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1

Extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate from aqueous nitric acid solutions with CMPO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE sponsored development of the transuranium extraction (TRUEX) process for removing actinides from radioactive wastes. The solvent is a mixture of CMPO and TBP. Since the extraction characteristics of CMPO are not as well understood as those of TBP, the extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate with CMPO (dissolved in n-dodecane) were studied. Results indicate that CMPO extracts nitric acid with a 1:1 stoichiometry; equilibrium constant is 2. 660{plus_minus}0.092 at 25 C, and extraction enthalpy is -5. 46{plus_minus}0.46 kcal/mol. Slope analysis indicates that uranyl nitrate extracts with a mixed equilibria of 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries in nearly equal proportion. Equil. constant of the 2: 1 extraction was 1.213 {times} 10{sup 6}{plus_minus}3.56 {times} 10{sup 4} at 25 C; reaction enthalpy was -9.610{plus_minus}0.594 kcal/mol. Nitration complexation constant is 8.412{plus_minus}0.579, with an enthalpy of -10.72{plus_minus}1.87 kcal/mol. Bismuth nitrate also extracts with a mixed equilibria of (perhaps) 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries. A 2:1 extraction equilibrium and a nitrate complexation adequately model the data. Kinetics and enthalpies were also measured.

Spencer, B.B.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Standard test method for isotopic analysis of hydrolyzed uranium hexafluoride and uranyl nitrate solutions by thermal ionization mass spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This method applies to the determination of isotopic composition in hydrolyzed nuclear grade uranium hexafluoride. It covers isotopic abundance of 235U between 0.1 and 5.0 % mass fraction, abundance of 234U between 0.0055 and 0.05 % mass fraction, and abundance of 236U between 0.0003 and 0.5 % mass fraction. This test method may be applicable to other isotopic abundance providing that corresponding standards are available. 1.2 This test method can apply to uranyl nitrate solutions. This can be achieved either by transforming the uranyl nitrate solution to a uranyl fluoride solution prior to the deposition on the filaments or directly by depositing the uranyl nitrate solution on the filaments. In the latter case, a calibration with uranyl nitrate standards must be performed. 1.3 This test method can also apply to other nuclear grade matrices (for example, uranium oxides) by providing a chemical transformation to uranyl fluoride or uranyl nitrate solution. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address al...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Standard test method for isotopic abundance analysis of uranium hexa?uoride and uranyl nitrate solutions by multi-collector, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Standard test method for isotopic abundance analysis of uranium hexa?uoride and uranyl nitrate solutions by multi-collector, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Uranyl nitrate pouring solution for producing nuclear fuel particles and a method for its preparation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sorbitol, or another polyalcohol such as erythritol, dulcitol or xylitol, is added to a solution containing uranyl nitrate which may also contain another heavy metal, such as thorium or plutonium, prior to preneutralization with ammonia in order to provide a highly viscous solution that can be preneutralized to a great extent without premature precipitation of uranium. The high viscosity makes possible the formation of favorably large drops when the solution is dripped into an ammonia containing bath for external gelification of the drops. According to the pouring apparatus used, the particles after washing, drying and sintering have a diameter between 0.6 and 1.5 mm. The polyalcohol is added to a hydrosol containing from 1.5 to 2 moles per liter of heavy metal, the polyalcohol being added until concentration of onethird mole of polyalcohol per mole of heavy metal is reached. In certain cases up to four moles of ammonium nitrate per liter are added. The solution so produced can be preneutralized with up to 90% of the amount of ammonia stoichiometrically necessary for T separation of uranium without the formation of any precipitate, preferably by first adding ammonia gas under strong stirring and then adding ammonium bicarbonate in excess, which decomposes to liberate ammonia to an extent determined by the temperature, which is to be precisely controlled. It is possible to obtain this way a solution of predetermined viscosity from which the excess ammonium bicarbonate can readily be separated.

Hein, K.

1983-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

5

Critical Parameters of Complex Geometries of Intersecting Cylinders Containing Uranyl Nitrate Solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

About three dozen previously unreported critical configurations are presented for very complex geometries filled with high concentration enriched uranyl nitrate solution. These geometries resemble a tall, thin Central Column (or trunk of a ''tree'') having long, thin arms (or ''branches'') extending up to four directions off the column. Arms are equally spaced from one another in vertical planes, and that spacing ranges from arms in contact to quite wide spacings. Both the Central Column and the many different arms are critically safe by themselves with each, alone, is filled with fissile solution; but, in combination, criticality occurs due to the interactions between arms and the column. Such neutronic interactions formed the principal focus of this study. While these results are fresh to the nuclear criticality safety industry and to those seeking novel experiments against which to validate computer codes, the experiments, themselves, are not recent. Over 100 experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory between September, 1967, and February of the following year.

J. B. Briggs (INEEL POC); R. E. Rothe

1999-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

6

Standard test method for gamma energy emission from fission products in uranium hexafluoride and uranyl nitrate solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This test method covers the measurement of gamma energy emitted from fission products in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and uranyl nitrate solution. It is intended to provide a method for demonstrating compliance with UF6 specifications C 787 and C 996 and uranyl nitrate specification C 788. 1.2 The lower limit of detection is 5000 MeV Bq/kg (MeV/kg per second) of uranium and is the square root of the sum of the squares of the individual reporting limits of the nuclides to be measured. The limit of detection was determined on a pure, aged natural uranium (ANU) solution. The value is dependent upon detector efficiency and background. 1.3 The nuclides to be measured are106Ru/ 106Rh, 103Ru,137Cs, 144Ce, 144Pr, 141Ce, 95Zr, 95Nb, and 125Sb. Other gamma energy-emitting fission nuclides present in the spectrum at detectable levels should be identified and quantified as required by the data quality objectives. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its us...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solution to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Determination of Uranium 7 Specific Gravity by Pycnometry 15-20 Free Acid by Oxalate Complexation 21-27 Determination of Thorium 28 Determination of Chromium 29 Determination of Molybdenum 30 Halogens Separation by Steam Distillation 31-35 Fluoride by Specific Ion Electrode 36-42 Halogen Distillate Analysis: Chloride, Bromide, and Iodide by Amperometric Microtitrimetry 43 Determination of Chloride and Bromide 44 Determination of Sulfur by X-Ray Fluorescence 45 Sulfate Sulfur by (Photometric) Turbidimetry 46 Phosphorus by the Molybdenum Blue (Photometric) Method 54-61 Silicon by the Molybdenum Blue (Photometric) Method 62-69 Carbon by Persulfate Oxidation-Acid Titrimetry 70 Conversion to U3O8 71-74 Boron by ...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

LUMINESCENCE SPECTRA OF THE URANYL ION IN TWO GEOMETRICALLY SIMILAR COORDINATION ENVIRONMENTS: URANYL NITRATE HEXAHYDRATE AND DI-u-AQUO-BIS (DIOXODINITRA-TOURANIUM(VI) DI-IMIDAZOLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coordination sphere of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UNH). U-Coordination Environments: Uranyl Nitrate Hexahydrate andin the crystal hosts of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UNH) and

Brittain, Harry G.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

1,4818 pour le nitrate d'uranyle). Les diffrents m-langes prsentaient sensiblement la mme densit.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

434 1,4818 pour le nitrate d'uranyle). Les différents mé- langes présentaient sensiblement la mème pour des solutions de nitrate d'uranyle dont la densité a été reliée au moyen de chlorure ferrique nitrate d'uranyle sans chlorure fer- rique. En résumé, la mesure précise de l'activité des so- lutions de

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

10

Analysis of Enriched Uranyl Nitrate in Nested Annular Tank Array  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two series of experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory during the 1980s using highly enriched (93%) uranyl nitrate solution in annular tanks. [1, 2] Tanks were of typical sizes found in nuclear production plants. Experiments looked at tanks of varying radii in a co-located set of nested tanks, a 1 by 2 array, and a 1 by 3 array. The co-located set of tanks had been analyzed previously [3] as a benchmark for inclusion within the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments. [4] The current study represents the benchmark analysis of the 1 by 3 array of a series of nested annular tanks. Of the seventeen configurations performed in this set of experiments, twelve were evaluated and nine were judged as acceptable benchmarks.

John D. Bess; James D. Cleaver

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Uranyl fluoride luminescence in acidic aqueous solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Luminescence emission spectra and decay rates are reported for uranyl species in acidic aqueous solutions containing HF or added NaF. The longest luminescence lifetime, 0.269 {+-} 0.006 ms, was observed from uranyl in 1 M HF + 1 M HClO{sub 4} at 296 K and decreased with increasing temperature. Based on a luminescence dynamics model that assumes equilibrium among electronically excited uranyl fluoride species and free fluoride ion, this long lived uranyl luminescence in aqueous solution is attributed primarily to UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}. Studies on the effect of added LiNO{sub 3} or Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O showed relatively weak quenching of uranyl fluoride luminescence which suggests that high sensitivity determination of the UF{sub 6} content of WF{sub 6} gas should be feasible via uranyl luminescence analysis of hydrolyzed gas samples of impure WF{sub 6}.

Beitz, J.V.; Williams, C.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

STRUCTURE OF PENTAKIS (UREA) DIOXOURANIUM(VI)NITRATE LUO2 (OC (NH2)2)5 (NO3) 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate and urea which wasALL f(O,O.t URANYL UREA NITRATE FOB AND FCA ARE THEFACTORS CO~TINUE& FOf URANYL UREA NITRATE l F[) B PAGE . ,

Zalkin, Allan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Uranyl nitrate-exposed rat alveolar macrophages cell death: Influence of superoxide anion and TNF ? mediators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium compounds are widely used in the nuclear fuel cycle, military and many other diverse industrial processes. Health risks associated with uranium exposure include nephrotoxicity, cancer, respiratory, and immune disorders. Macrophages present in body tissues are the main cell type involved in the internalization of uranium particles. To better understand the pathological effects associated with depleted uranium (DU) inhalation, we examined the metabolic activity, phagocytosis, genotoxicity and inflammation on DU-exposed rat alveolar macrophages (12.5200 ?M). Stability and dissolution of DU could differ depending on the dissolvent and in turn alter its biological action. We dissolved DU in sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO{sub 3} 100 mM) and in what we consider a more physiological vehicle resembling human internal media: sodium chloride (NaCl 0.9%). We demonstrate that uranyl nitrate in NaCl solubilizes, enters the cell, and elicits its cytotoxic effect similarly to when it is diluted in NaHCO{sub 3}. We show that irrespective of the dissolvent employed, uranyl nitrate impairs cell metabolism, and at low doses induces both phagocytosis and generation of superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup ?}). At high doses it provokes the secretion of TNF? and through all the range of doses tested, apoptosis. We herein suggest that at DU low doses O{sub 2}{sup ?} may act as the principal mediator of DNA damage while at higher doses the signaling pathway mediated by O{sub 2}{sup ?} may be blocked, prevailing damage to DNA by the TNF? route. The study of macrophage functions after uranyl nitrate treatment could provide insights into the pathophysiology of uranium?related diseases. -- Highlights: ? Uranyl nitrate effect on cultured macrophages is linked to the doses and independent of its solubility. ? At low doses uranyl nitrate induces generation of superoxide anion. ? At high doses uranyl nitrate provokes secretion of TNF?. ? Uranyl nitrate induces apoptosis through all the range of doses tested.

Orona, N.S. [School of Science and Technology, National University of General Martn, Avda Gral Paz 5445 (1650) San Martn, Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [School of Science and Technology, National University of General Martn, Avda Gral Paz 5445 (1650) San Martn, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Tasat, D.R., E-mail: deborah.tasat@unsam.edu.ar [School of Science and Technology, National University of General Martn, Avda Gral Paz 5445 (1650) San Martn, Buenos Aires (Argentina); School of Dentistry, University of Buenos Aires, M. T. de Alvear 2142 (1122), Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

Highly Enriched Uranyl Nitrate in Annular Tanks with Concrete Reflection: 1 x 3 Line Array of Nested Pairs of Tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of seven experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory beginning in August, 1980 (References 1 and 2). Highly enriched uranyl nitrate solution was introduced into a 1-3 linear array of nested stainless steel annular tanks. The tanks were inside a concrete enclosure, with various moderator and absorber materials placed inside and/or between the tanks. These moderators and absorbers included boron-free concrete, borated concrete, borated plaster, and cadmium. Two configurations included placing bottles of highly enriched uranyl nitrate between tanks externally. Another experiment involved nested hemispheres of highly enriched uranium placed between tanks externally. These three configurations are not evaluated in this report. The experiments evaluated here are part of a series of experiments, one set of which is evaluated in HEU-SOL-THERM-033. The experiments in this and HEU-SOL-THERM-033 were performed similarly. They took place in the same room and used the same tanks, some of the same moderators and absorbers, some of the same reflector panels, and uranyl nitrate solution from the same location. There are probably additional similarities that existed that are not identified here. Thus, many of the descriptions in this report are either the same or similar to those in the HEU-SOL-THERM-033 report. Seventeen configurations (sixteen of which were critical) were performed during seven experiments; six of those experiments are evaluated here with thirteen configurations. Two configurations were identical, except for solution height, and were conducted to test repeatability. The solution heights were averaged and the two were evaluated as one configuration, which gives a total of twelve evaluated configurations. One of the seventeen configurations was subcritical. Of the twelve critical configurations evaluated, nine were judged as acceptable as benchmarks.

James Cleaver; John D. Bess; Nathan Devine; Fitz Trumble

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Aqueous uranium(IV) concentrations controlled by calcium uranyl vanadate precipitates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oxidizing conditions. Uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (Spectrumto contain 300 ?M uranyl nitrate (hexahydrate), 300 ?M

Tokunaga, T.K.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

acute uranyl nitrate: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 % in the two experimental seasons. Key words: Date palm Fruit set Yield Fruit quality Boric acid Calcium nitrate INTRODUCTION synthesis, transport of sugars and carbohydrate...

17

Effect of the TBP and Water on the Complexation of Uranyl Nitrate and the Dissolution of Nitric Acid into Supercritical CO2. A Theoretical Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

started from "random" mixtures of water, TBP, nitric acid, and uranyl nitrate, complexation of uranyl to dissolve nitric acid in the supercritical phase. Indeed, without TBP, nitric acid alone self aggregates via containing the acid and uranyl salts. The simulations show that a high TBP/nitric acid ratio is needed

Boyer, Edmond

18

Structure and dynamics of aqueous solution of uranyl ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present work describes a molecular dynamics simulation study of structure and dynamics of aqueous solution of uranyl ions in water. Structural properties of the system in terms of radial distribution functions and dynamical characteristics as obtained through velocity autocorrelation function and mean square displacements have been analyzed. The results for radial distribution functions show the oxygen of water to form the first solvation shell at 2.4 around the uranium atom, whereas the hydrogen atoms of water are distributed around the uranium atom with the major peak at around 3.0 . Analyses of transport behaviors of ions and water through MSD indicates that the diffusion of the uranyl ion is much less as compared to that of the water molecules. It is also observed that the dynamical behavior of water molecules gets modified due to the presence of uranyl ion. The effect of increase in concentration of uranyl ions on the structure and dynamics of water molecules is also studied.

Chopra, Manish [Radiation Safety Systems Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400085 (India); Choudhury, Niharendu, E-mail: nihcho@barc.gov.in [Theoretical Chemistry Section, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400085 (India)

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

19

ARRAYS OF BOTTLES OF PLUTONIUM NITRATE SOLUTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In October and November of 1981 thirteen approaches-to-critical were performed on a remote split table machine (RSTM) in the Critical Mass Laboratory of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in Richland, Washington using planar arrays of polyethylene bottles filled with plutonium (Pu) nitrate solution. Arrays of up to sixteen bottles were used to measure the critical number of bottles and critical array spacing with a tight fitting Plexiglas reflector on all sides of the arrays except the top. Some experiments used Plexiglas shells fitted around each bottles to determine the effect of moderation on criticality. Each bottle contained approximately 2.4 L of Pu(NO3)4 solution with a Pu content of 105 g Pu/L and a free acid molarity H+ of 5.1. The plutonium was of low 240Pu (2.9 wt.%) content. These experiments were sponsored by Rockwell Hanford Operations because of the lack of experimental data on the criticality of arrays of bottles of Pu solution such as might be found in storage and handling at the Purex Facility at Hanford. The results of these experiments were used to provide benchmark data to validate calculational codes used in criticality safety assessments of [the] plant configurations (Ref. 1). Data for this evaluation were collected from the published report (Ref. 1), the approach to critical logbook, the experimenters logbook, and communication with the primary experimenter, B. Michael Durst. Of the 13 experiments preformed 10 were evaluated. One of the experiments was not evaluated because it had been thrown out by the experimenter, one was not evaluated because it was a repeat of another experiment and the third was not evaluated because it reported the critical number of bottles as being greater than 25. Seven of the thirteen evaluated experiments were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments. A similar experiment using uranyl nitrate was benchmarked as U233-SOL-THERM-014.

Margaret A. Marshall

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid uranyl nitrate Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cell conditions with uranyl... .1089ees.2006.0009 Soil Humic Acid Decreases Biological Uranium(VI) Reduction by Shewanella putrefaciens CN... the filter. Identical experiments...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

SYNTHESIS AND PROPERTIES OF URANYL MONOTHIOCARBAMATE ALKOXIDES, AN AIR-STABLE CLASS OF URANYL ALKOXIDES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

uranyl chemistry, however, has centered around the salts (and their complexes) such as the halides~ nitrates,

Perry, Dale L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Characterizing solution and solid-phase amorphous uranyl silicates q  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. INTRODUCTION Dissolved uranium, as the uranyl ion UO2 2þ , is consid- ered a contaminant introduced into the environment near mining, processing and production

Illinois at Chicago, University of

23

Standard test method for determination of bromine and chlorine in UF6 and uranyl nitrate by X-Ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This method covers the determination of bromine (Br) and chlorine (Cl) in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and uranyl nitrate solution. The method as written covers the determination of bromine in UF6 over the concentration range of 0.2 to 8 ?g/g, uranium basis. The chlorine in UF6 can be determined over the range of 4 to 160 ?g/g, uranium basis. Higher concentrations may be covered by appropriate dilutions. The detection limit for Br is 0.2 ?g/g uranium basis and for Cl is 4 ?g/g uranium basis. 1.2 This standard may involve hazardous materials, operations and equipment. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Report seeks solutions for nitrate in drinking water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nitrate in Californias Drinking Water report http://Clark Report seeks solutions for nitrate in drinking waternitrate contamination of drinking water in high-risk areas

Editors, By

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as uranyl nitrate hexahydrate. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will have two missions: (1) convert HEU materials to pure HEU uranyl nitrate (UNH) and (2) blend pure HEU UNH with depleted and natural UNH to produce HEU UNH crystals. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. To the extent practical, the chemical and isotopic concentrations of blended LEU product will be held within the specifications required for LWR fuel. Such blended LEU product will be offered to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) to be sold as feed material to the commercial nuclear industry. Otherwise, blended LEU Will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

NONE

1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

26

E-Print Network 3.0 - anhydrous li uranyl Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and the dissolution of nitric acid... started from "random" mixtures of water, TBP, nitric acid, and uranyl nitrate, complexation of uranyl Source: Ecole Polytechnique, Centre...

27

Modeling of the simultaneous extraction of nitric acid and uranyl nitrate with tri-n-butyl phosphate. Application to extraction operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mathematical model developed for the equilibrium HNO{sub 3}-UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}-tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)-diluent is the basis of the computation of distribution isotherms. The isotherms are used to study the influence of TBP concentration on two chosen operation parameters, distribution coefficients and number of theoretical stages, for the selected flow sheets. It is established that an increase in TBP concentration leads to a decrease in the number of theoretical stages for the extraction flow sheets but to their increase for the striping flow sheets. Given diagrams can be used to determine the efficiency of extraction processes. Agreement with available literature calculations on the number of theoretical stages supports the use of the model in the computation of distribution isotherms, of the system quoted above, in a wide range of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and TBP concentrations.

Comor, J.J.; Tolic, A.S.; Kopecni, M.M.; Petkovic, D.M. [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Yugoslavia). Chemical Dynamics Lab.] [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Yugoslavia). Chemical Dynamics Lab.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Uranyl coordination environment in hydrophobic ionic liquids : an in situ investigation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Different inner-sphere coordination environments are observed for the uranyl nitrate complexes formed with octyl-phenyl-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide and tributyl phosphate in dodecane and in the hydrophobic ionic liquids (ILs) [C{sub 4}mim][PF{sub 6}] and [C{sub 8}mim][N(SO{sub 2}CF{sub 3}){sub 2}]. Qualitative differences in the coordination environment of the extracted uranyl species are implied by changes in peak intensity patterns and locations for uranyl UV-visible spectral bands when the solvent is changed. EXAFS data for uranyl complexes in dodecane solutions is consistent with hexagonal bipyramidal coordination and the existence of UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}(CMPO){sub 2}. In contrast, the complexes formed when uranyl is transferred from aqueous nitric acid solutions into the ILs exhibit an average equatorial coordination number of approximately 4.5. Liquid/liquid extraction results for uranyl in both ILs indicate a net stoichiometry of UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3})(CMPO){sup +}. The concentration of the IL cation in the aqueous phase increases in proportion to the amount of UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3})(CMPO){sup +} in the IL phase, supporting a predominantly cation exchange mechanism for partitioning in the IL systems.

Visser, A. E.; Jensen, M. P.; Laszak, I.; Nash, K. L.; Choppin, G. R.; Roers, R. D.; Chemistry; Univ. of Alabama; Flordia State Univ.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Uranyl and Uranyl Carbonate...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Simulations of Uranyl and Uranyl Carbonate Adsorption at Alumino-silicate Surfaces. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Uranyl and Uranyl Carbonate Adsorption at Alumino-silicate...

30

The Influence of Linker Geometry on Uranyl Complexation by Rigidly-Linked Bis(3-hydroxy-N-methyl-pyridin-2-one)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3,2-HOPO ligand with uranyl nitrate and Et 3 N or methanolicbis-Me-3,2-HOPO ligand, uranyl nitrate, and Et 3 N in DMF or

Szigethy, Geza

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous nitrate solutions Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biology and Medicine 23 Evaluation for Biological Reduction of Nitrate and Perchlorate in Brine Water Using Summary: in high salt solution. One culture was capable of reducing up...

32

ammonium nitrate solution: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 % in the two experimental seasons. Key words: Date palm Fruit set Yield Fruit quality Boric acid Calcium nitrate INTRODUCTION synthesis, transport of sugars and carbohydrate...

33

ammonium nitrate solutions: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 % in the two experimental seasons. Key words: Date palm Fruit set Yield Fruit quality Boric acid Calcium nitrate INTRODUCTION synthesis, transport of sugars and carbohydrate...

34

Hydrothermal synthesis, structure and thermal stability of diamine templated layered uranyl-vanadates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

crystal structure and thermal behavior are reported herein. Experimental Synthesis Uranyl nitrate (UO2(NO31 Hydrothermal synthesis, structure and thermal stability of diamine templated layered uranyl. Murielle.rivenet@ensc-lille.fr Running Title : Diamine templated layered uranyl-vanadates. Figure for table

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

35

Solution High-Energy Burst Assembly (SHEBA) results from subprompt critical experiments with uranyl fluoride fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments were performed to measure a variety of parameters for SHEBA: behavior of the facility during transient and steady-state operation; characteristics of the SHEBA fuel; delayed-critical solution height vs solution temperature; initial reactor period and reactivity vs solution height; calibration of power level vs reactor power instrumentation readings; flux profile in SHEBA; radiation levels and neutron spectra outside the assembly for code verification and criticality alarm and dosimetry purposes; and effect on reactivity of voids in the fuel.

Cappiello, C.C.; Butterfield, K.B.; Sanchez, R.G.; Bounds, J.A.; Kimpland, R.H.; Damjanovich, R.P.; Jaegers, P.J.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Solution High-Energy Burst Assembly (SHEBA) results from subprompt critical experiments with uranyl fluoride fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Solution High-Energy Burst Assembly (SHEBA) was originally constructed during 1980 and was designed to be a clean free-field geometry, right-circular, cylindrically symmetric critical assembly employing U(5%)O{sub 2}F{sub 2} solution as fuel. A second version of SHEBA, employing the same fuel but equipped with a fuel pump and shielding pit, was commissioned in 1993. This report includes data and operating experience for the 1993 SHEBA only. Solution-fueled benchmark work focused on the development of experimental measurements of the characterization of SHEBA; a summary of the results are given. A description of the system and the experimental results are given in some detail in the report. Experiments were designed to: (1) study the behavior of nuclear excursions in a low-enrichment solution, (2) evaluate accidental criticality alarm detectors for fuel-processing facilities, (3) provide radiation spectra and dose measurements to benchmark radiation transport calculations on a low-enrichment solution system similar to centrifuge enrichment plants, and (4) provide radiation fields to calibrate personnel dosimetry. 15 refs., 37 figs., 10 tabs.

Cappiello, C.C.; Butterfield, K.B.; Sanchez, R.G. [and others

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Optical apparatus and method for sensing uranyl  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical sensing device for uranyl and other substances, a method for making an optical sensing device and a method for chemically binding uranyl and other indicators to glass, quartz, cellulose and similar substrates. The indicator, such as arsenazo III, is immobilized on the substrate using a chemical binding process. The immobilized arsenazo III causes uranyl from a fluid sample to bind irreversibly to the substrate at its active sites, thus causing absorption of a portion of light transmitted through the substrate. Determination of the amount of light absorbed, using conventional means, yields the concentration of uranyl present in the sample fluid. The binding of uranyl on the substrate can be reversed by subsequent exposure of the substrate to a solution of 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid. The chemical binding process is suitable for similarly binding other indicators, such as bromocresol green.

Baylor, L.C.; Buchanan, B.R.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

ACTINIDES-1981. ABSTRACTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phys. 59, 1785 (1973). URANYL NITRATE PHOTOCHEMISTRY ANDUpon diges tion of the uranyl nitrate solutions ocntainingcomprising a solution of uranyl nitrate in acetonitril with

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Composition for detecting uranyl  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to an indicator composition for use in spectrophotometric detection of a substance in a solution, and a method for making the composition. Useful indicators are sensitive to the particular substance being measured, but are unaffected by the fluid and other chemical species that may be present in the fluid. Optical indicators are used to measure the uranium concentration of process solutions in facilities for extracting uranium from ores, production of nuclear fuels, and reprocessing of irradiated fuels. The composition comprises an organohalide covalently bonded to an indicator for the substance, in such a manner that the product is itself an indicator that provides increased spectral resolution for detecting the substance. The indicator is preferably arsenazo III and the organohalide is preferably cyanuric chloride. These form a composition that is ideally suited for detecting uranyl.

Baylor, L.C.; Stephens, S.M.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Density of Gadolinium Nitrate Solutions for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In late 1992, the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) was planning to switch the solution contained in the poison injection tank from cadmium nitrate to gadolinium nitrate. The poison injection system is an emergency system used to shut down the reactor by adding a neutron poison to the cooling water. This system must be able to supply a minimum of 69 pounds of gadolinium to the reactor coolant system in order to guarantee that the reactor would become subcritical. A graph of the density of gadolinium nitrate solutions over a concentration range of 5 to 30 wt% and a temperature range of 15 to 40{sup o}C was prepared. Routine density measurements of the solution in the poison injection tank are made by HFIR personnel, and an adaptation of the original graph is used to determine the gadolinium nitrate concentration. In late 2008, HFIR personnel decided that the heat tracing that was present on the piping for the poison injection system could be removed without any danger of freezing the solution; however, the gadolinium nitrate solution might get as cold as 5{sup o}C. This was outside the range of the current density-concentration correlation, so the range needed to be expanded. This report supplies a new density-concentration correlation that covers the extended temperature range. The correlation is given in new units, which greatly simplifies the calculation that is required to determine the pounds of gadolinium in the tank solution. The procedure for calculating the amount of gadolinium in the HFIR poison injection system is as follows: (1) Calculate the usable volume in the system; (2) Measure the density of the solution; (3) Calculate the gadolinium concentration using the following equation: Gd(lb/ft{sup 3}) = measured density (g/mL) x 34.681 - 34.785; (4) Calculate the amount of gadolinium in the system using the following equation: Amount of Gd(lb) = Gd concentration (lb/ft{sup 3}) x usable volume (ft{sup 3}). The equation in step 3 is exact for a temperature of 5{sup o}C, and overestimates the gadolinium concentration at all higher temperatures. This guarantees that the calculation is conservative, in that the actual concentration will be at least as high as that calculated. If an additional safety factor is desired, it is recommended that an administrative control limit be set that is higher than the required minimum amount of gadolinium.

Taylor, Paul Allen [ORNL; Lee, Denise L [ORNL

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Infrared Spectroscopy of Discrete Uranyl Anion Complexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Free-Electron Laser for Infrared Experiments, FELIX, was used to study the wavelength-resolved multiphoton dissociation of discrete, gas phase uranyl (UO22+) complexes containing a single anionic ligand (A), with or without ligated solvent molecules (S). The apparent uranyl antisymmetric and symmetric stretching frequencies were measured for complexes with general formula [UO2A(S)n]+, where A was either hydroxide, methoxide or acetate, S was water, ammonia, acetone or acetonitrile, and n = 0-2. The values for the antisymmetric stretching frequency for uranyl ligated with only an anion ([UO2A]+) were as low or lower than measurements for [UO2]2+ ligated with as many as five strong neutral donor ligands, and are comparable to solution phase values. This result was surprising because initial DFT calculations using B3LYP predicted values that were 30 40 cm-1 higher, consistent with intuition but not with the data. Modification of the basis set and use of alternative functionals improved computational accuracy for the methoxide and acetate complexes, but calculated values for the hydroxide were greater than the measurement regardless of the computational method used. Attachment of a neutral donor ligand S to [UO2A]+ produced [UO2AS]+, which resulted only very modest changes to the uranyl frequency, and did not universally shift values lower. DFT calculations for [UO2AS]+ were in accord with trends in the data, and showed that attachment of the solvent was accommodated by weakening of the U-anion bond as well as the uranyl. When uranyl frequencies were compared for [UO2AS]+ species having different solvent neutrals, values decreased with increasing neutral nucleophilicity.

Gary S. Groenewold; Anita K. Gianotto; Michael E. McIlwain; Michael J. Van Stipdonk; Michael Kullman; Travis J. Cooper; David T. Moore; Nick Polfer; Jos Oomens; Ivan Infante; Lucas Visscher; Bertrand Siboulet; Wibe A. de Jong

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Infared Spectroscopy of Discrete Uranyl Anion Complexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Free-Electron Laser for Infrared Experiments (FELIX) w 1 as used to study the wavelength-resolved multiple photon photodissociation of discrete, gas phase uranyl (UO2 2 2+) complexes containing a single anionic ligand (A), with or without ligated solvent molecules (S). The uranyl antisymmetric and symmetric stretching frequencies were measured for complexes with general formula [UO2A(S)n]+, where A was either hydroxide, methoxide, or acetate; S was water, ammonia, acetone, or acetonitrile; and n = 0-3. The values for the antisymmetric stretching frequency for uranyl ligated with only an anion ([UO2A]+) were as low or lower than measurements for [UO2]2+ ligated with as many as five strong neutral donor ligands, and are comparable to solution phase values. This result was surprising because initial DFT calculations predicted values that were 3040 cm-1 higher, consistent with intuition but not with the data. Modification of the basis sets and use of alternative functionals improved computational accuracy for the methoxide and acetate complexes, but calculated values for the hydroxide were greater than the measurement regardless of the computational method used. Attachment of a neutral donor ligand S to [UO2A]+ produced [UO2AS]+, which produced only very modest changes to the uranyl antisymmetric stretch frequency, and did not universally shift the frequency to lower values. DFT calculations for [UO2AS]+ were in accord with trends in the data, and showed that attachment of the solvent was accommodated by weakening of the U-anion bond as well as the uranyl. When uranyl frequencies were compared for [UO2AS]+ species having different solvent neutrals, values decreased with increasing neutral nucleophilicity.

Groenewold, G. S.; Gianotto, Anita K.; McIIwain, Michael E.; Van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Kullman, Michael; Moore, David T.; Polfer, Nick; Oomens, Jos; Infante, Ivan A.; Visscher, Lucas; Siboulet, Bertrand; De Jong, Wibe A.

2008-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

43

Water Structure at the Air-Aqueous Interface of Divalent Cation and Nitrate Solutions Man Xu, Rick Spinney, and Heather C. Allen*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Structure at the Air-Aqueous Interface of Divalent Cation and Nitrate Solutions Man Xu, Rick, Columbus, Ohio 43210 ReceiVed: July 24, 2008; ReVised Manuscript ReceiVed: December 4, 2008 The water surface structure of aqueous magnesium, calcium, and strontium nitrate solutions with six to seven water

44

Distribution of 1-butanol between organic solvent and acidic solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

1-butanol, a major TBP-degraded product, is known to react explosively with concentrated nitric acid under non-heated conditions. However, no quantitative data is available on the distribution behavior in the Purex solution. The distribution of 1-butanol between tributyl phosphate(TBP) diluted with n-dodecane and aqueous solution of nitric acid and uranyl nitrate was investigated under various conditions, by changing the concentration of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, the composition of the organic mixture, the organic to aqueous phase volume ratio, and temperature. 1-butanol was found to distribute more in solvent phase, but the distribution ratio is not large, less than four under typical Purex solution conditions. The ratio was found to be correlated with the molar concentration of free TBP and 1-butanol. Effects of these characteristics on safety in radiochemical plants will be discussed from the local accumulation of 1-butanol.

Asakura, T.; Nemoto, H.; Uchiyama, G. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)] [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline nitrate solutions Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2010 www.atmos-chem-phys.net1039992010 Summary: . The model in- cludes explicit transport of size-resolved mineral dust and its alkalinity, nitrate... in terms of...

46

Pillared and open-framework uranyl diphosphonates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hydrothermal reactions of uranium trioxide, uranyl acetate, or uranyl nitrate with 1,4-benzenebisphosphonic acid in the presence of very small amount of HF at 200 deg. C results in the formation of three different uranyl diphosphonate compounds, [H{sub 3}O]{sub 2}{l_brace}(UO{sub 2}){sub 6}[C{sub 6}H{sub 4}(PO{sub 3})(PO{sub 2}OH)]{sub 2}[C{sub 6}H{sub 4}(PO{sub 2}OH){sub 2}]{sub 2}[C{sub 6}H{sub 4}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{r_brace}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (Ubbp-1), [H{sub 3}O]{sub 4}{l_brace}(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}[C{sub 6}H{sub 4}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2}F{sub 4}{r_brace}.H{sub 2}O (Ubbp-2), and {l_brace}(UO{sub 2})[C{sub 6}H{sub 2}F{sub 2}(PO{sub 2}OH){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){r_brace}{sub 2}.H{sub 2}O (Ubbp-3). The crystal structures of these compounds were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction experiments. Ubbp-1 consists of UO{sub 7} pentagonal bipyramids that are bridged by the phosphonate moieties to form a three-dimensional pillared structure. Ubbp-2 is composed of UO{sub 5}F{sub 2} pentagonal bipyramids that are bridged through the phosphonate oxygen atoms into one-dimensional chains that are cross-linked by the phenyl spacers into a pillared structure. The structure of Ubbp-3 is a three-dimensional open-framework with large channels containing water molecules with internal dimensions of approximately 10.9x10.9 A. Ubbp-1 and Ubbp-2 fluoresce at room temperature. - Graphical Abstract: Illustration of the three-dimensional open-framework structure of {l_brace}(UO{sub 2})[C{sub 6}H{sub 2}F{sub 2}(PO{sub 2}OH){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){r_brace}{sub 2}.H{sub 2}O viewed along the c-axis. The structure is constructed from UO{sub 7} units, pentagonal bipyramids=green, oxygen=red, phosphorus=magenta, carbon=black, hydrogen=white. Highlights: > The influence of the uranyl salt anions and pH were critically examined in relation to structural variation. > The acetate and nitrate counter ions of uranyl may be acting as structure directing agents. > The use of rigid phenyl spacer yield a three-dimensional network of pillared structures of uranyl diphosphonates that fluoresce. > The fluorination of the phenyl ring under hydrothermal condition. > The large voids in this structure are suggestive of potential applications in sorption, separation of gases and in catalytic processes.

Adelani, Pius O. [Department of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E., E-mail: talbrec1@nd.edu [Department of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

47

Sodium-Copper Exchange on Wyoming Montmorillonite in Chloride, Perchlorate, Nitrate, and Sulfate Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sodium-Copper Exchange on Wyoming Montmorillonite in Chloride, Perchlorate, Nitrate, and Sulfate. The copper exchange capacity (CuEC) and Na-Cu exchange reactions on Wyoming montmo- rillonite were studied

Sparks, Donald L.

48

Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium nitrate solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium nitrate solutions to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Plutonium by Controlled-Potential Coulometry Plutonium by Amperometric Titration with Iron(II) Plutonium by Diode Array Spectrophotometry Free Acid by Titration in an Oxalate Solution 8 to 15 Free Acid by Iodate Precipitation-Potentiometric Titration Test Method 16 to 22 Uranium by Arsenazo I Spectrophotometric Test Method 23 to 33 Thorium by Thorin Spectrophotometric Test Method 34 to 42 Iron by 1,10-Phenanthroline Spectrophotometric Test Method 43 to 50 Impurities by ICP-AES Chloride by Thiocyanate Spectrophotometric Test Method 51 to 58 Fluoride by Distillation-Spectrophotometric Test Method 59 to 66 Sulfate by Barium Sulfate Turbidimetric Test Method 67 to 74 Isotopic Composition by Mass Spectrom...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Whole-genome transcriptional analysis of heavy metal stresses in Caulobacter crescentus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A concentration of 200 ?M uranyl nitrate was used forthe exception of the uranyl nitrate stock solution which wasK 2 Cr 2 O 7 ) and uranyl nitrate (UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 6H 2 O).

Hu, Ping; Brodie, Eoin L.; Suzuki, Yohey; McAdams, Harley H.; Andersen, Gary L.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Purification of alkali metal nitrates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is disclosed for removing heavy metal contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises mixing the impure nitrates with sufficient water to form a concentrated aqueous solution of the impure nitrates, adjusting the pH of the resulting solution to within the range of between about 2 and about 7, adding sufficient reducing agent to react with heavy metal contaminants within said solution, adjusting the pH of the solution containing reducing agent to effect precipitation of heavy metal impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified aqueous solution of alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified solution of alkali metal nitrates may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrate suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of alkali metal nitrates.

Fiorucci, Louis C. (Hamden, CT); Gregory, Kevin M. (Woodridge, IL)

1985-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

51

Criticality experiments with mixed oxide fuel pin arrays in plutonium-uranium nitrate solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of critical experiments was completed with mixed plutonium-uranium solutions having a Pu/(Pu + U) ratio of approximately 0.22 in a boiler tube-type lattice assembly. These experiments were conducted as part of the Criticality Data Development Program between the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) of Japan. A complete description of the experiments and data are included in this report. The experiments were performed with an array of mixed oxide fuel pins in aqueous plutonium-uranium solutions. The fuel pins were contained in a boiler tube-type tank and arranged in a 1.4 cm square pitch array which resembled cylindrical geometry. One experiment was perfomed with the fuel pins removed from the vessel. The experiments were performed with a water reflector. The concentration of the solutions in the boiler tube-type tank was varied from 4 to 468 g (Pu + U)/liter. The ratio of plutonium to total heavy metal (plutonium plus uranium) was approximately 0.22 for all experiments.

Lloyd, R.C. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Smolen, G.R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Long-term Kinetics of Uranyl Desorption from Sediments Under...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

term Kinetics of Uranyl Desorption from Sediments Under Advective Conditions. Long-term Kinetics of Uranyl Desorption from Sediments Under Advective Conditions. Abstract: Long-term...

53

Structure, Kinetics, and Thermodynamics of the Aqueous Uranyl...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Kinetics, and Thermodynamics of the Aqueous Uranyl(VI) Cation. Structure, Kinetics, and Thermodynamics of the Aqueous Uranyl(VI) Cation. Abstract: Molecular simulation techniques...

54

Computer Simulation of Uranyl Uptake by the Rough Lipopolysaccharide...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Computer Simulation of Uranyl Uptake by the Rough Lipopolysaccharide Membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Computer Simulation of Uranyl Uptake by the Rough Lipopolysaccharide...

55

ORNL/TM-2008/048 Uranyl Nitrate Flow Loop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge. Web site http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1

Pennycook, Steve

56

Nitrate reduction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Nitrates are reduced to nitrogen gas by contacting the nitrates with a metal to reduce the nitrates to nitrites which are then contacted with an amide to produce nitrogen and carbon dioxide or acid anions which can be released to the atmosphere. Minor amounts of metal catalysts can be useful in the reduction of the nitrates to nitrites. Metal salts which are formed can be treated electrochemically to recover the metals.

Dziewinski, Jacek J. (Los Alamos, NM); Marczak, Stanislaw (Los Alamos, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Effect of temperature on the extraction of nitric acid and plutonium(IV) nitrate with 30 vol% tributyl phosphate (TBP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The author's own and published data were evaluated for characterizing the effect of temperature on the distribution of nitric acid and plutonium(IV). The solutes were distributed between 30 vol% TBP in an aliphatic diluent and aqueous solutions containing nitric acid and zero to macro amounts of plutonium(IV) and uranyl nitrates. The temperature dependence of the distribution ratios is described with empirical model equations and examples of the dependence in the absence and presence of uranium(VI) are given. Taking infinite dilution of all solutes of the system as a standard state, the enthalpy change of the extraction reaction could be estimated as -17 kJ/mol for nitric acid, but no numerical estimate was possible for plutonium(IV).

Kolarik, Z.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Thermodynamics of Uranyl Minerals: Enthalpies of Formation of Uranyl Oxide Hydrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The enthalpies of formation of seven uranyl oxide hydrate phases and one uranate have been determined using high-temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry: [(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}O(OH){sub 6}](H{sub 2}O){sub 5}, metaschoepite; {beta}-UO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}; CaUO{sub 4}; Ca(UO{sub 2}){sub 6}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 6}(H{sub 2}O){sub 8}, becquerelite; Ca(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}O{sub 3}(OH){sub 4}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}; Na(UO{sub 2})O(OH), clarkeite; Na{sub 2}(UO{sub 2}){sub 6}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 6}(H{sub 2}O){sub 7}, the sodium analogue of compreignacite and Pb{sub 3}(UO{sub 2}){sub 8}O{sub 8}(OH){sub 6}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}, curite. The enthalpy of formation from the binary oxides, {Delta}H{sub f-ox}, at 298 K was calculated for each compound from the respective drop solution enthalpy, {Delta}H{sub ds}. The standard enthalpies of formation from the elements, {Delta}H{sub f}{sup o}, at 298 K are -1791.0 {+-} 3.2, -1536.2 {+-} 2.8, -2002.0 {+-} 3.2, -11389.2 {+-} 13.5, -6653.1 {+-} 13.8, -1724.7 {+-} 5.1, -10936.4 {+-} 14.5 and -13163.2 {+-} 34.4 kJ mol{sup -1}, respectively. These values are useful in exploring the stability of uranyl oxide hydrates in auxiliary chemical systems, such as those expected in U-contaminated environments.

K. Kubatko; K. Helean; A. Navrotsky; P.C. Burns

2005-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

59

Process for reducing aqueous nitrate to ammonia  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Powdered aluminum is added to a nitrate-containing alkaline, aqueous solution to reduce the nitrate and/or nitrite to ammonia and co-produce a sinterable ceramic product.

Mattus, Alfred J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Uranyl and Uranyl Carbonate Adsorption at Alumino-silicate Surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adsorption at mineral surfaces is a critical factor controlling the mobility of uranium(VI) in aqueous environments. Therefore, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to investigate uranyl(VI) adsorption onto two neutral alumino-silicate surfaces, namely the orthoclase (001) surface and the octahedral aluminum sheet of the kaolinite (001) surface. Although uranyl preferentially adsorbed as a bi-dentate innersphere complex on both surfaces, the free energy of adsorption at the orthoclase surface (-15 kcal mol-1) was significantly more favorable than that at the kaolinite surface (-3 kcal mol-1), which was attributed to differences in surface functional groups and to the ability of the orthoclase surface to dissolve a surface potassium ion upon uranyl adsorption. The structures of the adsorbed complexes compared favorably with X-ray absorption spectroscopy results. Simulations of the adsorption of uranyl complexes with up to three carbonate ligands revealed that uranyl complexes coordinated to up to 2 carbonate ions are stable on the orthoclase surface whereas uranyl carbonate surface complexes are unfavored at the kaolinite surface. Combining the MD-derived equilibrium adsorption constants for orthoclase with aqueous equilibrium constants for uranyl carbonate species indicates the presence of adsorbed uranium complexes with one or two carbonates in alkaline conditions, in support of current uranium(VI) surface complexation models.

Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Liu, Chongxuan

2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Uranyl Sequestration: Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Uranyl Complexes with a Tetradentate Methylterephthalamide Ligand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranyl complexes of a bis(methylterephthalamide) ligand (LH{sub 4}) have been synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography. The structure is an unexpected [Me{sub 4}N]{sub 8}[L(UO{sub 2})]{sub 4} tetramer, formed via coordination of the two MeTAM units of L to two uranyl moieties. Addition of KOH to the tetramer gave the corresponding monomeric uranyl methoxide species [Me{sub 4}N]K{sub 2}[LUO{sub 2}(OMe)].

Ni, Chengbao; Shuh, David; Raymond, Kenneth

2011-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

62

SYNTHESIS AND PROPERTIES OF URANYL MONOTHIOCARBAMATE ALKOXIDES, AN AIR-STABLE CLASS OF URANYL ALKOXIDES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

unique 4 in its chemistry, since the uranium- oxygen bonduranium, Thus, the potential for an interesting and important reaction chemistrychemistry The uranyl monothiocarbamate alkoxides represent a case where the uranium-

Perry, Dale L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Interfacial Complex Formation in Uranyl Extraction by Tributyl-Phosphate in Dodecane Diluent: A Molecular Dynamics Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atomistic simulations have been carried out in a multicomponent two-phase system (aqueous and organic phases in direct contact) to investigate the interfacial molecular mechanisms leading to uranyl extractionfrom the aqueous to organic phase. The aqueous phase consists of the dissolved ions UO2^2+ and nitrate NO3-,with or without H3O+, in water to describe acidic or neutral condition; the organic phase consists of tributyl phosphate, the extractant, in dodecane as the diluent. We find that the interface facilitates the formation of various uranyl complexes, with a general formula UO2^2+(NO3-)n mTBP kH2O, with n + m + k ) 5, suggesting a 5-fold coordination. The coordination for all three molecular entities has the common feature that they all bind to the uranyl at the uranium atom with an oxygen atom in the equatorial plane perpendicular to the molecular axis of the uranyl, forming a 5-fold symmetry plane. Nitric acid has a strong effect in enhancing the formation of extractable species, which is consistent with experimental findings.

de Almeida, Valmor F [ORNL; Cui, Shengting [ORNL; Ye, Xianggui [ORNL; Khomami, Bamin [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Crystallographic controls on uranyl binding at the quartz/water...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

controls on uranyl binding at the quartzwater interface. Abstract: Molecular dynamics methods were used to simulate UO2(OH)20 binding to pairs of oxo sites on three...

65

A cryogenic fluorescence spectroscopic study of uranyl carbonate...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

spectroscopic study of uranyl carbonate, phosphate, and oxyhydroxide minerals. Abstract: In this work we have applied liquid-helium temperature (LHeT) time-resolved...

66

Molecular analysis of Streptococcus pyogenes M1 protein  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bakers dimercurial uranyl nitrate hexahydrate potassiumIII) nitrate potassium hexachloroplatinate uranyl acetate

McNamara, Case W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Criticality safety of an annular tank for fissile solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments performed to determine the criticality safety of annular tanks for storing fissile solutions are described. Six annular tanks were built in four nesting sizes to obtain experimental criticality data which could be used to validate computer codes employed in the design of such a safe storage system for an industrial plant. Each tank had an annular solution region thickness of 38 mm. The height of this region was 2.13 m, held 0.3 m off the floor by a stainless steel skirting. Walls were 6.4 mm-thick type 304L stainless steel. The uranyl nitrate solution contained 357 g U/l and had a density of 1.5 kg/m/sup 3/. The uranium was enriched to 93.2% /sup 235/U with other isotopes: 5.4% /sup 238/U, 1.0% /sup 234/U, and 0.4% /sup 236/U. The solution contained 0.5 molar nitric acid and a total impurity content of less than 1500 ppM. Important neutron absorbers, boron and cadmium, averaged 10 ppM and 30 ppM, respectively. Boron-loaded concrete and boron-loaded plaster were selected for the neutron moderator/absorber interior to the annular tank. Three configurations of tanks and reflector were taken to criticality and are reported. The critical uranium solution height in all tanks containing solution as a function of boron content in earthen interior material, tank array configuration, and other variables. (LCL)

Rothe, R.E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Uranyl-Peroxide Nanocapsules in Aqueous Solution: Force Field Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearchScheduledProductionCCEIResearch Upper Great

69

Scandium nitrate-nitric acid-water-tributyl phosphate system. III. IR spectra of scandium extracts from concentrated nitric acid solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Equilibrium organic phases in extraction systems consisting of tributyl phosphate (TBP) (neat or 1 M in CCl{sub 4}) and 8-12 M nitric acid containing scandium or scandium-free have been studied by IR spectroscopy. Extracted complex contains 3, 4, or 5 nitric acid molecules per Sc atom in the case of extraction from 8.3, 10.9, and 12.2 M HNO{sub 3}, respectively, and corresponds to the formula Sc(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{center_dot}mHNO{sub 3}{center_dot}3TBP. Nitric acid molecules are incorporated into extracted complex via H-bond between oxygen atom of coordinated nitrate ion and acid proton.

Nikitina, G.P.; Egorova, V.P.; Listopadov, A.A. [Khlopin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)] [and others

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Method of precipitating uranium from an aqueous solution and/or sediment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for precipitating uranium from an aqueous solution and/or sediment comprising uranium and/or vanadium is presented. The method includes precipitating uranium as a uranyl vanadate through mixing an aqueous solution and/or sediment comprising uranium and/or vanadium and a solution comprising a monovalent or divalent cation to form the corresponding cation uranyl vanadate precipitate. The method also provides a pathway for extraction of uranium and vanadium from an aqueous solution and/or sediment.

Tokunaga, Tetsu K; Kim, Yongman; Wan, Jiamin

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

71

Influence of Contact Time on the Extraction of 233Uranyl Spike and Contaminant Uranium From Hanford Sediment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study 233Uranyl nitrate was added to uranium (U) contaminated Hanford 300 Area sediment and incubated under moist conditions for 1 year. It hypothesized that geochemical transformations and/or physical processes will result in decreased extractability of 233U as the incubation period increases, and eventually the extraction behavior of the 233U spike will be congruent to contaminant U that has been associated with sediment for decades. Following 1 week, 1 month, and 1 year incubation periods, sediment extractions were performed using either batch or dynamic (sediment column flow) chemical extraction techniques. Overall, extraction of U from sediment using batch extraction was less complicated to conduct compared to dynamic extraction, but dynamic extraction could distinguish the range of U forms associated with sediment which are eluted at different times.

Smith, Steven C.; Szecsody, James E.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Thermochemical nitrate destruction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed for denitrification of nitrates and nitrates present in aqueous waste streams. The method comprises the steps of (1) identifying the concentration nitrates and nitrites present in a waste stream, (2) causing formate to be present in the waste stream, (3) heating the mixture to a predetermined reaction temperature from about 200.degree. C. to about 600.degree. C., and (4) holding the mixture and accumulating products at heated and pressurized conditions for a residence time, thereby resulting in nitrogen and carbon dioxide gas, and hydroxides, and reducing the level of nitrates and nitrites to below drinking water standards.

Cox, John L. (Richland, WA); Hallen, Richard T. (Richland, WA); Lilga, Michael A. (Richland, WA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

MATERIALS AND MOLECULAR RESEARCH DIVISION Annual Report 1977.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Templeton, Structure of Uranyl Nitrate Di-Tetrahydrofuran,1972). c. Structure of Uranyl Nitrate Di-Tetrahydrofurangeometry is typical of uranyl nitrate :f:~ is the same as

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

CU(II): catalyzed hydrazine reduction of ferric nitrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is described for producing ferrous nitrate solutions by the cupric ion-catalyzed reduction of ferric nitrate with hydrazine. The reaction is complete in about 1.5 hours at 40/sup 0/C. Hydrazoic acid is also produced in substantial quantities as a reaction byproduct.

Karraker, D.G.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Nitrate-Cancrinite Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nitrate-Cancrinite Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford Tank Solutions B A R R Y R . B minerals at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site in Washington. Nitrate-cancrinite began's (DOE) Hanford Site in southeast Washington since the late 1950s (1). To predict the fate

Illinois at Chicago, University of

76

abandonne dans l'obscurit pour schage, pendant quelques heures.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dans une solution de nitrate d'uranyle (pH 2) montre au bout de quelques jours un certain nombre de trajectoires de rayons a. Trois trajectoires a provenant de la solution de nitrate d'uranyle et ayant traversé trajec- toires très nettes après immersion de 70 h dans une solution de nitrate d'uranyle (pH 2) (fig. 2

Boyer, Edmond

77

Thermochemical nitrate destruction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed for denitrification of nitrates and nitrites present in aqueous waste streams. The method comprises the steps of (1) identifying the concentration nitrates and nitrites present in a waste stream, (2) causing formate to be present in the waste stream, (3) heating the mixture to a predetermined reaction temperature from about 200 C to about 600 C, and (4) holding the mixture and accumulating products at heated and pressurized conditions for a residence time, thereby resulting in nitrogen and carbon dioxide gas, and hydroxides, and reducing the level of nitrates and nitrites to below drinking water standards.

Cox, J.L.; Hallen, R.T.; Lilga, M.A.

1992-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

78

Drinking Water Problems: Nitrates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 7). Nitrate ions are drawn through the membrane pores with elec- trical currents. The nitrate is pulled from the water into a brine waste stream. Ni trate-contaminated water Treated water Nitrate Chloride or hydroxide Exchange resin Figure 6. Ion... and Extension Agricultural Engineer, Texas Cooperative Extension, The Texas A&M University System B-6184 3-08 ' the safe levels of chemicals for U.S. drinking water. The EPA conducts research to determine the level of a contaminant in drinking water...

Dozier, Monty; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

79

actinium bromides: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solution to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical...

80

atomic spectrometric techniques: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solution to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Increased Accumulation of Intraneuronal Amyloid ? in HIV-Infected Patients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

uranyl acetate solution in 50% ethanol for 20 min at room temperature, washed in distilled water, and placed in bismuth nitrate

Achim, Cristian L.; Adame, Anthony; Dumaop, Wilmar; Everall, Ian P.; Masliah, Eliezer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Criticality experiments with mixed plutonium and uranium nitrate solution at a plutonium fraction of 0.5 in slab and cylindrical geometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of critical experiments was completed with mixed plutonium-uranium solutions having Pu/(Pu + U) ratios of approximately 0.5. These experiments were a part of the Criticality Data Development Program between the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) of Japan. A complete description of, and data from, the experiments are included in this report. The experiments were performed with mixed plutonium-uranium solutions in cylindrical and slab geometries and included measurements with a water reflector, a concrete reflector, and without an added reflector. The concentration was varied from 112 to 332 g (Pu + U)/liter. The ratio of plutonium to total heavy metal (plutonium plus uranium) was 52% for all experiments.

Lloyd, R.C.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Identifies Calcium-Uranyl-Carbonate Complexes at Environmental Concentrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current research on bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater focuses on supplying indigenous metal-reducing bacteria with the appropriate metabolic requirements to induce microbiological reduction of soluble uranium(VI) to poorly soluble uranium(IV). Recent studies of uranium(VI) bioreduction in the presence of environmentally relevant levels of calcium revealed limited and slowed uranium(VI) reduction and the formation of a Ca-UO2-CO3 complex. However, the stoichiometry of the complex is poorly defined and may be complicated by the presence of a Na-UO2-CO3 complex. Such a complex might exist even at high calcium concentrations, as some UO2-CO3 complexes will still be present. The number of calcium and/or sodium atoms coordinated to a uranyl carbonate complex will determine the net charge of the complex. Such a change in aqueous speciation of uranium(VI) in calcareous groundwater may affect the fate and transport properties of uranium. In this paper, we present the results from X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements of a series of solutions containing 50 lM uranium(VI) and 30 mM sodium bicarbonate, with various calcium concentrations of 0-5 mM. Use of the data series reduces the uncertainty in the number of calcium atoms bound to the UO2-CO3 complex to approximately 0.6 and enables spectroscopic identification of the Na-UO2-CO3 complex. At nearly neutral pH values, the numbers of sodium and calcium atoms bound to the uranyl triscarbonate species are found to depend on the calcium concentration, as predicted by speciation calculations.

Kelly, Shelly D [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Kemner, Kenneth M [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Brooks, Scott C [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Studies of Fundamental Properties of Rutherfordium (element 104) using Organic Complexing Agents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Samples of natural uranyl nitrate were enclosed infission products. The uranyl nitrate was dissolved in 12 M

Czerwinski, K.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

The role of neurexins in Insulin exocytosis from pancreatic beta cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and stained with uranyl acetate and lead nitrate. Grids wereand stained with uranyl acetate and lead nitrate. Grids were

Mosedale, Merrie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

University of California Radiation Laboratory Progress Report for November, 1947  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

preparE Since anhydrous uranyl nitrate for use in the studyevacuation of the hydrated uranyl nitrate salts resulted in

Perlman, I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

2nd Annual DOE-ERSP PI Meeting: Abstracts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

orthophosphate. Uranyl-sulfate and -nitrate species may alsosuch as nitrate and alterations in uranyl speciation. Here,

Hazen, Terry C.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Density Functional Studies on the Complexation and Spectroscopy of Uranyl Ligated with Acetonitrile and Acetone Derivatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The coordination of nitrile (acetonitrile, propionitrile, and benzonitrile) and carbonyl (formaldehyde, ethanal, and acetone) ligands to the uranyl dication (UO22+) has been examined using density functional theory (DFT) utilizing relativistic effective core potentials (RECPs). Complexes containing up to six ligands have been modeled for all ligands except formaldehyde, for which no minimum could be found. A comparison of relative binding energies indicates that five coordinate complexes are predominant while a six coordinate complex involving propionitrile ligands might be possible. Additionally, the relative binding energy and the weakening of the uranyl bond is related to the size of the ligand and, in general, nitriles bind more strongly to uranyl than carbonyls.

Schoendorff, George E.; Windus, Theresa L.; De Jong, Wibe A.

2009-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

89

Experimental critical parameters of enriched uranium solution in annular tank geometries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A total of 61 critical configurations are reported for experiments involving various combinations of annular tanks into which enriched uranium solution was pumped. These experiments were performed at two widely separated times in the 1980s under two programs at the Rocky Flats Plant`s Critical Mass Laboratory. The uranyl nitrate solution contained about 370 g of uranium per liter, but this concentration varied a little over the duration of the studies. The uranium was enriched to about 93% [sup 235]U. All tanks were typical of sizes commonly found in nuclear production plants. They were about 2 m tall and ranged in diameter from 0.6 m to 1.5 m. Annular thicknesses and conditions of neutron reflection, moderation, and absorption were such that criticality would be achieved with these dimensions. Only 13 of the entire set of 74 experiments proved to be subcritical when tanks were completely filled with solution. Single tanks of several radial thicknesses were studied as well as small line arrays (1 x 2 and 1 x 3) of annular tanks. Many systems were reflected on four sides and the bottom by concrete, but none were reflected from above. Many experiments also contained materials within and outside the annular regions that contained strong neutron absorbers. One program had such a thick external moderator/absorber combination that no reflector was used at all.

Rothe, R.E.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Preparation of U.sub.3 O.sub.8  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for the preparation of U.sub.3 O.sub.8 nuclear fuel material by direct precipitation of uranyl formate monohydrate from uranyl nitrate solution. The uranyl formate monohydrate precipitate is removed, dried and calcined to produce U.sub.3 O.sub.8 having a controlled particle size distribution.

Johnson, David R. (Aiken, SC)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

E-Print Network 3.0 - anhydrous uranyl chloride Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

were then warmed to -70C and rinsed three times with acetone... of fixatives: 10% acrolein, 0.2% osmium, and then 10% glutaraldehyde. Staining was with 0.5% uranyl acetate......

92

Speciation and spectroscopy of the uranyl and tetravalent plutonium nitrate systems: Fundamental studies and applications to used fuel reprocessing.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This dissertation explores the use of UV-Visible spectroscopy and Time Resolved Laser Induced Fluorescence spectroscopy as near real time process monitors of uranium and plutonium (more)

Smith, Nicholas A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Nitrate and Prussic Acid Poisoning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nitrate and prussic acid poisoning in cattle are noninfectious conditions that can kill livestock. This publication explains the causes and symptoms of these conditions as well as preventive measures and sampling and testing steps....

Stichler, Charles; Reagor, John C.

2001-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

94

Aerosols Generated by Free Fall Spills of Powders and Solutions in Static Air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safety assessments and environmental impact statements for nuclear fuel cycle facilities require an estimation of potential airborne releases. Aerosols generated by accidents are being investigated to develop the source terms for these releases. The lower boundary accidental release event would be a free fall spill of powders or liquids in static air. Experiments measured the mass airborne and particle size distribution of these aerosols for various source sizes and spill heights. Two powder and liquid sources were used: Ti02 and uo2; and aqueous uranine (sodium fluorescein) and uranyl nitrate solutions. Spill height and source size were significant in releases of both powders and liquids. For the source powders used (l "m uo2 and 1.7 "m Ti0 2, quantities from 25 g to 1000 g, and fall heights of 1 m and 3m), the maximum source airborne was 0.12%. The maximum source airborne was an order of magnitude less for the liquids (with source quantities ranging from 125 to 1000 cc at the same fall heights). The median aerodynamic equivalent diameters for collected airborne powder ranged from 6 to 26.5 "m; liquids ranged from 4.1 to 34 "m. All of the spills produced a significant fraction of respirable particles 10 ~m and less.

Sutter, S. L.; Johnston, J. W.; Mishima, J.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

A Novel Chemical Nitrate Destruction Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nitrates represent one of the most significant pollutant discharged to the Baltic Sea by the Sliiamae hydrometallurgical plant. This article contains a brief overview of the existing nitrate destruction technologies followed by the description of a new process developed by the authors. The new chemical process for nitrate destruction is cost effective and simple to operate. It converts the nitrate to nitrogen gas which goes to the atmosphere.

Dziewinski, J.; Marczak, S.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

SUR LE COEFFICIENT D'ABSORPTION DU RAYONNEMENT 03B2 DE L'URANIUM Y Par Mme Z. V. ERCHOVA.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mesurées. Préparation des sources. - Je me suis servie- du nitrate d'uranyle comme matière première. On dis fer, en ajoutant à la solution d'uranyle d'abord 0,5 g de (N?3)3Fe en solution acidebouillante, puis

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

97

Thermal Decomposition of Nitrated Tributyl Phosphate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contact between tributyl phosphate and aqueous solutions of nitric acid and/or heavy metal nitrate salts at elevated temperatures can lead to exothermic reactions of explosive violence. Even though such operations have been routinely performed safely for decades as an intrinsic part of the Purex separation processes, several so-called ``red oil`` explosions are known to have occurred in the United States, Canada, and the former Soviet Union. The most recent red oil explosion occurred at the Tomsk-7 separations facility in Siberia, in April 1993. That explosion destroyed part of the unreinforced masonry walls of the canyon-type building in which the process was housed, and allowed the release of a significant quantity of radioactive material.

Paddleford, D.F. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States); Hou, Y.; Barefield, E.K.; Tedder, D.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I. [Georgia Institute of Technology, GA (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Uranium and other heavy metals in the plant-animal-human food chain near abandoned mining sites and structures in an American Indian community in northwestern New Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Moss, M.A. (1998). Uranyl nitrate: 28-day and 91-dayMorphologic changes in uranyl nitrate-induced acute renalMoss, M.A. (1998). Uranyl nitrate: 28-day and 91-day

Samuel-Nakamura, Christine

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

MOLECULAR SPECTROSCPY AND REACTIONS OF ACTINIDES IN THE GAS PHASE AND CRYOGENIC MATRICES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

composed of the uranyl ion, nitrate or hydroxide, and water2-propanol in uranyl complexed by nitrate and the alcohol.composed of uranyl and an anion ? hydroxide, nitrate or

Heaven, Michael C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

THE PLUTONIUM STORY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bulk of the uranium, as uranyl nitrate hexahydrate, from thelarge- amounts of uranyl nitrate from plutonium. Methods hadPlutonium. A sample of uranyl nitrate weighing 1.2 kilograms

Seaborg, G.T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

MATERIALS AND MOLECULAR RESEARCH DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1979  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Bridged Dimer of Uranyl Nitrate," LBL-99T\\, submitted2, A Water- Bridged Dimer of Uranyl Nitrate Imidazoliuma 1:1 milJimole of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate ancl imidazole

Authors, Various

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Early History of Heavy Isotope Research at Berkeley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the recovery of the uranyl nitrate after the etherthe use of 5.5 grams of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (U02(N03)This neutron-bombarded uranyl nitrate hexahydrate sample was

Glenn T. Seaborg

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Assessment of the potential for ammonium nitrate formation and reaction in Tank 241-SY-101  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two principal scenarios by which ammonium nitrate may be formed were considered: (a) precipitation of ammonium nitrate in the waste, and (b) ammonium nitrate formation via the gas phase reaction of ammonia and nitrogen dioxide. The first of these can be dismissed because ammonium ions, which are necessary for ammonium nitrate precipitation, can exist only in negligibly small concentrations in strongly alkaline solutions. Gas phase reactions between ammonia, nitrogen dioxide, and water vapor in the gas phase represent the most likely means by which ammonium nitrate aerosols could be formed in Tank 241-SY-101. Predicted ammonium nitrate formation rates are largely controlled by the concentration of nitrogen dioxide. This gas has not been detected among those gases vented from the wastes using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FTIR) or mass spectrometry. While detection limits for nitrogen dioxide have not been established experimentally, the maximum concentration of nitrogen dioxide in the gas phase in Tank 241-SY-101 was estimated at 0.1 ppm based on calculations using the HITRAN data base and on FTIR spectra of gases vented from the wastes. At 50 C and with 100 ppm ammonia also present, less than one gram of ammonium nitrate per year is estimated to be formed in the tank. To date, ammonium nitrate has not been detected on HEPA filters in the ventilation system, so any quantity that has been formed in the tank must be quite small, in good agreement with rate calculations. The potential for runaway exothermic reactions involving ammonium nitrate in Tank 241-SY-101 is minimal. Dilution by non-reacting waste components, particularly water, would prevent hazardous exothermic reactions from occurring within the waste slurry, even if ammonium nitrate were present. 41 refs.

Pederson, L.R.; Bryan, S.A.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Thermal decomposition of nitrated tributyl phosphate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extended contact between heated mixtures of tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) and aqueous solutions of nitric acid and/or heavy metal nitrate salts at elevated temperatures can lead to exothermic reactions of explosive violence. Most solvent extraction operations are conducted at ambient conditions without heating TBP and have been performed safely for decades, but several explosions involving TBP have occurred in the US, Canada, and the former Soviet Union. This investigation was undertaken to characterize the products of thermal decomposition of both single- and two-phase mixtures of TBP, nitric acid, and water under a variety of conditions. The data indicate that the extent of reaction and the rate of gaseous product formation are affected by the presence of Zr{sup 4+}, distillation compared with reflux conditions, temperature, water/HNO{sub 3} and HNO{sub 3}/TBP ratios, and whether the decomposition occurs under constant pressure or constant volume conditions. Higher reaction temperatures accelerate the rate of decomposition, but the extent of decomposition, as measured by the quantity of gaseous products, was greater at lower temperatures when the decomposition was performed under distillation conditions. Higher gas production occurs under reflux conditions, lower H{sub 2}O/HNO{sub 3} ratios, and when a separate water-HNO{sub 3} phase is initially present. The major gaseous products include N{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, NO, and N{sub 2}O. Measurable amounts of NO{sub 2} were not present in the final product mixture, although an orange color suggesting the presence of NO{sub 2} was observed in the early stages of decomposition. The major liquid products were dibutyl phosphoric acid, butyl nitrate, and water. Small amounts of C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} carboxylic acids were also present. Because of the small sample sizes that were employed and the isothermal conditions of the decomposition, runaway reactions were not observed. Some possible reaction pathways are considered.

Hou, Y.; Barefield, E.K.; Tedder, D.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

A density functional study of actinyl containing complexes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Density functional (DFT) methods are first used to study 22 of the most stable solution-phase UN4O12 isomers containing uranyl nitrate, UO2(NO3)2. Based on relative free (more)

Berard, Joel J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Heterogeneous Reduction of U6+ by Structural Fe2+ From Theory...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

single crystals of magnetite with different initial Fe2+Fe3+ ratios were exposed to uranyl-nitrate solution (pH 4) for 90 hours. X ray photoelectron spectroscopy and...

107

Searching for the Decay of 229m Th  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3 , UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 (uranyl nitrate), and metallic uranium.varied from 12% for uranyl nitrate to 31% for uranium metal.

Swanberg, Erik

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

U(VI) sorption and reduction kinetics on the magnetite (111) surface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U(VI) (introduced as uranyl nitrate), 1 mM NaNO 3 , [CO 3 ]respect to uraninite and uranyl nitrate mechanical mixture

Singer, D.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Nitrates and Prussic Acid in Forages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When nitrates and prussic acid accumulate in forage, the feed may not be safe for livestock consumption. Learn the symptoms of nitrate and prussic acid poisoning and which plants are most likely to pose a risk to livestock. Also learn sampling...

Provin, Tony; Pitt, John L.

2003-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

110

Thermal decomposition of nitrated tributyl phosphate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP), nitric acid and water mixtures are subject to thermal decomposition. The gaseous and liquid decomposition product yields are highly path dependent. Higher temperatures accelerate decomposition rates, but may result in lower extent of reaction than comparable low temperature cases. Actual extent of reaction, and gaseous by-products generation, are affected by the presence of Zr(IV), condensate reflux back into the reaction vessel, the water/HNO{sub 3} and the HNO{sub 3}/TBP molar ratios, and whether the decomposition occurs at isobaric or constant volume conditions. Higher gaseous production results from condensate reflux, lower H{sub 2}O/HNO{sub 3} ratios, and with excess HNO{sub 3} and water present as a second liquid phase. Principal gaseous products include N{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, NO and N{sub 2}O. Measurable concentrations of NO{sub 2} were not observed, although gas coloration indicative of NO{sub 2} were obsessed during the beginning of decomposition measurements. Principal liquid products are dibutyl phosphoric acid and butyl nitrate. Air sparging of TBP solutions (e.g., thru transfers using air lift pumps) may increase the hazards of TBP decomposition reactions by lowering the H{sub 2}O/HNO{sub 3} molar ratios. Runaway reactions were not observed under the conditions of this study. Possible reaction mechanisms and pathways are discussed.

Hou, Y.; Barefield, E.K.; Tedder, D.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

111

Atomic structure of nitrate-binding protein crucial for photosynthetic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

structure of nitrate-binding protein crucial for photosynthetic productivity. Atomic structure of nitrate-binding protein crucial for photosynthetic productivity. Abstract:...

112

Combined uranous nitrate production consisting of undivided electrolytic cell and divided electrolytic cell (Electrolysis ? Electrolytic cell)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electrochemical reduction of uranyl nitrate is a green, mild way to make uranous ions. Undivided electrolyzers whose maintenance is less but their conversion ratio and current efficiency are low, have been chosen. However, at the beginning of undivided electrolysis, high current efficiency can also be maintained. Divided electrolyzers' conversion ratio and current efficiency is much higher because the re-oxidation of uranous on anode is avoided, but their maintenance costs are more, because in radioactive environment the membrane has to be changed after several operations. In this paper, a combined method of uranous production is proposed which consists of 2 stages: undivided electrolysis (early stage) and divided electrolysis (late stage) to benefit from the advantages of both electrolysis modes. The performance of the combined method was tested. The results show that in combined mode, after 200 min long electrolysis (80 min undivided electrolysis and 120 min divided electrolysis), U(IV) yield can achieve 92.3% (500 ml feed, U 199 g/l, 72 cm{sup 2} cathode, 120 mA/cm{sup 2}). Compared with divided mode, about 1/3 working time in divided electrolyzer is reduced to achieve the same U(IV) yield. If 120 min long undivided electrolysis was taken, more than 1/2 working time can be reduced in divided electrolyzer, which means that about half of the maintenance cost can also be reduced. (authors)

Yuan, Zhongwei; Yan, Taihong; Zheng, Weifang; Li, Xiaodong; Yang, Hui; Xian, Liang [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O.Box 275-26, Beijing 102413 (China)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

A low-temperature process for the denitration of Hanford single-shell tank, nitrate-based waste utilizing the nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bench-top feasibility studies with Hanford single-shell tank (SST) simulants, using a new, low-temperature (50 to 60C) process for converting nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC), have conclusively shown that between 85 to 99% of the nitrate can be readily converted. In this process, aluminum powders or shot can be used to convert alkaline, nitrate-based supernate to ammonia and an aluminum oxide-sodium aluminate-based solid which might function as its own waste form. The process may actually be able to utilize already contaminated aluminum scrap metal from various DOE sites to effect the conversion. The final, nearly nitrate-free ceramic-like product can be pressed and sintered like other ceramics. Based upon the starting volumes of 6.2 and 3.1 M sodium nitrate solution, volume reductions of 50 to 55% were obtained for the waste form produced, compared to an expected 35 to 50% volume increase if the Hanford supernate were grouted. Engineering data extracted from bench-top studies indicate that the process will be very economical to operate, and data were used to cost a batch, 1,200-kg NO{sub 3}/h plant for working off Hanford SST waste over 20 years. Their total process cost analysis presented in the appendix, indicates that between $2.01 to 2.66 per kilogram of nitrate converted will be required. Additionally, data on the fate of select radioelements present in solution are presented in this report as well as kinetic, operational, and control data for a number of experiments. Additionally, if the ceramic product functions as its own waste form, it too will offer other cost savings associated with having a smaller volume of waste form as well as eliminating other process steps such as grouting.

Mattus, A.J.; Lee, D.D.; Dillow, T.A.; Farr, L.L.; Loghry, S.L.; Pitt, W.W.; Gibson, M.R.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Process for the preparation of an energetic nitrate ester  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for the preparation of an energetic nitrate ester compound and related intermediates is provided.

Chavez, David E; Naud, Darren L; Hiskey, Michael A

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

115

Synthesis of a new energetic nitrate ester  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nitrate esters have been known as useful energetic materials since the discovery of nitroglycerin by Ascanio Sobrero in 1846. The development of methods to increase the safety and utility of nitroglycerin by Alfred Nobel led to the revolutionary improvement in the utility of nitroglycerin in explosive applications in the form of dynamite. Since then, many nitrate esters have been prepared and incorporated into military applications such as double-based propellants, detonators and as energetic plasticizers. Nitrate esters have also been shown to have vasodilatory effects in humans and thus have been studied and used for treatments of ailments such as angina. The mechanism of the biological response towards nitrate esters has been elucidated recently. Interestingly, many of the nitrate esters used for military purposes are liquids (ethylene glycol dinitrate, propylene glycol dinitrate, etc). Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) is one of the only solid nitrate esters, besides nitrocellulose, that is used in any application. Unfortunately, PETN melting point is above 100 {sup o}C, and thus must be pressed as a solid for detonator applications. A more practical material would be a melt-castable explosive, for potential simplification of manufacturing processes. Herein we describe the synthesis of a new energetic nitrate ester (1) that is a solid at ambient temperatures, has a melting point of 85-86 {sup o}C and has the highest density of any known nitrate ester composed only of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen. We also describe the chemical, thermal and sensitivity properties of 1 as well as some preliminary explosive performance data.

Chavez, David E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Nitrates and detinning in canned carrots  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NITRATES AND DETINNING IN CANNED CARROTS A Thesis by Thomas Edward Florine Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1968 Major... Subject: Food Technology NITRATES AND DETINNING IN CANNED CARROTS A Thesis by Thomas Edward Florine Approved as to style and content by: / C-~ (Chairman of Cemi. tee) Head of Department Member) (Member) :-'i ~ (Member) (Member) (Member...

Florine, Thomas Edward

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

3220 FR.01 Restricted Items Approval Request INSTRUCTIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Arsenic compounds Hydrogen(compressed gas) Uranyl acetate or nitrate Picric acid Hexaethyl tetraphosphate

118

The nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) process -- a newly developed low-temperature technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bench-top feasibility studies with Hanford single-shell tank (SST) simulants, using a new low-temperature (50-60C) process for converting nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC), showed that between 90 and 99% of the nitrate at Hanford can be readily converted to ammonia. Aluminum powders or shot can be used to convert alkaline, nitrate-based supernate to ammonia and an alumina-silica-based ceramic solid. The process may utilize already contaminated aluminum scrap metal from various DOE sites to effect the conversion. The final nitrate-free ceramic product can be calcined, pressed, and sintered like any other ceramic. Based on starting volumes of 6.2 and 3.1 M sodium nitrate solution (probable supernate concentrations resulting from salt-cake/sludge removal from Hanford SSTs), volume reductions as high as 70% are currently obtained, compared with an expected 40 to 50% volume increase if the Hanford supernate were grouted. Engineering data indicate that the process will be very economical. Data were used to cost a batch facility with a production rate of 1200 kilograms of nitrate per hour for processing all the Hanford SST waste over 20 years. Process cost analysis indicates that between $2.01 and 2.66 will be required to convert each kilogram of nitrate. These costs are one-third to one-half of the processing costs for electrolytic and thermal processes. The ceramic waste form offers other cost savings associated with a smaller volume of waste as well as eliminates other process steps such as grouting. Silica added to the reactor, based upon the total sodium in the waste, permits us to actually bind the sodium in a nepheline phase of the final ceramic structure as well as bind most metals and nonmetals in the ceramic.

Mattus, A.J.; Lee, D.D.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Impact of uranyl-calcium-carbonato complexes on uranium(VI) adsorption to synthetic and natural sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adsorption on soil and sediment solids may decrease aqueous uranium concentrations and limit its propensity for migration in natural and contaminated settings. Uranium adsorption will be controlled in large part by its aqueous speciation, with a particular dependence on the presence of dissolved calcium and carbonate. Here we quantify the impact of uranyl speciation on adsorption to both goethite and sediments from the Hanford Clastic Dike and Oak Ridge Melton Branch Ridgetop formations. Hanford sediments were preconditioned with sodium acetate and acetic acid to remove carbonate grains, and Ca and carbonate were reintroduced at defined levels to provide a range of aqueous uranyl species. U(VI) adsorption is directly linked to UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} speciation, with the extent of retention decreasing with formation of ternary uranyl-calcium-carbonato species. Adsorption isotherms under the conditions studied are linear, and K{sub d} values decrease from 48 to 17 L kg{sup -1} for goethite, from 64 to 29 L kg{sup -1} for Hanford sediments, and from 95 to 51 L kg{sup -1} for Melton Branch sediments as the Ca concentration increases from 0 to 1 mM at pH 7. Our observations reveal that, in carbonate-bearing waters, neutral to slightly acidic pH values ({approx}5) and limited dissolved calcium are optimal for uranium adsorption.

Stewart, B.D. [Stanford University; Mayes, Melanie [ORNL; Fendorf, Scott [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Submergible torch for treating waste solutions and method thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A submergible torch for removing nitrate and/or nitrite ions from a waste solution containing nitrate and/or nitrite ions comprises: a torch tip, a fuel delivery mechanism, a fuel flow control mechanism, a catalyst, and a combustion chamber. The submergible torch is ignited to form a flame within the combustion chamber of the submergible torch. The torch is submerged in a waste solution containing nitrate and/or nitrite ions in such a manner that the flame is in contact with the waste solution and the catalyst and is maintained submerged for a period of time sufficient to decompose the nitrate and/or nitrite ions present in the waste solution.

Mattus, Alfred J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Submergible torch for treating waste solutions and method thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A submergible torch for removing nitrate and/or nitrite ions from a waste solution containing nitrate and/or nitrite ions comprises: a torch tip, a fuel delivery mechanism, a fuel flow control mechanism, a catalyst, and a combustion chamber. The submergible torch is ignited to form a flame within the combustion chamber of the submergible torch. The torch is submerged in a waste solution containing nitrate and/or nitrite ions in such a manner that the flame is in contact with the waste solution and the catalyst and is maintained submerged for a period of time sufficient to decompose the nitrate and/or nitrite ions present in the waste solution.

Mattus, Alfred J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Submergible torch for treating waste solutions and method thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A submergible torch is described for removing nitrate and/or nitrite ions from a waste solution containing nitrate and/or nitrite ions comprises: a torch tip, a fuel delivery mechanism, a fuel flow control mechanism, a catalyst, and a combustion chamber. The submergible torch is ignited to form a flame within the combustion chamber of the submergible torch. The torch is submerged in a waste solution containing nitrate and/or nitrite ions in such a manner that the flame is in contact with the waste solution and the catalyst and is maintained submerged for a period of time sufficient to decompose the nitrate and/or nitrite ions present in the waste solution. 2 figures.

Mattus, A.J.

1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

123

Perchlorate and nitrate in situ bioremediation of ground water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nitrate and perchlorate are growing worldwide problems as mobile anionic groundwater contaminants. Biological rduction of nitrate and perchlorate in groundwater is under development as a technology to address these problems.

Strietelmeier, E. A. (Elizabeth A.); Nuttall, H. Eric; Hatzinger, Paul; Goltz, Mark

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Denitration of High Nitrate Salts Using Reductants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes work conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in conjunction with Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), to remove nitrates in simulated low-activity waste (LAW). The major objective of this work was to provide data for identifying and demonstrating a technically viable and cost-effective approach to condition LAW for immobilization (grout).

HD Smith; EO Jones; AJ Schmidt; AH Zacher; MD Brown; MR Elmore; SR Gano

1999-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

125

3, 59195976, 2003 The nitrate aerosol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 3, 5919­5976, 2003 The nitrate aerosol field over Europe M. Schaap et al. Title Page Abstract of Utrecht, Institute of Marine and Atmospheric Science, PO Box 80005, 3508 TA, Utrecht, The Netherlands 2, The Netherlands 3 Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN), PO Box 1, 1755 LE Petten, The Netherlands 4 Joint

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

126

NITRATE DESTRUCTION LITERATURE SURVEY AND EVALUATION CRITERIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report satisfies the initial phase of Task WP-2.3.4 Alternative Sodium Recovery Technology, Subtask 1; Develop Near-Tank Nitrate/Nitrite Destruction Technology. Some of the more common anions in carbon steel waste tanks at SRS and Hanford Site are nitrate which is corrosive, and nitrite and hydroxide which are corrosion inhibitors. At present it is necessary to periodically add large quantities of 50 wt% caustic to waste tanks. There are three primary reasons for this addition. First, when the contents of salt tanks are dissolved, sodium hydroxide preferentially dissolves and is removed. During the dissolution process the concentration of free hydroxide in the tank liquid can decrease from 9 M to less than 0.2 M. As a result, roughly half way through the dissolution process large quantities of sodium hydroxide must be added to the tank to comply with requirements for corrosion control. Second, hydroxide is continuously consumed by reaction with carbon dioxide which occurs naturally in purge air used to prevent buildup of hydrogen gas inside the tanks. The hydrogen is generated by radiolysis of water. Third, increasing the concentration of hydroxide increases solubility of some aluminum compounds, which is desirable in processing waste. A process that converts nitrate and nitrite to hydroxide would reduce certain costs. (1) Less caustic would be purchased. (2) Some of the aluminum solid compounds in the waste tanks would become more soluble so less mass of solids would be sent to High Level Vitrification and therefore it would be not be necessary to make as much expensive high level vitrified product. (3) Less mass of sodium would be fed to Saltstone at SRS or Low Level Vitrification at Hanford Site so it would not be necessary to make as much low level product. (4) At SRS less nitrite and nitrate would be sent to Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) so less formic acid would be consumed there and less hydrogen gas would be generated. This task involves literature survey of technologies to perform the nitrate to hydroxide conversion, selection of the most promising technologies, preparation of a flowsheet and design of a system. The most promising technologies are electrochemical reduction of nitrates and chemical reduction with hydrogen or ammonia. The primary reviewed technologies are listed and they aredescribed in more detail later in the report: (1) Electrochemical destruction; (2) Chemical reduction with agents such as ammonia, hydrazine or hydrogen; (3) Hydrothermal reduction process; and (4) Calcination. Only three of the technologies on the list have been demonstrated to generate usable amounts of caustic; electrochemical reduction and chemical reduction with ammonia, hydrazine or hydrogen and hydrothermal reduction. Chemical reduction with an organic reactant such as formic acid generates carbon dioxide which reacts with caustic and is thus counterproductive. Treatment of nitrate with aluminum or other active metals generates a solid product. High temperature calcination has the potential to generate sodium oxide which may be hydrated to sodium hydroxide, but this is unproven. The following criteria were developed to evaluate the most suitable option. The numbers in brackets after the criteria are relative weighting factors to account for importance: (1) Personnel exposure to radiation for installation, routine operation and maintenance; (2) Non-radioactive safety issues; (3) Whether the technology generates caustic and how many moles of caustic are generated per mole of nitrate plus nitrite decomposed; (4) Whether the technology can handle nitrate and nitrite at the concentrations encountered in waste; (5) Maturity of technology; (6) Estimated annual cost of operation (labor, depreciation, materials, utilities); (7) Capital cost; (8) Selectivity to nitrogen as decomposition product (other products are flammable and/or toxic); (9) Impact of introduced species; (10) Selectivity for destruction of nitrate vs. nitrite; and (11) Cost of deactivation and demolition. Each technology was given a score from one

Steimke, J.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Changes in spectrum and critical height accompanying a fuel changeover in SHEBA-II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Solution High-Energy Burst Assembly II (SHEBA-II) has been in operation at Los Alamos National Laboratory for more than 4 yr. During that time it has been fueled exclusively with an aqueous solution of uranyl fluoride. However, because of the corrosiveness and viscosity of uranyl fluoride, it is planned eventually to use an aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate as fuel instead. This paper evaluates the likely change in spectrum and critical height accompanying this changeover and investigates its impact on a set of proposed experiments.

Mosteller, R.D.; Cappiello, C.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Summary of aluminum nitrate tests at the F/H-ETF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biofouling of the Norton ceramic filters in the F/H Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) has been minimized by bacterial control strategies on the influent streams. However, enough bacteria still exists in the routine influent to impact the filter performance. One method of remediating biofouling in routine influent, initially observed in laboratory tests on simulant solutions, involves addition of aluminum nitrate to the influent wastewater. Tests on actual feed at the ETF using aluminum nitrate showed significantly improved performance, with increases in filter permeability of up to four-fold compared to the baseline case. These improvements were only realized after modifications to the pH adjustment system were completed which minimized upsets in the pH of the feed solutions.

McCabe, D.J.; Wiggins, A.W.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Summary of aluminum nitrate tests at the F/H-ETF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biofouling of the Norton ceramic filters in the F/H Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) has been minimized by bacterial control strategies on the influent streams. However, enough bacteria still exists in the routine influent to impact the filter performance. One method of remediating biofouling in routine influent, initially observed in laboratory tests on simulant solutions, involves addition of aluminum nitrate to the influent wastewater. Tests on actual feed at the ETF using aluminum nitrate showed significantly improved performance, with increases in filter permeability of up to four-fold compared to the baseline case. These improvements were only realized after modifications to the pH adjustment system were completed which minimized upsets in the pH of the feed solutions.

McCabe, D.J.; Wiggins, A.W.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Free energies and mechanisms of water exchange around Uranyl from first principles molecular dynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From density functional theory (DFT) based ab initio (Car-Parrinello) metadynamics, we compute the activation energies and mechanisms of water exchange between the first and second hydration shells of aqueous Uranyl (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) using the primary hydration number of U as the reaction coordinate. The free energy and activation barrier of the water dissociation reaction [UO{sub 2}(OH{sub 2}){sub 5}]{sup 2+}(aq) {yields} [UO{sub 2}(OH{sub 2})4]{sup 2+}(aq) + H{sub 2}O are 0.7 kcal and 4.7 kcal/mol respectively. The free energy is in good agreement with previous theoretical (-2.7 to +1.2 kcal/mol) and experimental (0.5 to 2.2 kcal/mol) data. The associative reaction [UO{sub 2}(OH{sub 2}){sub 5}]{sup 2+}(aq) + H{sub 2}O {yields} [UO{sub 2}(OH{sub 2})6]{sup 2+}(aq) is short-lived with a free energy and activation barrier of +7.9 kcal/mol and +8.9 kca/mol respectively; it is therefore classified as associative-interchange. On the basis of the free energy differences and activation barriers, we predict that the dominant exchange mechanism between [UO{sub 2}(OH{sub 2}){sub 5}]{sup 2+}(aq) and bulk water is dissociative.

Atta-Fynn, Raymond; Bylaska, Eric J.; De Jong, Wibe A.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Size effect of hematite and corundum inclusions on the efflorescence relative humidities of aqueous ammonium nitrate particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Structure: Aerosols and particles (0345, 4801); 0345 Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Pollution ammonium nitrate particles Jeong-Ho Han Department of Environmental Chemistry, Atmospheric Science Division by the saturation of the aqueous solution with respect to the solid. INDEX TERMS: 0305 Atmospheric Composition

132

Extraction of Uranium from Aqueous Solutions Using Ionic Liquid and Supercritical Carbon Dioxide in Conjunction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranyl ions (UO2)2+ in aqueous nitric acid solutions can be extracted into supercritical CO2 (sc-CO2) via an imidazolium-based ionic liquid using tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) as a complexing agent. The transfer of uranium from the ionic liquid to the supercritical fluid phase was monitored by UV/Vis spectroscopy using a high-pressure fiberoptic cell. The form of the uranyl complex extracted into the supercritical CO2 phase was found to be UO2(NO3)2(TBP)2. The extraction results were confirmed by UV/Vis spectroscopy and by neutron activation analysis. This technique could potentially be used to extract other actinides for applications in the field of nuclear waste management.

Wang, Joanna S.; Sheaff, Chrystal N.; Yoon, Byunghoon; Addleman, Raymond S.; Wai, Chien M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Long-term Kinetics of Uranyl Desorption from Sediments Under Advective Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Long-term (> 4 months) column experiments were performed to investigate the kinetics of uranyl (U(VI)) desorption in sediments collected from the Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford 300 Area. The experimental results were used to evaluate alternative multi-rate surface complexation reaction (SCR) approaches to describe the short- and long-term kinetics of U(VI) desorption under flow conditions. The SCR stoichiometry, equilibrium constants, and multi-rate parameters were independently characterized in batch and stirred flow-cell reactors. Multi-rate SCR models that were either additively constructed using the SCRs for individual size fractions (e.g., Shang et al., 2011), or composite in nature could effectively describe short-term U(VI) desorption under flow conditions. The long-term desorption results, however, revealed that using a labile U concentration measured by carbonate extraction under-estimated desorbable U(VI) and the long-term rate of U(VI) desorption. An alternative modeling approach using total U as the desorbable U(VI) concentration was proposed to overcome this difficulty. This study also found that the gravel size fraction (2-8 mm), which is typically treated as non-reactive in modeling U(VI) reactive transport because of low external surface area, can have an important effect on the U(VI) desorption in the sediment. This study demonstrates an approach to effectively extrapolate U(VI) desorption kinetics for field-scale application, and identifies important parameters and uncertainties affecting model predictions.

Shang, Jianying; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M.

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

134

Scale-Dependent Rates of Uranyl Surface Complexation Reaction in Sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scale-dependency of uranyl[U(VI)] surface complexation rates was investigated in stirred flow-cell and column systems using a U(VI)-contaminated sediment from the US Department of Energy, Hanford site, WA. The experimental results were used to estimate the apparent rate of U(VI) surface complexation at the grain-scale and in porous media. Numerical simulations using molecular, pore-scale, and continuum models were performed to provide insights into and to estimate the rate constants of U(VI) surface complexation at the different scales. The results showed that the grain-scale rate constant of U(VI) surface complexation was over 3 to 10 orders of magnitude smaller, dependent on the temporal scale, than the rate constant calculated using the molecular simulations. The grain-scale rate was faster initially and slower with time, showing the temporal scale-dependency. The largest rate constant at the grain-scale decreased additional 2 orders of magnitude when the rate was scaled to the porous media in the column. The scaling effect from the grain-scale to the porous media became less important for the slower sorption sites. Pore-scale simulations revealed the importance of coupled mass transport and reactions in both intragranular and inter-granular domains, which caused both spatial and temporal dependence of U(VI) surface complexation rates in the sediment. Pore-scale simulations also revealed a new rate-limiting mechanism in the intragranular porous domains that the rate of coupled diffusion and surface complexation reaction was slower than either process alone. The results provided important implications for developing models to scale geochemical/biogeochemical reactions.

Liu, Chongxuan; Shang, Jianying; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Zachara, John M.; Zhu, Weihuang

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

135

E-Print Network 3.0 - ability nitrate reductase Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: reductase (SO3980) is deficient in its ability to reduce both nitrite and uranyl (39; J. R. Dale, R. Wade... results in a loss of the ability to respire with...

136

Reactions Between Water Soluble Organic Acids and Nitrates in...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reactions Between Water Soluble Organic Acids and Nitrates in Atmospheric Aerosols: Recycling of Nitric Acid and Formation of Reactions Between Water Soluble Organic Acids and...

137

Aluminum nitrate recrystallization and recovery from liquid extraction raffinates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solid sludges resulting form biodenitrification of discarded aluminum nitrate are the largest Y-12 Plant process solid waste. Aluminum nitrate feedstocks also represent a major plant materials cost. The chemical constraints on aluminum nitrate recycle were investigated to determine the feasibility of increasing recycle while maintaining acceptable aluminum nitrate purity. Reported phase behavior of analogous systems, together with bench research, indicated that it would be possible to raise the recycle rate from 35% to between 70 and 90% by successive concentration and recrystallization of the mother liquor. A full scale pilot test successfully confirmed the ability to obtain 70% recycle in existing process equipment.

Griffith, W.L.; Compere, A.L.; Googin, J.M.; Huxtable, W.P.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

ammonium nitrates: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 % in the two experimental seasons. Key words: Date palm Fruit set Yield Fruit quality Boric acid Calcium nitrate INTRODUCTION synthesis, transport of sugars and carbohydrate...

139

ammonium nitrate pills: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 % in the two experimental seasons. Key words: Date palm Fruit set Yield Fruit quality Boric acid Calcium nitrate INTRODUCTION synthesis, transport of sugars and carbohydrate...

140

The Influence of Linker Geometry on Uranyl Complexation by Rigidly-Linked Bis(3-hydroxy-N-methyl-pyridin-2-one)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the formation of UO 2 L(solv. ) complexes (where L is theUO 2 (bis-Me-3,2-HOPO)(solv. ) (right), tabulated in Tablethe uranyl cation. The UO solv distances also show little

Szigethy, Geza

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminium nitrates Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

uranium... for uranium,.contaminated groundwater. Nitrate is a common co.contaminant with uranium. Nitrate inhib- ited U... Mexico. Once nitrate was depleted, both U(VI) and...

142

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous nitrate flowsheet Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hanford Site, located in Southeastern Washington... tetrachloride (CT) and nitrate contamination covers at least 5 km2. Within this area, CT concentrations up to 1... nitrate...

143

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous magnesium nitrate Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

magnesium nitrate Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aqueous magnesium nitrate Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Subscriber access provided...

144

Effect of K loadings on nitrate formation/decomposition and on...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

K loadings on nitrate formationdecomposition and on NOx storage performance of K-based NOx storage-reduction Effect of K loadings on nitrate formationdecomposition and on NOx...

145

Effect of Phosphate, Fluoride, and Nitrate on Gibbsite Dissolution Rate and Solubility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory tests have been completed with simulated tank waste samples to investigate the effects of phosphate, fluoride, and nitrate on the dissolution rate and equilibrium solubility of gibbsite in sodium hydroxide solution at 22 and 40{degrees}C. Results are compared to relevant literature data and to computer model predictions. The presence of sodium nitrate (3 M) caused a reduction in the rate of gibbsite dissolution in NaOH, but a modest increase in the equilibrium solubility of aluminum. The increase in solubility was not as large, though, as the increase predicted by the computer model. The presence of phosphate, either as sodium phosphate or sodium fluoride phosphate, had a negligible effect on the rate of gibbsite dissolution, but caused a slight increase in aluminum solubility. The magnitude of the increased solubility, relative to the increase caused by sodium nitrate, suggests that the increase is due to ionic strength (or water activity) effects, rather than being associated with the specific ion involved. The computer model predicted that phosphate would cause a slight decrease in aluminum solubility, suggesting some Al-PO4 interaction. No evidence was found of such an interaction.

Herting, Daniel L. [Washington River Protection Solutions LLC (United States)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

146

NITRATE CONVERSION OF HB-LINE REILLEXTM HPQ RESIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reillex{trademark} HPQ ion exchange resin is used by HB Line to remove plutonium from aqueous streams. Reillex{trademark} HPQ resin currently available from Vertellus Specialties LLC is a chloride ionic form, which can cause stress corrosion cracking in stainless steels. Therefore, HB Line Engineering requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) convert resin from chloride form to nitrate form in the Engineering Development Laboratory (EDL). To perform this task, SRNL treated two batches of resin in 2012. The first batch of resin from Reilly Industries Batch 80302MA was initially treated at SRNL in 2001 to remove chloride. This batch of resin, nominally 30 liters, has been stored wet in carboys since that time until being retreated in 2012. The second batch of resin from Batch 23408 consisted of 50 kg of new resin purchased from Vertellus Specialties in 2012. Both batches were treated in a column designed to convert resin using downflow of 1.0 M sodium nitrate solution through the resin bed followed by rinsing with deionized water. Both batches were analyzed for chloride concentration, before and after treatment, using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA). The resin specification [Werling, 2003] states the total chlorine and chloride concentration shall be less than 250 ppm. The resin condition for measuring this concentration is not specified; however, in service the resin would always be fully wet. Measurements in SRNL showed that changing from oven dry resin to fully wet resin, with liquid in the particle interstices but no supernatant, increases the total weight by a factor of at least three. Therefore, concentration of chlorine or chloride expressed as parts per million (ppm) decreases by a factor of three. Therefore, SRNL recommends measuring chlorine concentration on an oven dry basis, then dividing by three to estimate chloride concentration in the fully wet condition. Chloride concentration in the first batch (No.80302MA) was nearly the same before the current treatment (759 ppm dry) and after treatment (745 ppm dry or {approx}248 ppm wet). Treatment of the second batch of resin (No.23408) was very successful. Chloride concentration decreased from 120,000 ppm dry to an average of 44 ppm dry or {approx}15ppm wet, which easily passes the 250 ppm wet criterion. Per guidance from HB Line Engineering, SRNL blended Batch 80302 resin with Batch P9059 resin which had been treated previously by ResinTech to remove chloride. The chloride concentrations for the two drums of Batch P9059 were 248 ppm dry ({approx}83 ppm wet) {+-}22.8% and 583 ppm dry ({approx}194 ppm wet) {+-} 11.8%. The blended resin was packaged in five gallon buckets.

Steimke, J.; Williams, M.; Steeper, T.; Leishear, R.

2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

147

Method for producing microcomposite powders using a soap solution  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing microcomposite powders for use in superconducting and non-superconducting applications. A particular method to produce microcomposite powders for use in superconducting applications includes the steps of: (a) preparing a solution including ammonium soap; (b) dissolving a preselected amount of a soluble metallic such as silver nitrate in the solution including ammonium soap to form a first solution; (c) adding a primary phase material such as a single phase YBC superconducting material in particle form to the first solution; (d) preparing a second solution formed from a mixture of a weak acid and an alkyl-mono-ether; (e) adding the second solution to the first solution to form a resultant mixture; (f) allowing the resultant mixture to set until the resultant mixture begins to cloud and thicken into a gel precipitating around individual particles of the primary phase material; (g) thereafter drying the resultant mixture to form a YBC superconducting material/silver nitrate precursor powder; and (h) calcining the YBC superconducting material/silver nitrate precursor powder to convert the silver nitrate to silver and thereby form a YBC/silver microcomposite powder wherein the silver is substantially uniformly dispersed in the matrix of the YBC material.

Maginnis, Michael A. (Coker, AL); Robinson, David A. (Mobile, AL)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Groundwater nitrates in the Seymour Aquifer: problem or resource?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

24 tx H2O Fall 2012 Story by Alejandra Arreola-Triana In the Rolling Plains of Texas, the Seymour Aquifer is the major source of water for Haskell, Jones and Knox counties. #31;e water from the Seymour Aquifer, however, contains nitrate levels... are working on ways to manage the nitrate levels in this aquifer. Tracking the source Nitrates in groundwater can come from runo#27;, fertilizer use, leaks from septic tanks, sewage and erosion of natural deposits, according to the U.S. Environmental...

Arreola-Triana, Alejandra

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Sodium meta-autunite colloids: Synthesis, characterization, stability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J.T.Baker) and crystalline uranyl nitrate, UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 .by: mixing 0.5 mM uranyl nitrate, UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 .6H 2 O,

Zheng, Zuoping; Wan, Jiamin; Tokunaga, Tetsu K.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Degradation of the molecular weight and nitrate ester content of cellulose nitrate on thermal aging. [PBX-9404  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Changes in molecular weight and nitrate ester content for cellulose nitrate (NC), either pure or as a constituent of PBX-9404, were determined as a function of time and temperature. Changes in the number-averaged molecular weight, M/sub n/, are described by the simple theory of random chain scission, and M/sub n/ is found to correlate well with nitrate ester loss. Significant differences are seen between NC aged in the isolated condition and aged as the binder in PBX-9404.

Leider, H R

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Decontamination of water using nitrate selective ion exchange resin  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for nitrate decontamination of water which involves passing the water through a bed of alkyl phosphonium anion exchange resin which has pendant alkyl groups of C[sub 3] or larger.

Lockridge, J.E.; Fritz, J.S.

1990-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

152

Nitrate contamination of domestic potable water supplies: a social problem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nitrate contamination of potable water supplies is a recognized health hazard. Potentially, the contamination of private drinking water supplies could be a problem in the rural Palouse area of Idaho and Washington. Studies have shown that 12% of the rural population of Whitman County, Washington, may be drinking water containing nitrates in excess of the national standard. Yet there is no organized concern about this potential health hazard among local citizens. After reviewing the literature on nitrate contamination of ground water and discussing nitrate contamination of private potable water supplies in the Palouse, we use a social movement theory of social problems to explain why this situation has not been defined as a public health problem.

Holmes, T.; Jensen, E.L.; Conway, J.B.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Preparation of thin ceramic films via an aqueous solution route  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new chemical method of forming thin ceramic films has been developed. An aqueous solution of metal nitrates or other soluble metal salts and a low molecular weight amino acid is coated onto a substrate and pyrolyzed. The amino acid serves to prevent precipitation of individual solution components, forming a very viscous, glass-like material as excess water is evaporated. Using metal nitrates and glycine, the method has been demonstrated for zirconia with various levels of yttria stabilization, for lanthanum-strontium chromites, and for yttrium-barium-copper oxide superconductors on various substrates.

Pederson, Larry R. (Kennewick, WA); Chick, Lawrence A. (Richland, WA); Exarhos, Gregory J. (Richland, WA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Uranyl ion interaction at the water/NiO(100) interface: A predictive investigation by first-principles molecular dynamic simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The behavior of the UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} uranyl ion at the water/NiO(100) interface was investigated for the first time using Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamic simulations with the spin polarized DFT +U extension. A water/NiO(100) interface model was first optimized on a defect-free five layers slab thickness, proposed as a reliable surface model, with an explicit treatment of the solvent. Water molecules are adsorbed with a well-defined structure in a thickness of about 4 A above the surface. The first layer, adsorbed on nickel atoms, remains mainly in molecular form but can partly dissociate at 293 K. Considering low acidic conditions, a bidentate uranyl ion complex was characterized on two surface oxygen species (arising from water molecules adsorption on nickel atoms) with d{sub U-O{sub a{sub d{sub s{sub o{sub r{sub p{sub t{sub i{sub o{sub n}}}}}}}}}}}=2.39 A. This complex is stable at 293 K due to iono-covalent bonds with an estimated charge transfer of 0.58 electron from the surface to the uranyl ion.

Sebbari, Karim [EDF-R and D, Departement Materiaux et Mecanique des Composants, Les Renardieres, Ecuelles, 77818 Moret Sur Loing (France); Institut de Physique Nucleaire d'Orsay, Universite Paris-Sud, CNRS UMR 8608, 15 rue Georges Clemenceau, Batiment 100, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Roques, Jerome; Simoni, Eric [Institut de Physique Nucleaire d'Orsay, Universite Paris-Sud, CNRS UMR 8608, 15 rue Georges Clemenceau, Batiment 100, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Domain, Christophe [EDF-R and D, Departement Materiaux et Mecanique des Composants, Les Renardieres, Ecuelles, 77818 Moret Sur Loing (France)

2012-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

155

Monolayers and multilayers of uranyl arachidate 2. Influence of the subphase pH on the structure and stability of Langmuir-Blodgett films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this second paper we describe the comprehensive structure investigations on multilayers of uranyl arachidate formed by Langmuir-Blodgett deposition from subphases of different pH on solid substrates by means of a combination of infrared spectroscopy, X-ray specular reflection, ellipsometry, and scanning force microscopy. The structure of these multilayers and their stability are obviously influenced by the subphase pH. The pH range of the acid to salt conversion determined for the Langmuir films is confirmed by the infrared spectroscopic data of the multilayers. While arachidic acid films, deposited from an uranyl acetate subphase of low pH, are found to have a strongly distorted rough surface, the films of uranyl arachidate formed at higher subphase pH are smooth and have a quite regular and stable multilayer structure. The influence of the counterions on the alkyl chain conformation, chain packing, reorganization probability, and stability of the multilayers is discussed. 29 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Penacorada, F. [Univ. of Potsdam, Teltow (Germany)] [Univ. of Potsdam, Teltow (Germany); [Universidad de Valladolid (Spain); Reiche, J.; Dietel, R.; Zetzsche, T.; Stiller, B.; Knobloch, H.; Brehmer, L. [Universidad de Valladolid (Spain)] [Universidad de Valladolid (Spain)

1996-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

156

CONTRIBUTION OF PROTOZOA TO THE RUMEN CELLULOLYTIC ACTIVITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and embedded in Epon. Ultrathin sections were stained in uranyl ace- tate and postained in lead nitrate

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

157

Immobilization of sodium nitrate waste with polymers: Topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the development of solidification systems for sodium nitrate waste. Sodium nitrate waste was solidified in the polymers polyethylene, polyester-styrene (PES), and water-extendible polyester-styrene (WEP). Evaluations were made of the properties of waste forms containing various amounts of sodium nitrate by leaching immersion in water, measuring compressive strengths and by the EPA Extraction Procedure. Results of the leaching test are presented as cumulative fraction leached (CFL), incremental leaching rate, and average leaching indices (LI). For waste forms containing 30 to 70 wt% sodium nitrate, the CFL ranged from 9.0 x 10/sup -3/ to 7.3 x 10/sup -1/ and the LI from 11 to 7.8. After ninety days immersion in water, the compressive strengths ranged from 720 psi to 2550 psi. The nitrate releases from these samples using the EPA Extraction Procedure were below 500 ppM. The nitrate releases from PES waste forms were similar to those from polyethylene waste forms at the same waste loadings. The compressive yield strengths, measured after ninety-day immersion in water, ranged between 2070 and 7710 psi. In the case of WEP waste forms, only 30 wt% loaded samples passed the immersion test. 23 refs., 24 figs., 12 tabs.

Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Evaluation of a solar intermittent refrigeration system for ice production operating with ammonia/lithium nitrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel solar intermittent refrigeration system for ice production developed in the Centro de Investigacion en Energia of the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico is presented. The system operates with the ammonia/lithium nitrate mixture. The system developed has a nominal capacity of 8 kg of ice/day. It consists of a cylindrical parabolic collector acting as generator-absorber. Evaporator temperatures as low as -11 C were obtained for several hours with solar coefficients of performance up to 0.08. It was found that the coefficient of performance increases with the increment of solar radiation and the solution concentration. A dependency of the coefficient of performance was not founded against the cooling water temperature. Also it was found that the maximum operating pressure increases meanwhile the generation temperature decreases with an increase of the solution concentration. (author)

Rivera, W.; Moreno-Quintanar, G.; Best, R. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 34, 62580 Temixco, Mor. (Mexico); Rivera, C.O.; Martinez, F. [Facultad de Ingenieria Campus Coatzacoalcos, Universidad Veracruzana, Av. Universidad Km 7.5, 96530 Coatzacoalcos, Ver. (Mexico)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

159

Crystal chemistry of thorium nitrates and chromates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structures and infrared spectra of six novel thorium compounds are reported. Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}(OH){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (1) crystallizes in space group C2/c, a=14.050(1), b=8.992(7), c=5.954(5) A, {beta}=101.014(2){sup o}. K{sub 2}Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 6} (2), P-3, a=13.606(1), c=6.641(6) A. (C{sub 12}H{sub 28}N){sub 2}Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 6} (3), P2{sub 1}/c, a=14.643(4), b=15.772(5), c=22.316(5) A, {beta}=131.01(1){sup o}. KTh(NO{sub 3}){sub 5}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (4), P2{sub 1}/c, a=10.070(8), b=12.731(9), c=13.231(8) A, {beta}=128.647(4){sup o}. Th(CrO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (5), P2{sub 1}/n, a=12.731(1), b=9.469(8), c=12.972(1) A, {beta}=91.793(2){sup o}. K{sub 2}Th{sub 3}(CrO{sub 4}){sub 7}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10} (6), Ama2, a=19.302(8), b=15.580(6), c=11.318(6) A. The coordination polyhedra about Th in these structures are diverse. Th is coordinated by 9 O atoms in 5 and 6, seven of which are from monodentate (CrO{sub 4}) tetrahedra and two are (H{sub 2}O). The Th in compound 1 is coordinated by ten O atoms, four of which are O atoms of two bidentate (NO{sub 3}) triangles and six of which are (OH) and (H{sub 2}O). In compounds 2, 3 and 4 the Th is coordinate by 12 O atoms. In 2 and 3 there are six bidentate (NO{sub 3}) triangles, and in 4 ten of the O atoms are part of five bidentate (NO{sub 3}) triangles and the others are (H{sub 2}O) groups. The structural units of these compounds consist of a chain of thorium and nitrate polyhedra (1), isolated thorium hexanitrate clusters (2, 3), an isolated thorium pentanitrate dihydrate cluster (4), and a sheet (6) and framework (5) of thorium and chromate polyhedra. These structures illustrate the complexity inherent in the crystal chemistry of Th. - Graphical Abstract: The structures and infrared spectra of four new Th nitrates and two Th chromates are reported. The coordination numbers of the Th cations range from nine to 12 in these compounds. Structural units consist of isolated clusters, chains, sheets and frameworks.

Sigmon, Ginger E. [Department of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Burns, Peter C., E-mail: pburns@nd.ed [Department of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

Safe handling of TBP and nitrates in the nuclear process industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A laboratory and literature study was made of the reactions of tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) with nitric acid and nitrates. Its goal was to establish safe conditions for solvent extraction processes involving these chemicals. The damaging explosions at the Tomsk-7 PUREX plant in Russia graphically illustrated the potential hazard involved in such operations. The study has involved a review of prior and contemporary experiments, and new experiments to answer particular questions about these reactions. TBP extracts nitric acid and some metal nitrates from aqueous solutions. The resulting liquid contains both oxidant and reductant, and can react exothermically if heated sufficiently. Safe handling of these potentially reactive materials involves not only limiting the heat generated by the chemical reaction, but also providing adequate heat removal and venting. Specifically, the following recommendations are made to ensure safety: (1) tanks in which TBP-nitrate complexes are or may be present should be adequately vented to avoid pressurization. Data are supplied as a basis for adequacy; (2) chemically degraded TBP, or TBP that has sat a long time in the presence of acids or radiation, should be purified before use in solvent extraction; (3) evaporators in which TBP might be introduced should be operated at a controlled temperature, and their TBP content should be limited; (4) evaporator bottoms that may contain TBP should be cooled under conditions that ensure heat removal. Finally, process design should consider the potential for such reactions, and operators should be made aware of this potential, so that it is considered during training and process operation.

Hyder, M.L.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

RADIOACTIVE HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANK PITTING PREDICTIONS: AN INVESTIGATION INTO CRITICAL SOLUTION CONCENTRATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of cyclic potentiodynamic polarization tests was performed on samples of ASTM A537 carbon steel in support of a probability-based approach to evaluate the effect of chloride and sulfate on corrosion the steel?s susceptibility to pitting corrosion. Testing solutions were chosen to systemically evaluate the influence of the secondary aggressive species, chloride, and sulfate, in the nitrate based, high-level wastes. The results suggest that evaluating the combined effect of all aggressive species, nitrate, chloride, and sulfate, provides a consistent response for determining corrosion susceptibility. The results of this work emphasize the importance for not only nitrate concentration limits, but also chloride and sulfate concentration limits.

Hoffman, E.

2012-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

162

Characterization of Surface and Bulk Nitrates of ?-Al2O3...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Surface and Bulk Nitrates of ?-Al2O3-Supported Alkaline Earth Oxides using Density Functional Theory. Characterization of Surface and Bulk Nitrates of ?-Al2O3-Supported...

163

THE SYSTEM THORIUM NITRATE-WATER-NITRIC ACID AT 25 AND THE HYDRATES...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

SYSTEM THORIUM NITRATE-WATER-NITRIC ACID AT 25 AND THE HYDRATES OF THORIUM NITRATE Re-direct Destination: Temp Data Fields Ferraro, J.R.; Katzin, L.I. Temp Data Storage 3: Argonne...

164

THE SYSTEM THORIUM NITRATE-WATER-NITRIC ACID AT 25 AND THE HYDRATES...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

SYSTEM THORIUM NITRATE-WATER-NITRIC ACID AT 25 AND THE HYDRATES OF THORIUM NITRATE Re-direct Destination: times redirected to final destination ShortURL Code Published Current...

165

The Aerobic Oxidation of Bromide to Dibromine Catalyzed by Homogeneous Oxidation Catalysts and Initiated by Nitrate in Acetic Acid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A small amount of nitrate, ~0.002 molal, initiates the Co/Mn catalyzed aerobic oxidation of bromide compounds (HBr,NaBr,LiBr) to dibromine in acetic acid at room temperature. At temperatures 40oC or less , the reaction is autocatalytic. Co(II) and Mn(II) themselves and mixed with ionic bromide are known homogeneous oxidation catalysts. The reaction was discovered serendipitously when a Co/Br and Co/Mn/Br catalyst solution was prepared for the aerobic oxidation of methyaromatic compounds and the Co acetate contained a small amount of impurity i.e. nitrate. The reaction was characterized by IR, UV-VIS, MALDI and EXAFS spectroscopies and the coordination chemistry is described. The reaction is inhibited by water and its rate changed by pH. The change in these variables, as well as others, are identical to those observed during homogeneous, aerobic oxidation of akylaromatics. A mechanism is proposed. Accidental addition of a small amount of nitrate compound into a Co/Mn/Br/acetic acid mixture in a large, commercial feedtank is potentially dangerous.

Partenheimer, Walt; Fulton, John L.; Sorensen, Christina M.; Pham, Van Thai; Chen, Yongsheng

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Nitrate Salt Bearing Waste Container  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Energy (DOE) and Nuclear Waste Partnership LLC (NWP), collectively referred to as the Permittees Isolation Plan (Plan) for identified nitrate salt bearing waste disposed in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant detailed proposal for the expedited closure of underground Hazardous Waste Disposal Unit (HWDU) Panel 6, so

Napp, Nils

167

MICHIGAN'S SOIL NITRATE TEST FOR CORN MSU SOIL AND PLANT NUTRIENT LAB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHIGAN'S SOIL NITRATE TEST FOR CORN MSU SOIL AND PLANT NUTRIENT LAB Michigan State University Extension Crop and Soil Sciences Department Michigan State University WHY TEST SOIL FOR NITRATES Nitrate testing of soil is an excellent and inexpensive way of evaluating the available nitrogen (N) status

Isaacs, Rufus

168

Regulation by nitrate of protein synthesis and translation of RNA in maize roots  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Roots of maize seedlings were exposed to /sup 35/S-methionine in the presence or absence of nitrate. Using SDS-PAGE, nitrate-induced changes in labeled polypeptides were noted in the soluble (at 92, 63 and 21kD) and organellar(at 14kD) fractions, as well as in a membrane fraction of putative tonoplast origin (at 31kD). No nitrate-induced changes were noted in a plasmamembrane-enriched fraction or in a membrane fraction of mixed origin. Total RNA from nitrate-treated and control roots was translated in a rabbit reticulocyte system. Five translation products (94, 63, 41, 39 and 21kD) were identified as nitrate-inducible by comparative gel electrophoresis. Changes in protein synthesis and translation of mRNA were apparent within 2-3 h after introduction of nitrate. Within 4-6 h after removal of nitrate, the level of nitrate-inducible translation products diminished to that of control roots. In contrast, the 31kD tonoplast polypeptide was still labeled 26 h after removal of external nitrate and /sup 35/S-methionine. The results will be discussed in relation to the nitrate induction of nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, and the nitrate uptake system.

McClure, P.R.; Bouthyette, P.Y.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Nitrate Enhanced Microbial Cr(VI) Reduction-Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major challenge for the bioremediation of radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium) and metals (i.e., Cr(VI), Hg) is the co-occurrence of nitrate as it can inhibit metal transformation. Denitrification (nitrate reduction to dinitrogen gas) is considered the most important ecological process. For many metal and metalloid reducing bacteria, however, ammonia is the end product through respiratory nitrate reduction (RNRA). The focus of this work was to determine how RNRA impacts Cr(VI) transformation. The goal was to elucidate the specific mechanism(s) that limits Cr(VI) reduction in the presence of nitrate and to use this information to develop strategies that enhance Cr(VI) reduction (and thus detoxification). Our central hypothesis is that nitrate impacts the biotransformation of metals and metalloids in three ways 1) as a competitive alternative electron acceptor (inhibiting transformation), 2) as a co-metabolite (i.e., concomitant reduction, stimulating transformation), and 3) as an inducer of specific proteins and pathways involved in oxidation/reduction reactions (stimulating transformation). We have identified three model organisms, Geobacter metallireducens (mechanism 1), Sulfurospirillum barnesii, (mechasism 2), and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (mechanisms 3). Our specific aims were to 1) investigate the role of Cr(VI) concentration on the kinetics of both growth and reduction of nitrate, nitrite, and Cr(VI) in these three organisms; 2) develop a profile of bacterial enzymes involved in nitrate transformation (e.g., oxidoreductases) using a proteomic approach; 3) investigate the function of periplasmic nitrite reductase (Nrf) as a chromate reductase; and 4) develop a strategy to maximize microbial chromium reduction in the presence of nitrate. We found that growth on nitrate by G. metallireducens was inhibited by Cr(VI). Over 240 proteins were identified by LC/MS-MS. Redox active proteins, outer membrane heavy metal efflux proteins, and chemotaxis sensory proteins (Gmet_2478 and Gmet_1641) were up-regulated with exposure to Cr(VI). A nine-heme cytochrome C was purified that could reduce nitrite and could be oxidized by Cr(VI). For D. desulfuricans, we found that confirmed that Cr(VI) induced a prolonged lag period when Cr(VI) was reduced. Over three hundred proteins were unequivocally identified by LC/MS-MS and a significant number of down-regulated proteins for which the levels were changed >2 fold compared to control. Sulfite reductase levels were similar, however, nitrate and nitrite reductase were down-regulated. The supernatant of spent cultures was found to contain a filterable, heat stable compound that rapidly reduced Cr(VI). In addition, desulfoviridin was purified from nitrate grown cells and shown to have nitrite reductase activity that was inhibited by Cr(VI). For S. barnesii, periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap), nitrite reductase (Nrf), and the metalloid reductase (Rar) were purified and characterized. The supernatant of spent cultures was also found to contain a filterable, heat stable compound that rapidly reduced Cr(VI) but that Rar also reduced Cr(VI). Our results from specific aims 1 through 3 indicate that for G. metallireducens, Cr(VI) inhibits nitrate respiration as it oxidizes cytochromes involved in nitrate respiration. Iron reduction is apparently not affected and the inhibitory affects of Cr(VI) may be attenuated by the addition of sufficient Fe(III) to generate Fe(II) that abiotically reduces the chromium. For S. barnesii, although the enzyme assays indicate that the components of the respiratory pathway for nitrate (e.g. Nap and Nrf) are inhibited by chromate, the organism has a mechanism to prevent this from actually occurring. Our current hypothesis is that the non-specific metalloid reductase (Rar) is providing resistance by reducing the Cr(VI). The strategy here would be to enhance its growth and metabolism in the natural setting. Lactate is a suitable electron donor for S. barnesii but other donors are possible. Although the version of the Phylochip used for monitoring the microb

John F. Stolz

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

The Influence of the Linker Geometry in Bis(3-hydroxy-N-methyl-pyridin-2-one) Ligands on Solution-Phase Uranyl Affinity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M. S. Murali, K. L. Nash, Solv. Extr. Ion Exch. 2001, 19,dimers of the form [UO 2 L 2 (solv. )] 2 as opposed to thesterically-induced [UO 2 (L)(solv. )] 2 dimer formation, [

Szigethy, Gza

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

CORROSION TESTING IN SIMULATED TANK SOLUTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three simulated waste solutions representing wastes from tanks SY-102 (high nitrate, modified to exceed guidance limits), AN-107, and AY-102 were supplied by PNNL. Out of the three solutions tested, both optical and electrochemical results show that carbon steel samples corroded much faster in SY-102 (high nitrate) than in the other two solutions with lower ratios of nitrate to nitrite. The effect of the surface preparation was not as strong as the effect of solution chemistry. In areas with pristine mill-scale surface, no corrosion occurred even in the SY-102 (high nitrate) solution, however, corrosion occurred in the areas where the mill-scale was damaged or flaked off due to machining. Localized corrosion in the form of pitting in the vapor space of tank walls is an ongoing challenge to overcome in maintaining the structural integrity of the liquid waste tanks at the Savannah River and Hanford Sites. It has been shown that the liquid waste condensate chemistry influences the amount of corrosion that occurs along the walls of the storage tanks. To minimize pitting corrosion, an effort is underway to gain an understanding of the pitting response in various simulated waste solutions. Electrochemical testing has been used as an accelerated tool in the investigation of pitting corrosion. While significant effort has been undertaken to evaluate the pitting susceptibility of carbon steel in various simulated waste solutions, additional effort is needed to evaluate the effect of liquid waste supernates from six Hanford Site tanks (AY-101, AY-102, AN-102, AN-107, SY-102 (high Cl{sup -}), and SY-102 (high nitrate)) on carbon steel. Solutions were formulated at PNNL to replicate tank conditions, and in the case of SY-102, exceed Cl{sup -} and NO{sub 3}{sup -} conditions, respectively, to provide a contrast between in and out of specification limits. The majority of previous testing has been performed on pristine polished samples. To evaluate the actual tank carbon steel surface, efforts are needed to compare the polished surfaces to corroded and mill-scale surfaces, which are more likely to occur in application. Additionally, due to the change in liquid waste levels within the tanks, salt deposits are highly likely to be present along the tank wall. When the level of the tank decreases, a salt deposit will form as the solution evaporates. The effects of this pre-existing salt, or supernate deposit, are unknown at this time on the corrosion effect and thus require investigation. Additionally, in the presence of radiation, moist air undergoes radiolysis, forming a corrosive nitric acid condensate. This condensate could accelerate the corrosion process in the vapor space. To investigate this process, an experimental apparatus simulating the effects of radiation was designed and constructed to provide gamma irradiation while coupons are exposed to a simulate tank solution. Additionally, ammonia vapors will also be introduced to further represent the tank environment.

Hoffman, E.

2010-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

172

Changes in U(VI) speciation upon sorption onto montmorillonite from aqueous and organic solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The speciation of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} Tributylphosphate (TBP) mixtures has been investigated in solution and intercalated with the reference smectite clay SAz-1 using x-ray absorption, Raman, and luminescence spectroscopies. Neither aquated UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} nor its TBP complex undergoes any detectable changes in uranium oxidation state on intercalation. Further, at the pH values employed in this work, there is no evidence for hydrolysis of the uranium species to generate dimeric or higher order uranium oligomers. However, we do find indications that the structures of the solution complexes are altered on intercalation, particularly for the UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}/TBP system. In addition, several lines of evidence suggest that, at the loading levels used in this study, the uranyl species may be interacting with two or more spectroscopically distinguishable sites on SAz-1. 29 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Chisholm-Brause, C.; Morris, D.E.; Eller, P.G.; Buscher, T.; Conradson, S.D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Safe conditions for contacting nitric acid or nitrates with tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to a request from DOE-SR, the current state of knowledge of the reactions between TBP and aqueous nitrate solutions is critically reviewed, and recommendations are made for the safe operation of SRS separations equipment in which this combination of chemicals may be present. The existing limits for evaporation are validated. Guidelines are presented for cases in which general limits do not apply. The rate of reaction between nitric acid and TBP appears to be controlled by the rate of TBP hydrolysis. The hydrolysis reaction produces dibutyl phosphate and n-butanol. The hydrolysis rate is a strong function of temperature, and becomes very fast at temperatures in the range 130{degrees} to 150{degrees}C. The resulting n-butanol is volatile at high temperatures, boiling at 117.5{degrees}C, but is also subject to exothermic oxidation by nitric acid or nitrates. If oxidation occurs before the n-butanol evaporates, the heat of oxidation may exceed local cooling by convection. The resulting heating will further accelerate the reaction, leading to an energetic runaway and possibly (in confined systems) an explosion. Extensive experiments and practice have shown that in a well-mixed and well-vented aqueous system such as an evaporator, at moderate acidities and temperatures below 130{degrees}C, the heat of reaction is adequately removed by vaporization of steam. In general, the heating will be so slow that natural processes provide adequate cooling at temperatures below 80{degrees}C. Above this temperature, care should be taken to ensure that adequate cooling is available for the amount of TBP that may be present. Experiments suggest that in well-ventilated systems n-butanol evaporation and convective cooling are sufficient to control the reaction at temperatures up to 120{degrees}C.

Hyder, M.L

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Features of gadolinium and ytterbium extraction by tributyl phosphate from concentrated nitric acid solutions. I. Compositions of extracted complexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Distribution of macroquantity (0.3-1.3 M) of Gd and Yb between neat tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) and 5-12 M nitric acid solutions has been studied. The species extracted by TBP from 7-12 M nitric acid solutions are rare-earth metal (REM) nitrate trisolvates containing one or several nitric molecules.

Nikitna, G.P.; Seredkina, N.V.; Listopadov, A.A. [Khlopin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Real time in situ detection of organic nitrates in atmospheric aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new field instrument is described that quantifies total particle phase organic nitrates. The instrument is based on the thermal dissociation laser induced fluorescence (TD-LIF) method that thermally converts nitrates to NO2 which is then detected by LIF. This instrument is unique in its ability to provide fast sensitive measurements of particle phase organic nitrates, without interference from inorganic nitrate. Here we use it to quantify organic nitrates in SOA generated from high-NOx photooxidation of limonene, a-pinene, D-3-carene, and tridecane. In these experiments the organic nitrate moiety is observed to be 6-15percent of the total SOA mass, depending on the organic precursor.

Rollins, Andrew W.; Smith, Jared D.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Cohen, Ronald C.

2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

176

E-Print Network 3.0 - ammonium nitrate melt Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

on Peat Decomposition in Plum Summary: , phosphate, ammonium and DIC on all of the water samples. Nitrate concentrations were measured according... ;11 indicating greater...

177

Micro- and Mini-nitrate Sensors for Monitoring of Soils, Groundwater and Aquatic Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nitrate Mini-Sensor with PVC membrane containing liquidmin) Mini-sensors with PVC maintain their sensitivity duringfabricated mini- sensors with PVC membranes showed better

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic nitrate-dependent oxidation Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the experiment... nitrate- dependent Fe(II) ... Source: Roden, Eric E. - Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Wisconsin at Madison Collection: Environmental...

179

Ureides in active and nitrate-repressed soybean nodules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) detected ureides in his final preparations of two acid soluble peptides which seemed to be associated with nitrogen fixation. He presented evidence that these crude preparations were able to: A) bind and release NH ; and 8) reduce the triple bond... (----1 of nitrate, were analyzed on a Beckman 120B automatic amino acid analyzer. The post arginine peaks (I, II, III) were measured. 38 Table 4. The Effect of N03 on Acid-Soluble Peptide(s) from Soybean Nodules. Acid-soluble ex- tracts were...

Bundy, Timothy K.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Extraction of nitrosoruthenium by tributyl phosphate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ruthenium is one of the elements that complicate regeneration of the spent nuclear fuel. A study has been made of distribution of highly extractable nitrosoruthenium complex RuNO(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} (RuT) between aqueous solutions and tributyl phosphate (TBP) in n-dodecane. Short phase contact ({approximately}30 s) was employed to minimize possible mutual conversion of nitrosoruthenium species, which takes place in the case of prolonged phase contact. The distribution coefficient {alpha}{sub RuT} is independent of hydrogen ion concentration and the presence of various salts in aqueous phase, i.e., RuT is extracted as nonelectrolyte. Experiments in which the TBP concentration was varied by dilution or binding TBP with nitric acid and uranyl nitrate indicates formation of trisolvate (as main complex characterized by extraction constant K{sub 3}=72) and disolvate (K{sub 2} = 5). At high nitric acid and/or uranyl nitrate concentration, {alpha}{sub RuT} is insignificantly reduced, while solvate number decrease substantially, Probably, nitrosoruthenium tetranitrate, e.g., RuNO(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{center_dot}HNO{sub 3}{center_dot}TBP, and/or complex of RuT with uranyl nitrate is formed. The decontamination of valuable fuel components from ruthenium may be improved by a factor 10{sup 3} by binding TBP with nitric acid and uranyl nitrate. Another way to reduce {alpha}{sub RuT} is to convert RuT into poorly extractable RuD form. The time of RuT half-conversion into RuD was found to be 15 min in the presence of HNO{sub 3}, 9 min in the presence of uranyl nitrate, and 5 min at 50-60{degrees}C (simultaneously {alpha}{sub RuT} decreases by an order of magnitude).

Rozen, A.M.; Kartasheva, N.A.; Nikolotova, Z.N. [Bochvar Russian Inst. of Inorganic Materials, Moscow (Russian Federation)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Mercuric iodate precipitation from radioiodine-containing off-gas scrubber solution  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Mercuric nitrate-nitric acid scrub solutions containing radioiodine may be reduced in volume without excessive loss of volatile iodine. The use of concentrated nitric acid during an evaporation process oxidizes the mercury-iodide complex to a less volatile mercuric iodate precipitate.

Partridge, Jerry A. (Richland, WA); Bosuego, Gail P. (Richland, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Effects of Nitrate on Decomposition in Salt Marsh Peats Arianna Goodman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of Nitrate on Decomposition in Salt Marsh Peats Arianna Goodman Oberlin College `13 Advisor and loss. Rapid nitrate addition to salt marshes may stimulate bacterial decomposition of existing peat, and the decomposition may contribute to creek bank destabilization and collapse. Alternately, peat deposited in high

Vallino, Joseph J.

183

Infrared Spectroscopy of the Microhydrated Nitrate Ions NO3 Daniel J. Goebbert,,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Infrared Spectroscopy of the Microhydrated Nitrate Ions NO3 - (H2O)1-6 Daniel J. Goebbert ReceiVed: April 15, 2009 We present infrared photodissociation spectra of the microhydrated nitrate ions the infrared spectroscopy of NO3 - (H2O)n clusters, n ) 1-6. The gas-phase vibrational spectroscopy of NO3

Neumark, Daniel M.

184

Nitrate-responsive miR393/AFB3 regulatory module controls root system architecture in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environmental conditions is the modulation of root system architecture (RSA) in response to nitrate supplyNitrate-responsive miR393/AFB3 regulatory module controls root system architecture in ArabidopsisR393/AFB3 is a unique N- responsive module that controls root system architecture in response

Green, Pamela

185

Strontium sorption and precipitation behaviour during bioreduction in nitrate impacted sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radionuclides (e.g. U and Tc) from groundwaters at these sites is a key challenge for nuclear decommissioning D. Bryan a , Katherine Morris a, a Research Centre for Radwaste and Decommissioning and Williamson Nitrate Nuclear The behaviour of strontium (Sr2+ ) during microbial reduction in nitrate impacted

Burke, Ian

186

Correction to ``Nitrate and colloid transport through coarse Hanford sediments under steady state,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Correction to ``Nitrate and colloid transport through coarse Hanford sediments under steady state), Correction to ``Nitrate and colloid transport through coarse Hanford sediments under steady state, variably and colloid transport through coarse Hanford sediments under steady state, variably saturated flow'' by Kelly

Flury, Markus

187

The fate and transport of nitrate in shallow groundwater in northwestern Mississippi, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

modeling . USA Introduction Nitrate is the primary form of dissolved nitrogen in natural waters (MuellerThe fate and transport of nitrate in shallow groundwater in northwestern Mississippi, USA Heather L. Welch & Christopher T. Green & Richard H. Coupe Abstract Agricultural contamination of groundwater

188

Stainless steel corrosion by molten nitrates : analysis and lessons learned.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A secondary containment vessel, made of stainless 316, failed due to severe nitrate salt corrosion. Corrosion was in the form of pitting was observed during high temperature, chemical stability experiments. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy were all used to diagnose the cause of the failure. Failure was caused by potassium oxide that crept into the gap between the primary vessel (alumina) and the stainless steel vessel. Molten nitrate solar salt (89% KNO{sub 3}, 11% NaNO{sub 3} by weight) was used during chemical stability experiments, with an oxygen cover gas, at a salt temperature of 350-700 C. Nitrate salt was primarily contained in an alumina vessel; however salt crept into the gap between the alumina and 316 stainless steel. Corrosion occurred over a period of approximately 2000 hours, with the end result of full wall penetration through the stainless steel vessel; see Figures 1 and 2 for images of the corrosion damage to the vessel. Wall thickness was 0.0625 inches, which, based on previous data, should have been adequate to avoid corrosion-induced failure while in direct contact with salt temperature at 677 C (0.081-inch/year). Salt temperatures exceeding 650 C lasted for approximately 14 days. However, previous corrosion data was performed with air as the cover gas. High temperature combined with an oxygen cover gas obviously drove corrosion rates to a much higher value. Corrosion resulted in the form of uniform pitting. Based on SEM and EDS data, pits contained primarily potassium oxide and potassium chromate, reinforcing the link between oxides and severe corrosion. In addition to the pitting corrosion, a large blister formed on the side wall, which was mainly composed of potassium, chromium and oxygen. All data indicated that corrosion initiated internally and moved outward. There was no evidence of intergranular corrosion nor were there any indication of fast pathways along grain boundaries. Much of the pitting occurred near welds; however this was the hottest region in the chamber. Pitting was observed up to two inches above the weld, indicating independence from weld effects.

Kruizenga, Alan Michael

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Metrological characteristics of the multiparameter method of analysis of multicomponent solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On the basis of previously obtained results of the study of nitrate solutions and the parameters of chloride solutions in the homogenous region for acid-salt-water systems, the authors have investigated the conditions and possibilities of the multiparameter method. The authors, having studied the density, viscosity, and electrical conductivity of three acid-salt-water chloride systems as a function of the composition of the solution, obtained equations relative to the measured values of the density, viscosity, and electrical conductivity for determination of the acid and salt contents for solutions of nitrate and chloride systems. The authors estimated the detection limits, the ranges of measurable contents, the standard deviations of the analysis results, the allowable contents of other components, and the requirements imposed on the accuracy in the measurement of the density, viscosity, electrical conductivity and temperature.

Mikhailov, V.A.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Selective and quantitative nitrate electroreduction to ammonium using a porous copper electrode in an electrochemical flow cell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,version1-10Jul2014 #12;3 1. Introduction Nitrate ions (NO3 - ) contamination of ground and surface water and physiochemical methods are used for nitrate removal from contaminated water but show drastic limits are costly [10] and produce secondary brine wastes, because the nitrate are only separated but not destroyed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

191

Rational Ligand Design for U(VI) and Pu(IV)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HOPO ligand with uranyl nitrate and Et 3 N or methanolic KOHbis-Me-3,2-HOPO ligand, uranyl nitrate, and Et 3 N in DMF oruranyl complexes are difficult to separate from the mixture of potassium, tetramethylammonium and nitrate

Szigethy, Geza

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Electrochemical Recovery of Sodium Hydroxide from Alkaline Salt Solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A statistically designed set of tests determined the effects of current density, temperature, and the concentrations of nitrate/nitrite, hydroxide and aluminate on the recovery of sodium as sodium hydroxide (caustic) from solutions simulating those produced from the Savannah River Site (SRS) In-Tank Precipitation process. These tests included low nitrate and nitrite concentrations which would be produced by electrolytic nitrate/nitrite destruction. The tests used a two compartment electrochemical cell with a Nafion Type 324 ion-exchange membrane. Caustic was successfully recovered from the waste solutions. Evaluation of the testing results indicated that the transport of sodium across the membrane was not significantly affected by any of the varied parameters. The observed variance in the sodium flux is attributed to experimental errors and variations in the performance characteristics of individual pieces of the organic-based Nafion membrane.Additional testing is recommended to determine the maximum current density, to evaluate the chemical durability of the organic membrane as a function of current density and to compare the durability and performance characteristics of the organic-based Nafion membrane with that of other commercially available organic membranes and the inorganic class of membranes under development by Ceramatec and PNNL.

Hobbs, D.T. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Edwards, T.B.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Application of municipal sludge (biosolids) for agricultural purposes and groundwater nitrate concentrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the more popular means of handling sewage sludge from municipalities is its application to agricultural lands. A variety of crops are grown with the expectation that plants will utilize the nitrogen. However, a complex scenario allows some of the nitrate to move below root depth and eventually to the water table at depths of up to 30 ft. The City of Raleigh, NC injects sewage sludge ( residuals'', biosolids'') into soils derived largely from the Rolesville Granite in an area of typical rolling Piedmont topography. A 1975 background study of part of the site demonstrated differences in groundwater quality between areas farmed over a period of years and areas dominated by second-growth pine and harwood forests. Groundwater quality data collected semiannually between 1982 and 1988 show gradual buildup of nitrate in some fields; in others groundwater quality apparently remains unaffected by nitrate from the sludge. Monitoring well placement may play a role in these differences. Minimum time from the sludge application to an increase in groundwater nitrate is from 9 to 12 months. An ongoing study of a 12-acre field which lay fallow for a number of years prior to sludge application in 1990 demonstrates that some nitrate does move downward fairly rapidly, its movement being recorded in both the saprolite and groundwater. Comparison of nitrate content of groundwater from monitoring wells at a nearby dairy farm shows that normal agricultural practices may also increase the nitrate content of the shallow groundwater.

Welby, C.W. (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

additional immunohistochemical staining: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with water-soluble salts of heavy metals. The best results were obtained with lanthanum nitrate, uranyl acetate, and lead perchlorate. The molecules appear as filaments...

195

Prokaryotic microorganisms in uranium mining waste piles and their interactions with uranium and other heavy metals.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The influence of uranyl and sodium nitrate under aerobic and anaerobic conditions on the microbial community structure of a soil sample from the uranium mining (more)

Geiler, Andrea

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Effects of Organic Carbon Supply Rates on Uranium Mobility in a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

respiration caused increased (bi)carbonate concentration and formation of stable uranyl carbonate complexes remediation. Dissolved oxygen, nitrate and denitrification products have been demonstrated to mobilize U

Hazen, Terry

197

Ultrastructure of scutellar sensilla in Aphytis melinus (HymenopteraL Aphelinidae) and morphological variation across Chalcidoidea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

uranyl acetate stain was diluted in methanol and the lead citrate stain mixed using 0.3 grams lead citrate, 0.3 grams lead nitrate,

Romero, Christina; Heraty, John

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Microsoft Word - CHPRC-0900540.37_MSA%20Attachment%201[1].docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with Recovery Act funding. When operational, the facilities were used to convert uranyl nitrate liquid into uranium trioxide powder that is safer and more stable. Today,...

199

Uranium biokinetics in gavaged young adult female rats.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Blood, liver, kidney, femur, and ovaries were assayed from female Wistar rats following oral administration of uranyl nitrate. Three uranium concentrations were studied for six (more)

Keizer, Philip John

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

E. VILLARI. 2014 Sulla propriet scaricatrice prodotta pei gas dall'uraninite (Sur la proprit de dcharge produite dans les gaz par l'uranite). -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

les expériences de M. H. Becquerel sur l'uranium, le nitrate d'urane, le sulfate double d'uranyle et

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Utilizing Microalgae to Remediate Nitrate-Contaminated Groundwater N. Case, M. Sommerfeld, H. Qiang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utilizing Microalgae to Remediate Nitrate-Contaminated Groundwater N. Case, M. Sommerfeld, H. Qiang or domestic animals. It can also be used as a fertilizer or converted to biofuels. The photobioreactor can

Hall, Sharon J.

202

The Effect of Nanoparticle Concentration on Thermo-physical Properties of Alumina-nitrate Nanofluid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this study was to determine how Al2O3 nanoparticle concentration affected the specific heat, heat of fusion, melting point, thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of Alumina-Nitrate nanofluids. Al2O3 nanoparticles were...

Shao, Qian

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

Nighttime Measurements of Dinitrogen Pentoxide and the Nitrate Radical via Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technique, known as cavity ring-down spectroscopy, will be introduced for simultaneously measuring the nitrate radical and dinitrogen pentoxide. The cavity ring-down spectrometer was initially designed and constructed based on the experiments by Steven Brown...

Perkins, Katie C.

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

204

Nitrate and sulphate dynamics in peat subjected to different hydrological conditions: Batch experiments and field comparison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nitrate and sulphate dynamics in peat subjected to different hydrological conditions: Batch concentrations were investigated in bioreactors, using peat samples from field sites influenced by different hydrologic regimes. In this experiment, peat samples were subjected to similar conditions to address

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

205

Application of Artificially Immobilized Microorganisms to Nitrate Removal from Drinking Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Nitrate Removal from Drinking Water By Sean X. Liu andFor biological treatment of drinking water, several crucialalginate gel beads to drinking water treatment has proved to

Liu, Sean X; Hermanowicz, Slawomir W

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkali metal nitrate Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0021-91930104.00 0 DOI: 10.1128JB.183.19.54915495.2001 Summary: for this heavy metal for its anaerobic growth mode on nitrate (1). However, also in this organism,...

207

J. CHEM. SOC. DALTON TRANS. 1982 1691 Part 2.t Defect Centres inEnergy Transfer in Actinyl Compounds.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of uranyl nitrate into gels formed by the neutralis- ation of sodium metasilicate with acetic acid study of the electronic spectra of the uranyl ion 1 the low temperature single crystal ab- sorption+ion.3 A troublesome feature of the spectroscopy of sodium uranyl acetate is the observation

208

Herbicide and nitrate distribution in central Iowa rainfall  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Herbicides are detected in rainfall; however, these are a small fraction of the total applied. This study was designed to evaluate monthly and annual variation in atrazine (6-chloro-N-ethyl-N{prime}-(1-methylethyl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine), alachlor (2-chloro-N-(2,6-diethylphenyl)-N-(methoxymethyl)acetamide), metolachlor (2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-N-(2-methoxy-1-methylethyl)acetamide), and NO{sub 3}-N concentrations in rainfall over Walnut Creek watershed south of Ames, IA. The study began in 1991 and continued through 1994. Within the watershed, two wet/dry precipitation samplers were positioned 4 km apart. Detections varied during the year with >90% of the herbicide detections occurring in April through early July. Concentrations varied among events from nondetectable amounts to concentrations of 154 {mu}g L{sup {minus}1}, which occurred when atrazine was applied during an extremely humid day immediately followed by rainfall of <10 mm that washed spray drift from the atmosphere. This was a local scale phenomenon, because the other collector had a more typical concentration of 1.7 {mu}g L{sup {minus}1} with an 8-mm rainfall. VAriation between the two collectors suggests that local scale meteorological processes affect herbicide movement. Yearly atrazine deposition totals were >100 {mu}g m{sup {minus}2} representing <0.1% of the amount applied. Nitrate-N concentrations in precipitation were uniformly distributed throughout the year and without annual variation in the concentrations. Deposition rates of NO{sub 3}-N were about 1.2 g m{sup {minus}2}. Annual loading onto the watershed was about 25% of the amount applied from all forms of N fertilizers. Movement and rates of deposition provide an understanding of the processes and magnitude of the impact of agriculture on the environment. 7 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Hatfield, J.L.; Prueger, J.H.; Pfeiffer, R.L. [National Soil Tilth Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Wesley, C.K. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Y-12 Development Organization technical progress report: Part 3 -- Metal processing, period ending March 1, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the effort to downsize its uranium processing facilities, the Y-12 Plant has supported an investigation to identify extraction solvents that would both work efficiently in centrifugal contactors and be disposed of easily. Various organic ethers, hydroxy ethers, ether ketones, acids, amides, and diketones were studied for their ability to extract uranyl nitrate from aqueous solutions. Although many of these solvents were obtained commercially, others had to be synthesized in-house. The authors found a large range of extraction coefficients for these solvents. Because of steric hindrance or some other factor, certain ethers performed poorly. On the other hand, various mono- and diethers of tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol exhibited excellent extraction and stripping coefficients for uranyl nitrate, justifying purchase of a pilot plant batch of one of this family of solvents. Likewise, the authors determined the extraction coefficient for one of the two amides synthesized in-house to be quite high.

Northcutt, W.G. Jr. [comp.

1994-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

210

Malonamides as new extractants for nuclear waste solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new class of extractants has been investigated: pentaalkylpropane diamides. Due to their chelating effect on metallic cations, they extract trivalent actinides such as Am{sup 3+} and Cm{sup 3+} from acidic nitrate nuclear waste solutions. These solvents are completely incinerable and do not generate large amounts of waste. A review is provided of their chemical properties, leading to the choice of the proper molecule. The results of a bench-scale experiment performed in a mixer-settler battery are presented.

Cuillerdier, C.; Musikas, C.; Hoel, P.; Nigond, L.; Vitart, X. (Commissariat a L'Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France))

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Crystal chemistry of new thorium nitrates and chromates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structures and infrared spectra of six novel thorium compounds are reported. Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}(OH){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (1) crystallizes in space group C2/c, a=14.050(1), b=8.992(7), c=5.954(5) , ?=101.014(2). K{sub 2}Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 6} (2), P-3, a=13.606(1), c=6.641(6) . (C{sub 12}H{sub 28}N){sub 2}Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 6} (3), P21/c, a=14.643(4), b=15.772(5), c=22.316(5) , ?=131.01(1). KTh(NO{sub 3}){sub 5}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (4), P21/c, a=10.070(8), b=12.731(9), c=13.231(8) , ?=128.647(4). Th(CrO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (5), P21/n, a=12.731(1), b=9.469(8), c=12.972(1) , ?=91.793(2). K{sub 2}Th{sub 3}(CrO{sub 4}){sub 7}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10} (6), Ama2, a=19.302(8), b=15.580(6), c=11.318(6) . The coordination polyhedra about Th in these structures are diverse. Th is coordinated by 9 O atoms in 5 and 6, seven of which are from monodentate (CrO{sub 4}) tetrahedra and two are (H{sub 2}O). The Th in compound 1 is coordinated by ten O atoms, four of which are O atoms of two bidentate (NO{sub 3}) triangles and six of which are (OH) and (H{sub 2}O). In compounds 2, 3 and 4 the Th is coordinate by 12 O atoms. In 2 and 3 there are six bidentate (NO{sub 3}) triangles, and in 4 ten of the O atoms are part of five bidentate (NO{sub 3}) triangles and the others are (H{sub 2}O) groups. The structural units of these compounds consist of a chain of thorium and nitrate polyhedra (1), isolated thorium hexanitrate clusters (2, 3), an isolated thorium pentanitrate dihydrate cluster (4), and a sheet (6) and framework (5) of thorium and chromate polyhedra. These structures illustrate the complexity inherent in the crystal chemistry of Th.

Sigmon, Ginger E.; Burns, Peter C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Low time resolution analysis of polar ice cores cannot detect impulsive nitrate events  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ice cores are archives of climate change and possibly large solar proton events (SPEs). Wolff et al. (2012) used a single event, a nitrate peak in the GISP2-H core, which McCracken et al. (2001a) time associated with the poorly quantified 1859 Carrington event, to discredit SPE-produced, impulsive nitrate deposition in polar ice. This is not the ideal test case. We critique the Wolff et al. analysis and demonstrate that the data they used cannot detect impulsive nitrate events because of resolution limitations. We suggest re-examination of the top of the Greenland ice sheet at key intervals over the last two millennia with attention to fine resolution and replicate sampling of multiple species. This will allow further insight into polar depositional processes on a sub-seasonal scale, including atmospheric sources, transport mechanisms to the ice sheet, post-depositional interactions, and a potential SPE association.

Smart, D F; Melott, A L; Laird, C M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

THE DAYLIGHTING SOLUTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1980, pp.l4-20 THE DAYLIGHTING SOLUTION Stephen SelkowitzEEB-W-80-19 W-74 THE DAYLIGHTING SOLUTION Stephen Selkowitz

Selkowitz, Stephen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Electrolysis of Humus Solutions: An Improved Method for the Estimation of Humus.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

after electrolysis, though absent from the original solntions. Apparently the .current had produced nitric nitrogen. Nitrates mere determined colorimctrically by the phenolsulphuric acid method, a blank on the original solution being run with each... from lime and magnesia by washing with acid, with coarse and ancl placed them in a small funnel, at the bottom of which were fragments of porcelain. This was moistened with ammonia and allowed to digest for several hours. The ammonia...

Rather, J. B. (James Burness)

1911-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

A search for regulatory mutants of the nitrate utilization pathway of Neurospora Crassa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A SEARCH FOR REGULATORI MUTANTS OF THE NITRATE UTILIZATION PATHWAl OF NEUROSPORA CRASSA A Thesis by CLAUDE STEVEN MCDANIEL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fu1fillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1976 Major Subject: Genetics A SEARCH FOR REGULATORY MUTANTS OF THE NITRATE U1'IIIZA1'ION PA1'NNAY OF ~N A Thesis by CLAUDE STEVEN MCDANIEL Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committ e) (Head oi' epar...

McDaniel, Claude Steven

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Alkyl nitrate (C1-C3) depth profiles in the tropical Pacific Ocean E. E. Dahl,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and distribution of tropo- spheric ozone. Atmospheric alkyl nitrates are normally associated with polluted air free radical processes initiated by radioactive decay or cosmic rays, enzymatically mediated reactions expedition in the equatorial Pacific, an equatorial maximum in atmospheric ethyl and isopropyl nitrate

Saltzman, Eric

217

Biological Oxidation of Fe(II) in Reduced Nontronite Coupled with Nitrate Reduction by Pseudogulbenkiania sp. Strain 2002  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nitrate contamination in soils, sediments, and water bodies is a significant issue. Although much is known about nitrate degradation in these environments, especially via microbial pathways, a complete understanding of all degradation processes, especially in clay mineral-rich soils, is still lacking. The objective of this study was to study the potential of removing nitrate contaminant using structural Fe(II) in clay mineral nontronite. Specifically, the coupled processes of microbial oxidation of Fe(II) in microbially reduced nontronite (NAu-2) and nitrate reduction by Pseudogulbenkiania species strain 2002 was investigated. Bio-oxidation experiments were conducted in bicarbonate-buffered medium under both growth and nongrowth conditions. The extents of Fe(II) oxidation and nitrate reduction were measured by wet chemical methods. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), and 57Fe-Mssbauer spectroscopy were used to observe mineralogical changes associated with Fe(III) reduction and Fe(II) oxidation in nontronite. The bio-oxidation extent under growth and nongrowth conditions reached 93% and 57%, respectively. Over the same time period, nitrate was completely reduced under both conditions to nitrogen gas (N2), via an intermediate product nitrite. Magnetite was a mineral product of nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation, as evidenced by XRD data and TEM diffraction patterns. The results of this study highlight the importance of iron-bearing clay minerals in the global nitrogen cycle with potential applications in nitrate removal in soils.

Zhao, Linduo; Dong, Hailiang; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Agrawal, A.; Liu, Deng; Zhang, Jing; Edelmann, Richard E.

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

218

NITRATE UTILIZATION BY PHYTOPLANKTON IN LAKE SUPERIOR IS IMPAIRED BY LOW NUTRIENT (P, Fe) AVAILABILITY AND SEASONAL LIGHT LIMITATION--  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NITRATE UTILIZATION BY PHYTOPLANKTON IN LAKE SUPERIOR IS IMPAIRED BY LOW NUTRIENT (P, Fe utilization in this oligotrophic system. Clean sampling methods were used to collect water from Lake Superior during spring and summer 2004, and nitrate utilization was measured by monitoring bioreporter

Sterner, Robert W.

219

Isotopic evidence for source changes of nitrate in rain at Bermuda Meredith Galanter Hastings and Daniel M. Sigman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), or nitrate (NO3 ? ), is a significant contributor to acid rain, an important species in marineIsotopic evidence for source changes of nitrate in rain at Bermuda Meredith Galanter Hastings O is 68.6% and 76.9% (versus Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water). The few cool season rain events

Sigman, Daniel M.

220

Structural Changes of Bimetallic PdX/Cu (1-X) Nanocatalysts Developed for Nitrate Reduction of Drinking Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Drinking Water Huiping Xu1,2 , Ray Twesten3 , Kathryn Guy4 , John Shapley4 , Charles Werth5 , Anatoly alternative for nitrate removal in drinking water [1]. Fundamental understanding how the atomic arrangement for the purification of drinking water. INTRODUCTION Presently nitrate in drinking water is either not removed

Frenkel, Anatoly

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Application of a modified denitrifying bacteria method for analyzing groundwater and vadose zone pore water nitrate at the Hanford Site, WA, USA.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

zone pore water nitrate at the Hanford Site, WA, USA. Woods,and Conrad, Mark The Hanford Site in southern WashingtonL have been reported for Hanford groundwaters, where nitrate

Woods, Katharine N.; Singleton, Michael J.; Conrad, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Separation of uranium from nitric and hydrochloric acid solutions with extractant-coated magnetic microparticles.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The magnetically assisted chemical separation (MACS) process utilizes selective magnetic microparticle composites to separate dissolved metals from solution. In this study, MACS particles were coated with neutral and acidic organophosphorus extractants,octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl phosphine oxide (CMPO), tributyl phosphate (TBP), trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO), and bis(2-ethyl-hexyl)phosphoric acid (D{sub 2}EHPA or HDEHP) and were evaluated for the separation of uranyl ions from nitric- and hydrochloric-acid solutions. The results suggest that a synergistic interaction between the particle surface and solvent coating may explain why the particles display, in some cases, orders of magnitude of higher partitioning coefficients than are estimated from solvent-extraction measurements. Particles coated with TBP and those coated with a combination of TOPO and D{sub 2}EHPA displayed the most desirable characteristics for removing uranium from dilute acid environments typical of contaminated groundwater. Uranium separation from moderate to highly acidic waste streams typical of Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear wastes is best accomplished using particles coated with a combination of CMPO and TBP.

Kaminski, M. D.; Nunez, L.; Chemical Engineering

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Financing Solutions | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Solution Center Financing Solutions Financing Solutions Transitioning to a clean energy economy requires innovative financing solutions that enable state, local, and tribal...

224

Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Uranyl and Uranyl Carbonate Adsorption at  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource ProgramModification and Application ofof a Coflowand

225

Gas/particle partitioning of total alkyl nitrates observed with TD-LIF in Bakersfield  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

total AN (gas + aerosol) and ANaer show that on average 21% of ANs are in the condensed phaseGas/particle partitioning of total alkyl nitrates observed with TD-LIF in Bakersfield A. W. Rollins samples. These measurements show that ANs are a ubiquitous component of the OA with the ­ONO2 subunit

Cohen, Ronald C.

226

Effect of nitrate on the performance of single chamber air cathode microbial fuel cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of nitrate on the performance of single chamber air cathode microbial fuel cells Chontisa Accepted 26 August 2008 Published online 11 September 2008 Keywords: Microbial fuel cell Denitrification microbial fuel cells (MFCs) has drawn much attention recently as a new approach of waste- water treatment

Tullos, Desiree

227

Nitrogen sources and cycling in the San Francisco Bay Estuary: A nitrate dual isotopic composition approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as 25.0%) at the SacramentoSan Joaquin River delta region give rise to a wide range of d18ONO3 valuesNitrogen sources and cycling in the San Francisco Bay Estuary: A nitrate dual isotopic composition18O) within the estuarine system of San Francisco (SF) Bay, California, to explore the utility

Paytan, Adina

228

Soil Tillage Influences on Soil Mineral Nitrogen and Nitrate Leaching in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil Tillage Influences on Soil Mineral Nitrogen and Nitrate Leaching in Swedish Arable Soils sa Myrbeck Faculty of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences Department of Soil and Environment Uppsala field experiment, Paper III. (photo: J. Arvidsson) #12;Soil Tillage Influences on Soil Mineral Nitrogen

229

Quantifying uncertainty in nitrate pollution from land application of sewage sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uncertainty associated with nitrate-nitrogen pollution of ground water from sludge applications was investigated. Three alternative planning models were proposed. The models estimate annual loads and concentrations of nitrate-nitrogen in percolation. Published data from four field studies that included aerobic and anaerobic sludge and surface- and soil-incorporated applications were used for model testing. Point and stochastic validation procedures were used. The models were generally conservative. For three data sets average relative errors were approximately +/- 25% for all three models. The fourth data set had average relative errors of 100-500%. Wilcoxon Signed Rank test results (at ..cap alpha.. = 5%) suggested point-model predictions and observations were drawn from similar distributions. Stochastic validation tests also suggested that observations were samples from distributions of predictions. The models were tested as uncalibrated approximations of nitrate percolation. All three appear sufficiently accurate for planning application systems. A planning procedure was developed which utilizes analytically approximated probability distributions of nitrate loads and concentrations. Distributions are specified with analytical moment expressions and a normal distribution function limited to be non-negative.

Mummert, M.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Materials Chemistry and Physics 100 (2006) 3840 X-ray irradiation induced degradation of cellulose nitrate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract Energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometry was previously proposed to measure energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometry. For that method, a reference silver nitrate-ray energy is high enough to avoid total a

Yu, K.N.

231

Alkyl nitrate (C 1 -C 3 ) depth profiles in the tropical Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concentrations with a [ iPr]/[Et] ratio of 0.10.0. Noat all depths with an [iPr]/[Et] ratio of 0.2 0.0. Thiswith ethyl nitrate with an [iPr]/[Et] ratio of 0.2 0.0.

Dahl, E. E; Yvon-Lewis, S. A; Saltzman, E. S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Nitrate and colloid transport through coarse Hanford sediments under steady state, variably saturated flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nitrate and colloid transport through coarse Hanford sediments under steady state, variably] At the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Reservation, colloid-facilitated transport is a potential of colloids through Hanford sediments under steady state, unsaturated flow conditions. We isolated colloids

Flury, Markus

233

Water and nitrate exchange between cultivated ecosystems and groundwater in the Rolling Pampas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

model (UPFLOW) suggested that at TS groundwater supplied an importanWater and nitrate exchange between cultivated ecosystems and groundwater in the Rolling Pampas Agropecuaria Parana´, INTA, Ruta 11 km 12.5, 3101 Oro Verde, Argentina 1. Introduction Biogeochemical exchange

Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

234

Microrheological Studies of Regenerated Silk Fibroin Solution by Video Microscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have carried out studies on the rheological properties of regenerated silk fibroin (RSF) solution using video microscopy. The degummed silk from the Bombyx mori silkworm was used to prepare RSF solution by dissolving it in calcium nitrate tetrahydrate-methanol solvent. Measurements were carried out by tracking the position of an embedded micron-sized polystyrene bead within the RSF solution through video imaging. The time dependent mean squared displacement (MSD) of the bead in solution and hence, the complex shear modulus of this solution was calculated from the bead's position information. An optical tweezer was used to transport and locate the bead at any desired site within the micro-volume of the sample, to facilitate the subsequent free-bead video analysis. We present here the results of rheological measurements of the silk polymer network in solution over a frequency range, whose upper limit is the frame capture rate of our camera, at full resolution. By examining the distribution of MSD of beads at different locations within the sample volume, we demonstrate that this probe technique enables us to detect local inhomogeneties at micrometer length scales, not detectable either by a rheometer or from diffusing wave spectroscopy.

Raghu A; Somashekar R; Sharath Ananthamurthy

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Combined Effects of UV-B, Nitrate, and Low pH Reduce the Survival and Activity Level of Larval Cascades Frogs (Rana cascadae)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combined Effects of UV-B, Nitrate, and Low pH Reduce the Survival and Activity Level of Larval. We investigated interactions between low pH, high nitrate level, and ultraviolet-B (UV-B) light were significantly reduced in the treatment with low pH, high nitrate, and UV-B together. In both years

Blaustein, Andrew R.

236

CX-004179: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

on nitric acid solutions as a function of the addition of the following salts: Aluminum nitrate, Lead nitrate, Cesium nitrate, Sodium nitrate and Potassium nitrate. The VLE...

237

--No Title--  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

on nitric acid solutions as a function of the addition of the following salts: Aluminum nitrate, Lead nitrate, Cesium nitrate, sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. The VLE...

238

Future Climate Engineering Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Future Climate Engineering Solutions Joint report 13 engineering participating engeneering. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Engineering Solutions A Climate call from engineers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Summaries of National Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Summary of The Climate Plan

239

Structure and Function of Metal- and Nitrate-reducing Microbial Communities in the FRC Subsurface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of this study is to evaluate structure-function relationships of sedimentary microbial communities likely to regulate U(VI) reduction and immobilization in the subsurface of Area 2 at the Field Research Center (FRC), Oak Ridge, TN. Microcosm experiments were conducted under near in situ conditions with FRC subsurface materials cocontaminated with high levels of U(VI) and nitrate. The activity, abundance, and community composition of microorganisms was determined in microcosm samples, stimulated with ethanol or glucose, and compared to those from sediment cores and unamended controls. Activity was assessed by monitoring terminal electron accepting processes (TEAPs; nitrate, sulfate, uranium, and iron reduction) as well as electron donor utilization. Microbial functional groups, nitrate- and iron(III)-reducing bacteria, were enumerated during the nitrate- and metal-reduction phases of the incubation and in sediment core samples using a most probable number (MPN) serial dilution assay. U(VI) and Fe(III) were reduced concurrently in the glucose but not the ethanol treatments. In ethanol-amended microcosms, U(VI) was reduced during a 4-day lag phase between nitrate- and Fe(III)-reduction phases. Biostimulation resulted in 3 to 5 orders of magnitude higher counts of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, whereas populations of nitrate-reducers were enhanced by 1 to 3 orders of magnitude. One to 2 orders of magnitude more Fe(III)-reducers were observed in ethanol- as compared to glucose-amended treatments in parallel with enhanced U(VI) removal in ethanol treatments. Cultivatable Fe(III)-reducing bacteria in the ethanol treatments were dominated by Geobacter sp. while those cultured on glucose were dominated by fermentative organisms, i.e., Tolumonas sp. Currently, carbon substrate utilization is being examined through HPLC analysis of microcosm porewaters. In addition, changes in the overall microbial community composition are being assessed using cultivation-independent techniques, including fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (T-RFLP) and cloning/sequencing of structural and functional genes. Our results indicate that the microbially-catalyzed mechanism of U(VI) reduction is electron donor dependent and that more effective U(VI) removal is achieved in parallel with an enrichment of Geobacter sp. upon treatment with ethanol.

Akob, Denise M.; Mills, Heath J.; Kerkhof, Lee; Gihring, Thomas M.; Kostk, Joel E.

2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

240

Thermodynamic and structural description of europium complexation in 1-octanol solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Polydentate N-bearing ligands such as bis-triazinyl-pyridines (BTPS) are interesting extractants for actinide(III)/lanthanide(III) separation. A description of europium complexation in 1-octanol solutions was undertaken to enhance the knowledge of the extraction mechanisms. Time- Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence (TRLIF) spectroscopy allows determination of the first solvation shell for europium(III) nitrate, chloride, and perchlorate with different amounts of water. Europium nitrate complexation by iPr-BTP was then studied by TRLIF and microcalorimetry; the stability constant related to the formation of Eu(BTP){sub 3}{sup 3+} is similar by both techniques (log {beta}{sub 3} = 11.3 {+-} 0.5). The difference of solvation of the cation seems to have an influence on the thermodynamic properties related to the complexation with organic ligands. (authors)

Charbonnel, M.C.; Vu, T.H.; Boubals, N.; Couston, L. [CEA Valrho Marcoule, DEN/DRCP/SCPS/LCAT, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Arnaud, F. [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique, IPHC, 25 rue Becquerel, 67087 Strasbourg (France)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Impact of pH on the removal of fluoride, nitrate and boron by nanofiltration/reverse osmosis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of pH on boron, fluoride, and nitrate retention by comparing modelled speciation predictions with retention using six different nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis ...

Richards, Laura A.; Vuachre, Marion; Schfer, Andrea

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Model validation and uncertainty analysis -- An example using a nitrate percolation model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Model validation and uncertainty analysis are demonstrated using a model previously developed for estimating nitrate-nitrogen (nitrate) concentrations in percolation water from land application of sewage sludge. The objectives are to demonstrate alternate validation techniques and to analyze uncertainty associated with model use following validation. Field data from three published sludge application studies and two separate methods are used for the validation. The first method, point validation, is accomplished by inserting mean values into the model to make point predictions. Model accuracy is then assessed by calculating coefficient of determination (r{sup 2}), relative error and standard error. Statistical accuracy is tested using the Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test. The second method, statistical validation, uses Monte Carlo simulation to obtain distributions of model predictions. The hypothesis that field data represent reasonable samples from the distribution of model predictions is tested by checking whether observed values are within a range bounded by the 5 and 95% quantities of the distribution. Both validation methods demonstrate that the land application model generally overestimates nitrate concentrations. Monte Carlo simulation is used to identify which model input parameters are the largest contributors to the uncertainty in model predictions.

Mummert, M.C. [R.E. Wright Environmental, Inc., Middletown, PA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

243

Aqueous nitrate waste treatment: Technology comparison, cost/benefit, and market analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to provide information necessary for the Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate the practical utility of the Nitrate to Ammonia and Ceramic or Glass (NAC/NAG/NAX) process, which is under development in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The NAC/NACx/NAX process can convert aqueous radioactive nitrate-laden waste to a glass, ceramic, or grout solid waste form. The tasks include, but are not limited to, the following: Identify current commercial technologies to meet hazardous and radiological waste disposal requirements. The technologies may be thermal or non-thermal but must be all inclusive (i.e., must convert a radionuclide-containing nitrate waste with a pH around 12 to a stable form that can be disposed at permitted facilities); evaluate and compare DOE-sponsored vitrification, grouting, and minimum additive waste stabilization projects for life-cycle costs; compare the technologies above with respect to material costs, capital equipment costs, operating costs, and operating efficiencies. For the NAC/NAG/NAX process, assume aluminum reactant is government furnished and ammonia gas may be marketed; compare the identified technologies with respect to frequency of use within DOE for environmental management applications with appropriate rationale for use; Assess the potential size of the DOE market for the NAC/NAG/NAX process; assess and off-gas issues; and compare with international technologies, including life-cycle estimates.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

TREATMENT TESTS FOR EX SITU REMOVAL OF CHROMATE & NITRATE & URANIUM (VI) FROM HANFORD (100-HR-3) GROUNDWATER FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes batch and ion exchange column laboratory scale studies investigating ex situ methods to remove chromate (chromium [VI]), nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}) and uranium (present as uranium [VI]) from contaminated Hanford site groundwaters. The technologies investigated include: chemical precipitation or coprecipitation to remove chromate and uranium; and anion exchange to remove chromate, uranium and nitrate. The technologies investigated were specified in the 100-HR-3 Groundwater Treatability Test Plan. The method suggested for future study is anion exchange.

BECK MA; DUNCAN JB

1994-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

245

The Effect of Time and Rate of Application of Nitrate of Soda on the Yield of Cotton.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIHENT STATIDJ A. R. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY. TEXAS BULLETIN NO. 490 MARCH, 1934 .--' --7 , The Effect of Time and Rate of Application of Nitrate of Soda on the Yield of Cotton - AGRICULTURAL... of nitrate of soda on yield, length and percentage of lint, size of boll, shedding, and other characters of the cotton plant on the sandy soils of eastern Texas, as a basis for developing a more intelligent and profitable fertilizer practice for cotton...

Reynolds, E. B. (Elbert Brunner); Langley, B. C. (Bryon Caldwell); Johnson, P. R. (Paul Rufus)

1934-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Solution deposition assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and devices are provided for improved deposition systems. In one embodiment of the present invention, a deposition system is provided for use with a solution and a substrate. The system comprises of a solution deposition apparatus; at least one heating chamber, at least one assembly for holding a solution over the substrate; and a substrate curling apparatus for curling at least one edge of the substrate to define a zone capable of containing a volume of the solution over the substrate. In another embodiment of the present invention, a deposition system for use with a substrate, the system comprising a solution deposition apparatus; at heating chamber; and at least assembly for holding solution over the substrate to allow for a depth of at least about 0.5 microns to 10 mm.

Roussillon, Yann; Scholz, Jeremy H; Shelton, Addison; Green, Geoff T; Utthachoo, Piyaphant

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

247

Mixed oxide solid solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a mixed oxide solid solution containing a tetravalent and a pentavalent cation that can be used as a support for a metal combustion catalyst. The invention is furthermore a combustion catalyst containing the mixed oxide solid solution and a method of making the mixed oxide solid solution. The tetravalent cation is zirconium(+4), hafnium(+4) or thorium(+4). In one embodiment, the pentavalent cation is tantalum(+5), niobium(+5) or bismuth(+5). Mixed oxide solid solutions of the present invention exhibit enhanced thermal stability, maintaining relatively high surface areas at high temperatures in the presence of water vapor.

Magno, Scott (Dublin, CA); Wang, Ruiping (Fremont, CA); Derouane, Eric (Liverpool, GB)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Dispersant solutions for dispersing hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A dispersant solution includes a hydrocarbon dispersing solution derived from a bacterium from ATCC 75527, ATCC 75529, or ATCC 55638.

Tyndall, Richard L. (Clinton, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Dispersant solutions for dispersing hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A dispersant solution includes a hydrocarbon dispersing solution derived from a bacterium from ATCC 75527, ATCC 75529, or ATCC 55638.

Tyndall, R.L.

1997-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

250

Instrument Development and Measurements of the Atmospheric Pollutants Sulfur Dioxide, Nitrate Radical, and Nitrous Acid by Cavity Ring-down Spectroscopy and Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A. , A method of nitrogen dioxide and sulphur dioxidedetermination of nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide in theDOAS) have measured nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ), nitrate

Medina, David Salvador

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Conceptual designs of NDA instruments for the NRTA system at the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors are studying conceptual designs of selected nondestructive assay (NDA) instruments for the near-real-time accounting system at the rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP) of Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited (JNFL). The JNFL RRP is a large-scale commercial reprocessing facility for spent fuel from boiling-water and pressurized-water reactors. The facility comprises two major components: the main process area to separate and produce purified plutonium nitrate and uranyl nitrate from irradiated reactor spent fuels, and the co-denitration process area to combine and convert the plutonium nitrate and uranyl nitrate into mixed oxide (MOX). The selected NDA instruments for conceptual design studies are the MOX-product canister counter, holdup measurement systems for calcination and reduction furnaces and for blenders in the co-denitration process, the isotope dilution gamma-ray spectrometer for the spent fuel dissolver solution, and unattended verification systems. For more effective and practical safeguards and material control and accounting at RRP, the authors are also studying the conceptual design for the UO{sub 3} large-barrel counter. This paper discusses the state-of-the-art NDA conceptual design and research and development activities for the above instruments.

Li, T.K.; Klosterbuer, S.F.; Menlove, H.O. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Safeguards Science and Technology Group] [and others

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Factors affecting total alkaloid and nitrate levels in pearl millet (Pennisetum americanum (L.) Leeke)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

('gM University Co-Chairmen of Advisory Committee: Dr. Ethan C. Holt Dr. F. M. Roulette, Jr. P l 'lit (P ' t ' (L. )L k)g 'gt d drought stress in the summer of 1978 in East Texas became unpalat- able to grazing cattle. The unpalatable forage contained... as much as 460 ppm total alkaloid and. potentially toxic levels of nitrate (NO ). Several factors which may play a role in the accumula. tion of alkaloids and NO in pearl millet were investigated in these studies. The effect of drought stress, nitrogen...

Krejsa, Beverly Blohowiak

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

In-Situ Silver Acetylide Silver Nitrate Explosive Deposition Measurements Using X-Ray Fluorescence.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Light Initiated High Explosive facility utilized a spray deposited coating of silver acetylide - silver nitrate explosive to impart a mechanical shock into targets of interest. A diagnostic was required to measure the explosive deposition in - situ. An X - ray fluorescence spectrometer was deployed at the facility. A measurement methodology was developed to measure the explosive quantity with sufficient accuracy. Through the use of a tin reference material under the silver based explosive, a field calibration relationship has been developed with a standard deviation of 3.2 % . The effect of the inserted tin material into the experiment configuration has been explored.

Covert, Timothy T.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Strategic Biomass Solutions (Mississippi)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Strategic Biomass Solutions (SBS) was formed by the Mississippi Technology Alliance in June 2009. The purpose of the SBS is to provide assistance to existing and potential companies, investors...

255

Solution to Quiz 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sep 5, 2013 ... over the next four years: Cash Flow at End of Year Amount of Cash Flow. 1. 1 Million. 2 ... project is 8%. Calculate X . Solution: By definition, the...

jeffb_000

2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

256

Solutions of Penrose's Equation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The computational use of Killing potentials which satisfy Penrose's equation is discussed. Penrose's equation is presented as a conformal Killing-Yano equation and the class of possible solutions is analyzed. It is shown that solutions exist in spacetimes of Petrov type O, D or N. In the particular case of the Kerr background, it is shown that there can be no Killing potential for the axial Killing vector.

E. N. Glass; Jonathan Kress

1998-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

257

LITERATURE SURVEY FOR GROUNDWATER TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR NITRATE IODINE-129 AND URANIUM 200-ZP-1 OPERABLE UNIT HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This literature review presents treatment options for nitrate, iodine-129, and uranium, which are present in groundwater at the 200-ZP-I Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) within the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The objective of this review is to determine available methods to treat or sequester these contaminants in place (i.e., in situ) or to pump-and-treat the groundwater aboveground (i.e., ex situ). This review has been conducted with emphasis on commercially available or field-tested technologies, but theoretical studies have, in some cases, been considered when no published field data exist. The initial scope of this literature review included only nitrate and iodine-I 29, but it was later expanded to include uranium. The focus of the literature review was weighted toward researching methods for treatment of nitrate and iodine-129 over uranium because of the relatively greater impact of those compounds identified at the 200-ZP-I OU.

BYRNES ME

2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

258

The Self-Ignition Temperatures of Bitumen Mixtures Containing Transition Metal Nitrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information is provided on the self-ignition temperature (SIT) of blown bitumen asphalt mixed with sodium nitrate and some chemicals that are added in the bituminization process to adjust pH and to immobilize the radioactive isotopes of Cs, Sr, and I. In each ignition temperature test, the prepared bitumen sample was heated at a constant rate of temperature increase, and the ignition point was measured. Among the tested chemicals added to the bitumen, Ni(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} shows a relatively large SIT decrease, and furthermore, the mixture of Ni(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} and AgNO{sub 3} has been shown to greatly lower the SIT of blown bitumen. It is suggested that, in general, segregation of these nitrates should be avoided in bituminization, and care should be taken in handling Ag in a Purex reprocessing plant from the viewpoint of waste treatment. Furthermore, the oxidation effects of Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} were tested by measuring torque of the bitumen sample. It was confirmed that the addition of Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} to bitumen rapidly oxidizes the bitumen and increases the viscosity of the bitumen mixture.

Okada, Ken; Nomura, Masao; Fujii, Yasuhiko [Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan)

2000-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

259

The effect of sources of nitrogen on nitrate formation and nitrogen uptake by cotton plants growing on Miller clay loam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that the temperature may affect the occurrence of nitrites. Same cultures incubated. at 24oC contained. much ni+rites snd little nitrates, while portions of the same cultures incubated at 3$oC contained nitrates but no nitrites. Cultures from sub-soil are more... criticism during the elaboration of the present work. Appreciation is extended. to Dx. H. E. Hampton, Chaixman of' the Hecognition is due tc Dx. V. M. Artecona and Nr. A. P. Cobra for committee, and. to Dr. A. G. Caldwell for help snd encouragement...

Marcos, Zilmar Ziller

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

The influence of dose-rest cycles on the nitrate concentration of deep percolate below septic fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in private water sup- plies in Morgan County, Missouri. J. Milk and Food Technology, 30: 224-225. 23. King, L. D. and H. D. Morris. 1972. Land disposal of liquid sewage sludge; the effect on soil nitrate. J. Environmental Quality, 1: 442-446. 34 24... septic- tank technology. J. Environmental Health, 3, 30: 250-262. 37 APPENDIX 0 ~O O I- CL IJ, I U O O O 20 16 12 8 4 20 I FEB. DOSE IO 20 ' 30 MAR. ~ OXYGEN NITRATE RESI 10 20 30 IO 20 30 10 20 APR . MAY JUNE DATE -120 100...

Allison, John Bryan

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Scandium nitrate-nitric acid-water-tributyl phosphate system. II. Interaction of Sc(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{center_dot}3TBP with nitric acid in organic solvent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scandium nitrate solvates Sc(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{center_dot}qTBP (TBP is tributyl phosphate, q = 3.15, 2.57, and 1.58) were synthesized, and their IR spectra were measured. Model solutions of Sc(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{center_dot}3TBP in CCl{sub 4} containing nitric acid with Sc:HNO{sub 3} molar ratios 1:1 to 1:3 and 1:7 were prepared, and their IR spectra were also measured. The spectra indicate formation of complexes with formula Sc(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{center_dot}mHNO{sub 3}{center_dot}3TBP (m = 1-7) through H-bonding of medium strength. In complexes with m = 1-2, nitric acid molecules are presumably bonded to oxygen atoms of nitrate groups coordinated to scandium. The R{sub O{hor_ellipsis}O} distance in these complexes was estimated for the H-bond as 2.68 {angstrom}.

Nikitina, G.P.; Papkov, K.B.; Listopadov, A.A. [Khlopin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Fissile solution measurement apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for determining the content of a fissile material within a solution by detecting delayed fission neutrons emitted by the fissile material after it is temporarily irradiated by a neutron source. The apparatus comprises a container holding the solution and having a portion defining a neutron source cavity centrally disposed within the container. The neutron source cavity temporarily receives the neutron source. The container has portions defining a plurality of neutron detector ports that form an annular pattern and surround the neutron source cavity. A plurality of neutron detectors count delayed fission neutrons emitted by the fissile material. Each neutron detector is located in a separate one of the neutron detector ports.

Crane, T.W.; Collinsworth, P.R.

1984-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

263

Excited States and Luminescent Properties of UO2F2 and Its Solvated Complexes in Aqueous Solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electronic absorption and emission spectra of free UO2F2 and its water solvated complexes below 32,000 cm?1 are investigated at the levels of ab initio CASPT2 and CCSD(T) with inclusion of scalar relativistic and spin-orbit coupling effects. The influence of the water coordination on the electronic spectra of UO2F2 is explored by investigating the excited states of solvated complexes (H2O)nUO2F2 (n = 1?3). In these uranyl-complexes, water coordination is found to have appreciable influence on the 3? (? = 1g) character of the luminescent state and on the electronic spectral shape. The simulated luminescence spectral curves based on the calculated spectral parameters of (H2O)nUO2F2 from CCSD(T) approach agree well with experimental spectra in aqueous solution at both near liquid helium temperature and room temperature. The possible luminescence spectra of free UO2F2 in gas phase are predicted based on CASPT2 and CCSD(T) results, respectively, by considering three symmetric vibration modes. The effect of competition between spin-orbital coupling and ligand field repulsion on the luminescent state properties is discussed.

Su, Jing; Wang, Zheming; Pan, Duoqiang; Li, Jun

2014-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

264

Offshore Renewable Energy Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

power ­ to meet its target of achieving 15% of energy consumption from renewable sources by 2020. CefasOffshore Renewable Energy Solutions #12;Cefas: meeting complex requirements The Centre and maximise resource input on field and lab-based studies ­ saving you time and money.Recognised expertise

265

A measurement of the effective delayed neutron fraction of the Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company Slab Tank Assembly using Rossi-[alpha] techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effective delayed neutron fraction of a solution reactor fueled with highly enriched uranyl nitrate was measured using two Rossi-[alpha] techniques: the slope method and the Nelson number method. The average value of the effective delayed neutron fraction was measured to be 0.0147 [plus minus] 13%, which is significantly higher than the calculated value of 0.009. The discrepancy between the measured and the calculated value is not understood at this time, but it is suspected that the majority of the bias is associated with the measurement of the intrinsic neutron source strength.

Spriggs, G.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Validation of the Monte Carlo criticality program KENO IV and the Hansen-Roach sixteen-energy-group-cross sections for high-assay uranium systems. [KENO IV criticality code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Validation of the Monte Carlo criticality code, KENO IV, and the Hansen-Roach sixteen-energy-group cross sections was accomplished by calculating the effective neutron multiplication constant, k/sub eff/, of 29 experimentally critical assemblies which had uranium enrichments of 92.6% or higher in the uranium-235 isotope. The experiments were chosen so that a large variety of geometries and of neutron energy spectra were covered. Problems, calculating the k/sub eff/ of systems with high-uranium-concentration uranyl nitrate solution that were minimally reflected or unreflected, resulted in the separate examination of five cases.

Handley, G. R.; Masters, L. C.; Stachowiak, R. V.

1981-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

267

Draft Genome Sequence for Microbacterium laevaniformans Strain OR221, a Bacterium Tolerant to Metals, Nitrate, and Low pH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbacterium laevaniformans strain OR221 was isolated from subsurface sediments obtained from the Field Research Center (FRC) in Oak Ridge, TN. It was characterized as a bacterium tolerant to heavy metals such as uranium, nickel, cobalt, cadmium, as well as nitrate and low pH. We present its draft genome sequence.

Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Panikov, Nikolai [ORNL; Ariyawansa, Thilini [Northeastern University; Klingeman, Dawn Marie [ORNL; Johnson, Courtney M [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Utturkar, Sagar M [ORNL; Epstein, Slava [Northeastern University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

DISTINCT PATTERNS OF NITRATE REDUCTASE ACTIVITY IN BROWN ALGAE: LIGHT AND AMMONIUM SENSITIVITY IN LAMINARIA DIGITATA IS ABSENT IN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DISTINCT PATTERNS OF NITRATE REDUCTASE ACTIVITY IN BROWN ALGAE: LIGHT AND AMMONIUM SENSITIVITY and lowest in summer. This is the first report of NR activity in any alga that is not strongly regulated the regulation of NR by light that has been observed in other algae and higher plants. Key index words: ammonium

Berges, John A.

269

THE SENSITIVITY OF CARBON STEELS' SUSCEPTIBILITY TO LOCALIZED CORROSION TO THE PH OF NITRATE BASED NUCLEAR WASTES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford tank reservation contains approximately 50 million gallons of liquid legacy radioactive waste from cold war weapons production, which is stored in 177 underground storage tanks. The tanks will be in use until waste processing operations are completed. The wastes tend to be high pH (over 10) and nitrate based. Under these alkaline conditions carbon steels tend to be passive and undergo relatively slow uniform corrosion. However, the presence of nitrate and other aggressive species, can lead to pitting and stress corrosion cracking. This work is a continuation of previous work that investigated the propensity of steels to suffer pitting and stress corrosion cracking in various waste simulants. The focus of this work is an investigation of the sensitivity of the steels' pitting and stress corrosion cracking susceptibility tosimulant pH. Previous work demonstrated that wastes that are high in aggressive nitrate and low in inhibitory nitrite are susceptible to localized corrosion. However, the previous work involved wastes with pH 12 or higher. The current work involves wastes with lower pH of 10 or 11. It is expected that at these lower pHs that a higher nitrite-to-nitrate ratio will be necessary to ensure tank integrity. This experimental work involved both electrochemical testing, and slow strain rate testing at either the free corrosion potential or under anodic polarization. The results of the current work will be discussed, and compared to work previously presented.

BOOMER KD

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

270

Enhanced anaerobic biodegradation of BTEX-ethanol mixtures in aquifer columns amended with sulfate, chelated ferric iron or nitrate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enhanced anaerobic biodegradation of BTEX-ethanol mixtures in aquifer columns amended with sulfate-mail: alvarez@rice.edu) Key words: anaerobic biostimulation, bioremediation, BTEX, ethanol, natural attenuation­Fe(III) or nitrate to enhance the biodegradation of BTEX and ethanol mixtures. The rapid biodegradation of ethanol

Alvarez, Pedro J.

271

Steady state protein levels in Geobacter metallireducens grown with Iron (III) citrate or nitrate as terminal electron acceptor.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geobacter species predominate in aquatic sediments and submerged soils where organic carbon sources are oxidized with the reduction of Fe(III). The natural occurrence of Geobacter in some waste sites suggests this microorganism could be useful for bioremediation if growth and metabolic activity can be regulated. 2-DE was used to monitor the steady state protein levels of Geobacter metallireducens grown with either Fe(III) citrate or nitrate to elucidate metabolic differences in response to different terminal electron acceptors present in natural environments populated by Geobacter. Forty-six protein spots varied significantly in abundance (p<0.05) between the two growth conditions; proteins were identified by tryptic peptide mass and peptide sequence determined by MS/MS. Enzymes involved in pyruvate metabolism and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle were more abundant in cells grown with Fe(III) citrate, while proteins associated with nitrate metabolism and sensing cellular redox status along with several proteins of unknown function were more abundant in cells grown with nitrate. These results indicate a higher level of flux through the TCA cycle in the presence of Fe(III) compared to nitrate. The oxidative stress response observed in previous studies of Geobacter sulfurreducens grown with Fe(III) citrate was not seen in G. metallireducens.

Ahrendt, A. J.; Tollaksen, S. L.; Lindberg, C.; Zhu, W.; Yates, J. R., III; Nevin, K. P.; Lovley, D.; Giometti, C. S.; Biosciences Division; The Scripps Research Inst.; Univ. of Massachusetts

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration Better Buildings Residential Program Solution...

273

Reoxidation of Bioreduced Uranium under Reducing Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concentrations and formation of very stable uranyl carbonatecomplexes in sediments and groundwaters with neutral to alkaline pH, where uranyl carbonates are most stable(IV). Dissolved oxygen, nitrate, and deni- trification products have been shown to oxidize U(IV) (10- 12

Hazen, Terry

274

Sexual reproduction in Populus II. Information molecules of the pollen grain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). They were stained with uranyl acetate/lead citrate (Reynolds, 1963), and observed at 80 kV with the Hitachi. Grids were then stained (uranyl acetate/lead citrate; Reynolds, 1963) and observed by TEM. Biochemical-gel, according to Laemmli's procedure (Laemmli, 1970). After running, proteins were stained with silver nitrate

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

275

Evaluation of the Magnesium Hydroxide Treatment Process for Stabilizing PFP Plutonium/Nitric Acid Solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes an evaluation of the magnesium hydroxide [Mg(OH)2] process to be used at the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) for stabilizing plutonium/nitric acid solutions to meet the goal of stabilizing the plutonium in an oxide form suitable for storage under DOE-STD-3013-99. During the treatment process, nitric acid solutions bearing plutonium nitrate are neutralized with Mg(OH)2 in an air sparge reactor. The resulting slurry, containing plutonium hydroxide, is filtered and calcined. The process evaluation included a literature review and extensive laboratory- and bench-scale testing. The testing was conducted using cerium as a surrogate for plutonium to identify and quantify the effects of key processing variables on processing time (primarily neutralization and filtration time) and calcined product properties.

Gerber, Mark A.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Baker, Aaron B.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

2000-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

276

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid molecules interacting Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the TBP and Water on the Complexation of Uranyl Nitrate and the Dissolution of Nitric Acid into Supercritical CO2. A Theoretical Study Summary: molecules are involved in...

277

Contribution ltude de la nphrotoxicit de sels duranium dans les tubules rnaux proximaux humains et murins : apport de la spectroscopie RMN du 13C.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Au cours de ce travail, nous avons recherch leffet du nitrate et de lactate duranyle sur des tubules proximaux isols de reins de souris et (more)

Renault, Sophie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

E-Print Network 3.0 - attached chinese hamster Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

uranium; V79, Chinese hamster lung cells; DU-UO2NO3 depleted uranium... - tial for DU as uranyl nitrate to induce mutations and cell trans- formation in Chinese hamster lung... in...

279

TO  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Chemical 42-17, Grade A. It is not presently known whether the code number refers to the uranyl nitrate which was originally ordered or tc the UO3 which was actually reoeived....

280

La vitesse de rarfaction n'est donc pas, et on devait s'y attendre a priori, comparable celle que ralise la pompe mcanique de  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'acide oxalique en pré- sence de nitrate d'uranyle. Contrairement à la théorie de Bodens- (1) J. cle 5e série, t

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Bearwall Energy Efficient Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CATEE Conference November 20, 2014 ENERGY EFFICIENT SOLUTIONS ESL-KT-14-11-06 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Brief History of Bearwall Who We Are: ? Manuel Sovero ? Luis Osorio Energy Conservation... Experience: ESL-KT-14-11-06 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Energy Programs ESL-KT-14-11-06 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Bearwall Methodology Introduction...

Sovero,M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Cyanide Solution | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganization FY 2012 FYCustomer-Comments SignCyanide Solution

283

Review: Greenhouse Solutions with Sustainable Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solutions with Sustainable Energy By Mark DiesendorfSolutions with Sustainable Energy. Sydney, NSW: University

Hamilton-Smith, Elery

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Summary of Tests to Determine Effectiveness of Gelatin Strike on SS{ampersand}C Dissolver Solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solutions from the dissolution of sand, slag, and crucible (SS&C) material are sufficiently different from previous solutions processed via the F-Canyon Purex process that the effectiveness of individual process steps needed to be ascertained. In this study, the effectiveness of gelatin strike was tested under a variety of conditions. Specifically, several concentrations of silica, fluoride, nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), boric acid (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}), and aluminium nitrate nonahydrate (ANN) were studied. The disengagement times of surrogate and plant SS&C dissolver solutions from plant solvent also were measured. The results of the tests indicate that gelatin strike does not coagulate the silica at the low concentration of silica ({tilde 30} ppm) expected in the SS&C dissolver solutions because the silicon is complexed with fluoride ions (e.g., SiF{sub 6}{sup -2}). The silicon fluoride complex is expected to remain with the aqueous phase during solvent extraction. The disengagement times of the dissolver solutions from the plant solvent were not affected by the presence of low concentrations of silica and no third phase formation was observed in the disengagement phase with the low silica concentrations. Tests of surrogate SS&C dissolver solutions with higher concentration of silica (less than 150 ppm) did show that gelatin strike followed by centrifugation resulted in good phase disengagement of the surrogate SS{ampersand}C dissolver solution from the plant dissolver solution. At the higher silica concentrations, there is not sufficient fluoride to complex with the silica, and the silica must be entrained by the gelatin and removed from the dissolver solution prior to solvent extraction.

Murray, A.M. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Karraker, D.G.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Radioluminescence of curium(III) and the lanthanoids in aqueous solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements have been made on the radioluminescence produced in trivalent Cm, Tb, Eu, Dy, and Sm by the a radiation from curium-244 in aqueous solution. The emission range for the f-element ions is the same as that for the photoluminescence. The radioluminescence yields for 10/sup -2/ M solutions of Cm, Tb, Eu, Dy, and Sm nitrates in quanta per 100 eV of absorbed energy are (5.0 +/- 0.60) x 10/sup -4/, (3.75 +/- 0.76) x 10/sup -4/, (0.90 +/- 0.08) x 10/sup -4/, (0.030 +/- 0.013) x 10/sup -4/ (t = 25/sup 0/C). These figures can be compared with the photoluminescence quantum yields for the corresponding ions in aqueous solution. There is a clear-cut correlation for the two for the lanthanoids, whereas the radioluminescence from curium is much more intense than would be expected from the quantum yield in photoluminescence, because the excitation of Cm/sup 3 +/ is more effective than that of the Ln/sup 3 +/. The most likely reasons for certain discrepancies between the radioluminescence and photoluminescence yields are that radiolysis gives products that quench the excited states for the f elements and that the radioluminescence excitation efficiency is dependent on the electronic proportion of the ion in solution (i.e., on the atomic number of the element). The results agree with the hypothesis that radioluminescence is excited in these elements in solution directly.

Yusov, A.B.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Linking specific heterotrophic bacterial populations to bioreduction of uranium and nitrate using stable isotope probing in contaminated subsurface sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shifts in terminal electron-accepting processes during biostimulation of uranium-contaminated sediments were linked to the composition of stimulated microbial populations using DNA-based stable isotope probing. Nitrate reduction preceded U(VI) and Fe(III) reduction in [{sup 13}C]ethanol-amended microcosms. The predominant, active denitrifying microbial groups were identified as members of the Betaproteobacteria, whereas Actinobacteria dominated under metal-reducing conditions.

Akob, Denise M. [Florida State University; Kerkhof, Lee [Rutgers University; Kusel, Kirsten [Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Jena Germany; Watson, David B [ORNL; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Kostka, Joel [Florida State University

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Materials corrosion of high temperature alloys immersed in 600C binary nitrate salt.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thirteen high temperature alloys were immersion tested in a 60/40 binary nitrate salt. Samples were interval tested up to 3000 hours at 600%C2%B0C with air as the ullage gas. Chemical analysis of the molten salt indicated lower nitrite concentrations present in the salt, as predicted by the equilibrium equation. Corrosion rates were generally low for all alloys. Corrosion products were identified using x-ray diffraction and electron microprobe analysis. Fe-Cr based alloys tended to form mixtures of sodium and iron oxides, while Fe-Ni/Cr alloys had similar corrosion products plus oxides of nickel and chromium. Nickel based alloys primarily formed NiO, with chromium oxides near the oxide/base alloy interface. In625 exhibited similar corrosion performance in relation to previous tests, lending confidence in comparisons between past and present experiments. HA230 exhibited internal oxidation that consisted of a nickel/chromium oxide. Alloys with significant aluminum alloying tended to exhibit superior performance, due formation of a thin alumina layer. Soluble corrosion products of chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten were also formed and are thought to be a significant factor in alloy performance.

Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Gill, David Dennis; LaFord, Marianne Elizabeth

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Polyethylene encapsulatin of nitrate salt wastes: Waste form stability, process scale-up, and economics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A polyethylene encapsulation system for treatment of low-level radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes has been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Polyethylene has several advantages compared with conventional solidification/stabilization materials such as hydraulic cements. Waste can be encapsulated with greater efficiency and with better waste form performance than is possible with hydraulic cement. The properties of polyethylene relevant to its long-term durability in storage and disposal environments are reviewed. Response to specific potential failure mechanisms including biodegradation, radiation, chemical attack, flammability, environmental stress cracking, and photodegradation are examined. These data are supported by results from extensive waste form performance testing including compressive yield strength, water immersion, thermal cycling, leachability of radioactive and hazardous species, irradiation, biodegradation, and flammability. The bench-scale process has been successfully tested for application with a number of specific problem'' waste streams. Quality assurance and performance testing of the resulting waste form confirmed scale-up feasibility. Use of this system at Rocky Flats Plant can result in over 70% fewer drums processed and shipped for disposal, compared with optimal cement formulations. Based on the current Rocky Flats production of nitrate salt per year, polyethylene encapsulation can yield an estimated annual savings between $1.5 million and $2.7 million, compared with conventional hydraulic cement systems. 72 refs., 23 figs., 16 tabs.

Kalb, P.D.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Electronic Safeguards...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Solutions Electronic Safeguards Security System (E3S) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Electronic Safeguards Security System (E3S) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions...

290

NSTAR (Electric)- Business Solutions Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Business Solutions Program offers NSTAR's non-residential customers incentives for a variety of energy efficient retrofit and new construction projects. Prescriptive rebates are available for...

291

Is Nuclear Energy the Solution?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

009-0270-y Is Nuclear Energy the Solution? Milton H. Saier &in the last 50 years, nuclear energy subsidies have totaledadministration, the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP)

Saier, Milton H.; Trevors, Jack T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Enhanced safeguards via solution monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solution monitoring is defined as the essentially continuous monitoring of solution level, density, and temperature in all tanks in the process that contain, or could contain, safeguards-significant quantities of nuclear material. This report describes some of the enhancements that solution monitoring could make to international safeguards. The focus is on the quantifiable benefits of solution monitoring, but qualitatively, solution monitoring can be viewed as a form of surveillance. Quantitatively, solution monitoring can in some cases improve diversion detection probability. For example, the authors show that under certain assumptions, solution monitoring can be used to reduce the standard deviation of the annual material balance, {sigma}{sub MB}, from approximately 17 kg to approximately 4 kg. Such reduction in {sigma}{sub MB} will not always be possible, as they discuss. However, in all cases, solution monitoring would provide assurance that the measurement error models are adequate so that one has confidence in his estimate of {sigma}{sub MB}. Some of the results in this report were generated using data that were simulated with prototype solution monitoring software that they are developing. An accompanying document describes that software.

Burr, T.; Wangen, L.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

High conductivity electrolyte solutions and rechargeable cells incorporating such solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates generally to electrolyte solvents for use in liquid or rubbery polymer electrolyte solutions as are used, for example, in electrochemical devices. More specifically, this invention relates to sulfonyl/phospho-compound electrolyte solvents and sulfonyl/phospho-compound electrolyte solutions incorporating such solvents. 9 figs.

Angell, C.A.; Zhang, S.S.; Xu, K.

1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

294

Nonphosphate Degradation Products of Tributyl Phosphate and Their Reactivities in Purex Media Under Extreme Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chemical degradation of tributyl phosphate (TBP) in liquid systems, where TBP was in contact with aqueous solutions containing nitric acid and/or uranyl nitrate, was studied experimentally to clarify the mechanisms of the formation and successive reactions of nonphosphate products under atmospheric pressure. Butyl nitrate, propionic acid, acetic acid, butric acid, and butyl alcohol were formed as the nonphosphate butyl products derived from the butyl-groups of TBP in an open system. The total amount of these products almost equals the amount of the major intermediate phosphate products reduced, i.e., di- and monobutyl phosphates and phosphoric acid. Butyl alcohol was found to be the precursor of the other nonphosphate products.Even when the extremely degraded solvent was further contacted with 10 M nitric acid at 90 deg. C, no significant heat evolution was observed at atmospheric pressure. Only butyl alcohol changed into carboxylic acids by exothermic oxidative reactions.

Tashiro, Yoshikazu [Sumitomo Metal Mining Company, Ltd. (Japan); Kodama, Ryuji [Sumitomo Metal Mining Company, Ltd. (Japan); Sugai, Hiroshi [Sumitomo Metal Mining Company, Ltd. (Japan); Suzuki, Katsuhiko [Japan Nuclear Fuel, Ltd. (Japan); Matsuoka, Shingo [Japan Nuclear Fuel, Ltd. (Japan)

2000-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

295

Haze Formation and Behavior in Liquid-Liquid Extraction Processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aqueous haze formation and behavior was studied in the liquid-liquid system tri-n-butyl phosphate in odorless kerosene and 3M nitric acid with uranyl nitrate and cesium nitrate representing the major solute and an impurity, respectively. A pulsed column, mixer-settler and centrifugal contactor were chosen to investigate the effect of different turbulence characteristics on the manifestation of haze since these contactors exhibit distinct mixing phenomena. The dispersive processes of drop coalescence and breakage, and water precipitation in the organic phase were observed to lead to the formation of haze drops of {approx}1 um in diameter. The interaction between the haze and primary drops of the dispersion was critical to the separation efficiency of the liquid-liquid extraction equipment. Conditions of high power input and spatially homogeneous mixing enabled the haze drops to become rapidly assimilated within the dispersion to maximize the scrub performance and separation efficiency of the equipment.

Arm, Stuart T.; Jenkins, J. A.

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

296

Mineral Dissolution and Secondary Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford Tank Solutions Affecting Subsurface Porosity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highly alkaline nuclear waste solutions have been released from underground nuclear waste storage tanks and pipelines into the vadose zone at the U.S. Department of Energys Hanford Site in Washington, causing mineral dissolution and re-precipitation upon contact with subsurface sediments. High pH caustic NaNO3 solutions with and without dissolved Al were reacted with quartz sand through flow-through columns stepwise at 45, 51, and 89C to simulate possible reactions between leaked nuclear waste solution and primary subsurface mineral. Upon reaction, Si was released from the dissolution of quartz sand, and nitrate-cancrinite [Na8Si6Al6O24(NO3)2] precipitated on the quartz surface as a secondary mineral phase. Both steady-state dissolution and precipitation kinetics were quantified, and quartz dissolution apparent activation energy was determined. Mineral alteration through dissolution and precipitation processes results in pore volume and structure changes in the subsurface porous media. In this study, the column porosity increased up to 40.3% in the pure dissolution column when no dissolved Al was present in the leachate, whereas up to a 26.5% porosity decrease was found in columns where both dissolution and precipitation were observed because of the presence of Al in the input solution. The porosity change was also confirmed by calculation using the dissolution and precipitation rates and mineral volume changes.

Wang, Guohui; Um, Wooyong

2012-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

297

The solubilities of significant organic compounds in HLW tank supernate solutions -- FY 1995 progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the Hanford Site organic compounds were measured in tank supernate simulant solutions during FY 1995. This solubility information will be used to determine if these organic salts could exist in solid phases (saltcake or sludges) in the waste where they might react violently with the nitrate or nitrite salts present in the tanks. Solubilities of sodium glycolate, succinate, and caproate salts; iron and aluminum and butylphosphate salts; and aluminum oxalate were measured in simulated waste supernate solutions at 25 {degree}C, 30 {degree}C, 40 {degree}C, and 50 {degree}C. The organic compounds were selected because they are expected to exist in relatively high concentrations in the tanks. The solubilities of sodium glycolate, succinate, caproate, and butylphosphate in HLW tank supernate solutions were high over the temperature and sodium hydroxide concentration ranges expected in the tanks. High solubilities will prevent solid sodium salts of these organic acids from precipitating from tank supernate solutions. The total organic carbon concentrations (YOC) of actual tank supernates are generally much lower than the TOC ranges for simulated supernate solutions saturated (at the solubility limit) with the organic salts. This is so even if all the dissolved carbon in a given tank and supernate is due to only one of these eight soluble compounds (an unlikely situation). Metal ion complexes of and butylphosphate and oxalate in supernate solutions were not stable in the presence of the hydroxide concentrations expected in most tanks. Iron and aluminum dibutylphosphate compounds reacted with hydroxide to form soluble sodium dibutylphosphate and precipitated iron and aluminum hydroxides. Aluminum oxalate complexes were also not stable in the basic simulated supernate solutions. Solubilities of all the organic salts decrease with increasing sodium hydroxide concentration because of the common ion effect of Na+. Increasing temperatures raised the solubilities of the organic salts, especially the succinate and caproate salts.

Barney, G.S.

1996-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

298

Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Program Solution Center Demonstration Webinar Transcript Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration Webinar Transcript The Better Buildings Residential...

299

Conference Agenda: Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions 2012...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Conference Agenda: Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions 2012 Conference Agenda: Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions 2012 Presents conference agenda including a general...

300

Presentation: Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Presentation: Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Presentation: Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Presentation: Better Buildings Residential...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration Webinar Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration Webinar Demonstration webinar slides...

302

Toroidal solutions in Horava Gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recently a new four-dimensional non relativistic renormalizable theory of gravity was proposed by Horava. This gravity reduces to Einstein gravity at large distances. In this paper by using the new action for gravity we present different toroidal solutions to the equations of motion. Our solutions describe the near horizon geometry with slow rotating parameter.

Ahmad Ghodsi

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

303

FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING MINERALIZATION FOR HIGH ORGANIC AND NITRATE WASTE STREAMS FOR THE GLOBAL NUCLEAR ENERGY PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste streams that may be generated by the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) Advanced Energy Initiative may contain significant quantities of organics (0-53 wt%) and/or nitrates (0-56 wt%). Decomposition of high nitrate streams requires reducing conditions, e.g. organic additives such as sugar or coal, to reduce the NO{sub x} in the off-gas to N{sub 2} to meet the Clean Air Act (CAA) standards during processing. Thus, organics will be present during waste form stabilization regardless of which GNEP processes are chosen, e.g. organics in the feed or organics for nitrate destruction. High organic containing wastes cannot be stabilized with the existing HLW Best Developed Available Technology (BDAT) which is HLW vitrification (HLVIT) unless the organics are removed by preprocessing. Alternative waste stabilization processes such as Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) operate at moderate temperatures (650-750 C) compared to vitrification (1150-1300 C). FBSR converts organics to CAA compliant gases, creates no secondary liquid waste streams, and creates a stable mineral waste form that is as durable as glass. For application to the high Cs-137 and Sr-90 containing GNEP waste streams a single phase mineralized Cs-mica phase was made by co-reacting illite clay and GNEP simulated waste. The Cs-mica accommodates up to 30% wt% Cs{sub 2}O and all the GNEP waste species, Ba, Sr, Rb including the Cs-137 transmutation to Ba-137. For reference, the cesium mineral pollucite (CsAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}), currently being studied for GNEP applications, can only be fabricated at {ge} 1000 C. Pollucite mineralization creates secondary aqueous waste streams and NO{sub x}. Pollucite is not tolerant of high concentrations of Ba, Sr or Rb and forces the divalent species into different mineral host phases. The pollucite can accommodate up to 33% wt% Cs{sub 2}O.

Jantzen, C; Michael Williams, M

2008-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

304

Effect of calcium nitrate on the vapor-liquid equilibria of ethanol + water and 2-propanol + water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of calcium nitrate on the vapor-liquid equilibria of ethanol + water and 2-propanol + water was studied using a Swietoslawski ebulliometer. The measurements were performed for two constant salt molalities (1 and 2 mol[center dot]kg[sup [minus]1]) under isobaric conditions at 50.66 kPa. Strong salting-out of the alcohol was observed in all cases, leading to a complete elimination of the azeotropic point at relatively low salt concentrations. The results were correlated using an extension of the NRTL equation for mixed solvent electrolyte systems proposed by Mock, Evans, and Chen.

Polka, H.M.; Gmehling, J. (Univ. of Oldenburg (Germany). Chair of Industrial Chemistry)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Dietary nitrate increases arginine availability and protects mitochondrial complex I and energetics in the hypoxic rat heart  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, before thorough vortexing and centrifugation at 13,000 x g for 15 min. The aqueous and organic fractions were removed and aliquoted into separate 2 mL tubes and kept on ice. A further 600 L 2:1 methanol:chloroform was added to protein pellet... : ajm267@cam.ac.uk Keywords: Hypoxia; Mitochondria; Energy Metabolism Word count: 6589 (exc. references, figure legends, table) TOC category: Cardiovascular Ashmore et al: Dietary nitrate and the hypoxic heart 2 Key points summary...

Ashmore, Tom; Fernandez, Bernadette O.; Branco-Price, Cristina; West, James A.; Cowburn, Andrew S.; Heather, Lisa C.; Griffin, Julian L.; Johnson, Randall S.; Feelisch, Martin; Murray, Andrew J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Scandium nitrate-nitric acid-water-tributyl phosphate system. I. Scandium extraction isotherms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study has been made of scandium distribution between neat tributyl phosphate (TBP) and 0.2-1.2 M scandium solutions in 2.7-12.3 M nitric acid. Scandium extracts in equilibrium with 0.2-1 M Sc in 6-12 M HNO{sub 3} contain from 2 to 5 HNO{sub 3} molecules per scandium atom in extracted Sc complex.

Listopadov, A.A.; Nikitina, G.P.; Egorova, V.P. [Khlopin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)] [and others

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Is Nuclear Energy the Solution?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10.1007/s11270-009-0270-y Is Nuclear Energy the Solution?MHS) attended a lecture on Nuclear Responsibility on theof the Alliance for Nuclear Responsibility. The information

Saier, Milton H.; Trevors, Jack T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Negative Energy Solutions and Symmetries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We revisit the negative energy solutions of the Dirac equation, which become relevant at very high energies and study several symmetries which follow therefrom. The consequences are briefly examined.

Burra G. Sidharth

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Laboratory performance testing of an extruded bitumen containing a surrogate, sodium nitrate-based, low-level aqueous waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory results of a comprehensive, regulatory performance test program, utilizing an extruded bitumen and a surrogate, sodium nitrate-based waste, have been compiled at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Using a 53 millimeter, Werner and Pfleiderer extruder, operated by personnel of WasteChem Corporation of Paramus, New Jersey, laboratory-scale, molded samples of type three, air blown bitumen were prepared for laboratory performance testing. A surrogate, low-level, mixed liquid waste, formulated to represent an actual on-site waste at ORNL, containing about 30 wt % sodium nitrate, in addition to eight heavy metals, cold cesium and strontium was utilized. Samples tested contained three levels of waste loading: that is, forty, fifty and sixty wt % salt. Performance test results include the ninety day ANS 16.1 leach test, with leach indices reported for all cations and anions, in addition to the EP Toxicity test, at all levels of waste loading. Additionally, test results presented also include the unconfined compressive strength and surface morphology utilizing scanning electron microscopy. Data presented include correlations between waste form loading and test results, in addition to their relationship to regulatory performance requirements.

Mattus, A.J.; Kaczmarsky, M.M.

1986-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

SciTech Connect: A Solution for Solution-Produced [beta]-FeSe...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

A Solution for Solution-Produced beta-FeSe: Elucidating and Overcoming Factors that Prevent Superconductivity Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A Solution for...

311

MOLECULAR APPROACHES FOR IN SITU IDENTIFCIATION OF NITRATE UTILIZATION BY MARINE BACTERIA AND PHYTOPLANKTON  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traditionally, the importance of inorganic nitrogen (N) for the nutrition and growth of marine phytoplankton has been recognized, while inorganic N utilization by bacteria has received less attention. Likewise, organic N has been thought to be important for heterotrophic organisms but not for phytoplankton. However, accumulating evidence suggests that bacteria compete with phytoplankton for nitrate (NO3-) and other N species. The consequences of this competition may have a profound effect on the flux of N, and therefore carbon (C), in ocean margins. Because it has been difficult to differentiate between N uptake by heterotrophic bacterioplankton versus autotrophic phytoplankton, the processes that control N utilization, and the consequences of these competitive interactions, have traditionally been difficult to study. Significant bacterial utilization of DIN may have a profound effect on the flux of N and C in the water column because sinks for dissolved N that do not incorporate inorganic C represent mechanisms that reduce the atmospheric CO2 drawdown via the ?biological pump? and limit the flux of POC from the euphotic zone. This project was active over the period of 1998-2007 with support from the DOE Biotechnology Investigations ? Ocean Margins Program (BI-OMP). Over this period we developed a tool kit of molecular methods (PCR, RT-PCR, Q-PCR, QRT-PCR, and TRFLP) and combined isotope mass spectrometry and flow-cytometric approaches that allow selective isolation, characterization, and study of the diversity and genetic expression (mRNA) of the structural gene responsible for the assimilation of NO3- by heterotrophic bacteria (nasA). As a result of these studies we discovered that bacteria capable of assimilating NO3- are ubiquitous in marine waters, that the nasA gene is expressed in these environments, that heterotrophic bacteria can account for a significant fraction of total DIN uptake in different ocean margin systems, that the expression of nasA is differentially regulated in genetically distinct NO3- assimilating bacteria, and that the best predictors of nasA gene expression are either NO3- concentration or NO3- uptake rates. These studies provide convincing evidence of the importance of bacterial utilization of NO3-, insight into controlling processes, and provide a rich dataset that are being used to develop linked C and N modeling components necessary to evaluate the significance of bacterial DIN utilization to global C cycling. Furthermore, as a result of BI-OMP funding we made exciting strides towards institutionalizing a research and education based collaboration between the Skidaway Institute of Oceanography (SkIO) and Savannah State University (SSU), an historically black university within the University System of Georgia with undergraduate and now graduate programs in marine science. The BI-OMP program, in addition to supporting undergraduate (24) graduate (10) and postdoctoral (2) students, contributed to the development of a new graduate program in Marine Sciences at SSU that remains an important legacy of this project. The long-term goals of these collaborations are to increase the capacity for marine biotechnology research and to increase representation of minorities in marine, environmental and biotechnological sciences.

Frischer, Marc E. [Skidaway Institute of Oceanography; Verity, Peter G.; Gilligan, Mathew R.; Bronk, Deborah A.; Zehr, Jonathan P.; Booth, Melissa G.

2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

312

Process for the extraction of technetium from uranium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A spent fuel reprocessing method contacts an aqueous solution containing Technetium(V) and uranyl with an acidic solution comprising hydroxylamine hydrochloride or acetohydroxamic acid to reduce Tc(V) to Tc(II, and then extracts the uranyl with an organic phase, leaving technetium(II) in aqueous solution.

Gong, Cynthia-May S. (San Mateo, CA); Poineau, Frederic (Las Vegas, NV); Czerwinski, Kenneth R. (Las Vegas, NV)

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

313

Project Management Plan Solution Stabilization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan presents the overall objectives, description, justification and planning for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Solutions Stabilization subproject. The intent of this plan is to describe how this project will be managed and integrated with other facility stabilization and deactivation activities. This plan supplements the overall integrated plan presented in the Integrated Project Management Plan (IPMP) for the Plutonium Finishing Plant Stabilization and Deactivation Project, HNF-3617. This project plan is the top-level definitive project management document for the PFP Solution Stabilization subproject. It specifies the technical, schedule, requirements and the cost baselines to manage the execution of the Solution Stabilization subproject. Any deviations to the document must be authorized through the appropriate change control process.

SATO, P.K.

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

314

Interested Parties - Energy Solutions | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- Energy Solutions EnergySolutions.pdf More Documents & Publications Interested Parties - NRG Energy Interested Parties - Myriant Interested Parties - 1603 Program Discussion...

315

Funding Opportunity Webinar - Advancing Solutions To Improve...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Funding Opportunity Webinar - Advancing Solutions To Improve the Energy Efficiency of US Commercial Buildings Funding Opportunity Webinar - Advancing Solutions To Improve the...

316

ITP Aluminum: Aluminum Industry Vision: Sustainable Solutions...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Aluminum Industry Vision: Sustainable Solutions for a Dynamic World ITP Aluminum: Aluminum Industry Vision: Sustainable Solutions for a Dynamic World alumvision.pdf More Documents...

317

Webinar Presentation: Energy Storage Solutions for Microgrids...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Presentation: Energy Storage Solutions for Microgrids (November 2012) Webinar Presentation: Energy Storage Solutions for Microgrids (November 2012) On November 7, 2012, Clean...

318

Blueprint for Sustainability - Sustainable Solutions for Every...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Blueprint for Sustainability - Sustainable Solutions for Every Consumer Blueprint for Sustainability - Sustainable Solutions for Every Consumer Highlights of Ford's near, mid, and...

319

APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, Nov. 2005, p. 74537460 Vol. 71, No. 11 0099-2240/05/$08.00 0 doi:10.1128/AEM.71.11.74537460.2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with nitrate and incubated with no electron acceptor, was used for the two time points considered and for both- ganese(IV), nitrate, nitrite, thiosulfate, sulfite, trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), dimethyl sulfoxide and soluble hexavalent uranyl (UO2 2 ) and chro- mate (CrO4 2 ) to less soluble and less toxic forms [U

Tebo, Brad

320

Permeability of ovarian follicle ; corona cell-oocyte relationship in mammals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and lanthanum nitrate were penetrated freely by the tracers through the granulosa cells and the cumulus oophorus. Follicles were also fixed in toto with the addition of lanthanum nitrate (Revel and Karnovsky, 1967 methods for electron microscopy. In somes case the tissues were placed into a 2 p. 100 uranyl acetate

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Gravitational duality and rotating solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study how gravitational duality acts on rotating solutions, using the Kerr-NUT black hole as an example. After properly reconsidering how to take into account both electric (i.e. masslike) and magnetic (i.e. NUT-like) sources in the equations of general relativity, we propose a set of definitions for the dual Lorentz charges. We then show that the Kerr-NUT solution has nontrivial such charges. Further, we clarify in which respect Kerr's source can be seen as a mass M with a dipole of NUT charges.

Argurio, Riccardo; Dehouck, Francois [Physique Theorique et Mathematique and International Solvay Institutes, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, C.P. 231, 1050 Bruxelles (Belgium)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

322

Watershed scale fungal community characterization along a pH gradient in a subsurface environment co-contaminated with uranium and nitrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to characterize fungal communities in a subsurface environment co-contaminated with uranium and nitrate at the watershed scale, and to determine the potential contribution of fungi to contaminant transformation (nitrate attenuation). The abundance, distribution and diversity of fungi in subsurface groundwater samples were determined using quantitative and semi-quantitative molecular techniques, including quantitative PCR of eukaryotic SSU rRNA genes and pyrosequencing of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. Potential bacterial and fungal denitrification was assessed in sediment-groundwater slurries amended with antimicrobial compounds and in fungal pure cultures isolated from subsurface. Our results demonstrate that subsurface fungal communities are dominated by members of the phylum Ascomycota, and a pronounced shift in fungal community composition occurs across the groundwater pH gradient at the field site, with lower diversity observed under acidic (pH < 4.5) conditions. Fungal isolates recovered from subsurface sediments were shown to reduce nitrate to nitrous oxide, including cultures of the genus Coniochaeta that were detected in abundance in pyrosequence libraries of site groundwater samples. Denitrifying fungal isolates recovered from the site were classified, and found to be distributed broadly within the phylum Ascomycota, and within a single genus within the Basidiomycota. Potential denitrification rate assays with sediment-groundwater slurries showed the potential for subsurface fungi to reduce nitrate to nitrous oxide under in situ acidic pH conditions.

Jasrotia, Puja [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Green, Stefan [University of Illinois, Chicago] [University of Illinois, Chicago; Canion, Andy [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Overholt, Will [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Prakash, Om [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Wafula, Dennis [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta] [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta; Hubbard, Daniela [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Watson, David B [ORNL] [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL] [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL] [ORNL; Kostka, [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta] [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feb 16, 2012 ... Calculate the accumulated value of this annuity at the end of 5 years .... The Net Present Value of this project at 10% interest is 280,026.06 .

324

Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10000= yields 2133.18 (Using BA 35 Solar keystrokes are AC/ON (to clear registers) ... In this question, first layer gives a value of 1/i (=PV of level perpetuity of 1...

CJordan

2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

325

Ozone decomposition in water solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Hewes, III; B. S. , Texas ASH University Directed by Dr. R. R. Davison The rate of the decomposition of ozone in water solutions at various pH's and temperatures were ob- tained by an iodometrical method. The orders of the reactions and the reaction...

Hewes, Cecil Grayson

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Kampung Capacity Local Solutions for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kampung Capacity Local Solutions for Sustainable Rural Energy in the Baram River Basin, Sarawak with a large-scale hydropower plan for the river basin. Keywords: South East Asia, Malaysia, Rural Energy In this study we explore the potential for rural renewable energy supply through a focus on villages

Kammen, Daniel M.

327

Energy solutions?Director Eric Isaacs  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Argonne's Director Eric Isaacs talks about the laboratory's efforts for creating new, clean energy solutions.

Eric ISaacs

2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

328

Energy solutionsDirector Eric Isaacs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne's Director Eric Isaacs talks about the laboratory's efforts for creating new, clean energy solutions.

Eric ISaacs

2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

329

Microcalorimetric measurement of reaction enthalpies in solutions of uranium and neptunium compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The formation of complexes of uranyl and neptunyl(VI) ions with carbonate and hydrogen carbonate has been studied by titration microcalorimetry. The measurements were carried out with a computer-controlled microcalorimeter which is described in detail. Sample volumes are typically in the range of 1.5 to 2.5 ccm, containing about 0.05 millimole of the ionic species to be studied. The small volume renders the calorimeter useful for the measurement of uncommon and strongly radioactive substances. Enthalpies of reaction were obtained for the formation of the dicarbonato and the tricarbonato uranyl ions in a sulfate medium of ionic strength 1.6. The enthalpies are ..delta..H/sub 2/ = -39.6 +- 1 kJ/mol and -57.5 +- 1.5 kJ/mol, respectively. The titration data for the neptunyl(VI) - carbonate system yield a value of -50 +- 2 kJ/mol for the tricarbonato-neptunyl ion when interpreted in analogy to the uranyl system.

Schreiner, F.; Friedman, A.M.; Richards, R.R.; Sullivan, J.C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Fissile solution dynamics: Student research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are two research projects in criticality safety at the University of Arizona: one in dynamic simulation of hypothetical criticality accidents in fissile solutions, and one in criticality benchmarks using transport theory. We have used the data from nuclear excursions in KEWB, CRAC, and SILENE to help in building models for solution excursions. An equation of state for liquids containing gas bubbles has been developed and coupled to point-reactor dynamics in an attempt to predict fission rate, yield, pressure, and kinetic energy. It appears that radiolytic gas is unimportant until after the first peak, but that it does strongly affect the shape of the subsequent power decrease and also the dynamic pressure.

Hetrick, D.L.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Electrochromic Salts, Solutions, and Devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Electrochromic salts. Electrochromic salts of dicationic viologens such as methyl viologen and benzyl viologen associated with anions selected from bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide, and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide are produced by metathesis with the corresponding viologen dihalide. They are highly soluble in molten quarternary ammonium salts and together with a suitable reductant provide electrolyte solutions that are used in electrochromic windows.

Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); McClesky, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

332

Electrochromic Salts, Solutions, and Devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Electrochromic salts. Electrochromic salts of dicationic viologens such as methyl viologen and benzyl viologen associated with anions selected from bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide, and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide are produced by metathesis with the corresponding viologen dihalide. They are highly soluble in molten quarternary ammonium salts and together with a suitable reductant provide electrolyte solutions that are used in electrochromic windows.

Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); McClesky, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

333

Electrochromic salts, solutions, and devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Electrochromic salts. Electrochromic salts of dicationic viologens such as methyl viologen and benzyl viologen associated with anions selected from bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide, and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide are produced by metathesis with the corresponding viologen dihalide. They are highly soluble in molten quarternary ammonium salts and together with a suitable reductant provide electrolyte solutions that are used in electrochromic windows.

Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); McClesky,7,064,212 T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

334

Clean Energy Solutions Center (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Clean Energy Ministerial launched the Clean Energy Solutions Center in April, 2011 for major economy countries, led by Australia and U.S. with other CEM partners. Partnership with UN-Energy is extending scope to support all developing countries: 1. Enhance resources on policies relating to energy access, small to medium enterprises (SMEs), and financing programs; 2. Offer expert policy assistance to all countries; 3. Expand peer to peer learning, training, and deployment and policy data for developing countries.

Reategui, S.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Solvent extraction of heptavalent technetium and rhenium by tributyl phosphate. Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program and Basic Energy Sciences Programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The literature pertaining to the solvent extraction of heptavalent technetium and rhenium from aqueous solution by tributyl phosphate (TBP) has been compiled, critically evaluated, and supplemented with new data in some areas. The effects of adding mineral acids, alkali metal nitrates, alkali metal chlorides, uranyl nitrate, thorium nitrate, and plutonium(IV) nitrate to these systems were also examined. Discussions of the possible nature of the organic-phase complexes are presented, along with values of ..delta..G, ..delta..H, ..delta..S, and the equilibrium constant for the extraction reaction in several systems. Mathematical models correlating the distribution behavior over a wide range of conditions were also developed. Equations are given for calculating the distribution coefficients for the extraction of Re(VII) or Tc(VII) from 0.2 to 4 M HCl by 0.339 to 2.90 M TBP at 298 to 333/sup 0/K. Equations are given for calculating the distribution coefficients under the same conditions, but with HNO/sub 3/ (instead of HCl) present in the aqueous phase. 28 references, 27 figures, 3 tables.

Pruett, D.J.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

HYDROGEN PRODUCTION BY THE CYANOBACTERIUM PLECTONEMA BORYANUM: EFFECTS OF INITIAL NITRATE CONCENTRATION, LIGHT INTENSITY, AND INHIBITION OF PHOTOSYSTEM II BY DCMU  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The alarming rate at which atmospheric carbon dioxide levels are increasing due to the burning of fossil fuels will have incalculable consequences if disregarded. Fuel cells, a source of energy that does not add to carbon dioxide emissions, have become an important topic of study. Although signifi cant advances have been made related to fuel cells, the problem of cheap and renewable hydrogen production still remains. The cyanobacterium Plectonema boryanum has demonstrated potential as a resolution to this problem by producing hydrogen under nitrogen defi cient growing conditions. Plectonema boryanum cultures were tested in a series of experiments to determine the effects of light intensity, initial nitrate concentration, and photosystem II inhibitor DCMU (3-(3,4- dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea) upon hydrogen production. Cultures were grown in sterile Chu. No. 10 medium within photobioreactors constantly illuminated by halogen lights. Because the enzyme responsible for hydrogen production is sensitive to oxygen, the medium was continuously sparged with argon/CO2 (99.7%/0.3% vol/vol) by gas dispersion tubes immersed in the culture. Hydrogen production was monitored by using a gas chromatograph equipped with a thermal conductivity detector. In the initial experiment, the effects of initial nitrate concentration were tested and results revealed cumulative hydrogen production was maximum at an initial nitrate concentration of 1 mM. A second experiment was then conducted at an initial nitrate concentration of 1 mM to determine the effects of light intensity at 50, 100, and 200 ?mole m-2 s-1. Cumulative hydrogen production increased with increasing light intensity. A fi nal experiment, conducted at an initial nitrate concentration of 2 mM, tested the effects of high light intensity at 200 and 400 ?mole m-2 s-1. Excessive light at 400 ?mole m-2 s-1 decreased cumulative hydrogen production. Based upon all experiments, cumulative hydrogen production rates were optimal at an initial nitrate concentration of 1 mM and a light intensity of 100 ?mole m-2 s-1. DCMU was shown in all experiments to severely decrease hydrogen production as time progressed. With the information acquired so far, future experiments with reducing substances could determine maximum rates of hydrogen production. If maximum hydrogen production rates proved to be large enough, Plectonema boryanum could be grown on an industrial scale to provide hydrogen gas as a renewable fuel.

Carter, B.; Huesemann, M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Commercial Lighting Solutions Webtool Peer Review Report, Office Solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Commercial Lighting Solutions (CLS) project directly supports the U.S. Department of Energys Commercial Building Energy Alliance efforts to design high performance buildings. CLS creates energy efficient best practice lighting designs for widespread use, and they are made available to users via an interactive webtool that both educates and guides the end user through the application of the Lighting Solutions. This report summarizes the peer review of the CLS webtool for offices. The methodology for the peer review process included data collection (stakeholder input), analysis of the comments, and organization of the input into categories for prioritization of the comments against a set of criteria. Based on this process, recommendations were developed for the release of version 2.0 of the webtool at the Lightfair conference in Las Vegas in May 2010. The report provides a list of the top ten most significant and relevant improvements that will be made within the webtool for version 2.0 as well as appendices containing the comments and short-term priorities in additional detail. Peer review comments that are considered high priority by the reviewers and the CLS team but cannot be completed for Version 2.0 are listed as long-term recommendations.

Beeson, Tracy A.; Jones, Carol C.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training & Technology Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training & Technology Solutions 718-997-4875 ~ training@qc.cuny.edu ~ I-Bldg 214 Advisor Center Navigation: Login #12;Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training

Johnson Jr.,, Ray

339

Equilibria in aqueous iodine solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the determination of pH and. 1odide concentration. This instrument, reads pH to 0. 001 pH units and millivolts to F 1 mv. An Orion Specific Ion Electrode, Iodide Model 94-53, was used in the iodide determination. A Corning Triple Purpose pH glass elect- rode... with such electrodes fully confirms this statement. The optimum concentration of Solution I was found to be between 5 x 10 and 10 H iodide. Error in ZIIF Although short-term reproducibility to within 0. 001 26 pH unit can in principle be achieved. with the glass...

Burger, Joanne Denise

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Singlet exciton fission in solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physics 135, 214508 (2011). 25. Sheraw, C. D., Jackson, T. N., Eaton, D. L. & Anthony, J. E. Functionalized Pentacene Active Layer Organic Thin-Film Transistors. Advanced Materials 15, 20092011 (2003). 26. Giri, G. et al. Tuning charge transport... in solution-sheared organic semiconductors using lattice strain. Nature 480, 5048 (2011). 27. Gundlach, D. J. et al. Contact-induced crystallinity for high-performance soluble acene-based transistors and circuits. Nature Materials 7, 21621 (2008). 28...

Walker, Brian J.; Musser, Andrew J.; Beljonne, David; Friend, Richard H.

2013-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

New Solutions Require New Thinking  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced Scorecard Federal2Energy SecondWellsWinsRules HelpSolutions Require

342

Soy Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty Ltd JumpGTZHolland, Illinois:5717551°Farms LtdLLC JumpSouthwoodSoy Solutions

343

Organic tank safety project: Preliminary results of energetics and thermal behavior studies of model organic nitrate and/or nitrite mixtures and a simulated organic waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a result of years of production and recovery of nuclear defense materials and subsequent waste management at the Hanford Site, organic-bearing radioactive high-level wastes (HLW) are currently stored in large (up to 3. ML) single-shell storage tanks (SSTs). Because these wastes contain both fuels (organics) and the oxidants nitrate and nitrite, rapid energetic reactions at certain conditions could occur. In support of Westinghouse Hanford Company`s (WHC) efforts to ensure continued safe storage of these organic- and oxidant-bearing wastes and to define the conditions necessary for reactions to occur, we measured the thermal sensitivities and thermochemical and thermokinetic properties of mixtures of selected organics and sodium nitrate and/or nitrite and a simulated Hanford organic-bearing waste using thermoanalytical technologies. These thermoanalytical technologies are used by chemical reactivity hazards evaluation organizations within the chemical industry to assess chemical reaction hazards.

Scheele, R.D.; Sell, R.L.; Sobolik, J.L.; Burger, L.L.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Extraction of uranium from spent fuels using liquefied gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels, a novel method to extract actinides from spent fuel using highly compressed gases, nitrogen dioxide and carbon dioxide was proposed. As a fundamental study, the nitrate conversion with liquefied nitrogen dioxide and the nitrate extraction with supercritical carbon dioxide were demonstrated by using uranium dioxide powder, uranyl nitrate and tri-n-butylphosphate complex in the present study. (authors)

Sawada, Kayo; Hirabayashi, Daisuke; Enokida, Youichi [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, 464-8603 (Japan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

2015 Midwest Energy Solutions | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

2015 Midwest Energy Solutions 2015 Midwest Energy Solutions January 28, 2015 9:00AM EST to January 30, 2015 5:00PM EST Chicago, Illinois Learn more....

346

Correction-solution partielle des Feuilles 1 8 Exercice 1.1 : Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STIA3 Correction-solution partielle des Feuilles 1 à 8 Exercice 1.1 : Solutions : Df = R+ Dg = Rn 5

Mas, André

347

Response of rice to ammonium and nitrate nitrogen applied at various stages of plant growth on limed and unlimed Beaumont and Lake Charles clays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESPONSE OF RICE TO AMMONIUM AND NITRATE NITROGEN APPLIED AT VARIOUS STAGES OF PLANT GROWTH ON LIMED AND UNLINED BEAUNONT AND LAKE CHARLES CLAYS A Thesis By William B. Gay, III Submitted to the Graduate Sohool of the Agricultural... BEAUMONT AND LAKE CHARLES CLAYS A Thesis By Nilliam B. Gay, III Chairman of Committee Head of the Department of Soil Sc Crop Sciences ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would like to express my appreciation to Dr. A. G. Caldwell for his 1nterest and guidance...

Gay, William Blalock, III

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Engineering report (conceptual design) PFP solution stabilization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Engineering Report (Conceptual Design) addresses remediation of the plutonium-bearing solutions currently in inventory at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The recommendation from the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is that the solutions be treated thermally and stabilized as a solid for long term storage. For solutions which are not discardable, the baseline plan is to utilize a denitration process to stabilize the solutions prior to packaging for storage.

Witt, J.B.

1997-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

349

Clean Energy Solutions Center Services (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Clean Energy Solutions Center (Solutions Center) helps governments, advisors and analysts create policies and programs that advance the deployment of clean energy technologies. The Solutions Center partners with international organizations to provide online training, expert assistance, and technical resources on clean energy policy.

Not Available

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

IBM Software Solution Brief Safeguarding the cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IBM Software Solution Brief Safeguarding the cloud with IBM Security solutions Maintain visibility and control with proven security solutions for public, private and hybrid clouds Highlights Address cloud internal and external users, data, applications and workloads as they move to and from the cloud Regain

351

Internship -Fall 2011 Search Solutions Digital Media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Internship - Fall 2011 Search Solutions Digital Media SSdigitalmedia.com About us: Search Solutions Search Solutions Digital Media 1500 N. Stephenson HWY Royal Oak, MI 48067 Amanda are a full service digital advertising agency. We build custom web packages to meet our clients' exact needs

Cinabro, David

352

Moving from software to solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Like other industries, oil and gas companies are looking to computer-aided technologies to contribute to their bottom line. The question is, what can and should software vendors offer the oil and gas industry for them to achieve this goal? In order to answer this, the paper looks at the enablers of change that today's geoscience software vendors can exploit to meet these challenges, as well as at the future role of software vendors. The era of computer-aided exploration tools has somewhat changed. The oil and gas industry's concerns for cost-effectiveness demand a more holistic approach--geoscience software and services that optimize the reservoir's full life cycle. Recent advances in computing technologies and geoscience justify the oil and gas industry's expectations that software vendors deliver next-generation reservoir management solutions.

Weiss, E.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Solution synthesis of germanium nanocrystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method for providing a route for the synthesis of a Ge(0) nanometer-sized material from. A Ge(II) precursor is dissolved in a ligand heated to a temperature, generally between approximately 100.degree. C. and 400.degree. C., sufficient to thermally reduce the Ge(II) to Ge(0), where the ligand is a compound that can bond to the surface of the germanium nanomaterials to subsequently prevent agglomeration of the nanomaterials. The ligand encapsulates the surface of the Ge(0) material to prevent agglomeration. The resulting solution is cooled for handling, with the cooling characteristics useful in controlling the size and size distribution of the Ge(0) materials. The characteristics of the Ge(II) precursor determine whether the Ge(0) materials that result will be nanocrystals or nanowires.

Gerung, Henry (Albuquerque, NM); Boyle, Timothy J. (Kensington, MD); Bunge, Scott D. (Cuyahoga Falls, OH)

2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

354

Regional Transmission Projects: Finding Solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Keystone Center convened and facilitated a year-long Dialogue on "Regional Transmission Projects: Finding Solutions" to develop recommendations that will help address the difficult and contentious issues related to expansions of regional electric transmission systems that are needed for reliable and economic transmission of power within and across regions. This effort brought together a cross-section of affected stakeholders and thought leaders to address the problem with the collective wisdom of their experience and interests. Transmission owners sat at the table with consumer advocates and environmental organizations. Representatives from regional transmission organizations exchanged ideas with state and federal regulators. Generation developers explored common interests with public power suppliers. Together, the Dialogue participants developed consensus solutions about how to begin unraveling some of the more intractable issues surrounding identification of need, allocation of costs, and reaching consensus on siting issues that can frustrate the development of regional transmission infrastructure. The recommendations fall into three broad categories: 1. Recommendations on appropriate institutional arrangements and processes for achieving regional consensus on the need for new or expanded transmission infrastructure 2. Recommendations on the process for siting of transmission lines 3. Recommendations on the tools needed to support regional planning, cost allocation, and siting efforts. List of Dialogue participants: List of Dialogue Participants: American Electric Power American Transmission Company American Wind Energy Association California ISO Calpine Corporation Cinergy Edison Electric Institute Environmental Defense Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Great River Energy International Transmission Company ISO-New England Iowa Public Utility Board Kanner & Associates Midwest ISO National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners National Association of State Utility Consumer Advocates National Grid Northeast Utilities PA Office of Consumer Advocates Pacific Gas & Electric Corporation Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission PJM Interconnection The Electricity Consumers Resource Council U.S. Department of Energy US Department of the Interior Van Ness Feldman Western Interstate Energy Board Wind on the Wires Wisconsin Public Service Commission Xcel Energy

The Keystone Center

2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

355

Characterising Vainshtein Solutions in Massive Gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study static, spherically symmetric solutions in a recently proposed ghost-free model of non-linear massive gravity. We focus on a branch of solutions where the helicity-0 mode can be strongly coupled within certain radial regions, giving rise to the Vainshtein effect. We truncate the analysis to scales below the gravitational Compton wavelength, and consider the weak field limit for the gravitational potentials, while keeping all non-linearities of the helicity-0 mode. We determine analytically the number and properties of local solutions which exist asymptotically on large scales, and of local (inner) solutions which exist on small scales. We find two kinds of asymptotic solutions, one of which is asymptotically flat, while the other one is not, and also two types of inner solutions, one of which displays the Vainshtein mechanism, while the other exhibits a self-shielding behaviour of the gravitational field. We analyse in detail in which cases the solutions match in an intermediate region. The asymptotically flat solutions connect only to inner configurations displaying the Vainshtein mechanism, while the non asymptotically flat solutions can connect with both kinds of inner solutions. We show furthermore that there are some regions in the parameter space where global solutions do not exist, and characterise precisely in which regions of the phase space the Vainshtein mechanism takes place.

Fulvio Sbisa'; Gustavo Niz; Kazuya Koyama; Gianmassimo Tasinato

2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

356

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation and Recycle of Sodium Hydroxide and Sodium Nitrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disposal of high-level nuclear waste is horrendously expensive, in large part because the actual radioactive matter in the tanks has been diluted over 1000-fold by ordinary inorganic chemicals. Treatment processes themselves can exacerbate the problem by adding further volume to the waste. Waste retrieval and sludge washing, for example, will require copious amounts of sodium hydroxide. If the needed sodium hydroxide could be separated from the waste and recycled, however, the addition of fresh sodium hydroxide could be avoided, ultimately reducing the final waste volume and associated disposal costs. The major objective of this research is to explore new liquid-liquid extraction approaches to the selective separation of sodium hydroxide from alkaline high-level wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford and Savannah River sites. Consideration is also given to separating potassium and abundant anions, including nitrate, nitrite, aluminate, and carbonate. Salts of these ions represent possible additional value for recycle, alternative disposal, or even use as commodity chemicals. A comprehensive approach toward understanding the extractive chemistry of these salts is envisioned, involving systems of varying complexity, from use of simple solvents to new bifunctional host molecules for ion-pair recognition. These extractants will ideally require no adjustment of the waste composition and will release the extracted salt into water, thereby consuming no additional chemicals and producing no additional waste volume. The overall goal of this research is to provide a scientific foundation upon which the feasibility of new liquid-liquid extraction chemistry applicable to the bulk reduction of the volume of tank waste can be evaluated.

Moyer, Bruce A.; Marchand, Alan P.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation and Recycle of Sodium Hydroxide and Sodium Nitrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to explore new liquid-liquid extraction approaches to the selective separation of major sodium salts from alkaline high-level wastes stored in underground tanks at Hanford, Savannah River, and Oak Ridge sites. Disposal of high level waste is horrendously expensive, in large part because the actual radioactive matter in the tanks has been diluted over 1000-fold by ordinary inorganic chemicals. Since the residual bulk chemicals must still undergo expensive treatment and disposal after most of the hazardous radionuclides have been removed, large cost savings will result from processes that reduce the overall waste volume. It is proposed that major cost savings can be expected if sodium hydroxide needed for sludge washing can be obtained from the waste itself, thus avoiding the addition of yet another bulk chemical to the waste and still further increase of the waste volume and disposal cost. Secondary priority is given to separating potassium an d abundant anions, including nitrate, nitrite, aluminate, and carbonate. Salts of these ions represent possible additional value for recycle, alternative disposal, or even use as commodity chemicals. A comprehensive approach toward understanding the extractive chemistry of these salts is envisioned, involving systems of varying complexity, from use of simple solvents to new bifunctional host molecules for ion-pair recognition. These extractants will ideally require no adjustment of the waste composition and will release the extracted salt into water, thereby consuming no additional chemicals and producing no additional waste volume. The overall goal of this research is to provide a scientific foundation upon which the feasibility of new liquid-liquid extraction chemistry applicable to the bulk reduction of the volume of tank waste can be evaluated.

Moyer, Bruce A.; Marchand, Alan P.; Bryan, Jeffrey C.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation and Recycle of Sodium Hydroxide and Sodium Nitrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disposal of high- level waste is horrendously expensive, in large part because the actual radioactive matter in the tanks has been diluted over 1000-fold by ordinary inorganic chemicals. Treatment processes themselves can exacerbate the problem by adding further volume to the waste. Waste retrieval and sludge washing, for example, will require copious amounts of sodium hydroxide. If the needed sodium hydroxide could be separated from the waste and recycled, however, the addition of fresh sodium hydroxide could be avoided, ultimately reducing the final waste volume and associated disposal costs. The major objective of this research is to explore new liquid- liquid extraction approaches to the selective separation of sodium hydroxide from alkaline high-level wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford and Savannah River sites. Consideration is also given to separating potassium and abundant anions, including nitrate, nitrite, aluminate, and carbonate. Salts of these ions represent possible additional value for recycle, alternative disposal, or even use as commodity chemicals. A comprehensive approach toward understanding the extractive chemistry of these salts is envisioned, involving systems of varying complexity, from use of simple solvents to new bifunctional host molecules for ion-pair recognition. These extractants will ideally require no adjustment of the waste composition and will release the extracted salt into water, thereby consuming no additional chemicals and producing no additional waste volume. The overall goal of this research is to provide a scientific foundation upon which the feasibility of new liquid-liquid extraction chemistry applicable to the bulk reduction of the volume of tank waste can be evaluated.

Moyer, Bruce A.; Marchand, Alan P.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

New knotted solutions of Maxwell's equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this note we have further developed the study of topologically non-trivial solutions of vacuum electrodynamics. We have discovered a novel method of generating such solutions by applying conformal transformations with complex parameters on known solutions expressed in terms of Bateman's variables. This has enabled us to get a wide class of solutions from the basic configuration like constant electromagnetic fields and plane-waves. We have introduced a covariant formulation of the Bateman's construction and discussed the conserved charges associated with the conformal group as well as a set of four types of conserved helicities. We have also given a formulation in terms of quaternions. This led to a simple map between the electromagnetic knotted and linked solutions into flat connections of $SU(2)$ gauge theory. We have computed the corresponding CS charge in a class of solutions and it takes integer values.

Hoyos, Carlos; Sonnenschein, Jacob

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Standard specification for uranium oxides with a 235U content of less than 5 % for dissolution prior to conversion to nuclear-grade uranium dioxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This specification covers uranium oxides, including processed byproducts or scrap material (powder, pellets, or pieces), that are intended for dissolution into uranyl nitrate solution meeting the requirements of Specification C788 prior to conversion into nuclear grade UO2 powder with a 235U content of less than 5 %. This specification defines the impurity and uranium isotope limits for such urania powders that are to be dissolved prior to processing to nuclear grade UO2 as defined in Specification C753. 1.2 This specification provides the nuclear industry with a general standard for such uranium oxide powders. It recognizes the diversity of conversion processes and the processes to which such powders are subsequently to be subjected (for instance, by solvent extraction). It is therefore anticipated that it may be necessary to include supplementary specification limits by agreement between the buyer and seller. 1.3 The scope of this specification does not comprehensively cover all provisions for prevent...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Robinson-Trautman solution with scalar hair  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Explicit Robinson-Trautman solution with minimally coupled free scalar field is derived and analyzed. It is shown that this solution contains curvature singularity which is initially naked but later the horizon envelopes it. We use quasilocal horizon definition and prove its existence in later retarded times using sub- and supersolution method combined with growth estimates. We show that the solution is generally of algebraic type II but reduces to type D in spherical symmetry.

T. Tahamtan; O. Svitek

2015-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

362

Robinson-Trautman solution with scalar hair  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Explicit Robinson-Trautman solution with minimally coupled free scalar field is derived and analyzed. It is shown that this solution contains curvature singularity which is initially naked but later the horizon envelopes it. We use quasilocal horizon definition and prove its existence in later retarded times using sub- and supersolution method combined with growth estimates. We show that the solution is generally of algebraic type II but reduces to type D in spherical symmetry.

Tahamtan, T

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

AGCO Biomass Solutions: Biomass 2014 Presentation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Plenary IV: Advances in Bioenergy FeedstocksFrom Field to Fuel AGCO Biomass Solutions: Biomass 2014 Presentation Glenn Farris, Marketing Manager Biomass, AGCO Corporation

364

Engineered Solutions: Order (2010-CE-2112)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE issued an Order after entering into a Compromise Agreement with Engineered Solutions, Inc. to resolve a case involving the failure to certify dehumidifier basic model SD109.

365

Engineered Solutions: Proposed Penalty (2010-CE-2112)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Engineered Solutions, Inc. failed to certify a dehumidifier as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

366

Black Hole Solutions in $R^2$ Gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We find static spherically symmetric solutions of scale invariant $R^2$ gravity. The latter has been shown to be equivalent to General Relativity with a positive cosmological constant and a scalar mode. Therefore, one expects that solutions of the $R^2$ theory will be identical to that of Einstein theory. Indeed, we find that the solutions of $R^2$ gravity are in one-to-one correspondence with solutions of General Relativity in the case of non-vanishing Ricci scalar. However, scalar-flat $R=0$ solutions are global minima of the $R^2$ action and they cannot in general be mapped to solutions of the Einstein theory. As we will discuss, the $R=0$ solutions arise in Einstein gravity as solutions in the tensionless, strong coupling limit $M_P\\rightarrow 0$. As a further result, there is no corresponding Birkhoff theorem and the Schwarzschild black hole is by no means unique in this framework. In fact, $R^2$ gravity has a rich structure of vacuum static spherically symmetric solutions partially uncovered here. We al...

Kehagias, Alex; Lust, Dieter; Riotto, Antonio

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Optimization Online - Solution Analysis for the Pseudomonotone ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nov 18, 2014 ... Solution Analysis for the Pseudomonotone Second-order Cone Linear Complementarity Problem. Yang Wei Hong(whyang ***at***...

Yang Wei Hong

2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

368

NFWF Environmental Solutions for Communities Grant  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Wells Fargo and the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) are accepting applications for approximately $2.5 million in Environmental Solutions for Communities grants.

369

El Paso Electric Company- Residential Solutions Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

'''The El Paso Electric Residential Solutions Program funding has been expended in Texas for 2012. New funding will be available January 1, 2013. '''

370

Home Energy Solutions for Existing Homes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Energy Trust of Oregon offers a variety of incentives and services through their Home Energy Solutions program. All equipment eligible for incentives needs to meet the efficiency requirements...

371

Independent Activity Report, Washington River Protection Solutions...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Solutions, LLC Industrial Hygiene Program Strategy and Implementation of the Hanford Concerns Council Recommendations HIAR-ORP-2011-10-26 This Independent Activity...

372

TVA- Energy Right Solutions for Business  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

TVA offers the Energy Right Solutions Program to commercial and industrial facilities. In addition to prescriptive rebates for lighting, motors, HVAC, and kitchen equipment, administrators take a...

373

TVA- Energy Right Solutions for Business (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) offers the Energy Right Solutions Program for commercial and industrial facilities. Prescriptive rebates are available for lighting, motors, HVAC, and kitchen...

374

TVA- Energy Right Solutions for Business (Georgia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

TVA offers the Energy Right Solutions Program to commercial and industrial facilities. In addition to prescriptive rebates for lighting, motors, HVAC, and kitchen equipment, administrators take a...

375

Advanced Combustion Concepts - Enabling Systems and Solutions...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Evaluation Meeting ace066yilmaz2013o.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Combustion Concepts - Enabling Systems and Solutions (ACCESS) for High Efficiency Light Duty...

376

Disposition of highly enriched uranium obtained from the Republic of Kazakhstan. Environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This EA assesses the potential environmental impacts associated with DOE`s proposal to transport 600 kg of Kazakhstand-origin HEU from Y-12 to a blending site (B&W Lynchburg or NFS Erwin), transport low-enriched UF6 blending stock from a gaseous diffusion plant to GE Wilmington and U oxide blending stock to the blending site, blending the HEU and uranium oxide blending stock to produce LEU in the form of uranyl nitrate, and transport the uranyl nitrate from the blending site to USEC Portsmouth.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Technical solutions to nonproliferation challenges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The threat of nuclear terrorism is real and poses a significant challenge to both U.S. and global security. For terrorists, the challenge is not so much the actual design of an improvised nuclear device (IND) but more the acquisition of the special nuclear material (SNM), either highly enriched uranium (HEU) or plutonium, to make the fission weapon. This paper provides two examples of technical solutions that were developed in support of the nonproliferation objective of reducing the opportunity for acquisition of HEU. The first example reviews technologies used to monitor centrifuge enrichment plants to determine if there is any diversion of uranium materials or misuse of facilities to produce undeclared product. The discussion begins with a brief overview of the basics of uranium processing and enrichment. The role of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), its safeguard objectives and how the technology evolved to meet those objectives will be described. The second example focuses on technologies developed and deployed to monitor the blend down of 500 metric tons of HEU from Russia's dismantled nuclear weapons to reactor fuel or low enriched uranium (LEU) under the U.S.-Russia HEU Purchase Agreement. This reactor fuel was then purchased by U.S. fuel fabricators and provided about half the fuel for the domestic power reactors. The Department of Energy established the HEU Transparency Program to provide confidence that weapons usable HEU was being blended down and thus removed from any potential theft scenario. Two measurement technologies, an enrichment meter and a flow monitor, were combined into an automated blend down monitoring system (BDMS) and were deployed to four sites in Russia to provide 24/7 monitoring of the blend down. Data was downloaded and analyzed periodically by inspectors to provide the assurances required.

Satkowiak, Lawrence [Director, Nonproliferation, Safeguards and Security Programs, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

378

Nitrate accumulation in soils and in plant parts of sorghum and oats as influenced by sources and rates of nitrogen fertilizers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Accumulation in the Soil Profile Residual soil NO atter removal by the first crop Residual soil NO after removal by the second crop Residual soil NO after. 15 years in Coastal bermudagrass plo s 21 2 J. 21 41 41 46 50 DI, CUSSION Nitrate... in hydroxylamine reductase. Wright and Trautman (65) and Nightingale (39) have indicated that deficiencies or imbalance of other nutrients such as K, S, and Fe may cause NO build-up. 3 According to Benne (4), injury of the pl. ant tissues resulted in a drastic...

Costa, Cassimiro Vaz

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Energy Technology Solutions: Public-Private Partnerships Transforming...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Solutions: Public-Private Partnerships Transforming Industry, November 2010 Energy Technology Solutions: Public-Private Partnerships Transforming Industry, November 2010...

380

WIPP Nitrate Updates 2014  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudhaSurface.Laboratory inApprovedRegionalDOE Awards4

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

WIPP Nitrate Updates 2015  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudhaSurface.Laboratory inApprovedRegionalDOE Awards45

382

Exercise Session 7 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 7 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Aleksandar Haber a Session 7 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, A. Haber Solution to state space models Find the output response Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise Session 7 ­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, A. Haber The output is Y (t) = CX(t) + DU

Abate, Alessandro

383

Exercise Session 7 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 7 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Marco Forgione m Session 7 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, M. Forgione Solution to state space models Find the output response Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise Session 7 ­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, M. Forgione The output is Y (t) = CX(t) + DU

Abate, Alessandro

384

The general double-dust solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The gravitational field of two identical rotating and counter-moving dust beams is found in full generality. The solution depends on an arbitrary function and a parameter. Some of its properties are studied. Previous particular solutions are derived as subcases.

B. V. Ivanov

2003-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

385

Decomposing Linear Programs for Parallel Solution?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Decomposing Linear Programs for Parallel Solution? Ali P nar, Umit V. Catalyurek, Cevdet Aykanat in the solution of Linear Programming (LP) problems with block angular constraint matrices has been exploited industrial applications and the advent of powerful computers have in- creased the users' ability to formulate

?atalyürek, ?mit V.

386

Decomposing Linear Programs for Parallel Solution ?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Decomposing Linear Programs for Parallel Solution ? Ali Pinar, ¨ Umit V. C¸ ataly¨urek, Cevdet in the solution of Linear Programming (LP) problems with block angular constraint matrices has been exploited with successful industrial applications and the advent of powerful computers have in­ creased the users' ability

?atalyürek, ?mit V.

387

Kampung Capacity Local Solutions for Sustainable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kampung Capacity Local Solutions for Sustainable Rural Energy in the Baram River Basin, Sarawak for the river basin. Keywords: South East Asia, Malaysia, Rural Energy Access, Local Solutions #12;RAEL Report, Malaysia Rebekah Shirley Daniel Kammen University of California ­ Berkeley Renewable and Appropriate Energy

Kammen, Daniel M.

388

Deep subsurface drip irrigation using coal-bed sodic water: Part I. Water and solute movement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water co-produced with coal-bed methane (CBM) in the semi-arid Powder River Basin of Wyoming and Montana commonly has relatively low salinity and high sodium adsorption ratios that can degrade soil permeability where used for irrigation. Nevertheless, a desire to derive beneficial use from the water and a need to dispose of large volumes of it have motivated the design of a deep subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) system capable of utilizing that water. Drip tubing is buried 92 cm deep and irrigates at a relatively constant rate year-round, while evapotranspiration by the alfalfa and grass crops grown is seasonal. We use field data from two sites and computer simulations of unsaturated flow to understand water and solute movements in the SDI fields. Combined irrigation and precipitation exceed potential evapotranspiration by 300480 mm annually. Initially, excess water contributes to increased storage in the unsaturated zone, and then drainage causes cyclical rises in the water table beneath the fields. Native chloride and nitrate below 200 cm depth are leached by the drainage. Some CBM water moves upward from the drip tubing, drawn by drier conditions above. Chloride from CBM water accumulates there as root uptake removes the water. Year over year accumulations indicated by computer simulations illustrate that infiltration of precipitation water from the surface only partially leaches such accumulations away. Field data show that 7% and 27% of added chloride has accumulated above the drip tubing in an alfalfa and grass field, respectively, following 6 years of irrigation. Maximum chloride concentrations in the alfalfa field are around 45 cm depth but reach the surface in parts of the grass field, illustrating differences driven by crop physiology. Deep SDI offers a means of utilizing marginal quality irrigation waters and managing the accumulation of their associated solutes in the crop rooting zone.

Bern, Carleton R.; Breit, George N.; Healy, Richard W.; Zupancic, John W.; Hammack, Richard

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Detection of localized and general corrosion of mild steel in simulated defense nuclear waste solutions using electrochemical noise analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Underground waste tanks fabricated from mild steel store more than 60 million gallons of radioactive waste from 50 years of weapons production. Leaks are suspected in a significant number of tanks. The probable modes of corrosion failures are reported to be localized corrosion (e.g. nitrate stress corrosion cracking and pitting). The use of electrochemical noise (EN) for the monitoring and detection of localized corrosion processes has received considerable attention and application over the last several years. Proof of principle laboratory tests were conducted to verify the capability of EN evaluation to detect localized corrosion and to compare the predictions of general corrosion obtained from EN with those derived from other sources. Simple, pre-fabricated flat and U-bend specimens of steel alloys A516-Grade 60 (UNS K02100) and A537-CL 1 (UNS K02400) were immersed in temperature controlled simulated waste solutions. The simulated waste solution was either 5M NaNO{sub 3} with 0.3M NaOH at 90 C or 11M NaNO{sub 3} with 0.15M NaOH at 95 C. The electrochemical noise activity from the specimens was monitored and recorded for periods ranging between 140 and 240 hours. At the end of each test period, the specimens were metallographically examined to correlated EN data with corrosion damage.

Edgemon, G.L.; Ohl, P.C. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Bell, G.E.C. [M.J. Schiff and Associates, Inc., Claremont, CA (United States); Wilson, D.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Studies of solution deposited cerium oxide thin films on textured Ni-alloy substrates for YBCO superconductor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cerium oxide (CeO{sub 2}) buffer layers play an important role for the development of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} (YBCO) based superconducting tapes using the rolling assisted biaxially textured substrates (RABiTS) approach. The chemical solution deposition (CSD) approach has been used to grow epitaxial CeO{sub 2} films on textured Ni-3 at.% W alloy substrates with various starting precursors of ceria. Precursors such as cerium acetate, cerium acetylacetonate, cerium 2-ethylhexanoate, cerium nitrate, and cerium trifluoroacetate were prepared in suitable solvents. The optimum growth conditions for these cerium precursors were Ar-4% H{sub 2} gas processing atmosphere, solution concentration levels of 0.2-0.5 M, a dwell time of 15 min, and a process temperature range of 1050-1150 deg. C. X-ray diffraction, AFM, SEM, and optical microscopy were used to characterize the CeO{sub 2} films. Highly textured CeO{sub 2} layers were obtained on Ni-W substrates with both cerium acetate and cerium acetylacetonate as starting precursors. YBCO films with a J {sub c} of 1.5 MA/cm{sup 2} were obtained on cerium acetylacetonate-based CeO{sub 2} films with sputtered YSZ and CeO{sub 2} cap layers.

Stewart, E. [Chemical Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6100 (United States); Bhuiyan, M.S. [Chemical Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6100 (United States); Sathyamurthy, S. [Chemical Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6100 (United States); Paranthaman, M. [Chemical Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6100 (United States)]. E-mail: paranthamanm@ornl.gov

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

Exact Solutions of Einstein's Field Equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine various well known exact solutions available in the literature to investigate the recent criterion obtained in ref. [20] which should be fulfilled by any static and spherically symmetric solution in the state of hydrostatic equilibrium. It is seen that this criterion is fulfilled only by (i) the regular solutions having a vanishing surface density together with the pressure, and (ii) the singular solutions corresponding to a non-vanishing density at the surface of the configuration . On the other hand, the regular solutions corresponding to a non-vanishing surface density do not fulfill this criterion. Based upon this investigation, we point out that the exterior Schwarzschild solution itself provides necessary conditions for the types of the density distributions to be considered inside the mass, in order to obtain exact solutions or equations of state compatible with the structure of general relativity. The regular solutions with finite centre and non-zero surface densities which do not fulfill the criterion [20], in fact, can not meet the requirement of the `actual mass' set up by exterior Schwarzschild solution. The only regular solution which could be possible in this regard is represented by uniform (homogeneous) density distribution. The criterion [20] provides a necessary and sufficient condition for any static and spherical configuration (including core-envelope models) to be compatible with the structure of general relativity. Thus, it may find application to construct the appropriate core-envelope models of stellar objects like neutron stars and may be used to test various equations of state for dense nuclear matter and the models of relativistic stellar structures like star clusters.

P. S. Negi

2004-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

392

Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training & Technology Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training & Technology Solutions 718-997-4875 ~ training@qc.cuny.edu ~ I-Bldg 214 DegreeWorks 4.09 Student Manual Degree is the same account you used when applying to Queens College. #12;Training & Technology Solutions Queens

Johnson Jr.,, Ray

393

Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training & Technology Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training & Technology Solutions 718-997-4875 ~ training@qc.cuny.edu ~ I-Bldg 214 How To Navigate the Finance Section the payment history) · Pending Financial Aid #12;Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office

Johnson Jr.,, Ray

394

Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training & Technology Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training & Technology Solutions 718-997-4875 ~ training@qc.cuny.edu ~ I-Bldg 214 CUNYfirst Faculty Center Navigation;Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training & Technology

Johnson Jr.,, Ray

395

Are Simple Real Pole Solutions Physical?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider exact solutions generated by the inverse scattering technique, also known as the soliton transformation. In particular, we study the class of simple real pole solutions. For quite some time, those solutions have been considered interesting as models of cosmological shock waves. A coordinate singularity on the wave fronts was removed by a transformation which induces a null fluid with negative energy density on the wave front. This null fluid is usually seen as another coordinate artifact, since there seems to be a general belief that that this kind of solution can be seen as the real pole limit of the smooth solution generated with a pair of complex conjugate poles in the transformation. We perform this limit explicitly, and find that the belief is unfounded: two coalescing complex conjugate poles cannot yield a solution with one real pole. Instead, the two complex conjugate poles go to a different limit, what we call a ``pole on a pole''. The limiting procedure is not unique; it is sensitive to how quickly some parameters approach zero. We also show that there exists no improved coordinate transformation which would remove the negative energy density. We conclude that negative energy is an intrinsic part of this class of solutions.

M Berg; M Bradley

2000-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

396

Properties of lead-lithium solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lead-lithium solutions are of interest to liquid metal wall ICF reactor designers because Pb may be present to some extent in both heavy ion beam and laser-driven ICF targets; therefore, Pb will be present as an impurity in a flowing lithium wall. In addition, Pb-Li solutions containing approx. 80 a/o Pb are a strong candidate for a heavy ion beam driven HYLIFE converter and a viable alternative to a pure Li wall for a laser driven converter. The properties of Pb-Li solutions including the effect of hydrogen impurities are reviewed, and the reactor design implications are discussed.

Hoffman, N.J.; Darnell, A.; Blink, J.A.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Stabilization of polyaniline solutions through additives  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A stabilized non-conductive polyaniline solution comprising from about 1 to about 10 percent by weight polyaniline or a polyaniline derivative, from about 90 to about 99 percent by weight N-methylpyrrolidone, and from about 0.5 percent by weight to about 15 percent by weight of a solution stabilizing additive selected from the group consisting of hindered amine light stabilizers, polymeric amines, and dialkylamines, percent by weight of additive based on the total weight of polyaniline or polyaniline derivative is provided together with a method for stabilizing a polyaniline solution. 4 figs.

Wrobleski, D.A.; Benicewicz, B.C.

1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

398

Stabilization of polyaniline solutions through additives  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A stabilized non-conductive polyaniline solution comprising from about 1 to bout 10 percent by weight polyaniline or a polyaniline derivative, from about 90 to about 99 percent by weight N-methylpyrrolidone, and from about 0.5 percent by weight to about 15 percent by weight of a solution stabilizing additive selected from the group consisting of hindered amine light stabilizers, polymeric amines, and dialkylamines, percent by weight of additive based on the total weight of polyaniline or polyaniline derivative is provided together with a method for stabilizing a polyaniline solution.

Wrobleski, Debra A. (Los Alamos, NM); Benicewicz, Brian C. (Los Alamos, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Glass bead micromodel study of solute transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study presents the quantification of glass bead micromodel experiments through a combination of computational modeling and experimental analysis. The computational model simulates two-dimensional solute flow through porous media using a finite...

Fedirchuk, Paula Diane

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

STAT 416 Fall 2014 Homework 6 Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nov 3, 2014 ... STAT 416 Fall 2014. Homework 6 Solutions ... 4.35 Let X denote the winnings. P (X = 1.1) = P (both marbles red) + P (both marbles blue) = 2. (5.

2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Concentrating aqueous acetate solutions with tertiary amines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water may be extracted from aqueous calcium acetate or sodium acetate solutions using low miscibility, low molecular weight tertiary amines, e.g. triethylamine (TEA) and N,N- dietliylmethylaniine (DEMA). This novel extraction technology...

Lee, Champion

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

IID Energy- PV Solutions Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

'''''IID accepted applications for the 2013 PV Solutions Program from Jan. 2, 2013 Jan. 31, 2013. Winners were determined via lottery. The program is now closed for the remainder of 2013, but...

403

Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat unit for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heayv metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

Jackson, Paul J. (both Los Alamos, NM); Delhaize, Emmanuel (both Los Alamos, NM); Robinson, Nigel J. (Durham, GB2); Unkefer, Clifford J. (Los Alamos, NM); Furlong, Clement (Seattle, WA)

1990-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

404

Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

Jackson, Paul J. (Los Alamos, NM); Delhaize, Emmanuel (Los Alamos, NM); Robinson, Nigel J. (Durham, GB2); Unkefer, Clifford J. (Los Alamos, NM); Furlong, Clement (Seattle, WA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Generating Geodesic Flows and Supergravity Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the geodesic motion on the symmetric moduli spaces that arise after timelike and spacelike reductions of supergravity theories. The geodesics correspond to timelike respectively spacelike $p$-brane solutions when they are lifted over a $p$-dimensional flat space. In particular, we consider the problem of constructing \\emph{the minimal generating solution}: A geodesic with the minimal number of free parameters such that all other geodesics are generated through isometries. We give an intrinsic characterization of this solution in a wide class of orbits for various supergravities in different dimensions. We apply our method to three cases: (i) Einstein vacuum solutions, (ii) extreme and non-extreme D=4 black holes in N=8 supergravity and their relation to N=2 STU black holes and (iii) Euclidean wormholes in $D\\geq 3$. In case (iii) we present an easy and general criterium for the existence of regular wormholes for a given scalar coset.

E. Bergshoeff; W. Chemissany; A. Ploegh; M. Trigiante; T. Van Riet

2008-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

406

EIS-0219: F-Canyon Plutonium Solutions  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of processingthe plutonium solutions to metal form using the F-Canyon and FB-Line facilities at the Savannah River Site.

407

Lightweight Steel Solutions for Automotive Industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently, improvement in fuel efficiency and safety has become the biggest issue in worldwide automotive industry. Although the regulation of environment and safety has been tightened up more and more, the majority of vehicle bodies are still manufactured from stamped steel components. This means that the optimized steel solutions enable to demonstrate its ability to reduce body weight with high crashworthiness performance instead of expensive light weight materials such as Al, Mg and composites. To provide the innovative steel solutions for automotive industry, POSCO has developed AHSS and its application technologies, which is directly connected to EVI activities. EVI is a technical cooperation program with customer covering all stages of new car project from design to mass production. Integrated light weight solutions through new forming technologies such as TWB, hydroforming and HPF are continuously developed and provided for EVI activities. This paper will discuss the detailed status of these technologies especially light weight steel solutions based on innovative technologies.

Lee, Hong Woo; Kim, Gyosung; Park, Sung Ho [Technical Research Laboratories, POSCO, 699, Gumho-dong, Gwangyang-si, Jeonnam, 545-090 (Korea, Republic of)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

Missing solution in a Cornell potential  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Missing bound-state solutions for fermions in the background of a Cornell potential consisting of a mixed scalarvectorpseudoscalar coupling is examined. Charge-conjugation operation, degeneracy and localization are discussed. -- Highlights: The Dirac equation with scalarvectorpseudoscalar Cornell potential is investigated. The isolated solution from the SturmLiouville problem is found. Charge-conjugation operation, degeneracy and localization are discussed.

Castro, L.B., E-mail: luis.castro@pgfsc.ufsc.br [Departamento de Fsica, CFM, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianpolis - SC (Brazil); Castro, A.S. de, E-mail: castro@pq.cnpq.br [Departamento de Fsica e Qumica, Campus de Guaratinguet, Universidade Estadual Paulista, 12516-410, Guaratinguet - SP (Brazil)] [Departamento de Fsica e Qumica, Campus de Guaratinguet, Universidade Estadual Paulista, 12516-410, Guaratinguet - SP (Brazil)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

409

Solutions of systems of ordinary differential equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOLUTIONS OF SYSTEMS OF ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS A Thesis By CLAUDE EVANS KITCHENS Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1967... Major Subject: Mathematics SOLUTIONS OF SYSTEMS OF ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS A Thesis By CLAUDE EVANS KITCHENS Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Commi e) (Nember (Hea of Departmen (H er May 1967 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I wish...

Kitchens, Claude Evans

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Embeddings for solutions of Einstein equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study isometric embeddings of some solutions of the Einstein equations with suffciently high symmetries into a flat ambient space. We briefly describe a method for constructing surfaces with a given symmetry. We discuss all minimal embeddings of the Schwarzschild metric obtained using this method and show how the method can be used to construct all minimal embeddings for the Friedmann models. We classify all the embeddings in terms of realizations of symmetries of the corresponding solutions.

S. A. Paston; A. A. Sheykin

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

411

GELATIN SUBBED SLIDES (SOP-21) GELATIN SOLUTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GELATIN SUBBED SLIDES (SOP-21) GELATIN SOLUTION · Warm 1000 ml dH2O to 70° C (Do not heat water. Solution may be stored in the refrigerator for up to l week. CLEANING SLIDES · Fill a staining dish with 1:1 mixture of 95 % (v/v) ethanol and glacial acetic acid. · Soak slides placed in large metal slide rack

Kleinfeld, David

412

Solution dewatering with concomitant ion removal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

One of the biggest needs in the separations and waste handling and reduction area is a method for dewatering ion-containing solutions. Unexpectedly, it has been found that phosphazene polymers can discriminate between water and metal ions, allowing water to pass through the membrane while retaining the ions. This unexpected result, along with the inherent chemical and thermal stability of the phosphazene polymers, yields a powerful tool for separating and dewatering metal-ion-containing solutions.

Peterson, Eric S.; Marshall, Douglas W.; Stone, Mark L.

2003-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

413

Community Renewable Solutions LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentratingRenewable Solutions LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Community Renewable Solutions

414

Solution generating theorems: perfect fluid spheres and the TOV equation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report several new transformation theorems that map perfect fluid spheres into perfect fluid spheres. In addition, we report new ``solution generating'' theorems for the TOV, whereby any given solution can be ``deformed'' to a new solution.

Petarpa Boonserm; Matt Visser; Silke Weinfurtner

2006-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

415

Well performance under solutions gas drive  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fully implicit black-oil simulator was written to predict the drawdown and buildup responses for a single well under Solution Gas Drive. The model is capable of handling the following reservoir behaviors: Unfractured reservoir, Double-Porosity system, and Double Permeability-Double Porosity model of Bourdet. The accuracy of the model results is tested for both single-phase liquid flow and two-phase flow. The results presented here provide a basis for the empirical equations presented in the literature. New definitions of pseudopressure and dimensionless time are presented. By using these two definitions, the multiphase flow solutions correlate with the constant rate liquid flow solution for both transient and boundary-dominated flow. For pressure buildup tests, an analogue for the liquid solution is constructed from the drawdown pseudopressure, similar to the reservoir integral of J. Jones. The utility of using the producing gas-oil ration at shut in to compute pseudopressures and pseudotimes is documented. The influence of pressure level and skin factor on the Inflow Performance Relationship (IPR) of wells producing solution gas drive systems is examined. A new definition of flow efficiency that is based on the structure of the deliverability equations is proposed. This definition avoids problems that result when the presently available methods are applied to heavily stimulated wells. The need for using pseudopressures to analyze well test data for fractured reservoirs is shown. Expressions to compute sandface saturations for fractured systems are presented.

Camacho-Velazquez, R.G.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

The effect of penetration factor, deposition, and environmental factors on the indoor concentration of PM2.5 sulfate, nitrate, and carbon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Indoor exposure to particles of outdoor origin constitutes an important exposure pathway. We conducted an intensive set of indoor particle measurements in an unoccupied house under differing operating conditions. Real-time measurements were conducted both indoors and outdoors, including PM2.5 nitrate, sulfate, and carbon. Because the time-scale of the fluctuations in outdoor particle concentrations and meteorological conditions are often similar to the time constant for building air exchange, a steady state concentration may never be reached. The time-series experimental data were used to determine the effect of changes in air exchange rate and indoor/outdoor temperature and relative humidity differences on indoor particle concentrations. A multivariate regression was performed to investigate the difference between measured indoor concentrations and results from a simple time-dependent physical model. Environmental conditions had a significant effect on indoor concentrations of all three PM2.5 species, but did not explain all of the model variation.

Thatcher, T.L.; Lunden, M.M.; Sextro, R.G.; Hering, S.; Brown, N.J.

2002-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

417

The electrochemical analysis of sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate in solutions containing oilfield impurities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

molecules, and above the CMC they diffuse to the drop as micelles. An alternate explanation for this behavior concerns the surface- active properties of nitrated SOBS. It is very likely that adsorption of nitrated SDBS onto the mercury surface takes... of concentration determinat1on would help fill this need. Four different determination methods were investigated using either the rotating-disc electrode or the dropping-mercury electrode. Direct limiting current measurements of the concentration of sodium...

Becker, Michael Carl

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Five-Dimensional Cosmological Scaling Solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A five-dimensional Ricci-flat cosmological solution is studied by assuming that the induced 4D matter contains two components: the usual fluid for dark matter as well as baryons and a scalar field with an exponential potential for dark energy. With use of the phase-plane analysis it is shown that there exist two late-time attractors one of which corresponds to a universe dominated by the scalar field alone and the other is a scaling solution in which the energy density of the scalar field remains proportional to that of the dark matter. It is furthermore shown that for this 5D scaling solution the universe expands with the same rate as in the 4D FRW models and not relies on which 4D hypersurface the universe is located in the 5D manifold.

Baorong Chang; Hongya Liu; Huanying Liu; Lixin Xu

2005-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

419

Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Transformations...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Transformations, Inc. Net Zero Energy Communities (Fact Sheet) Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes:...

420

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) Human Resource...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Solutions (SRNS) Human Resource Management System (HRMS) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) Human Resource Management System (HRMS) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Cost Effectiveness of Technology Solutions for Future Vehicle...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Cost Effectiveness of Technology Solutions for Future Vehicle Systems Cost Effectiveness of Technology Solutions for Future Vehicle Systems Explores the economics of CO2 emission...

422

Coordination and Hydrolysis of Plutonium Ions in Aqueous Solution...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrolysis of Plutonium Ions in Aqueous Solution using Car-Parrinello Molecular Dynamics Free Energy Coordination and Hydrolysis of Plutonium Ions in Aqueous Solution using...

423

Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Buried and Encapsulated Ducts, Jacksonville, Florida (Fact Sheet) Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes:...

424

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS ProRad Environment...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

SRNS ProRad Environment Management PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS ProRad Environment Management PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS ProRad Environment Management...

425

United States Department of Energy Solution Center for Renewable...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solution Center for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: United States Department of Energy Solution Center for...

426

Energy Department's New Buildings Solution Center Shares Proven...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Department's New Buildings Solution Center Shares Proven Strategies for Energy Efficiency Programs Energy Department's New Buildings Solution Center Shares Proven Strategies for...

427

Formation of Supercooled Liquid Solutions from Nanoscale Amorphous...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Supercooled Liquid Solutions from Nanoscale Amorphous Solid Films of Methanol and Ethanol. Formation of Supercooled Liquid Solutions from Nanoscale Amorphous Solid Films of...

428

Probing the Degradation Mechanisms in Electrolyte Solutions for...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Degradation Mechanisms in Electrolyte Solutions for Li-ion Batteries by In-Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy. Probing the Degradation Mechanisms in Electrolyte Solutions for...

429

Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Foundation Heat Exchanger, Oak Ridge, Tennessee Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes:...

430

A Solution NMR Investigation into the Early Events of Amelogenin...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Solution NMR Investigation into the Early Events of Amelogenin Nanosphere Self-Assembly Initiated with Sodium Chloride or A Solution NMR Investigation into the Early Events of...

431

A solution NMR investigation into the impaired self-assembly...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

solution NMR investigation into the impaired self-assembly properties of two murine amelogenins containing the point mutations A solution NMR investigation into the impaired...

432

Electrodeposition From Acidic Solutions of Nickel Bis(benzenedithiolat...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

From Acidic Solutions of Nickel Bis(benzenedithiolate) Produces a Hydrogen-Evolving Ni-S Film on Glassy Carbon Electrodeposition From Acidic Solutions of Nickel...

433

Energy Storage Solutions Industrial Symposium | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Solutions Industrial Symposium Sep 04 2013 09:00 AM - 05:30 PM Energy Storage Solutions Industrial Symposium - Wednesday September 4, 2013 CONTACT : Email: Phone:...

434

Project Profile: CSP Energy Storage Solutions - Multiple Technologies...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Storage Solutions - Multiple Technologies Compared Project Profile: CSP Energy Storage Solutions - Multiple Technologies Compared US Solar Holdings logo US Solar Holdings,...

435

Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Measure Guideline: Guidance on Taped Insulating Sheathing Drainage Planes Building America Technology Solutions...

436

Breakout Session: Bringing Solutions to the Solar Industry: Startups...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Bringing Solutions to the Solar Industry: Startups, Technology Development and Market Entry Breakout Session: Bringing Solutions to the Solar Industry: Startups, Technology...

437

Innovative Financing Solutions: Finding Money for Your Energy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Innovative Financing Solutions: Finding Money for Your Energy Efficiency Projects Innovative Financing Solutions: Finding Money for Your Energy Efficiency Projects Provides an...

438

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Training Records and Informatio...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Nuclear Solutions Training Records and Information Network (TRAIN) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Training Records and Information Network (TRAIN) PIA - Savannah River...

439

Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Passive...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Passive Room-to-Room Air Transfer, Fresno, California (Fact Sheet) Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Passive...

440

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Badge Request and Site...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Solutions Badge Request and Site Personnel Roster Systems PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Badge Request and Site Personnel Roster Systems PIA - Savannah River Nuclear...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Hydronic...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Hydronic Heating Coil Versus Propane Furnace (Fact Sheet) Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Hydronic...

442

Radioluminescence of curium(III) in solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radioluminescence of curium(III) under the action of the intrinsic ..cap alpha..-radiation was studied in aqueous, heavy water, and organic solutions. The luminescence maximum falls at lambda approx. 600 nm. The yield of radioluminescence G is proportional to the concentration (or electronic fraction) of curium, and for a 10/sup -2/ M aqueous solution of Cm(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/, G approx. 5 x 10/sup -4/ quanta per 100 eV of absorbed energy. In dilute acids the yield of radioluminescence is the same as in neutral solution, but in concentrated acid it is substantially changed. In the presence of ligands (formate, acetate, citrate ions, and others), the yield of the radioluminescence of curium in aqueous solutions increases, which is associated with complex formation, leading to a decrease in the quenching of excited curium by water molecules. The intensification of the radioluminescence of curium in the presence of sodium paratungstate is especially great; it is suggested that in this case a significant role is played by energy transfer from the ligand to curium. H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, NH/sub 2/NH/sub 2/, NH/sub 2/OH, Ce/sup (IV)/, and uranium, neptunium, and plutonium ions in various oxidation states have no great influence on the radioluminescence of curium. Its quenching by NpO/sub 2//sup +/ ions is somewhat greater than by other actinide ions and is associated with the formation of cation-cation complexes of NpO/sub 2//sup 2 +/ with Cm/sup 3 +/. In heavy water and organic solutions, a substantial increase in the radioluminescence yield of curium is observed, which is in good agreement with the data on photoluminescence. The results obtained suggest that the radioluminescence of curium in solutions (in the absence of energy-donor ligands) is excited mainly directly, while the role of energy transfer to curium from the solvent or its radiolysis products is negligible.

Yusov, A.B.; Perminov, V.P.; Krot, N.N.; Kazakov, V.P.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Plutonium recovery from carbonate wash solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Periodically higher than expected levels of plutonium are found in carbonate solutions used to wash second plutonium cycle solvent. The recent accumulation of plutonium in carbonate wash solutions has led to studies to determine the cause of that plutonium accumulation, to evaluate the quality of all canyon solvents, and to develop additional criteria needed to establish when solvent quality is acceptable. Solvent from three canyon solvent extraction cycles was used to evaluate technology required to measure tributyl phosphate (TBP) degradation products and was used to evaluate solvent quality criteria during the development of plutonium recovery processes. 1 fig.

Gray, J.H.; Reif, D.J.; Chostner, D.F.; Holcomb, H.P.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

444

Cosmological Solutions of Emergent Noncommutative Gravity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Matrix models of the Yang-Mills type lead to an emergent gravity theory, which does not require fine-tuning of a cosmological constant. We find cosmological solutions of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker type. They generically have a big bounce, and an early inflationlike phase with graceful exit. The mechanism is purely geometrical; no ad hoc scalar fields are introduced. The solutions are stabilized through vacuum fluctuations and are thus compatible with quantum mechanics. This leads to a Milne-like universe after inflation, which appears to be in remarkably good agreement with observation and may provide an alternative to standard cosmology.

Klammer, Daniela; Steinacker, Harold [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Wien, A-1090 Wien (Austria)

2009-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

445

Alkali solution treatment on sandstone cores  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was used for filtering the solution before the injection into the core. Hassler-t e Core Holder A stainless steel core holder was used to hold the core for treatment with the solutions. The core sample was positioned in the center of the core holder... and heat the water in the flask. Electric Heatin Ta e A silicone rubber embedded flexible heating tape was used to wrap the core holder to heat the core sample to the desired temperature. The maximum 0 continuous operating temperature of the tape...

Lee, Suk Jin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

446

Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training & Technology Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training & Technology Solutions 718-997-4875 ~ training@qc.cuny.edu ~ I-Bldg 214 How to Pay Your Tuition Using E be navigated to your Student Center page. John Smith 23145678 John's Student Center #12;Training & Technology

Johnson Jr.,, Ray

447

Extraction and Quantitative Analysis of Iodine in Solid and Solution Matrixes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

129I is a contaminant of interest in the vadose zone and groundwater at numerous federal and privately-owned facilities. Several techniques have been utilized to extract iodine from solid matrices; however, all of them rely on two fundamental approaches: liquid extraction or chemical/heat facilitated volatilization. While these methods are typically chosen for their ease of implementation, they do not totally dissolve the solid. Because some of the iodine partitions onto the soil, extraction methods that do not result in total sample dissolution could underestimate the total iodine content of solid samples. We defined a method that produces complete solid dissolution and conducted laboratory tests to assess its efficacy to completely extract iodine from solid matrices. Testing consisted of potassium nitrate/potassium hydroxide fusion of the sample, followed by sample dissolution in a mixture of sulfuric acid and sodium bisulfite. Direct analysis of the dissolved sample was performed via inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (Perkin Elmer Elan DRC II) using a tertiary amine (Spectrasol CFA-C) carrier solution. The fusion extraction method resulted in complete sample dissolution of all solid matrices tested: sediment, glass samples containing low-levels of iodine, as well as tank waste material collected from the Hanford Site. Quantitative analysis of iodine (127I and 129I) showed better than ? 10% accuracy for certified reference standards, with the linear operating range extending more than three orders of magnitude (0.005 to 5 ug/L). Extraction and analysis of four replicates of standard reference material (San Joaquin Soil) from the National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD, resulted in an average recovery of 98% with a relative percent deviation of 6%. This simple and cost-effective technique can be applied to solid samples of varying matrices with little or no adaptation.

Brown, Christopher F.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Vickerman, Tanya S.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

HEU to LEU conversion and blending facility: UNH blending alternative to produce LEU oxide for disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is examining options for the disposition of surplus weapons-usable fissile materials and storage of all weapons-usable fissile materials. Disposition is a process of use or disposal of material that results in the material being converted to a form that is substantially and inherently more proliferation-resistant than is the original form. Examining options for increasing the proliferation resistance of highly enriched uranium (HEU) is part of this effort. This report provides data to be used in the environmental impact analysis for the uranyl nitrate hexahydrate blending option to produce oxide for disposal. This the Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) alternative will have two missions (1) convert HEU materials into HEU uranyl nitrate (UNH) and (2) blend the HEU uranyl nitrate with depleted and natural assay uranyl nitrate to produce an oxide that can be stored until an acceptable disposal approach is available. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. The blended LEU will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

LE JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE ACTION DE L'ACIDE MOLYBDIQUE ET DES MOLYBDATES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

d'autres corps étrangers que les molybdates et tungstates. yValden (') découvre l'action du nitrate d'uranyle alcalin sur les acides tartrique et malique. Rosenheim et Itzig (3) montrent que les sels

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

450

tivcment a perdu la proprit de dissiper la charge positive ou ngative d'un second conducteur; mais il peut dcharger un con-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

photo- graphique, comme dans les expériences de M. H. Becquerel sur l'uranium, le nitrate d'urane, le sulfate double d'uranyle et de potassium, etc. Mais il n'a pas réussi à observer l'action électrique de l

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

451

Np Behavior in Synthesized Uranyl Phases: Results of Initial Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Initial tests were completed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for developing a potential mechanism to retard the mobility of neptunium at the Yucca Mountain repository. Neptunium is of concern because of its mobility in the environment and long half life, contributing a large percentage of the potential dose over extended times at the perimeter of the site. The mobility of neptunium could be retarded by associating with uranium mineral phases. The following four uranium mineral phases were examined and are potential secondary phases expected to form as a result of interactions of spent nuclear fuel with the local environment: meta-schoepite, studtite, uranophane, and sodium boltwoodite. The fate of the neptunium was examined in these synthetic experiments.

Friese, Judah I.; Douglas, Matthew; McNamara, Bruce K.; Clark, Sue B.; Hanson, Brady D.

2004-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

452

Diffusion and Adsorption of Uranyl Carbonate Species in Nanosized...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

whereas adsorption of CO32- and Ca2UO2(CO3)3, which attach to the surface via hydrogen bonding from a surface hydroxyl group to a carbonate oxygen, was calculated to be either...

453

Diffusion and Adsorption of Uranyl Carbonate Species in Nanosized Mineral  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData FilesShape,Physics DiagnosticsMicrochips.

454

Multispecies diffusion models: A study of uranyl species diffusion. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource ProgramModificationEnzyme-Functionalized Gold Nanorod Labels

455

A cryogenic fluorescence spectroscopic study of uranyl carbonate,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies |November 2011A FirstEMSL ShellACalmodulin inU

456

Sequestering Uranium from Seawater: Binding Strength and Modes of Uranyl  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmitted forHighlightsSeminars Seminars at the

457

Computer Simulation of Uranyl Uptake by the Rough Lipopolysaccharide  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity2 Computational Physics andComputer Sciences andMembrane

458

ammonium uranyl carbonate: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PHYSICS Visualizing Preferential Flow Paths using Ammonium Carbonate and a pH Indicator Environmental Management and Restoration Websites Summary: wet-ers of water flow in soil....

459

ammonium uranyl carbonates: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PHYSICS Visualizing Preferential Flow Paths using Ammonium Carbonate and a pH Indicator Environmental Management and Restoration Websites Summary: wet-ers of water flow in soil....

460

Finding Acceptable Solutions Faster Using Inadmissible Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

explicit estimation search (EES), a bounded suboptimal search algorithm that uses unbiased cost(n)+h(n) becomes f (n) = g(n)+wh(n). The weight, w, increases the importance of h (estimated cost of reaching attempt to find a solution quickly while guaranteeing that its cost does not exceed optimal by more than

Ruml, Wheeler

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Energy and Society Week 3 Section Solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wh and the power plant has a conversion efficiency of 30%. Coal has an energy density of 29.3x106 J/kg. Before1 9/7/2014 Energy and Society Week 3 Section Solution 3. ENERGY BASICS AND UNIT ANALYSIS (ONLY to office hours soon. Energy versus Power - Work refers to an activity involving a force and movement

Kammen, Daniel M.

462

Workshop to Assess Innovative Solutions to Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Workshop to Assess Innovative Solutions to Transportation Needs in the Colonias Workshop Summary SWUTC/04/167151-1 Texas Transportation Institute Texas A&M University System College Station, Texas 77843-3135 Center for HUD's Colonias Program Southwest Region University Transportation Center #12

463

Schwarzschild solution in extended teleparallel gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tetrad field, with two unknown functions of radial coordinate and an angle $\\Phi$ which is the polar angle $\\phi$ times a function of the redial coordinate, is applied to the field equation of modified theory of gravity. Exact vacuum solution is derived whose scalar torsion, $T ={T^\\alpha}_{\\mu \

G. G. L. Nashed

2015-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

464

Ankndigung Stellenausschreibung Forschungsprojekt Offshore-Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ankündigung Stellenausschreibung für das Forschungsprojekt Offshore-Solutions - Dienstleistungspotenziale von Werften und Reedereien als Lösungsanbieter während des Betriebs von Offshore Windparks und Reedereien in der Betriebsphase von Offshore-Windparks, ggf. bis zu einer Positionierung als

Berlin,Technische Universität

465

Piping-System Solutions Using Mathcad  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Piping-System Solutions Using Mathcad B. K. HODGE,1 ROBERT P. TAYLOR2 1 Mechanical Engineering associated with piping systems. Examples include series piping systems, parallel piping systems, and pipingScience (www.interscience.wiley.com.); DOI 10.1002/cae.10010 Keywords: piping systems; Mathcad, Hardy

Kostic, Milivoje M.

466

EPSILON AURIGAE: AN IMPROVED SPECTROSCOPIC ORBITAL SOLUTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A rare eclipse of the mysterious object ? Aurigae will occur in 2009-2011. We report an updated single-lined spectroscopic solution for the orbit of the primary star based on 20 years of monitoring at the CfA, combined ...

Stefanik, Robert P.

467

Robust capacity expansion solutions for telecommunication ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

networksX the osts of investment nd the qulity of servie @ oA ...... Robust solutions with 1 ? ? for capacity constraints. Deterministic. Protection ...... tions networks under demnd unertintyD in Proceedings of the 6th International.

2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

468

Exercise Session 6 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 6 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Marco Forgione m Session 6 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, M. Forgione Linear Quadratic Regulator, in Theory Consider an object ­ Ac.Yr. 2012/13, 1e Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise Session 6 ­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, M. Forgione it can be easily

Abate, Alessandro

469

Exercise Session 2 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 2 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Pawel Stano p ­ Exercise Session 2 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, P. Stano Review of Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors Computation Find 1 #12;A. Abate, P. Stano The eigenvectors are found as follows: = 3 : (A - 3I)v = 0 -2 -2 2 -1

Abate, Alessandro

470

Exercise Session 2 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 2 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Jacopo Antonello j ­ Exercise Session 2 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, J. Antonello Review of Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors Computation 1 #12;A. Abate, J. Antonello The eigenvectors are found as follows: = 3 : (A - 3I)v = 0 -2 -2 2

Abate, Alessandro

471

Exercise Session 3 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 3 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Marco Forgione m ­ Exercise Session 3 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, M. Forgione Linearization Example In the following diagram, we.Yr. 2012/13, 1e Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise Session 3 ­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, M. Forgione · x, horizontal position

Abate, Alessandro

472

Exercise Session 3 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 3 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Pawel Stano p ­ Exercise Session 3 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, P. Stano Linearization Example In the following diagram, we have.Yr. 2011/12, 1e Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise Session 3 ­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, P. Stano · x, horizontal position

Abate, Alessandro

473

Exercise Session 5 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 5 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Aleksandar Haber a Session 5 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, P. Stano Eigenvalue Assignment via Controllable Canonical Form Consider ­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, P. Stano The state space representation is: x1 x2 x3 x4 = -1 -2 -3

Abate, Alessandro

474

Exercise Session 5 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sc4026 Exercise Session 5 (with solutions) Alessandro Abate a.abate@tudelft.nl Jacopo Antonello j Session 5 ­ sc4026 #12;A. Abate, J. Antonello Eigenvalue Assignment via Controllable Canonical Form ­ sc4026 1 #12;A. Abate, J. Antonello The state space representation is: x1 x2 x3 x4 = -1

Abate, Alessandro

475

cleanenergyfuels.com Natural Gas Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 cleanenergyfuels.com Natural Gas Solutions for Transportation December 7, 2012 #12;2 cleanenergyfuels.com Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Taxis Airport Vehicles Transit Buses Leading Provider of Natural Gas As a Transportation Fuel About Clean Energy Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Port Trucking LNG Station

Minnesota, University of

476

Materials Solutions for Hydrogen Delivery in Pipelines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Materials Solutions for Hydrogen Delivery in Pipelines Dr. Subodh K. Das Secat, Inc. September of new pipeline infrastructure Develop barrier coatings for minimizing hydrogen permeation in pipelines;NACE Hydrogen Induced Cracking (HIC) Test Evaluates resistance of pipeline and pressure vessel

477

Semi-analytical solutions for multilayer reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intercept Case 3 aj + bj tD Linear p[wDj(tD)] Case 4 a[j] exp(bj tD) Exponential p[wDj(tD)] Case 5 General formulation: p[wsD(tD)] = [] Total Pressure/Rate Averaging} Our work illustrates the validity of each approximate multilayer solution...

Lolon, Elyezer Pabibak

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

478

Primes Solutions Of Linear Diophantine Equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Let k => 1, m => 1 be small fixed integers, gcd(k, m) = 1. This note develops some techniques for proving the existence of infinitely many primes solutions x = p, and y = q of the linear Diophantine equation y = mx + k.

N. A. Carella

2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

479

On unorthodox solutions of the Bloch equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A systematic, rigorous, and complete investigation of the Bloch equations in time-harmonic driving classical field is performed. Our treatment is unique in that it takes full advantage of the partial fraction decomposition over real number field, which makes it possible to find and classify all analytic solutions. Torrey's analytic solution in the form of exponentially damped harmonic oscillations [Phys. Rev. {\\bf 76}, 1059 (1949)] is found to dominate the parameter space, which justifies its use at numerous occasions in magnetic resonance and in quantum optics of atoms, molecules, and quantum dots. The unorthodox solutions of the Bloch equations, which do not have the form of exponentially damped harmonic oscillations, are confined to rather small detunings $\\delta^2\\lesssim (\\gamma-\\gamma_t)^2/27$ and small field strengths $\\Omega^2\\lesssim 8 (\\gamma-\\gamma_t)^2/27$, where $\\gamma$ and $\\gamma_t$ describe decay rates of the excited state (the total population relaxation rate) and of the coherence, respectively. The unorthodox solutions being readily accessible experimentally are characterized by rather featureless time dependence.

Alexander Moroz

2012-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

480

Energy and Society Week 4 Section Solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. What is the main flaw of GDP per capita as the development metric? ANS: Open end question. Main flaw1 9/17/2014 Energy and Society Week 4 Section Solution TOPIC 1: Energy & Development: [iClicker]-1. Influence = B. Energy consumption = (/$) C. Carbon = 2 (/) ANS: [C] Note carbon

Kammen, Daniel M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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481

Storage Solutions for Hawaii's Smart Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Storage Solutions for Hawaii's Smart Energy Future Presented to CMRU August 12, 2012 University of Hawaii at Manoa Hawaii Natural Energy Institute #12;Current Energy Storage Projects in Hawaii · 15 (2) · Spinning reserve/reserve support (2) #12;· Select and deploy Grid-scale energy storage systems

482

Bifurcation to vortex solutions in superconducting lms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bifurcation to vortex solutions in superconducting #12;lms T. Boeck #3; S.J. Chapman y Mathematical state to a superconducting state in a decreasing magnetic #12;eld is studied for a slab geometry of these behaviours will occur in practice. 1 Introduction If a superconducting body is placed in a su?ciently strong

Chapman, Jon

483

Annual Inventory Troubleshooting Checklist Problem Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Annual Inventory Troubleshooting Checklist Problem Solutions Duplicate tag number Send email to am-4608 showing date and why returned. If equipment was replaced, has it been inventoried? If so, please notate and property coordinator. If item is listed for another department: 1) If the item should be in your inventory

484

Internship Description Title: Stellar Solutions Engineering Internship  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Internship Description Title: Stellar Solutions ­ Engineering Internship Job Description: The internship will be held at the Stellar National Reconnaissance Office in Washington, DC. Tasks will require a background in intelligence, and familiar with all-source analysis. This internship is flexible throughout

Virginia Tech

485

Four nontrivial solutions for subcritical exponential equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Four nontrivial solutions for subcritical exponential equations Dimitri Mugnai Dipartimento di@dipmat.unipg.it Abstract We show that a semilinear Dirichlet problem in bounded domains of R2 in presence of subcritical). Equation (3) is a standard example of a subcritical growth, while equation (4) is the model for a critical

Mugnai, Dimitri

486

CIMFUELS: Commercial practice--tools vs. solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Continuing the them of CIMFUELS` recent editorials on good management practice, the nature of commercial offerings and practices between CIM providers and their fuel and petrochemical operating company customers and clients also warrants discussion. The commercial practices of the CIMFUELS business in this unstructured, fast changing, high technology global business has suffered unduly from inadequate distinction between tools and solutions.

Latour, P.R.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Solution generating theorems for perfect fluid spheres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The first static spherically symmetric perfect fluid solution with constant density was found by Schwarzschild in 1918. Generically, perfect fluid spheres are interesting because they are first approximations to any attempt at building a realistic model for a general relativistic star. Over the past 90 years a confusing tangle of specific perfect fluid spheres has been discovered, with most of these examples seemingly independent from each other. To bring some order to this collection, we develop several new transformation theorems that map perfect fluid spheres into perfect fluid spheres. These transformation theorems sometimes lead to unexpected connections between previously known perfect fluid spheres, sometimes lead to new previously unknown perfect fluid spheres, and in general can be used to develop a systematic way of classifying the set of all perfect fluid spheres. In addition, we develop new ``solution generating'' theorems for the TOV, whereby any given solution can be ``deformed'' to a new solution. Because these TOV-based theorems work directly in terms of the pressure profile and density profile it is relatively easy to impose regularity conditions at the centre of the fluid sphere.

Petarpa Boonserm; Matt Visser; Silke Weinfurtner

2006-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

488

Solution generating theorems for the TOV equation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkov [TOV] equation constrains the internal structure of general relativistic static perfect fluid spheres. We develop several "solution generating" theorems for the TOV, whereby any given solution can be "deformed" to a new solution. Because the theorems we develop work directly in terms of the physical observables -- pressure profile and density profile -- it is relatively easy to check the density and pressure profiles for physical reasonableness. This work complements our previous article [Phys. Rev. D71 (2005) 124307; gr-qc/0503007] wherein a similar "algorithmic" analysis of the general relativistic static perfect fluid sphere was presented in terms of the spacetime geometry -- in the present analysis the pressure and density are primary and the spacetime geometry is secondary. In particular, our "deformed" solutions to the TOV equation are conveniently parameterized in terms of delta rho_c and delta p_c, the finite shift in the central density and central pressure. We conclude by presenting a new physical and mathematical interpretation of the TOV equation -- as an integrability condition on the density and pressure profiles.

Petarpa Boonserm; Matt Visser; Silke Weinfurtner

2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

489

Fiber optic detector and method for using same for detecting chemical species  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical sensing device for uranyl and other substances, a method for making an optical sensing device and a method for chemically binding uranyl and other indicators to glass, quartz, cellulose and similar substrates. The indicator, such as arsenazo III, is immobilized on the substrate using a chemical binding process. The immobilized arsenazo III causes uranyl from a fluid sample to bind irreversibly to the substrate at its active sites, thus causing absorption of a portion of light transmitted through the substrate. Determination of the amount of light absorbed, using conventional means, yields the concentration of uranyl present in the sample fluid. The binding of uranyl on the substrate can be reversed by subsequent exposure of the substrate to a solution of 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid. The chemical binding process is suitable for similarly binding other indicators, such as bromocresol green.

Baylor, Lewis C. (North Augusta, SC); Buchanan, Bruce R. (Perkiomenville, PA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Clean Energy Solutions Center Services (Chinese Translation) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the Chinese language translation of the Clean Energy Solutions Center (Solutions Center) fact sheet. The Solutions Center helps governments, advisors and analysts create policies and programs that advance the deployment of clean energy technologies. The Solutions Center partners with international organizations to provide online training, expert assistance, and technical resources on clean energy policy.

Not Available

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Clean Energy Solutions Center Services (Vietnamese Translation) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the Vietnamese language translation of the Clean Energy Solutions Center (Solutions Center) fact sheet. The Solutions Center helps governments, advisors and analysts create policies and programs that advance the deployment of clean energy technologies. The Solutions Center partners with international organizations to provide online training, expert assistance, and technical resources on clean energy policy.

Not Available

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Clean Energy Solutions Center Services (Arabic Translation) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the Arabic translation of the Clean Energy Solutions Center Services fact sheet. The Clean Energy Solutions Center (Solutions Center) helps governments, advisors and analysts create policies and programs that advance the deployment of clean energy technologies. The Solutions Center partners with international organizations to provide online training, expert assistance, and technical resources on clean energy policy.

Not Available

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Symmetry in CSP solutions Nicoleta Neagu and Boi Faltings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Symmetry in CSP solutions Nicoleta Neagu and Boi Faltings Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (LIA for finding symmetric solutions of in a CSP. This method is using local symmetries of the CSP structure and research upon searching CSP solutions but few of them watch the relations between CSP solutions. In certain

Flener, Pierre

494

Static Solutions of Einstein's Equations with Spherical Symmetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Schwarzschild solution is a complete solution of Einstein's field equations for a static spherically symmetric field. The Einstein's field equations solutions appear in the literature, but in different ways corresponding to different definitions of the radial coordinate. We attempt to compare them to the solutions with nonvanishing energy density and pressure. We also calculate some special cases with changes in spherical symmetry.

Iftikhar Ahmad; Maqsoom Fatima; Najam-ul-Basat

2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

495

Solution-grown crystals for neutron radiation detectors, and methods of solution growth  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method according to one embodiment includes growing an organic crystal from solution, the organic crystal exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source. A system according to one embodiment includes an organic crystal having physical characteristics of formation from solution, the organic crystal exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source; and a photodetector for detecting the signal response of the organic crystal. A method according to another embodiment includes growing an organic crystal from solution, the organic crystal being large enough to exhibit a detectable signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source. An organic crystal according to another embodiment includes an organic crystal having physical characteristics of formation from solution, the organic crystal exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source, wherein the organic crystal has a length of greater than about 1 mm in one dimension.

Zaitseva, Natalia P.; Hull, Giulia; Cherepy, Nerine J.; Payne, Stephen A.; Stoeffl, Wolfgang

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

496

Solutions to the anisotropic quantum Rabi model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, the anisotropic quantum Rabi model with different coupling strengths of the rotating-wave and counter-rotating wave terms is studied by using two kinds of extended coherent states (ECS). By the first kind of ECS, we can derive a so-called $G$-function, by which both the regular and exceptional solutions can be given. The exceptional solution are just corresponding to the crossing points of two energy levels with different parities, so is doubly degenerate. By the second kind of ECS, a general scheme for the eigensolutions is derived analytically in a unified way. The zero-order approximation is just the adiabatic approximation, and the first-order approximation is actually a generalized rotating-wave approximation. The algebraic formulae for the eigensolutions are given explicitly in two approximations. The generalized rotating-wave approximations work well in a wide range of two different coupling strengths and the qubit detunings.

Liwei Duan; Qing-Hu Chen

2015-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

497

Fractal powers in Serrin's swirling vortex solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a modification of the fluid flow model for a tornado-like swirling vortex developed by J. Serrin, where velocity decreases as the reciprocal of the distance from the vortex axis. Recent studies, based on radar data of selected severe weather events, indicate that the angular momentum in a tornado may not be constant with the radius, and thus suggest a different scaling of the velocity/radial distance dependence. Motivated by this suggestion, we consider Serrin's approach with the assumption that the velocity decreases as the reciprocal of the distance from the vortex axis to the power $b$ with a general $b>0$. This leads to a boundary-value problem for a system of nonlinear differential equations. We analyze this problem for particular cases, both with nonzero and zero viscosity, discuss the question of existence of solutions, and use numerical techniques to describe those solutions that we cannot obtain analytically.

Pavel B?lk; Douglas P. Dokken; Kurt Scholz; Mikhail M. Shvartsman

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

498

The Radiolysis of AmVI Solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reduction of bismuthate-produced AmVI by 60Co gamma-rays was measured using post-irradiation UV/Vis spectroscopy. The reduction of AmVI by radiolysis was rapid, producing AmV as the sole product. Relatively low absorbed doses in the ~0.3 kGy range quantitatively reduced a solution of 2.5 x 10-4 M AmVI. The addition of bismuthate to samples during irradiation did not appear to protect AmVI from radiolytic reduction during these experiments. It was also shown here that AmV is very stable toward radiation. The quantitative reduction of the AmVI concentration here corresponds to 1.4 hours of exposure to a process solution, however the actual americium concentrations will be higher and the expected contact times short when using centrifugal contactors. Thus, the reduction rate found in these initial experiments may not be excessive.

Bruce J. Mincher

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Predicting binding free energies in solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent predictions of absolute binding free energies of host-guest complexes in aqueous solution using electronic structure theory have been encouraging for some systems, while other systems remain problematic for others. In paper I summarize some of the many factors that could easily contribute 1-3 kcal/mol errors at 298 K: three-body dispersion effects, molecular symmetry, anharmonicity, spurious imaginary frequencies, insufficient conformational sampling, wrong or changing ionization states, errors in the solvation free energy of ions, and explicit solvent (and ion) effects that are not well-represented by continuum models. While the paper is primarily a synthesis of previously published work there are two new results: the adaptation of Legendre transformed free energies to electronic structure theory and a use of water clusters that maximizes error cancellation in binding free energies computed using explicit solvent molecules. While I focus on binding free energies in aqueous solution the approach also a...

Jensen, Jan H

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Alkaline earth cation extraction from acid solution  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An extractant medium for extracting alkaline earth cations from an aqueous acidic sample solution is described as are a method and apparatus for using the same. The separation medium is free of diluent, free-flowing and particulate, and comprises a Crown ether that is a 4,4'(5')[C.sub.4 -C.sub.8 -alkylcyclohexano]18-Crown-6 dispersed on an inert substrate material.

Dietz, Mark (Elmhurst, IL); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z