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1

SEPARATION OF BARIUM VALUES FROM URANYL NITRATE SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The separation of radioactive barium values from a uranyl nitrate solution of neutron-irradiated uranium is described. The 10 to 20% uranyl nitrate solution is passed through a flrst column of a cation exchange resin under conditions favoring the adsorption of barium and certain other cations. The loaded resin is first washed with dilute sulfuric acid to remove a portion of the other cations, and then wash with a citric acid solution at pH of 5 to 7 to recover the barium along with a lesser amount of the other cations. The PH of the resulting eluate is adjusted to about 2.3 to 3.5 and diluted prior to passing through a smaller second column of exchange resin. The loaded resin is first washed with a citric acid solution at a pH of 3 to elute undesired cations and then with citric acid solution at a pH of 6 to eluts the barium, which is substantially free of undesired cations.

Tompkins, E.R.

1959-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

2

Critical Parameters of Complex Geometry Intersecting Cylinders Containing Uranyl Nitrate Solution  

SciTech Connect

About three dozen previously unreported critical configurations are presented for very complex geometries filled with high concentration enriched uranyl nitrate solution. These geometries resemble a tall, thin Central Column (or trunk of a "tree") having long, thin arms (or "branches") extending up to four directions off the column. Arms are equally spaced from one another in vertical planes; and that spacing ranges from arms in contact to quite wide spacings. Both the Central Column and the many different arms are critically safe by themselves when each, alone, is filled with fissile solution; but, in combination, criticality occurs due to the interactions between arms and the column. Such neutronic interactions formed the principal focus of this study. While these results are fresh to the nuclear criticality safety industry and to those seeking novel experiments against which to validate computer codes, the experiments, themselves, are not recent. Over 100 experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory between September, 1967, and February of the following year.

Rothe, Robert Emil; Briggs, Joseph Blair

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

SEPARATION OF URANYL NITRATE BY EXTRACTION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is presented for obtaining U/sup 233/ from solutions containing Pa/sup 233/. A carrier precipitate, such as MnO/sub 2/, is formed in such solutions and carries with it the Pa/sup 233/ present. This precipitate is then dissolved in nitric acid and the solution is aged to allow decay of the Pa/ sup 233/ into U/sup 233/. After a sufficient length of time the U/sup 233/ bearing solution is made 2.5 to 4.5 Molar in manganese nitrate by addition thereof, and the solution is then treated with ether to obtain uranyl nitrate by solvent extraction techniques.

Stoughton, R.W.; Steahly, F.L.

1958-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

4

PRECISE DETERMINATION OF URANIUM IN URANYL NITRATE-ALUMINUM NITRATE SOLUTIONS  

SciTech Connect

A method was developed for the determination of uranium in aqueous solutions that contain aluminum and in tributyl phosphate. Uranium was separated from aluminum by an ion exchange technique and was then determined gravimetrically by the 8-hydroxyquinoline method. The coefficient of variation was O.3%. (auth)

MacDonald, C.M.

1960-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

GRAPHITE PRODUCTION UTILIZING URANYL NITRATE HEXAHYDRATE CATALYST  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

ABS>The graphitizing of a mixture composed of furfuryl alcohol binder and uranyl nitrate hexahydrate hardener and the subsequent curing, baking, and graphitizing with pressure being initially applied prior to curing are described. The pressure step may be carried out by extrusion, methyl cellulose being added to the mixture before the completion of extrusion. Uranium oxide may be added to the graphitizable mixture prior to the heating and pressure steps. The graphitizable mixture may consist of discrete layers of different compositions. (AEC)

Sheinberg, H.; Armstrong, J.R.; Schell, D.H.

1964-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

6

Production and Handling Slide 15: Yellow Cake, Uranyl Nitrate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skip Presentation Navigation First Slide Previous Slide Next Slide Last Presentation Table of Contents Yellow Cake, Uranyl Nitrate, ADU, UO2 Refer to caption below for image...

7

Production and Handling Slide 13: Yellow Cake, Uranyl Nitrate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ADU Skip Presentation Navigation First Slide Previous Slide Next Slide Last Presentation Table of Contents Yellow Cake, Uranyl Nitrate, ADU Refer to caption below for image...

8

Production and Handling Slide 17: Yellow Cake, Uranyl Nitrate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

, UF4 Skip Presentation Navigation First Slide Previous Slide Next Slide Last Presentation Table of Contents Yellow Cake, Uranyl Nitrate, ADU, UO2, UF4 Refer to caption below for...

9

Analysis of Enriched Uranyl Nitrate in Nested Annular Tank Array  

SciTech Connect

Two series of experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory during the 1980s using highly enriched (93%) uranyl nitrate solution in annular tanks. [1, 2] Tanks were of typical sizes found in nuclear production plants. Experiments looked at tanks of varying radii in a co-located set of nested tanks, a 1 by 2 array, and a 1 by 3 array. The co-located set of tanks had been analyzed previously [3] as a benchmark for inclusion within the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments. [4] The current study represents the benchmark analysis of the 1 by 3 array of a series of nested annular tanks. Of the seventeen configurations performed in this set of experiments, twelve were evaluated and nine were judged as acceptable benchmarks.

John D. Bess; James D. Cleaver

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Highly Enriched Uranyl Nitrate in Annular Tanks with Concrete Reflection: 1 x 3 Line Array of Nested Pairs of Tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of seven experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory beginning in August, 1980 (References 1 and 2). Highly enriched uranyl nitrate solution was introduced into a 1-3 linear array of nested stainless steel annular tanks. The tanks were inside a concrete enclosure, with various moderator and absorber materials placed inside and/or between the tanks. These moderators and absorbers included boron-free concrete, borated concrete, borated plaster, and cadmium. Two configurations included placing bottles of highly enriched uranyl nitrate between tanks externally. Another experiment involved nested hemispheres of highly enriched uranium placed between tanks externally. These three configurations are not evaluated in this report. The experiments evaluated here are part of a series of experiments, one set of which is evaluated in HEU-SOL-THERM-033. The experiments in this and HEU-SOL-THERM-033 were performed similarly. They took place in the same room and used the same tanks, some of the same moderators and absorbers, some of the same reflector panels, and uranyl nitrate solution from the same location. There are probably additional similarities that existed that are not identified here. Thus, many of the descriptions in this report are either the same or similar to those in the HEU-SOL-THERM-033 report. Seventeen configurations (sixteen of which were critical) were performed during seven experiments; six of those experiments are evaluated here with thirteen configurations. Two configurations were identical, except for solution height, and were conducted to test repeatability. The solution heights were averaged and the two were evaluated as one configuration, which gives a total of twelve evaluated configurations. One of the seventeen configurations was subcritical. Of the twelve critical configurations evaluated, nine were judged as acceptable as benchmarks.

James Cleaver; John D. Bess; Nathan Devine; Fitz Trumble

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

TREATMENT OF AMMONIUM NITRATE SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The treatment of waste solutions obtained in the processing of neutron- irradiated uranium containing fission products and ammonium nitrate is described. The object of this process is to provide a method whereby the ammonium nitrate is destroyed and removed from the solution so as to permit subsequent concentration of the solution.. In accordance with the process the residual nitrate solutions are treated with an excess of alkyl acid anhydride, such as acetic anhydride. Preferably, the residual nitrate solution is added to an excess of the acetic anhydride at such a rate that external heat is not required. The result of this operation is that the ammonium nitrate and acetic anhydride react to form N/sub 2/ O and acetic acid.

Boyer, T.W.; MacHutchin, J.G.; Yaffe, L.

1958-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

12

FLAME DENITRATION AND REDUCTION OF URANIUM NITRATE TO URANIUM DIOXIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is given for converting uranyl nitrate solution to uranium dioxide. The process comprises spraying fine droplets of aqueous uranyl nitrate solution into a hightemperature hydrocarbon flame, said flame being deficient in oxygen approximately 30%, retaining the feed in the flame for a sufficient length of time to reduce the nitrate to the dioxide, and recovering uranium dioxide. (AEC)

Hedley, W.H.; Roehrs, R.J.; Henderson, C.M.

1962-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

13

Standard test method for determination of bromine and chlorine in UF6 and uranyl nitrate by X-Ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This method covers the determination of bromine (Br) and chlorine (Cl) in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and uranyl nitrate solution. The method as written covers the determination of bromine in UF6 over the concentration range of 0.2 to 8 ?g/g, uranium basis. The chlorine in UF6 can be determined over the range of 4 to 160 ?g/g, uranium basis. Higher concentrations may be covered by appropriate dilutions. The detection limit for Br is 0.2 ?g/g uranium basis and for Cl is 4 ?g/g uranium basis. 1.2 This standard may involve hazardous materials, operations and equipment. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

PREPARATION OF URANIUM(IV) NITRATE SOLUTIONS  

SciTech Connect

A procedure was developed for the preparation of uranium(IV) nitrate solutions in dilute nitric acid. Zinc metal was used as a reducing agent for uranium(VI) in dilute sulfuric acid. The uranium(IV) was precipitated as the hydrated oxide and dissolved in nitric acid. Uranium(IV) nitrate solutions were prepared at a maximum concentration of 100 g/l. The uranium(VI) content was less than 2% of the uranium(IV). (auth)

Ondrejcin, R.S.

1961-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

ELECTROLYTIC OXIDATION OF ZIRCONIUM IN NITRATE SOLUTIONS  

SciTech Connect

Zirconiurn alloys used in the fabrication of nuclear fuel elements can be disintegrated and converted to insoluble oxides by electrolytic treatment in concentrated nitrate solutions. This reaction shows promise as a technique for reprocessing nuclear fuels clad with Zircaloy-2. For a particular applied voltage, nitric acid achieves the highest rate of attack, but the reaction can be carried out at rates of 2 mg/(cm/sup 2/)(min) or greater in either 7.5M sodium nitrate or 2.3M aluminum nitrate. A reaction rate of 7 mg/(cm/sup 2/) (min) can be easily attained in either 8M nitric acid or 7.5M sodium nitrate. The rate of reaction is a function of the temperature and tho applied voltage. An as-yet unsolved problem is the carry--down of uranium with the insoluble zirconium oxide product. (auth)

Bomar, M.R.

1961-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

16

Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as uranyl nitrate hexahydrate. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will have two missions: (1) convert HEU materials to pure HEU uranyl nitrate (UNH) and (2) blend pure HEU UNH with depleted and natural UNH to produce HEU UNH crystals. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. To the extent practical, the chemical and isotopic concentrations of blended LEU product will be held within the specifications required for LWR fuel. Such blended LEU product will be offered to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) to be sold as feed material to the commercial nuclear industry. Otherwise, blended LEU Will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

17

THE PREPARATION OF URANIUM DIOXIDE FROM A MOLTEN SALT SOLUTION OF URANYL CHLORIDE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Uranium oxides in a molten eutectic mixture of NaClKCl were chlorinated by bubbling chlorine gas through the mixture. The reaction product, uranyl chloride. was soluble in the molten salt. Although UO/sub 2/ was the most common oxide used, the reaction was similar in the other oxides. Phosgene and aluminum chloride were also used as chlorinating agents. A dense, crystalline precipitate of pure UO/sub 2/ was prepared by the reduction of the uranyl chloride contained in the molten salt solution. The reduction was accomplished by contacting the salt solution with any of several metals, by reaction with hydrogen or dry ammonia gas, or by electrolysis. Several kilograms of UO/sub 2/ were prepared by electrolysis using graphite electrodes. The physical properties of the material made it potentially useful as a ceramic fuel material. The initial high particle density of the "as-produced" UO/sub 2/ was considered of great potential advantage for adapting this process to the refabrication of irradiated UO/sub 2/ into recycle fuel elements. (M.C.G.)

Lyon, W.L.; Voiland, E.E.

1959-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

18

Method for photochemical reduction of uranyl nitrate by tri-N-butyl phosphate and application of this method to nuclear fuel reprocessing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Uranyl ion in solution in tri-n-butyl phosphate is readily photochemically reduced to U(IV). The product U(IV) may effectively be used in the Purex process for treating spent nuclear fuels to reduce Pu(IV) to Pu(III). The Pu(III) is readily separated from uranium in solution in the tri-n-butyl phosphate by an aqueous strip.

De Poorter, Gerald L. (Los Alamos, NM); Rofer-De Poorter, Cheryl K. (Los Alamos, NM)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Benchmark Evaluation of Plutonium Nitrate Solution Arrays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In October and November of 1981 thirteen approach-to-critical experiments were performed on a remote split table machine (RSTM) in the Critical Mass Laboratory of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in Richland, Washington, using planar arrays of polyethylene bottles filled with plutonium (Pu) nitrate solution. Arrays of up to sixteen bottles were used to measure the critical number of bottles and critical array spacing with a tight fitting Plexiglas{reg_sign} reflector on all sides of the arrays except the top. Some experiments used Plexiglas shells fitted around each bottles to determine the effect of moderation on criticality. Each bottle contained approximately 2.4 L of Pu(NO3)4 solution with a Pu content of 105 g Pu/L and a free acid molarity H+ of 5.1. The plutonium was of low 240Pu (2.9 wt.%) content. These experiments were performed to fill a gap in experimental data regarding criticality limits for storing and handling arrays of Pu solution in reprocessing facilities. Of the thirteen approach-to-critical experiments eleven resulted in extrapolations to critical configurations. Four of the approaches were extrapolated to the critical number of bottles; these were not evaluated further due to the large uncertainty associated with the modeling of a fraction of a bottle. The remaining seven approaches were extrapolated to critical array spacing of 3-4 and 4-4 arrays; these seven critical configurations were evaluation for inclusion as acceptable benchmark experiments in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) Handbook. Detailed and simple models of these configurations were created and the associated bias of these simplifications was determined to range from 0.00116 and 0.00162 {+-} 0.00006 ?keff. Monte Carlo analysis of all models was completed using MCNP5 with ENDF/BVII.0 neutron cross section libraries. A thorough uncertainty analysis of all critical, geometric, and material parameters was performed using parameter perturbation methods. It was found that uncertainty in the impurities in the polyethylene bottles, reflector position, bottle outer diameter, and critical array spacing had the largest effect. The total uncertainty ranged from 0.00651 to 0.00920 ?keff. Evaluation methods and results will be presented and discussed in greater detail in the full paper.

M. A. Marshall; J. D. Bess

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Method for improved decomposition of metal nitrate solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for co-conversion of aqueous solutions of one or more heavy metal nitrates is described, wherein thermal decomposition within a temperature range of about 300 to 800/sup 0/C is carried out in the presence of about 50 to 500% molar concentration of ammonium nitrate to total metal.

Haas, P.A.; Stines, W.B.

1981-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Method for improved decomposition of metal nitrate solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for co-conversion of aqueous solutions of one or more heavy metal nitrates wherein thermal decomposition within a temperature range of about 300.degree. to 800.degree. C. is carried out in the presence of about 50 to 500% molar concentration of ammonium nitrate to total metal.

Haas, Paul A. (Knoxville, TN); Stines, William B. (Knoxville, TN)

1983-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

22

Uranyl Nitrate Flow Loop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of the work discussed in this report were to: (1) develop a flow loop that would simulate the purified uranium-bearing aqueous stream exiting the solvent extraction process in a natural uranium conversion plant (NUCP); (2) develop a test plan that would simulate normal operation and disturbances that could be anticipated in an NUCP; (3) use the flow loop to test commercially available flowmeters for use as safeguards monitors; and (4) recommend a flowmeter for production-scale testing at an NUCP. There has been interest in safeguarding conversion plants because the intermediate products [uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}), uranium tetrafluoride (UF{sub 4}), and uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6})] are all suitable uranium feedstocks for producing special nuclear materials. Furthermore, if safeguards are not applied virtually any nuclear weapons program can obtain these feedstocks without detection by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Historically, IAEA had not implemented safeguards until the purified UF{sub 6} product was declared as feedstock for enrichment plants. H. A. Elayat et al. provide a basic definition of a safeguards system: 'The function of a safeguards system on a chemical conversion plant is in general terms to verify that no useful nuclear material is being diverted to use in a nuclear weapons program'. The IAEA now considers all highly purified uranium compounds as candidates for safeguarding. DOE is currently interested in 'developing instruments, tools, strategies, and methods that could be of use to the IAEA in the application of safeguards' for materials found in the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle-prior to the production of the uranium hexafluoride or oxides that have been the traditional starting point for IAEA safeguards. Several national laboratories, including Oak Ridge, Los Alamos, Lawrence Livermore, and Brookhaven, have been involved in developing tools or techniques for safeguarding conversion plants. This study was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) NA-241, Office of Dismantlement and Transparency.

Ladd-Lively, Jennifer L [ORNL

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Electrochemical processing of nitrate waste solutions  

SciTech Connect

The second phase of research performed at The Electrosynthesis Co., Inc. has demonstrated the successful removal of nitrite and nitrate from a synthetic effluent stream via a direct electrochemical reduction at a cathode. It was shown that direct reduction occurs at good current efficiencies in 1,000 hour studies. The membrane separation process is not readily achievable for the removal of nitrites and nitrates due to poor current efficiencies and membrane stability problems. A direct reduction process was studied at various cathode materials in a flow cell using the complete synthetic mix. Lead was found to be the cathode material of choice, displaying good current efficiencies and stability in short and long term tests under conditions of high temperature and high current density. Several anode materials were studied in both undivided and divided cell configurations. A divided cell configuration was preferable because it would prevent re-oxidation of nitrite by the anode. The technical objective of eliminating electrode fouling and solids formation was achieved although anode materials which had demonstrated good stability in short term divided cell tests corroded in 1,000 hour experiments. The cause for corrosion is thought to be F[sup [minus

Genders, D.; Weinberg, N.; Hartsough, D. (Electrosynthesis Co., Inc., Cheektowaga, NY (United States))

1992-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

24

The Influence of the Linker Geometry in Bis(3-hydroxy-N-methyl-pyridin-2-one) Ligands on Solution-Phase Uranyl Affinity  

SciTech Connect

Seven water-soluble, tetradentate bis(3-hydroxy-N-methyl-pyridin-2-one) (bis-Me-3,2-HOPO) ligands were synthesized that vary only in linker geometry and rigidity. Solution phase thermodynamic measurements were conducted between pH 1.6 and pH 9.0 to determine the effects of these variations on proton and uranyl cation affinity. Proton affinity decreases by introduction of the solubilizing triethylene glycol group as compared to un-substituted reference ligands. Uranyl affinity was found to follow no discernable trends with incremental geometric modification. The butyl-linked 4Li-Me-3,2-HOPO ligand exhibited the highest uranyl affinity, consistent with prior in vivo decorporation results. Of the rigidly-linked ligands, the o-phenylene linker imparted the best uranyl affinity to the bis-Me-3,2-HOPO ligand platform.

Szigethy, Geza; Raymond, Kenneth

2010-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

25

Electrochemical processing of nitrate waste solutions. Phase 2, Final report  

SciTech Connect

The second phase of research performed at The Electrosynthesis Co., Inc. has demonstrated the successful removal of nitrite and nitrate from a synthetic effluent stream via a direct electrochemical reduction at a cathode. It was shown that direct reduction occurs at good current efficiencies in 1,000 hour studies. The membrane separation process is not readily achievable for the removal of nitrites and nitrates due to poor current efficiencies and membrane stability problems. A direct reduction process was studied at various cathode materials in a flow cell using the complete synthetic mix. Lead was found to be the cathode material of choice, displaying good current efficiencies and stability in short and long term tests under conditions of high temperature and high current density. Several anode materials were studied in both undivided and divided cell configurations. A divided cell configuration was preferable because it would prevent re-oxidation of nitrite by the anode. The technical objective of eliminating electrode fouling and solids formation was achieved although anode materials which had demonstrated good stability in short term divided cell tests corroded in 1,000 hour experiments. The cause for corrosion is thought to be F{sup {minus}} ions from the synthetic mix migrating across the cation exchange membrane and forming HF in the acid anolyte. Other possibilities for anode materials were explored. A membrane separation process was investigated which employs an anion and cation exchange membrane to remove nitrite and nitrate, recovering caustic and nitric acid. Present research has shown poor current efficiencies for nitrite and nitrate transport across the anion exchange membrane due to co-migration of hydroxide anions. Precipitates form within the anion exchange membranes which would eventually result in the failure of the membranes. Electrochemical processing offers a highly promising and viable method for the treatment of nitrate waste solutions.

Genders, D.; Weinberg, N.; Hartsough, D. [Electrosynthesis Co., Inc., Cheektowaga, NY (US)

1992-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

26

Solution High-Energy Burst Assembly (SHEBA) results from subprompt critical experiments with uranyl fluoride fuel  

SciTech Connect

The Solution High-Energy Burst Assembly (SHEBA) was originally constructed during 1980 and was designed to be a clean free-field geometry, right-circular, cylindrically symmetric critical assembly employing U(5%)O{sub 2}F{sub 2} solution as fuel. A second version of SHEBA, employing the same fuel but equipped with a fuel pump and shielding pit, was commissioned in 1993. This report includes data and operating experience for the 1993 SHEBA only. Solution-fueled benchmark work focused on the development of experimental measurements of the characterization of SHEBA; a summary of the results are given. A description of the system and the experimental results are given in some detail in the report. Experiments were designed to: (1) study the behavior of nuclear excursions in a low-enrichment solution, (2) evaluate accidental criticality alarm detectors for fuel-processing facilities, (3) provide radiation spectra and dose measurements to benchmark radiation transport calculations on a low-enrichment solution system similar to centrifuge enrichment plants, and (4) provide radiation fields to calibrate personnel dosimetry. 15 refs., 37 figs., 10 tabs.

Cappiello, C.C.; Butterfield, K.B.; Sanchez, R.G. [and others

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Optical apparatus and method for sensing uranyl  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical sensing device for uranyl and other substances, a method for making an optical sensing device and a method for chemically binding uranyl and other indicators to glass, quartz, cellulose and similar substrates. The indicator, such as arsenazo III, is immobilized on the substrate using a chemical binding process. The immobilized arsenazo III causes uranyl from a fluid sample to bind irreversibly to the substrate at its active sites, thus causing absorption of a portion of light transmitted through the substrate. Determination of the amount of light absorbed, using conventional means, yields the concentration of uranyl present in the sample fluid. The binding of uranyl on the substrate can be reversed by subsequent exposure of the substrate to a solution of 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid. The chemical binding process is suitable for similarly binding other indicators, such as bromocresol green.

Baylor, L.C.; Buchanan, B.R.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Shock compression of water and solutions of ammonium nitrate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4.3 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 4.4 Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 5 Shock compression of water 95 5.1 Cell development... .pwcs.com.au/display/assets/download.php?id=498. W. B. Sudweeks. Physical and chemical properties of industrial slurry explo- sives. Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Product Research and Development, 24(3):432436, 1985. N. Taylor. Hot spots in Ammonium Nitrate. PhD thesis, University of Cam...

Morley, Michael James

2011-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

29

LOW TEMPERATURE PROCESS FOR THE REMOVAL AND RECOVERY OF CHLORIDES AND NITRATES FROM AQUEOUS NITRATE SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for reducing the chloride content of a solution derived from the dissolution of a stainless steel clad nuclear fuel element with an aqua regia dissolution medium. The solutlon is adjusted to a nitric acid concentration in the range 5 to 10 M and is countercurrently contacted at room temperature with a gaseous oxide of nitrogen selected from NO, NO/sub 2/, N/sub 2/ O/sub 3/, and N/sub 2/O/sub 4/. Chlo ride is recovered from the contacted solution as nitrosyl chloride. After reduction of the chloride content, the solution is then contacted with gaseous NO to reduce the nitric acid molarity to a desired level. (AEC)

Savolainen, J.E.

1963-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

30

Composition for detecting uranyl  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to an indicator composition for use in spectrophotometric detection of a substance in a solution, and a method for making the composition. Useful indicators are sensitive to the particular substance being measured, but are unaffected by the fluid and other chemical species that may be present in the fluid. Optical indicators are used to measure the uranium concentration of process solutions in facilities for extracting uranium from ores, production of nuclear fuels, and reprocessing of irradiated fuels. The composition comprises an organohalide covalently bonded to an indicator for the substance, in such a manner that the product is itself an indicator that provides increased spectral resolution for detecting the substance. The indicator is preferably arsenazo III and the organohalide is preferably cyanuric chloride. These form a composition that is ideally suited for detecting uranyl.

Baylor, L.C.; Stephens, S.M.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

{sup 13}C and {sup 17}O NMR binding constant studies of uranyl carbonate complexes in near-neutral aqueous solution. Yucca Mountain Project Milestone Report 3351  

SciTech Connect

Valuable structural information, much of it unavailable by other methods, can be obtained about complexes in solution through NMR spectroscopy. From chemical shift and intensity measurements of complexed species, NMR can serve as a species-specific structural probe for molecules in solution and can be used to validate thermodynamic constants used in geochemical modeling. Fourier-transform nuclear magnetic resonance (FT-NMR) spectroscopy has been employed to study the speciation of uranium(VI) ions in aqueous carbonate solutions as a function of pH, ionic strength, carbonate concentration, uranium concentration, and temperature. Carbon-13 and oxygen-17 NMR spectroscopy were used to monitor the fractions, and hence thermodynamic binding constants of two different uranyl species U0{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4{minus}} and (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(CO{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 6{minus}} in aqueous solution. Synthetic buffer solutions were prepared under the ionic strength conditions used in the NMR studies in order to obtain an accurate measure of the hydrogen ion concentration, and a discussion of pH = {minus}log(a{sub H}{sup +}) versus p[H] = {minus}log[H+] is provided. It is shown that for quantitative studies, the quantity p[H] needs to be used. Fourteen uranium(VI) binding constants recommended by the OECD NEA literature review were corrected to the ionic strengths employed in the NMR study using specific ion interaction theory (SIT), and the predicted species distributions were compared with the actual species observed by multinuclear NMR. Agreement between observed and predicted stability fields is excellent. This establishes the utility of multinuclear NMR as a species-specific tool for the study of the actinide carbonate complexation constants, and serves as a means for validating the recommendations provided by the OECD NEA.

Clark, D.L.; Newton, T.W.; Palmer, P.D.; Zwick, B.D.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Influence of microstructure on stress corrosion cracking of mild steel in synthetic caustic-nitrate nuclear waste solution  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The influence of alloy microstructure on stress corrosion cracking of mild steel in caustic-nitrate synthetic nuclear waste solutions was studied. An evaluation was made of the effect of heat treatment on a representative material (ASTM A 516 Grade 70) used in the construction of high activity radioactive waste storage tanks at Savannah River Plant. Several different microstructures were tested for susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking. Precracked fracture specimens loaded in either constant load or constant crack opening displacement were exposed to a variety of caustic-nitrate and nitrate solutions. Results were correlated with the mechanical and corrosion properties of the microstructures. Crack velocity and crack arrest stress intensity were found to be related to the yield strength of the steel microstructures. Fractographic evidence indicated pH depletion and corrosive crack tip chemistry conditions even in highly caustic solutions. Experimental results were compatible with crack growth by a strain- assisted anodic dissolution mechanism; however, hydrogen embrittlement also was considered possible. (auth)

Sarafian, P.G.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Alkali metal nitrate purification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for removing contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises heating the impure alkali metal nitrates in solution form or molten form at a temperature and for a time sufficient to effect precipitation of solid impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified alkali metal nitrates in solution form may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrates suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of purified alkali metal nitrates.

Fiorucci, Louis C. (Hamden, CT); Morgan, Michael J. (Guilford, CT)

1986-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

34

Criticality experiments with planar arrays of three-liter bottles containing plutonium nitrate solution  

SciTech Connect

The objective of these experiments was to provide benchmark data to validate calculational codes used in critically safety assessments of plant configurations. Arrays containing up to as many as sixteen three-liter bottles filled with plutonium nitrate were used in the experiments. A split-table device was used in the final assembly of the arrays. Ths planar arrays were reflected with close fitting plexiglas on each side and on the bottom but not the top surface. The experiments addressed a number of factors effecting criticality: the critical air gap between bottles in an array of fixed number of bottles, the number of bottles required for criticality if the bottles were touching, and the effect on critical array spacing and critical bottle number due to the insertion of an hydrogeneous substance into the air gap between bottles. Each bottle contained about 2.4l of Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 4} solution at a Pu concentration of 105g Pu/l, with the {sup 240}Pu content being 2.9 wt% at a free acid molarity H{sup +} of 5.1. After the initial series of experiments were performed with bottles separated by air gaps, plexiglas shells of varying thicknesses were placed around each bottle to investigate how moderation between bottles affects both the number of bottles required for criticality and the critical spacing between each bottle. The minimum of bottles required for criticality was found to be 10.9 bottles, occurring for a square array with bottles in contact. As the bottles were spaced apart, the critical number increased. For sixteen bottles in a square array, the critical separation between surfaces in both x and y direction was 0.96 cm. The addition of plexiglas around each bottle decreased the critical bottle number, compared to those separated in air, but the critical bottle number, even with interstitial plastic in place was always greater than 10.9 bottles. The most reactive configuration was a tightly packed array of bottles with no intervening material.

Durst, B.M.; Clayton, E.D.; Smith, J.H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Summary of criticality data obtained at Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories on fixed and soluble poisons in U + Pu nitrate solutions  

SciTech Connect

Knowledge of the effects of neutron poisons on U +Pu systems is necessary to better establish criticality safety programs. These data are needed in setting of criticality safety specifications for storage, processing and shipping of fissile material where it is desired to handle larger quantities with safety and efficiency. These data are needed also for validating calculational techniques and cross sections sets. U + Pu solutions containing 30% Pu in the total U + Pu were used in these experiments to determine the effect of neutron poisons. Criticality of heterogeneous systems of UO/sub 2/-PuO/sub 2/ rods in a lattice were studied when the U + Pu solutions with various amounts of Gd and + B were added to the system. Criticality of homogeneous systems of the U + Pu nitrate were determined with varying amounts of Gd and Gd + B added to the solution. Measurements were made to determine also the effect of boron-glass raschig rings on the criticality of the U + Pu nitrate solution systems.

Lloyd, R.C.; Clayton, E.D.

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Purification of alkali metal nitrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for removing heavy metal contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises mixing the impure nitrates with sufficient water to form a concentrated aqueous solution of the impure nitrates, adjusting the pH of the resulting solution to within the range of between about 2 and about 7, adding sufficient reducing agent to react with heavy metal contaminants within said solution, adjusting the pH of the solution containing reducing agent to effect precipitation of heavy metal impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified aqueous solution of alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified solution of alkali metal nitrates may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrate suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of alkali metal nitrates.

Fiorucci, Louis C. (Hamden, CT); Gregory, Kevin M. (Woodridge, IL)

1985-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

37

NBL-ME-08-SME  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RESULTS ... 14 H. ANNUAL EVALUATION OF ELEMENTAL URANIUM MEASUREMENTS... 15 H.1. Uranyl nitrate solutions...

38

ORNL/TM-2008/048 Uranyl Nitrate Flow Loop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Uranium conversion process for a small-size plant with proposed safeguards monitoring points identified MTU/yr metric tons of uranium per year NUCP natural uranium conversion plant ORNL Oak Ridge National-bearing aqueous stream exiting the solvent extraction process in a natural uranium conversion plant (NUCP

Pennycook, Steve

39

Criticality experiments with mixed plutonium-uranium nitrate solution at plutonium fractions of 0. 2, 0. 5, and 1. 0 in annular cylindrical geometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of these criticality experiments is to provide criticality data for Pu + U solutions for optimizing the physical size of equipment during fissile product conversion and storage and for the design of reprocessing plants. Prior to these measurements, little or no criticality data were available for mixed plutonium-uranium solutions in annular geometry. The experiments were performed under a joint Criticality Data Development Program between the US Department of Energy and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan. The critical experiments were performed in the critical mass facility of Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Criticality measurements were made with (Pu + U) nitrate solutions in a water-reflected annular vessel. The concentration of (Pu + U) in the nitrate solution was varied and ranged between 61 and 489 g (Pu + U)/l. The ratio of Pu to (Pu + U) in the solution also was varied, with measurements being made at {approx}0.52, {approx}0.23, {approx}0.97. The measurements provide data essential for validating criticality codes that may be used on configurations similar to those of the experiments.

Lloyd, R.C.; Koyama, T.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Thermochemical nitrate reduction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of preliminary experiments was conducted directed at thermochemically converting nitrate to nitrogen and water. Nitrates are a major constituent of the waste stored in the underground tanks on the Hanford Site, and the characteristics and effects of nitrate compounds on stabilization techniques must be considered before permanent disposal operations begin. For the thermochemical reduction experiments, six reducing agents (ammonia, formate, urea, glucose, methane, and hydrogen) were mixed separately with {approximately}3 wt% NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} solutions in a buffered aqueous solution at high pH (13); ammonia and formate were also mixed at low pH (4). Reactions were conducted in an aqueous solution in a batch reactor at temperatures of 200{degrees}C to 350{degrees}C and pressures of 600 to 2800 psig. Both gas and liquid samples were analyzed. The specific components analyzed were nitrate, nitrite, nitrous oxide, nitrogen, and ammonia. Results of experimental runs showed the following order of nitrate reduction of the six reducing agents in basic solution: formate > glucose > urea > hydrogen > ammonia {approx} methane. Airnmonia was more effective under acidic conditions than basic conditions. Formate was also effective under acidic conditions. A more thorough, fundamental study appears warranted to provide additional data on the mechanism of nitrate reduction. Furthermore, an expanded data base and engineering feasibility study could be used to evaluate conversion conditions for promising reducing agents in more detail and identify new reducing agents with improved performance characteristics.

Cox, J.L.; Lilga, M.A.; Hallen, R.T.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Method of producing thin cellulose nitrate film  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method for forming a thin nitrocellulose film of reproducible thickness is described. The film is a cellulose nitrate film, 10 to 20 microns in thickness, cast from a solution of cellulose nitrate in tetrahydrofuran, said solution containing from 7 to 15 percent, by weight, of dioctyl phthalate, said cellulose nitrate having a nitrogen content of from 10 to 13 percent.

Lupica, S.B.

1975-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

42

Process for reducing aqueous nitrate to ammonia  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Powdered aluminum is added to a nitrate-containing alkaline, aqueous solution to reduce the nitrate and/or nitrite to ammonia and co-produce a sinterable ceramic product.

Mattus, Alfred J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Process for reducing aqueous nitrate to ammonia  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Powdered aluminum is added to a nitrate-containing alkaline, aqueous solution to reduce the nitrate and/or nitrite to ammonia and co-produce a sinterable ceramic product. 3 figures.

Mattus, A.J.

1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

44

Biological denitrification of high concentration nitrate waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Biological denitrification of nitrate solutions at concentrations of greater than one kilogram nitrate per cubic meter is accomplished anaerobically in an upflow column having as a packing material a support for denitrifying bacteria.

Francis, Chester W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Brinkley, Frank S. (Knoxville, TN)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Uranyl Sequestration: Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Uranyl Complexes with a Tetradentate Methylterephthalamide Ligand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uranyl complexes of a bis(methylterephthalamide) ligand (LH{sub 4}) have been synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography. The structure is an unexpected [Me{sub 4}N]{sub 8}[L(UO{sub 2})]{sub 4} tetramer, formed via coordination of the two MeTAM units of L to two uranyl moieties. Addition of KOH to the tetramer gave the corresponding monomeric uranyl methoxide species [Me{sub 4}N]K{sub 2}[LUO{sub 2}(OMe)].

Ni, Chengbao; Shuh, David; Raymond, Kenneth

2011-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

46

Energetic Material Electro Nitration  

INL has developed an improved method of nitrating a nitro compound by oxidizing a chemical mediator in the presence of a voltage in order to produce an oxidizing agent. Then, the agent reacts with a nitro compound and ion source in a solution in order ...

47

A literature review on the chemical and physical properties of uranyl fluoride (UO sub 2 F sub 2 )  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews the preparation and properties of uranyl fluoride. Data are given on the crystal structure, solubility in water, specific gravity, density, specific heat, enthalpy, entropy, acidity, corrosion properties, and refractive indices. Empirical formulas are given to calculate specific gravity, density of aqueous solutions, molal volume, and refractive indices. 13 refs., 3 figs., 11 tabs.

Myers, W.L. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA) Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (USA). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Evaluation of nitrate destruction methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A wide variety of high nitrate-concentration aqueous mixed [radioactive and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous] wastes are stored at various US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. These wastes will ultimately be solidified for final disposal, although the waste acceptance criteria for the final waste form is still being determined. Because the nitrates in the wastes will normally increase the volume or reduce the integrity of all of the waste forms under consideration for final disposal, nitrate destruction before solidification of the waste will generally be beneficial. This report describes and evaluates various technologies that could be used to destroy the nitrates in the stored wastes. This work was funded by the Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development, through the Chemical/Physical Technology Support Group of the Mixed Waste Integrated Program. All the nitrate destruction technologies will require further development work before a facility could be designed and built to treat the majority of the stored wastes. Several of the technologies have particularly attractive features: the nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) process produces an insoluble waste form with a significant volume reduction, electrochemical reduction destroys nitrates without any chemical addition, and the hydrothermal process can simultaneously treat nitrates and organics in both acidic and alkaline wastes. These three technologies have been tested using lab-scale equipment and surrogate solutions. At their current state of development, it is not possible to predict which process will be the most beneficial for a particular waste stream.

Taylor, P.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kurath, D.E.; Guenther, R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

49

Electronic structure of uranyl compounds: an XPS study  

SciTech Connect

X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) measurements are reported for a series of uranyl compounds in which the primary uranium--oxygen (U--O/sub I/) separation varies substantially. Crystal field splittings of the U 6p$sub 3$/ $sub 2$ core electron energy levels were observed. These splittings are explained with the point charge crystal field model when both first and second near uranium neighbors are considered. The systematics of charge migration (observed by monitoring electron core level shifts) associated with bonding in the uranyl series were also investigated. Core level shifts for compounds with different U--O/sub I/ separations are large, but essentially no relative shifts of uranium and oxygen core levels were observed within the uranyl group. Thus charge appears to flow between the uranyl group (as a unit), and the secondary uranium ligands as U--O/sub I/ is varied. The U 5f electron participation in covalent bonding was also studied by systematically measuring XPS line intensities; U 5f electron occupation appears to be minimal. (auth)

Veal, B.W.; Lam, D.J.; Hoekstra, H.R.; Carnall, W.T.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Nitrate Removal in NITREXTM Permeable Reactive Barriers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was originally the injection site for our tracer solution, but instead it became our lone up-gradient well) and ~48 hours (low tide) after injection. At every time point, samples were collected from all wells and nitrate concentrations were estimated from samples taken from the injection well right before the solution

Vallino, Joseph J.

51

Thermochemical nitrate destruction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for denitrification of nitrates and nitrates present in aqueous waste streams. The method comprises the steps of (1) identifying the concentration nitrates and nitrites present in a waste stream, (2) causing formate to be present in the waste stream, (3) heating the mixture to a predetermined reaction temperature from about 200.degree. C. to about 600.degree. C., and (4) holding the mixture and accumulating products at heated and pressurized conditions for a residence time, thereby resulting in nitrogen and carbon dioxide gas, and hydroxides, and reducing the level of nitrates and nitrites to below drinking water standards.

Cox, John L. (Richland, WA); Hallen, Richard T. (Richland, WA); Lilga, Michael A. (Richland, WA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Drinking Water Problems: Nitrates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High levels of nitrates in drinking water can be harmful for very young infants and susceptible adults. This publication explains how people are exposed to nitrates, what health effects are caused by them in drinking water and how to remove them.

Dozier, Monty; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

53

Electrolytic production of uranous nitrate  

SciTech Connect

Efficient production of uranous nitrate is important in nuclear fuel reprocessing because U(IV) acts as a plutonium reductant in solvent extraction and can be coprecipitated with plutonium and/or throium as oxalates during fuel reprocessing. Experimental conditions are described for the efficient electrolytic production of uranous nitrate for use as a reductant in the SRP Purex process. The bench-scale, continuous-flow, electrolysis cell exhibits a current efficiency approaching 100% in combination with high conversion rates of U(VI) to U(IV) in simulated and actual SRP Purex solutions. High current efficiency is achieved with a voltage-controlled mercury-plated platinum electrode and the use of hydrazine as a nitrite scavenger. Conversion of U(VI) to U(IV) proceeds at 100% efficiency. Cathodic gas generation is minimal. The low rate of gas generation permits a long residence time within the cathode, a necessary condition for high conversions on a continuous basis. Design proposals are given for a plant-scale, continuous-flow unit to meet SRP production requirements. Results from the bench-scale tests indicate that an 8-kW unit can supply sufficient uranous nitrate reductant to meet the needs of the Purex process at SRP.

Orebaugh, E.G.; Propst, R.C.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Nitrate-Cancrinite Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrate-Cancrinite Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford Tank Solutions B A R R Y R . B minerals at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site in Washington. Nitrate-cancrinite began's (DOE) Hanford Site in southeast Washington since the late 1950s (1). To predict the fate

Illinois at Chicago, University of

55

Thermochemical nitrate destruction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for denitrification of nitrates and nitrites present in aqueous waste streams. The method comprises the steps of (1) identifying the concentration nitrates and nitrites present in a waste stream, (2) causing formate to be present in the waste stream, (3) heating the mixture to a predetermined reaction temperature from about 200 C to about 600 C, and (4) holding the mixture and accumulating products at heated and pressurized conditions for a residence time, thereby resulting in nitrogen and carbon dioxide gas, and hydroxides, and reducing the level of nitrates and nitrites to below drinking water standards.

Cox, J.L.; Hallen, R.T.; Lilga, M.A.

1992-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

56

Electromarking solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is directed to an aqueous halogen-free electromarking solution which possesses the capacity for marking a broad spectrum of metals and alloys selected from different classes. The aqueous solution comprises basically the nitrate salt of an amphoteric metal, a chelating agent, and a corrosion-inhibiting agent.

Bullock, Jonathan S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Harper, William L. (Wartburg, TN); Peck, Charles G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1976-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

57

Method for loading resin beds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method of preparing nuclear reactor fuel by carbonizing a uranium loaded cation exchange resin provided by contacting a H.sup.+ loaded resin with a uranyl nitrate solution deficient in nitrate, comprises providing the nitrate deficient solution by a method comprising the steps of reacting in a reaction zone maintained between about 145.degree.-200.degree. C, a first aqueous component comprising a uranyl nitrate solution having a boiling point of at least 145.degree. C with a second aqueous component to provide a gaseous phase containing HNO.sub.3 and a reaction product comprising an aqueous uranyl nitrate solution deficient in nitrate.

Notz, Karl J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Rainey, Robert H. (Knoxville, TN); Greene, Charles W. (Knoxville, TN); Shockley, William E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Calcium nitrate explosive composition  

SciTech Connect

A blasting agent is composed of about 40% by wt of a mixture of calcium nitrate, water, a second inorganic oxidizing salt, and a water miscible organic fuel. These 4 components are provided in proportions to each other so as to provide an effective blasting agent. Optionally, up to 60% of additives well known in the explosives art, e.g., organic and inorganic fuels, sensitizers, density control agents, thickeners and gelling agents, inorganic nitrate based explosive compositions, can be incorporated into the blasting agent to provide certain desired characteristics. (42 claims)

Clark, W.F.; Slykhouse, T.E.

1974-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

PRELIMINARY SOLUTION CRITICAL EXPERIMENTS FOR THE HIGH-FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design of the High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) was supported by a series of preliminary experiments performed at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility in 1960. The experiments yielded results describing directly some of the expected performance characteristics of the reactor and strengthened the calculational methods used in its design. The critical assembly, like the reactor, was of a flux-trap type in which a central 6-in.-dia column of H/sub 2/O was surrounded by an annulus of fissile material and, in turn, by an annular neutron reflector. The fuel region contained a solution of enriched uranyl nitrate in a mixture of H/sub 2/O and D/sub 2/O and the reflector was a composite of two annuli, the inner one of D/sub 2/O surrounded by one of H/sub 2/O. In most experiments the ends of the assembly were reflected by H/sub 2/O. Important results evaluate the absolute thermal-neutron flux to be expected in the design reactor and describe the flux distributions within this type of assembly. It was also observed that the cadmium ratio along the axis of the assembly was about 100, showing that a highly thermal-neutron flux was truly developed in the trap. It was shown that reduction of the hydrogen density in the central water column to about 80% of its normal value increased the reactivity about 6% and that further hydrogen density reduction decreased the reactivity as the effect of the loss of neutron moderation dominated the effect of the increased coupling across the central column. These considerations are of importance to the safety of the reactor. Additional experiments gave values of the usual critical dimensions and explored the effects on both the dimensions and the flux distributions of changing the concentration of the uranyl nitrate solution, of changing the composition of the solvent, and of adding neutron-absorbing materials to the D/ sub 2/O reflector. These changes were made to alter the neutron properties of the fuel solution over a range including those expected in the reactor itself. (auth)

Fox, J.K.; Gilley, L.W.; Magnuson, D.W.

1963-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

60

Ammonium nitrate explosive systems  

SciTech Connect

Novel explosives which comprise mixtures of ammonium nitrate and an ammonium salt of a nitroazole in desired ratios are disclosed. A preferred nitroazole is 3,5-dinitro-1,2,4-triazole. The explosive and physical properties of these explosives may readily be varied by the addition of other explosives and oxidizers. Certain of these mixtures have been found to act as ideal explosives.

Stinecipher, Mary M. (Los Alamos, NM); Coburn, Michael D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Preparation of U.sub.3 O.sub.8  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for the preparation of U.sub.3 O.sub.8 nuclear fuel material by direct precipitation of uranyl formate monohydrate from uranyl nitrate solution. The uranyl formate monohydrate precipitate is removed, dried and calcined to produce U.sub.3 O.sub.8 having a controlled particle size distribution.

Johnson, David R. (Aiken, SC)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Thermophysical Properties of Sodium Nitrate and Sodium Chloride  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Thermophysical Properties of Sodium Nitrate and Sodium Chloride Thermophysical Properties of Sodium Nitrate and Sodium Chloride Solutions and Their Effects on Fluid Flow in Unsaturated Media Tianfu Xu and Karsten Pruess Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 ABSTRACT. Understanding movement of saline sodium nitrate (NaNO 3 ) waste solutions is important for assessing the contaminant migration near leaking waste storage tanks in the unsaturated zone at the Hanford site (Washington, USA). The purpose of this study is to contribute a basic understanding of effects of the thermophysical behavior of NaNO 3 solutions on fluid flow in unsaturated media. We first present mathematical expressions for the dependence of density, viscosity, solubility and vapor pressure of

63

THE DISTRIBUTION OF PRECIOUS METALS IN VARIOUS RESIDUES OBTAINED IN THE PREPARATION OF URANYL NITRATE FROM PITCHBLENDE  

SciTech Connect

A study was made of the distribution of Ag, Au, Bt, and Pd in the residues from an extraction process in which purified UO/sub 2/(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/ is prepared from a pitchblende ore. The residues studied were the gangue Pb cake, the BaSO/sub 4/ cake, the filtrate boildown cake, the raffinate cake, and the purified UO/sub 2/(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/. Samples representing three different batches of ore were used. The following conclusions were reached: (1) neither Ag nor Pd are present in the ore in significant quantities; (2) approximately 30 ppm of Au (based on U content) is present, of which 90% was found in the residue (gangue Pb cake) from the initial co-precipitation step; this residue contains gangue, PbSO/sub 4/, RaSO/sub 4/, and other insoluble sulfates; (3) the ore contains 15 ppm of Pt, which is distributed in an extremely varying manner in the residues leaving the process. (W. L.H.)

Shearer, R.W.

1946-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Nitrate Anion Exchange in Pu-238 Aqueous Scrap Recovery Operations  

SciTech Connect

Strong base, nitrate anion exchange (IX) is crucial to the purification of {sup 238}Pu solution feedstocks with gross levels of impurities. This paper discusses the work involved in bench scale experiments to optimize the nitrate anion exchange process. In particular, results are presented of experiments conducted to (a) demonstrate that high levels of impurities can be separated from {sup 238}Pu solutions via nitrate anion exchange and, (b) work out chemical pretreatment methodology to adjust and maintain {sup 238}Pu in the IV oxidation state to optimize the Pu(IV)-hexanitrato anionic complex sorption to Reillex-HPQ resin. Additional experiments performed to determine the best chemical treatment methodology to enhance recovery of sorbed Pu from the resin, and VIS-NIR absorption studies to determine the steady state equilibrium of Pu(IV), Pu(III), and Pu(VI) in nitric acid are discussed.

Pansoy-Hjelvik, M.E.; Silver, G.L.; Reimus, M.A.H.; Ramsey, K.B.

1999-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

65

Enrichment and Location of Uranium Precipitates from Uranyl Carbonate Addition to Tank 43  

SciTech Connect

In order to safety restart the 2H evaporator, plans are to add depleted uranium (DU) as uranyl carbonate to Tank 43 to lower the 235U enrichment in the supernate. This memo examines the enrichment and location of uranium precipitates formed in Tank 43. An assessment of the risks associated with precipitating uranium shows that there is no criticality concern during this operation.

d' Entremont, P.D.

2001-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

66

Crystallization of sodium nitrate from radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect

From the 1940s to the 1980s, the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IPC/RAS) conducted research and development on processes to separate acetate and nitrate salts and acetic acid from radioactive wastes by crystallization. The research objective was to decrease waste volumes and produce the separated decontaminated materials for recycle. This report presents an account of the IPC/RAS experience in this field. Details on operating conditions, waste and product compositions, decontamination factors, and process equipment are described. The research and development was generally related to the management of intermediate-level radioactive wastes. The waste solutions resulted from recovery and processing of uranium, plutonium, and other products from irradiated nuclear fuel, neutralization of nuclear process solutions after extractant recovery, regeneration of process nitric acid, equipment decontamination, and other radiochemical processes. Waste components include nitric acid, metal nitrate and acetate salts, organic impurities, and surfactants. Waste management operations generally consist of two stages: volume reduction and processing of the concentrates for storage, solidification, and disposal. Filtration, coprecipitation, coagulation, evaporation, and sorption were used to reduce waste volume. 28 figs., 40 tabs.

Krapukhin, V.B.; Krasavina, E.P. Pikaev, A.K. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Institute of Physical Chemistry

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Method for calcining nuclear waste solutions containing zirconium and halides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reduction in the quantity of gelatinous solids which are formed in aqueous zirconium-fluoride nuclear reprocessing waste solutions by calcium nitrate added to suppress halide volatility during calcination of the solution while further suppressing chloride volatility is achieved by increasing the aluminum to fluoride mole ratio in the waste solution prior to adding the calcium nitrate.

Newby, Billie J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

RECOVERY OF CESIUM FROM WASTE SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent covers the precipitation of fission products including cesium on nickel or ferric ferrocyanide and subsequent selective dissolution from the carrier with a solution of ammonia or mercurlc nitrate.

Burgus, W.H.

1959-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

69

Rapid Dissolution of Soluble Uranyl Phases in Arid, Mine-Impacted Catchments Near Church Rock, NM  

SciTech Connect

We tested the hypothesis that runoff of uranium-bearing particles from mining waste disposal areas was a significant mechanism for redistribution of uranium in the northeastern part of the Upper Puerco River watershed (New Mexico). However, our results were not consistent with this hypothesis. Analysis of >100 sediment and suspended sediment samples collected adjacent to and downstream from uranium source areas indicated that uranium levels in the majority of the samples were not elevated above background. Samples collected within 50 m of a known waste disposal site were subjected to detailed geochemical characterization. Uranium in these samples was found to be highly soluble; treatment with synthetic pore water for 24 h caused dissolution of 10-50% of total uranium in the samples. Equilibrium uranium concentrations in pore water were >4.0 mg/L and were sustained in repeated wetting events, effectively depleting soluble uranium from the solid phase. The dissolution rate of uranium appeared to be controlled by solid-phase diffusion of uranium from within uranium-bearing mineral particles. X-ray adsorption spectroscopy indicated the presence of a soluble uranyl silicate, and possibly a uranyl phosphate. These phases were exhausted in transported sediment suggesting that uranium was readily mobilized from sediments in the Upper Puerco watershed and transported in the dissolved load. These results could have significance for uranium risk assessment as well as mining waste management and cleanup efforts.

deLemos, J.L.; Bostick, B.C.; Quicksall, A.N.; Landis, J.D.; George, C.; Slagowski, N.L.; Rock, T.; Brugge, D.; Lewis, J.; Durant, J.L.

2009-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

70

SEPARATION OF RUTHENIUM FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

>The separation of ruthenium from aqueous solutions containing uranium plutonium, ruthenium, and fission products is described. The separation is accomplished by providing a nitric acid solution of plutonium, uranium, ruthenium, and fission products, oxidizing plutonium to the hexavalent state with sodium dichromate, contacting the solution with a water-immiscible organic solvent, such as hexone, to extract plutonyl, uranyl, ruthenium, and fission products, reducing with sodium ferrite the plutonyl in the solvent phase to trivalent plutonium, reextracting from the solvent phase the trivalent plutonium, ruthenium, and some fission products with an aqueous solution containing a salting out agent, introducing ozone into the aqueous acid solution to oxidize plutonium to the hexavalent state and ruthenium to ruthenium tetraoxide, and volatizing off the ruthenium tetraoxide.

Callis, C.F.; Moore, R.L.

1959-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

The Transformation of Outdoor Ammonium Nitrate Aerosols in the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Transformation of Outdoor Ammonium Nitrate Aerosols in the Indoor Environment Title The Transformation of Outdoor Ammonium Nitrate Aerosols in the Indoor Environment...

72

Complexation of Lanthanides with Nitrate at Variable Temperatures: Thermodynamics and Coordination Modes  

SciTech Connect

Complexation of neodymium(III) with nitrate was studied at variable temperatures (25, 40, 55 and 70 C) by spectrophotometry and microcalorimetry. The NdNO{sub 3}{sup 2+} complex is weak and becomes slightly stronger as the temperature is increased. The enthalpy of complexation at 25 C was determined by microcalorimetry to be small and positive, (1.5 {+-} 0.2) kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}, in good agreement with the trend of the stability constant at variable temperatures. Luminescence emission spectra and lifetime of Eu(III) in nitrate solutions suggest that inner-sphere and bidentate complexes form between trivalent lanthanides (Nd{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 3+}) and nitrate in aqueous solutions. Specific Ion Interaction approach (SIT) was used to obtain the stability constants of NdNO{sub 3}{sup 2+} at infinite dilution and variable temperatures.

Rao, Linfeng; Tian, Guoxin

2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

73

EXTRACTION OF HEXAVALENT PLUTONIUM FROM AQUEOUS ACIDIC SOLUTIONS WITH ETHYL SULFIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for extracting Pu>s6/sup > /om an aqueous ammonium nitrate-containing nitric acid solution with ethyl sulfide.

Seaborg, G.T.

1961-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

74

Atomic structure of nitrate-binding protein crucial for photosynthetic productivity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cyanobacteria, blue-green algae, are the most abundant autotrophs in aquatic environments and form the base of all aquatic food chains by fixing carbon and nitrogen into cellular biomass. The single most important nutrient for photosynthesis and growth is nitrate, which is severely limiting in many aquatic environments particularly the open ocean (1, 2). It is therefore not surprising that NrtA, the solute-binding component of the high-affinity nitrate ABC transporter, is the single-most abundant protein in the plasma membrane of these bacteria (3). Here we describe the first structure of a nitratespecific receptor, NrtA from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, complexed with nitrate and determined to a resolution of 1.5. NrtA is significantly larger than other oxyanionbinding proteins, representing a new class of transport proteins. From sequence alignments, the only other solute-binding protein in this class is CmpA, a bicarbonatebinding protein. Therefore, these organisms created a novel solute-binding protein for two of the most important nutrients; inorganic nitrogen and carbon. The electrostatic charge distribution of NrtA appears to force the protein off of the membrane while the flexible tether facilitates the delivery of nitrate to the membrane pore. The structure not only details the determinants for nitrate selectivity in NrtA, but also the bicarbonate specificity in CmpA. Nitrate and bicarbonate transport are regulated by the cytoplasmic proteins NrtC and CmpC, respectively. Interestingly, the residues lining the ligand binding pockets suggest that they both bind nitrate. This implies that the nitrogen and carbon uptake pathways are synchronized by intracellular nitrate and nitrite.3 The nitrate ABC transporter of cyanobacteria is composed of four polypeptides (Figure 1): a high-affinity periplasmic solute-binding lipoprotein (NrtA), an integral membrane permease (NrtB), a cytoplasmic ATPase (NrtD), and a unique ATPase/solute-binding fusion protein (NrtC) that regulates transport (4). NrtA binds both nitrate and nitrite (Kd = 0.3 mM) and is necessary for cell survival when nitrate is the primary nitrogen source (5). The role of NrtA is to scavenge nitrate/nitrite from the periplasm for delivery to the membrane permease, NrtB. The passage of solute through the transmembrane pore is linked to ATP hydrolysis by NrtC and NrtD. NrtD consists of a single ATPase domain. In contrast, NrtC contains both an ATPase domain and a Cterminal solute-binding domain that shares 50% amino acid sequence similarity with NrtA, and is required for the ammonium-mediated inhibition of nitrate transport (6, 7). Aside from the homologous transporter for bicarbonate, CmpABCD, there are no other known examples of ABC transporters that have an ATPase/solute-binding fusion component. The specificity of the nitrate transporter is conferred by NrtA (4). NrtA is ~49% identical (60% similar) in amino acid sequence to the bicarbonate receptor CmpA. In its entirety, it does not have significant homology to any other known protein. To elucidate the molecular determinants of nitrate specificity, we determined the crystal structure of the Synechocystis 6803 NrtA to 1.5 . While the general shape of NrtA is akin to that of other solute binding proteins, NrtA clearly represents a new and unique structural variant of these C clamp proteins. From this structure and sequence alignments of other bicarbonate and nitrate transporters, the molecular basis for solute selectivity is clear and suggests that regulatory domains of both icarbonate and nitrate transport systems bind nitrate. Based on these findings, a model is presented that 4 demonstrates how such synergistic regulation of bicarbonate and nitrate transport is important in conserving energy during the process of carbon fixation and nitrogen assimilation.

Koropatkin, Nicole M.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Smith, Thomas J.

2006-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

75

Process for extracting technetium from alkaline solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for extracting technetium values from an aqueous alkaline solution containing at least one alkali metal hydroxide and at least one alkali metal nitrate, the at least one alkali metal nitrate having a concentration of from about 0.1 to 6 molar. The solution is contacted with a solvent consisting of a crown ether in a diluent for a period of time sufficient to selectively extract the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution. The solvent containing the technetium values is separated from the aqueous alkaline solution and the technetium values are stripped from the solvent.

Moyer, Bruce A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sachleben, Richard A. (Knoxville, TN); Bonnesen, Peter V. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Process for the preparation of an energetic nitrate ester  

SciTech Connect

A process for the preparation of an energetic nitrate ester compound and related intermediates is provided.

Chavez, David E; Naud, Darren L; Hiskey, Michael A

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

77

Synthesis of a new energetic nitrate ester  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nitrate esters have been known as useful energetic materials since the discovery of nitroglycerin by Ascanio Sobrero in 1846. The development of methods to increase the safety and utility of nitroglycerin by Alfred Nobel led to the revolutionary improvement in the utility of nitroglycerin in explosive applications in the form of dynamite. Since then, many nitrate esters have been prepared and incorporated into military applications such as double-based propellants, detonators and as energetic plasticizers. Nitrate esters have also been shown to have vasodilatory effects in humans and thus have been studied and used for treatments of ailments such as angina. The mechanism of the biological response towards nitrate esters has been elucidated recently. Interestingly, many of the nitrate esters used for military purposes are liquids (ethylene glycol dinitrate, propylene glycol dinitrate, etc). Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) is one of the only solid nitrate esters, besides nitrocellulose, that is used in any application. Unfortunately, PETN melting point is above 100 {sup o}C, and thus must be pressed as a solid for detonator applications. A more practical material would be a melt-castable explosive, for potential simplification of manufacturing processes. Herein we describe the synthesis of a new energetic nitrate ester (1) that is a solid at ambient temperatures, has a melting point of 85-86 {sup o}C and has the highest density of any known nitrate ester composed only of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen. We also describe the chemical, thermal and sensitivity properties of 1 as well as some preliminary explosive performance data.

Chavez, David E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Impact of uranyl-calcium-carbonato complexes on uranium(VI) adsorption to synthetic and natural sediments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adsorption on soil and sediment solids may decrease aqueous uranium concentrations and limit its propensity for migration in natural and contaminated settings. Uranium adsorption will be controlled in large part by its aqueous speciation, with a particular dependence on the presence of dissolved calcium and carbonate. Here we quantify the impact of uranyl speciation on adsorption to both goethite and sediments from the Hanford Clastic Dike and Oak Ridge Melton Branch Ridgetop formations. Hanford sediments were preconditioned with sodium acetate and acetic acid to remove carbonate grains, and Ca and carbonate were reintroduced at defined levels to provide a range of aqueous uranyl species. U(VI) adsorption is directly linked to UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} speciation, with the extent of retention decreasing with formation of ternary uranyl-calcium-carbonato species. Adsorption isotherms under the conditions studied are linear, and K{sub d} values decrease from 48 to 17 L kg{sup -1} for goethite, from 64 to 29 L kg{sup -1} for Hanford sediments, and from 95 to 51 L kg{sup -1} for Melton Branch sediments as the Ca concentration increases from 0 to 1 mM at pH 7. Our observations reveal that, in carbonate-bearing waters, neutral to slightly acidic pH values ({approx}5) and limited dissolved calcium are optimal for uranium adsorption.

Stewart, B.D. [Stanford University; Mayes, Melanie [ORNL; Fendorf, Scott [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Emulsion explosives containing high concentrations of calcium nitrate  

SciTech Connect

A water-in-oil emulsion blasting agent is described having a discontinuous aqueous oxidizer salt solution phase which contains a calcium nitrate (CN) to ammonium nitrate (AN) weight ratio of 1.5 or greater, a continuous oil or water-immiscible liquid organic phase, an emulsifier, and, optionally, a density reducing agent. It is found that emulsion slurry blasting agents containing this relatively high amount of CN to AN have properties that conventional emulsion slurry explosives, those containing more AN than CN or solely AN, do not. Specifically, one property is that the high-CN emulsion blasting agents of the present composition can have much smaller critical diameters but yet pass the US DOT Blasting Agent tests. This result will be shown in the examples that follow. Thus, if AN is present as the principal oxidizer salt, emulsion explosives that have small critical diameters, and even those with relatively large critical diameters, generally are too sensitive to pass the Blasting Agent tests. If CN is the principal oxidizer, the emulsion blasting agents are less sensitive and more likely to pass the tests. This effect of CN has commercial significance. 10 claims.

Jessop, H.A.; Funk, A.G.

1982-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

80

Free energies and mechanisms of water exchange around Uranyl from first principles molecular dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From density functional theory (DFT) based ab initio (Car-Parrinello) metadynamics, we compute the activation energies and mechanisms of water exchange between the first and second hydration shells of aqueous Uranyl (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) using the primary hydration number of U as the reaction coordinate. The free energy and activation barrier of the water dissociation reaction [UO{sub 2}(OH{sub 2}){sub 5}]{sup 2+}(aq) {yields} [UO{sub 2}(OH{sub 2})4]{sup 2+}(aq) + H{sub 2}O are 0.7 kcal and 4.7 kcal/mol respectively. The free energy is in good agreement with previous theoretical (-2.7 to +1.2 kcal/mol) and experimental (0.5 to 2.2 kcal/mol) data. The associative reaction [UO{sub 2}(OH{sub 2}){sub 5}]{sup 2+}(aq) + H{sub 2}O {yields} [UO{sub 2}(OH{sub 2})6]{sup 2+}(aq) is short-lived with a free energy and activation barrier of +7.9 kcal/mol and +8.9 kca/mol respectively; it is therefore classified as associative-interchange. On the basis of the free energy differences and activation barriers, we predict that the dominant exchange mechanism between [UO{sub 2}(OH{sub 2}){sub 5}]{sup 2+}(aq) and bulk water is dissociative.

Atta-Fynn, Raymond; Bylaska, Eric J.; De Jong, Wibe A.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

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81

The Influence of Linker Geometry on Uranyl Complexation by Rigidly-Linked Bis(3-hydroxy-N-methyl-pyridin-2-one)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of bis(3-hydroxy-N-methyl-pyridin-2-one) ligands was synthesized, and their respective uranyl complexes were characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. These structures were inspected for high-energy conformations and evaluated using a series of metrics to measure co-planarity of chelating moieties with each other and the uranyl coordination plane, as well as to measure coordinative crowding about the uranyl dication. Both very short (ethyl, 3,4-thiophene and o-phenylene) and very long ({alpha},{alpha}{prime}-m-xylene and 1,8-fluorene) linkers provide optimal ligand geometries about the uranyl cation, resulting in planar, unstrained molecular arrangements. The planarity of the rigid linkers also suggests there is a degree of pre-organization for a planar coordination mode that is ideal for uranyl-selective ligand design. Comparison of intramolecular N{sub amide}-O{sub phenolate} distances and {sup 1}H NMR chemical shifts of amide protons supports earlier results that short linkers provide the optimal geometry for intramolecular hydrogen bonding.

Szigethy, Geza; Raymond, Kenneth

2010-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

82

Submergible torch for treating waste solutions and method thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A submergible torch for removing nitrate and/or nitrite ions from a waste solution containing nitrate and/or nitrite ions comprises: a torch tip, a fuel delivery mechanism, a fuel flow control mechanism, a catalyst, and a combustion chamber. The submergible torch is ignited to form a flame within the combustion chamber of the submergible torch. The torch is submerged in a waste solution containing nitrate and/or nitrite ions in such a manner that the flame is in contact with the waste solution and the catalyst and is maintained submerged for a period of time sufficient to decompose the nitrate and/or nitrite ions present in the waste solution.

Mattus, Alfred J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Submergible torch for treating waste solutions and method thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A submergible torch for removing nitrate and/or nitrite ions from a waste solution containing nitrate and/or nitrite ions comprises: a torch tip, a fuel delivery mechanism, a fuel flow control mechanism, a catalyst, and a combustion chamber. The submergible torch is ignited to form a flame within the combustion chamber of the submergible torch. The torch is submerged in a waste solution containing nitrate and/or nitrite ions in such a manner that the flame is in contact with the waste solution and the catalyst and is maintained submerged for a period of time sufficient to decompose the nitrate and/or nitrite ions present in the waste solution.

Mattus, Alfred J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Submergible torch for treating waste solutions and method thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A submergible torch is described for removing nitrate and/or nitrite ions from a waste solution containing nitrate and/or nitrite ions comprises: a torch tip, a fuel delivery mechanism, a fuel flow control mechanism, a catalyst, and a combustion chamber. The submergible torch is ignited to form a flame within the combustion chamber of the submergible torch. The torch is submerged in a waste solution containing nitrate and/or nitrite ions in such a manner that the flame is in contact with the waste solution and the catalyst and is maintained submerged for a period of time sufficient to decompose the nitrate and/or nitrite ions present in the waste solution. 2 figures.

Mattus, A.J.

1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

85

SunShot Initiative: Advanced Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Advanced Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant on Facebook Tweet about SunShot...

86

Formation mechanisms and quantification of organic nitrates in atmospheric aerosol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

limonene-1-nitrate, 1-hydroxy-butane- 2-nitrate, 3-hydroxy-our measured spectra of the butane hydroxynitrate we foundstandards except for the butane hydroxynitrate the O/C based

Rollins, Andrew Waite

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Formation mechanisms and quantification of organic nitrates in atmospheric aerosol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric submicron aerosol . . . . . . . 2.3 Partitioningon SOA organic aerosol formation alkyl nitrate and secondaryPeroxy radical fate . . . . . . Aerosol . . . . . . . .

Rollins, Andrew Waite

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

NITRATE DESTRUCTION LITERATURE SURVEY AND EVALUATION CRITERIA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report satisfies the initial phase of Task WP-2.3.4 Alternative Sodium Recovery Technology, Subtask 1; Develop Near-Tank Nitrate/Nitrite Destruction Technology. Some of the more common anions in carbon steel waste tanks at SRS and Hanford Site are nitrate which is corrosive, and nitrite and hydroxide which are corrosion inhibitors. At present it is necessary to periodically add large quantities of 50 wt% caustic to waste tanks. There are three primary reasons for this addition. First, when the contents of salt tanks are dissolved, sodium hydroxide preferentially dissolves and is removed. During the dissolution process the concentration of free hydroxide in the tank liquid can decrease from 9 M to less than 0.2 M. As a result, roughly half way through the dissolution process large quantities of sodium hydroxide must be added to the tank to comply with requirements for corrosion control. Second, hydroxide is continuously consumed by reaction with carbon dioxide which occurs naturally in purge air used to prevent buildup of hydrogen gas inside the tanks. The hydrogen is generated by radiolysis of water. Third, increasing the concentration of hydroxide increases solubility of some aluminum compounds, which is desirable in processing waste. A process that converts nitrate and nitrite to hydroxide would reduce certain costs. (1) Less caustic would be purchased. (2) Some of the aluminum solid compounds in the waste tanks would become more soluble so less mass of solids would be sent to High Level Vitrification and therefore it would be not be necessary to make as much expensive high level vitrified product. (3) Less mass of sodium would be fed to Saltstone at SRS or Low Level Vitrification at Hanford Site so it would not be necessary to make as much low level product. (4) At SRS less nitrite and nitrate would be sent to Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) so less formic acid would be consumed there and less hydrogen gas would be generated. This task involves literature survey of technologies to perform the nitrate to hydroxide conversion, selection of the most promising technologies, preparation of a flowsheet and design of a system. The most promising technologies are electrochemical reduction of nitrates and chemical reduction with hydrogen or ammonia. The primary reviewed technologies are listed and they aredescribed in more detail later in the report: (1) Electrochemical destruction; (2) Chemical reduction with agents such as ammonia, hydrazine or hydrogen; (3) Hydrothermal reduction process; and (4) Calcination. Only three of the technologies on the list have been demonstrated to generate usable amounts of caustic; electrochemical reduction and chemical reduction with ammonia, hydrazine or hydrogen and hydrothermal reduction. Chemical reduction with an organic reactant such as formic acid generates carbon dioxide which reacts with caustic and is thus counterproductive. Treatment of nitrate with aluminum or other active metals generates a solid product. High temperature calcination has the potential to generate sodium oxide which may be hydrated to sodium hydroxide, but this is unproven. The following criteria were developed to evaluate the most suitable option. The numbers in brackets after the criteria are relative weighting factors to account for importance: (1) Personnel exposure to radiation for installation, routine operation and maintenance; (2) Non-radioactive safety issues; (3) Whether the technology generates caustic and how many moles of caustic are generated per mole of nitrate plus nitrite decomposed; (4) Whether the technology can handle nitrate and nitrite at the concentrations encountered in waste; (5) Maturity of technology; (6) Estimated annual cost of operation (labor, depreciation, materials, utilities); (7) Capital cost; (8) Selectivity to nitrogen as decomposition product (other products are flammable and/or toxic); (9) Impact of introduced species; (10) Selectivity for destruction of nitrate vs. nitrite; and (11) Cost of deactivation and demolition. Each technology was given a score from one

Steimke, J.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Separation of iodine from mercury containing scrubbing solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Radioactive iodines can be recovered from a nitric acid scrub solution containing mercuric nitrate by passing a current through the scrub solution to react the iodine with the mercuric nitrate to form mercuric iodate which precipitates out. The mercuric iodate can then be reacted to recover the radioiodine for further processing into a form suitable for long-term storage and to recover the mercury for recycling.

Burger, Leland L. (Richland, WA); Scheele, Randall D. (Kennewick, WA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Molten nitrate salt technology development status report  

SciTech Connect

Recognizing thermal energy storage as potentially critical to the successful commercialization of solar thermal power systems, the Department of Energy (DOE) has established a comprehensive and aggressive thermal energy storage technology development program. Of the fluids proposed for heat transfer and energy storage molten nitrate salts offer significant economic advantages. The nitrate salt of most interest is a binary mixture of NaNO/sub 3/ and KNO/sub 3/. Although nitrate/nitrite mixtures have been used for decades as heat transfer and heat treatment fluids the use has been at temperatures of about 450/sup 0/C and lower. In solar thermal power systems the salts will experience a temperature range of 350 to 600/sup 0/C. Because central receiver applications place more rigorous demands and higher temperatures on nitrate salts a comprehensive experimental program has been developed to examine what effects, if any, the new demands and temperatures have on the salts. The experiments include corrosion testing, environmental cracking of containment materials, and determinations of physical properties and decomposition mechanisms. This report details the work done at Sandia National Laboratories in each area listed. In addition, summaries of the experimental programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the University of New York, EIC Laboratories, Inc., and the Norwegian Institute of Technology on molten nitrate salts are given. Also discussed is how the experimental programs will influence the near-term central receiver programs such as utility repowering/industrial retrofit and cogeneration. The report is designed to provide easy access to the latest information and data on molten NaNO/sub 3//KNO/sub 3/ for the designers and engineers of future central receiver projects.

Carling, R.W.; Kramer, C.M.; Bradshaw, R.W.; Nissen, D.A.; Goods, S.H.; Mar, R.W.; Munford, J.W.; Karnowsky, M.M.; Biefeld, R.N.; Norem, N.J.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Solubilty and growth kinetics of silver nitrate in ethanol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The solubility of silver nitrate in ethanol was determined at various temperatures. The growth kinetics of silver nitrate in ethanol were then determined using initial derivaties of temperature and desupersaturation in a mixed-batch crystallizer. For ... Keywords: ethanol, growth kinetics, initial derivatives, silver nitrate, solubility

M. Manteghian; A. Ebrahimi

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Evaluation of Composite Alumina Nanoparticle and Nitrate Eutectic Materials for use in Concentrating Solar Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The focus of this research was to create and characterize high temperature alumina and nitrate salt eutectic nanofluids for use in thermal energy storage (TES) systems. The nitrate eutectic was originally used in the TES system demonstrated as part of the Solar Two power tower and is currently employed as the TES material at Andasol 1 in Spain. Concentrations of alumina nanoparticles between 0.1% and 10% by weight were introduced into the base material in an effort to create nanofluids which would exhibit improved specific heat capacity to reduce the $/kWht thermal energy storage system costs. The composite materials were created using an aqueous mixing method in which both the nanoparticles and nitrate eutectic were placed into solution using acidic water. This solution was then sonicated in an ultrasonic bath in an effort to reduce nanoparticle agglomeration and to improve homogeneity. After boiling off the excess water, the nanoparticle-nitrate eutectic composite was recovered for characterization. The thermal properties of both the composite and base materials were characterized using the differential scanning calorimetry techniques outlined in ASTM E 1269. The created nanofluids were not stable and did not offer a cost-effective alternative to the current nitrate eutectic TES material. Despite these setbacks, a positive correlation between alumina concentration and nanofluid specific heat was demonstrated. Additionally, the specific heat capacities of the created nanofluids exceeded that predicted by the current theoretical models. These findings suggest that further work in the field of high temperature nanofluids for use in TES systems is warranted.

Malik, Darren R.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Process for extracting technetium from alkaline solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates generally to a process for extracting technetium from nuclear wastes and more particularly to a process for extracting technetium from alkaline waste solutions containing technetium and high concentrations of alkali metal nitrates. A process for extracting technetium values from an aqueous alkaline solution containing at least one alkali metal hydroxide and at least one alkali metal nitrate comprises the steps of: contacting the aqueous alkaline solution with a solvent consisting of a crown ether in a diluent, the diluent being a water-immiscible organic liquid in which the crown ether is soluble, for a period of time sufficient to selectively extract the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution into the solvent; separating the solvent containing the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution; and stripping the technetium values from the solvent by contacting the solvent with water.

Moyer, B.A.; Sachleben, R.A.; Bonnesen, P.V.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

94

THORIUM OXALATE-URANYL ACETATE COUPLED PROCEDURE FOR THE SEPARATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The recovery of fission products from neutronirradiated uranium is described. The neutron-irradiated uranium is dissolved in acid and thorium oxalate is precipitated in ihe solution formed, whereby the fission products are carried on the thorium oxalate. The separated thorium oxalate precipitate is then dissolved in an aqueous oxalate solution and the solution formed is acidified, limiting ihe excess acidity to a maximum of 2 N, whereby thorium oxalate precipitates and carries lanthanum-rareearth- and alkaline-earth-metal fission products while the zirconium-fission-product remains in solution. This precipitate, too, is dissolved in an aqaeous oxalate solution at elevated temperature, and lanthanum-rare-earth ions are added to the solution whereby lanthanum-rare-earth oxalate forms and the lanthanum-rare-earth-type and alkalineearth-metal-type fission products are carried on the oxalate. The precipitate is separated from the solution.

Gofman, J.W.

1959-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

95

Aluminum nitrate recrystallization and recovery from liquid extraction raffinates  

SciTech Connect

The solid sludges resulting form biodenitrification of discarded aluminum nitrate are the largest Y-12 Plant process solid waste. Aluminum nitrate feedstocks also represent a major plant materials cost. The chemical constraints on aluminum nitrate recycle were investigated to determine the feasibility of increasing recycle while maintaining acceptable aluminum nitrate purity. Reported phase behavior of analogous systems, together with bench research, indicated that it would be possible to raise the recycle rate from 35% to between 70 and 90% by successive concentration and recrystallization of the mother liquor. A full scale pilot test successfully confirmed the ability to obtain 70% recycle in existing process equipment.

Griffith, W.L.; Compere, A.L.; Googin, J.M.; Huxtable, W.P.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Corrosion of aluminides by molten nitrate salt  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The corrosion of titanium-, iron-, and nickel-based aluminides by a highly aggressive, oxidizing NaNO{sub 3}(-KNO{sub 3})-Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} has been studied at 650{degree}C. It was shown that weight changes could be used to effectively evaluate corrosion behavior in the subject nitrate salt environments provided these data were combined with salt analyses and microstructural examinations. The studies indicated that the corrosion of relatively resistant aluminides by these nitrate salts proceeded by oxidation and a slow release from an aluminum-rich product layer into the salt at rates lower than that associated with many other types of metallic materials. The overall corrosion process and resulting rate depended on the particular aluminide being exposed. In order to minimize corrosion of nickel or iron aluminides, it was necessary to have aluminum concentrations in excess of 30 at. %. However, even at a concentration of 50 at. % Al, the corrosion resistance of TiAl was inferior to that of Ni{sub 3}Al and Fe{sub 3}Al. At higher aluminum concentrations, iron, nickel, and iron-nickel aluminides exhibited quite similar weight changes, indicative of the principal role of aluminum in controlling the corrosion process in NaNO{sub 3}(-KNO{sub 3})-Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} salts. 20 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Tortorelli, P.F.; Bishop, P.S.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

NITRIC ACID RECOVERY FROM WASTE SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The recovery of nitric acid from aqueous nitrate solutions containing fission products as impurities is described. It is desirable to subject such solutions to concentration by evaporation since nitric acid is regenerated thereby. A difficulty, however, is that the highly radioactive fission product ruthenium is volatilized together with the nitric acid. It has been found that by adding nitrous acid, ruthenium volatilization is suppressed and reduced to a negligible degree so that the distillate obtained is practically free of ruthenium.

Wilson, A.S.

1959-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

98

The Effects of Nanoparticle Augmentation of Nitrate Thermal Storage Materials for Use in Concentrating Solar Power Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Department of Energy funded a project to determine if the specific heat of thermal energy storage materials could be improved by adding nanoparticles. The standard thermal energy storage materials are molten salts. The chosen molten salt was a sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate eutectic, commercially called Hitec Solar Salt. Two nanoparticle types were chosen, alumina and silica. The nanoparticle composite materials were fabricated by mixing the components in an aqueous solution, mixing that solution for a set amount of time using a sonic mixer, then removing the water from the aqueous solution, leaving the composite molten salt behind as a fine white powder. The thermal properties of the composite and plain material were measured using two techniques: American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) 1269E and Modulating Differential Scanning Calorimetry (MDSC). These two techniques measured the specific heat and the heat of fusion of the plain and composite materials. The results of all the ASTM and MDSC measurements suggest that the addition of the nanoparticles using the given manufacturing technique increased the specific heat of the molten salt by approximately 20 percent, with both measurement techniques showing approximately the same level of increase. The silica and the alumina improved the specific heat by nearly the same amount over the base material. The heat of fusion did not seem to be significantly altered compared to the observed heat of fusion value of the unmodified material. It was also observed that the nitrate and silica composite material's specific heat decreased if the material was raised to a temperature above 400C. The specific heat was observed to decrease over time, even when the temperature was well below 400C. It is unknown why this occurred. The nitrate plus alumina composite and the plain nitrate were stable to a temperature of 450C for the test duration.

Betts, Matthew

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

PROCESS OF PREPARING URANIUM-IMPREGNATED GRAPHITE BODY  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the fabrication of graphite bodies containing uniformly distributed uranium is described. It consists of impregnating a body of graphite having uniform porosity and low density with an aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate preferably by a vacuum technique, thereafter removing excess aqueous solution from the surface of the graphite, then removing the solvent water from the body under substantially normal atmospheric conditions of temperature and pressure in the presence of a stream of dry inert gas, and finally heating the dry impregnated graphite body in the presence of inert gas at a temperature between 800 and 1400 d C to convert the uranyl nitrate hexahydrate to an oxide of uranium.

Kanter, M.A.

1958-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

100

NITRATE CONVERSION OF HB-LINE REILLEXTM HPQ RESIN  

SciTech Connect

Reillex{trademark} HPQ ion exchange resin is used by HB Line to remove plutonium from aqueous streams. Reillex{trademark} HPQ resin currently available from Vertellus Specialties LLC is a chloride ionic form, which can cause stress corrosion cracking in stainless steels. Therefore, HB Line Engineering requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) convert resin from chloride form to nitrate form in the Engineering Development Laboratory (EDL). To perform this task, SRNL treated two batches of resin in 2012. The first batch of resin from Reilly Industries Batch 80302MA was initially treated at SRNL in 2001 to remove chloride. This batch of resin, nominally 30 liters, has been stored wet in carboys since that time until being retreated in 2012. The second batch of resin from Batch 23408 consisted of 50 kg of new resin purchased from Vertellus Specialties in 2012. Both batches were treated in a column designed to convert resin using downflow of 1.0 M sodium nitrate solution through the resin bed followed by rinsing with deionized water. Both batches were analyzed for chloride concentration, before and after treatment, using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA). The resin specification [Werling, 2003] states the total chlorine and chloride concentration shall be less than 250 ppm. The resin condition for measuring this concentration is not specified; however, in service the resin would always be fully wet. Measurements in SRNL showed that changing from oven dry resin to fully wet resin, with liquid in the particle interstices but no supernatant, increases the total weight by a factor of at least three. Therefore, concentration of chlorine or chloride expressed as parts per million (ppm) decreases by a factor of three. Therefore, SRNL recommends measuring chlorine concentration on an oven dry basis, then dividing by three to estimate chloride concentration in the fully wet condition. Chloride concentration in the first batch (No.80302MA) was nearly the same before the current treatment (759 ppm dry) and after treatment (745 ppm dry or {approx}248 ppm wet). Treatment of the second batch of resin (No.23408) was very successful. Chloride concentration decreased from 120,000 ppm dry to an average of 44 ppm dry or {approx}15ppm wet, which easily passes the 250 ppm wet criterion. Per guidance from HB Line Engineering, SRNL blended Batch 80302 resin with Batch P9059 resin which had been treated previously by ResinTech to remove chloride. The chloride concentrations for the two drums of Batch P9059 were 248 ppm dry ({approx}83 ppm wet) {+-}22.8% and 583 ppm dry ({approx}194 ppm wet) {+-} 11.8%. The blended resin was packaged in five gallon buckets.

Steimke, J.; Williams, M.; Steeper, T.; Leishear, R.

2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

USE OF A UNIQUE BIOBARRIER TO REMEDIATE NITRATE AND PERCHLORATE IN GROUNDWATER  

SciTech Connect

Research was conducted to evaluate a multiple-layer system of volcanic rock, limestone, Apatite mineral and a 'biobarrier' to impede migration of radionuclides, metals and colloids through shallow alluvial groundwater, while simultaneously destroying contaminants such as nitrate and perchlorate. The 'bio' portion of this Multi-Barrier system uses highly porous, slowly degradable, carbon-based material (pecan shells) that serves as an energy source and supports the growth of indigenous microbial populations capable of destroying biodegradable compounds. The studies, using elevated nitrate concentrations in groundwater, have demonstrated reduction from levels of 6.5-9.7 mM nitrate (400-600 mg/L) to below discharge limits (0.16 mM nitrate). Perchlorate levels of 4.3 {micro}M (350 {micro}g/L) were also greatly reduced. Elevated levels of nitrate in drinking water are a public health concern, particularly for infants and adults susceptible to gastric cancer. Primary sources of contamination include feedlots, agriculture (fertilization), septic systems, mining and nuclear operations. A major source of perchlorate contamination in water is ammonium perchlorate from manufacture/use of rocket propellants. Perchlorate, recently identified as an EPA contaminant of concern, may affect thyroid function and cause tumor formation. A biobarrier used to support the growth of microbial populations (i.e. a biofilm) is a viable and inexpensive tool for cleaning contaminated groundwater. Aquatic ecosystems and human populations worldwide are affected by contaminated water supplies. One of the most frequent contaminants is nitrate. Remediation of nitrate in groundwater and drinking water by biodegradation is a natural solution to this problem. Microbial processes play an extremely important role in in situ groundwater treatment technologies. The assumption of carbon limitation is the basis for addition of carbon-based substrates to a system in the development of bioremediation schemes for nitrate-contaminated groundwater. The biobarrier concept typically involves construction of a wall of porous carbon-based material that is placed in a trench perpendicular to the direction of groundwater flow that extends at least the width and depth of the contaminant plume. A biobarrier can be used as a stand-alone system when biodegradable materials are the only contaminants, or it can be used along with other barriers, as has been done in the LANL Multi-Barrier system, designed to remediate multiple contaminants. The groundwater system must be reasonably well characterized in terms of direction of flow, width and depth of plume, concentrations along the plume, flow velocity and hydraulic conductivity. Barrier technology is largely applicable to shallow, alluvial plumes (less than 20 feet deep), although permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) have been placed at much greater depths, up to 70 ft. deep. Under these conditions, a barrier could be placed across the plume downstream from the source to prevent migration from a controlled site. The most effective barrier materials are natural waste materials of high porosity, resistant to degradation, that will not require removal or replacement with time. Pecan shells are a significant waste problem in pecan-growing areas. The most commonly used solution is land disposal. Use in biobarriers provides a desirable alternative. Pecan shells are composed of cellulose and lignin, and they degrade very slowly, providing a 'time-release' carbon source. If left uncrushed, they provide a high porosity material. Fishbone is a waste product made of calcium phosphate, or hydroxyapatite, which is very resistant to deterioration. Apatite-II effectively removes dissolved metals and radionuclides from groundwater. The precipitates formed with metals and radionuclides are highly insoluble and very unlikely to leach subsequently from the barrier. The residual tissue associated with the fishbones provides nutrient materials that contribute to formation of a microbial population as an additional benefit. W

Strietelmeier, E. A. (Elizabeth A.); Espinosa, Melissa L. (Melissa L.); Adams, J. D. (Joshua D. ); Leonard, P. A. (Patricia A.); Hodge, E. M. (Evangeline M.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Laboratory scale vitrification of low-level radioactive nitrate salts and soils from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

INEL has radiologically contaminated nitrate salt and soil waste stored above and below ground in Pad A and the Acid Pit at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Pad A contain uranium and transuranic contaminated potassium and sodium nitrate salts generated from dewatered waste solutions at the Rocky Flats Plant. The Acid Pit was used to dispose of liquids containing waste mineral acids, uranium, nitrate, chlorinated solvents, and some mercury. Ex situ vitrification is a high temperature destruction of nitrates and organics and immobilizes hazardous and radioactive metals. Laboratory scale melting of actual radionuclides containing INEL Pad A nitrate salts and Acid Pit soils was performed. The salt/soil/additive ratios were varied to determine the range of glass compositions (resulted from melting different wastes); maximize mass and volume reduction, durability, and immobilization of hazardous and radioactive metals; and minimize viscosity and offgas generation for wastes prevalent at INEL and other DOE sites. Some mixtures were spiked with additional hazardous and radioactive metals. Representative glasses were leach tested and showed none. Samples spiked with transuranic showed low nuclide leaching. Wasteforms were two to three times bulk densities of the salt and soil. Thermally co-processing soils and salts is an effective remediation method for destroying nitrate salts while stabilizing the radiological and hazardous metals they contain. The measured durability of these low-level waste glasses approached those of high-level waste glasses. Lab scale vitrification of actual INEL contaminated salts and soils was performed at General Atomics Laboratory as part of the INEL Waste Technology Development and Environmental Restoration within the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program.

Shaw, P. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Anderson, B. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States). NRT Div.; Davis, D. [Envitco Inc., Toledo, OH (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Decontamination of water using nitrate selective ion exchange resin  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for nitrate decontamination of water which involves passing the water through a bed of alkyl phosphonium anion exchange resin which has pendant alkyl groups of C[sub 3] or larger.

Lockridge, J.E.; Fritz, J.S.

1990-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

104

Decontamination of water using nitrate selective ion exchange resin  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for nitrate decontamination of water which involves passing the water through a bed of alkyl phosphonium anion exchange resin which has pendant alkyl groups of C.sub.3 or larger.

Lockridge, James E. (Ames, IA); Fritz, James S. (Ames, IA)

1990-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

105

Preparation of thin ceramic films via an aqueous solution route  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new chemical method of forming thin ceramic films has been developed. An aqueous solution of metal nitrates or other soluble metal salts and a low molecular weight amino acid is coated onto a substrate and pyrolyzed. The amino acid serves to prevent precipitation of individual solution components, forming a very viscous, glass-like material as excess water is evaporated. Using metal nitrates and glycine, the method has been demonstrated for zirconia with various levels of yttria stabilization, for lanthanum-strontium chromites, and for yttrium-barium-copper oxide superconductors on various substrates.

Pederson, Larry R. (Kennewick, WA); Chick, Lawrence A. (Richland, WA); Exarhos, Gregory J. (Richland, WA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

U-EXTRACTION--IMPROVEMENTS IN ELIMINATION OF Mo BY USE OF FERRIC ION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved solvent extraction process is described whereby U may be extracted by a water immiscible organic solvent from an aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate. It has been found that Mo in the presence of phosphate ions appears to form a complex with the phosphate which extracts along with the U. This extraction of Mo may be suppressed by providing ferric ion in the solution prior to the extraction step. The ferric ion is preferably provided in the form of ferric nitrate.

Clark, H.M.; Duffey, D.

1958-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

107

Effects of 2-Ethylhexyl Nitrate on Diesel-Spray Processes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Diesel fuel ignition-enhancing additives, such as 2-ethylhexyl nitrate, are known to reduce emissions from diesel engines; however, the mechanisms by which the emissions reduction occur are not understood. This report covers the first phase of a research project supported by Ethyl Corporation that is aimed at developing a detailed understanding of how 2-ethylhexyl nitrate alters in-cylinder injection, ignition, and combustion processes to reduce diesel engine emissions.

Higgins, B.; Mueller, C.; Siebers, D.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Nonaqueous purification of mixed nitrate heat transfer media  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nonaqueous, in-line method for removing carbonate and hydroxide contamination from a molten mixed sodium nitrate/potassium nitrate heat transfer salt. The method comprises dissolving a stoichiometric quantity of anhydrous Ca(NO.sub.3).sub.2 in the melt whereby an insoluble CaCO.sub.3 and Ca(OH).sub.2 precipitate is formed. The precipitate can be removed by settling, filtration or floatation techniques.

Fiorucci, Louis C. (Hamden, CT); Morgan, Michael J. (Guilford, CT)

1983-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

109

Physics of enriched uranyl fluoride deposit characterizations using active neutron and gamma interrogation techniques with {sup 252}Cf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method was developed and successfully applied to characterize large uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 21}) deposits at the former Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant. These deposits were formed by a wet air in-leakage into the UF{sub 6} process gas lines over a period of years. The resulting UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} is hygroscopic, readily absorbing moisture from the air to form hydrates as UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}-nH{sub 2}O. The ratio of hydrogen to uranium, denoted H/U, can vary from 0--16, and has significant nuclear criticality safety impacts for large deposits. In order to properly formulate the required course of action, a non-intrusive characterization of the distribution of the fissile material within the pipe, its total mass, and amount of hydration was needed. The Nuclear Weapons Identification System (NWIS) previously developed at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant for identification of uranium weapons components in storage containers was used to successfully characterize the distribution, hydration, and total mass of these deposits.

Wyatt, M.S. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Uckan, T.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Valentine, T.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hannon, T.F. [East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Characterization of the nitrate complexes of Pu(IV) using absorption spectroscopy, {sup 15}N NMR, and EXAFS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nitrate complexes of Pu(IV) are studied in solutions containing nitrate up to 13 molar (M). Three major nitrato complexes are observed and identified using absorption spectroscopy, {sup 15}N nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) as Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup 2+}, Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 4}, and Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 2{minus}}. The possibility that Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 1}{sup 3+}, Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 1+} and Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 5}{sup 1{minus}} are major species in solution is not consistent with these results and an upper limit of 0.10 can be set on the fraction for each of these three nitrate complexes in nitrate containing solutions. Fraction of the three major species in nitric acid over the 1--13 M range were calculated from absorption spectra data. The fraction of Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 2{minus}} as a function of nitric acid concentration is in good agreement with the literature, whereas the fraction of Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup 2+} and Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 4} species differ from previous studies. We have modeled the chemical equilibria up to moderate ionic strength ( < 6 molal) using the specific ion interaction theory (SM. Comparison of our experimental observations to literature stability constants that assume the presence of mononitrate species is poor. Stability constant at zero ionic strength for the dinitrato complex is determined to be log({beta}{sub 2}{sup 0})=3.77 {plus_minus} 0.14 (2{sigma}).

Veirs, D.K.; Smith, C.A.; Zwick, B.D.; Marsh, S.F.; Conradson, S.D.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Evaluation of a solar intermittent refrigeration system for ice production operating with ammonia/lithium nitrate  

SciTech Connect

A novel solar intermittent refrigeration system for ice production developed in the Centro de Investigacion en Energia of the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico is presented. The system operates with the ammonia/lithium nitrate mixture. The system developed has a nominal capacity of 8 kg of ice/day. It consists of a cylindrical parabolic collector acting as generator-absorber. Evaporator temperatures as low as -11 C were obtained for several hours with solar coefficients of performance up to 0.08. It was found that the coefficient of performance increases with the increment of solar radiation and the solution concentration. A dependency of the coefficient of performance was not founded against the cooling water temperature. Also it was found that the maximum operating pressure increases meanwhile the generation temperature decreases with an increase of the solution concentration. (author)

Rivera, W.; Moreno-Quintanar, G.; Best, R. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 34, 62580 Temixco, Mor. (Mexico); Rivera, C.O.; Martinez, F. [Facultad de Ingenieria Campus Coatzacoalcos, Universidad Veracruzana, Av. Universidad Km 7.5, 96530 Coatzacoalcos, Ver. (Mexico)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

112

Electroactive Materials for Anion Separation - Technetium from Nitrate  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many contaminants of interest to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) exist as anions. These include the high priority pollutants chromate, pertechnetate, and nitrate ions. In addition, there are also industrial and urban applications where the separation of anionic species from aqueous streams is critical. Examples include industrial water recycle and waste water treatment (e.g., chloride ion removal for the pulp and paper industry, borate ion in the chemical and nuclear industries) and drinking water and agricultural waste treatment (e.g., nitrate removal). In the proposed research, technetium is chosen as the target pollutant. Because of its half-life of 213,000 years, technetium (99Tc) presents a long-term hazard for waste disposal. Much of the 99Tc in the tank wastes is present as pertechnetate (TcO4-), accounting for its high solubility and mobility in aqueous systems. Several sorbents are available for removing TcO4- from alkaline waste brines, but each has important drawbacks. The use of commercial ion exchange (IX) resins to extract TcO4-, e.g., Reillex{trademark}-HPQ (Reilly Industries) and ABEC 5000 (Eichrom Industries), generates significant secondary waste. The elution of TcO4- from Reillex{trademark}-HPQ resins requires either concentrated nitric acid or a concentrated caustic solution of ethylene-diamine containing a small amount of tin chloride. This eluant has a short shelf life requiring frequent preparation, and the 99Tc is delivered in a complexed, reduced form. While TcO4- can be eluted from ABEC 5000 resins using de-ionized water, the much-reduced capacity of ABEC 5000 resins in comparison to the Reillex{trademark}-HPQ resins leads to a low column capacity. In general, unwanted secondary wastes are generated because (1) the only effective eluant happens to be hazardous and/or (2) the IX material has a low capacity or selectivity for the target ion, resulting in more frequent elution and column replacements. Alternative IX materials that have high capacities, can be regenerated easily, and are highly selective for TcO4- would avoid these problems. Electrochemically active IX media meet these criteria. Such an IX system uses electrically induced changes in the media to expel sorbed ions through a charge imbalance rather than requiring chemical eluants to ''strip'' them. Therefore, this medium eliminates the need to prepare, store, and dispose of many of the process chemicals normally required for IX operations. The focus of the project is to develop a fundamental understanding of how the physical and chemical properties of electroactive ion exchange (EaIX) materials control their efficiency when used as mass separation agents. Specifically, the desirable characteristics of EaIX materials for separation applications are (1) high reversibility, (2) high selectivity, (3) acceptable physical and chemical stability, (4) rapid intercalation and de-intercalation rates, and (5) high capacity. Because of these requirements, EaIX materials share many properties in common with conventional ion exchangers and electroactive polymers. For example, EaIX materials require the selectivity typically found in ion exchangers; they also require the redox reversibility of electroactive polymers. The results of this work will allow the rational design of new materials and processes tailored for the separation of specific anions.

Sukamto, Johanes H.; Smyrl, William H.; McBreen, James; Hubler, Timothy L.; Lilga, Michael A.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Thorium Nitrate Stockpile--From Here to Eternity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Defense National Stockpile Center (DNSC), a field level activity of the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) has stewardship of a stockpile of thorium nitrate that has been in storage for decades. The stockpile is made up of approximately 3.2 million kg (7 million lb) of thorium nitrate crystals (hydrate form) stored at two depot locations in the United States. DNSC sought technical assistance from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to define and quantify the management options for the thorium nitrate stockpile. This paper describes methodologies and results comprising the work in Phase 1 and Phase 2. The results allow the DNSC to structure and schedule needed tasks to ensure continued safe long-term storage and/or phased disposal of the stockpile.

Hermes, W. H.; Hylton, T. D.; Mattus, C.H.; Storch, S. N.; Singley, P.S.; Terry. J. W.; Pecullan, M.; Reilly, F. K.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

114

Evaporation of iodine-containing off-gas scrubber solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Mercuric nitrate-nitric acid scrub solutions containing radioiodine may be reduced in volume without excessive loss of volatile iodine. The use of concentrated nitric acid during an evaporation process oxidizes the mercury-iodide complex to a less volatile mercuric iodate precipitate.

Partridge, J.A.; Bosuego, G.P.

1980-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

115

CHARACTERIZATION OF SURFACTANTS IN ALUMINUM-URANIUM FUEL REPROCESSING SOLUTIONS  

SciTech Connect

Surface active materials in aluminum nitrate-nitric acid fuel reprocessing solutions were characterized. Polymerized silica, zirconium- modified silica and soluble dibutyl phosphate species were found to contribute to stable emulsion formation. These surfactants were reduced in effectiveness by added acid. (auth)

Cannon, R.D.

1959-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

116

Regular Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...The structure of a binary solid solution is shown schematically in Fig. 13. Three types of interatomic bonds

117

RADIOACTIVE HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANK PITTING PREDICTIONS: AN INVESTIGATION INTO CRITICAL SOLUTION CONCENTRATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of cyclic potentiodynamic polarization tests was performed on samples of ASTM A537 carbon steel in support of a probability-based approach to evaluate the effect of chloride and sulfate on corrosion the steel?s susceptibility to pitting corrosion. Testing solutions were chosen to systemically evaluate the influence of the secondary aggressive species, chloride, and sulfate, in the nitrate based, high-level wastes. The results suggest that evaluating the combined effect of all aggressive species, nitrate, chloride, and sulfate, provides a consistent response for determining corrosion susceptibility. The results of this work emphasize the importance for not only nitrate concentration limits, but also chloride and sulfate concentration limits.

Hoffman, E.

2012-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

118

SEPARATION OF INORGANIC SALTS FROM ORGANIC SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for recovering the nitrates of uranium and plutonium from solution in oxygen-containing organic solvents such as ketones or ethers. The solution of such salts dissolved in an oxygen-containing organic compound is contacted with an ion exchange resin whereby sorption of the entire salt on the resin takes place and then the salt-depleted liquid and the resin are separated from each other. The reaction seems to be based on an anion formation of the entire salt by complexing with the anion of the resin. Strong base or quaternary ammonium type resins can be used successfully in this process.

Katzin, L.I.; Sullivan, J.C.

1958-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

119

Speciation model selection by Monte Carlo analysis of optical absorption spectra: Plutonium(IV) nitrate complexes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Standard modeling approaches can produce the most likely values of the formation constants of metal-ligand complexes if a particular set of species containing the metal ion is known or assumed to exist in solution equilibrium with complexing ligands. Identifying the most likely set of species when more than one set is plausible is a more difficult problem to address quantitatively. A Monte Carlo method of data analysis is described that measures the relative abilities of different speciation models to fit optical spectra of open-shell actinide ions. The best model(s) can be identified from among a larger group of models initially judged to be plausible. The method is demonstrated by analyzing the absorption spectra of aqueous Pu(IV) titrated with nitrate ion at constant 2 molal ionic strength in aqueous perchloric acid. The best speciation model supported by the data is shown to include three Pu(IV) species with nitrate coordination numbers 0, 1, and 2. Formation constants are {beta}{sub 1}=3.2{+-}0.5 and {beta}{sub 2}=11.2{+-}1.2, where the uncertainties are 95% confidence limits estimated by propagating raw data uncertainties using Monte Carlo methods. Principal component analysis independently indicates three Pu(IV) complexes in equilibrium. (c) 2000 Society for Applied Spectroscopy.

Berg, John M. [Nuclear Materials Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Veirs, D. Kirk [Nuclear Materials Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Vaughn, Randolph B. [Nuclear Materials Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Cisneros, Michael R. [Nuclear Materials Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Smith, Coleman A. [Nuclear Materials Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

METHOD OF RECOVERING PLUTONIUM VALUES FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS BY CARRIER PRECIPITATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is presented for pretreating aqueous nitric acid- plutonium solutions containing a small quantity of hydrazine that has formed as a decomposition product during the dissolution of neutron-bombarded uranium in nitric acid and that impairs the precipitation of plutonium on bismuth phosphate. The solution is digested with alkali metal dichromate or potassium permanganate at between 75 and 100 deg C; sulfuric acid at approximately 75 deg C and sodium nitrate, oxaiic acid plus manganous nitrate, or hydroxylamine are added to the solution to secure the plutonium in the tetravalent state and make it suitable for precipitation on BiPO/sub 4/.

James, R.A.; Thompson, S.G.

1959-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Method for recovering palladium and technetium values from nuclear fuel reprocessing waste solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for recovering palladium and technetium values from nuclear fuel reprocessing waste solutions containing these and other values by contacting the waste solution with an extractant of tricaprylmethylammonium nitrate in an inert hydrocarbon diluent which extracts the palladium and technetium values from the waste solution. The palladium and technetium values are recovered from the extractant and from any other coextracted values with a strong nitric acid strip solution.

Horwitz, E. Philip (Elmhurst, IL); Delphin, Walter H. (Woodridge, IL)

1979-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

122

Embedded Network Sensing of Moisture and Nitrate Propagation During Irrigation with Reclaimed Wastewater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

operation, thus optimizing discharge of nitrate-laden wastewater. rain gauge D ata acquisition a nd wireless

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Alcohol fuel use: Implications for atmospheric levels of aldehydes, organic nitrates, pans, and peroxides: Separating sources using carbon isotopes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have developed DiNitroPhenylHydrazone (DNPH) derivatization--high performance liquid chromatographic methods for measuring aldehydes in ambient samples with detection limits of approximately 1ppbV. These methods can be used for air or precipitation studies, and have been used for indoor measurements at much higher levels using shorter integration times. We are using gas chromatographs with electron capture detection (GCECD) to measure ambient levels of peroxyacyl nitrates and organic nitrates. Diffusion tubes with synthetically produced organic nitrates in n-tridecane solution are used to calibrate these systems. These compounds are important means of transporting NO/sub x/ over large scales due to their reduced tropospheric reactivity, low water solubilities, photolytic, and thermal stability. Their chemistries are coupled to aldehyde chemistry and are important greenhouse gases as well as phytotoxins. We have completed preliminary studies in Rio de Janeiro examining the atmospheric chemistry consequences of ethanol fuel usage. The urban air mass has been effected by the direct uncontrolled usage of ethanolgasoline and ethanoldiesel mixtures. We are exploring the use of luminol chemiluminescent detection of peroxides using gas chromatography to separate the various organic and inorganic peroxides. These compounds are coupled to the aldehyde chemistry, particularly in remote chemistries down-wind of urban sources. 13 refs.

Gaffney, J.S.; Tanner, R.L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Nitrate Enhanced Microbial Cr(VI) Reduction-Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major challenge for the bioremediation of radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium) and metals (i.e., Cr(VI), Hg) is the co-occurrence of nitrate as it can inhibit metal transformation. Denitrification (nitrate reduction to dinitrogen gas) is considered the most important ecological process. For many metal and metalloid reducing bacteria, however, ammonia is the end product through respiratory nitrate reduction (RNRA). The focus of this work was to determine how RNRA impacts Cr(VI) transformation. The goal was to elucidate the specific mechanism(s) that limits Cr(VI) reduction in the presence of nitrate and to use this information to develop strategies that enhance Cr(VI) reduction (and thus detoxification). Our central hypothesis is that nitrate impacts the biotransformation of metals and metalloids in three ways 1) as a competitive alternative electron acceptor (inhibiting transformation), 2) as a co-metabolite (i.e., concomitant reduction, stimulating transformation), and 3) as an inducer of specific proteins and pathways involved in oxidation/reduction reactions (stimulating transformation). We have identified three model organisms, Geobacter metallireducens (mechanism 1), Sulfurospirillum barnesii, (mechasism 2), and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (mechanisms 3). Our specific aims were to 1) investigate the role of Cr(VI) concentration on the kinetics of both growth and reduction of nitrate, nitrite, and Cr(VI) in these three organisms; 2) develop a profile of bacterial enzymes involved in nitrate transformation (e.g., oxidoreductases) using a proteomic approach; 3) investigate the function of periplasmic nitrite reductase (Nrf) as a chromate reductase; and 4) develop a strategy to maximize microbial chromium reduction in the presence of nitrate. We found that growth on nitrate by G. metallireducens was inhibited by Cr(VI). Over 240 proteins were identified by LC/MS-MS. Redox active proteins, outer membrane heavy metal efflux proteins, and chemotaxis sensory proteins (Gmet_2478 and Gmet_1641) were up-regulated with exposure to Cr(VI). A nine-heme cytochrome C was purified that could reduce nitrite and could be oxidized by Cr(VI). For D. desulfuricans, we found that confirmed that Cr(VI) induced a prolonged lag period when Cr(VI) was reduced. Over three hundred proteins were unequivocally identified by LC/MS-MS and a significant number of down-regulated proteins for which the levels were changed >2 fold compared to control. Sulfite reductase levels were similar, however, nitrate and nitrite reductase were down-regulated. The supernatant of spent cultures was found to contain a filterable, heat stable compound that rapidly reduced Cr(VI). In addition, desulfoviridin was purified from nitrate grown cells and shown to have nitrite reductase activity that was inhibited by Cr(VI). For S. barnesii, periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap), nitrite reductase (Nrf), and the metalloid reductase (Rar) were purified and characterized. The supernatant of spent cultures was also found to contain a filterable, heat stable compound that rapidly reduced Cr(VI) but that Rar also reduced Cr(VI). Our results from specific aims 1 through 3 indicate that for G. metallireducens, Cr(VI) inhibits nitrate respiration as it oxidizes cytochromes involved in nitrate respiration. Iron reduction is apparently not affected and the inhibitory affects of Cr(VI) may be attenuated by the addition of sufficient Fe(III) to generate Fe(II) that abiotically reduces the chromium. For S. barnesii, although the enzyme assays indicate that the components of the respiratory pathway for nitrate (e.g. Nap and Nrf) are inhibited by chromate, the organism has a mechanism to prevent this from actually occurring. Our current hypothesis is that the non-specific metalloid reductase (Rar) is providing resistance by reducing the Cr(VI). The strategy here would be to enhance its growth and metabolism in the natural setting. Lactate is a suitable electron donor for S. barnesii but other donors are possible. Although the version of the Phylochip used for monitoring the microb

John F. Stolz

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

Total Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Nitrate Measurements in the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Total Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Nitrate Measurements in the Southwest Pacific during Austral Autumn, 1990: Results from NOAA/PMEL CGC-90 Cruise. Total Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Nitrate Measurements in the Southwest Pacific during Austral Autumn, 1990: Results from NOAA/PMEL CGC-90 Cruise. NDP-052 (1995) data Download the Data and ASCII Documentation files of NDP-052 PDF Download a PDF of NDP-052 image Contributed by Marilyn F. Lamb and Richard A. Feely Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory Seattle, Washington and Lloyd Moore and Donald K. Atwood Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory Miami, Florida Prepared by Alexander Kozyr* Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. *Energy, Environment, and Resources Center The University of Tennessee Knoxville, Tennessee Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 4420 Date Published: September 1995

126

Nitrate and Perchlorate removal from groundwater by ion exchange  

SciTech Connect

This study was conducted to evaluate the performance of a small scale ion exchange unit (Krudico, Inc of Auborn, IA) for removal of nitrate and perchlorate from groundwater at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Site 300. The unit was able to treat 3,600 gallons of Site 300 groundwater, at an average influent concentration of 100 mg/L NO{sub 3}{sup -} before breakthrough occurred. The unit contained 2.5 ft{sup 3} of Sybron SR-7 resin. Seventy gallons of regeneration waste were generated (water treated to waste ratio of 51:1). The effluent concentration was about 20 mg/L NO{sub 3}{sup -}, which is equivalent to a treatment efficiency of at least 80%. There are several options for implementing this technology at Site 300. A target well, in the 817 area, has been selected. It has a 3 to 4 gpm flow rate, and concentrations of 90 mg/L NO{sub 3}{sup -} and 40 {micro}g/L perchlorate. The different treatment options include ion exchange treatment of nitrate only, nitrate and perchlorate, or perchlorate only. Option 1: For the treatment of nitrate only, this unit will be able to treat 3,700 gallons of water before regeneration is required. If both columns of the ion exchange unit are used, 7,400 gallons could be treated before the columns will need to be regenerated (producing 140 gallons of waste, per cycle or every 1.5 days). The effluent nitrate concentration is expected to be about 17 mg/L. Annual operation and maintenance costs are estimated to be $0.14 per gallon of water treated. Option 2: If only perchlorate is to be removed with ion exchange at the 817 area, a smaller unit should be considered. A 55 gallon canister filled with ion exchange resin should be able to reduce perchlorate concentrations in the groundwater from 40 {micro}g/L to non-detect levels for three years before the resin would need to be replaced. The contaminant-laden resin would be disposed of as hazardous waste. It is not practical to regenerate the resin because of the extreme difficulty of removing perchlorate from the resin. Due to the selectivity of the ion exchange resin, it will also be possible to selectively remove perchlorate from nitrate-contaminated water. Annual operation and maintenance costs are estimated to be $0.02 per gallon of water treated. Option 3: Another alternative is to treat both perchlorate and nitrate. A three column unit would be built. The first column would capture perchlorate and the resin would be replaced rather than regenerated. The second and third column would be operated as under Option 1 to treat nitrate. Annual operation and maintenance costs are estimated to be $0.14 per gallon of water treated.

Burge, S; Halden, R

1999-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

Using solvent extraction to process nitrate anion exchange column effluents  

SciTech Connect

Octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO), a new organophosphorous extractant, and a new centrifugal mixer-settler both recently developed at Argonne were evaluated for their potential use in the recovery of actinides from nitrate anion exchange column effluents. The performance of the extractant was evaluated by measuring the extraction coefficient values as a function of acid and salt concentration. Additional performance parameters include extraction coefficient behavior as a function of the total metal concentration in the organic phase, and comparison of different stripping and organic scrubbing techniques. A simulated effluent stream was used to evaluate the performance of the centrifugal mixer-settlers by comparing experimental and calculated interstage concentration profiles. Both the CMPO extractant and the centrifugal mixer-settlers have potential for processing nitrate column effluents, particularly if the stripping behavior can be improved. Details of the proposed process are presented in the flowsheet and contactor design analyses.

Yarbro, S.L.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

State and Local Solution Center: Financing Solutions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technical Assistance Technical Assistance Resources Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to State and Local Solution Center: Financing Solutions to someone by E-mail Share State and Local Solution Center: Financing Solutions on Facebook Tweet about State and Local Solution Center: Financing Solutions on Twitter Bookmark State and Local Solution Center: Financing Solutions on Google Bookmark State and Local Solution Center: Financing Solutions on Delicious Rank State and Local Solution Center: Financing Solutions on Digg Find More places to share State and Local Solution Center: Financing Solutions on AddThis.com... Strategic Energy Planning Energy Policies & Programs Financing Financing Overview Financing Program Market Segments Energy Data Management Energy Technologies

129

PROCESS OF MAKING A NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT COMPOSITION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is presented for making a ceramic-like material suitable for use as a nuclear fuel. The material consists of a solid solution of plutonium dioxide in uranium dioxide and is produced from a uranyl nitrate -plutonium nitrate solution containing uraniunm and plutonium in the desired ratio. The uranium and plutonium are first precipitated from the solution by addition of NH/ sub 4/OH and the dried precipitate is then calcined at 600 C in a hydrogen atmosphere to yield the desired solid solution of PuO/sub 2/ in UO/sub 2/.

Alter, H.W.; Davidson, J.K.; Miller, R.S.; Mewherter, J.L.

1959-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

130

Low-melting point inorganic nitrate salt heat transfer fluid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low-melting point, heat transfer fluid made of a mixture of four inorganic nitrate salts: 9-18 wt % NaNO.sub.3, 40-52 wt % KNO.sub.3, 13-21 wt % LiNO.sub.3, and 20-27 wt % Ca(NO.sub.3).sub.2. These compositions can have liquidus temperatures less than 100 C; thermal stability limits greater than 500 C; and viscosity in the range of 5-6 cP at 300 C; and 2-3 cP at 400 C.

Bradshaw, Robert W. (Livermore, CA); Brosseau, Douglas A. (Albuquerque, NM)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

131

Management Solution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MEMO: Request for proposal for Computer-Aided Facilities and Maintenance Management application software; professional services; development services for interfaces to Financial Management and Human Resources systems; configuration, test, train, maintenance and support services to implement and maintain a CAFM Solution for the California Administrative Office of the Courts, the Trial Courts, the Appellate Courts and the Judicial Council, known as The AOC Group. You are invited to review and respond to the attached Request for Proposal (RFP):

Rfp Number Isdcafm

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

A Novel Integration of an Ultraviolet Nitrate Sensor On Board a Towed Vehicle for Mapping Open-Ocean Submesoscale Nitrate Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Initial results from a deployment of the SUV-6 ultraviolet spectrophotometer, integrated with the SeaSoar towed vehicle, are presented. The innovative, combined system measures nitrate concentration at high spatial resolution (4 m vertically, 5 ...

Rosalind Pidcock; Meric Srokosz; John Allen; Mark Hartman; Stuart Painter; Matt Mowlem; David Hydes; Adrian Martin

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant hydrogen generation study: Formation of ammonia from nitrate and nitrate in hydrogen generating systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) is being designed for the Departrnent of Energy (DOE) to immobilize pretreated highly radioactive wastes in glass for permanent disposal in the HWVP, formic acid is added to the waste before vitrification to adjust glass redox and melter feed rheology. The operation of the glass melter and durability of the glass are affected by the glass oxidation state. Formation of a conductive metallic sludge in an over-reduced melt can result in a shortened melter lifetime. An over-oxidized melt may lead to foaming and loss of ruthenium as volatile RuO{sub 4}. Historically, foaming in the joule heated ceramic melter has been attributed to gas generation in the melt which is controlled by instruction of a reductant such as formic acid into the melter feed. Formic acid is also found to decrease the melter feed viscosity thereby facilitating pumping. This technical report discusses the noble metal catalyzed formic acid reduction of nitrite and/or nitrate to ammonia, a problem of considerable concern because of the generation of a potential ammonium nitrate explosion hazard in the plant ventilation system.

King, R.B.; Bhattacharyya, N.K.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS FOR SEPARATING URANIUM AND PLUTONIUM FROM AQUEOUS ACIDIC SOLUTIONS OF NEUTRON IRRADIATED URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solvent extraction process was developed for separating actinide elements including plutonium and uranium from fission products. By this method the ion content of the acidic aqueous solution is adjusted so that it contains more equivalents of total metal ions than equivalents of nitrate ions. Under these conditions the extractability of fission products is greatly decreased. (AEC)

Bruce, F.R.

1962-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

135

Mercuric iodate precipitation from radioiodine-containing off-gas scrubber solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Mercuric nitrate-nitric acid scrub solutions containing radioiodine may be reduced in volume without excessive loss of volatile iodine. The use of concentrated nitric acid during an evaporation process oxidizes the mercury-iodide complex to a less volatile mercuric iodate precipitate.

Partridge, Jerry A. (Richland, WA); Bosuego, Gail P. (Richland, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Correction to ``Nitrate and colloid transport through coarse Hanford sediments under steady state,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Correction to ``Nitrate and colloid transport through coarse Hanford sediments under steady state), Correction to ``Nitrate and colloid transport through coarse Hanford sediments under steady state, variably and colloid transport through coarse Hanford sediments under steady state, variably saturated flow'' by Kelly

Flury, Markus

137

Stainless steel corrosion by molten nitrates : analysis and lessons learned.  

SciTech Connect

A secondary containment vessel, made of stainless 316, failed due to severe nitrate salt corrosion. Corrosion was in the form of pitting was observed during high temperature, chemical stability experiments. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy were all used to diagnose the cause of the failure. Failure was caused by potassium oxide that crept into the gap between the primary vessel (alumina) and the stainless steel vessel. Molten nitrate solar salt (89% KNO{sub 3}, 11% NaNO{sub 3} by weight) was used during chemical stability experiments, with an oxygen cover gas, at a salt temperature of 350-700 C. Nitrate salt was primarily contained in an alumina vessel; however salt crept into the gap between the alumina and 316 stainless steel. Corrosion occurred over a period of approximately 2000 hours, with the end result of full wall penetration through the stainless steel vessel; see Figures 1 and 2 for images of the corrosion damage to the vessel. Wall thickness was 0.0625 inches, which, based on previous data, should have been adequate to avoid corrosion-induced failure while in direct contact with salt temperature at 677 C (0.081-inch/year). Salt temperatures exceeding 650 C lasted for approximately 14 days. However, previous corrosion data was performed with air as the cover gas. High temperature combined with an oxygen cover gas obviously drove corrosion rates to a much higher value. Corrosion resulted in the form of uniform pitting. Based on SEM and EDS data, pits contained primarily potassium oxide and potassium chromate, reinforcing the link between oxides and severe corrosion. In addition to the pitting corrosion, a large blister formed on the side wall, which was mainly composed of potassium, chromium and oxygen. All data indicated that corrosion initiated internally and moved outward. There was no evidence of intergranular corrosion nor were there any indication of fast pathways along grain boundaries. Much of the pitting occurred near welds; however this was the hottest region in the chamber. Pitting was observed up to two inches above the weld, indicating independence from weld effects.

Kruizenga, Alan Michael

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Accelerating Solutions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solutions From vehicles on the road to the energy that powers them, Oak Ridge National Laboratory innovations are advancing American transportation. Oak Ridge National Laboratory is making an impact on everyday America by enhancing transportation choices and quality of life. Through strong collaborative partnerships with industry, ORNL research and development efforts are helping accelerate the deployment of a new generation of energy efficient vehicles powered by domestic, renewable, clean energy. EPA ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel rule ORNL and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory co-led a comprehensive research and test program to determine the effects of diesel fuel sulfur on emissions and emission control (catalyst) technology. In the course of this program, involving

139

Does nitrate deposition following astrophysical ionizing radiation events pose an additional threat to amphibians?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is known that amphibians are especially susceptible to the combination of heightened UVB radiation and increased nitrate concentrations. Various astrophysical events have been suggested as sources of ionizing radiation that could pose a threat to life on Earth, through destruction of the ozone layer and subsequent increase in UVB, followed by deposition of nitrate. In this study, we investigate whether the nitrate deposition following an ionizing event is sufficiently large to cause an additional stress beyond that of the heightened UVB previously considered. We have converted predicted nitrate depositions to concentration values, utilizing data from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Acid Rain Monitoring Network web site. Our results show that the increase in nitrate concentration in bodies of water following the most intense ionization event likely in the last billion years would not be sufficient to cause a serious additional stress on amphibian populations and may actually provide some benefit by acting as fertilizer.

Brian C. Thomas; Michelle D. Honeyman

2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

140

Amphibian nitrate stress as an additional terrestrial threat from astrophysical ionizing radiation events?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As diversity in amphibian species declines, the search for causes has intensified. Work in this area has shown that amphibians are especially susceptible to the combination of heightened UVB radiation and increased nitrate concentrations. Various astrophysical events have been suggested as sources of ionizing radiation that could pose a threat to life on Earth, through destruction of the ozone layer and subsequent increase in UVB, followed by deposition of nitrate. In this study, we investigate whether the nitrate deposition following an ionizing event is sufficiently large to cause an additional stress beyond that of the heightened UVB previously considered. We have converted predicted nitrate depositions to concentration values, utilizing data from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Acid Rain Monitoring Network web site. Our results show that the increase in nitrate concentration in bodies of water following the most intense ionization event likely in the last billion years would no...

Thomas, Brian C

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Characterization of an enriched uranyl fluoride deposit in a valve and pipe intersection using time-of-flight transmission measurements with {sup 252}Cf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method was developed and successfully applied to characterize large uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) deposits at the former Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant. These deposits were formed by a wet air in-leakage into the UF{sub 6} process gas lines over a period of years. The resulting UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} is hygroscopic, readily absorbing moisture from the air to form hydrates as UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}-nH{sub 2}O. The ratio of hydrogen to uranium can vary from 0--16, and has significant nuclear criticality safety impacts for large deposits. In order to properly formulate the required course of action, a non-intrusive characterization of the distribution of the fissile material within the pipe, its total mass, and amount of hydration was necessary. The Nuclear Weapons Identification System (NWIS) previously developed at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant for identification of uranium weapons components in storage containers was used to successfully characterize these deposits.

Wyatt, M.S. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Uckan, T.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Valentine, T.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hannon, T.F. [East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Methane, Nonmethane Hydrocarbons, Alkyl Nitrates, and Chlorinated Carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Trace Gases in Whole-Air Samples Atmospheric Trace Gases in Whole-Air Samples Methane, Nonmethane Hydrocarbons, Alkyl Nitrates, and Chlorinated Carbon Compounds including 3 Chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-11, CFC-12, and CFC-113) in Whole-air Samples graphics Graphics data Data Investigator Donald Blake Department of Chemistry, University of California Irvine, California, 92697 USA Period of Record April 1979 - December 2012 Methods Whole-air samples are collected in conditioned, evacuated, 2-L stainless steel canisters; each canister is filled to ambient pressure over a period of about 1 minute (approximately 20 seconds to 2 minutes). These canisters are returned to the University of California at Irvine for chromatographic analysis. Analysis for methane includes gas chromatography with flame ionization, as

143

Industrial use of molten nitrate/nitrite salts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nitrate salts have been used for years as a high-temperature heat transfer medium in the chemical and metal industries. This experience is often cited as an argument for the use of these salts in large-scale solar energy systems. However, this industrial experience has not been well documented and a study was carried out to provide such information to the solar community and to determine the applicability of this data base. Seven different industrial plants were visited and the plant operators were interviewed with regard to operating history and experience. In all cases the molten salt systems operate without problems. However, it is not possible to apply the base of industrial experience directly to solar thermal energy applications because of differences in operating temperature, salt composition, alloys used, and thermal/mechanical conditions.

Carling, R.W.; Mar, R.W.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Containerized Wetland Bioreactor Evaluated for Perchlorate and Nitrate Degradation  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLNL) designed and constructed an innovative containerized wetlands (bioreactor) system that began operation in November 2000 to biologically degrade perchlorate and nitrate under relatively low-flow conditions at a remote location at Site 300 known as Building 854. Since initial start-up, the system has processed over 3,463,000 liters of ground water and treated over 38 grams of perchlorate and 148 kilograms of nitrate. Site 300 is operated by the University of California as a high-explosives and materials testing facility supporting nuclear weapons research. The 11-square mile site located in northern California was added to the NPL in 1990 primarily due to the presence of elevated concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in ground water. At the urging of the regulatory agencies, perchlorate was looked for and detected in the ground water in 1999. VOCs, nitrate and perchlorate were released into the soil and ground water in the Building 854 area as the result of accidental leaks during stability testing of weapons or from waste discharge practices that are no longer permitted at Site 300. Design of the wetland bioreactors was based on earlier studies showing that indigenous chlorate-respiring bacteria could effectively degrade perchlorate into nontoxic concentrations of chlorate, chlorite, oxygen, and chloride. Studies also showed that the addition of organic carbon would enhance microbial denitrification. Early onsite testing showed acetic acid to be a more effective carbon source than dried leaf matter, dried algae, or milk replacement starter; a nutrient and carbon source used in a Department of Defense phytoremediation demonstration. No inocula were added to the system. Groundwater was allowed to circulate through the bioreactor for three weeks to acclimate the wetland plants and to build a biofilm from indigenous flora. Using solar energy, ground water is pumped into granular activated carbon canisters to remove VOCs (Figure x). Following solar treatment, ground water containing approximately 46 mg/L of nitrate and 13 {micro}g/L of perchlorate is gravity-fed continuously into two parallel series of two-1,900 liter tank bioreactors. Each bioreactor contains coarse, aquarium-grade gravel and locally-obtained plant species such as cattails (Typha spp.), sedges (Cyperus spp.), and indigenous denitrifying microorganisms. No inocula were added to the system. Groundwater was allowed to circulate through the bioreactor for three weeks to acclimate the wetland plants and to build a biofilm from indigenous flora. Sodium acetate is added to the first bioreactor in each of the two series to promote growth and metabolic activity of rhizome microorganisms. The split flow from each series is combined, and flows through two back-up ion exchange columns to assure complete perchlorate removal. Effluent from the ground water treatment system is monitored and discharged an infiltration trench in accordance with the Substantive Requirements for Waste Discharge issued by the California Regional Water Quality Control Board.

Dibley, V R; Krauter, P W

2004-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

145

FUMIGATION, GROSS NITROGEN TRANSFORMATIONS, N-15, NITRATE, RATES, SOIL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FUMIGATION, GROSS NITROGEN TRANSFORMATIONS, N-15, FUMIGATION, GROSS NITROGEN TRANSFORMATIONS, N-15, NITRATE, RATES, SOIL 1909 Pushnik, J.C., R.S. Demaree, J.L.J. Houpis, W.B. Flory, S.M. Bauer, and P.D. Anderson. 1995. The effect of elevated carbon dioxide on a Sierra-Nevadan dominant species: Pinus ponderosa. Journal of Biogeography 22(2-3):249-254. The impact of increasing atmospheric CO2 has not been fully evaluated on western coniferous forest species. Two year old seedlings of Pinus ponderosa were grown in environmentally controlled chambers under increased CO2 conditions (525 mu L L(-1) and 700 mu L L(-1)) for 6 months. These trees exhibited morphological, physiological and biochemical alterations when compared to our controls (350 mu L L(- 1)). Analysis of whole plant biomass distribution has shown no

146

Alloy solution hardening with solute pairs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Solution hardened alloys are formed by using at least two solutes which form associated solute pairs in the solvent metal lattice. Copper containing equal atomic percentages of aluminum and palladium is an example.

Mitchell, John W. (Charlottesville, VA)

1976-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

147

Fernald Environmental Management Project Director's Final Findings...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CERCLA Scope Summary Establish guidelines and deadlines for neutralizationremoval of the hazardous waste in the uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UNH) System Parties DOE; Fernald...

148

Thermal decomposition study of hydroxylamine nitrate during storage and handling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN), an important agent for the nuclear industry and the U.S. Army, has been involved in several costly incidents. To prevent similar incidents, the study of HAN safe storage and handling boundary has become extremely important for industries. However, HAN decomposition involves complicated reaction pathways due to its autocatalytic behavior and therefore presents a challenge for definition of safe boundaries of HAN storage and handling. This research focused on HAN decomposition behavior under various conditions and proposed isothermal aging testing and kinetic-based simulation to determine safety boundaries for HAN storage and handling. Specifically, HAN decomposition in the presence of glass, titanium, stainless steel with titanium, or stainless steel was examined in an Automatic Pressure Tracking Adiabatic Calorimeter (APTAC). n-th order kinetics was used for initial reaction rate estimation. Because stainless steel is a commonly used material for HAN containers, isothermal aging tests were conducted in a stainless steel cell to determine the maximum safe storage time of HAN. Moreover, by changing thermal inertia, data for HAN decomposition in the stainless steel cell were examined and the experimental results were simulated by the Thermal Safety Software package. This work offers useful guidance for industries that manufacture, handle, and store HAN. The experimental data acquired not only can help with aspects of process safety design, including emergency relief systems, process control, and process equipment selection, but also is a useful reference for the associated theoretical study of autocatalytic decomposition behavior.

Zhang, Chuanji

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

SunShot Initiative: Advanced Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant Advanced Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant Abengoa logo Photo of two lit towers surrounded by much smaller blue flat plates that are mounted on the ground. Commercial central receiver plant designs Abengoa, under the Baseload CSP FOA, will demonstrate a 100-megawatt electrical (MWe) central receiver plant using nitrate salt as the receiver coolant, thermal storage medium, and heat transport fluid in the steam generator. Approach The plan is to operate the plant at full load for 6,400 hours each year using only solar energy. Abengoa is working to create a team of suppliers capable of deploying a commercially ready nitrate salt central receiver technology that can be competitive in the current power marketplace. Innovation Abengoa is developing a new molten-salt power tower technology with a surround heliostat field. Key components include:

150

Impaired mitochondrial respiration and protein nitration in the rat hippocampus after acute inhalation of combustion smoke  

SciTech Connect

Survivors of massive inhalation of combustion smoke endure critical injuries, including lasting neurological complications. We have previously reported that acute inhalation of combustion smoke disrupts the nitric oxide homeostasis in the rat brain. In this study, we extend our findings and report that a 30-minute exposure of awake rats to ambient wood combustion smoke induces protein nitration in the rat hippocampus and that mitochondrial proteins are a sensitive nitration target in this setting. Mitochondria are central to energy metabolism and cellular signaling and are critical to proper cell function. Here, analyses of the mitochondrial proteome showed elevated protein nitration in the course of a 24-hour recovery following exposure to smoke. Mass spectrometry identification of several significantly nitrated mitochondrial proteins revealed diverse functions and involvement in central aspects of mitochondrial physiology. The nitrated proteins include the ubiquitous mitochondrial creatine kinase, F1-ATP synthase {alpha} subunit, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3), succinate dehydrogenase Fp subunit, and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC1) protein. Furthermore, acute exposure to combustion smoke significantly compromised the respiratory capacity of hippocampal mitochondria. Importantly, elevated protein nitration and reduced mitochondrial respiration in the hippocampus persisted beyond the time required for restoration of normal oxygen and carboxyhemoglobin blood levels after the cessation of exposure to smoke. Thus, the time frame for intensification of the various smoke-induced effects differs between blood and brain tissues. Taken together, our findings suggest that nitration of essential mitochondrial proteins may contribute to the reduction in mitochondrial respiratory capacity and underlie, in part, the brain pathophysiology after acute inhalation of combustion smoke.

Lee, Heung M.; Reed, Jason; Greeley, George H. [Department of Surgery, University of Texas Medical Branch (United States); Englander, Ella W. [Department of Surgery, University of Texas Medical Branch (United States); Shriners Hospitals for Children, Galveston, TX (United States)], E-mail: elenglan@utmb.edu

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Processing nitric-phosphoric acid solutions to nitroammophoska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The technology for comprehensive processing of apatite with recovery of all valuable components in the starting material is based on its nitric acid decomposition with crystallization of calcium nitrate tetrahydrate. The results of operation on a pilot installation for complex processing of apatite with production of strontium carbonate, calcium fluoride, a rare earth phosphate concentrate, calcium carbonate and a nitric-phosphoric acid solution (NPAS) are given below. The article presents the data of the operation of the experimental unit for production of complex fertilizers of the nitroammophoska type from the NPAS.

Gol'dinov, A.L.; Abramov, O.B.; Afanasenko, B.P.; Baibakov, P.Y.; Kiselevich, P.V.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Perchlorate and Nitrate Remediation Efficiency and Microbial Diversity in a Containerized Wetland Bioreactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have developed a method to remove perchlorate (14 to 27 {micro}g/L) and nitrate (48 mg/L) from contaminated groundwater using a wetland bioreactor. The bioreactor has operated continuously in a remote field location for more than two years with a stable ecosystem of indigenous organisms. This study assesses the bioreactor for long-term perchlorate and nitrate remediation by evaluating influent and effluent groundwater for reduction-oxidation conditions and nitrate and perchlorate concentrations. Total community DNA was extracted and purified from 10-g sediment samples retrieved from vertical coring of the bioreactor during winter. Analysis by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of short, 16S rDNA, polymerase-chain-reaction products was used to identify dominant microorganisms. Bacteria genera identified were closely affiliated with bacteria widely distributed in soils, mud layers, and fresh water. Of the 17 dominant bands sequenced, most were gram negative and capable of aerobic or anaerobic respiration with nitrate as the terminal electron acceptor (Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Halomonas, and Nitrospira). Several identified genera (Rhizobium, Acinetobactor, and Xanthomonas) are capable of fixing atmospheric nitrogen into a combined form (ammonia) usable by host plants. Isolates were identified from the Proteobacteria class, known for the ability to reduce perchlorate. Initial bacterial assessments of sediments confirm the prevalence of facultative anaerobic bacteria capable of reducing perchlorate and nitrate in situ.

Jr., B D; Dibley, V; Pinkart, H; Legler, T

2004-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

153

Influence of temperature on the extraction of Pu(IV) by tri-n-butyl phosphate from acidic nitrate solutions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The goal of Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative program is to efficiently separate and recover actinides in attempts to reprocess irradiated nuclear fuel and reduce the (more)

[No author

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Calculated K-effectives using ENDF/B-V data for U + Pu solution critical experiments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Effective multiplication factors for 12 critical experiments have been calculated using multigroup cross sections derived from the ENDF/B-V library. All 12 experiments contained mixed plutonium and uranium nitrate solutions. The range of hydrogen-to-fissile plutonium atom ratios spanned by these experiments was 200 to 2200. A comparison with K-effectives calculated with ENDF/B-IV data is presented.

Primm, R.T. III; Mincey, J.F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

WET FLUORIDE SEPARATION METHOD  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The separation of U/sup 233/ from thorium, protactinium, and fission products present in neutron-irradiated thorium is accomplished by dissolving the irradiated materials in aqueous nitric acid, adding either a soluble fluoride, iodate, phosphate, or oxalate to precipltate the thorium, separating the precipltate from the solution, and then precipitating uranlum and protactinium by alkalizing the solution. The uranium and protactinium precipitate is removcd from the solution and dissolved in nitric acid. The uranyl nitrate may then be extracted from the acid solution by means of ether, and the protactinium recovered from the aqueous phase.

Seaborg, G.T.; Gofman, J.W.; Stoughton, R.W.

1958-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

156

EXTRACTION METHOD FOR SEPARATING URANIUM, PLUTONIUM, AND FISSION PRODUCTS FROM COMPOSITIONS CONTAINING SAME  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods for separating plutonium from the fission products present in masses of neutron irradiated uranium are reported. The neutron irradiated uranium is first dissolved in an aqueous solution of nitric acid. The plutonium in this solution is present as plutonous nitrate. The aqueous solution is then agitated with an organic solvent, which is not miscible with water, such as diethyl ether. The ether extracts 90% of the uraryl nitrate leaving, substantially all of the plutonium in the aqueous phase. The aqueous solution of plutonous nitrate is then oxidized to the hexavalent state, and agitated with diethyl ether again. In the ether phase there is then obtained 90% of plutonium as a solution of plutonyl nitrate. The ether solution of plutonyl nitrate is then agitated with water containing a reducing agent such as sulfur dioxide, and the plutonium dissolves in the water and is reduced to the plutonous state. The uranyl nitrate remains in the ether. The plutonous nitrate in the water may be recovered by precipitation.

Seaborg, G.T.

1957-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

157

Application of bacterial leaching technology to deep solution-mining conditions for uranium extraction. Final report, September 1, 1978-September 30, 1981  

SciTech Connect

Microorganisms were evaluated for use in recovery of uranium under conditions of in-situ solution mining. The cultures tested were Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, the faculative-thermophilic TH3 strain, and two Sulfolobus species. Growth of the organisms occurred in the presence of 0.34 to 5.0 mM uranyl ion with higher concentrations being inhibitory. Uranium ore from the Anaconda Minerals Co. Jackpile mine was not readily leachable by microorganisms. To support bacterial activity the ore was supplemented with pyrite or ferrous iron. The ore possessed some toxic properties. T. ferrooxidans was able to assist in leaching of uranium from the ore at a hydrostatic pressure of 10.3 MPa.

Brierley, J.A.; Brierley, C.L.; Torma, A.E.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Stochastic hydro-economic modeling for optimal management of agricultural groundwater nitrate pollution under hydraulic conductivity uncertainty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In decision-making processes, reliability and risk aversion play a decisive role. This paper presents a framework for stochastic optimization of control strategies for groundwater nitrate pollution from agriculture under hydraulic conductivity uncertainty. ... Keywords: Fertilizer allocation, Groundwater, Nitrates, Optimization, Stochastic management model, Uncertainty

S. Pea-Haro; M. Pulido-Velazquez; C. Llopis-Albert

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

California GAMA Special Study: An isotopic and dissolved gas investigation of nitrate source and transport to a public supply well in California's Central Valley  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates nitrate contamination of a deep municipal drinking water production well in Ripon, CA to demonstrate the utility of natural groundwater tracers in constraining the sources and transport of nitrate to deep aquifers in the Central Valley. The goal of the study was to investigate the origin (source) of elevated nitrate and the potential for the deep aquifer to attenuate anthropogenic nitrate. The site is ideal for such an investigation. The production well is screened from 165-325 feet below ground surface and a number of nearby shallow and deep monitoring wells were available for sampling. Furthermore, potential sources of nitrate contamination to the well had been identified, including a fertilizer supply plant located approximately 1000 feet to the east and local almond groves. A variety of natural isotopic and dissolved gas tracers including {sup 3}H-{sup 3}He groundwater age and the isotopic composition of nitrate are applied to identify nitrate sources and to characterize nitrate transport. An advanced method for sampling production wells is employed to help identify contaminant contributions from specific screen intervals. Nitrate transport: Groundwater nitrate at this field site is not being actively denitrified. Groundwater parameters indicate oxic conditions, the dissolved gas data shows no evidence for excess nitrogen as the result of denitrification, and nitrate-N and -O isotope compositions do not display patterns typical of denitrification. Contaminant nitrate source: The ambient nitrate concentration in shallow groundwater at the Ripon site ({approx}12 mg/L as nitrate) is typical of shallow groundwaters affected by recharge from agricultural and urban areas. Nitrate concentrations in Ripon City Well 12 (50-58 mg/L as nitrate) are significantly higher than these ambient concentrations, indicating an additional source of anthropogenic nitrate is affecting groundwater in the capture zone of this municipal drinking water well. This study provides two new pieces of evidence that the Ripon Farm Services Plant is the source of elevated nitrate in Ripon City Well 12. (1) Chemical mass balance calculations using nitrate concentration, nitrate isotopic composition, and initial tritium activity all indicate that that the source water for elevated nitrate to Ripon City Well 12 is a very small component of the water produced by City Well 12 and thus must have extremely high nitrate concentration. The high source water nitrate concentration ({approx}1500 mg/L as nitrate) required by these mass balance calculations precludes common sources of nitrate such as irrigated agriculture, dairy wastewater, and septic discharge. Shallow groundwater under the Ripon Farm Services RFS plant does contain extremely high concentrations of nitrate (>1700 mg/L as nitrate). (2) Nitrogen and oxygen isotope compositions of nitrate indicate that the additional anthropogenic nitrate source to Ripon City Well 12 is significantly enriched in {delta}{sup 18}O-NO{sub 3}, an isotopic signature consistent with synthetic nitrate fertilizer, and not with human or animal wastewater discharge (i.e. dairy operations, septic system discharge, or municipal wastewater discharge), or with organic fertilizer. Monitoring wells on and near the RFS plant also have high {delta}{sup 18}O-NO{sub 3}, and the plant has handled and stored synthetic nitrate fertilizer that will have this isotopic signature. The results described here highlight the complexity of attributing nitrate found in long screened, high capacity wells to specific sources. In this case, the presence of a very high concentration source near the well site combined with sampling using multiple isotopic tracer techniques and specialized depth-specific techniques allowed fingerprinting of the source in the mixed-age samples drawn from the production well.

Singleton, M J; Moran, J E; Esser, B K; Roberts, S K; Hillegonds, D J

2010-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

160

Application of a modified denitrifying bacteria method for analyzing groundwater and vadose zone pore water nitrate at the Hanford Site, WA, USA.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

zone pore water nitrate at the Hanford Site, WA, USA. Woods,and Conrad, Mark The Hanford Site in southern WashingtonL have been reported for Hanford groundwaters, where nitrate

Woods, Katharine N.; Singleton, Michael J.; Conrad, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Long-term nitrate measurements in the ocean using the In Situ Ultraviolet Spectrophotometer: sensor integration into the Apex profiling float  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reagent-free, optical nitrate sensors (ISUS: In Situ Ultraviolet Spectrophotometer) can be used to detect nitrate throughout most of the ocean. Although the sensor is a relatively high power device when operated continuously (7.5 W typical), the ...

Kenneth S. Johnson; Luke J. Coletti; Hans W. Jannasch; Carole M. Sakamoto; Dana D. Swift; Stephen C. Riser

162

Swaging Problems and Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 5   Some swaging problems, potential causes, and possible solutions...causes Solutions Difficult feeding Work material too hard Anneal or stress relieve to remove effects of cold

163

Big Data Solutions Glossary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Big Data Solutions Reference Glossary (14 pages) Very brief descriptions and links are listed here to provide starting ...

2013-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

164

Solutioning and Aging Behaviours  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 13, 2012 ... Aluminum Alloys: Fabrication, Characterization and Applications: Solutioning and Aging Behaviours Sponsored by: The Minerals, Metals and...

165

Solutioning and Aging Behaviors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aluminum Alloys: Development, Characterization and Applications: Solutioning and Aging Behaviors Sponsored by: TMS Light Metals Division, TMS: Aluminum

166

Nitrate and colloid transport through coarse Hanford sediments under steady state, variably saturated flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrate and colloid transport through coarse Hanford sediments under steady state, variably] At the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Reservation, colloid-facilitated transport is a potential of colloids through Hanford sediments under steady state, unsaturated flow conditions. We isolated colloids

Flury, Markus

167

Extraction of Am(III) and Fe(III) by selected dihexyl N,N-dialkylcarbamoylmethyl-phosphonates, -phosphinates and -phospine oxides from nitrate media  

SciTech Connect

A series of neutral bifunctional extractants related to dihexyl N,N,-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate (DHDECMP) have been prepared and studied for the liquid-liquid extraction of Am(III) and Fe(III) from nitrate solutions. Changes in the steric bulk of the substitutent alkyl chains and in the electronegativity of the groups attached to the phosphoryl center in these compounds have brought about large changes in distribution ratios and selectivities for the extraction of these metals. Comparisons of these extractants to related monofunctional phosphorus-based compounds have revealed that these bifunctional species behave as monodentate, rather than chelating, extractants. The presence of the carbamoyl portion of the extractant molecules is important not for coordination to the metal, but for the ability to buffer the extractant against the effects of HNO/sub 3/. 9 figures, 2 tables.

Kalina, D.G.; Horwitz, E.P.; Kaplan, L.; Muscatello, A.C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The recovery of uranium from the acidic aqueous metal waste solutions resulting from the bismuth phosphate carrier precipitation of plutonium from solutions of neutron irradiated uranium is described. The waste solutions consist of phosphoric acid, sulfuric acid, and uranium as a uranyl salt, together with salts of the fission products normally associated with neutron irradiated uranium. Generally, the process of the invention involves the partial neutralization of the waste solution with sodium hydroxide, followed by conversion of the solution to a pH 11 by mixing therewith sufficient sodium carbonate. The resultant carbonate-complexed waste is contacted with a titanated silica gel and the adsorbent separated from the aqueous medium. The aqueous solution is then mixed with sufficient acetic acid to bring the pH of the aqueous medium to between 4 and 5, whereby sodium uranyl acetate is precipitated. The precipitate is dissolved in nitric acid and the resulting solution preferably provided with salting out agents. Uranyl nitrate is recovered from the solution by extraction with an ether such as diethyl ether.

Hyman, H.H.; Dreher, J.L.

1959-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Extraction of selected transplutonium(III) and lanthanide(III) ions by dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate from aqueous nitrate media  

SciTech Connect

The extraction behavior of selected transplutonium(III) and lanthanide(III) ions from nitrate solution was studied using relatively pure dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate (DHDECMP). The data obtained for Am(III) and Eu(III) using DHDECMP were compared with analogous measurements obtained with dibutyl butylphosphonate (DB(BP)) and in certain cases with dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylethylphosphonate (DHDECEP). It was found that both the nitrate and extractant concentration dependencies were third power. The K/sub d/'s for Am(III) and for Eu(III) measured from low acid LiNO/sub 3/ solutions were similar for DHDECMP, DHDECEP, and DB(BP), thus giving no evidence for any significant chelation effect for DHDECMP. Significant differences among DHDECMP, DHDECEP, and DB(BP) are found for the extraction of Am(III) and Eu(III) from 1 to 5 M HNO/sub 3/. These differences are explained by the ability of DHDECMP (and to a lesser extent, DHDECEP) to buffer itself against HNO/sub 3/ by protonation of the amide group. The K/sub d/'s for Am(III) through Fm(III) and for La(III) through Lu(III) measured from LiNO/sub 3/ and HNO/sub 3/ using DHDECMP show a definite tetrad effect when plotted as a function of Z. The K/sub d/'s for the lanthanides generally decrease with Z whereas the K/sub d/'s for the transplutonium elements change very little with Z.

Horwitz, E.P.; Muscatello, A.C.; Kalina, D.G.; Kaplan, L.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Innovative Financing Solutions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AGENCY'S ENERGY STAR PROGRAM INNOVATIVE FINANCING SOLUTIONS: FINDING MONEY FOR YOUR ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROJECTS Are you having trouble getting energy efficiency projects...

171

Information Technology Solutions - Energy  

texturing process is a cost effective alternative that uses nontoxic materials. Information Technology Solutions ... United States Department of Energys National

172

Information Technology Solutions  

Information Technology Solutions Advantages LLNL and University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) have used nickel-chelating nanolipoprotein particles (Ni-NLPs) as a ...

173

Corrosion of stainless and carbon steels in molten mixtures of industrial nitrates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Corrosion behavior of two stainless steels and carbon steel in mixtures of NaNO{sub 3} and KNO{sub 3} was evaluated to determine if impurities found in commodity grades of alkali nitrates aggravate corrosivity as applicable to an advanced solar thermal energy system. Corrosion tests were conducted for 7000 hours with Types 304 and 316 stainless steels at 570C and A36 carbon steel at 316C in seven mixtures of NaNO{sub 3} and KNO{sub 3} containing variations in impurity concentrations. Corrosion tests were also conducted in a ternary mixture of NaNO{sub 3}, KNO{sub 3}, and Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}. Corrosion rates were determined by descaled weight losses while oxidation products were examined by scanning electron microscopy, electron microprobe analysis, and X-ray diffraction. The nitrate mixtures were periodically analyzed for changes in impurity concentrations and for soluble corrosion products.

Goods, S.H.; Bradshaw, R.W. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Prairie, M.R.; Chavez, J.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Equipment evaluation for low density polyethylene encapsulated nitrate salt waste at the Rocky Flats Plant  

SciTech Connect

Mixed wastes at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) are subject to regulation by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Polymer solidification is being developed as a final treatment technology for several of these mixed wastes, including nitrate salts. Encapsulation nitrate salts with low density polyethylene (LDPE) has been the preliminary focus of the RFP polymer solidification effort. Literature reviews, industry surveys, and lab-scale and pilot-scale tests have been conducted to evaluate several options for encapsulating nitrate salts with LDPE. Most of the effort has focused on identifying compatible drying and extrusion technologies. Other processing options, specifically meltration and non-heated compounding machines, were also investigated. The best approach appears to be pretreatment of the nitrate salt waste brine in either a vertical or horizontal thin film evaporator followed by compounding of the dried waste with LDPE in an intermeshing, co-rotating, twin-screw extruder. Additional pilot-scale tests planned for the fall of 1993 should further support this recommendation. Preliminary evaluation work indicates that meltration is not possible at atmospheric pressure with the LDPE (Chevron PE-1409) provided by RFP. However, meltration should be possible at atmospheric pressure using another LDPE formulation with altered physical and rheological properties: Lower molecular weight and lower viscosity (Epoline C-15). Contract modifications are now in process to allow a follow-on pilot scale demonstration. Questions regarding changed safety and physical properties of the resultant LDPE waste form due to use of the Epoline C-15 will be addressed. No additional work with non-heated mixer compounder machines is planned at this time.

Yamada, W.I.; Faucette, A.M.; Jantzen, R.C.; Logsdon, B.W.; Oldham, J.H.; Saiki, D.M.; Yudnich, R.J.

1993-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

175

The Effect of Nanoparticle Concentration on Thermo-physical Properties of Alumina-nitrate Nanofluid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to determine how Al2O3 nanoparticle concentration affected the specific heat, heat of fusion, melting point, thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of Alumina-Nitrate nanofluids. Al2O3 nanoparticles were dispersed in a eutectic of sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate (60:40 for mole fraction) to create nanofluids using a hot plate evaporation method and an air dryer method. The nominal Al2O3 (alumina) mass fraction was between 0 and 2%, and was determined as the ratio of the mass of Al2O3 nanoparticles to the total mass of the nanofluid. After the preparation of the nanofluids, Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) was used to measure the actual Al2O3 mass fraction in the nanofluids. The specific heat, heat of fusion, and melting point were measured with a Modulated Differential Scanning Calorimeter (MDSC). The thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity were measured with Laser Flash Analysis (LFA). The MDSC results showed that the addition of Al2O3 nanoparticles enhanced the specific heat of the nanofluids synthesize from both methods. There was a parabolic relation between the specific heat and the Al2O3 mass fraction for the nanofluids synthesized from the hot plate evaporation method, with a maximum 31% enhancement at 0.78% Al2O3 mass fraction. The nanofluids synthesized from the air dryer method also resulted in enhanced specific heats which were higher at the same Al2O3 mass fraction than those of the nanofluids synthesized from the hot plate evaporation method. It was not determined why this enhancement occurred. The results also showed that the introduction of Al2O3 nanoparticles had no significant effect on the heat of fusion and melting point of the nanofluids synthesized from either method. The LFA results showed that adding Al2O3 nanoparticles decreased the thermal diffusivity and the thermal conductivity of the nitrate eutectic.

Shao, Qian

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Nitrogen cycling in oxygen deficient zones : insights from [delta]?N and [delta]?O of nitrite and nitrate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The stable isotopes, [delta]?N and [delta]?O, of nitrite and nitrate can be powerful tools used to interpret nitrogen cycling in the ocean. They are particularly useful in regions of the ocean where there are multiple ...

Buchwald, Carolyn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Aqueous nitrate waste treatment: Technology comparison, cost/benefit, and market analysis  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this analysis is to provide information necessary for the Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate the practical utility of the Nitrate to Ammonia and Ceramic or Glass (NAC/NAG/NAX) process, which is under development in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The NAC/NACx/NAX process can convert aqueous radioactive nitrate-laden waste to a glass, ceramic, or grout solid waste form. The tasks include, but are not limited to, the following: Identify current commercial technologies to meet hazardous and radiological waste disposal requirements. The technologies may be thermal or non-thermal but must be all inclusive (i.e., must convert a radionuclide-containing nitrate waste with a pH around 12 to a stable form that can be disposed at permitted facilities); evaluate and compare DOE-sponsored vitrification, grouting, and minimum additive waste stabilization projects for life-cycle costs; compare the technologies above with respect to material costs, capital equipment costs, operating costs, and operating efficiencies. For the NAC/NAG/NAX process, assume aluminum reactant is government furnished and ammonia gas may be marketed; compare the identified technologies with respect to frequency of use within DOE for environmental management applications with appropriate rationale for use; Assess the potential size of the DOE market for the NAC/NAG/NAX process; assess and off-gas issues; and compare with international technologies, including life-cycle estimates.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Dispersant solutions for dispersing hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dispersant solution includes a hydrocarbon dispersing solution derived from a bacterium from ATCC 75527, ATCC 75529, or ATCC 55638.

Tyndall, Richard L. (Clinton, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Thermodynamics of ATP in Solution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermodynamics of ATP in Solution. Summary: ... Computations of the thermodynamics of biomolecules in solution are rare in the literature. ...

2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

180

Solvent wash solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Process for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 volume percent of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

Neace, James C. (Blackville, SC)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Solvent wash solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is claimed for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 vol % of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

Neace, J.C.

1984-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

182

Reduction of Perchlorate and Nitrate by Aluminum Activated by pH Change and Electrochemically Induced Pitting Corrosion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Highly oxidized species like perchlorate and nitrate that are released into the environment by anthropogenic activities are a source of concern as they have been known to contaminate groundwater. These species are extremely soluble in water and can migrate through aquifer systems, travelling substantial distances from the original site of contamination. Due to their high solubility, these oxy-anions cannot be treated using conventional treatment processes like filtration and sedimentation. Several treatment technologies are currently available to abate the human health risk due to exposure to perchlorate and nitrate. However, most of the existing treatment processes are expensive or have limitations, like generation of brines with high concentrations of perchlorate or nitrate. Aluminum can effectively reduce perchlorate and nitrate, if the protective oxide film that separates the thermodynamically reactive Al0 from most environments is removed. Aluminum was activated by pH change and electrochemically induced, pitting corrosion to remove the passivating oxide layer and expose the underlying, thermodynamically reactive, zero-valent aluminum. A partially oxidized species of aluminum, like monovalent aluminum, is believed to bring about the reduction of perchlorate and nitrate. This research studied the reduction of perchlorate and nitrate by aluminum that was activated by these two mechanisms. Results indicated that aluminum activated by pH change resulted in an instantaneous decrease in perchlorate concentration without any increase in chlorate or chloride concentrations, which suggests that the perchlorate might be adsorbed on the aluminum oxide surface. However, aluminum activated by electrochemically induced pitting corrosion can effectively reduce perchlorate to chlorate. Nitrate, on the other hand, was reduced completely to ammonia by both treatment mechanisms. The studies conducted in this dissertation suggest that aluminum can be effectively used as a reducing agent to develop a treatment process to reduce perchlorate and nitrate.

Raut Desai, Aditya B.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Building Energy Software Tools Directory : HVAC Solution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HVAC Solution Back to Tool Screenshot for HVAC Solution. Screenshot for HVAC Solution. Screenshot for HVAC Solution...

184

Impact of nitrate-enhanced leachate recirculation on gaseous releases from a landfill bioreactor cell  

SciTech Connect

This study evaluates the impact of nitrate injection on a full scale landfill bioreactor through the monitoring of gaseous releases and particularly N{sub 2}O emissions. During several weeks, we monitored gas concentrations in the landfill gas collection system as well as surface gas releases with a series of seven static chambers. These devices were directly connected to a gas chromatograph coupled to a flame ionisation detector and an electron capture detector (GC-FID/ECD) placed directly on the field. Measurements were performed before, during and after recirculation of raw leachate and nitrate-enhanced leachate. Raw leachate recirculation did not have a significant effect on the biogas concentrations (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O) in the gas extraction network. However, nitrate-enhanced leachate recirculation induced a marked increase of the N{sub 2}O concentrations in the gas collected from the recirculation trench (100-fold increase from 0.2 ppm to 23 ppm). In the common gas collection system however, this N{sub 2}O increase was no more detectable because of dilution by gas coming from other cells or ambient air intrusion. Surface releases through the temporary cover were characterized by a large spatial and temporal variability. One automated chamber gave limited standard errors over each experimental period for N{sub 2}O releases: 8.1 {+-} 0.16 mg m{sup -2} d{sup -1} (n = 384), 4.2 {+-} 0.14 mg m{sup -2} d{sup -1} (n = 132) and 1.9 {+-} 0.10 mg m{sup -2} d{sup -1} (n = 49), during, after raw leachate and nitrate-enhanced leachate recirculation, respectively. No clear correlation between N{sub 2}O gaseous surface releases and recirculation events were evidenced. Estimated N{sub 2}O fluxes remained in the lower range of what is reported in the literature for landfill covers, even after nitrate injection.

Tallec, G.; Bureau, C. [Cemagref, UR HBAN, Parc de Tourvoie, BP44, F-92163 Antony (France); Peu, P.; Benoist, J.C. [Cemagref, UR GERE, 17 Avenue de Cucille, CS 64427, F-35044 Rennes (France); Lemunier, M. [Suez-Environnement, CIRADE, 38 Av. Jean Jaures, 78440 Gargenville (France); Budka, A.; Presse, D. [SITA France, 132 Rue des 3 Fontanot, 92000 Nanterre Cedex (France); Bouchez, T. [Cemagref, UR HBAN, Parc de Tourvoie, BP44, F-92163 Antony (France)], E-mail: theodore.bouchez@cemagref.fr

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

185

Process for converting sodium nitrate-containing, caustic liquid radioactive wastes to solid insoluble products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for converting sodium nitrate-containing, caustic, radioactive wastes to a solid, relatively insoluble, thermally stable form is provided and comprises the steps of reacting powdered aluminum silicate clay, e.g., kaolin, bentonite, dickite, halloysite, pyrophyllite, etc., with the sodium nitrate-containing radioactive wastes which have a caustic concentration of about 3 to 7 M at a temperature of 30.degree. C to 100.degree. C to thereby entrap the dissolved radioactive salts in the aluminosilicate matrix. In one embodiment the sodium nitrate-containing, caustic, radioactive liquid waste, such as neutralized Purex-type waste, or salts or oxide produced by evaporation or calcination of these liquid wastes (e.g., anhydrous salt cake) is converted at a temperature within the range of 30.degree. C to 100.degree. C to the solid mineral form-cancrinite having an approximate chemical formula 2(NaAlSiO.sub.4) .sup.. xSalt.sup.. y H.sub.2 O with x = 0.52 and y = 0.68 when the entrapped salt is NaNO.sub.3. In another embodiment the sodium nitrate-containing, caustic, radioactive liquid is reacted with the powdered aluminum silicate clay at a temperature within the range of 30.degree. C to 100.degree. C, the resulting reaction product is air dried eitheras loose powder or molded shapes (e.g., bricks) and then fired at a temperature of at least 600.degree. C to form the solid mineral form-nepheline which has the approximate chemical formula of NaAlSiO.sub.4. The leach rate of the entrapped radioactive salts with distilled water is reduced essentially to that of the aluminosilicate lattice which is very low, e.g., in the range of 10.sup.-.sup.2 to 10.sup.-.sup.4 g/cm.sup.2 -- day for cancrinite and 10.sup.-.sup.3 to 10.sup.-.sup.5 g/cm.sup.2 -- day for nepheline.

Barney, Gary S. (Richland, WA); Brownell, Lloyd E. (Richland, WA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Closure of the condensed-phase organic-nitrate reaction USQ at hanford  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A discovery Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) was declared on the underground waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site in May 1996. The USQ was for condensed-phase organic-nitrate reactions (sometimes called organic complexant reactions) in the tanks. This paper outlines the steps taken to close the USQ, and resolve the related safety issue. Several processes were used at the Hanford Site to extract and/or process plutonium. These processes resulted in organic complexants (for chelating multivalent cations) and organic extraction solvents being sent to the underground waste storage tanks. This paper addresses the organic complexant hazard. The organic complexants are in waste matrices that include inert material, diluents, and potential oxidizers. In the presence of oxidizing material, the complexant salts can be made to react exothermically by heating to high temperatures or by applying an external ignition source of sufficient energy. The first organic complexant hazard assessments focused on determining whether a hulk runaway reaction could occur, similar to the 1957 accident at Kyshtm (a reprocessing plant in the former U.S.S.R.). Early analyses (1977 through 1994) examined organic-nitrate reaction onset temperatures and concluded that a bulk runaway reaction could not occur at the Hanford Site because tank temperatures were well below that necessary for bulk runaway. Therefore, it was believed that organic-nitrate reactions were adequately described in the then current Authorization Basis (AB). Subsequent studies examined a different accident scenario, propagation resulting from an external ignition source (e.g., lightning or welding slag) that initiates a combustion front that propagates through the organic waste. A USQ evaluation determined that localized high energy ignition sources were credible, and that point source ignition of organic complexant waste was not adequately addressed i n the then existing AB. Consequently, the USQ was declared on the underground storage tanks in May 1996 for condensed-phase organic-nitrate reactions. At the same time that the operating contractor recommended that the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) declare a USQ. preventative coiitrols were implemented to minimize potential ignition sources and prevent a possible accident.

COWLEY, W.L.

1999-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

187

Decontamination solution development studies  

SciTech Connect

This study was conducted for the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of the Hanford Grout Technology Program (HGTP). The objective of this study was to identify decontamination solutions capable of removing radioactive contaminants and grout from the Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) process equipment and to determine the impact of these solutions on equipment components and disposal options. The reference grout used in this study was prepared with simulated double-shell slurry feed (DSSF) and a dry blend consisting of 40 wt % limestone flour, 28 wt % blast furnace slag, 28 wt % fly ash, and 4 wt % type I/II Portland cement.

Allen, R.P.; Fetrow, L.K.; Kjarmo, H.E.; Pool, K.H.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Study of the interactions of molten sodium nitrate-potassium nitrate 50 mol % mixture with water vapor and carbon dioxide in air. Final report, June 2, 1980-June 30, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The interactions of aerial components such as water, carbon dioxide, and oxygen with the binary 50 mol % mixture of sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate have been studied in the temperature range 300 to 600/sup 0/C using electrochemical methods. In addition, the behavior of nitrite ions in this melt was investigated electrochemically. By judicious choice of techniques, in situ electroanalysis was possible and the necessary relevant data to accomplish this is presented, as well as insight into the corresponding electrochemical mechanisms associated with the electroactive species. The influence of each atmospheric component was examined separately. At temperatures above 300/sup 0/C, nitrite ions are found to accumulate due to thermal decomposition of the nitrate. Water is highly soluble in the salt mixture, but no hydrolytic reactions were observed. Two methods of in situ analysis for water are described. Pure carbon dioxide is found to attack the melt at all temperatures above 250/sup 0/C producing carbonate. (LEW)

White, S.H.; Twardoch, U.M.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Cyanide Analysis for Complex Cyanide Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... titration) with the common site laboratory rhodanine endpoint silver nitrate titration method ... Achieving Stakeholder Support for New Gold Developments that Contain ... Massive Sulfide Deposits of the Bathurst Mining Camp, New Brunswick.

190

Solidification Structures of Solid Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Figure: ...Fig. 16 Binary phase diagrams. L, L 1 , and L 2 are liquid solutions. α and β are solid solutions. (a) Complete

191

Integrated Solutions in Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paths best traveled Choose from a portfolio of comprehensive, interlinked, intuitive and accessible chemistry resources Paths best traveled Choose from a comprehensive portfolio of interlinked, intuitive and accessible resources www.info.sciencedirect.com/solutions www.elsevier.com/chemistrysolutions ELSEVIERS

unknown authors

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Offshore Renewable Energy Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and sustainable energy supply. The UK is uniquely placed to harness its natural resources ­ wind, wave and tidalOffshore Renewable Energy Solutions #12;Cefas: meeting complex requirements The Centre science centre, Cefas provides a bridge between government and industry. We have unprecedented links

193

LITERATURE SURVEY FOR GROUNDWATER TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR NITRATE IODINE-129 AND URANIUM 200-ZP-1 OPERABLE UNIT HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect

This literature review presents treatment options for nitrate, iodine-129, and uranium, which are present in groundwater at the 200-ZP-I Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) within the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The objective of this review is to determine available methods to treat or sequester these contaminants in place (i.e., in situ) or to pump-and-treat the groundwater aboveground (i.e., ex situ). This review has been conducted with emphasis on commercially available or field-tested technologies, but theoretical studies have, in some cases, been considered when no published field data exist. The initial scope of this literature review included only nitrate and iodine-I 29, but it was later expanded to include uranium. The focus of the literature review was weighted toward researching methods for treatment of nitrate and iodine-129 over uranium because of the relatively greater impact of those compounds identified at the 200-ZP-I OU.

BYRNES ME

2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

194

Functionalized Polymers For Binding To Solutes In Aqueous Solutions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Functionalized Polymers For Binding To Solutes In Aqueous Solutions Functionalized Polymers For Binding To Solutes In Aqueous Solutions Functionalized Polymers For Binding To Solutes In Aqueous Solutions A functionalized polymer for binding a dissolved molecule in an aqueous solution is presented. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Functionalized Polymers For Binding To Solutes In Aqueous Solutions A functionalized polymer for binding a dissolved molecule in an aqueous solution is presented. The polymer has a backbone polymer to which one or more functional groups are covalently linked. The backbone polymer can be such polymers as polyethylenimine, polyvinylamine, polyallylamine, and polypropylamine. These polymers are generally water-soluble, but can be insoluble when cross-linked. The functional group can be for example diol

195

ANL progress in minimizing effects of LEU conversion on calcination of fission-product {sup 99}Mo acid waste solution.  

SciTech Connect

A partnership between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), MDS Nordion (MDSN), Atomic Energy Canada Limited (AECL) and SGN (France) has addressed the conversion of the MAPLE Reactor 99Mo production process from high-enriched uranium (HEU) targets to low-enriched uranium (LEU) targets. One effect of the conversion would be to increase the amount of solid uranium waste five-fold; we have worked to minimize the effect of the additional waste on the overall production process and, in particular, solid waste storage. Two processes were investigated for the treatment of the uranium-rich acidic waste solution: direct calcination, and oxalate precipitation as a prelude to calcination. Direct calcination generates a dense UO3 solid that should allow a significantly greater amount of uranium in one waste container than is planned for the HEU process, but doing so results in undesirable sputtering. These results suggest that direct calcination could be adapted for use with LEU targets without a large effect on the uranium waste treatment procedures. The oxalate-calcination generates a lower-density granular U3O8 product; sputtering is not significant during calcination of the uranyl oxalate precipitate. A physical means to densify the product would need to be developed to increase the amount of uranium in each waste container. Future work will focus on the specific chemical reactions that occur during the direct and oxalate calcination processes.

Bakel, A.; Vandegrift, G.; Quigley, K.; Aase, S.; Neylon, M.; Carney, K.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

A literature review of radiolytic gas generation as a result of the decomposition of sodium nitrate wastes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this literature review is to determine expected chemical reactions and the gas generation associated with radiolytic decomposition of radioactive sodium nitrate wastes such as the wastes stored in the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The literature survey summarizes expected chemical reactions and identifies the gases expected to be generated as a result of the radiolytic decomposition. The literature survey also identifies G values, which are the expression for radiation chemical yields as molecules of gas formed per 100 eV of absorbed energy, obtained from experimental studies of the radiolytic decomposition of water and sodium nitrate. 2 tabs., 32 refs.

Kasten, J.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Application of the risk-based strategy to the Hanford tank waste organic-nitrate safety issue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results from application of the Risk-Based Decision Management Approach for Justifying Characterization of Hanford Tank Waste to the organic-nitrate safety issue in Hanford single-shell tanks (SSTs). Existing chemical and physical models were used, taking advantage of the most current (mid-1997) sampling and analysis data. The purpose of this study is to make specific recommendations for planning characterization to help ensure the safety of each SST as it relates to the organic-nitrate safety issue. An additional objective is to demonstrate the viability of the Risk-Based Strategy for addressing Hanford tank waste safety issues.

Hunter, V.L.; Colson, S.D.; Ferryman, T.; Gephart, R.E.; Heasler, P.; Scheele, R.D.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Long-Term Nitrate Measurements in the Ocean Using the in situ Ultraviolet Spectrophotometer: Sensor Integration into the APEX Profiling Float  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reagent-free optical nitrate sensors [in situ ultraviolet spectrophotometer (ISUS)] can be used to detect nitrate throughout most of the ocean. Although the sensor is a relatively high-power device when operated continuously (7.5 W typical), the ...

Kenneth S. Johnson; Luke J. Coletti; Hans W. Jannasch; Carole M. Sakamoto; Dana D. Swift; Stephen C. Riser

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Coordinated safeguards for materials management in a nitrate-to-oxide conversion facility  

SciTech Connect

The conceptual design of a materials management system for safeguarding special nuclear materials in a plutonium nitrate-to-oxide conversion facility is developed and evaluated. Dynamic material balances are drawn from information provided by nondestructive-analysis techniques, process-control instrumentation, and conventional chemical analyses augmented by process-monitoring devices. Powerful statistical methods, cast in the framework of decision analysis and applied to unit-process accounting areas, ensure adequate spatial and temporal quantification of possible diversion with minimal process disruption. Modeling and simulation techniques assist in evaluating the sensitivity of the system to various diversion schemes and in comparing safeguards strategies. Features that would improve the safeguardability of the conversion process are discussed.

Dayem, H.A.; Cobb, D.D.; Dietz, R.J.; Hakkila, E.A.; Kern, E.A.; Shipley, J.P.; Smith, D.B.; Bowersox, D.F.

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

THE SENSITIVITY OF CARBON STEELS' SUSCEPTIBILITY TO LOCALIZED CORROSION TO THE PH OF NITRATE BASED NUCLEAR WASTES  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford tank reservation contains approximately 50 million gallons of liquid legacy radioactive waste from cold war weapons production, which is stored in 177 underground storage tanks. The tanks will be in use until waste processing operations are completed. The wastes tend to be high pH (over 10) and nitrate based. Under these alkaline conditions carbon steels tend to be passive and undergo relatively slow uniform corrosion. However, the presence of nitrate and other aggressive species, can lead to pitting and stress corrosion cracking. This work is a continuation of previous work that investigated the propensity of steels to suffer pitting and stress corrosion cracking in various waste simulants. The focus of this work is an investigation of the sensitivity of the steels' pitting and stress corrosion cracking susceptibility tosimulant pH. Previous work demonstrated that wastes that are high in aggressive nitrate and low in inhibitory nitrite are susceptible to localized corrosion. However, the previous work involved wastes with pH 12 or higher. The current work involves wastes with lower pH of 10 or 11. It is expected that at these lower pHs that a higher nitrite-to-nitrate ratio will be necessary to ensure tank integrity. This experimental work involved both electrochemical testing, and slow strain rate testing at either the free corrosion potential or under anodic polarization. The results of the current work will be discussed, and compared to work previously presented.

BOOMER KD

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Effects of Nitrate Exposure on the Functional Structure of a Microbial Community in a Uranium-contaminated Aquifer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the final model were COD, iron, and sulfate (p=0.020; f-Samples in FW101-2 and [FW102-2] (M) Day # COD aSulfate a COD, Sulfide Iron pH Nitrate U(VI) Nitrite NH 4 -H

Van Nostrand, Joy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Nighttime Measurements of Dinitrogen Pentoxide and the Nitrate Radical via Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development of effective pollution control strategies for urban areas requires accurate predictive models. The ability of models to correctly characterize the atmospheric chemistry, meteorology, and deposition rely on accurate data measurements, both as input and verification of output. Therefore, the measurement techniques must be sensitive, accurate, and capable of resolving the spatial and temporal variations of key chemical species. The application of a sensitive in situ optical absorption technique, known as cavity ring-down spectroscopy, will be introduced for simultaneously measuring the nitrate radical and dinitrogen pentoxide. The cavity ring-down spectrometer was initially designed and constructed based on the experiments by Steven Brown and Akkihebal Ravishankara at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The instrument design has since undergone many revisions before attaining the current instrumentation system. Laboratory observations provide verification of accurate N2O5 and NO3 detection with measurements of the nitrate radical absorption spectrum centered at 662 nm, effective chemical zeroing with nitric oxide, and efficient thermal decomposition of N2O5. Field observations at a local park provided further confirmation of the instruments capability in measuring N2O5 and NO3. However, detection limits were too high to detect ambient NO3. Effective and frequent zeroing can easily improve upon the sensitivity of the instrument. Determination of the source of the polluted air masses detected during these studies was unknown since the typical southerly winds from Houston were not observed. Since deployment in the field, instrumentation modifications and laboratory measurements are underway for preparation of the SOOT campaign in Houston, Texas starting April 15, 2009. Current modifications include automation of the titration with a solenoid valve and an automated filter changer. Wall losses and filter transmission for NO3 and N2O5 will be determined through laboratory measurements in coincidence with and ion-drift chemical ionization mass spectrometer prior to the SOOT project. Potential modifications to improve upon the instrument are suggested for future endeavors.

Perkins, Katie C.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

DEVELOPMENT Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DEVELOPMENT Solutions DEVELOPMENT Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name DEVELOPMENT Solutions Place Reading, England, United Kingdom Zip RG4 8UJ Sector Efficiency Product DEVELOPMENT Solutions (DS) supports investors to realise projects with sustainable applications, including in the areas of environment, energy efficiency, water resource management and other applications for sustainable development. References DEVELOPMENT Solutions[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. DEVELOPMENT Solutions is a company located in Reading, England, United Kingdom . References ↑ "DEVELOPMENT Solutions" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=DEVELOPMENT_Solutions&oldid=344207

204

Review: Greenhouse Solutions with Sustainable Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solutions with Sustainable Energy By Mark DiesendorfSolutions with Sustainable Energy. Sydney, NSW: University

Hamilton-Smith, Elery

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Suppressant:Water & Aqueous Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Suppressant:Water & Aqueous Solutions. ... Reuther, JJ; 1991. Fine Water Sprays for Fire Protection: A Halon Replacement Option.. ...

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

206

Savannah River Nuclear Solutions LLC  

Savannah River Nuclear Solutions LLC Permission to Publish KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRESENTS, that the undersigned (hereinafter referred to

207

Discontinuous bifurcations of periodic solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses different aspects of bifurcations of periodic solutions in discontinuous systems. It is explained how jumps in the fundamental solution matrix lead to jumps of the Floquet multipliers of periodic solutions. A Floquet multiplier of ... Keywords: Bifurcation, Discontinuous, Dry friction, Stick-slip

R. I. Leine; D. H. Van Campen

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Ch. 11, App. X-1 Unofficial Title 22 2005 State of California, all rights reserved. May not be commercially reproduced or sold. 03/02/09  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) 165. Calcium fluoride (X) 166. * Calcium hydride (C,I,R) 167. Calcium hydroxide, Hydrated lime (C) 168, Muriatic Acid (X,C,R) 382. * Hydrocyanic acid, Hydrogen cyanide (X,I,R) 383. * Hydrofluoric acid, Hydrogen and salts (X) 757. Turpentine (X,I) 758. Uranyl nitrate, Uranium nitrate (X,I,R) 759. Urea nitrate (X

Sorin, Eric J.

209

Texas Tech University Hygiene Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) 165. Calcium fluoride (X) 166. * Calcium hydride (C,I,R) 167. Calcium hydroxide, Hydrated lime (C) 168, Muriatic Acid (X,C,R) 382. * Hydrocyanic acid, Hydrogen cyanide (X,I,R) 383. * Hydrofluoric acid, Hydrogen and salts (X) 757. Turpentine (X,I) 758. Uranyl nitrate, Uranium nitrate (X,I,R) 759. Urea nitrate (X

Rock, Chris

210

Looking for Energy Solutions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Governments and Schools: Governments and Schools: Looking for Energy Solutions Turn to an ENERGY STAR ® Service and Product Provider Partner ENERGY STAR Service and Product Providers (SPPs) have the experience and access to the tools needed to implement energy- efficient strategies that are right for you. Following the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Guidelines for Energy Management, a proven strategy developed from ENERGY STAR partner successes, your organization can gain control of energy expenses and demonstrate environmental leadership. SPPs can help you assess your energy performance and recommend low-cost upgrades, cost-effective investments, and longer-term strategies that make the most sense for you. ENERGY STAR SPPs make it easy for you to care for your constituents, your facilities, and your finances.

211

CONCENTRATION AND DECONTAMINATION OF SOLUTIONS CONTAINING PLUTONIUM VALUES BY BISMUTH PHOSPHATE CARRIER PRECIPITATION METHODS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is given for isolating plutonium present in the tetravalent state in an aqueous solution together with fission products. First, the plutonium and fission products are coprecipitated on a bismuth phosphate carrier. The precipitate obtained is dissolved, and the plutonium in the solution is oxidized to the hexavalent state (with ceric nitrate, potassium dichromate, Pb/ sub 3/O/sub 4/, sodium bismuthate and/or potassium dichromate). Thereafter a carrier for fission products is added (bismuth phosphate, lanthanum fluoride, ceric phosphate, bismuth oxalate, thorium iodate, or thorium oxalate), and the fission-product precipitation can be repeated with one other of these carriers. After removal of the fission-product-containing precipitate or precipitates. the plutonium in the supernatant is reduced to the tetravalent state (with sulfur dioxide, hydrogen peroxide. or sodium nitrate), and a carrier for tetravalent plutonium is added (lanthanum fluoride, lanthanum hydroxide, lanthanum phosphate, ceric phosphate, thorium iodate, thorium oxalate, bismuth oxalate, or niobium pentoxide). The plutonium-containing precipitate is then dissolved in a relatively small volume of liquid so as to obtain a concentrated solution. Prior to dissolution, the bismuth phosphate precipitates first formed can be metathesized with a mixture of sodium hydroxide and potassium carbonate and plutonium-containing lanthanum fluorides with alkali-metal hydroxide. In the solutions formed from a plutonium-containing lanthanum fluoride carrier the plutonium can be selectively precipitated with a peroxide after the pH was adjusted preferably to a value of between 1 and 2. Various combinations of second, third, and fourth carriers are discussed.

Seaborg, G.T.; Thompson, S.G.

1960-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

212

Suntech Energy Solutions Formerly EI Solutions | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Formerly EI Solutions) Place Pasadena, California Zip 91103 Sector Solar Product A California-based solar power systems integrator and installer. References Suntech Energy...

213

Solidification of Acidic, High Nitrate Nuclear Wastes by Grouting or Absorption on Silica Gel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of grout and silica gel were explored for the solidification of four types of acidic, high nitrate radioactive wastes. Two methods of grouting were tested: direct grouting and pre-neutralization. Two methods of absorption on silica gel were also tested: direct absorption and rotary spray drying. The waste simulant acidity varied between 1 N and 12 N. The waste simulant was neutralized by pre-blending calcium hydroxide with Portland cement and blast furnace slag powders prior to mixing with the simulant for grout solidification. Liquid sodium hydroxide was used to partially neutralize the simulant to a pH above 2 and then it was absorbed for silica gel solidification. Formulations for each of these methods are presented along with waste form characteristics and properties. Compositional variation maps for grout formulations are presented which help determine the optimum "recipe" for a particular waste stream. These maps provide a method to determine the proportions of waste, calcium hydroxide, Portland cement, and blast furnace slag that provide a waste form that meets the disposal acceptance criteria. The maps guide researchers in selecting areas to study and provide an operational envelop that produces acceptable waste forms. The grouts both solidify and stabilize the wastes, while absorption on silica gel produces a solid waste that will not pass standard leaching procedures (TCLP) if required. Silica gel wastes can be made to pass most leach tests if heated to 600C.

A. K. Herbst; S. V. Raman; R. J. Kirkham

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Solar Choice Solutions Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Choice Solutions Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Solar Choice Solutions Inc. Place Calabasas, California Zip 91302 Sector Solar Product Solar Choice Solutions Inc. is an...

215

Sunflower Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Sunflower Solutions Place Cleveland, Ohio Zip 44106 Product Cleveland-based tracking systems maker for PV modules targeted at installations in the developing world....

216

Is Nuclear Energy the Solution?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

009-0270-y Is Nuclear Energy the Solution? Milton H. Saier &in the last 50 years, nuclear energy subsidies have totaledadministration, the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP)

Saier, Milton H.; Trevors, Jack T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Enspiria Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

information systems and technology consultants, with services in smart grid planning and systems integration. References Enspiria Solutions1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

218

Extracting alcohols from aqueous solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon and surfactants are contacted with a solution of alcohol and water to extract the alcohol into the hydrocarbon-surfactant mixture.

Compere, Alicia L. (Knoxville, TN); Googin, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Griffith, William L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Biofuel Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Name Biofuel Solutions Place Colorado Product Defunct bioethanol plant developer, which had been developing one plant in Fairmont, Minnesota and...

220

Toroidal solutions in Horava Gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently a new four-dimensional non relativistic renormalizable theory of gravity was proposed by Horava. This gravity reduces to Einstein gravity at large distances. In this paper by using the new action for gravity we present different toroidal solutions to the equations of motion. Our solutions describe the near horizon geometry with slow rotating parameter.

Ahmad Ghodsi

2009-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

CRITICALITY SAFETY OF PROCESSING SALT SOLUTION AT SRS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High level radioactive liquid waste generated as a result of the production of nuclear material for the United States defense program at the Savannah River Site has been stored as 36 million gallons in underground tanks. About ten percent of the waste volume is sludge, composed of insoluble metal hydroxides primarily hydroxides of Mn, Fe, Al, Hg, and most radionuclides including fission products. The remaining ninety percent of the waste volume is saltcake, composed of primarily sodium (nitrites, nitrates, and aluminates) and hydroxides. Saltcakes account for 30% of the radioactivity while the sludge accounts for 70% of the radioactivity. A pilot plant salt disposition processing system has been designed at the Savannah River Site for interim processing of salt solution and is composed of two facilities: the Actinide Removal Process Facility (ARPF) and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Data from the pilot plant salt processing system will be used for future processing salt at a much higher rate in a new salt processing facility. Saltcake contains significant amounts of actinides, and other long-lived radioactive nuclides such as strontium and cesium that must be extracted prior to disposal as low level waste. The extracted radioactive nuclides will be mixed with the sludge from waste tanks and vitrified in another facility. Because of the presence of highly enriched uranium in the saltcake, there is a criticality concern associated with concentration and/or accumulation of fissionable material in the ARP and MCU.

Stephens, K; Davoud Eghbali, D; Michelle Abney, M

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

Exact Solutions in Massive Gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Massive gravity is a good theoretical laboratory to study modifications of General Relativity. The theory offers a concrete set-up to study models of dark energy, since it admits cosmological self-accelerating solutions in the vacuum, in which the size of the acceleration depends on the graviton mass. Moreover, non-linear gravitational self-interactions, in the proximity of a matter source, manage to mimic the predictions of linearised General Relativity, hence agreeing with solar-system precision measurements. In this article, we review our work in the subject, classifying, on one hand, static solutions, and on the other hand, self-accelerating backgrounds. For what respects static solutions we exhibit black hole configurations, together with other solutions that recover General Relativity near a source via the Vainshtein mechanism. For the self-accelerating solutions we describe a wide class of cosmological backgrounds, including an analysis of their stability.

Gianmassimo Tasinato; Kazuya Koyama; Gustavo Niz

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

223

Mineral Dissolution and Secondary Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford Tank Solutions Affecting Subsurface Porosity  

SciTech Connect

Highly alkaline nuclear waste solutions have been released from underground nuclear waste storage tanks and pipelines into the vadose zone at the U.S. Department of Energys Hanford Site in Washington, causing mineral dissolution and re-precipitation upon contact with subsurface sediments. High pH caustic NaNO3 solutions with and without dissolved Al were reacted with quartz sand through flow-through columns stepwise at 45, 51, and 89C to simulate possible reactions between leaked nuclear waste solution and primary subsurface mineral. Upon reaction, Si was released from the dissolution of quartz sand, and nitrate-cancrinite [Na8Si6Al6O24(NO3)2] precipitated on the quartz surface as a secondary mineral phase. Both steady-state dissolution and precipitation kinetics were quantified, and quartz dissolution apparent activation energy was determined. Mineral alteration through dissolution and precipitation processes results in pore volume and structure changes in the subsurface porous media. In this study, the column porosity increased up to 40.3% in the pure dissolution column when no dissolved Al was present in the leachate, whereas up to a 26.5% porosity decrease was found in columns where both dissolution and precipitation were observed because of the presence of Al in the input solution. The porosity change was also confirmed by calculation using the dissolution and precipitation rates and mineral volume changes.

Wang, Guohui; Um, Wooyong

2012-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

224

PLUTONIUM SOLUBILITY IN SIMULATED SAVANNAH RIVER SITE WASTE SOLUTIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To address the accelerated disposition of the supernate and salt portions of Savannah River Site (SRS) high level waste (HLW), solubility experiments were performed to develop a predictive capability for plutonium (Pu) solubility. A statistically designed experiment was used to measure the solubility of Pu in simulated solutions with salt concentrations and temperatures which bounded those observed in SRS HLW solutions. Constituents of the simulated waste solutions included: hydroxide (OH{sup -}), aluminate (Al(OH){sub 4}{sup -}), sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}), carbonate (CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}), nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}), and nitrite (NO{sub 2}{sup -}) anions. Each anion was added to the waste solution in the sodium form. The solubilities were measured at 25 and 80 C. Five sets of samples were analyzed over a six month period and a partial sample set was analyzed after nominally fifteen months of equilibration. No discernable time dependence of the measured Pu concentrations was observed except for two salt solutions equilibrated at 80 C which contained OH{sup -} concentrations >5 mol/L. In these solutions, the Pu solubility increased with time. This observation was attributed to the air oxidation of a portion of the Pu from Pu(IV) to the more soluble Pu(V) or Pu(VI) valence states. A data driven approach was subsequently used to develop a modified response surface model for Pu solubility. Solubility data from this study and historical data from the literature were used to fit the model. The model predicted the Pu solubility of the solutions from this study within the 95% confidence interval for individual predictions and the analysis of variance indicated no statistically significant lack of fit. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) model was compared with predicted values from the Aqueous Electrolyte (AQ) model developed by OLI Systems, Inc. and a solubility prediction equation developed by Delegard and Gallagher for Hanford tank waste. The agreement between measured or values predicted by the SRNL model and values predicted by the OLI AG model was very poor. The much higher predicted concentrations by the OLI AQ model appears to be the result of the model predicting the predominate Pu oxidation state is Pu(V) which is reported as unstable below sodium hydroxide (NaOH) concentrations of 6 M. There was very good agreement between the predicted Pu concentrations using the SRNL model and the model developed by Delegard and Gallagher with the exception of solutions that had very high OH{sup -} (15 M) concentrations. The lower Pu solubilities in these solutions were attributed to the presence of NO{sub 3}{sup -} and NO{sub 2}{sup -} which limit the oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(V).

Rudisill, T.; Hobbs, D.; Edwards, T.

2010-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

225

Haze Formation and Behavior in Liquid-Liquid Extraction Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aqueous haze formation and behavior was studied in the liquid-liquid system tri-n-butyl phosphate in odorless kerosene and 3M nitric acid with uranyl nitrate and cesium nitrate representing the major solute and an impurity, respectively. A pulsed column, mixer-settler and centrifugal contactor were chosen to investigate the effect of different turbulence characteristics on the manifestation of haze since these contactors exhibit distinct mixing phenomena. The dispersive processes of drop coalescence and breakage, and water precipitation in the organic phase were observed to lead to the formation of haze drops of {approx}1 um in diameter. The interaction between the haze and primary drops of the dispersion was critical to the separation efficiency of the liquid-liquid extraction equipment. Conditions of high power input and spatially homogeneous mixing enabled the haze drops to become rapidly assimilated within the dispersion to maximize the scrub performance and separation efficiency of the equipment.

Arm, Stuart T.; Jenkins, J. A.

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

226

K2 Energy Solutions formerly Peak Energy Solutions | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Solutions formerly Peak Energy Solutions Energy Solutions formerly Peak Energy Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name K2 Energy Solutions (formerly Peak Energy Solutions) Place Henderson, Nevada Zip 89074 Product Nevada-based designer and fabricator of Lithium Iron Phosphate (LFP) batteries for such applications as EVs, power tools and larger-scale storage. Coordinates 38.83461°, -82.140509° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.83461,"lon":-82.140509,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

227

New Solutions Require New Thinking  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solutions Require Solutions Require New Thinking America's demand for power threatens to overburden an already congested electric system. The U.S. Department of Energy is addressing these energy challenges with innovative solutions to energy generation. Its Renewable and Distributed Systems Integration (RDSI) Program is helping to alleviate congestion, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and improve reliability by investigating answers such as * Microgrid technologies * Distributed generation * Two-way communication systems * Demand response programs Reducing Peak Demand The RDSI program aims to reduce peak load on distribution feeders 20% by 2015. To help achieve this goal, RDSI is sponsoring demonstration projects nationwide. From California to New York, these projects are

228

Sol Solution | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solution Solution Jump to: navigation, search Name Sol Solution Place Los Gatos, California Zip 95030 Sector Solar Product Rainbow Concentrator, Current matching multijunction Solar Cell Year founded 2008 Website http://www.Sol-Solution.net Coordinates 37.216351719361°, -121.9694852829° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.216351719361,"lon":-121.9694852829,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

229

Natural Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Natural Solutions Natural Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Natural Solutions Name Natural Solutions Address 3715 Briarwood Dr. Place Cedar Falls, Iowa Zip 50613 Sector Solar Product solar and wind systems Phone number 319-277-7842 Website http://www.naturalsolutions-sk Coordinates 42.5048475°, -92.434048° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.5048475,"lon":-92.434048,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

230

Heinsight Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heinsight Solutions Heinsight Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Heinsight Solutions Name Heinsight Solutions Address 217 Pine Street Place Fort Collins, Colorado Zip 80524 Sector Efficiency Product Skylight and solar water heating installation Website http://www.heinsightsolutions. Coordinates 40.5891279°, -105.0765009° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.5891279,"lon":-105.0765009,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

231

Soy Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Milford, Iowa Zip 51351 Product Manufacturer and distributor of 100 percent Soy-Based Biodiesel References Soy Solutions1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase...

232

Is Nuclear Energy the Solution?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10.1007/s11270-009-0270-y Is Nuclear Energy the Solution?MHS) attended a lecture on Nuclear Responsibility on theof the Alliance for Nuclear Responsibility. The information

Saier, Milton H.; Trevors, Jack T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Effect of Organic Acid Additions on the General and Localized Corrosion Susceptibility of Alloy 22 in Chloride Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrochemical studies such as cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were performed to determine the corrosion behavior of Alloy 22 (N06022) in 1M NaCl solutions at various pH values from acidic to neutral at 90 C. All the tested material was wrought Mill Annealed (MA). Tests were also performed in NaCl solutions containing weak organic acids such as oxalic, acetic, citric and picric. Results show that the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 was significantly higher in solutions containing oxalic acid than in solutions of pure NaCl at the same pH. Citric and picric acids showed a slightly higher corrosion rate, and acetic acid maintained the corrosion rate of pure chloride solutions at the same pH. Organic acids revealed to be weak inhibitors for crevice corrosion. Higher concentration ratios, compared to nitrate ions, were needed to completely inhibit crevice corrosion in chloride solutions. Results are discussed considering acid dissociation constants, buffer capacity and complex formation constants of the different weak acids.

Carranza, R M; Giordano, C M; Rodr?guez, M A; Ilevbare, G O; Rebak, R B

2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

234

Investigation of cold filling receiver panels and piping in molten-nitrate-salt central-receiver solar power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cold filling refers to flowing a fluid through piping or tubes that are at temperatures below the fluid`s freezing point. Since the piping and areas of the receiver in a molten-nitrate salt central-receiver solar power plant must be electrically heated to maintain their temperatures above the nitrate salt freezing point (430{degrees}F, 221{degrees}C), considerable energy could be used to maintain such temperatures during nightly shut down and bad weather. Experiments and analyses have been conducted to investigate cold filling receiver panels and piping as a way of reducing parasitic electrical power consumption and increasing the availability of the plant. The two major concerns with cold filling are: (1) how far can the molten salt penetrate cold piping before freezing closed and (2) what thermal stresses develop during the associated thermal shock. Cold fill experiments were conducted by flowing molten salt at 550{degrees}F (288{degrees}C) through cold panels, manifolds, and piping to determine the feasibility of cold filling the receiver and piping. The transient thermal responses were measured and heat transfer coefficients were calculated from the data. Nondimensional analysis is presented which quantifies the thermal stresses in a pipe or tube undergoing thermal shock. In addition, penetration distances were calculated to determine the distance salt could flow in cold pipes prior to freezing closed.

Pacheco, J.E.; Ralph, M.E.; Chavez, J.M.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

235

Ferrocyanide Safety Project Dynamic X-Ray Diffraction studies of sodium nickel ferrocyanide reactions with equimolar nitrate/nitrite salts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dynamic X-ray Diffraction (DXRD) has been to used to identify and quantify the solid state reactions that take place between sodium nickel ferrocyanide, Na{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6}, and equimolar concentrations of sodium nitrate/nitrite, reactions of interest to the continued environmental safety of several large underground waste storage tanks at the Hanford site in eastern Washington. The results are supportive of previous work, which indicated that endothermic dehydration and melting of the nitrates take place before the occurrence of exothermic reactions that being about 300{degrees}C. The DXRD results show that a major reaction set at these temperatures is the occurrence of a series reaction that produces sodium cyanate, NaCNO, as an intermediate in a mildly exothermic first step. In the presence of gaseous oxygen, NaCNO subsequently reacts exothermally and at a faster rate to form metal oxides. Measurements of the rate of this reaction are used to estimate the heat release. Comparisons of this estimated heat release rate with heat transfer rates from a hypothetical ``hot spot`` show that, even in a worst-case scenario, the heat transfer rates are approximately eight times higher than the rate of energy release from the exothermic reactions.

Dodds, J.N. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering]|[UNOCAL, Brea, CA (United States). Hartley Research Center

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Extraction of Th(IV) and U(VI) by dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate from aqueous nitrate media  

SciTech Connect

The extraction behavior of Th(IV) and U(VI) from nitrate media was studied using relatively pure dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate (DHDECMP). The data were compared with analogous measurements obtained with dibutyl butylphosphonate (DB(BP)). It was found that the extractant dependency is second power for U(VI) with both DHDECMP and DB(BP). However, the extractant dependency for Th(IV) is third power for DB(BP) but varied from 2.5 to 2.0 power for DHDECMP depending on the total nitrate concentration. The K/sub d/ data do not support the theory that DHDECMP is an effective chelating agent for actinide ions. Significant differences between DHDECMP and DB(BP) do appear in the extraction behavior of Th(IV) from 1 to 5 M HNO/sub 3/. These differences are explained by the ability of DHDECMP to buffer itself against the effects of HNO/sub 3/ by protonation of the amide group.

Horwitz, E.P.; Kalina, D.G.; Muscatello, A.C.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Nitrate analysis of snow and ice core samples collected in the vicinity of a waste detonation event, McMurdo Station, Antarctica  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On December 30, 1991, a small quantity of hazardous materials was detonated at a site near McMurdo Station, Antarctica. The materials involved in the detonation represented highly reactive or explosive wastes that could not be transported safely for disposal in the United States. Detonation was therefore considered the safest and most effective means for disposing these hazardous materials. One concern regarding the detonation of these substances was that the process could generate or distribute measurable quantities of contaminants to the area surrounding the detonation site. Nitrate was selected as a tracer to document the distribution of contaminants from the detonation. Snow and ice cores were collected about 4 months after the event. These cores were analyzed for nitrate concentrations in May 1993, and a map was generated to show the extent of nitrate contamination. This report describes the collection of these samples and summarizes the analytical results.

White, G.J.; Lugar, R.M.; Crockett, A.B.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Powerit Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Powerit Solutions Powerit Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name Powerit Solutions Address 568 First Ave South Place Seattle, Washington Zip 98104 Sector Efficiency Product Allows business customers to control their energy usage online Website http://www.poweritsolutions.co Coordinates 47.5977906°, -122.3341632° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.5977906,"lon":-122.3341632,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

239

MOLECULAR APPROACHES FOR IN SITU IDENTIFCIATION OF NITRATE UTILIZATION BY MARINE BACTERIA AND PHYTOPLANKTON  

SciTech Connect

Traditionally, the importance of inorganic nitrogen (N) for the nutrition and growth of marine phytoplankton has been recognized, while inorganic N utilization by bacteria has received less attention. Likewise, organic N has been thought to be important for heterotrophic organisms but not for phytoplankton. However, accumulating evidence suggests that bacteria compete with phytoplankton for nitrate (NO3-) and other N species. The consequences of this competition may have a profound effect on the flux of N, and therefore carbon (C), in ocean margins. Because it has been difficult to differentiate between N uptake by heterotrophic bacterioplankton versus autotrophic phytoplankton, the processes that control N utilization, and the consequences of these competitive interactions, have traditionally been difficult to study. Significant bacterial utilization of DIN may have a profound effect on the flux of N and C in the water column because sinks for dissolved N that do not incorporate inorganic C represent mechanisms that reduce the atmospheric CO2 drawdown via the ?biological pump? and limit the flux of POC from the euphotic zone. This project was active over the period of 1998-2007 with support from the DOE Biotechnology Investigations ? Ocean Margins Program (BI-OMP). Over this period we developed a tool kit of molecular methods (PCR, RT-PCR, Q-PCR, QRT-PCR, and TRFLP) and combined isotope mass spectrometry and flow-cytometric approaches that allow selective isolation, characterization, and study of the diversity and genetic expression (mRNA) of the structural gene responsible for the assimilation of NO3- by heterotrophic bacteria (nasA). As a result of these studies we discovered that bacteria capable of assimilating NO3- are ubiquitous in marine waters, that the nasA gene is expressed in these environments, that heterotrophic bacteria can account for a significant fraction of total DIN uptake in different ocean margin systems, that the expression of nasA is differentially regulated in genetically distinct NO3- assimilating bacteria, and that the best predictors of nasA gene expression are either NO3- concentration or NO3- uptake rates. These studies provide convincing evidence of the importance of bacterial utilization of NO3-, insight into controlling processes, and provide a rich dataset that are being used to develop linked C and N modeling components necessary to evaluate the significance of bacterial DIN utilization to global C cycling. Furthermore, as a result of BI-OMP funding we made exciting strides towards institutionalizing a research and education based collaboration between the Skidaway Institute of Oceanography (SkIO) and Savannah State University (SSU), an historically black university within the University System of Georgia with undergraduate and now graduate programs in marine science. The BI-OMP program, in addition to supporting undergraduate (24) graduate (10) and postdoctoral (2) students, contributed to the development of a new graduate program in Marine Sciences at SSU that remains an important legacy of this project. The long-term goals of these collaborations are to increase the capacity for marine biotechnology research and to increase representation of minorities in marine, environmental and biotechnological sciences.

Frischer, Marc E. [Skidaway Institute of Oceanography; Verity, Peter G.; Gilligan, Mathew R.; Bronk, Deborah A.; Zehr, Jonathan P.; Booth, Melissa G.

2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

240

Electrodialysis operation with buffer solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new method for improving the efficiency of electrodialysis (ED) cells and stacks, in particular those used in chemical synthesis. The process entails adding a buffer solution to the stack for subsequent depletion in the stack during electrolysis. The buffer solution is regenerated continuously after depletion. This buffer process serves to control the hydrogen ion or hydroxide ion concentration so as to protect the active sites of electrodialysis membranes. The process enables electrodialysis processing options for products that are sensitive to pH changes.

Hryn, John N. (Naperville, IL); Daniels, Edward J. (Orland Park, IL); Krumdick, Greg K. (Crete, IL)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Solid Solution Lithium Alloy Cermet Anodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solid Solution Lithium Alloy Cermet Anodes Thomas J.94720 USA Abstract Lithium-magnesium solid solution alloysHeating mixtures of lithium nitride and magnesium provides a

Richardson, Thomas J.; Chen, Guoying

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Annual Inventory Troubleshooting Checklist Problem Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Annual Inventory Troubleshooting Checklist Problem Solutions Duplicate tag number Send email to am;Annual Inventory Troubleshooting Checklist Problem Solutions Personal property Send email to am

Li, Mo

243

Solar Project Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Project Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name Solar Project Solutions Place California Sector Solar Product US-based JV to build solar-power plants in California....

244

Solar amp Electric Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar amp Electric Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name Solar & Electric Solutions Place Santa Cruz, California Zip 95062 Sector Solar Product Small solar installation firm...

245

Green Heat Solutions Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heat Solutions Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Green Heat Solutions Limited Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:http:www.greenheating Region Scotland LinkedIn...

246

AG Solutions Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AG Solutions Inc. Place Gladstone, Michigan Product 10Mgpy biodiesel producer in Gladstone, Michigan. References AG Solutions Inc.1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No...

247

Nextreme Thermal Solutions Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nextreme Thermal Solutions Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Nextreme Thermal Solutions Inc Place North Carolina Zip 27709-3981 Product String representation "Manufactures ad...

248

AFV Solutions Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inc Place Mesa, Arizona Zip 85210 Product AFV Solutions is a manufacturer of electric-hybrid buses and energy conversion systems for cars. References AFV Solutions Inc1...

249

Energy Options Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Options & Solutions Place Ann Arbor, Michigan Zip 48103 Product Michigan-based alternative energy consultant. References Energy Options & Solutions1 LinkedIn...

250

FT Solutions LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FT Solutions LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name FT Solutions LLC Place South Jordan, Utah Zip 84095 Product JV between Headwaters Technology Innovation Group and Rentech to focus...

251

Quantum Energy Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Solutions Place Rancho Cordova, California Zip 95742 Product California-based energy management company that was formed in 1974. References Quantum Energy Solutions1...

252

Webinar Presentation: Energy Storage Solutions for Microgrids...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Webinar Presentation: Energy Storage Solutions for Microgrids (November 2012) Webinar Presentation: Energy Storage Solutions for Microgrids (November 2012) On November 7, 2012,...

253

Solar India Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar India Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name Solar India Solutions Place Visakhapatnam, Andhra Pradesh, India Zip 530016 Sector Efficiency Product Andhra-based energy...

254

Bio Solutions Manufacturing Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name Bio Solutions Manufacturing Inc Place Las Vegas, Nevada Zip 89103 Product Waste-to-energy bioremediation developer. References Bio Solutions Manufacturing Inc1...

255

Battery Wireless Solutions Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Data Page Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Battery Wireless Solutions Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Battery & Wireless Solutions...

256

Smarter Grid Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Smarter Grid Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name Smarter Grid Solutions Place United Kingdom Product String representation "The SGS technol ... the technology." is too long....

257

Energy Solutions International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

. References "Energy Solutions International" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleEnergySolutionsInternational&oldid344882" Categories: Clean Energy...

258

PNE Renewable Solutions JV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Solutions JV Jump to: navigation, search Name PNE & Renewable Solutions JV Place Delaware Sector Wind energy Product Delaware-based limited liability company and JV...

259

Tribal Renewable Energy Solutions and Partnerships: Collaborating...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tribal Renewable Energy Solutions and Partnerships: Collaborating Through the Headwinds of Change Tribal Renewable Energy Solutions and Partnerships: Collaborating Through the...

260

Wind Park Solutions Arcadia | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Arcadia Jump to: navigation, search Name Wind Park Solutions Arcadia Place Big Sandy, Montana Sector Wind energy Product JV between Wind Park Solutions America and Arcadia...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Robust solutions for combinatorial auctions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bids submitted in auctions are usually treated as enforceable commitments in most bidding and auction theory literature. In reality bidders often withdraw winning bids before the transaction when it is in their best interests to do so. Given a bid withdrawal ... Keywords: bid withdrawal, combinatorial auctions, constraint programming, robustness, weighted Super Solutions

Alan Holland; Barry O'Sullivan

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

RWE Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RWE Solutions RWE Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name RWE Solutions Place Neu-Isenburg, Germany Zip 63263 Sector Solar Product Germany-based, subsidiary of RWE AG plans, builds and manages energy infrastructure for utilities (power, gas, water, steam, heat and cooling). RWE Solutions through its subsidiaries is invovled in the solar sector Coordinates 50.05652°, 8.695144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":50.05652,"lon":8.695144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

263

Process for the extraction of technetium from uranium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A spent fuel reprocessing method contacts an aqueous solution containing Technetium(V) and uranyl with an acidic solution comprising hydroxylamine hydrochloride or acetohydroxamic acid to reduce Tc(V) to Tc(II, and then extracts the uranyl with an organic phase, leaving technetium(II) in aqueous solution.

Gong, Cynthia-May S. (San Mateo, CA); Poineau, Frederic (Las Vegas, NV); Czerwinski, Kenneth R. (Las Vegas, NV)

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

264

REMOVAL OF CHLORIDE FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The removal of chlorides from aqueons solutions is described. The process involves contacting the aqueous chloride containing solution with a benzene solution about 0.005 M in phenyl mercuric acetate whereby the chloride anions are taken up by the organic phase and separating the organic phase from the aqueous solutions.

Schulz, W.W.

1959-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Uranyl Sequestration: Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Uranyl Complexes with a Tetradentate Methylterephthalamide Ligand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ligands containing catechol derivatives, 3- hydroxy-N-to those in Na 4 [U(catechol)] 21 and Me-3,2-HOPO uranylof 2.371(4) in Na 4 [U(catechol)]. 21 A close examination

Ni, Chengbao

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Clean Energy Solutions Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clean Energy Solutions Center Clean Energy Solutions Center Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Clean Energy Solutions Center Name Clean Energy Solutions Center Agency/Company /Organization Clean Energy Ministerial Sector Energy Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency, Transportation Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, -Roadmap, -TNA, Market analysis Resource Type Case studies/examples, Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices, Publications, Training materials, Webinar Website http://cleanenergysolutions.or Program Start 2011 References Clean Energy Solutions Center Website[1] Clean Energy Solutions Center Screenshot The Clean Energy Solutions Center helps governments turn clean energy visions into reality. We share policy best practices, data, and analysis

267

QUARTERLY REPORT OF THE SOLUTION CORROSION GROUP FOR THE PERIOD ENDING APRIL 30, 1958  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

6 9 2 4 8 < E 5 0 2 5 H 5 of a solution containing 0.04 M UO/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, 0.025 M D/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, 0.03 M CuSO/sub 4/ and 750 ppm of nickel as nickel sulfate at 300 deg C in D/sub 2/0 but both nickel and copper were lost from solution when the nickel concentration was increased to 1700 ppm. The chemical stability of a solution containing 0.036 M UO/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, 0.022 M D/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, 0.009 M CuSO/sub 0.013 M NiSO/sub 4/ and 0.0016 M MnSO/sub 4/ in D/sub 2/0 was also demonstrated at 300 deg C. The corrosion of stainless steel in 0.04 M UO/sub 2/S/sub 4/O/sub 4/ containing 0.025 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and 0.0 1 M CuSO/sub 4/ was found to be relatively severe above the critical velocity at 250 and 300 deg C. The critical velocities observed were 10 to 20 and 30 to 40 fps, respectively at 250 and 300 deg C. Loop runs in which oxygen was removed from solution have shown that as uranium precipitated excess acid, ferrous and nickelous ions formed. On addition of oxygen to such a solution, uranium dissolved and ferrous ions were oxidized to ferric ions which precipitated from solution. A sixth test of the bellows and stainless steel-Zircaloy-2 traasition joint mockup was completed satisfactorily. The total exposure of the mockup was 9153 hr, including 8600 hr on fuel solution 312 thermal cycles between 300 and 1OO deg C and 518 mechanicai deflections. Tests to determine if type 304 stainless steel York mesh would corrode appreciably in uranyl sulfate solutions containing iodine and a hydrogen and oxygen atmosphere at 1OO deg C produced negative results. No significant corrosion of the steel was observed. A solution of 0.04 M U0/sub 2/S0/sub 4/ containing 0.04 M BeSO/sub 4/ and O.0O5 M CuSO/sub 4/ proved to be unstable during a 200-hr run at 280 deg C. Both uranium and beryllium were lost from solution. The addition of 100 ppm ruthenium as rthenium nitroso sulfate to a 0.02 M UO/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ solution containing 0.025M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and 0.01 M CuSO/sub 4/ at 250 deg C provided substantial inhibition of corrosion of stainless steel. However, the inhibition appeared to be due to the substantial quantities of chromium(VI) that formed in the presence of ruthenium. A solution of 0.17 M U0/sub 2/S0/sub 4/ containing 0.20 M Li/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, 0.10 M H/sub 2/ S0/sub 4/, and 0.02 M CuSO/sub 4/ was stabl e at 280 to 295 deg C and was only slightly more corrosive to stainless steel at 250 deg C than 0.17 M U0/sub 2/S0/ sub 4/ without additives. Tests of inhibitors of corrosion of stainiess steel in 0.05 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ at 250 deg C showed 0.002 M potassium dichromate to be very effective. 0.04 M MgSO/sub 4/ and 0.05 M Li/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ also gave substantial inhibition though not so much as expected. 0.02 M U0/sub 2/S0/sub 4/ had little effect. Stress-corrosion cracking characteristics of a number of alloys were investigated under conditions in which steam-heated pipe bends of the materials were cooled by a spray of chloride-containing potable water. MST Gr 3 titanium and Croloy 16-1 stainless steel did not crack during 5000-hr of exposure. Inconel and Nionel were resistant to cracking during test periods of 1000 and 2000 hr, respectively. Incoloy T cracked in 1000 hr. Cold-formed type 347 stainless steel pipe bends did not crack provided the surface was shot-blasted or cathodically protected with aluminum. Normally, coldformed bends of the alloy crack during 1000 hr. Annealing; of type 347 stainless steel pipes did not completely eliminnte susceptibility to cracking but did reduce the frequency of cracks. No cracking of the alloy was experienced during a 1000-hr run in which the cooling water was added slowly enough to allow flash vaporization. Stress specimens of several alloys were tested in distilled water at 300 deg C containing oxygen and 100 ppm of chloride. Generally, at pH 10.5 the high nickel alloys such as Nionel and Incoloy were more resistant to cracking than the austenitic stainiess steels. However,

Griess, J.C.; Savage, H.C.; English, J.L.; Greeley, R.S.; Buxton, S.R.; Hess, D.N.; Neumann, P.D.; Bolt, S.E.; Ulrich, W.C.

1958-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

268

Randa Energy Solutions LLC R A Energy Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Randa Energy Solutions LLC R A Energy Solutions Randa Energy Solutions LLC R A Energy Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name Randa Energy Solutions, LLC (R&A Energy Solutions) Place North Ridgeville, Ohio Zip 44039 Product String representation "Ohio-based prov ... alue add power." is too long. References Randa Energy Solutions, LLC (R&A Energy Solutions)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Randa Energy Solutions, LLC (R&A Energy Solutions) is a company located in North Ridgeville, Ohio . References ↑ "[ Randa Energy Solutions, LLC (R&A Energy Solutions)]" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Randa_Energy_Solutions_LLC_R_A_Energy_Solutions&oldid=350191

269

Energy Solutions Using Wireless Telemetry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solutions Using Wireless Telemetry Solutions Using Wireless Telemetry Speaker(s): Andy Green Date: June 12, 2001 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Satkartar K. Kinney This talk will address the following: * Introduction to wireless data networks * What are cellular control channels and why do I care? * Telemetry using wireless short packet data * Aeris technologies * Energy applications - Automatic meter reading - HVAV-R monitoring and control - Home gateways and remote thermostat control - Load management and curtailment - Distribution automation - Supply monitoring/management * The future For more information on this topic, you're invited to visit Aeris.Net at: http://www.aeris.net For more information about this seminar, please contact: Satkartar Kinney(510) 495-2365

270

SMUD's Residential Summer Solutions Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SMUD's Residential Summer Solutions Study SMUD's Residential Summer Solutions Study Speaker(s): Karen Herter Date: August 26, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Janie Page In 2009, the DRRC and SMUD teamed up to test the use of dynamic pricing and communicating thermostats in the small commercial sector. The final results showed summer energy savings of 20%, event impacts of 14%, and bill savings of 25%. In 2011, the same team will conduct a similar study involving residential customers with interval meters. The study is designed to inform the transition to the Sacramento smart grid through experimentation with real-time energy use data and communicating thermostats, both with and without dynamic pricing. Three randomly chosen groups of residential customers were offered one of three equipment configuration treatments: (a)

271

Protein Puzzles and Scientific Solutions  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Articles » 2014 » Protein Articles » 2014 » Protein Puzzles and Scientific Solutions News Featured Articles 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Headlines Presentations & Testimony News Archives Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 01.06.14 Protein Puzzles and Scientific Solutions Researchers at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory solve fiendishly complicated structures using X-ray savvy and serious computing power. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo The Coherent X-ray Imaging experimental station at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source. Photo courtesy of Brad Plummer/SLAC In crystallography experiments at the Coherent X-ray Imaging experimental

272

New combustion synthesis technique for the production of (InxGa1-x)2O3 powders: Hydrazine/metal nitrate method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New combustion synthesis technique for the production of (InxGa1-x)2O3 powders: Hydrazine. The combustion reaction occurred when heating the precursors between 150 and 200 °C in a closed vessel filled by a more typical combustion synthesis reaction between nitrates and a carbonaceous fuel at a higher

McKittrick, Joanna

273

Clean Energy Solutions Center (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Clean Energy Ministerial launched the Clean Energy Solutions Center in April, 2011 for major economy countries, led by Australia and U.S. with other CEM partners. Partnership with UN-Energy is extending scope to support all developing countries: 1. Enhance resources on policies relating to energy access, small to medium enterprises (SMEs), and financing programs; 2. Offer expert policy assistance to all countries; 3. Expand peer to peer learning, training, and deployment and policy data for developing countries.

Reategui, S.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Electrochromic Salts, Solutions, and Devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrochromic salts. Electrochromic salts of dicationic viologens such as methyl viologen and benzyl viologen associated with anions selected from bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide, and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide are produced by metathesis with the corresponding viologen dihalide. They are highly soluble in molten quarternary ammonium salts and together with a suitable reductant provide electrolyte solutions that are used in electrochromic windows.

Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); McClesky, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

275

Electrochromic salts, solutions, and devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrochromic salts. Electrochromic salts of dicationic viologens such as methyl viologen and benzyl viologen associated with anions selected from bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide, and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide are produced by metathesis with the corresponding viologen dihalide. They are highly soluble in molten quarternary ammonium salts and together with a suitable reductant provide electrolyte solutions that are used in electrochromic windows.

Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); McClesky,7,064,212 T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

276

Electrochromic Salts, Solutions, and Devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrochromic salts. Electrochromic salts of dicationic viologens such as methyl viologen and benzyl viologen associated with anions selected from bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide, and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide are produced by metathesis with the corresponding viologen dihalide. They are highly soluble in molten quarternary ammonium salts and together with a suitable reductant provide electrolyte solutions that are used in electrochromic windows.

Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); McClesky, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

277

Mechanism of plutonium metal dissolution in HNO/sub 3/-HF-N/sub 2/H/sub 4/ solution  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An oxidation-reduction balance of the products of the dissolution of plutonium metal and alloys in HNO/sub 3/-HF-N/sub 2/H/sub 4/ solution shows that the major reactions during dissolution are the reduction of nitrate to NH/sub 3/, N/sub 2/ and N/sub 2/O by the metal, and the oxidation of H free radicals to NH/sub 3/ by N/sub 2/H/sub 4/. Reactions between HNO/sub 3/ and N/sub 2/H/sub 4/ produce varying amounts of HN/sub 3/. The reaction rate is greater for delta-Pu than alpha-Pu, and is increased by higher concentrations of HF and HNO/sub 3/. The low yield of reduced nitrogen species indicates that nitrate is reduced on the metal surface without producing a significant concentration of species that react with N/sub 2/H/sub 4/. It is conjectured that intermediate Pu valences and electron transfer within the metal are involved. 7 refs., 3 tabs.

Karraker, D G

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Clean Energy Solutions Centers Fact Sheet | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Energy Solutions Centers Fact Sheet Clean Energy Solutions Centers Fact Sheet A fact sheet describing the mission of the Clean Energy Solution Center. Clean Energy Solutions...

279

Influence of pH of the impregnation solution on the catalytic properties of Co/{gamma}-alumina for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis  

SciTech Connect

The Co/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts were prepared by the slurry impregnation of an aqueous solution of cobalt(II) nitrate precursor. Nitric acid or ammonium hydroxide was added to the cobalt nitrate solution, during impregnation, to give an acidic or basic environment. The changes in the particle size of cobalt species were estimated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and hydrogen chemisorption. The reduction degree of cobalt oxides was measured by temperature-programmed reduction (TPR). The catalysts prepared under acidic conditions showed a higher reduction degree compared to those prepared at higher pH because of the reduced salt-support interaction. During the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis at 220{sup o}C, employing the catalysts prepared at a different pH (0.80, 4.94, 9.96, and 11.12), a considerable difference in the initial activity was observed, depending upon the cobalt metal surface area. However, after stabilization, all of the catalysts attained a similar level of conversion, possibly because of the active-site rearrangement, deactivation, and wax formation on the catalyst surface. At a higher reaction temperature of 240{sup o}C, the catalysts prepared at lower solution pH exhibited higher conversion than those prepared at higher solution pH. The cobalt species on the catalysts prepared under acidic conditions had a heterogeneous particle size distribution, showing higher steady-state activity, because of the reduced interaction with the support. The product distribution revealed a higher selectivity to C{sub 1} and C{sub 8+} on the catalyst prepared with a higher solution pH. 44 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Jong Wook Bae; Yun-Jo Lee; Jo-Yong Park; Ki-Won Jun [Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology (KRICT), Daejeon (Republic of Korea). Alternative Chemicals/Fuel Research Center

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

Commercial Lighting Solutions Webtool Peer Review Report, Office Solutions  

SciTech Connect

The Commercial Lighting Solutions (CLS) project directly supports the U.S. Department of Energys Commercial Building Energy Alliance efforts to design high performance buildings. CLS creates energy efficient best practice lighting designs for widespread use, and they are made available to users via an interactive webtool that both educates and guides the end user through the application of the Lighting Solutions. This report summarizes the peer review of the CLS webtool for offices. The methodology for the peer review process included data collection (stakeholder input), analysis of the comments, and organization of the input into categories for prioritization of the comments against a set of criteria. Based on this process, recommendations were developed for the release of version 2.0 of the webtool at the Lightfair conference in Las Vegas in May 2010. The report provides a list of the top ten most significant and relevant improvements that will be made within the webtool for version 2.0 as well as appendices containing the comments and short-term priorities in additional detail. Peer review comments that are considered high priority by the reviewers and the CLS team but cannot be completed for Version 2.0 are listed as long-term recommendations.

Beeson, Tracy A.; Jones, Carol C.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Development and evaluation of methods for safeguards use of solution monitoring data  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the effort to develop, implement, and evaluate data analysis methods for solution-monitoring measurements in the plutonium nitrate storage at the Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP). The intent is to address TRP-specific issues to some extent, as well as to anticipate the data analysis needs at future reprocessing plants (especially the new Rokkasho reprocessing plant (RRP)) in Japan. The essential difference between a plant like TRP and a more modern plant like RRP is that one expects more and better instrumentation in the tanks in a modern plant. Because the TRP solution monitoring hardware is scheduled to be upgraded, the authors de-emphasized the effort to handle information-poor plants like TRP. This report mostly describes the analysis methods and software for finding and identifying all key tank events. To a large extent they have to experiment with several candidate methods for implementing their analysis objectives. Therefore, they chose to use a prototyping software system called S-PLUS, which is an object-oriented statistical programming and graphics package. The intent is to eventually implement selected portions of their current solution-monitoring toolkit in a more robust and user-friendly system. The authors describe their current software system as being far more than they needed for their own in-house use (menus are provided for the user who doesn`t want to type any S-PLUS commands), but less than is needed for a fieldable system. Mostly as a result of working on this project, they have come to conclude that solution monitoring is a potentially very valuable asset to nuclear safeguards at a modern reprocessing plant.

Burr, T.; Wangen, L.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Nitrous oxide production from radiolysis of simulted high-level nuclear waste solutions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nitrous oxide gas (N{sub 2}O) is produced by the radiolysis of aqueous nitrate or nitrite solutions in the presence of organic compounds. When ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or N- (2-hydroxyethyl)-ethylenediaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA) is present, the G-value for hydrogen increases and N{sub 2}O become the major gaseous product (G=0.54). A survey of organic compounds indicates the amount of N{sub 2}O formed depends on the structure of the organic. With highly oxidized organics (carbonate, formate, acetate and oxalate), little or no N{sub 2}O is formed. Aromatic and aliphatic organics (sodium tetraphenylborate, benzene, phenol, n-paraffin, and tributylphosphate) produce small amounts of N{sub 2}O. Water soluble, easily oxidized organics (methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, n-butanol, acetone, and ethylene glycol) produce large amounts of N{sub 2}O relative to the previous two categories. Nitrous oxide production is not greatly affected by pH between neutral and pH=13, but increases significantly in acid solution. The G-value for N{sub 2}O production in 10 wt% potassium tetraphenylborate slurries has been measured under process conditions important at the Savannah River Site.

Walker, D.D.; Hobbs, D.T.; Tiffany, J.B.; Bibler, N.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Meisel, D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Nitrous oxide production from radiolysis of simulted high-level nuclear waste solutions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nitrous oxide gas (N{sub 2}O) is produced by the radiolysis of aqueous nitrate or nitrite solutions in the presence of organic compounds. When ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or N- (2-hydroxyethyl)-ethylenediaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA) is present, the G-value for hydrogen increases and N{sub 2}O become the major gaseous product (G=0.54). A survey of organic compounds indicates the amount of N{sub 2}O formed depends on the structure of the organic. With highly oxidized organics (carbonate, formate, acetate and oxalate), little or no N{sub 2}O is formed. Aromatic and aliphatic organics (sodium tetraphenylborate, benzene, phenol, n-paraffin, and tributylphosphate) produce small amounts of N{sub 2}O. Water soluble, easily oxidized organics (methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, n-butanol, acetone, and ethylene glycol) produce large amounts of N{sub 2}O relative to the previous two categories. Nitrous oxide production is not greatly affected by pH between neutral and pH=13, but increases significantly in acid solution. The G-value for N{sub 2}O production in 10 wt% potassium tetraphenylborate slurries has been measured under process conditions important at the Savannah River Site.

Walker, D.D.; Hobbs, D.T.; Tiffany, J.B.; Bibler, N.E. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Meisel, D. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

We will perform an analysis of samples of scale removed from the Gravity Drain Line (GDL) and the pot of the 2H Evaporator. The analysis will support We will perform an analysis of samples of scale removed from the Gravity Drain Line (GDL) and the pot of the 2H Evaporator. The analysis will support the development of a Nuclear Criticality Safety Analysis (NCSA) for evaporator operation and chemical cleaning. Previous chemical cleaning operations were performed using a nitric acid flowsheet that involved copious amounts of depleted uranyl nitrate used as a neutron poison. Current interest and focus is on a chemical cleaning operation involving only a sodium hydroxide solution. Therefore, testing will involve dissolving sub-samples of scale sample in sodium hydroxide solution at temperatures up to 90oC. 7/28/2010 - Revised to reflect the periodic performance of Task 1 to support 2H Evaporator cleaning. Changed end date and project contact.

285

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

We will perform an analysis of samples of scale removed from the Gravity Drain Line (GDL) and the pot of the 2H Evaporator. The analysis will support We will perform an analysis of samples of scale removed from the Gravity Drain Line (GDL) and the pot of the 2H Evaporator. The analysis will support the development of a Nuclear Criticality Safety Analysis (NCSA) for evaporator operation and chemical cleaning. Previous chemical cleaning operations were performed using a nitric acid flowsheet that involved copious amounts of depleted uranyl nitrate used as a neutron poison. Current interest and focus is on a chemical cleaning operation involving only a sodium hydroxide solution. Therefore, testing will involve dissolving sub-samples of scale sample in sodium hydroxide solution at temperatures up to 90oC. 7/28/2010 - Revised to reflect the periodic performance of Task 1 to support 2H Evaporator cleaning. Changed end date and project contact.

286

CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY DIVISION, UNIT OPERATIONS SECTION MONTHLY PROGRESS REPORT, MAY 1961  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The experimental results on the oxidation of H from a He stream with CuO pellets were very close to the predicted behavior based on the mathematical model. Experimental measurements of uranyl sulfate loading rates on chloride equilibrated resin showed little variation with solution concentrations. A tentative flowsbeet was proposed for cost analysis of processing a Pebble Bed Reactor. A U-Zr plate was dissolved in nitrate-free Zirflex solution. An authentic TRIGA prototype was processed in engineering-scale equipment. Three 4- stage leacher model dissolution runs were made, two of which used 8 M HNO/sub 3/ and one used 4 M HNO/sub 3/. Flooding rates and holdup data were obtained for sieve plate pulse columns under 5% TBP - l.8 Mi Al(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/ flowsheet conditions. A Purex waste calcination run (R-37) was made using sodium anid imagnesium to reduce sulfate volatility. (auth)

Whatley, M.E.; Haas, P.A.; Horton, R.W.; Ryon, A.D.; Suddath, J.C.; Watson, C.D.

1961-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

287

PROCESS OF PREPARING A FLUORIDE OF TETRAVLENT URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for producing a fluoride salt pf tetravalent uranium suitable for bomb reduction to metallic uranium. An aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate is treated with acetic acid and a nitrite-suppressor and then contacted with metallic lead whereby uranium is reduced from the hexavalent to the tetravalent state and soluble lead acetate is formed. Sulfate ions are then added to the solution to precipitate and remove the lead values. Hydrofluoric acid and alkali metal ions are then added causing the formation of an alkali metal uranium double-fluoride in which the uranium is in the tetravalent state. After recovery, this precipitate is suitable for using in the limited production of metallic uranium.

Wheelwright, E.J.

1959-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

288

State and Local Solution Center: Webinars  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Webinars to someone by E-mail Share State and Local Solution Center: Webinars on Facebook Tweet about State and Local Solution Center: Webinars on Twitter Bookmark State and Local...

289

Analytical Solutions for Cloud-Drop Concentration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This note compares and evaluates the analytical solutions of Squires and Twomey for cloud droplet concentration. Either solution is likely to be fairly accurate (30%) when the slope parameter (?) of the cloud condensation nuclei distribution is ...

David B. Johnson

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Stellar Energy Solutions Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stellar Energy Solutions Inc Stellar Energy Solutions Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Stellar Energy Solutions Inc Place Healdsburg, California Zip 95448 Sector Renewable Energy, Solar Product Turn-key renewable energy solutions provider specializing in solar electric roofing. References Stellar Energy Solutions Inc[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Stellar Energy Solutions Inc is a company located in Healdsburg, California . References ↑ "Stellar Energy Solutions Inc" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Stellar_Energy_Solutions_Inc&oldid=351700" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes

291

Agri Energy Funding Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agri Energy Funding Solutions Agri Energy Funding Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name Agri-Energy Funding Solutions Place Omaha, Nebraska Zip 68137-2495 Sector Biomass, Wind energy Product AGRI-ENERGY FUNDING SOLUTIONS is a market consultant for BioDiesel, Ethanol as well as Biomass and Wind Energy projects both nationally and internationally and is based in Omaha, Nebraska. References Agri-Energy Funding Solutions[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Agri-Energy Funding Solutions is a company located in Omaha, Nebraska . References ↑ "Agri-Energy Funding Solutions" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Agri_Energy_Funding_Solutions&oldid=341887

292

WM Solutions Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name WM Solutions Inc Place Los Angeles, California Product Owns and operates a landfill gas plant located at Bradley Landfill. References WM Solutions Inc1 LinkedIn...

293

Sandia National Laboratories Information Technology Solutions  

Information Technology Solutions ... applications and market spaces. ... ration, for the United States Department of Energys

294

Static solutions for fourth order gravity  

SciTech Connect

The Lichnerowicz and Israel theorems are extended to higher order theories of gravity. In particular it is shown that Schwarzschild is the unique spherically symmetric, static, asymptotically flat, black-hole solution, provided the spatial curvature is less than the quantum gravity scale outside the horizon. It is then shown that in the presence of matter (satisfying certain positivity requirements), the only static and asymptotically flat solutions of general relativity that are also solutions of higher order gravity are the vacuum solutions.

Nelson, William [Institute of Gravitation and the Cosmos, Penn State University, State College, Pennsylvania 16801 (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

295

A solution manual for Polchinski's "String Theory"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present detailed solutions to 81 of the 202 problems in J. Polchinski's two-volume textbook "String Theory".

Headrick, Matthew

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

A solution manual for Polchinski's "String Theory"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present detailed solutions to 81 of the 202 problems in J. Polchinski's two-volume textbook "String Theory".

Matthew Headrick

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

297

HYDROGEN PRODUCTION BY THE CYANOBACTERIUM PLECTONEMA BORYANUM: EFFECTS OF INITIAL NITRATE CONCENTRATION, LIGHT INTENSITY, AND INHIBITION OF PHOTOSYSTEM II BY DCMU  

SciTech Connect

The alarming rate at which atmospheric carbon dioxide levels are increasing due to the burning of fossil fuels will have incalculable consequences if disregarded. Fuel cells, a source of energy that does not add to carbon dioxide emissions, have become an important topic of study. Although signifi cant advances have been made related to fuel cells, the problem of cheap and renewable hydrogen production still remains. The cyanobacterium Plectonema boryanum has demonstrated potential as a resolution to this problem by producing hydrogen under nitrogen defi cient growing conditions. Plectonema boryanum cultures were tested in a series of experiments to determine the effects of light intensity, initial nitrate concentration, and photosystem II inhibitor DCMU (3-(3,4- dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea) upon hydrogen production. Cultures were grown in sterile Chu. No. 10 medium within photobioreactors constantly illuminated by halogen lights. Because the enzyme responsible for hydrogen production is sensitive to oxygen, the medium was continuously sparged with argon/CO2 (99.7%/0.3% vol/vol) by gas dispersion tubes immersed in the culture. Hydrogen production was monitored by using a gas chromatograph equipped with a thermal conductivity detector. In the initial experiment, the effects of initial nitrate concentration were tested and results revealed cumulative hydrogen production was maximum at an initial nitrate concentration of 1 mM. A second experiment was then conducted at an initial nitrate concentration of 1 mM to determine the effects of light intensity at 50, 100, and 200 ?mole m-2 s-1. Cumulative hydrogen production increased with increasing light intensity. A fi nal experiment, conducted at an initial nitrate concentration of 2 mM, tested the effects of high light intensity at 200 and 400 ?mole m-2 s-1. Excessive light at 400 ?mole m-2 s-1 decreased cumulative hydrogen production. Based upon all experiments, cumulative hydrogen production rates were optimal at an initial nitrate concentration of 1 mM and a light intensity of 100 ?mole m-2 s-1. DCMU was shown in all experiments to severely decrease hydrogen production as time progressed. With the information acquired so far, future experiments with reducing substances could determine maximum rates of hydrogen production. If maximum hydrogen production rates proved to be large enough, Plectonema boryanum could be grown on an industrial scale to provide hydrogen gas as a renewable fuel.

Carter, B.; Huesemann, M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Hardware/Software Solution Unifying DALI, IBECS,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hardware/Software Solution Unifying DALI, IBECS, Hardware/Software Solution Unifying DALI, IBECS, and BACnet Final Report Contributors: Ed Koch (Akua Controls) Francis Rubinstein Sila Kiliccote Report on Hardware/Software Solution Unifying DALI, IBECS, and BACnet 1 Table of Contents Executive Summary................................................................................................................................3 Introduction.............................................................................................................................................4 Context....................................................................................................................................................4 Control Strategies ..............................................................................................................................................

299

Healthcare: Looking for Energy Solutions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Looking for Energy Solutions Turn to an ENERGY STAR ® Service and Product Provider Partner ENERGY STAR Service and Product Providers (SPPs) have the experience and access to the tools needed to implement energy- efficient strategies that are right for you. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Guidelines for Energy Management is a proven strategy developed from ENERGY STAR partner successes. Following the Guidelines, SPPs can help you assess your energy performance, and recommend low-cost upgrades, cost-effective investments, and longer-term strategies that make the most sense for your organization. Working with an ENERGY STAR SPP, your organization can gain control of energy expenses, making it easier to care for your patients, your facilities, and your bottom line. Through improved energy efficiency,

300

Cleantech Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Address 27 W. 60th Street Address 27 W. 60th Street Place New York, New York Zip 10023 Sector Efficiency Product Energy efficiency solutions and consumption monitoring systems for buildings Website http://www.cleantechsolutions. Coordinates 40.769643°, -73.983294° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.769643,"lon":-73.983294,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Regional Transmission Projects: Finding Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Keystone Center convened and facilitated a year-long Dialogue on "Regional Transmission Projects: Finding Solutions" to develop recommendations that will help address the difficult and contentious issues related to expansions of regional electric transmission systems that are needed for reliable and economic transmission of power within and across regions. This effort brought together a cross-section of affected stakeholders and thought leaders to address the problem with the collective wisdom of their experience and interests. Transmission owners sat at the table with consumer advocates and environmental organizations. Representatives from regional transmission organizations exchanged ideas with state and federal regulators. Generation developers explored common interests with public power suppliers. Together, the Dialogue participants developed consensus solutions about how to begin unraveling some of the more intractable issues surrounding identification of need, allocation of costs, and reaching consensus on siting issues that can frustrate the development of regional transmission infrastructure. The recommendations fall into three broad categories: 1. Recommendations on appropriate institutional arrangements and processes for achieving regional consensus on the need for new or expanded transmission infrastructure 2. Recommendations on the process for siting of transmission lines 3. Recommendations on the tools needed to support regional planning, cost allocation, and siting efforts. List of Dialogue participants: List of Dialogue Participants: American Electric Power American Transmission Company American Wind Energy Association California ISO Calpine Corporation Cinergy Edison Electric Institute Environmental Defense Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Great River Energy International Transmission Company ISO-New England Iowa Public Utility Board Kanner & Associates Midwest ISO National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners National Association of State Utility Consumer Advocates National Grid Northeast Utilities PA Office of Consumer Advocates Pacific Gas & Electric Corporation Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission PJM Interconnection The Electricity Consumers Resource Council U.S. Department of Energy US Department of the Interior Van Ness Feldman Western Interstate Energy Board Wind on the Wires Wisconsin Public Service Commission Xcel Energy

The Keystone Center

2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

302

Independent Activity Report, Washington River Protection Solutions -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Washington River Protection Solutions Washington River Protection Solutions - September 2010 Independent Activity Report, Washington River Protection Solutions - September 2010 September 2010 Participation in the Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC Integrated Safety Management System Annual Review The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), participated in the review of the Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC Integrated Safety Management System Annual Review for 2010. The review was conducted during the period of August 23 to September 2, 2010, and focused on six functional areas: corrective action management, work planning and control, radiological protection, environmental protection, emergency preparedness, and

303

Removal of uranium from aqueous HF solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is a simple and effective method for removing uranium from aqueous HF solutions containing trace quantities of the same. The method comprises contacting the solution with particulate calcium fluoride to form uranium-bearing particulates, permitting the particulates to settle, and separting the solution from the settled particulates. The CaF.sub.2 is selected to have a nitrogen surface area in a selected range and is employed in an amount providing a calcium fluoride/uranium weight ratio in a selected range. As applied to dilute HF solutions containing 120 ppm uranium, the method removes at least 92% of the uranium, without introducing contaminants to the product solution.

Pulley, Howard (West Paducah, KY); Seltzer, Steven F. (Paducah, KY)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Removal of uranium from aqueous HF solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This invention is a simple and effective method for removing uranium from aqueous HF solutions containing trace quantities of the same. The method comprises contacting the solution with particulate calcium fluoride to form uranium-bearing particulates, permitting the particulates to settle, and separating the solution from the settled particulates. The CaF2 is selected to have a nitrogen surface area in a selected range and is employed in an amount providing a calcium fluoride/uranium weight ratio in a selected range. As applied to dilute HF solutions containing 120 ppm uranium, the method removes at least 92% of the uranium without introducing contaminants to the product solution.

Pulley, H.; Seltzer, S.F.

1980-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

305

Organic tank safety project: Preliminary results of energetics and thermal behavior studies of model organic nitrate and/or nitrite mixtures and a simulated organic waste  

SciTech Connect

As a result of years of production and recovery of nuclear defense materials and subsequent waste management at the Hanford Site, organic-bearing radioactive high-level wastes (HLW) are currently stored in large (up to 3. ML) single-shell storage tanks (SSTs). Because these wastes contain both fuels (organics) and the oxidants nitrate and nitrite, rapid energetic reactions at certain conditions could occur. In support of Westinghouse Hanford Company`s (WHC) efforts to ensure continued safe storage of these organic- and oxidant-bearing wastes and to define the conditions necessary for reactions to occur, we measured the thermal sensitivities and thermochemical and thermokinetic properties of mixtures of selected organics and sodium nitrate and/or nitrite and a simulated Hanford organic-bearing waste using thermoanalytical technologies. These thermoanalytical technologies are used by chemical reactivity hazards evaluation organizations within the chemical industry to assess chemical reaction hazards.

Scheele, R.D.; Sell, R.L.; Sobolik, J.L.; Burger, L.L.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Enterprise Solar Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Solutions Solar Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name Enterprise Solar Solutions Place New York Sector Solar Product New York-based company that specializes in commercial solar photovoltaic applications for businesses. References Enterprise Solar Solutions[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Enterprise Solar Solutions is a company located in New York . References ↑ "Enterprise Solar Solutions" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Enterprise_Solar_Solutions&oldid=344998" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

307

Global Power Solutions LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Solutions LLC Power Solutions LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Power Solutions LLC Place Colorado Zip CO 80401 Sector Geothermal energy Product String representation "Global Power So ... sition support." is too long. References Global Power Solutions LLC[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Global Power Solutions LLC is a company located in Colorado . References ↑ "Global Power Solutions LLC" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Global_Power_Solutions_LLC&oldid=345917" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link

308

CO2 Global Solutions International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Solutions International Jump to: navigation, search Name CO2 Global Solutions International Place Madrid, Spain Zip 28001 Sector Carbon Product CO2 Global Solutions is a...

309

FACT SHEET: CLEAN ENERGY SOLUTIONS CENTERS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CLEAN ENERGY SOLUTIONS CENTERS CLEAN ENERGY SOLUTIONS CENTERS At the Clean Energy Ministerial in Washington, D.C. on July 19 th and 20 th , ministers launched an initiative to support developing countries in their efforts to implement clean energy policies and programs through the creation of Clean Energy Solution Centers - virtual networks of experts and world-class online tools. The initiative will initially be funded by at least US$50 million in contributions over five years, one-third of which

310

Troubleshooting: NP-hardness and solution methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Troubleshooting is one of the areas where Bayesian Networks are successfully applied [7]. In the present paper we show that the generally defined troubleshooting task is NP-hard. Heuristic algorithms that find an optimal solutions are described. A method approximating the optimal solution within polynomial time is proposed. Approximations provided by different methods are compared with the optimal solutions. The comparisons are performed on models for troubleshooting of laser printers.

Marta Sochorova; Jiri Vomlel

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Solutions for Data Visualization and Image Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 7, 2007 ... The link provided accesses an interactive index of computation, data analysis, and visualization tools by ITT Visual Information Solutions.

312

Sandia National Laboratories Information Technology Solutions ...  

Information Technology Solutions BENEFITS ... of Energys National Nuclear Security Administration under contact DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND #2010-5245P . Author:

313

Sandia National Laboratories Information Technology Solutions ...  

Information Technology Solutions BENEFITS ... United States Department of Energys National Nuclear Security Administration under contact DE-AC04-94AL85000.

314

EnergySolutions Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Place Salt Lake City, Utah Zip 84101 Sector Services Product Utah-based international nuclear services company that provides services and solutions to the nuclear industry....

315

Strategic Biomass Solutions (Mississippi) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Strategic Biomass Solutions (Mississippi) Strategic Biomass Solutions (Mississippi) Strategic Biomass Solutions (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Retail Supplier Utility Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Industry Recruitment/Support Training/Technical Assistance Provider Mississippi Technology Alliance The Strategic Biomass Solutions (SBS) was formed by the Mississippi Technology Alliance in June 2009. The purpose of the SBS is to provide assistance to existing and potential companies, investors and economic developers in the renewable energy sector. It offers companies strategic guidance for making their technology investor ready and connects companies to early stage private capital and available tax incentives. SBS assists

316

Building America Solution Center | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

America America Solution Center Building America Solution Center World-Class Research At Your Fingertips The Building America Solution Center provides residential building professionals with access to expert information on hundreds of high-performance design and construction topics, including air sealing and insulation, HVAC components, windows, indoor air quality, and much more. Explore the Building America Solution Center. The user-friendly interface delivers a variety of resources for each topic, including: Contracting documents and specifications Installation guidance Energy codes and labeling program compliance CAD drawings "Right and wrong" photographs Training videos Climate-specific case studies Technical reports. Users can access content in several ways, including the ENERGY STAR®

317

Troubleshooting: NP-hardness and solution methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Troubleshooting is one of the areas where Bayesian Networks are successfully applied [8]. In the present paper we show that the generally de ned troubleshooting task is NP-hard. Heuristic algorithms that find an optimal solution are described. A new method approximating the optimal solution within polynomial time is proposed. Approximations obtained through two different methods are compared with the optimal solutions. The comparisons are performed on models for troubleshooting of laser printers. We observed that the suboptimal solutions provided by the polynomial methods were not far from the optimal ones.

Marta Vomlelov; Jir Vomlel

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

A Green Solution To Energy Consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, MAX HT Bayer Sodalite Scale Inhibiter: A Green Solution To Energy Consumption. Author(s), Morris E. Lewellyn, Alan Rothenberg, Calvin...

319

Greenleaf Environmental Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solutions Place Buford, Georgia Zip 30518 Sector Services Product full service environmental company providing services such as waste management, remediation, piping...

320

Investigation of Solution Combustion Synthesis and Precipitation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Investigation of Solution Combustion Synthesis and Precipitation Synthesis Conditions on TiO2 and ZnO Nanopowder Characteristics

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Entergy Solutions, Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Entergy Solutions, Ltd Place Connecticut Utility Id 5953 Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC Location NPCC NERC NPCC Yes ISO NE Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes References EIA...

322

NYSEG Solutions Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name NYSEG Solutions Inc Place New York Utility Id 26650 Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC NPCC Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes References...

323

Engineered Solutions: Order (2010-CE-2112)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE issued an Order after entering into a Compromise Agreement with Engineered Solutions, Inc. to resolve a case involving the failure to certify dehumidifier basic model SD109.

324

Information Technology Solutions - Industrial Partnerships Office  

Information Technology Solutions Development and IP Status A patent application, US2006/0115427 Diagno-sis and assessment of skeletal related disease

325

Chemical Warfare Agent Decontamination Solution - Patent 5859064  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... and softens and removes paint.A need exists for a chemical warfare agent decontamination solution which is noncorrosive, nontoxic, nonflammable, ...

326

Biomass to Energy Solutions - National Renewable Energy ...  

ZeroPoint Clean Tech, Inc. Biomass to Energy Solutions 21st NREL Industry Growth Forum Denver, Colorado. October 30, 2008

327

Potline Shutdown and Restart Secured Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Heat Exchanger Solution for Aluminium Off-Gas Cooling and Heat Recovery ... The Effect of Calcium Fluoride on Alumina Solubility in Low Temperature...

328

DG Energy Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

92101 Product Develops owns and operates industrial, commercial and institutional cogeneration plants from 2-50MW. References DG Energy Solutions1 LinkedIn Connections...

329

Washington TRU Solutions Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

managing and operating contractor for the United States Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. References Washington TRU Solutions, Inc.1 LinkedIn...

330

Removal of radioisotopes from waste solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention comprises removing radioisotopes from waste liquids or solutions by passing these through filters and through a column containing a suitable salt of phosphoric acid. (Official Gazette)

Kirby, H.W.

1973-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Optimization Online - Flexible Solutions to Maritime Inventory ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aug 12, 2013 ... Flexible Solutions to Maritime Inventory Routing Problems with Delivery Time Windows. Chengliang Zhang(czhang85 ***at*** gatech.edu)

332

from Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC NEWS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and communications campaign known as "Safety Begins with Me" led by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC (SRNS). Banners are flying over roadways, safety-related stories fill...

333

Weak Solutions for Dislocation Type Equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe recent results obtained by G. Barles, P. Cardaliaguet, R. Monneau and the author recently. They are concerned with nonlocal Eikonal equations arising in the study of the dynamics of dislocation lines in crystals. These equations are nonlocal but also non monotone. We use a notion of weak solution to provide solutions for all time. Then, we discuss the link between these weak solutions and the classical viscosity solutions, and state some uniqueness results in particular cases. A counter-example to uniqueness is given.

Ley, Olivier

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Biodiesel Solutions Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

equipment and accessories to convert used and fresh vegetable oil into clean-burning biodiesel. References Biodiesel Solutions Inc1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

335

Solar Electric Solutions LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Woodland Hills, California Zip 91364 Sector Solar Product California-based developer of solar PV projects. References Solar Electric Solutions, LLC1 LinkedIn Connections...

336

Innovative Energy Solutions Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Innovative Energy Solutions Inc Place Las Vegas, Nevada Zip 89101 Sector Hydro, Hydrogen Product Holds serveral patents related to waste heat recovery, heat generating...

337

Generating Minimally Coupled Einstein-Scalar Field Solutions from Vacuum Solutions with Arbitrary Cosmological Constant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper generalizes two previously known techniques for generating minimally coupled Einstein-scalar field solutions in 4 dimensions; the Buchdahl and Fonarev transformations. By applying this solution generation technique, minimally coupled Einstein-scalar field solutions can be generated from vacuum solutions with arbitrary cosmological constant in arbitrary dimension. The only requirement to a seed solution is that it posesses a hypersurface-orthogonal Killing vector field. The generalization that allows us to use seed solutions with arbitrary cosmological constant uncovers a new class of Einstein-scalar field solutions that has previously not been studied. We apply the new solution transformation to the (A)dS4 vacuum solution. Transforming the resulting Einstein-scalar field solution to the conformal frame, a two-parameter family of spatially finite, expanding and accelerating cosmological solutions are found that are conformally isometric to the Einstein static universe RxS^3. We study null geodesics and find that for any observer, the solution has a cosmological horizon at an angular distance of pi/2 away from the observer. We find that a subset of these solutions can be naturally interpreted as expanding cosmologies in which a scalar black hole is formed at late times. The conformally coupled scalar field satisfies the weak energy condition as long as the energy density is positive, while the strong energy condition is generally violated.

Kjell Tangen

2007-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

338

Nanotechnology-based solutions for oil spills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

acknowledged to be among the worst ocean oil spills in world history. Inevitably, the spill has once againNanotechnology-based solutions for oil spills :: Texas Tech News http://today.ttu.edu/2011/02/nanotechnology-based-solutions-for-oil-spills/[2/23/2011 8:58:19 AM] February 22, 2011 nanowerk - Nanotechnology

Rock, Chris

339

SolSolution | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SolSolution SolSolution Jump to: navigation, search Logo: SolSolution Name SolSolution Address 485 Massachusetts Avenue Suite 300 Place Cambridge, Massachusetts Zip 02139 Sector Solar Year founded 2007 Phone number 805-813-4418 Website http://www.sol-solution.org Coordinates 42.363951°, -71.10122° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.363951,"lon":-71.10122,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

340

Solargen Solutions UK | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UK UK Jump to: navigation, search Name Solargen Solutions UK Place United Kingdom Zip NP 44 3AS Sector Renewable Energy, Solar Product String representation "SolarGen is a E ... s requirements." is too long. References Solargen Solutions UK[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Solargen Solutions UK is a company located in United Kingdom . References ↑ "Solargen Solutions UK" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Solargen_Solutions_UK&oldid=351378" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

PowerIt Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PowerIt Solutions PowerIt Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name PowerIt Solutions Place Seattle, Washington Zip 98104 Product Powerit Solutions provides energy demand response and demand control solutions for industrial and commercial applications. Coordinates 47.60356°, -122.329439° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.60356,"lon":-122.329439,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

342

Export.gov - Export.gov - Solutions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solutions Solutions Print | E-mail Page Solutions International Sales-Marketing International Finance International Logistics Licenses & Regulations Trade Data & Analysis Trade Problems Solutions International Sales-Marketing With offices in more than 100 U.S. cities and 80 countries across the globe, the U.S. government offers U.S. companies exporting information, advice and cost-effective end-to-end international business solutions. Whether you are new to international sales, trying to enter a new market or looking to expand your business in a specific market we have a variety of services available to help you. International Finance International finance includes not only financing, but also insurance that can cover export transactions and overseas investments and grants to help

343

PROCESSES OF RECLAIMING URANIUM FROM SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for reclaiming residual enriched uranium from calutron wash solutions containing Fe, Cr, Cu, Ni, and Mn as impurities. The solution is adjusted to a pH of between 2 and 4 and is contacted with a metallic reducing agent, such as iron or zinc, in order to reduce the copper to metal and thereby remove it from the solution. At the same time the uranium present is reduced to the uranous state The solution is then contacted with a precipitate of zinc hydroxide or barium carbonate in order to precipitate and carry uranium, iron, and chromium away from the nickel and manganese ions in the solution. The uranium is then recovered fronm this precipitate.

Zumwalt, L.R.

1959-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

344

Janus solutions in M-theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a one-parameter deformation of the AdS_{4} x S^{7} vacuum, which is a regular solution in M-theory, invariant under SO(2,2) x SO(4) x SO(4), and which preserves 16 supersymmetries. The solution corresponds to a holographic realization of a Janus-like interface/defect theory, despite the absence of a dilaton in M-theory. The 2+1-dimensional CFT dual results from the maximally symmetric CFT through the insertion of a dimension 2 operator which is localized along a 1+1-dimensional linear interface/defect, thereby partially breaking the superconformal symmetry. The solution admits a regular ABJM reduction to a quotient solution which is invariant under SO(2,2) x SO(4) x U(1)^2, preserves 12 supersymmetries, and provides a Janus-like interface/defect solution in ABJM theory.

D'Hoker, Eric; Gutperle, Michael; Krym, Darya

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Uranium at Y-12: Recovery | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery Recovery Uranium at Y-12: Recovery Posted: July 22, 2013 - 3:44pm | Y-12 Report | Volume 10, Issue 1 | 2013 Recovery involves reclaiming uranium from numerous sources and configurations and handling uranium in almost any form, including oxides and liquids (see A Rich Resource Requires Recovery). Y-12 has the equipment and expertise to recover uranium that is present in filters, wipes, mop water and elsewhere. For many salvage materials, the uranium is extracted and then manipulated into a uranyl nitrate solution, purified and chemically converted through several stages. Then it is reduced to a mass of uranium metal. This mass, called a button, is used in casting operations. The chemical operators who recover and purify uranium understand and monitor complex chemical reactions, flow rates, temperatures

346

CX-003632: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3632: Categorical Exclusion Determination 3632: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003632: Categorical Exclusion Determination Analysis of Evaporator Scale Sample CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/10/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office We will perform an analysis of samples of scale removed from the Gravity Drain Line (GDL) and the pot of the 2H Evaporator. The analysis will support the development of a Nuclear Criticality Safety Analysis (NCSA) for evaporator operation and chemical cleaning. Previous chemical cleaning operations were performed using a nitric acid flow sheet that involved copious amounts of depleted uranyl nitrate used as a neutron poison. Current interest and focus is on a chemical cleaning operation involving only a sodium hydroxide solution. Therefore, testing will involve

347

TO  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

J. fhith, Chief, J. fhith, Chief, TO : Hew Pork Operations Branoh, D*TE: July 10, 1951 ! I FROM : 'Russell H. BdcL, Chief, Research Service Branch, Berkeley &~'?A - wp+=q - 'I s , This Br'ea desires 500 pounds of U03 for research work on the TTA /: axtraotion process where the subjeot materisl will be spiked with Pu to make a synthetio solution for pilot plant runs. , It is desired that the material be obtained from the Msllinckrodt Chemical Works.similar to that prooured for this Area in 1950 on SR-1649 under the code number: Chemical 42-17, Grade A. It is not presently known whether the code number refers to the uranyl nitrate which was originally ordered or tc the UO3 which was actually reoeived. desired. In any event it is the oxid,? which is presently

348

SUMMARY TECHNICAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD JULY 1, 1956 TO SEPTEMBER 1, 1956  

SciTech Connect

The activities of the Technical Division, including the HNO/sub 3/ recovery process, a study of UO/sub 3/ factors as related to the production of metal-grade UF/sub 4/, a thermobalance investigation of starch as a reducing agent for UO/sub 3/, reduction of UF/sub 4/ to uranium by a thermite type reaction, melting and casting of Nb-U alloy, uranium recovery from scrap materials, preparation of uranium shot, cal cium reduction of ThO/sub 2/ production of thorium ingots, "wet chemical" and spectrochemical development, ammonia precipitation and filtration studies from uranyl nitrate solutions and preparation of active UO/sub 2/ from UF/sub 6/ are reviewed. (W.L.H.)

Simmons, J.W. ed.

1956-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

349

Environmental Microbiology (2002) 4(9), 510-516 Multip,le influences of nitrate on uranium solubility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the sulfate was depleted, U(VI) was reduced but there was no cell growth. Addition of as much as S mM uranium(VI) to U(IV) precipitates uranium from solution,D. desulfuricansmight be a usefulorganismfor recovering uranium from contaminatedwaters and wastestreams. Microbial reduction of soluble U(VI) to insoluble U

Lovley, Derek

350

Disposition of highly enriched uranium obtained from the Republic of Kazakhstan. Environmental assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EA assesses the potential environmental impacts associated with DOE`s proposal to transport 600 kg of Kazakhstand-origin HEU from Y-12 to a blending site (B&W Lynchburg or NFS Erwin), transport low-enriched UF6 blending stock from a gaseous diffusion plant to GE Wilmington and U oxide blending stock to the blending site, blending the HEU and uranium oxide blending stock to produce LEU in the form of uranyl nitrate, and transport the uranyl nitrate from the blending site to USEC Portsmouth.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Nitrates/Nitrites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Corrosion rates of iron-base alloys in eutectic molten salt mixtures...Stainless steel μm/yr mils/yr μm/yr mils/yr NaNO 3 -NaCl-Na 2 SO 4 (86.3,8.4,5.3 mol%, respectively) 15 0.6 1 0.03 KNO 3 -KCl (94.6 mol%, respectively) 23 0.9 7.5 0.3 LiCl-KCl (58.42 mol%, respectively) 63 2.5 20 0.8...

352

Heterogeneous Reduction of U6+ by Structural Fe2+ From Theory and Experiment  

SciTech Connect

Computational and experimental studies were performed to explore heterogeneous reduction of U6+ by structural Fe2+ at magnetite (Fe3O4) surfaces. Molecular Fe-Fe-U models representing a uranyl species adsorbed in a biatomic bidentate fashion to an iron surface group were constructed. Various possible charge distributions in this model surface complex were evaluated in terms of their relative stabilities and electron exchange rates using ab initio molecular orbital methods. Freshly-cleaved, single crystals of magnetite with different initial Fe2+/Fe3+ ratios were exposed to uranyl-nitrate solution (pH ~ 4) for 90 hours. X ray photoelectron spectroscopy and electron microscopy indicated the presence of a mixed U6+/U5+ precipitate heterogeneously nucleated and grown on stoichiometric magnetite surfaces, but only the presence of sorbed U6+ and no precipitate on sub-stoichiometric magnetite surfaces. Calculated electron transfer rates indicate that sequential multi-electron uranium reduction is not kinetically limited by conductive electron resupply to the adsorption site. Both theory and experiment point to local structural Fe2+ density and sterically accessible uranium coordination environments as key controls on uranium reduction extent and rate. Uranium incorporation in solid phases where its coordination is constrained to the 6-fold uranate type should widen the stability field of U5+ relative to U6+. If uranium cannot acquire 8 fold coordination then reduction may proceed to U5+ but not necessarily U4+.

Skomurski, Frances N.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Arey, Bruce W.; Rosso, Kevin M.

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

Materials Solutions for Hydrogen Delivery in Pipelines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solutions for Solutions for Hydrogen Delivery in Pipelines Dr. Subodh K. Das Secat, Inc. September 26, 2007 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Project Team SECAT (KY) Project Manager Oregon Steel Mills (OR) Steel Pipe Producer Columbia Gas of Kentucky (KY) NG transporter Schott North America (PA) Glass coatings supplier Chemical Composite Coatings (GA) Composites coatings Advanced Technology Corp. (TN) ABI technology provider ASME (NY) Codes and Standards DGS Metallurgical Solutions (OR) Steel consulting University of Illinois (IL) Basic embrittlement studies Oak Ridge National Laboratory (TN) Applied research Objective and Deliverables Objective: ∑ Develop materials technologies to minimize embrittlement of

354

Separation of metal ions from aqueous solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a process and apparatus for quantitatively and selectively separating metal ions from mixtures thereof in aqueous solution. The apparatus includes, in combination, a horizontal electrochemical flowing cell containing flowing bulk electrolyte solution and an aqueous, metal ion-containing solution, the cell containing a metal mesh working electrode, a counter electrode positioned downstream from the working electrode, an independent variable power supply/potentiostat positioned outside of the flowing cell and connected to the electrodes, and optionally a detector such as a chromatographic detector, positioned outside the flowing cell. This apparatus and its operation has significant application where trace amounts of metal ions are to be separated.

Almon, A.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

355

Oscillation Solutions to Solar Neutrino Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current status of oscillation solutions to the Solar Neutrino Problem is reviewed. Four oscillation solutions are discussed in the light of 708d Superkamiokande data: MSW, Just-So VO, VO with Energy-Independent Suppression (EIS) and Resonant-Spin-Flavor-Precession (RSFP). Only EIS VO is strongly disfavoured by the global rates, mostly due to the Homestake data. Vacuum oscillations give an interesting solution which explains high-energy excess of events observed by Superkamiokande and predicts {\\em semi-annual} seasonal variation of $Be$-neutrino flux. There are indications to these variations in the GALLEX and Homestake data. No direct evidence for oscillation is found yet.

V. Berezinsky

1999-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

356

Oscillation solutions to solar neutrino problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current status of oscillation solutions to the Solar Neutrino Problem is reviewed. Four oscillation solutions are discussed in the light of 708d Superkamiokande data: MSW, Just-So VO, VO with Energy-Independent Suppression (EIS) and Resonant-Spin-Flavor-Precession (RSFP). Only EIS VO is strongly disfavoured by the global rates, mostly due to the Homestake data. Vacuum oscillations give an interesting solution which explains high-energy excess of events observed by Superkamiokande and predicts {\\em semi-annual} seasonal variation of $Be$-neutrino flux. There are indications to these variations in the GALLEX and Homestake data. No direct evidence for oscillation is found yet.

Berezinsky, Veniamin Sergeevich

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Energy Distribution of Black Plane Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use the Einstein energy-momentum complex to calculate the energy distribution of static plane-symmetric solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell equations in 3+1 dimensions with asymptotic anti-de Sitter behavior. This solution is expressed in terms of three parameters: the mass, electric charge and cosmological constant. We compare the energy distribution to that of the Reissner-Nordstrom-anti-de Sitter solution, pointing to qualitative differences between the models. Finally, we examine these results within the context of the Cooperstock hypothesis.

Paul Halpern

2005-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

358

Reduction of Nitrate in Shewanella oneidensis depends on atypical NAP and NRF systems with NapB as a preferred electron transport protein from CymA to NapA  

SciTech Connect

In the genome of Shewanella oneidensis, a napDAGHB gene cluster encoding periplasmic nitrate reductase (NapA) and accessory proteins and an nrfA gene encoding periplasmic nitrite reductase (NrfA) have been identified. These two systems seem to be atypical because the genome lacks genes encoding cytoplasmic membrane electron transport proteins, NapC for NAP and NrfBCD/NrfH for NRF, respectively. Here, we present evidence that reduction of nitrate to ammonium in S. oneidensis is carried out by these atypical systems in a two-step manner. Transcriptional and mutational analyses suggest that CymA, a cytoplasmic membrane electron transport protein, is likely to be the functional replacement of both NapC and NrfH in S. oneidensis. Surprisingly, a strain devoid of napB encoding the small subunit of nitrate reductase exhibited the maximum cell density sooner than the wild type. Further characterization of this strain showed that nitrite was not detected as a free intermediate in its culture and NapB provides a fitness gain for S. oneidensis to compete for nitrate in the environments. On the basis results from mutational analyses of napA, napB, nrfA and napBnrfA in-frame deletion mutants, we propose that NapB is able to favor nitrate reduction by routing electrons to NapA exclusively.

Gao, Haichun; Yang, Zamin; Barua, Soumitra; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Tiedje, James M.; Zhou, Jizhong

2009-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

359

Concentration of perrhenate and pertechnetate solutions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method of preparing a concentrated solution of a carrier-free radioisotope which includes the steps of: a. providing a generator column loaded with a composition containing a parent radioisotope; b. eluting the generator column with an eluent solution which includes a salt of a weak acid to elute a target daughter radioisotope from the generator column in a first eluate. c. eluting a cation-exchange column with the first eluate to exchange cations of the salt for hydrogen ions and to elute the target daughter radioisotope and a weak acid in a second eluate; d. eluting an anion-exchange column with the second eluate to trap and concentrate the target daughter radioisotope and to elute the weak acid solution therefrom; and e. eluting the concentrated target daughter radioisotope from the anion-exchange column with a saline solution.

Knapp, Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Beets, Arnold L. (Clinton, TN); Mirzadeh, Saed (Knoxville, TN); Guhlke, Stefan (Bonn, DE)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Westinghouse TRU Solutions Launches New Web Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TRU Solutions LLC Launches New Web Site TRU Solutions LLC Launches New Web Site CARLSBAD, N.M., February 2, 2001 - Westinghouse TRU Solutions LLC (WTS) today launched its new Web site. WTS is the new management and operating contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The Web site, www.trusolutionsnm.com, is designed to provide up-to-date information about WTS and establish a mechanism for receiving feedback. "We want to make the transition to the new company as smooth as possible," said Hank Herrera, WTS President and General Manager. "The Web site enables us to effectively communicate the WTS role, objectives, and challenges to employees, clients, elected officials, and other stakeholders." The Web site contains sections about the formation of TRU Solutions, the new

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Island Energy Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Island Energy Solutions Island Energy Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name Island Energy Solutions Place Kailua, Hawaii Zip 96734 Product Island Energy Solutions, Inc. is an electrical contracting company, based out of Kailua, Oahu, Hawaii. Coordinates 21.396572°, -157.740068° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":21.396572,"lon":-157.740068,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

362

Chevron Energy Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Solutions Energy Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Chevron Energy Solutions Name Chevron Energy Solutions Address 345 California Street, 18th Floor Place San Francisco, California Zip 94111 Sector Solar Website http://www.chevronenergy.com/ Coordinates 37.79304°, -122.400491° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.79304,"lon":-122.400491,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

363

Building Science Solutions … Faster and Better  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

eere.energy.gov eere.energy.gov Webinar questions should be directed to: basc@pnnl.gov 2 | Building America eere.energy.gov Building Science Solutions - Faster and Better Sam Rashkin Michael Baechler Linda Connell Building America Solution Center October 11, 2012 3 | Building America eere.energy.gov Building America Solution Center Overview 4 | Building America eere.energy.gov World Class Research... ... at Your Finger Tips 5 | Building America eere.energy.gov Is: Easy Access to World-Class Research: * Guidance for Applying Targeted Energy Measures * Tool for Users to Prepare Customized Project Content * Source for Proven Performance * Link to Full References Is Not: * Design Tool for Customized Energy Packages What the DOE Building America Solution Center 'Is' & 'Is Not'

364

Composite Tower Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solutions Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name Composite Tower Solutions Place Provo, Utah Zip 84604 Sector Wind energy Product Composite Tower Solutions manufactures equipment for wind resource assessment needs, including meteorological towers, weather towers, and data collection and instrumentation towers. Coordinates 40.233765°, -111.668509° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.233765,"lon":-111.668509,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

365

Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly ({gamma}-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly ({gamma}-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

Jackson, P.J.; Delhaize, E.; Robinson, N.J.; Unkefer, C.J.; Furlong, C.

1988-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

366

Sustainability using M2M Solutions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustainability using M2M Solutions NOTICE Due to the current lapse of federal funding, Berkeley Lab websites are accessible, but may not be updated until Congress approves funds...

367

Free Solutions of the Barotropic Vorticity Equation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a variational procedure, we numerically search for steady solutions to the unforced, inviscid barotropic vorticity equation on the sphere. The algorithm produces many states that have extremely small tendencies within the triangular 15 ...

Grant Branstator; J. D. Opsteegh

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Multigrid Solution of the Semigeostrophic Invertibility Relation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In semigeostrophic theory one can recover the balanced wind and mass fields from the potential vorticity by solving a nonlinear elliptic boundary-value problem. This paper describes the efficient solution of this invertibility relation in two ...

Scott R. Fulton

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Proposals for Solutions to Problems Related  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reduction Emission Technologies (Propositions de solutions aux problmes lis lutilisation de F-34 (SFP) et de diesel haute teneur en soufre pour le matriel terrestre disposant de technologies avances de rduction des missions)

High Sulphur Diesel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Radiation Chemistry of MTBE in Aqueous Solution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methyl-tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE) in Aqueous Solution Stephen P. Mezyk, Jace Jones, William J. Cooper, Thomas Tobien, Michael G. Nickelsen, J. Wesley Adams, Kevin E. O'Shea, David M....

371

Scaling cosmological solutions with Horndeski Lagrangian  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We find the most general coupled scalar field Lagrangian linear in $\\Box\\phi$ and with a general kinetic term that contains cosmological scaling solutions, i.e. solutions on which the ratio of matter to field density and the equation of state remains constant. Scaling solutions of this kind may help solving the coincidence problem since in this case the presently observed ratio of matter to dark energy does not depend on initial conditions but rather on the theoretical parameters. Extending previous results we find that it is impossible to join in a single solution a matter era and the scaling attractor. This is an additional step towards finding the most general scaling Lagrangian within the Horndeski class, i.e. general scalar-tensor models with second order equations of motion.

Gomes, A R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Solar's Solutions for System Administrators, 2 edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From the Publisher:Solaris Solutions, Second Edition, teaches experienced Solaris system administrators time-saving tips, techniques, and workarounds. The book doesn't teach the basics; instead it shows how to work smarter and avoid the ...

Sandra L. Henry-Stocker; Evan R. Marks

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

Jackson, Paul J. (Los Alamos, NM); Delhaize, Emmanuel (Los Alamos, NM); Robinson, Nigel J. (Durham, GB2); Unkefer, Clifford J. (Los Alamos, NM); Furlong, Clement (Seattle, WA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat unit for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heayv metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

Jackson, Paul J. (both Los Alamos, NM); Delhaize, Emmanuel (both Los Alamos, NM); Robinson, Nigel J. (Durham, GB2); Unkefer, Clifford J. (Los Alamos, NM); Furlong, Clement (Seattle, WA)

1990-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

375

Plant Biomass Characterization: Application of Solution- and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant Biomass Characterization: Application of Solution- and Solid-state NMR Spectroscopy Yunqiao Pu 1,3 , Bassem Hallac 2,3 and Arthur J. Ragauskas 1,2,3 1 Georgia Institute of...

376

Solution to the Dark Energy Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I present a simple, and hopefully convincing, discussion of a solution to the dark energy problem, which arises because the visible universe is well approximated by a black hole.

Frampton, Paul Howard

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

TrueWind Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Center Partnership Year 2003 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now TrueWind Solutions is a company located in Albany, NY. References...

378

E3 Regenesis Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Place Foster City, California Zip 94404 Product A California-based company developing waste-to-energy projects in the southern US. References E3 Regenesis Solutions1 LinkedIn...

379

Lightweight Steel Solutions for Automotive Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, improvement in fuel efficiency and safety has become the biggest issue in worldwide automotive industry. Although the regulation of environment and safety has been tightened up more and more, the majority of vehicle bodies are still manufactured from stamped steel components. This means that the optimized steel solutions enable to demonstrate its ability to reduce body weight with high crashworthiness performance instead of expensive light weight materials such as Al, Mg and composites. To provide the innovative steel solutions for automotive industry, POSCO has developed AHSS and its application technologies, which is directly connected to EVI activities. EVI is a technical cooperation program with customer covering all stages of new car project from design to mass production. Integrated light weight solutions through new forming technologies such as TWB, hydroforming and HPF are continuously developed and provided for EVI activities. This paper will discuss the detailed status of these technologies especially light weight steel solutions based on innovative technologies.

Lee, Hong Woo; Kim, Gyosung; Park, Sung Ho [Technical Research Laboratories, POSCO, 699, Gumho-dong, Gwangyang-si, Jeonnam, 545-090 (Korea, Republic of)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

Building Technologies Office: Building America Solution Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solution Center Solution Center World-Class Research At Your Fingertips The Building America Solution Center provides residential building professionals with access to expert information on hundreds of high-performance design and construction topics, including air sealing and insulation, HVAC components, windows, indoor air quality, and much more. Explore the Building America Solution Center. The user-friendly interface delivers a variety of resources for each topic, including: Contracting documents and specifications Installation guidance Energy codes and labeling program compliance CAD drawings "Right and wrong" photographs Training videos Climate-specific case studies Technical reports. Users can access content in several ways, including the ENERGY STAR® checklists, alphabetical lists, a house diagram with selectable components, and an information map. Logged-in users can quickly save any of these elements into their personal Field Kit.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Public Energy Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Solutions Energy Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name Public Energy Solutions Place Englewood, New Jersey Zip 7631 Product Public Energy Solutions was previously the lighting division of PSEG Energy Technologies, now it is part of Comvergeâ€(tm)s Alternative Energy Resources Group. Coordinates 35.425805°, -84.487497° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.425805,"lon":-84.487497,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

382

Iterative solutions to the Dirac equation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a single particle which is bound by a central potential and obeys the Dirac equation in d dimensions. We first apply the asymptotic iteration method to recover the known exact solutions for the pure Coulomb case. For a screened-Coulomb potential and for a Coulomb plus linear potential with linear scalar confinement, the method is used to obtain accurate approximate solutions for both eigenvalues and wave functions.

Hakan Ciftci; Richard L. Hall; Nasser Saad

2005-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

383

Advanced Dehumidification and Humidity Control Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical brief explains the foundation of conventional, advanced, and emerging technologies for humidity control in air-conditioned buildings in easy-to-understand language for utility executives as well as end-users. It also describes new packaged solutions that integrate vapor compression cooling and desiccant dehumidification technologies in creative ways to offer more energy efficient solutions for applications in existing or new construction, especially in humid climates.

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

384

ENDF/B-VII.0, ENDF/B-VI, JEFF-3.1, AND JENDL-3.3 RESULTS FOR UNREFLECTED PLUTONIUM SOLUTIONS AND MOX LATTICES (U)  

SciTech Connect

Previous studies have indicated that ENDF/B-VII preliminary releases {beta}-2 and {beta}-3, predecessors to the recent initial release of ENDF/B-VII.0, produce significantly better overall agreement with criticality benchmarks than does ENDF/B-VI. However, one of those studies also suggests that improvements still may be needed for thermal plutonium cross sections. The current study substantiates that concern by examining criticality benchmarks for unreflected spheres of plutonium-nitrate solutions and for slightly and heavily borated mixed-oxide (MOX) lattices. Results are presented for the JEFF-3.1 and JENDL-3.3 nuclear data libraries as well as ENDF/B-VII.0 and ENDF/B-VI. It is shown that ENDF/B-VII.0 tends to overpredict reactivity for thermal plutonium benchmarks over at least a portion of the thermal range. In addition, it is found that additional benchmark data are needed for the deep thermal range.

MOSTELLER, RUSSELL D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2007-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

385

Studies on lanthanoid complexes of open chain multidentate ligands. VIII. Preparation and structural characterization of the undecacoordinate complex of neodymium nitrate with N,N{prime}-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)tetraglycollic diamide  

SciTech Connect

The title compound [Nd(L)(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}]2CH{sub 3}CN was formed by reaction of neodymium nitrate with N,N{prime}-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)tetraglycollic diamide (L). The complex crystallizes in the monoclinic system, space group Cc with Z = 4, a = 21.305(6), b = 11.470(4), c = 14.436(3) {angstrom}, {beta} = 97.41(2), V = 3498(2) {angstrom}{sup 3}. The pentadentate organic ligand wraps around the neodymium ion which is also bonded to three bidentate nitrate groups, achieving uncommon undecacoordination with the following mean bond lengths: Nd-O(etheric), 2.703; Nd-O(carbonyl), 2.518; Nd-O(nitrate), 2.546 {angstrom}. 18 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Zhijian Liang; Xinmin Gan; Ning Tang; Minyu Tan [Lanzhou Univ. (China); Kaibei Yu [Chengdu Centre of Analysis (China); Ganzu Tan [Lanzhou Institute of chemical Physics Academia Sinica (China)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

386

Analytic solutions of an unclassified artifact /  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the technical detail for analytic solutions for the inner and outer profiles of the unclassified CMM Test Artifact (LANL Part Number 157Y-700373, 5/03/2001) in terms of radius and polar angle. Furthermore, analytic solutions are derived for the legacy Sheffield measurement hardware, also in terms of radius and polar angle, using part coordinates, i.e., relative to the analytic profile solutions obtained. The purpose of this work is to determine the exact solution for the cosine correction term inherent to measurement with the Sheffield hardware. The cosine correction is required in order to interpret the actual measurements taken by the hardware in terms of an actual part definition, or knot-point spline definition, that typically accompanies a component drawing. Specifically, there are two portions of the problem: first an analytic solution must be obtained for any point on the part, e.g., given the radii and the straight lines that define the part, it is required to find an exact solution for the inner and outer profile for any arbitrary polar angle. Next, the problem of the inspection of this part must be solved, i.e., given an arbitrary sphere (representing the inspection hardware) that comes in contact with the part (inner and outer profiles) at any arbitrary polar angle, it is required to determine the exact location of that intersection. This is trivial for the case of concentric circles. In the present case, however, the spherical portion of the profiles is offset from the defined center of the part, making the analysis nontrivial. Here, a simultaneous solution of the part profiles and the sphere was obtained.

Trent, Bruce C.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

An Exact Analytical Solution for Raindrop Collision Rate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An exact solution was found for the rate of collisions between raindrops by integrating over a finite drop size range. Collision rates computed from this solution were compared to those computed from a solution obtained by integrating over an ...

Robert R. Czys; Kung Chyun Tang

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Clean-Energy-Solutions-Centers-Fact-Sheet.pdf | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean-Energy-Solutions-Centers-Fact-Sheet.pdf Clean-Energy-Solutions-Centers-Fact-Sheet.pdf Clean-Energy-Solutions-Centers-Fact-Sheet.pdf More Documents & Publications Clean Energy...

389

On the analytic solutions of the nonhomogeneous Blasius problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article a totally analytic solution of the nonhomogeneous Blasius problem is obtained using the homotopy analysis method (HAM). This solution converges for 0= Keywords: 65-xx, Analytic solution, Blasius problem, Homotopy analysis method

Fathi M. Allan; Muhammed I. Syam

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

SolarOne Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SolarOne Solutions SolarOne Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name SolarOne Solutions Address 354 Waverly Street Place Framingham, Massachusetts Zip 01702 Sector Solar Product Solar powered lighting Website http://www.solarone.net/ Coordinates 42.276902°, -71.413567° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.276902,"lon":-71.413567,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

391

Groom Energy Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Groom Energy Solutions Groom Energy Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name Groom Energy Solutions Address 96 Swampscott Road Place Salem, Massachusetts Zip 01970 Sector Efficiency Product Design, engineering and installation of energy efficiency technologies Website http://www.groomenergy.com/ Coordinates 42.494518°, -70.921074° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.494518,"lon":-70.921074,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

392

M S Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solutions Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name M/S Solutions Place Burdwan, West Bengal, India Sector Biomass Product Burdwan-based biomass cogenration project developer. Coordinates 23.24181°, 87.847038° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":23.24181,"lon":87.847038,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

393

EQuilibrium Solutions Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EQuilibrium Solutions Inc EQuilibrium Solutions Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name eQuilibrium Solutions Inc Place Boston, Massachusetts Zip 2215 Sector Carbon, Efficiency Product Boston-based privately owned carbon management and energy efficiency software developer. Coordinates 42.358635°, -71.056699° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.358635,"lon":-71.056699,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

394

Atlas Material Testing Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Atlas Material Testing Solutions Atlas Material Testing Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name Atlas Material Testing Solutions Place Chicago, IL Zip 60613 Website http://atlas-mts.com/ Coordinates 41.9529209°, -87.6605791° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.9529209,"lon":-87.6605791,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

395

Atlantic Energy Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Solutions Energy Solutions Place Foxboro, Massachusetts Sector Efficiency, Renewable Energy Product Atlantic Energy Solutions provides energy auditing for its customers and developers renewable energy projects to help reduce energy costs and increase demand efficiency. Coordinates 46.498115°, -92.289219° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.498115,"lon":-92.289219,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

396

First Carbon Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Solutions Carbon Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name First Carbon Solutions Place Bethesda, Maryland Product To be completed... Coordinates 40.020185°, -81.073819° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.020185,"lon":-81.073819,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

397

Cleantech Solutions (Colorado) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Cleantech Solutions Name Cleantech Solutions Address 1898 S. Flatiron Ct. Place Boulder, Colorado Zip 80301 Sector Efficiency Product Energy efficiency solutions and consumption monitoring systems for buildings Website http://www.cleantechsolutions. Coordinates 40.020175°, -105.21797° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.020175,"lon":-105.21797,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

398

Chevron Energy Solutions Company ESCO Qualification Sheet  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chevron Energy Solutions Company, Chevron Energy Solutions Company, a Division of Chevron U.S.A. Inc. ESCO Qualification Sheet DOE Super ESPC Introduction to Chevron Energy Solutions Chevron is a $165 billion U.S. Fortune 3 company employing more than 64,000 professionals in 180 countries. With a Standard and Poor's AA investment-grade credit rating, it is the second-largest U.S.-based energy company and the fourth largest publicly-traded integrated energy company in the world, based on market capitalization. Established in 2000, Chevron ES is one of the most reputable and successful energy services companies in the market, having completed nearly $2 billion in performance contracts with a current annual guaranteed savings portfolio of nearly $317 million. Chevron ES offers customized, comprehensive products and services that help

399

GE Appliances and Lighting Home Energy Solutions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GE Appliances and Lighting GE Appliances and Lighting Home Energy Solutions Introduction to Devices with Brillion(tm) Technology Portfolio of Products 3 GE Appliances and Lighting All Rights Reserved Brillion(tm) Suite of Home Energy Solutions Nucleus(tm) Smart Meter Other Devices Internet IHD Other Devices PCT Non-Meter Solution GE DRMS GEA Server 4 GE Appliances and Lighting All Rights Reserved Nucleus(tm) energy manager with Brillion(tm) technology Consumers can reduce electric usage by an average of 5% per year. 5 GE Appliances and Lighting All Rights Reserved GE Profile Appliances enabled with Brillion(tm) technology Delayed defrost during peak Delayed starts and temperature adjustments during peak Delayed start until off- peak Reduced energy usage 60%, DR- enabled Reduced wattage during peak When coupled with the Nucleus and a TOU

400

New Grid Energy Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grid Energy Solutions Grid Energy Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name New Grid Energy Solutions Address 3704 Macomb St Place Washington DC Zip 20016 Sector Biomass, Buildings, Efficiency, Geothermal energy, Services, Solar Product Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Services Number of employees 1-10 Website http://new-grid.com/ Coordinates 38.933282°, -77.072885° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.933282,"lon":-77.072885,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Eco Sustainable Solutions Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sustainable Solutions Ltd Sustainable Solutions Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Eco Sustainable Solutions Ltd Place Dorset, United Kingdom Zip BH23 6BG Sector Biomass Product Focused on organics recycling; setting up a biomass plant. Coordinates 43.253785°, -73.097705° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.253785,"lon":-73.097705,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

402

Enisolar Energy Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Enisolar Energy Solutions Enisolar Energy Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name Enisolar Energy Solutions Place Istanbul, Turkey Sector Wind energy Product Turkey-based wind, PV, and hybrid system integrator; also provides consultancy. Coordinates 41.040855°, 28.986183° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.040855,"lon":28.986183,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

403

Cleantech Solutions (Massachusetts) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solutions Solutions Address 276 Washington Street Place Boston, Massachusetts Zip 02108 Sector Efficiency Product Energy efficiency solutions and consumption monitoring systems for buildings Website http://www.cleantechsolutions. Coordinates 42.3575563°, -71.0581254° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.3575563,"lon":-71.0581254,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

404

Eco Power Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Solutions Power Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name Eco Power Solutions Place Quincy, Massachusetts Zip 2169 Product Massachusetts-based, energy recovery and emission control technology developer. Coordinates 47.237515°, -119.853309° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.237515,"lon":-119.853309,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

405

Cascade Sierra Solutions CSS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sierra Solutions CSS Sierra Solutions CSS Jump to: navigation, search Name Cascade Sierra Solutions (CSS) Place Coburg, Oregon Zip 97408-1313 Product Oregon-based, non-profit organization dedicated to saving fuel and reducing emissions from heavy-duty diesel engines. Coordinates 50.263202°, 10.966202° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":50.263202,"lon":10.966202,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

406

Energy Climate Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Solutions Climate Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name Energy Climate Solutions Place Waltham, Massachusetts Zip 02453-5339 Sector Efficiency Product Massachusetts-based third party finance arranger and developer of distributed power, cogeneration, and energy efficiency projects for colleges and universities. Coordinates 44.126439°, -73.213733° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.126439,"lon":-73.213733,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

407

EM Energy Solutions Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EM Energy Solutions Ltd EM Energy Solutions Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name EM Energy Solutions Ltd Place London, United Kingdom Zip NW3 5QY Product Consultant specialising in the development and financing of REE businesses, in Europe and the Emerging Markets. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

408

Prime BioSolutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prime BioSolutions Prime BioSolutions Jump to: navigation, search Name Prime BioSolutions Place Omaha, Nebraska Zip 68137 Product Ethanol and biogas producer using the closed-loop system. Coordinates 33.180954°, -94.743294° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.180954,"lon":-94.743294,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

409

Cadmium zinc sulfide by solution growth  

SciTech Connect

A process for depositing thin layers of a II-VI compound cadmium zinc sulfide (CdZnS) by an aqueous solution growth technique with quality suitable for high efficiency photovoltaic or other devices which can benefit from the band edge shift resulting from the inclusion of Zn in the sulfide. A first solution comprising CdCl.sub.2 2.5H.sub.2 O, NH.sub.4 Cl, NH.sub.4 OH and ZnCl.sub.2, and a second solution comprising thiourea ((NH.sub.2).sub.2 CS) are combined and placed in a deposition cell, along with a substrate to form a thin i.e. 10 nm film of CdZnS on the substrate. This process can be sequentially repeated with to achieve deposition of independent multiple layers having different Zn concentrations.

Chen, Wen S. (Seattle, WA)

1992-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

410

The Schwarzschild solution in the DGP model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the Schwarzschild solution in the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati (DGP) model. We obtain a perturbative expansion and find the explicit form of the lowest-order contribution. By keeping off-diagonal terms in the metric, we arrive at a perturbative expansion which is valid both far from and near the Schwarzschild radius. We calculate the lowest-order contribution explicitly and obtain the form of the metric both on the brane and in the bulk. As we approach the Schwarzschild radius, the perturbative expansion yields the standard four-dimensional Schwarzschild solution on the brane which is non-singular in the decoupling limit. This non-singular behavior is similar to the Vainshtein solution in massive gravity demonstrating the absence of the van Dam-Veltman-Zakharov (vDVZ) discontinuity in the DGP model.

Chad Middleton; George Siopsis

2003-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

411

ConEdison Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ConEdison Solutions ConEdison Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name ConEdison Solutions Address 701 Westchester Avenue, Suite 300 East Place White Plains, New York Zip 10604 Sector Services Product Green Power Marketer Website http://conedisonsolutions.com/ Coordinates 41.026762°, -73.737896° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.026762,"lon":-73.737896,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

412

Institute for Environmental Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Institute for Environmental Solutions Institute for Environmental Solutions Name Institute for Environmental Solutions Address 761 Newport St. Place Denver, Colorado Zip 80220-5554 Region Rockies Area Number of employees 1-10 Year founded 2004 Phone number 303-388-5211 Coordinates 39.728409°, -104.909694° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.728409,"lon":-104.909694,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

413

Advanced Hydro Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solutions Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name Advanced Hydro Solutions Place Fairlawn, Ohio Zip 44333 Sector Hydro Product Ohio-based company seeking to develop hydroelectric facilities on existing dams. Coordinates 41.134339°, -81.622978° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.134339,"lon":-81.622978,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

414

Advanced Energy Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Advanced Energy Solutions Advanced Energy Solutions Name Advanced Energy Solutions Address 192 Gates Road Place Pomona, Illinois Zip 62975 Sector Solar Year founded 1999 Company Type For Profit Phone number 618-893-1717 Website http://www.aessolar.com/ Coordinates 37.6281057°, -89.3367556° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.6281057,"lon":-89.3367556,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

415

Independent Energy Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solutions Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name Independent Energy Solutions Address 1090 Joshua Way Place Vista, California Zip 92081 Sector Solar Product Renewable energy development, engineering and construction firm Website http://www.indenergysolutions. Coordinates 33.148298°, -117.230822° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.148298,"lon":-117.230822,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

416

Renewable Energy Solutions, LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solutions, LLC Solutions, LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Renewable Energy Solutions, LLC Place Fairfield, California Zip 94534 Sector Services Year founded 2008 Website http://www.renewablesdigest.co Coordinates 38.2672631°, -122.1064668° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.2672631,"lon":-122.1064668,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

417

Carbon Solutions Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Group Group Jump to: navigation, search Name Carbon Solutions Group Place Chicago, Illinois Zip 60601 Sector Carbon Product Carbon Solutions Group collaborates with project developers to obtain environmental finance ,grants, feed-in ,tax-credits and subsidies.Carbon Solutions Group also procures energy generation technologies. Coordinates 41.88415°, -87.632409° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.88415,"lon":-87.632409,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

418

ELECTROLYTIC PRODUCTION OF URANIUM TETRAFLUORIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to electrolytic methods for the production of uranium tetrafluoride. According to the present invention a process for the production of uranium tetrafluoride comprises submitting to electrolysis an aqueous solution of uranyl fluoride containing free hydrofluoric acid. Advantageously the aqueous solution of uranyl fluoride is obtained by dissolving uranium hexafluoride in water. On electrolysis, the uranyl ions are reduced to uranous tons at the cathode and immediately combine with the fluoride ions in solution to form the insoluble uranium tetrafluoride which is precipitated.

Lofthouse, E.

1954-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

419

Robust signatures of solar neutrino oscillation solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the goal of identifying signatures that select specific neutrino oscillation parameters, we test the robustness of global oscillation solutions that fit all the available solar and reactor experimental data. We use three global analysis strategies previously applied by different authors and also determine the sensitivity of the oscillation solutions to the critical nuclear fusion cross section, S_{17}(0), for the production of 8B. The favored solutions are LMA, LOW, and VAC in order of g.o.f. The neutral current to charged current ratio for SNO is predicted to be 3.5 +- 0.6 (1 sigma), which is separated from the no-oscillation value of 1.0 by much more than the expected experimental error. The predicted range of the day-night difference in charged current rates is (8.2 +- 5.2)% and is strongly correlated with the day-night effect for neutrino-electron scattering. A measurement by SNO of either a NC to CC ratio > 3.3 or a day-night difference > 10%, would favor a small region of the currently allowed LMA neutrino parameter space. The global oscillation solutions predict a 7Be neutrino-electron scattering rate in BOREXINO and KamLAND in the range 0.66 +- 0.04 of the BP00 standard solar model rate, a prediction which can be used to test both the solar model and the neutrino oscillation theory. Only the LOW solution predicts a large day-night effect(reactor experiment, the LMA solution predicts 0.44 of the standard model rate; we evaluate 1 sigma and 3 sigma uncertainties and the first and second moments of the energy spectrum.

John N. Bahcall; M. C. Gonzalez-Garcia; Carlos Pena-Garay

2001-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

420

Pages that link to "Biofuel Solutions" | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Biofuel Solutions" Biofuel Solutions Jump to: navigation, search What links here Page:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Changes related to "Biofuel Solutions" | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Special page Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Biofuel Solutions" Biofuel Solutions Jump to: navigation, search This is a list of...

422

DOE Exercises 5 Year Option on Washington TRU Solutions Contract...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exercises 5 Year Option on Washington TRU Solutions Contract to Operate WIPP DOE Exercises 5 Year Option on Washington TRU Solutions Contract to Operate WIPP January 18, 2005 -...

423

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS ProRad Environment...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SRNS ProRad Environment Management PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS ProRad Environment Management PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS ProRad Environment Management...

424

United States Department of Energy Solution Center for Renewable...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solution Center for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Name United States Department of Energy Solution Center for Renewable Energy and Energy...

425

Department of Energy Cites Savannah River Nuclear Solutions,...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC for Worker Safety and Health Violations Department of Energy Cites Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC for Worker Safety and Health...

426

H2 Energy Solutions Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon Twitter icon H2 Energy Solutions Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name H2 Energy Solutions Inc Place Hollister, California Zip 95023 Sector Hydro, Hydrogen Product...

427

Burbank Water & Power - Energy Solutions Business Rebate Program...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Burbank Water & Power - Energy Solutions Business Rebate Program Burbank Water & Power - Energy Solutions Business Rebate Program Eligibility Commercial Nonprofit Savings For...

428

Energy Storage Solutions Industrial Symposium | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Solutions Industrial Symposium Sep 04 2013 09:00 AM - 05:30 PM Energy Storage Solutions Industrial Symposium - Wednesday September 4, 2013 CONTACT : Email: Phone:...

429

Energy Efficiency Fund (Electric) - Home Energy Solutions and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric) - Home Energy Solutions and Performance Programs Energy Efficiency Fund (Electric) - Home Energy Solutions and Performance Programs Eligibility Low-Income Residential...

430

The Role of Solution Architects in Systems Integration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Merging different types of architects in a solution architecture group provides a single point of responsibility for the entire systems solution. Keywords: systems integration, architecture, design

Rakesh Tandon

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Integrated Dynamic Electron Solutions, Inc. | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrated Dynamic Electron Solutions, Inc. America's Next Top Energy Innovator Challenge 333 likes Integrated Dynamic Electron Solutions, Inc. Lawrence Livermore National...

432

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Training Records and Informatio...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Training Records and Information Network (TRAIN) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Training Records and Information Network (TRAIN) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions...

433

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Training Records and Informatio...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Training Records and Information Network (TRAIN) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Training Records and Information Network (TRAIN) PIA...

434

DOE Selects Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC for Tank...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC for Tank Operations Contract at Hanford Site DOE Selects Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC for Tank Operations Contract at...

435

Cree LED Lighting Solutions Formerly LED Lighting Fixtures LLF...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cree LED Lighting Solutions Formerly LED Lighting Fixtures LLF Jump to: navigation, search Name Cree LED Lighting Solutions (Formerly LED Lighting Fixtures (LLF)) Place...

436

Agricultural Waste Solutions Inc AWS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solutions Inc (AWS)" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleAgriculturalWasteSolutionsIncAWS&oldid341893" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies...

437

Changes related to "Battery Wireless Solutions Inc" | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Special page Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Battery Wireless Solutions Inc" Battery Wireless Solutions Inc Jump to: navigation,...

438

Pages that link to "Battery Energy Power Solutions Pty Ltd" ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Battery Energy Power Solutions Pty Ltd" Battery Energy Power Solutions Pty Ltd Jump to:...

439

Changes related to "Battery Energy Power Solutions Pty Ltd" ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Special page Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Battery Energy Power Solutions Pty Ltd" Battery Energy Power Solutions Pty Ltd Jump to:...

440

Pages that link to "Battery Wireless Solutions Inc" | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Battery Wireless Solutions Inc" Battery Wireless Solutions Inc Jump to: navigation,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Molecular Packing Parameter in Bolaamphiphile Solutions: Adjustment of Aggregate Morphology by Modifying the Solution Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular Packing Parameter in Bolaamphiphile Solutions: Adjustment of Aggregate Morphology of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, and College of Life Science, Peking UniVersity, Beijing, 100871, People of molecular packing parameters in a bolaamphiphile solution was tested with experimental results. By modifying

Huang, Jianbin

442

Smart Office Energy Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Office Energy Solutions Office Energy Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Smart Office Energy Solutions Name Smart Office Energy Solutions Address 440 Louisiana Street Place Houston, Texas Zip 77002 Sector Buildings, Efficiency, Services Product wireless smart meters, Web-managed power sockets, and behavioral software Year founded 2009 Number of employees 1-10 Website http://smartoes.com Coordinates 29.762937°, -95.364652° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.762937,"lon":-95.364652,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

443

Legacy Environmental Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Legacy Environmental Solutions Legacy Environmental Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Legacy Environmental Solutions Name Legacy Environmental Solutions Address 9878 Main St Suite 105 Place Woodstock, Georgia Zip 30188 Sector Services, Solar Product AET and eShield Therma Reflective Insulation Year founded 2009 Number of employees 1-10 Phone number 678-919-9236 Website http://www.legacyenvironmental Coordinates 34.0809659°, -84.522443° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.0809659,"lon":-84.522443,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

444

Integrated Energy Solutions LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Integrated Energy Solutions LLC Integrated Energy Solutions LLC Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Integrated Energy Solutions LLC Name Integrated Energy Solutions LLC Address 11900 College Blvd, Ste 210 Place Overland Park, Kansas Zip 66210-3939 Product Bio-Coal TM Technology Year founded 2009 Number of employees 1-10 Phone number +1 913 231 2942 Website http://www.inensol.com Coordinates 38.928082°, -94.7242° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.928082,"lon":-94.7242,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

445

Water & Aqueous Solutions. Final Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Water & Aqueous Solutions was held at Holderness School, New Hampshire, 8/4/02 thru 8/9/02. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

2002-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

446

Phase behavior of DODAB aqueous solution  

SciTech Connect

Phase behavior of DODAB aqueous solution, prepared without sonication, was studied by adiabatic scanning calorimetry. Measurements revealed four phase transitions with the temperatures 35.2, 39.6, 44.6, and 52.4 Degree-Sign C at heating and one transition at the temperature 40.4 Degree-Sign C at cooling. The first three transitions at heating occur in unilamellar vesicles. The first and third transitions correspond to the subgel-gel and gelliquid phase transitions, corresponding enthalpy jumps are equal to 33 and 49 kJ/mol. The second transition appears after some aging and is similar to gel-ripple phase transition in a DPPC solution, with the enthalpy jump under the transition exceeding 7.4 kJ/mol. The transition occurs in unilamellar vesicles. The transition at the temperature 52.4 Degree-Sign C occurs in another subsystem of the solution, which we believe to be multilamellar vesicles. The enthalpy jump at this transition is equal to 97 kJ/mol, and data analysis suggests that this is a subgel-liquid transition. The phase transition at cooling is the liquid-gel transition in unilamellar vesicles. During the measurements, a slow evolution of the solution occurs, consisting in a change of concentrations of unilamellar and multilamellar vesicles. This transformation mainly occurs at low temperatures.

Voronov, V. P.; Kuryakov, V. N.; Muratov, A. R., E-mail: muratov@ogri.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Oil and Gas Research Institute (Russian Federation)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

447

On the Free Energy of Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The proposal has been made that the free energy of a mixture is (aside from the free energy of mixing) equal to the sum of the free energies of the pure components computed at a reduced temperature and reduced volume characteristic of the environment of the molecules in the solution. This proposal is tested for a simple model

Stuart A. Rice

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

CATALYZED OXIDATION OF URANIUM IN CARBONATE SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is given wherein carbonate solutions are employed to leach uranium from ores and the like containing lower valent uranium species by utilizing catalytic amounts of copper in the presence of ammonia therein and simultaneously supplying an oxidizing agent thereto. The catalysis accelerates rate of dissolution and increases recovery of uranium from the ore. (AEC)

Clifford, W.E.

1962-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

449

Fundamental solutions of homogeneous elliptic differential operators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compute fundamental solutions of homogeneous elliptic differential operators, with constant coefficients, on $\\mathbb{R}^n$ by mean of analytic continuation of distributions. The result obtained is valid in any dimension, for any degree and can be extended to pseudodifferential operators of the same type.

Brice Camus

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

450

Science for Solutions NOAA COASTALOCEAN PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Science for Solutions NOAA COASTALOCEAN PROGRAM Decision Analysis Series No. 14 NUTRIENT ENHANCED been established by NOAAYsCoastal Ocean Program (COP) to present documents that contain analytical Analysis Series, please write: NOAA National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science Coastal Ocean Program (NCOP

451

Ultrasonics and Water Structure in Urea Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ultrasonic absorption and velocity in aqueous urea solutions have been measured for concentrations up to 15m and at temperatures down to ??10C. The velocity itself was measured at pressures up to 2000 lbs/in.2. The structural part of the absorption decreases with increasing concentration of urea

Donald V. Beauregard; Robert E. Barrett

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

cleanenergyfuels.com Natural Gas Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tanks #12;36 cleanenergyfuels.com Natural Gas Truck Tanks Storage Capacity and Weight Impact LNG Tanks1 cleanenergyfuels.com Natural Gas Solutions for Transportation December 7, 2012 #12;2 cleanenergyfuels.com Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Taxis Airport Vehicles Transit Buses Leading Provider of Natural

Minnesota, University of

453

Guardian Energy Management Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Guardian Energy Management Solutions Guardian Energy Management Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name Guardian Energy Management Solutions Address 753 Forest Street, Suite 110 Place Marlborough, Massachusetts Zip 01752 Sector Buildings, Efficiency, Services, Vehicles Product Energy Management Solutions & Services Year founded 2003 Number of employees 51-200 Company Type For Profit Phone number 8008256460 Website [www.guardian-energy.com www.guardian-energy.com ] Coordinates 42.3199619°, -71.5926351° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.3199619,"lon":-71.5926351,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

454

Oil recovery by imbibition from polymer solutions  

SciTech Connect

The success of a polymer flood in a water-wet fractured reservoir is dependent on the recovery of oil from the matrix blocks by the polymer solution imbibition. This thesis presents the results of an experimental and theoretical study investigating this problem. Two sets of experiments were performed, static and dynamic. The results of the static experiments, in which a matrix block was surrounded by the imbibing fluid, showed that the amounts of oil that ultimately could be recovered by the water and polymer solutions are practically equal. However, the rate of oil recovery by the polymer solutions is always less than that of the water. This delay in the oil recovery was found to be a function of the polymer solutions molecular weight, concentration, and salt content. The theoretical investigation of the experimental data found that the polymer retention and the high apparent viscosity were the causes for the delay. The dynamic experiments consisted of flooding oil-saturated fractured cores through the fracture by water and different polymer solutions. The oil recovery behavior in these experiments was found to be dependent not only on the rate of injected fluid imbibition from the fracture into the matrix blocks, but also on the operating injection rate and the displacement efficiency of the oil in the fracture by the injected fluid. It is also dependent on the amount of viscous forces that are generated by the injected fluid flow through the fracture. Under certain conditions, polymer flooding of the fractures gave greater oil recovery than water flooding, whereas under others it did not.

Ghedan, S.G.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Symmetry in CSP solutions Nicoleta Neagu and Boi Faltings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Symmetry in CSP solutions Nicoleta Neagu and Boi Faltings Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (LIA for finding symmetric solutions of in a CSP. This method is using local symmetries of the CSP structure and research upon searching CSP solutions but few of them watch the relations between CSP solutions. In certain

Flener, Pierre

456

Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions Integrated Assessment of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

described in this paper coordinated by the Consortium of Electricity Reliability Technology Solutions

457

HEU to LEU conversion and blending facility: UNH blending alternative to produce LEU oxide for disposal  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is examining options for the disposition of surplus weapons-usable fissile materials and storage of all weapons-usable fissile materials. Disposition is a process of use or disposal of material that results in the material being converted to a form that is substantially and inherently more proliferation-resistant than is the original form. Examining options for increasing the proliferation resistance of highly enriched uranium (HEU) is part of this effort. This report provides data to be used in the environmental impact analysis for the uranyl nitrate hexahydrate blending option to produce oxide for disposal. This the Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) alternative will have two missions (1) convert HEU materials into HEU uranyl nitrate (UNH) and (2) blend the HEU uranyl nitrate with depleted and natural assay uranyl nitrate to produce an oxide that can be stored until an acceptable disposal approach is available. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. The blended LEU will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Big Problems. Big Results. Energy demands, environmental impacts, and national security are some of America's toughest challenges.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's security by discover- ing, assessing, and mitigating complex threats. Our focus is on ultra in the biological, chemical, and environmental sciences to the global scientific community. EMSL and its 750 annual. On the cover: Finding tiny crystals of thorium nitrate and uranyl sulfate is a clue that nuclear weapons may

459

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 554 (2005) 494499 Micro-pocket fission detectors (MPFD) for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 554 (2005) 494­499 Micro-pocket fission detectors (MPFD) for in-core neutron flux monitoring Douglas S. McGregor?, Martin F. Ohmes, Rylan E. Ortiz. The prototype devices have been coated with a natural uranyl- nitrate to provide a neutron reactive coating

Shultis, J. Kenneth

460

El Paso Electric Company - Residential Solutions Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Solutions Program Residential Solutions Program El Paso Electric Company - Residential Solutions Program < Back Eligibility Installer/Contractor Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Texas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Residential Solutions Program: $425/kW saved Low-Income Solutions Program: $576/kW saved Provider El Paso Electric Company '''The El Paso Electric Residential Solutions Program funding has been expended in Texas for 2012. New funding will be available January 1, 2013. ''' The El Paso Electric Residential Solutions Program offers El Paso Electric

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranyl nitrate solution" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

India's Energy Challenges: Illustrative Approaches to Solutions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

India's Energy Challenges: Illustrative Approaches to Solutions India's Energy Challenges: Illustrative Approaches to Solutions Speaker(s): S. Padmanabhan Date: May 26, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Girish Ghatikar Energy security and climate change have emerged as key global challenges in the 21st century. A low carbon development strategy is in India's interest and is not incompatible with its energy security concerns. Energy demand in India is expected to grow at an annual rate of nearly 4-5 percent over the next 10 years with projected economic growth rates of 8-9 percent. Finding adequate supplies of energy to satisfy this increased demand is a significant challenge. The Indian energy sector continues to struggle to overcome chronic energy shortages caused by a combination of low levels of

462

Freedom Energy Solutions LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Freedom Energy Solutions LLC Freedom Energy Solutions LLC Place Westminster, Maryland Zip 21157 Sector Geothermal energy, Solar Product Retailer and installer of solar passive, PV and geothermal systems for household use. Coordinates 43.07212°, -72.465748° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.07212,"lon":-72.465748,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

463

Conservation Resource Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conservation Resource Solutions Conservation Resource Solutions Place Cumming, Georgia Zip 30040 Sector Services Product String representation "Conservation Re ... ive industries." is too long. Coordinates 41.4832°, -93.761924° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.4832,"lon":-93.761924,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

464

Community Renewable Solutions LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Solutions LLC Renewable Solutions LLC Place Santa Barbara, California Phone number 805 284 9028 Website http://www.communityrenewables Coordinates 34.4208305°, -119.6981901° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.4208305,"lon":-119.6981901,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

465

Strong solutions of semilinear matched microstructure models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The subject of this article is a matched microstructure model for Newtonian fluid flows in fractured porous media. This is a homogenized model which takes the form of two coupled parabolic differential equations with boundary conditions in a given (two-scale) domain in Euclidean space. The main objective is to establish the local well-posedness in the strong sense of the flow. Two main settings are investigated: semi-linear systems with linear boundary conditions and semi-linear systems with nonlinear boundary conditions. With the help of analytic semigoups we establish local well-posedness and investigate the long-time behaviour of the solutions in the first case: we establish global existence and show that solutions converge to zero at an exponential rate.

Escher, Joachim

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

PROCESS OF ELIMINATING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE IN SOLUTIONS CONTAINING PLUTONIUM VALUES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A procedure is given for peroxide precipitation processes for separating and recovering plutonium values contained in an aqueous solution. When plutonium peroxide is precipitated from an aqueous solution, the supernatant contains appreciable quantities of plutonium and peroxide. It is desirable to process this solution further to recover plutonium contained therein, but the presence of the peroxide introduces difficulties; residual hydrogen peroxide contained in the supernatant solution is eliminated by adding a nitrite or a sulfite to this solution.

Barrick, J.G.; Fries, B.A.

1960-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

467

Fiber optic detector and method for using same for detecting chemical species  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical sensing device for uranyl and other substances, a method for making an optical sensing device and a method for chemically binding uranyl and other indicators to glass, quartz, cellulose and similar substrates. The indicator, such as arsenazo III, is immobilized on the substrate using a chemical binding process. The immobilized arsenazo III causes uranyl from a fluid sample to bind irreversibly to the substrate at its active sites, thus causing absorption of a portion of light transmitted through the substrate. Determination of the amount of light absorbed, using conventional means, yields the concentration of uranyl present in the sample fluid. The binding of uranyl on the substrate can be reversed by subsequent exposure of the substrate to a solution of 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid. The chemical binding process is suitable for similarly binding other indicators, such as bromocresol green.

Baylor, Lewis C. (North Augusta, SC); Buchanan, Bruce R. (Perkiomenville, PA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Community Technology Solutions--1997 Target Summaries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the work of the Community Technology Solutions (CTS) team, which was created to strengthen EPRI members' relationships with their communities by developing a consortium of EPRI members, public and private organizations, and non-profit groups to provide a range of resources and expertise aimed at solving mutual concerns for members and their communities. The goal of CTS is to support sustainable community growth and development as it pertains to community infrastructure, leading to en...

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Guidebook of Environmental Solutions for Small Businesses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the most important issues facing American small business today is how to comply with the growing maze of environmental regulations. Small business compliance decisions will ultimately affect productivity, profitability, and, in some cases, a company's very existence. This guidebook--written for utility marketing managers, market planners, and account representatives--describes environmental problems that small businesses encounter and applicable electric-based technology solutions.

1993-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

470

2004 Solutions Fermat Contest (Grade 11)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- - = - - = - - = - - = . Answer: (E) 8. From the graph, Jane arrives with 10 L of gas in her gas tank, and leaves with 50 L of gas 2004 Fermat Contest Solutions 1. Calculating, 10 10 11 10 10 110 100 12 ( )- = - = Answer: (D) 2. 4 4 4, having paid $36.60. So she buys 40 L of gas for $36.60, so the cost per litre is $ . $ . 36 60 40 0 915

Le Roy, Robert J.

471