary-source CO{sub 2} emissions into mineral carbonates (e.g., magnesium and calcium carbonate, MgCO{sub 3} and CaCO{sub 3})--has recently emerged as one of the most promising sequestration options, providing permanent CO{sub 2} disposal, rather than storage. In this approach a magnesium-bearing feedstock mineral (typically serpentine or olivine; available in vast quantities globally) is specially processed and allowed to react with CO{sub 2} under controlled conditions. This produces a mineral carbonate which (1) is environmentally benign, (2) already exists in nature in quantities far exceeding those that could result from carbonating the world's known fossil fuel reserves, and (3) is stable on a geological time scale. Minimizing the process cost via optimization of the reaction rate and degree of completion is the remaining challenge. As members of the DOE/NETL managed National Mineral Sequestration Working Group we have already significantly improved our understanding of mineral carbonation. Group members at the Albany Research Center have recently shown that carbonation of olivine and serpentine, which naturally occurs over geological time (i.e., 100,000s of years), can be accelerated to near completion in hours. Further process refinement will require a synergetic science/engineering approach that emphasizes simultaneous investigation of both thermodynamic processes and the detailed microscopic, atomic-level mechanisms that govern carbonation kinetics. Our previously funded Phase I Innovative Concepts project demonstrated the value of advanced quantum-mechanical modeling as a complementary tool in bridging important gaps in our understanding of the atomic/molecular structure and reaction mechanisms that govern CO{sub 2} mineral sequestration reaction processes for the model Mg-rich lamellar hydroxide feedstock material Mg(OH){sub 2}. In the present simulation project, improved techniques and more efficient computational schemes have allowed us to expand and augment these capabilities and explore more complex Mg-rich, lamellar hydroxide-based feedstock materials, including the serpentine-based minerals. These feedstock materials are being actively investigated due to their wide availability, and low-cost CO{sub 2} mineral sequestration potential. Cutting-edge first principles quantum chemical, computational solid-state and materials simulation methodology studies proposed herein, have been strategically integrated with our new DOE supported (ASU-Argonne National Laboratory) project to investigate the mechanisms that govern mineral feedstock heat-treatment and aqueous/fluid-phase serpentine mineral carbonation in situ. This unified, synergetic theoretical and experimental approach will provide a deeper understanding of the key reaction mechanisms than either individual approach can alone. Ab initio techniques will also significantly advance our understanding of atomic-level processes at the solid/solution interface by e

A.V.G. Chizmeshya

2003-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

370

ENHANCING THE ATOMIC-LEVEL UNDERSTANDING OF CO2 MINERAL SEQUESTRATION MECHANISMS VIA ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL MODELING  

SciTech Connect

Fossil fuels currently provide 85% of the world's energy needs, with the majority coming from coal, due to its low cost, wide availability, and high energy content. The extensive use of coalfired power assumes that the resulting CO{sub 2} emissions can be vented to the atmosphere. However, exponentially increasing atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels have brought this assumption under critical review. Over the last decade, this discussion has evolved from whether exponentially increasing anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions will adversely affect the global environment, to the timing and magnitude of their impact. A variety of sequestration technologies are being explored to mitigate CO{sub 2} emissions. These technologies must be both environmentally benign and economically viable. Mineral carbonation is an attractive candidate technology as it disposes of CO{sub 2} as geologically stable, environmentally benign mineral carbonates, clearly satisfying the first criteria. The primary challenge for mineral carbonation is cost-competitive process development. CO{sub 2} mineral sequestration--the conversion of stationary-source CO{sub 2} emissions into mineral carbonates (e.g., magnesium and calcium carbonate, MgCO{sub 3} and CaCO{sub 3})--has recently emerged as one of the most promising sequestration options, providing permanent CO{sub 2} disposal, rather than storage. In this approach a magnesium-bearing feedstock mineral (typically serpentine or olivine; available in vast quantities globally) is specially processed and allowed to react with CO{sub 2} under controlled conditions. This produces a mineral carbonate which (i) is environmentally benign, (ii) already exists in nature in quantities far exceeding those that could result from carbonating the world's known fossil fuel reserves, and (iii) is stable on a geological time scale. Minimizing the process cost via optimization of the reaction rate and degree of completion is the remaining challenge. As members of the DOE/NETL managed National Mineral Sequestration Working Group we have already significantly improved our understanding of mineral carbonation. Group members at the Albany Research Center have recently shown that carbonation of olivine and serpentine, which naturally occurs over geological time (i.e., 100,000s of years), can be accelerated to near completion in hours. Further process refinement will require a synergetic science/engineering approach that emphasizes simultaneous investigation of both thermodynamic processes and the detailed microscopic, atomic-level mechanisms that govern carbonation kinetics. Our previously funded Phase I Innovative Concepts project demonstrated the value of advanced quantum-mechanical modeling as a complementary tool in bridging important gaps in our understanding of the atomic/molecular structure and reaction mechanisms that govern CO{sub 2} mineral sequestration reaction processes for the model Mg-rich lamellar hydroxide feedstock material Mg(OH){sub 2}. In the present simulation project, improved techniques and more efficient computational schemes have allowed us to expand and augment these capabilities and explore more complex Mg-rich, lamellar hydroxide-based feedstock materials, including the serpentine-based minerals. These feedstock materials are being actively investigated due to their wide availability, and low-cost CO{sub 2} mineral sequestration potential. Cutting-edge first principles quantum chemical, computational solid-state and materials simulation methodology studies proposed herein, have been strategically integrated with our new DOE supported (ASU-Argonne National Laboratory) project to investigate the mechanisms that govern mineral feedstock heat-treatment and aqueous/fluid-phase serpentine mineral carbonation in situ. This unified, synergetic theoretical and experimental approach will provide a deeper understanding of the key reaction mechanisms than either individual approach can alone. Ab initio techniques will also significantly advance our understanding of atomic-level processes at the solid/solution interface by

A.V.G. Chizmeshya

2002-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

371

ENHANCING THE ATOMIC-LEVEL UNDERSTANDING OF CO2 MINERAL SEQUESTRATION MECHANISMS VIA ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL MODELING  

SciTech Connect

Fossil fuels currently provide 85% of the world's energy needs, with the majority coming from coal, due to its low cost, wide availability, and high energy content. The extensive use of coal-fired power assumes that the resulting CO2 emissions can be vented to the atmosphere. However, exponentially increasing atmospheric CO2 levels have brought this assumption under critical review. Over the last decade, this discussion has evolved from whether exponentially increasing anthropogenic CO2 emissions will adversely affect the global environment, to the timing and magnitude of their impact. A variety of sequestration technologies are being explored to mitigate CO2 emissions. These technologies must be both environmentally benign and economically viable. Mineral carbonation is an attractive candidate technology as it disposes of CO2 as geologically stable, environmentally benign mineral carbonates, clearly satisfying the first criteria. The primary challenge for mineral carbonation is cost-competitive process development. CO2 mineral sequestration--the conversion of stationary-source CO2 emissions into mineral carbonates (e.g., magnesium and calcium carbonate, MgCO3 and CaCO3)--has recently emerged as one of the most promising sequestration options, providing permanent CO2 disposal, rather than storage. In this approach a magnesium-bearing feedstock mineral (typically serpentine or olivine; available in vast quantities globally) is specially processed and allowed to react with CO2 under controlled conditions. This produces a mineral carbonate which (1) is environmentally benign, (2) already exists in nature in quantities far exceeding those that could result from carbonating the world's known fossil fuel reserves, and (3) is stable on a geological time scale. Minimizing the process cost via optimization of the reaction rate and degree of completion is the remaining challenge. As members of the DOE/NETL managed National Mineral Sequestration Working Group we have already significantly improved our understanding of mineral carbonation. Group members at the Albany Research Center have recently shown that carbonation of olivine and serpentine, which naturally occurs over geological time (i.e., 100,000s of years), can be accelerated to near completion in hours. Further process refinement will require a synergetic science/engineering approach that emphasizes simultaneous investigation of both thermodynamic processes and the detailed microscopic, atomic-level mechanisms that govern carbonation kinetics. Our previously funded Phase I Innovative Concepts project demonstrated the value of advanced quantum-mechanical modeling as a complementary tool in bridging important gaps in our understanding of the atomic/molecular structure and reaction mechanisms that govern CO2 mineral sequestration reaction processes for the model Mg-rich lamellar hydroxide feedstock material Mg(OH)2. In the present simulation project, improved techniques and more efficient computational schemes have allowed us to expand and augment these capabilities and explore more complex Mg-rich, lamellar hydroxide-based feedstock materials, including the serpentine-based minerals. These feedstock materials are being actively investigated due to their wide availability, and low-cost CO2 mineral sequestration potential. Cutting-edge first principles quantum chemical, computational solid-state and materials simulation methodology studies proposed herein, have been strategically integrated with our new DOE supported (ASU-Argonne National Laboratory) project to investigate the mechanisms that govern mineral feedstock heat-treatment and aqueous/fluid-phase serpentine mineral carbonation in situ. This unified, synergetic theoretical and experimental approach has provided a deeper understanding of the key reaction mechanisms than either individual approach can alone. We used ab initio techniques to significantly advance our understanding of atomic-level processes at the solid/solution interface by elucidating the origin of vibrational, electronic, x-ray and electron energy loss sp

A.V.G. Chizmeshya; M.J. McKelvy; G.H. Wolf; R.W. Carpenter; D.A. Gormley; J.R. Diefenbacher; R. Marzke

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Chapter 9: Model Systems for Formation and Dissolution of Calcium Phosphate Minerals  

SciTech Connect

Calcium phosphates are the mineral component of bones and teeth. As such there is great interest in understanding the physical mechanisms that underlie their growth, dissolution, and phase stability. Control is often achieved at the cellular level by the manipulation of solution states and the use of crystal growth modulators such as peptides or other organic molecules. This chapter begins with a discussion of solution speciation in body fluids and relates this to important crystal growth parameters such as the supersaturation, pH, ionic strength and the ratio of calcium to phosphate activities. We then discuss the use of scanning probe microscopy as a tool to measure surface kinetics of mineral surfaces evolving in simplified solutions. The two primary themes that we will touch on are the use of microenvironments that temporally evolve the solution state to control growth and dissolution; and the use of various growth modifiers that interact with the solution species or with mineral surfaces to shift growth away from the lowest energy facetted forms. The study of synthetic minerals in simplified solution lays the foundation for understand mineralization process in more complex environments found in the body.

Orme, C A; Giocondi, J L

2006-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

373

Process for removal of mineral particulates from coal-derived liquids  

SciTech Connect

Suspended mineral solids are separated from a coal-derived liquid containing the solids by a process comprising the steps of: (a) contacting said coal-derived liquid containing solids with a molten additive having a melting point of 100.degree.-500.degree. C. in an amount of up to 50 wt. % with respect to said coal-derived liquid containing solids, said solids present in an amount effective to increase the particle size of said mineral solids and comprising material or mixtures of material selected from the group of alkali metal hydroxides and inorganic salts having antimony, tin, lithium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium, beryllium, aluminum, zinc, molybdenum, cobalt, nickel, ruthenium, rhodium or iron cations and chloride, iodide, bromide, sulfate, phosphate, borate, carbonate, sulfite, or silicate anions; and (b) maintaining said coal-derived liquid in contact with said molten additive for sufficient time to permit said mineral matter to agglomerate, thereby increasing the mean particle size of said mineral solids; and (c) recovering a coal-derived liquid product having reduced mineral solids content. The process can be carried out with less than 5 wt. % additive and in the absence of hydrogen pressure.

McDowell, William J. (Knoxville, TN)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Geologic setting and mineralization of the Kougarok Sn(Ta-Nb) deposit, seaward peninsula, Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Kougarok tin (tantalum-niobium) deposit is located in the north-central Seward Peninsula, roughly 130 kilometers north of Nome, Alaska. Tin and tantalum-niobium mineralization occur within granitic dikes, subhorizontal sheets, plugs, and in schists adjacent to the granite bodies. Rb/Sr and K/Ar age determinations indicate the granites at Kougarok are late Cretaceous in age and coeval with other tin granites of the Seward Peninsula. The host rock to the granites at Kougarok is polydeformed pelitic schists of possible Precambrian age. Known mineralization occurs in four geologic settings: 1) within steep cylindrical pipes of greisenized granite; 2) in greisenized dikes; 3) in greisen along the roof zone of a subhorizontal granite sheet; and 4) as stringer zones in schists. Tin mineralization is known in all the above geologic environments and occurs dominantly as disseminated cassiterite in quartz+/-tourmaline+/-topaz greisen. Grades of significant tin mineralization range from 0.1 to 15 percent tin and average approximately 0.5 percent tin. Tantalum-niobium mineralization is confined to the roof greisen environment. Tantalite-columbite occurs as disseminated grains in white mica altered granite lateral to tin-bearing quartz-tourmaline greisen. Grades for both tantalum and niobium range from 0.02 to 0.05 percent.

Puchner, C.C.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Mineral Dissolution and Secondary Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford Tank Solutions Affecting Subsurface Porosity  

SciTech Connect

Highly alkaline nuclear waste solutions have been released from underground nuclear waste storage tanks and pipelines into the vadose zone at the U.S. Department of Energys Hanford Site in Washington, causing mineral dissolution and re-precipitation upon contact with subsurface sediments. High pH caustic NaNO3 solutions with and without dissolved Al were reacted with quartz sand through flow-through columns stepwise at 45, 51, and 89C to simulate possible reactions between leaked nuclear waste solution and primary subsurface mineral. Upon reaction, Si was released from the dissolution of quartz sand, and nitrate-cancrinite [Na8Si6Al6O24(NO3)2] precipitated on the quartz surface as a secondary mineral phase. Both steady-state dissolution and precipitation kinetics were quantified, and quartz dissolution apparent activation energy was determined. Mineral alteration through dissolution and precipitation processes results in pore volume and structure changes in the subsurface porous media. In this study, the column porosity increased up to 40.3% in the pure dissolution column when no dissolved Al was present in the leachate, whereas up to a 26.5% porosity decrease was found in columns where both dissolution and precipitation were observed because of the presence of Al in the input solution. The porosity change was also confirmed by calculation using the dissolution and precipitation rates and mineral volume changes.

Wang, Guohui; Um, Wooyong

2012-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

376

Magnetic order near 270 K in mineral and synthetic Mn 2 FeSbO 6 ilmenite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The structural and magnetic properties of Mn 2 FeSbO 6 single-crystalline mineral and ceramic samples synthesized under thermobaric treatment have been investigated

R. Mathieu; S. A. Ivanov; G. V. Bazuev; M. Hudl; P. Lazor; I. V. Solovyev; P. Nordblad

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Development and evaluation of a thermodynamic dataset for phases of interest in CO2 mineral sequestration in basaltic rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009. Thermoddem, a thermodynamic database for modelling theUCRL- Engi, M. , 1992. Thermodynamic data for minerals: aconstraints on the thermodynamic properties of the stilbite

Aradottir, E.S.P.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Analysis of Mineral Trapping for CO2 Disposal in Deep Aquifers  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Reactive Geochemical Transport Simulation to Study Mineral Trapping Reactive Geochemical Transport Simulation to Study Mineral Trapping for CO 2 Disposal in Deep Saline Arenaceous Aquifers Tianfu Xu, John A. Apps, and Karsten Pruess Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Abstract. A reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport numerical model for evaluating long-term CO 2 disposal in deep aquifers has been developed. Using this model, we performed a number of sensitivity simulations under CO 2 injection conditions for a commonly encountered Gulf Coast sediment to analyze the impact of CO 2 immobilization through carbonate precipitation. Geochemical models are needed because alteration of the predominant host rock aluminosilicate minerals is very slow and is not

379

File:Land sale mineral release complete.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

sale mineral release complete.pdf sale mineral release complete.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:Land sale mineral release complete.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 3 4 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 259 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 4 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 18:27, 15 November 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 18:27, 15 November 2012 1,275 × 1,650, 4 pages (259 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup instructions for more information) File usage

380

Lung cancer epidemiology in New Mexico uranium miners. Progress report, March 1, 1991--November 30, 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This investigation assesses the health effects of radon progeny exposure in New Mexico uranium miners. Cumulative exposures sustained by most New Mexico miners are well below those received earlier in the Colorado Plateau. This project utilizes the research opportunity offered by New Mexico miners to address unresolved issues related to radon progeny exposure: (1) the lung cancer risk of lower levels of exposure, (2) interaction between radon progeny exposure and cigarette smoking in the causation of lung cancer, (3) the relationship between lung cancer histologic type and radon progeny exposure, and (4) possible effects of radon progeny exposure other than lung cancer. A cohort study of 3800 men with at least one year of underground uranium mining experience in New Mexico is in progress. Results are discussed.

Samet, J.M.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uravan mineral belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Mineral-wool industry: opportunities for natural gas technologies. Topical report, January-July 1987  

SciTech Connect

To quantify the opportunities for natural gas and identify technological advances needed to capture such opportunities, the mineral-wool industry was analyzed with respect to the principal companies, their capabilities, and markets. The mineral-wool industry is stable with a slightly declining market. Of its market segments, only commercial acoustic insulation (which is currently dominant) is likely to be affected by growth in the next ten years. The principal process is based on treatment of blast-furnace slags in a cupola furnace using coke as the fuel and reducing agent. Expanded use of gas, as a substitute for coke, would eliminate environmental problems and expand the latitude of suitable raw materials. The study provides insights into the mineral-wool industry and identifies factors that may constitute bases for future usage of natural gas.

Not Available

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Influence of flow properties on a structure of a mineral wool primary layer  

SciTech Connect

Mineral wool primary layer formation is influenced by the aerodynamic characteristics of the blow-away airflow and the secondary surrounding airflow. The distribution of mineral wool fibres in the primary layer was determined experimentally using a computer-aided visualization method. The flow properties in the region where the primary layer is formed were analysed. Numerical simulations with experiment-based boundary conditions were performed. The numerically obtained profile of mineral wool thickness at the collection chamber outlet agreed with the results of the experiment. Presented numerical model confirms that the forming of the primary layer is significantly dependent on local aerodynamic characteristic of the airflow in the collection chamber. Interaction between the local anomalies on the forming layer and the corresponding aerodynamic effects in the surrounding region was also analysed. (author)

Bajcar, Tom; Blagojevic, Bogdan; Sirok, Brane; Dular, Matevz [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Ljubljana, Askerceva 6, SI - 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

GEOLOGY AND MINERAL PARAGENESIS STUDY WITHIN THE COSO-EGS PROJECT | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MINERAL PARAGENESIS STUDY WITHIN THE COSO-EGS PROJECT MINERAL PARAGENESIS STUDY WITHIN THE COSO-EGS PROJECT Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: GEOLOGY AND MINERAL PARAGENESIS STUDY WITHIN THE COSO-EGS PROJECT Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso Geothermal Field is a large, high temperature system located in California on the western edge of the Basin and Range province. The East Flank of this field is currently under study as a DOE-funded Enhanced Geothermal Systems project. The reservoir rocks generally consist of a complex, interfingering sequence of diorite, granodiorite, and granite. The diorites show weak to strong alteration representing multiple hydrothermal events. The work described here was undertaken to evaluate the geology and thermal history of the East Flank, in order to better

384

Stable-Isotope Studies Of Rocks And Secondary Minerals In A Vapor-Dominated  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stable-Isotope Studies Of Rocks And Secondary Minerals In A Vapor-Dominated Stable-Isotope Studies Of Rocks And Secondary Minerals In A Vapor-Dominated Hydrothermal System At The Geysers, Sonoma County, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Stable-Isotope Studies Of Rocks And Secondary Minerals In A Vapor-Dominated Hydrothermal System At The Geysers, Sonoma County, California Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Geysers, a vapor-dominated hydrothermal system, is developed in host rock of the Franciscan Formation, which contains veins of quartz and calcite whose Δ18O values record the temperatures and isotopic compositions of fluids prevailing during at least two different episodes of rock-fluid interaction. The first episode took place at about 200°C, during which marine silica and carbonate apparently interacted with ocean

385

Fundamental study of CO2-H2O-mineral interactions for carbon sequestration, with emphasis on the nature of the supercritical fluid-mineral interface.  

SciTech Connect

In the supercritical CO2-water-mineral systems relevant to subsurface CO2 sequestration, interfacial processes at the supercritical fluid-mineral interface will strongly affect core- and reservoir-scale hydrologic properties. Experimental and theoretical studies have shown that water films will form on mineral surfaces in supercritical CO2, but will be thinner than those that form in vadose zone environments at any given matric potential. The theoretical model presented here allows assessment of water saturation as a function of matric potential, a critical step for evaluating relative permeabilities the CO2 sequestration environment. The experimental water adsorption studies, using Quartz Crystal Microbalance and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy methods, confirm the major conclusions of the adsorption/condensation model. Additional data provided by the FTIR study is that CO2 intercalation into clays, if it occurs, does not involve carbonate or bicarbonate formation, or significant restriction of CO2 mobility. We have shown that the water film that forms in supercritical CO2 is reactive with common rock-forming minerals, including albite, orthoclase, labradorite, and muscovite. The experimental data indicate that reactivity is a function of water film thickness; at an activity of water of 0.9, the greatest extent of reaction in scCO2 occurred in areas (step edges, surface pits) where capillary condensation thickened the water films. This suggests that dissolution/precipitation reactions may occur preferentially in small pores and pore throats, where it may have a disproportionately large effect on rock hydrologic properties. Finally, a theoretical model is presented here that describes the formation and movement of CO2 ganglia in porous media, allowing assessment of the effect of pore size and structural heterogeneity on capillary trapping efficiency. The model results also suggest possible engineering approaches for optimizing trapping capacity and for monitoring ganglion formation in the subsurface.

Bryan, Charles R.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Heath, Jason E.; Wang, Yifeng; Matteo, Edward N.; Meserole, Stephen P.; Tallant, David Robert

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

A disconnect between O horizon and mineral soil carbon - Implications for soil C sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changing inputs of carbon to soil is one means of potentially increasing carbon sequestration in soils for the purpose of mitigating projected increases in atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. The effect of manipulations of aboveground carbon input on soil carbon storage was tested in a temperate, deciduous forest in east Tennessee, USA. A 4.5-year experiment included exclusion of aboveground litterfall and supplemental litter additions (three times ambient) in an upland and a valley that differed in soil nitrogen availability. The estimated decomposition rate of the carbon stock in the O horizon was greater in the valley than in the upland due to higher litter quality (i.e., lower C/N ratios). Short-term litter exclusion or addition had no effect on carbon stock in the mineral soil, measured to a depth of 30 cm, or the partitioning of carbon in the mineral soil between particulate- and mineral-associated organic matter. A two-compartment model was used to interpret results from the field experiments. Field data and a sensitivity analysis of the model were consistent with little carbon transfer between the O horizon and the mineral soil. Increasing aboveground carbon input does not appear to be an effective means of promoting carbon sequestration in forest soil at the location of the present study because a disconnect exists in carbon dynamics between O horizon and mineral soil. Factors that directly increase inputs to belowground soil carbon, via roots, or reduce decomposition rates of organic matter are more likely to benefit efforts to increase carbon sequestration in forests where carbon dynamics in the O horizon are uncoupled from the mineral soil.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

ISATEM: an integration of socioeconomic and spatial models for mineral resources exploitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the spatial-integrated socioeconomic model field, a multi-agent approach is appropriate for supporting applications modelled at a detailed territory scale, but it is less used than other approaches when supporting applications modelled at a larger ... Keywords: agent, component, mineral resources exploitation, simulation, socioeconomic model, spatial shape data

Fenintsoa Andriamasinoro; Daniel Cassard; Bruno Martel-Jantin

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

U-bearing particles in miners' and millers' lungs  

SciTech Connect

The size distribution of uranium-bearing particles in air particulates in occupational areas of active uranium mines and mills is largely uninvestigated. Investigation of the size of residual uranium-bearing particles in uranium miners' and millers' lungs is warranted because significant inhalation of uranium can occur in certain occupational areas. Average uranium concentrations of about 0.3 ppM U in uranium miners' and millers' lungs have been reported. Local uranium concentrations in uranium-bearing particles inhaled and regionally deposited in the lungs of uranium miners and millers are orders of magnitude larger than the average uranium concentrations reported. The feasibility of using microPIXE (particle induced x-ray emission) techniques to search for such uranium-bearing particles embedded in lung tissues has been demonstrated. Proton microbeams 20 ..mu..m in diameter, scanning in 5 ..mu..m steps, were used to irradiate sections of lung tissues 10 to 40 ..mu..m thick. The paper will briefly describe the method, and present and discuss the results obtained in an extensive search for uranium-bearing particles embedded in lung tissues, collected at autopsy, of former uranium miners and millers. 13 references, 1 table.

Paschoa, A.S.; Wrenn, M.E.; Singh, N.P.; Miller, S.C.; Jones, K.W.; Cholewa, M.; Hanson, A.L.; Saccomanno, G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Lithium elemental and isotopic disequilibrium in minerals from peridotite xenoliths from far-east Russia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium elemental and isotopic disequilibrium in minerals from peridotite xenoliths from far Abstract Lithium concentrations and isotopic compositions of coexisting olivine and clinopyroxene (cpx composition. Lithium concentrations in cpx from Tok (1­12 ppm) are equal to or significantly greater than

Mcdonough, William F.

390

1. Department, Course Number, Title ORE 330, Mineral & Energy Resources of the Sea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Covered · Peak Everything, Parts I (Population & Fossil Fuels) & II (Minerals) · Mid-ocean ridges, basins and polymetallic sulfides, Parts I & II · Introduction to Ocean Energy · Oil and gas deposits; Future oil provinces · Oil and Gas: Resources & politics of oil & gas, oil spills & oil spill recovery · Methane hydrates

Frandsen, Jannette B.

391

Reaction Kinetics of CO2 Carbonation with Mg-Rich Minerals  

SciTech Connect

Due to their low price, wide availability, and stability of the resulting carbonates, Mg-rich minerals are promising materials for carbonating CO{sub 2}. Direct carbonation of CO{sub 2} with Mg-rich minerals reported in this research for the first time could be considerably superior to conventional liquid extraction processes from an energy consumption perspective due to its avoidance of the use of a large amount of water with high specific heat capacity and latent heat of vaporization. Kinetic models of the reactions of the direct CO{sub 2} carbonation with Mg-rich minerals and within simulated flue gas environments are important to the scale-up of reactor designs. Unfortunately, such models have not been made available thus far. This research was initiated to fill that gap. Magnesium silicate (Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}), a representative compound in Mg-rich minerals, was used to study CO{sub 2} carbonation reaction kinetics under given simulated flue gas conditions. It was found that the chosen sorbent deactivation model fits well the experimental data collected under given conditions. A reaction order of 1 with respect to CO{sub 2} is obtained from experimental data. The Arrhenius form of CO{sub 2} carbonation with Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} is established based on changes in the rate constants of the chosen deactivation model as a function of temperature.

Kwon, Dr. Soonchul [Georgia Institute of Technology; Fan, Maohong [University of Wyoming, Laramie; DaCosta, Dr. Herbert F.M. [Chem-Innovations Inc; Russell, Dr. Armistead [Georgia Institute of Technology; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Report TKK-ENY-9 Mineral carbonation for long-term storage of CO2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report TKK-ENY-9 Mineral carbonation for long-term storage of CO2 from flue gases Jens Kohlmann 1 #12;TKK-ENY-9 June 2002 3 Preface This volume contains the two progress reports for the project "CO2 preparation, to be submitted to a technical journal #12;TKK-ENY-9 June 2002 5 Part 1 : Progress report August

Zevenhoven, Ron

393

Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering Spring 2013 Solar Innovations -HVAC and Waste Stream Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PENNSTATE Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering Spring 2013 Solar Innovations - HVAC and Waste Stream Analysis Overview There are two problems that were voiced by Solar Innovations, HVAC system design and recycling stream improvement. The HVAC system was not providing even conditioning of office

Demirel, Melik C.

394

The Sugar Creek zinc deposit, Jackson Co. TN -- Exploration history, geology and mineralization  

SciTech Connect

During the 60's and 70's zinc exploration of central TN and KY was active. The Sugar Creek Project was one of several investigated by Exxon. The discovery hole, Cu 15, was drilled in early 1973. The Sugar Creek Zinc Deposit was acquired by Independence Mining Co. in 1986 and I.M.C. has subsequently completed additional drilling, both stepout and confirmation holes. A total of 137 holes for 300,833 ft have been drilled. The Sugar Creek deposit is a typical Tennessee zinc deposit (Mississippi Valley Type) which occurs in solution collapse breccias in the Lower Ordovician, Knox Dolomite. The Knox consists of fine grained dolomite with interlayered limestones and crystalline dolomite. Only scattered residual limestone is found in the Sugar Creek area. Collapse breccias have formed which control zinc deposition and are similar to other TN Zn. deposits. At Sugar Creek the types of breccias include: a vertically exaggerated glory hole breakthrough breccia which extends to within 137 ft. of the Knox unconformity, has 500 ft. of zinc mineralization with 8 significant zinc intervals; holes with stacked zinc intervals interpreted to be sides of breakthrough breccia; and single zinc intervals in laterally positioned bedded mineral zones. A total of 99 holes were drilled in the more intense mineralized areas. The ratio of ore to non ore holes is nearly 1 to 1. The mineralization is typical M.V.T. with predominantly sphalerite and only minor occurrences of galena, fluorite, pyrite, etc.

Reinbold, G.; Moran, A.V.; Stevens, D.L. (Independence Mining Co. Inc., Reno, NV (United States))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Simulation of crop water and mineral relations in greenhouse soilless culture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A composite model was developed for water and mineral relations of greenhouse tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) cultivated in semi-closed or open soilless (rockwool) culture. The model simulated on a daily basis: (i) the evolution of crop leaf area index ... Keywords: Closed growing systems, Fertigation, Modelling, NaCl salinity, Nitrate, Solanum lycopersicum L.

D. Massa; L. Incrocci; R. Maggini; C. Bibbiani; G. Carmassi; F. Malorgio; A. Pardossi

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Flexible Statistical Models for Growth Fragments: a Study of Bone Mineral Acquisition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mineral called dual energy x-ray absorptiom- 2 #12; etry (DXA). To date, most of these investigations have youth and to determine if there were gender and/or ethnic di#11;erences in the magnitude and tempo are more closely linked to pubertal development than to chronologic age (Bonjour 1996), gender, ethnicity

Hastie, Trevor

397

Instrument for bone mineral measurement using a microprocessor as the control and arithmetic element  

SciTech Connect

A self-contained instrument for the determination of bone mineral content by photon absorptometry is described. A high-resolution detection system allows measurements to be made at up to 16 photon energies. Control and arithmetic functions are performed by a microprocessor. Analysis capability and limitations are discussed. (auth)

Alberi, J.L.; Hardy, W.H. II

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Soil Interfaces in a Changing World International Symposium of Interactions of Soil Minerals with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil Interfaces in a Changing World 6th ISMOM International Symposium of Interactions of Soil Minerals with Organic Components and Microorganisms 3rd InterCongress of Commission 2.5 IUSS Soil chemical Ginder-Vogel, and Gautier Landrot Delaware Environmental Institute and Department of Plant and Soil

Sparks, Donald L.

399

Trade in Mineral Resources Graham A. Davis and Arturo L. Vsquez Cordano  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and natural gas involves special considerations of market power and energy security that warrant a separate, Journal of Economics Surveys, doi: 10.1111/j.1467-6419.2011.00695.x, which has been published to provide a survey of the state of knowledge regarding mineral trade. Given the paucity of previous work

400

Basin evolution, diagenesis and uranium mineralization in the PaleoproterozicThelon Basin,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Basin evolution, diagenesis and uranium mineralization in the PaleoproterozicThelon Basin, Nunavut18 O values near 0% (Vienna Standard Mean OceanWater). Uranium-rich apatite cement (P1) also formed during diagenetic stage1indicating that oxygenated, uranium- bearing pore water was present in the basin

Hiatt, Eric E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uravan mineral belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Soil mineral genesis and distribution in a saline lake landscape of the Pantanal Wetland, Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil mineral genesis and distribution in a saline lake landscape of the Pantanal Wetland, Brazil S Geografia, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil b Soil & Water Sciences Program, Department São Paulo, Piracicaba, Brazil a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 20 August

Ahmad, Sajjad

402

The chemistry of minerals obtained from the combustion of Jordanian oil shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The chemistry of minerals obtained from the combustion of Jordanian oil shale Awni Y. Al was performed on the spent oil shale (oil shale ash) obtained from the combustion of Jordanian oil shale process, minimal fragmentation was encountered since Jordanian oil shale contains large proportions of ash

Shawabkeh, Reyad A.

403

emissions: mineral carbonation and Finnish pulp and paper industry (CO2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- ation of slags from iron- and steel industry" pre- sented at the 4th Nordic Mini-symposium on CO2CO2 emissions: mineral carbonation and Finnish pulp and paper industry (CO2 Nordic Plus) and Use of serpentinites in energy and metal industry (ECOSERP) Carl-Johan Fogelholm, Project leader, professor Sanni

Zevenhoven, Ron

404

Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Ministry of Petroleum and Mineral Resources | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Ministry of Petroleum and Mineral Resources Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Ministry of Petroleum and Mineral Resources Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Ministry of Petroleum and Mineral Resources Country Saudi Arabia Name Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Ministry of Petroleum and Mineral Resources Address PO Box 757, Airport Road, Riyadh 11189 City Riyadh Website http://www.mopm.gov.sa/mopm/ma Coordinates 24.800234°, 46.71742° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":24.800234,"lon":46.71742,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

405

Number, Mass and Volume Distributions of Mineral Aerosol and Soils of the Sahara  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A direct method will be described to determine the complete mineral size distribution in aerosol (xylene-insoluble component) and soils (water-insoluble component) covering a size range from 0.01 up to 100 ?m and 1000 ?m radius, respectively, by ...

Guillaume A. d'Almeida; Lothar Schtz

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Coke gasification: the influence and behavior of inherent catalytic mineral matter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gasification of coke contributes to its degradation in the blast furnace. In this study, the effect of gasification on the inherent catalytic minerals in cokes and their reciprocal influence on gasification are investigated. The catalytic mineral phases identified in the cokes used in this study were metallic iron, iron sulfides, and iron oxides. Metallic iron and pyrrhotite were rapidly oxidized during gasification to iron oxide. The catalysts had a strong influence on the apparent rates at the initial stages of reaction. As gasification proceeds, their effect on the reaction rate diminishes as a result of reducing the surface contact between catalyst and carbon matrix because of carbon consumption around the catalyst particles; with extended burnout the reactivity of the coke becomes increasingly dependent on surface area. The reaction rate in the initial stages was also influenced by the particle size of the catalytic minerals; for a given catalytic iron level, the cokes whose catalytic minerals were more finely dispersed had a higher apparent reaction rate than cokes containing larger catalytic particles. Iron, sodium, and potassium in the amorphous phase did not appear to affect the reaction rate. 40 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs.

Mihaela Grigore; Richard Sakurovs; David French; Veena Sahajwalla [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Bangor, NSW (Australia)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

407

Development of a CO2 Sequestration Module by Integrating Mineral Activation and Aqueous Carbonation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mineral carbonation is a promising concept for permanent CO{sub 2} sequestration due to the vast natural abundance of the raw materials and the permanent storage of CO{sub 2} in solid form as carbonates. The sequestration of CO{sub 2} through the employment of magnesium silicates--olivine and serpentine--is beyond the proof of concept stage. For the work done in this project, serpentine was chosen as the feedstock mineral due to its abundance and availability. Although the reactivity of olivine is greater than that of serpentine, physical and chemical treatments have been shown to increase greatly the reactivity of serpentine. The primary drawback to mineral carbonation is reaction kinetics. To accelerate the carbonation, aqueous processes are preferred, where the minerals are first dissolved in solution. In aqueous carbonation, the key step is the dissolution rate of the mineral, where the mineral dissolution reaction is likely to be surface-controlled. The relatively low reactivity of serpentine has warranted research into physical and chemical treatments that have been shown to greatly increase its reactivity. The use of sulfuric acid as an accelerating medium for the removal of magnesium from serpentine has been investigated. To accelerate the dissolution process, the mineral can be ground to very fine particle size, 185 C, >13 MPa, and control on the dissolution via the removal of water, which is closely correlated with the extraction of magnesium from serpentine. Single-variable experimentation demonstrated dissolution enhancements with increased reaction time and temperature. An increase in magnesium dissolution of 46% and 70%, relative to a baseline test, occurred for increased reaction time and temperature, respectively. In addition to the challenges presented by the dissolution of serpentine, another challenge is the subsequent carbonation of the magnesium ions. A stable hydration sphere for the magnesium ion reduces the carbonation kinetics by obstructing the formation of the carbonation products. Accordingly, this research has evaluated the solubility of carbon dioxide in aqueous solution, the interaction between the dissociation products of carbon dioxide, and the carbonation potential of the magnesium ion.

George Alexander; Parvana Aksoy; John Andresen; Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Harold Schobert

2006-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

408

Mineral-Surfactant Interactions for Minimum Reagents Precipitation and Adsorption for Improved Oil Recovery  

SciTech Connect

Chemical EOR can be an effective method for increasing oil recovery and reducing the amount of produced water; however, reservoir fluids are chemically complex and may react adversely to the polymers and surfactants injected into the reservoir. While a major goal is to alter rock wettability and interfacial tension between oil and water, rock-fluid and fluid-fluid interactions must be understood and controlled to minimize reagent loss, maximize recovery and mitigate costly failures. The overall objective of this project was to elucidate the mechanisms of interactions between polymers/surfactants and the mineral surfaces responsible for determining the chemical loss due to adsorption and precipitation in EOR processes. The role of dissolved inorganic species that are dependent on the mineralogy is investigated with respect to their effects on adsorption. Adsorption, wettability and interfacial tension are studied with the aim to control chemical losses, the ultimate goal being to devise schemes to develop guidelines for surfactant and polymer selection in EOR. The adsorption behavior of mixed polymer/surfactant and surfactant/surfactant systems on typical reservoir minerals (quartz, alumina, calcite, dolomite, kaolinite, gypsum, pyrite, etc.) was correlated to their molecular structures, intermolecular interactions and the solution conditions such as pH and/or salinity. Predictive models as well as general guidelines for the use of polymer/surfactant surfactant/surfactant system in EOR have been developed The following tasks have been completed under the scope of the project: (1) Mineral characterization, in terms of SEM, BET, size, surface charge, and point zero charge. (2) Study of the interactions among typical reservoir minerals (quartz, alumina, calcite, dolomite, kaolinite, gypsum, pyrite, etc.) and surfactants and/or polymers in terms of adsorption properties that include both macroscopic (adsorption density, wettability) and microscopic (orientation/conformation of the adsorbed layers), as well as precipitation/abstraction characteristics. (3) Investigation of the role of dissolved species, especially multivalent ions, on interactions between reservoir minerals and surfactants and/or polymers leading to surfactant precipitation or activated adsorption. (4) Solution behavior tests--surface tension, interaction, ultra filtration, and other tests. (5) Surfactant-mineral interactions relative to adsorption, wettability, and electrophoresis. (6) Work on the effects of multivalent ions, pH, temperature, salinity, and mixing ratio on the adsorption. Developments of adsorption models to explain interactions between surfactants/polymers/minerals. (7) General guidelines for the use of certain surfactants, polymers and their mixtures in micelle flooding processes.

P. Somasundaran

2008-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

409

Water-bearing minerals on mars: source of observed mid-latitude water?  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Odyssey spacecraft documented the existence of heterogeneously distributed hydrogen at martian mid-latitudes, suggesting that large areas of the near-equatorial highlands contain near-surface deposits of 'chemically and/or physically bound H20 and/or OH' in amounts up to 3 .8% equivalent H20. Shallow occurrences of water ice are not stable near the martian equator, making the hydrogen deposits at these latitudes somewhat enigmatic. Clay minerals and zeolites have both been proposed as possible water-bearing constituents on Mars, and both are common terrestrial alteration products of hydrovolcanic basaltic ashes and palagonitic material comparable to those that may be widespread on Mars. Smectites within martian meteorites, attributed to hydrous alteration on Mars rather than on Earth, provide direct evidence of clay minerals from Mars. In addition, new thermal emission spectrometer (TES) data provide good evidence for unspecified zeolites in martian surface dust [6] . The nature of the hydrogen-containing material observed in the equatorial martian regolith is of particular importance to the question of whether hydrous minerals have formed in the past on Mars. Also, whether these minerals exist in a hydrated (i .e., containing H2O molecules in their structures) or dehydrated state is a crucial question . The existence of hydrous minerals is also important in connection with their possible role in affecting the diurnal variation of the martian atmosphere, in their potential role in unraveling the paleohydrology and paleobiology of Mars, and in their possible use as a water resource to support exploration of the martian mid-latitudes.

Bish, D. L. (David L.); Carey, J. W. (James W.); Fialips, C. I. (Clair I.)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

ELECTRON IRRADIATION OF KUIPER BELT SURFACE ICES: TERNARY N{sub 2}-CH{sub 4}-CO MIXTURES AS A CASE STUDY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The space weathering of icy Kuiper Belt Objects was investigated in this case study by exposing methane (CH{sub 4}) and carbon monoxide (CO) doped nitrogen (N{sub 2}) ices at 10 K to ionizing radiation in the form of energetic electrons. Online and in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was utilized to monitor the radiation-induced chemical processing of these ices. Along with isocyanic acid (HNCO), the products could be mainly derived from those formed in irradiated binary ices of the N{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} and CO-CH{sub 4} systems: nitrogen-bearing products were found in the form of hydrogen cyanide (HCN), hydrogen isocyanide (HNC), diazomethane (CH{sub 2}N{sub 2}), and its radical fragment (HCN{sub 2}); oxygen-bearing products were of acetaldehyde (CH{sub 3}CHO), formyl radical (HCO), and formaldehyde (H{sub 2}CO). As in the pure ices, the methyl radical (CH{sub 3}) and ethane (C{sub 2}H{sub 6}) were also detected, as were carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the azide radical (N{sub 3}). Based on the temporal evolution of the newly formed products, kinetic reaction schemes were then developed to fit the temporal profiles of the newly formed species, resulting in numerical sets of rate constants. The current study highlights important constraints on the preferential formation of isocyanic acid (HNCO) over hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and hydrogen isocyanide (HNC), thus guiding the astrobiological and chemical evolution of those distant bodies.

Kim, Y. S.; Kaiser, R. I., E-mail: ralfk@hawaii.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

411

Formation of Replicating Saponite from a Gel in the Presence of Oxalate: Implications for the Formation of Clay Minerals in Carbonaceous Chondrites and the Origin of Life  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The potential role of clay minerals in the abiotic origin of life has been the subject of ongoing debate for the past several decades. At issue are the clay minerals found in a class of meteorites known as carbonaceous ...

Schumann, Dirk

412

Investigation of Mineral Transformations in Wet Supercritical CO2 by Electron Microscopy  

SciTech Connect

The capture and storage of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in deep geologic formations represents one of the most promising options for mitigating the impacts of greenhouse gases on global warming. In this regard, mineral-fluid interactions are of prime importance since such reactions can result in the long term sequestration of CO2 by trapping in mineral phases. Recently it has been recognized that interactions with neat to water-saturated non-aqueous fluids are of prime importance in understanding mineralization reactions since the introduced CO2 is likely to contain water initially or soon after injection and the supercritical CO2 (scCO2) is less dense than the aqueous phase which can result in a buoyant scCO2 plume contacting the isolating caprock. As a result, unraveling the molecular/microscopic mechanisms of mineral transformation in neat to water saturated scCO2 has taken on an added important. In this study, we are examining the interfacial reactions of the olivine mineral forsterite (Mg2SiO4) over a range of water contents up to and including complete water saturation in scCO2. The surface precipitates that form on the reacted forsterite grains are extremely fragile and difficult to experimentally characterize. In order to address this issue we have developed experimental protocols for preparing and imaging electron-transparent samples from fragile structures. These electron-transparent samples are then examined using a combination of STEM/EDX, FIB-TEM, and helium ion microscope (HIM) imaging (Figures 1-3). This combination of capabilities has provided unique insight into the geochemical processes that occur on scCO2 reacted mineral surfaces. The experimental procedures and protocols that have been developed also have useful applications for examining fragile structures on a wide variety of materials. This research was performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Arey, Bruce W.; Kovarik, Libor; Wang, Zheming; Felmy, Andrew R.

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

413

Incidence of non-lung solid cancers in Czech uranium miners: A case-cohort study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objectives: Uranium miners are chronically exposed to radon and its progeny, which are known to cause lung cancer and may be associated with leukemia. This study was undertaken to evaluate risk of non-lung solid cancers among uranium miners in Pribram region, Czech Republic. Methods: A retrospective stratified case-cohort study in a cohort of 22,816 underground miners who were employed between 1949 and 1975. All incident non-lung solid cancers were ascertained among miners who worked underground for at least 12 months (n=1020). A subcohort of 1707 subjects was randomly drawn from the same population by random sampling stratified on age. The follow-up period lasted from 1977 to 1996. Results: Relative risks comparing 180 WLM (90th percentile) of cumulative lifetime radon exposure to 3 WLM (10th percentile) were 0.88 for all non-lung solid cancers combined (95% CI 0.73-1.04, n=1020), 0.87 for all digestive cancers (95% CI 0.69-1.09, n=561), 2.39 for gallbladder cancer (95% CI 0.52-10.98, n=13), 0.79 for larynx cancer (95% CI 0.38-1.64, n=62), 2.92 for malignant melanoma (95% CI 0.91-9.42, n=23), 0.84 for bladder cancer (95% CI 0.43-1.65, n=73), and 1.13 for kidney cancer (95% CI 0.62-2.04, n=66). No cancer type was significantly associated with radon exposure; only malignant melanoma and gallbladder cancer showed elevated but non-significant association with radon. Conclusions: Radon was not significantly associated with incidence of any cancer of interest, although a positive association of radon with malignant melanoma and gallbladder cancer cannot be entirely ruled out. - Research highlights: {yields} Uranium miners are chronically exposed to radon. {yields} We evaluate risk of non-lung solid cancers among uranium miners. {yields} No cancer type was significantly associated with radon exposure. {yields} Malignant melanoma and gallbladder cancer showed non-significant elevated risk.

Kulich, M., E-mail: kulich@karlin.mff.cuni.cz [Department of Statistics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Sokolovska 83, CZ-186 75 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Rericha, V. [Regional Hospital Pribram (Czech Republic)] [Regional Hospital Pribram (Czech Republic); Rericha, R. [Center of Epidemiological Studies, Pribram (Czech Republic)] [Center of Epidemiological Studies, Pribram (Czech Republic); Shore, D.L. [Westat, Inc., Durham, NC (United States)] [Westat, Inc., Durham, NC (United States); Sandler, D.P. [Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, DHHS, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)] [Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, DHHS, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

MINERAL-SURFACTANT INTERACTIONS FOR MINIMUM REAGENTS PRECIPITATION AND ADSORPTION FOR IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this project is to delineate the role of mineralogy of reservoir rocks in determining interactions between reservoir minerals and externally added reagents (surfactants/polymers) and its effect on critical solid-liquid and liquid-liquid interfacial properties such as adsorption, wettability and interfacial tension in systems relevant to reservoir conditions. Previous studies have suggested that significant surfactant loss by precipitation or adsorption on reservoir minerals can cause chemical schemes to be less than satisfactory for enhanced oil recovery. Both macroscopic adsorption, wettability and microscopic orientation and conformation studies for various surfactant/polymer mixtures/reservoir rocks systems were conducted to explore the cause of chemical loss by means of precipitation or adsorption, and the effect of rock mineralogy on the chemical loss. During this period, the adsorption of mixed system of n-dodecyl-{beta}-D-maltoside (DM) and dodecyl sulfonate (C{sub 12}SO{sub 3}Na) has been studied. The effects of solution pH, surfactant mixing ratio and different salts on surfactant adsorption on alumina have been investigated in detail. Along with these adsorption studies, changes in mineral wettability due to the adsorption of the mixtures were determined under relevant conditions to identify the nano-structure of the adsorbed layers. Solution properties of C{sub 12}SO{sub 3}Na/DM mixtures were also studied to identify surfactant interactions that affect the mixed aggregate formation in solution. Adsorption of SDS on gypsum and limestone suggested stronger surfactant/mineral interaction than on alumina, due to the precipitation of surfactant by dissolved calcium ions. The effects of different salts such as sodium nitrate, sodium sulfite and sodium chloride on DM adsorption on alumina have also been determined. As surfactant hemimicelles at interface and micelles in solution have drastic effects on oil recovery processes, their microstructures in solutions and at mineral/solution interfaces were investigated by monitoring micropolarity of the aggregates using fluorescence technique. Compositional changes of the aggregates in solution were observed with the increase in surfactant concentration. The importance of this lies in that the resulting polarity/hydrophobicity change of the mixed micelles will affect the adsorption of surfactant mixtures on reservoir minerals, surfactant/oil emulsion formation and wettability, as a result, the oil release efficiency of the chemical flooding processes in EOR.

P. Somasundaran

2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

415

Hydrothermal Alteration Mineral Mapping Using Hyperspectral Imagery in Dixie Valley, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hyperspectral (HyMap) data was used to map the location of outcrops of high temperature, hydrothermally alterated minerals (including alunite, pyrophyllite, and hematite) along a 15 km swath of the eastern front of the Stillwater Mountain Range in Dixie Valley, Nevada. Analysis of this data set reveals that several outcrops of these altered minerals exist in the area, and that one outcrop, roughly 1 square kilometer in area, shows abundant high temperature alteration. Structural analysis of the altered region using a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) suggests that this outcrop is bounded on all sides by a set of cross-cutting faults. This fault set lies within the Dixie Valley Fault system (Caskey et al. 1996). Both the intense alteration in this area and the presence of cross-cutting faults indicate a high probability of recent hot fluid escape.

Kennedy-Bowdoin, T; Martini, B A; Silver, E A; Pickles, W L

2004-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

416

Carson Hot Mineral Springs Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Carson Hot Mineral Springs Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Carson Hot Mineral Springs Resort Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Carson, Washington Coordinates Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

417

The porincytochrome model for microbe-to-mineral electron transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many species of bacteria can couple anaerobic growth to the respiratory reduction of insoluble minerals containing Fe(III) or Mn(III/IV). It has been suggested that in Shewanella species electrons cross the outer membrane to extracellular substrates via 'porin-cytochrome' electron transport modules. The molecular structure of an outer-membrane extracellular-facing deca-haem terminus for such a module has recently been resolved. It is debated how, once outside the cells, electrons are transferred from outer-membrane cytochromes to insoluble electron sinks. This may occur directly or by assemblies of cytochromes, perhaps functioning as 'nanowires', or via electron shuttles. Here we review recent work in this field and explore whether it allows for unification of the electron transport mechanisms supporting extracellular mineral respiration in Shewanella that may extend into other genera of Gram-negative bacteria.

Richardson, David J.; Butt, Julea N.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Shi, Liang; Edwards, Marcus J.; White, Gaye F.; Baiden, Nanakow; Gates, Andrew J.; Marritt, Sophie; Clarke, Thomas A.

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

418

Exploring the biochemistry at the extracellular redox frontier of bacterial mineral Fe(III) respiration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many species of the bacterial Shewanella genus are notable for their ability to respire in anoxic environments utilizing insoluble minerals of Fe(III) and Mn(IV) as extracellular electron acceptors. In Shewanella oneidensis, the process is dependent on the decahaem electron-transport proteins that lie at the extracellular face of the outer membrane where they can contact the insoluble mineral substrates. These extracellular proteins are charged with electrons provided by an inter-membrane electron-transfer pathway that links the extracellular face of the outer membrane with the inner cytoplasmic membrane and thereby intracellular electron sources. In the present paper, we consider the common structural features of two of these outermembrane decahaem cytochromes, MtrC and MtrF, and bring this together with biochemical, spectroscopic and voltammetric data to identify common and distinct properties of these prototypical members of different clades of the outer-membrane decahaem cytochrome superfamily.

Richardson, David J.; Edwards, Marcus; White, Gaye F.; Baiden, Nanakow; Hartshorne, Robert S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Shi, Liang; Zachara, John M.; Gates, Andrew J.; Butt, Julea N.; Clarke, Thomas

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Development of a CO2 Sequestration Module by Integrating Mineral Activation and Aqueous Carbonation  

SciTech Connect

Mineral carbonation is a promising concept for permanent CO{sub 2} sequestration due to the vast natural abundance of the raw materials and the permanent storage of CO{sub 2} in solid form as carbonates. The sequestration of CO{sub 2} through the employment of magnesium silicates--olivine and serpentine--is beyond the proof of concept stage. For the work done in this project, serpentine was chosen as the feedstock mineral due to its abundance and availability. Although the reactivity of olivine is greater than that of serpentine, physical and chemical treatments have been shown to increase greatly the reactivity of serpentine. The primary drawback to mineral carbonation is reaction kinetics. To accelerate the carbonation, aqueous processes are preferred, where the minerals are first dissolved in solution. In aqueous carbonation, the key step is the dissolution rate of the mineral, where the mineral dissolution reaction is likely to be surface-controlled. The relatively low reactivity of serpentine has warranted research into physical and chemical treatments that have been shown to greatly increase its reactivity. The use of sulfuric acid as an accelerating medium for the removal of magnesium from serpentine has been investigated. To accelerate the dissolution process, the mineral can be ground to very fine particle size, <37 {micro}m, but this is a very energy-intensive process. Previous work in our laboratory showed that chemical surface activation helps to dissolve magnesium from the serpentine (of particle size {approx} 100 {micro}m) and that the carbonation reaction can be conducted under mild conditions (20 C and 4.6 MPa) compared to previous studies that required >185 C, >13 MPa, and <37 {micro}m particle size. This work also showed that over 70% of the magnesium can be extracted at ambient temperature, leaving an amorphous silica with surface area of about 330 m{sup 2}/g. The overall objective of this research program is to optimize the active carbonation process to design an integrated CO{sub 2} sequestration module. A parametric study was conducted to optimize conditions for mineral activation, in which serpentine and sulfuric acid were reacted. The study focused on the effects of varying the acid concentration, particle size, and reaction time. The reaction yield was as high as 48% with a 5 M acid concentration, with lower values directly corresponding to lower acid concentrations. Significant improvements in the removal of moisture, as well as in the dissolution, can be realized with comminution of particles to a D{sub 50} less than 125 ?m. A minimum threshold of 3 M concentration of sulfuric acid was found to exist in terms of removal of moisture from serpentine. The effect of reaction time was insignificant. The treated serpentine had low BET surface areas. Results demonstrated that acid concentration provided primary control on the dissolution via the removal of water, which is closely correlated with the extraction of magnesium from serpentine. Single-variable experimentation demonstrated dissolution enhancements with increased reaction time and temperature. An increase in magnesium dissolution of 46% and 70%, relative to a baseline test, occurred for increased reaction time and temperature, respectively. In addition to the challenges presented by the dissolution of serpentine, another challenge is the subsequent carbonation of the magnesium ions. A stable hydration sphere for the magnesium ion reduces the carbonation kinetics by obstructing the formation of the carbonation products. Accordingly, this research has evaluated the solubility of carbon dioxide in aqueous solution, the interaction between the dissociation products of carbon dioxide, and the carbonation potential of the magnesium ion.

George Alexander; Parvana Aksoy; John Andresen; Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Harold Schobert

2006-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

420

Mineral resources of the Devils Playground and Twin Buttes Wilderness study areas, Sweetwater County, Wyoming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Devils Playground and Twin Buttes Wilderness Study Areas are contiguous, covering an area totalling 26,800 acres in Southwest Wyoming. The study areas have been withdrawn from mining claim location because of the rich oil shale deposits in the region. In addition, Minerals management Service considers the areas to have moderate development potential for sodium (trona), with as much as 1.2 billion tons of inferred resources. The study areas are classic sites for vertebrate fossils, yielding many thousands of specimens now in museums. Chert beds are common, and it is prized by collectors for its banded appearance. The study area shave a high resource potential for undiscovered natural gas. The study areas have a moderate potential for zeolites. A low potential exists for coal resources (coal is present at great depths) and for undiscovered metallic minerals.

Van Loenen, R.E.; Bryant, W.A. (US Geological Survey (US)); Lane, M.E. (US Bureau of Mines (US))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Electron Transport at the MicrobeMineral Interface: A Synthesis of Current Research Challenges  

SciTech Connect

Many bacterial and archaeal species can couple growth to the respiratory reduction or oxidation of insoluble mineral oxides of transition metals. These solid substrates are abundant electron sinks and sources for life on Earth, but, since they are insoluble in water, they cannot enter the bacterial cells. So, to exploit these electron sinks and sources, specific respiratory electron-transfer mechanisms must overcome the physical limitations associated with electron transfer between a microbe and extracellular metal oxides. Recent microbiological, geochemical, biochemical, spectroscopic and structural work is beginning to shed light on the molecular mechanism and impacts of electron transfer at themicrobemineral interface from a nanometre to kilometre scale. The research field is attracting attention in applied quarters from those with interests in nanowires, microbial fuel cells, bioremediation and microbial cell factories.

Richardson, David; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Oxygen-isotope geochemistry of quaternary rhyolite from the Mineral Mountains, Utah, USA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Oxygen isotope analyses were made of phenocryst and glass separates from four Quaternary rhyolite flows and domes in the Mineral Mountains, southwest Utah. With the exception of biotite in all samples and alkali feldspar in the rhyolite domes, all minerals appear to be in close oxygen isotope exchange equilibrium. The geothermometry equations proposed by Bottinga and Javoy (1973) and Javoy (1977) for quartz, alkali feldspar and magnetite produce the best agreement with temperature results fom two-feldspar and iron-titanium oxide geothermometry for these rhyolites. If the rhyolites were generated by partial melting in the crust, their whole-rock (glass) delta/sup 18/O values (6.3 to 6.9 permil) are consistent with generation from I-type (Chappell and White, 1974, O'Neil and Chappell, 1977; O'Neil et. al., 1977) sources.

Bowman, J.R.; Evans, S.H. Jr.; Nash, W.P.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Method for the production of mineral wool and iron from serpentine ore  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Magnesium silicate mineral wools having a relatively high liquidus temperature of at least about 1400.degree. C. and to methods for the production thereof are provided. The methods of the present invention comprise melting a magnesium silicate feedstock (e.g., comprising a serpentine or olivine ore) having a liquidus temperature of at least about 1400.degree. C. to form a molten magnesium silicate, and subsequently fiberizing the molten magnesium silicate to produce a magnesium silicate mineral wool. In one embodiment, the magnesium silicate feedstock contains iron oxide (e.g., up to about 12% by weight). Preferably, the melting is performed in the presence of a reducing agent to produce an iron alloy, which can be separated from the molten ore. Useful magnesium silicate feedstocks include, without limitation, serpentine and olivine ores. Optionally, silicon dioxide can be added to the feedstock to lower the liquidus temperature thereof.

O' Connor, William K. (Albany, OR); Rush, Gilbert E. (Scio, OR); Soltau, Glen F. (Lebanon, OR)

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

424

Hydrodesulfurization and hydrodenitrogenation catalysts obtained from coal mineral matter. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrotreating catalyst is prepared from coal mineral matter obtained by low temperature ashing coals of relatively low bassanite content by the steps of: (a) depositing on the low temperature ash 0.25 to 3 grams of an iron or nickel salt in water per gram of ash and drying a resulting slurry; (b) crushing and sizing a resulting solid; and (c) heating the thus-sized solid powder in hydrogen.

Hwai-der Liu, K.; Hamrin, C.E. Jr.

1981-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

425

Hydrothermal alteration in Oregon's Newberry Volcano No. 2: fluid chemistry and secondary-mineral distribution  

SciTech Connect

Newberry 2 was drilled in the caldera floor of Newberry Volcano, Oregon, by the US Geological Survey during 1979-81. The maximum temperature measured was 265C at the bottom of the hole, 932 m below the surface. Rocks recovered fr9om the drill hole are divided into three intervals on the basis of hydrothermal alteration and mineral deposition: (1) 0-290 m consists of unaltered, largely glassy volcanic material, with present temperatures ranging from 20 to 40C; (2) 290-700 m consists of permeable tuff layers, tuff breccia units, and brecciated and fractured rhyodacitic to dacitic lava flows, with temperatures ranging from 40 to 100C; (3) 700-932 m consists of impermeable andesitic to basaltic lava flows that generally show little effect of alteration, interlayered with permeable hydrothermally altered flow breccia, with temperatures gradually increasing from 100 at 700 m to 265C at 932 m. Hydrothermal alteration throughout the system is controlled by rock permeability, temperature, composition of geothermal fluids, and composition and crystallinity of host rocks. Rock alteration consists mainly of replacement of glass by clay minerals and, locally, zeolites, partial replacement of plagioclase phenocrysts by calcite +/- epidote +/- illite, and whole-rock leaching adjacent to fluids channels. Open-space deposition of hydrothermal minerals in fractures, vesicles, and interbreccia pore space is far more abundant than replacement. A cooling shallow convection system in the upper 700 m is indicated by the occurrence of hydrothermal minerals that were deposited in a slightly higher temperature environment than presently exists. Below 700 m, the heat flow is conductive, and fluid flow is controlled by horizontal lava flows. Homogenization temperatures of secondary quartz fluid inclusions were as high as 370C.

Keith, T.E.C.; Mariner, R.H.; Bargar, K.E.; Evans, W.C.; Presser, T.S.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Regional gravity and aeromagnetic surveys of the Mineral Mountains and vicinity, Millard and Beaver Counties, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of gravity and aeromagnetic surveys of the Mineral Mountains and vicinity are presented as a terrain-corrected Bouguer gravity anomaly map (about 1450 stations with 1-mgal contour interval) and a total magnetic field intensity residual anomaly map (with contour interval 50 gammas), respectively. Combined interpretation of the gravity and aeromagnetic data was conducted based on comparing and contrasting various processed maps and interpretative geologic cross sections produced from each survey. (MHR)

Carter, J.A.; Cook, K.L.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Low dissolved organic carbon input from fresh litter to deep mineral soils  

SciTech Connect

Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) leached from recent litter in the forest floor has been suggested to be an important source of C to the mineral soil of forest ecosystems. In order to determine the rate at which this flux of C occurs we have taken advantage of a local release of 14C at Oak Ridge National Laboratory Reservation, USA (latitude N 35 58'; longitude W 84 16'). Eight replicate 7x7 m plots were estab lished at four field sites on the reservation in an upland oak forest setting. Half of the plots were provided with 14C-enriched litter (?14C ?1000 ), and the other half with near-background litter (?14C ?220 ) over multiple years. Differences in the labeled leaf litter were used to quantify the movement of litter derived DOC through the soil profile. Soil solutions were collected over several years with tension lysimeters at 15 and 70 cm depth and measured for DOC concentration and 14C abundance. The net amount of DOC retained between 15 and 70 cm was 1.5-6 g m-2 y-1. There were significant effects of the litter additions on the 14C abundance in the DOC, but the net transport of 14C from the added litter was small. The difference in ?14C between the treatments with enriched and near-background litter was only about 130 at both depths, which is small compared with the difference in ?14C in the added litter. The primary source of DOC within the mineral soil must therefore have been either the Oe/Oa horizon or the organic matter in the mineral soil. Over a 2-year time frame, leaching of DOC from recent litter did not have a major impact on the C stock in the mineral soil below 15 cm in this ecosystem.

Froeberg, Mats J [ORNL; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Swanston, Christopher [ORNL; Todd Jr, Donald E [ORNL; Phillips, Jana Randolph [ORNL; Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Osteoporotic-like effects of cadmium on bone mineral density and content in aged ovariectomized beagles  

SciTech Connect

Our purpose was to evaluate the effects of ovariectomy in conjunction with cadmium (Cd) exposure on bone. Aged female beagles with {sup 45}Ca-labeled skeletons ovariectomized and exposed to Cd. Successive vertebral scans by dual photon absorptiometry monitored changes in bone mineral density (BMD) in each dog with time. Results showed that ovariectomy or Cd exposure alone caused significant decreases in BMD; ovariectomy with Cd exposure caused the greatest decrease. Ovariectomy alone did not decrease BMD in the distal end or mid-shaft of the tibia while BMD of the distal tibia decreased significantly due to Cd exposure alone. Combination treatment resulted in significant decreases in BMD of both tibial regions. At necropsy, tibiae, humeri, lumbar vertebrae and ribs were obtained for biochemical analysis. No group-to-group differences in bone weights (wet, dry, ash), in ash/dry ratios, or in long bone and vertebral Ca/dry or Ca/ash ratios were observed. Significantly higher total {sup 45}Ca content and {sup 45}Ca/dry and {sup 45}Ca/ash ratios were observed in long bones and vertebrae of OV- and OV+ groups. In contrast, intact ribs showed significantly decreased Ca/dry and Ca/ash ratios compared to the SO-group. Quartered ribs demonstrated regional responses to specific treatment; decreases in total Ca content were greatest in the mid-rib region ({minus}36 to {minus}46%). Results suggest that in the aged female beagle, bone mineral loss associated with estrogen depletion is not only related to bone type (trabecular versus cortical) but also to bone Ca pools. Our results also suggest that a regional heterogeneity of bone plays a role in responsiveness to ovariectomy and Cd exposure. These aspects suggest that Cd is an exogenous factor affecting bone mineral loss independently of estrogen depletion. However, estrogen depletion primes bone for responsiveness to Cd-induced bone mineral loss.

Sacco-Gibson, N.; Abrams, J.; Chaudhry, S.; Hurst, D.; Peterson, D.; Bhattacharyya, M.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

429

Goa, India Risk Assessment of Surface Miner for Estonian Oil Shale Mining Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper deals with risk assessment of a high-selective oil-shale mining technology using surface miner Wirtgen 2500SM. This study addresses risk associated with productivity and cutting quality on example of Estonian oil shale deposit in areas with complicated layering conditions. The risk assessment method allows choosing relevant technology with friendly environment and economic value. For risk estimation the event tree is used. The results of the risk assessment are of practical interest for different purposes. 1

S. Sabanov; J-r. Pastarus; O. Nikitin; E. Vli

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

File:03AKDStateNoncompetitiveMineralLeasingProcess.pdf | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AKDStateNoncompetitiveMineralLeasingProcess.pdf AKDStateNoncompetitiveMineralLeasingProcess.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:03AKDStateNoncompetitiveMineralLeasingProcess.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 43 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 10:51, 18 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 10:51, 18 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (43 KB) Jnorris (Talk | contribs) 11:35, 6 August 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 11:35, 6 August 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (38 KB) Jnorris (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup

431

File:03AKAStateCompetitiveMineralLeasingProcess.pdf | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AKAStateCompetitiveMineralLeasingProcess.pdf AKAStateCompetitiveMineralLeasingProcess.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:03AKAStateCompetitiveMineralLeasingProcess.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 40 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 10:51, 2 July 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 10:51, 2 July 2013 1,275 × 1,650 (40 KB) Alevine (Talk | contribs) 11:34, 6 August 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 11:34, 6 August 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (44 KB) Jnorris (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup

432

File:03HIBStateMineralLeasingProcess.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HIBStateMineralLeasingProcess.pdf HIBStateMineralLeasingProcess.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:03HIBStateMineralLeasingProcess.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 65 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 2 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 13:18, 23 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 13:18, 23 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (65 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) 11:33, 20 August 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 11:33, 20 August 2012 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (61 KB) Alevine (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file.

433

File:03HIAReservedLandMineralLeasingProcess.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HIAReservedLandMineralLeasingProcess.pdf HIAReservedLandMineralLeasingProcess.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:03HIAReservedLandMineralLeasingProcess.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 42 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 10:34, 20 August 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 10:34, 20 August 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (42 KB) Alevine (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup instructions for more information) File usage The following 2 pages link to this file: GRR/Flowcharts GRR/Section 3-HI-a - Reserved Land Leasing Process

434

Fundamental Thermodynamics of Actinide-Bearing Mineral Waste Forms - Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The end of the Cold War raised the need for the technical community to be concerned with the disposition of excess nuclear weapon material. The plutonium will either be converted into mixed-oxide fuel for use in nuclear reactors or immobilized in glass or ceramic waste forms and placed in a repository. The stability and behavior of plutonium in the ceramic materials as well as the phase behavior and stability of the ceramic material in the environment is not well established. In order to provide technically sound solutions to these issues, thermodynamic data are essential in developing an understanding of the chemistry and phase equilibria of the actinide-bearing mineral waste form materials proposed as immobilization matrices. Mineral materials of interest include zircon, zirconolite, and pyrochlore. High temperature solution calorimetry is one of the most powerful techniques, sometimes the only technique, for providing the fundamental thermodynamic data needed to establish optimum material fabrication parameters, and more importantly understand and predict the behavior of the mineral materials in the environment. The purpose of this project is to experimentally determine the enthalpy of formation of actinide orthosilicates, the enthalpies of formation of actinide substituted zirconolite and pyrochlore, and develop an understanding of the bonding characteristics and stabilities of these materials.

Williamson, Mark A.; Ebbinghaus, Bartley B.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Crystallographic Study of U-Th bearing minerals in Tranomaro, Anosy Region- Madagascar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As an alternative to conventional fossil fuel, there is a renewed interest in the nuclear fuel to support increasing energy demand. New studies are then undertaken to characterize Madagascar U-Th bearing minerals. This is the case for the urano-thorianite bearing pyroxenites in the south East of Madagascar. In this region, several quarries were abandoned, after being mined by the French Atomic Energy Commission (C.E.A) in the fifties and sixties and are now explored by new mining companies. For this purpose, seven U-Th bearing mineral samples from old abandoned uranium quarries in Tranomaro, Amboasary Sud, Madagascar (46{\\deg} 28' 0"E, 24{\\deg} 36' 0"S), have been collected. To determine the mineral microstructure, they were investigated for qualitative and quantitative identification of crystalline compounds using X-ray powder diffraction analytical method (XRD). Results showed that the U and Th compounds, as minor elements, are present in various crystalline structures. This is important to understand their...

Sahoa, F E; Andriambololona, Raoelina; Geckeis, H; Marquardt, C; Finck, N

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Can hydrous minerals account for the observed mid-latitude water on Mars?  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Great interest was generated with the discovery by the Odyssey spacecraft OC heterogeneously distributed hydrogcn at martian mid-latitudes, suggesting that large areas of the near-equatorial highlands contain near-surface deposits of 'chemically and/or physically bound 1120 and/or OH' in amounts up to 3.8% equivalent H20. More recent interpretations of the Odyssey data using new calibrations suggest that some near-equatorial areas, such as Arabia Terra, contain up to 8.5f I .3% water-equivalent hydrogen. Such shallow occurrences (minerals and zeolites, have been proposed as possible M20-bearing constituents on Mars, and both groups of minerals are common terrestrial alteration products of hydrovolcanic basaltic ashes and palagonitic material comparable io those that may be widespread on Mars. Smectites within martian meteorites, attributed to hydrous alteration on Mars rather than on Earth, provide direct evidence of clay minerals from Mars. In addition, new thermal emission spectrometer (TES) data provide evidence for unspecified zeolites in martian surface dust, and concluded that spectral deconvolution of MGS TES and Mariner 9 IRIS data is consistent with the presence of zeolite in the martian surface dust.

Bish, D. L. (David L.); Vaniman, D. T. (David T.); Fialips, C. I. (Clair I.); Carey, J. W. (James W.); Feldman, W. C. (William C.)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Optimization of Mineral Activation for CO2 sequestration Hui X. Ou, McNair Scholar, Pennsylvania State University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

estuaries; increased biodiversity; enhanced recovery oil and methane; and the development of exportable technologies to help the U.S. economy (DOE, 1999). Mineral carbonation, which involves the reaction of CO2

Omiecinski, Curtis

438

Aerosol Radiative Forcing and Forcing Efficiency in the UVB for Regions Affected by Saharan and Asian Mineral Dust  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of mineral dust on ultraviolet energy transfer is studied for two different mineralogical origins. The aerosol radiative forcing ?F and the forcing efficiency at the surface ?Feff in the range 290325 nm were estimated in ground-...

O. E. Garca; A. M. Daz; F. J. Expsito; J. P. Daz; A. Redondas; T. Sasaki

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Development and evaluation of a thermodynamic dataset for phases of interest in CO2 mineral sequestration in basaltic rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Moganite molar volume and heat capacity function assumed toBrown, T.H. , 1985. Heat capacities of minerals in theterature heat content, heat capacity and entropy data for

Aradottir, E.S.P.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Changing role of the nonfuel mineral industry in the state and local economies of Arizona (1981-1986)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bureau of Mines is currently analyzing the impacts of changes in nonfuel mineral industry activity upon regional economies. As part of the project the Bureau examined the impacts on Arizona and four of its counties resulting from significant changes in nonfuel mineral production between 1981 and 1986. Regional input-output models for Arizona and the counties of Gila, Greenlee, Pima, and Pinal were developed through IMPLAN, the U.S. Forest Service's economic impact model. These models generated multipliers to measure total impacts of changes in activity on employment, earnings, and indirect business taxes. From 1981 to 1983 metallic nonfuel mineral production in Arizona declined significantly. Findings show that county economies are quite sensitive to changes in nonfuel mineral production.

Opyrchal, A.M.; Swisko, G.M.; Adams, R.L.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uravan mineral belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Mineral Chemistry of Basalts Recovered from Hotspot Snake River Scientific Drilling Project, Idaho: Source and Crystallization Characteristics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

recovered by Hotspot: Snake River Scientific Drilling Project, Idaho establish crystallization conditionsMineral Chemistry of Basalts Recovered from Hotspot Snake River Scientific Drilling Project, Idaho: Source and Crystallization Characteristics Richard W. Bradshaw A thesis submitted to the faculty

Seamons, Kent E.

442

Effects of mineral aerosols on the summertime climate of southwest Asia: Incorporating subgrid variability in a dust emission scheme  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[1] Improvements in modeling mineral aerosols over southwest Asia are made to the dust scheme in a regional climate model by representing subgrid variability of both wind speed and surface roughness length. The new module ...

Marcella, Marc Pace

443

Mechanism of physical transformations of mineral matter in the blast furnace coke with reference to its reactivity and strength  

SciTech Connect

Examinations of polished and dry cut sections of feed and tuyere coke revealed some possible mechanisms for the physical influence of mineral compounds on the reactivity and strength of coke. It was observed that rounded particles of mineral phases that are exposed to the pore walls and surface of coke at high temperature create an inorganic cover, thus reducing the surface available for gas-solid reactions. The particles of mineral matter that have a low melting point and viscosity can affect the coke at earlier stages in the blast furnace process, acting in the upper parts of the blast furnace (BF). The temperature-driven redistribution of mineral phases within the coke matrix probably leads to the creation of weak spots and in general to anisotropy in its properties, thus reducing its strength. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Stanislav S. Gornostayev; Jouko J. Haerkki [University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland). Laboratory of Process Metallurgy

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

444

Estimated Cancer Risks Associated with Dermal Exposure to Mineral Oil Containing PCB Concentrations of 50 ppm or Less  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The excess lifetime cancer risks (ELCRs) from dermal exposures to low levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) (that is, 50 ppm or less) in mineral oil were determined for utility workers involved in four different work activities related to mineral oil spill cleanup and the maintenance of breakers and transformers. Two risk calculations were made for each work activity: reasonable maximum exposure (RMaxE) scenarios using conservative to highly conservative parameters and central tendency exposure (CTE...

2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

445

Mineral Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Factors affecting wear of ceramics...Dense materials create greater wear because kinetic

446

Atlas of coal/minerals and important resource problem areas for fish and wildlife in the conterminous United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The atlas highlights areas in the conterminous US of potential concern involving coal and minerals development activities and fish and wildlife resources, in particular the Important Resource Problem Areas (IRPs) designated in 1980 by the US Fish and Wildlife Service as areas of emphasis in policymaking. The atlas serves as an initial screening tool for national and regional planners and administrators to help define areas that may require additional analysis prior to development in order to minimize disturbances and adverse impacts on fish and wildlife resources and to protect and enhance these resources where practicable. The publication contains maps of selected mineral resources (coal, copper, geothermal resources, gold, iron, molybdenum, nickel, oil shale/tar sands, peat, phosphate, silver, uranium), IRPs, and Federal Endangered and Threatened Animal Species. An overlay of the IRP map is provided: by placing this on a mineral map, counties containing both mineral and wildlife resources will be highlighted. Background information on IRPs, the mineral commodities, and environmental impacts of mineral mining is provided, as well as appendices which tabulate the data displayed in the maps. The document can also be used with a series of 1:7,500,000-scale reproductions of the maps.

Honig, R.A.; Olson, R.J.; Mason, W.T. Jr.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Injection of CO2 with H2S and SO2 and Subsequent Mineral Trapping in Sandstone-Shale Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection into deep geologic formations can potentially reduce atmospheric emissions of greenhouse gases. Sequestering less-pure CO{sub 2} waste streams (containing H{sub 2}S and/or SO{sub 2}) would be less expensive or would require less energy than separating CO{sub 2} from flue gas or a coal gasification process. The long-term interaction of these injected acid gases with shale-confining layers of a sandstone injection zone has not been well investigated. We therefore have developed a conceptual model of injection of CO{sub 2} with H{sub 2}S and/or SO{sub 2} into a sandstone-shale sequence, using hydrogeologic properties and mineral compositions commonly encountered in Gulf Coast sediments of the United States. We have performed numerical simulations of a 1-D radial well region considering sandstone alone and a 2-D model using a sandstone-shale sequence under acid-gas injection conditions. Results indicate that shale plays a limited role in mineral alteration and sequestration of gases within a sandstone horizon for short time periods (10,000 years in present simulations). The co-injection of SO{sub 2} results in different pH distribution, mineral alteration patterns, and CO{sub 2} mineral sequestration than the co-injection of H{sub 2}S or injection of CO{sub 2} alone. Simulations generate a zonal distribution of mineral alteration and formation of carbon and sulfur trapping minerals that depends on the pH distribution. The co-injection of SO{sub 2} results in a larger and stronger acidified zone close to the well. Precipitation of carbon trapping minerals occurs within the higher pH regions beyond the acidified zones. In contrast, sulfur trapping minerals are stable at low pH ranges (below 5) within the front of the acidified zone. Corrosion and well abandonment due to the co-injection of SO{sub 2} could be important issues. Significant CO{sub 2} is sequestered in ankerite and dawsonite, and some in siderite. The CO{sub 2} mineral-trapping capability can reach 80 kg per cubic meter of medium. Most sulfur is trapped through alunite precipitation, although some is trapped by anhydrite precipitation and minor amount of pyrite. The addition of the acid gases and induced mineral alteration result in changes in porosity. The limited information currently available on the mineralogy of natural high-pressure acid-gas reservoirs is generally consistent with our simulations.

Xu, Tianfu; Apps, John A.; Pruess, Karsten; Yamamoto, Hajime

2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

448

Report for Treating Hanford LAW and WTP SW Simulants: Pilot Plant Mineralizing Flowsheet  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy is responsible for managing the disposal of radioactive liquid waste in underground storage tanks at the Hanford site in Washington State. The Hanford waste treatment and immobilization plant (WPT) will separate the waste into a small volume of high level waste (HLW), containing most of the radioactive constituents, and a larger volume of low activity waste (LAW), containing most of the non-radioactive chemical and hazardous constituents. The HLW and LAW will be converted into immobilized waste forms for disposal. Currently there is inadequate LAW vitrification capacity planned at the WTP to complete the mission within the required timeframe. Therefore additional LAW capacity is required. One candidate supplemental treatment technology is the fluidized bed steam reformer process (FBSR). This report describes the demonstration testing of the FBSR process using a mineralizing flowsheet for treating simulated Hanford LAW and secondary waste from the WTP (WTP SW). The FBSR testing project produced leach-resistant solid products and environmentally compliant gaseous effluents. The solid products incorporated normally soluble ions into an alkali alumino-silicate (NaS) mineral matrix. Gaseous emissions were found to be within regulatory limits. Cesium and rhenium were captured in the mineralized products with system removal efficiencies of 99.999% and 99.998 respectively. The durability and leach performance of the FBSR granular solid were superior to the low activity reference material (LMR) glass standards. Normalized product consistency test (PCT) release rates for constituents of concern were approximately 2 orders of magnitude less than that of sodium in the Hanford glass [standard].

Arlin Olson

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

449

Structural characterization and dehydration kinetics of Kirka inderite mineral: Application of non-isothermal models  

SciTech Connect

Coats-Redfern, Arrhenius, Ozawa, Kissinger, and Doyle non-isothermal kinetic models were used to calculate the dynamic kinetic parameters for dehydration reaction of Mg-borate mineral, inderite (Kirka - Turkey) based on thermogravimetric analysis, derivative thermogravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis. Dehydration experiments were carried out at different heating rates of 2, 5, 10, 15, and 20 deg. C/min in a pure nitrogen atmosphere. Structural and morphological properties have been characterized by X-Ray diffraction, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, Scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy, and Inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy techniques.

Figen, Aysel Kantuerk, E-mail: akanturk@yildiz.edu.tr [Yildiz Technical University, Department of Chemical Engineering, Davutpasa Campus., N.127, Esenler, Istanbul (Turkey); Yilmaz, Muege Sari, E-mail: mugesari@yildiz.edu.tr [Yildiz Technical University, Department of Chemical Engineering, Davutpasa Campus., N.127, Esenler, Istanbul (Turkey); Piskin, Sabriye, E-mail: piskin@yildiz.edu.tr [Yildiz Technical University, Department of Chemical Engineering, Davutpasa Campus., N.127, Esenler, Istanbul (Turkey)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

450

Massive sulfide deposits and hydrothermal solutions: incremental reaction modeling of mineral precipitation and sulfur isotopic evolution  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Incremental reaction path modeling of chemical and sulfur isotopic reactions occurring in active hydrothermal vents on the seafloor, in combination with chemical and petrographic data from sulfide samples from the seafloor and massive sulfide ore deposits, allows a detailed examination of the processes involved. This paper presents theoretical models of reactions of two types: (1) adiabatic mixing between hydrothermal solution and seawater, and (2) reaction of hydrothermal solution with sulfide deposit materials. In addition, reaction of hydrothermal solution with sulfide deposit minerals and basalt in feeder zones is discussed.

Janecky, D.R.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z