National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for uranium vi exposed

  1. Uranium (VI) solubility in carbonate-free ERDA-6 brine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucchini, Jean-francois; Khaing, Hnin; Reed, Donald T

    2010-01-01

    When present, uranium is usually an element of importance in a nuclear waste repository. In the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), uranium is the most prevalent actinide component by mass, with about 647 metric tons to be placed in the repository. Therefore, the chemistry of uranium, and especially its solubility in the WIPP conditions, needs to be well determined. Long-term experiments were performed to measure the solubility of uranium (VI) in carbonate-free ERDA-6 brine, a simulated WIPP brine, at pC{sub H+} values between 8 and 12.5. These data, obtained from the over-saturation approach, were the first repository-relevant data for the VI actinide oxidation state. The solubility trends observed pointed towards low uranium solubility in WIPP brines and a lack of amphotericity. At the expected pC{sub H+} in the WIPP ({approx} 9.5), measured uranium solubility approached 10{sup -7} M. The objective of these experiments was to establish a baseline solubility to further investigate the effects of carbonate complexation on uranium solubility in WIPP brines.

  2. Fate and Transport of Uranium (VI) in Weathered Saprolite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Young-Jin; Brooks, Scott C; Zhang, Fan; Parker, Jack C.; Moon, Ji Won; Roh, Yul

    2015-01-01

    Batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate sorption and transport of uranium (U) in the presence of saprolite derived from interbedded shale, limestone, and sandstone sequences. Sorption kinetics were measured at two initial concentrations (C0; 1, 10 mM) and three soil:solution ratios (Rs/w; 0.005, 0.25, 2 kg/L) at pH 4.5 (pH of the saprolite). The rate of U loss from solution (mmole/L/h) increased with increasing Rs/w. Uranium sorption exhibited a fast phase with 80% sorption in the first eight hours for all C0 and Rs/w values and a slow phase during which the reaction slowly approached (pseudo) equilibrium over the next seven days. The pH-dependency of U sorption was apparent in pH sorption edges. U(VI) sorption increased over the pH range 4e6, then decreased sharply at pH > 7.5. U(VI) sorption edges were well described by a surface complexation model using calibrated parameters and the reaction network proposed by Waite et al. (1994). Sorption isotherms measured using the same Rs/w and pH values showed a solids concentration effect where U(VI) sorption capacity and affinity decreased with increasing solids concentration. This effect may have been due to either particle aggregation or competition between U(VI) and exchangeable cations for sorption sites. The surface complexation model with calibrated parameters was able to predict the general sorption behavior relatively well, but failed to reproduce solid concentration effects, implying the importance of appropriate design if batch experiments are to be utilized for dynamic systems. Transport of U(VI) through the packed column was significantly retarded. Transport simulations were conducted using the reactive transport model HydroGeoChem (HGC) v5.0 that incorporated the surface complexation reaction network used to model the batch data. Model parameters reported by Waite et al. (1994) provided a better prediction of U transport than optimized parameters derived from our sorption edges. The

  3. Fate and transport of uranium (VI) in weathered saprolite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Young-Jin; Brooks, Scott C.; Zhang, Fan; Parker, Jack C.; Moon, Ji-Won; Roh, Yul

    2015-01-01

    We conducted batch and column experiments to investigate sorption and transport of uranium (U) in the presence of saprolite derived from interbedded shale, limestone, and sandstone sequences. Sorption kinetics were measured at two initial concentrations (C0; 1, 10 mM) and three soil:solution ratios (Rs/w; 0.005, 0.25, 2 kg/L) at pH 4.5 (pH of the saprolite). The rate of U loss from solution (mmole/L/h) increased with increasing Rs/w. Uranium sorption exhibited a fast phase with 80% sorption in the first eight hours for all C0 and Rs/w values and a slow phase during which the reaction slowly approached (pseudo) equilibrium over the next seven days. The pH-dependency of U sorption was apparent in pH sorption edges. U(VI) sorption increased over the pH range 4e6, then decreased sharply at pH > 7.5. U(VI) sorption edges were well described by a surface complexation model using calibrated parameters and the reaction network proposed by Waite et al. (1994). Sorption isotherms measured using the same Rs/w and pH values showed a solids concentration effect where U(VI) sorption capacity and affinity decreased with increasing solids concentration. Moreover, this effect may have been due to either particle aggregation or competition between U(VI) and exchangeable cations for sorption sites. The surface complexation model with calibrated parameters was able to predict the general sorption behavior relatively well, but failed to reproduce solid concentration effects, implying the importance of appropriate design if batch experiments are to be utilized for dynamic systems. Transport of U(VI) through the packed column was significantly retarded. We also conducted transport simulations using the reactive transport model HydroGeoChem (HGC) v5.0 that incorporated the surface complexation reaction network used to model the batch data. Model parameters reported by Waite et al. (1994) provided a better prediction of U transport than optimized parameters derived from our sorption edges

  4. Fate and transport of uranium (VI) in weathered saprolite

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kim, Young-Jin; Brooks, Scott C.; Zhang, Fan; Parker, Jack C.; Moon, Ji-Won; Roh, Yul

    2015-01-01

    We conducted batch and column experiments to investigate sorption and transport of uranium (U) in the presence of saprolite derived from interbedded shale, limestone, and sandstone sequences. Sorption kinetics were measured at two initial concentrations (C0; 1, 10 mM) and three soil:solution ratios (Rs/w; 0.005, 0.25, 2 kg/L) at pH 4.5 (pH of the saprolite). The rate of U loss from solution (mmole/L/h) increased with increasing Rs/w. Uranium sorption exhibited a fast phase with 80% sorption in the first eight hours for all C0 and Rs/w values and a slow phase during which the reaction slowly approached (pseudo) equilibrium overmore » the next seven days. The pH-dependency of U sorption was apparent in pH sorption edges. U(VI) sorption increased over the pH range 4e6, then decreased sharply at pH > 7.5. U(VI) sorption edges were well described by a surface complexation model using calibrated parameters and the reaction network proposed by Waite et al. (1994). Sorption isotherms measured using the same Rs/w and pH values showed a solids concentration effect where U(VI) sorption capacity and affinity decreased with increasing solids concentration. Moreover, this effect may have been due to either particle aggregation or competition between U(VI) and exchangeable cations for sorption sites. The surface complexation model with calibrated parameters was able to predict the general sorption behavior relatively well, but failed to reproduce solid concentration effects, implying the importance of appropriate design if batch experiments are to be utilized for dynamic systems. Transport of U(VI) through the packed column was significantly retarded. We also conducted transport simulations using the reactive transport model HydroGeoChem (HGC) v5.0 that incorporated the surface complexation reaction network used to model the batch data. Model parameters reported by Waite et al. (1994) provided a better prediction of U transport than optimized parameters derived from our

  5. TREATMENT TESTS FOR EX SITU REMOVAL OF CHROMATE & NITRATE & URANIUM (VI) FROM HANFORD (100-HR-3) GROUNDWATER FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BECK MA; DUNCAN JB

    1994-01-03

    This report describes batch and ion exchange column laboratory scale studies investigating ex situ methods to remove chromate (chromium [VI]), nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}) and uranium (present as uranium [VI]) from contaminated Hanford site groundwaters. The technologies investigated include: chemical precipitation or coprecipitation to remove chromate and uranium; and anion exchange to remove chromate, uranium and nitrate. The technologies investigated were specified in the 100-HR-3 Groundwater Treatability Test Plan. The method suggested for future study is anion exchange.

  6. Spectroscopic confirmation of uranium(VI)-carbonato adsorption complexes on hematite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bargar, J.R. . Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab.); Reitmeyer, R.; Davis, J.A. . Water Resources Div.)

    1999-07-15

    Evaluating societal risks posed by uranium contamination from waste management facilities, mining sites, and heavy industry requires knowledge about uranium transport in groundwater, often the most significant pathway of exposure to humans. It has been proposed that uranium mobility in aquifers may be controlled by adsorption of U(VI)-carbonato complexes on oxide minerals. The existence of such complexes has not been demonstrated, and little is known about their compositions and reaction stoichiometries. The authors have used attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopies to probe the existence, structures, and compositions of [triple bond]FeO[sub surface]-U(VI)-carbonato complexes on hematite throughout the pH range of uranyl uptake under conditions relevant to aquifers. U(VI)-carbonato complexes were found to be the predominant adsorbed U(VI) species at all pH values examined, a much wider pH range than previously postulated based on analogy to aqueous U(VI)-carbonato complexes, which are trace constituents at pH < 6. This result indicates the inadequacy of the common modeling assumption that the compositions and predominance of adsorbed species can be inferred from aqueous species. By extension, adsorbed carbonato complexes may be of major importance to the groundwater transport of similar actinide contaminants such as neptunium and plutonium.

  7. Spectroscopic Confirmation of Uranium (VI)-Carbonato Adsorption Complexes on Hematite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bargar, John R

    1999-05-04

    Evaluating societal risks posed by uranium contamination from waste management facilities, mining sites, and heavy industry requires knowledge about uranium transport in groundwater, often the most significant pathway of exposure to humans. It has been proposed that uranium mobility in aquifers may be controlled by adsorption of U(VI)-carbonato complexes on oxide minerals. The existence of such complexes has not been demonstrated, and little is known about their compositions and reaction stoichiometries. We have used Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopies to probe the existence, structures, and compositions of FeO{sub surface}-U(VI)-carbonato complexes on hematite throughout the pH range of uranyl uptake under conditions relevant to aquifers. U(VI)-carbonato complexes were found to be the predominant adsorbed U(VI) species at all pH values examined, a much wider pH range than previously postulated based on analogy to aqueous U(VI)-carbonato complexes, which are trace constituents at pH < 6. This result indicates the inadequacy of the common modeling assumption that the compositions and predominance of adsorbed species can be inferred from aqueous species. By extension, adsorbed carbonato complexes may be of major importance to the groundwater transport of similar actinide contaminants such as neptunium and plutonium.

  8. Spectrophotometric determination of uranium(VI) with chlorophosphonazo-mN by flow injection analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Jun Ying; Chen, Xing Guo; Hu, Zhi De

    1994-07-01

    A sensitive and selective spectrophotometric flow injection analysis (FIA) method with chlorophosphonazo-mN has been developed for the determination of uranium(VI) in standard ore samples. Most interfereing ions are effectively eliminated by the masking reagent diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). In the U(VI)-chlorophosphonazo-mN system, the maximum absorption wavelength is at 680 nm and Beer`s law is obeyed in the range of 1 to 15 {mu}g {mu}l{sup -1}. The correlation coefficient of the calibration curve is. 0.9998, the sampling frequency is 60{sup -1}, and detection limit for uranium(VI) is 0.5 {mu}g mul{sup -1}.

  9. In Situ Bioreduction of Uranium (VI) to Submicromolar Levels and Reoxidation by Dissolved Oxygen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Weimin; Carley, Jack M; Luo, Jian; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew A.; Cardenas, Erick; Leigh, Mary Beth; Hwang, Chaichi; Kelly, Shelly D; Ruan, Chuanmin; Wu, Liyou; Van Nostrand, Joy; Gentry, Terry J; Lowe, Kenneth Alan; Mehlhorn, Tonia L; Carroll, Sue L; Luo, Wensui; Fields, Matthew Wayne; Gu, Baohua; Watson, David B; Kemner, Kenneth M; Marsh, Terence; Tiedje, James; Zhou, Jizhong; Fendorf, Scott; Kitanidis, Peter K.; Jardine, Philip M; Criddle, Craig

    2007-01-01

    Groundwater within Area 3 of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Remediation Sciences Program (ERSP) Field Research Center at Oak Ridge, TN (ORFRC) contains up to 135 {micro}M uranium as U(VI). Through a series of experiments at a pilot scale test facility, we explored the lower limits of groundwater U(VI) that can be achieved by in-situ biostimulation and the effects of dissolved oxygen on immobilized uranium. Weekly 2 day additions of ethanol over a 2-year period stimulated growth of denitrifying, Fe(III)-reducing, and sulfate-reducing bacteria, and immobilization of uranium as U(IV), with dissolved uranium concentrations decreasing to low levels. Following sulfite addition to remove dissolved oxygen, aqueous U(VI) concentrations fell below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant limit (MCL) for drinking water (<30 {micro}g L{sup -1} or 0.126 {micro}M). Under anaerobic conditions, these low concentrations were stable, even in the absence of added ethanol. However, when sulfite additions stopped, and dissolved oxygen (4.0-5.5 mg L{sup -1}) entered the injection well, spatially variable changes in aqueous U(VI) occurred over a 60 day period, with concentrations increasing rapidly from <0.13 to 2.0 {micro}M at a multilevel sampling (MLS) well located close to the injection well, but changing little at an MLS well located further away. Resumption of ethanol addition restored reduction of Fe(III), sulfate, and U(VI) within 36 h. After 2 years of ethanol addition, X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy (XANES) analyses indicated that U(IV) comprised 60-80% of the total uranium in sediment samples. At the completion of the project (day 1260), U concentrations in MLS wells were less than 0.1 {micro}M. The microbial community at MLS wells with low U(VI) contained bacteria that are known to reduce uranium, including Desulfovibrio spp. and Geobacter spp., in both sediment and groundwater. The dominant Fe(III)-reducing species

  10. Uranium(VI) coordination polymers with pyromellitate ligand: Unique 1D channel structures and diverse fluorescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yingjie; Bhadbhade, Mohan; Karatchevtseva, Inna; Price, Jason R.; Liu, Hao; Zhang, Zhaoming; Kong, Linggen; Čejka, Jiří; Lu, Kim; Lumpkin, Gregory R.

    2015-03-15

    Three new coordination polymers of uranium(VI) with pyromellitic acid (H{sub 4}btca) have been synthesized and structurally characterized. (ED)[(UO{sub 2})(btca)]·(DMSO)·3H{sub 2}O (1) (ED=ethylenediammonium; DMSO=dimethylsulfoxide) has a lamellar structure with intercalation of ED and DMSO. (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 6}O{sub 2}(OH){sub 6}(btca)]·~6H{sub 2}O (2) has a 3D framework built from 7-fold coordinated uranyl trinuclear units and btca ligands with 1D diamond-shaped channels (~8.5 Å×~8.6 Å). [(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)(btca)]·4H{sub 2}O (3) has a 3D network constructed by two types of 7-fold coordinated uranium polyhedron. The unique μ{sub 5}-coordination mode of btca in 3 enables the formation of 1D olive-shaped large channels (~4.5 Å×~19 Å). Vibrational modes, thermal stabilities and fluorescence properties have been investigated. - Graphical abstract: Table of content: three new uranium(VI) coordination polymers with pyromellitic acid (H{sub 4}btca) have been synthesized via room temperature and hydrothermal synthesis methods, and structurally characterized. Two to three dimensional (3D) frameworks are revealed. All 3D frameworks have unique 1D large channels. Their vibrational modes, thermal stabilities and photoluminescence properties have been investigated. - Highlights: • Three new coordination polymers of U(VI) with pyromellitic acid (H{sub 4}btca). • Structures from a 2D layer to 3D frameworks with unique 1D channels. • Unusual µ{sub 5}-(η{sub 1}:η{sub 2}:η{sub 1}:η{sub 2:}η{sub 1}) coordination mode of btca ligand. • Vibrational modes, thermal stabilities and luminescent properties reported.

  11. Uranium (VI)Bis(imido) chalcogenate complexes:synthesis and density functional theory analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, Liam P; Batista, Enrique R; Boncella, James M; Yang, Ping; Scott, Brian L

    2009-01-01

    Bis(imido) uranium(VI) trans- and cis-dichalcogenate complexes with the general formula U(NtBu)2(EAr)2(OPPh3)2 (EAr = O-2-tBuC6H4, SPh, SePh, TePh) and U(NtBu)2(EAr)2(R2bpy) (EAr = SPh, SePh, TePh) (R2bpy = 4,4'-disubstituted-2,2'-bipyridyl, R = Me, tBu) have been prepared. This family of complexes includes the first reported monodentate selenolate and tellurolate complexes of uranium(VI). Density functional theory calculations show that covalent interactions in the U-E bond increase in the trans-dichalcogenate series U(NtBu)2(EAr)2(OPPh3)2 as the size of the chalcogenate donor increases and that both 5f and 6d orbital participation is important in the M-E bonds of U-S, U-Se, and U-Te complexes.

  12. Role of uranium(VI) in the ThO/sub 2/-UO/sub 3/ sol-gel process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, P.H.; Campbell, A.B.

    1980-11-01

    Increases in pH and temperature of U(VI) solutions enhance adsorption of uranium on ThO/sub 2/ through hydrolysis of U(VI) as evidenced by absorption spectra changes of the solution. Sols of ThO/sub 2/-UO/sub 3/ are formed by adsorption of uranium on ThO/sub 2/. At low pH's (approx. pH 3.0), the sols behave as Newtonian fluids but at higher pH's the sols (especially the concentrated ones) transform into thixotropic gels. The increased adsorption of uranium by ThO/sub 2/ and the increased viscosity of the ThO/sub 2/-UO/sub 3/ sols with pH are related. Increased adsorption of uranium produces rod-shaped UO/sub 3/.2H/sub 2/O on the ThO/sub 2/ surface. These UO/sub 3/ nuclei link ThO/sub 2/ particles to form long rodlike particles. With further increased adsorption of uranium at higher pH's (less than or equal to 3.7), the particles crosslink to produce a structured network giving a thixotropic gel. Adsorption, electron microscopic, electrophoetic mobility, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic data are presented to explain the role of U(VI) in the sol-gel process. 6 figures, 1 table.

  13. Role of Anions and Reaction Conditions in the Preparation of Uranium(VI), Neptunium(VI), and Plutonium(VI) Borates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-02-03

    U(VI), Np(VI), and Pu(VI) borates with the formula AnO2[B8O11(OH)4] (An = U, Np, Pu) have been prepared via the reactions of U(VI) nitrate, Np(VI) perchlorate, or Pu(IV) or Pu(VI) nitrate with molten boric acid. These compounds are all isotypic and consist of a linear actinyl(VI) cation, AnO22+, surrounded by BO3 triangles and BO4 tetrahedra to create an AnO8 hexagonal bipyramidal environment. The actinyl bond lengths are consistent with actinide contraction across this series. The borate anions bridge between actinyl units to create sheets. Additional BO3 triangles and BO4 tetrahedra extend from the polyborate layers and connect these sheets together to form a three-dimensional chiral framework structure. UV-vis-NIR absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy confirms the hexavalent oxidation state in all three compounds. Bond-valence parameters are developed for Np(VI).

  14. Solvent-extraction and purification of uranium(VI) and molybdenum(VI) by tertiary amines from acid leach solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    La Gamma, Ana M.G.; Becquart, Elena T.; Chocron, Mauricio

    2008-07-01

    Considering international interest in the yellow-cake price, Argentina is seeking to exploit new uranium ore bodies and processing plants. A study of similar plants would suggest that solvent- extraction with Alamine 336 is considered the best method for the purification and concentration of uranium present in leaching solutions. In order to study the purification of these leach liquors, solvent-extraction tests under different conditions were performed with simulated solutions which containing molybdenum and molybdenum-uranium mixtures. Preliminary extraction tests carried out on mill acid-leaching liquors are also presented. (authors)

  15. Extraction of uranium(VI) by N,N-di-(2-ethylhexyl)isobutyramide (DEHIBA): from the batch experimental data to the countercurrent process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miguirditchian, M.; Sorel, C.; Cames, B.; Bisel, I.; Baron, P.

    2008-07-01

    The selective separation of uranium(VI) in the first cycle of the GANEX process is operated by a hydrometallurgical process using a monoamide extractant DEHiBA (N,N-di-(2-ethylhexyl)isobutyramide). Distribution ratios of uranium(VI) and nitric acid in 1 M DEHiBA/HTP were determined with macro-concentrations of uranium, and the experimental data were modelled by taking into account the activity coefficients of the constituents in aqueous phases. A flowsheet was designed and tested in a countercurrent process in laboratory-scale mixer-settlers on a surrogate U(VI)/HNO 3 feed. More than 99.999% of the uranium was recovered. (authors)

  16. Effect of Co-solutes on the Products and Solubility of Uranium(VI) Precipitated with Phosphate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehta, Vrajesh; Maillot, Fabien; Wang, Zheming; Catalano, Jeffrey G.; Giammar, Daniel E.

    2014-01-22

    Uranyl phosphate solids are often found with uranium ores, and their low solubility makes them promising target phases for in situ remediation of uranium-contaminated subsurface environments. The products and solubility of uranium(VI) precipitated with phosphate can be affected by the pH, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration, and co-solute composition (e.g. Na+/Ca2+) of the groundwater. Batch experiments were performed to study the effect of these parameters on the products and extent of uranium precipitation induced by phosphate addition. In the absence of co-solute cations, chernikovite [H3O(UO2)(PO4)•3H2O] precipitated despite uranyl orthophosphate [(UO2)3(PO4)2•4H2O] being thermodynamically more favorable under certain conditions. As determined using X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy, the presence of Na+ or Ca2+ as a co-solute led to the precipitation of sodium autunite ([Na2(UO2)2(PO4)2] and autunite [Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2]), which are structurally similar to chernikovite. In the presence of sodium, the dissolved U(VI) concentrations were generally in agreement with equilibrium predictions of sodium autunite solubility. However, in the calcium-containing systems, the observed concentrations were below the predicted solubility of autunite, suggesting the possibility of uranium adsorption to or incorporation in a calcium phosphate precipitate in addition to the precipitation of autunite.

  17. Kinetics of Uranium(VI) Desorption from Contaminated Sediments: Effect of Geochemical Conditions and Model Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Shi, Zhenqing; Zachara, John M.

    2009-09-01

    Stirred-flow cell experiments were performed to investigate the kinetics of uranyl [U(VI)] desorption from a contaminated sediment collected from the Hanford 300 Area at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, Washington. Three influent solutions of variable pH, Ca and carbonate concentrations that affected U(VI) aqueous and surface speciation were used under dynamic flow conditions to evaluate the effect of geochemical conditions on the rate of U(VI) desorption. The measured rate of U(VI) desorption varied with solution chemical composition that evolved as a result of thermodynamic and kinetic interactions between the influent solutions and sediment. The solution chemical composition that led to a lower equilibrium U(VI) sorption to the solid phase yielded a faster desorption rate. The experimental results were used to evaluate a multi-rate, surface complexation model (SCM) that has been proposed to describe U(VI) desorption kinetics in the Hanford sediment that contained complex sorbed U(VI) species in mass transfer limited domains. The model was modified and supplemented by including multi-rate, ion exchange reactions to describe the geochemical interactions between the solutions and sediment. With the same set of model parameters, the modified model reasonably well described the evolution of major ions and the rates of U(VI) desorption under variable geochemical and flow conditions, implying that the multi-rate SCM is an effective way to describe U(VI) desorption kinetics in subsurface sediments.

  18. Effect of temperature on the complexation of Uranium(VI) with fluoride in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, Guoxin; Rao, Linfeng

    2009-05-18

    Complexation of U(VI) with fluoride at elevated temperatures in aqueous solutions was studied by spectrophotometry. Four successive complexes, UO{sub 2}F{sup +}, UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}(aq), UO{sub 2}F{sub 3}{sup -}, and UO{sub 2}F{sub 4}{sup 2-}, were identified, and the stability constants at 25, 40, 55, and 70 C were calculated. The stability of the complexes increased as the temperature was elevated. The enthalpies of complexation at 25 C were determined by microcalorimetry. Thermodynamic parameters indicate that the complexation of U(VI) with fluoride in aqueous solutions at 25 to 70 C is slightly endothermic and entropy-driven. The Specific Ion Interaction (SIT) approach was used to obtain the thermodynamic parameters of complexation at infinite dilution. Structural information on the U(VI)/fluoride complexes was obtained by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy.

  19. Electrode Induced Removal and Recovery of Uranium (VI) from Acidic Subsurfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory, Kelvin

    2013-08-12

    The overarching objective of this research is to provide an improved understanding of how aqueous geochemical conditions impact the removal of U and Tc from groundwater and how engineering design may be utilized to optimize removal of these radionuclides. Experiments were designed to address the unique conditions in Area 3 of ORNL while also providing broader insight into the geochemical effectors of the removal rates and extent for U and Tc. The specific tasks of this work were to: 1) quantify the impact of common aqueous geochemical and operational conditions on the rate and extent of U removal and recovery from water, 2) investigate the removal of Tc with polarized graphite electrode, and determine the influence of geochemical and operational conditions on Tc removal and recovery, 3) determine whether U and Tc may be treated simultaneous from Area 3 groundwater, and examine the bench-scale performance of electrode-based treatment, and 4) determine the capacity of graphite electrodes for U(VI) removal and develop a mathematical, kinetic model for the removal of U(VI) from aqueous solution. Overall the body of work suggests that an electrode-based approach for the remediation of acidic subsurface environments, such as those observed in Area 3 of ORNL may be successful for the removal for both U(VI) and Tc. Carbonaceous (graphite) electrode materials are likely to be the least costly means to maximize removal rates and efficiency by maximizing the electrode surface area.

  20. Influence of calcite on uranium(VI) reactive transport in the groundwaterriver mixing zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Rui; Liu, Chongxuan; Greskowiak, Janek; Prommer, Henning; Zachara, John M.; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2014-01-23

    Calcite is an important mineral that can affect uranyl reactive transport in subsurface sediments. This study investigated the distribution of calcite and its influence on uranyl adsorption and reactive transport in the groundwater-river mixing zone at US Hanford 300A, Washington State. Simulations using a 2D reactive transport model under field-relevant hydrogeochemical conditions revealed a complex distribution of calcite concentration as a result of dynamic groundwater-river interactions. The calcite concentration distribution in turn affected the spatial and temporal changes in aqueous carbonate, calcium, and pH, which subsequently influenced U(VI) mobility and discharge rates into the river. The results implied that calcite distribution and its concentration dynamics is an important consideration for field characterization, monitoring, and reactive transport prediction.

  1. Complexation of Gluconate with Uranium(VI) in Acidic Solutions: Thermodynamic Study with Structural Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zhicheng; Helms, G.; Clark, S. B.; Tian, Guoxin; Zanonato, PierLuigi; Rao, Linfeng

    2009-01-05

    Within the pC{sub H} range of 2.5 to 4.2, gluconate forms three uranyl complexes UO{sub 2}(GH{sub 4}){sup +}, UO{sub 2}(GH{sub 3})(aq), and UO{sub 2}(GH{sub 3})(GH{sub 4}){sup -}, through the following reactions: (1) UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} + GH{sub 4}{sup -} = UO{sub 2}(GH{sub 4}){sup +}, (2) UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} + GH{sub 4}{sup -} = UO{sub 2}(GH{sub 3})(aq) + H{sup +}, and (3) UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} + 2GH{sub 4}{sup -} = UO{sub 2}(GH{sub 3})(GH{sub 4}){sup -} + H{sup +}. Complexes were inferred from potentiometric, calorimetric, NMR, and EXAFS studies. Correspondingly, the stability constants and enthalpies were determined to be log {Beta}{sub 1} = 2.2 {+-} 0.3 and {Delta}H{sub 1} = 7.5 {+-} 1.3 kJ mol{sup -1} for reaction (1), log {Beta}{sub 2} = -(0.38 {+-} 0.05) and {Delta}H{sub 2} = 15.4 {+-} 0.3 kJ mol{sup -1} for reaction (2), and log {Beta}{sub 3} = 1.3 {+-} 0.2 and {Delta}H{sub 3} = 14.6 {+-} 0.3 kJ mol{sup -1} for reaction (3), at I = 1.0 M NaClO{sub 4} and t = 25 C. The UO{sub 2}(GH{sub 4}){sup +} complex forms through the bidentate carboxylate binding to U(VI). In the UO{sub 2}(GH{sub 3})(aq) complex, hydroxyl-deprotonated gluconate (GH{sub 3}{sup 2-}) coordinates to U(VI) through the five-membered ring chelation. For the UO{sub 2}(GH{sub 3})(GH{sub 4}){sup -} complex, multiple coordination modes are suggested. These results are discussed in the context of trivalent and pentavalent actinide complexation by gluconate.

  2. uranium

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    to prepare surplus plutonium for disposition, and readiness to begin the Second Uranium Cycle, to start processing spent nuclear fuel.

    H Canyon is also being...

  3. Uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gabelman, J.W.; Chenoweth, W.L.; Ingerson, E.

    1981-10-01

    The uranium production industry is well into its third recession during the nuclear era (since 1945). Exploration is drastically curtailed, and many staffs are being reduced. Historical market price production trends are discussed. A total of 3.07 million acres of land was acquired for exploration; drastic decrease. Surface drilling footage was reduced sharply; an estimated 250 drill rigs were used by the uranium industry during 1980. Land acquisition costs increased 8%. The domestic reserve changes are detailed by cause: exploration, re-evaluation, or production. Two significant discoveries of deposits were made in Mohave County, Arizona. Uranium production during 1980 was 21,850 short tons U/sub 3/O/sub 8/; an increase of 17% from 1979. Domestic and foreign exploration highlights were given. Major producing areas for the US are San Juan basin, Wyoming basins, Texas coastal plain, Paradox basin, northeastern Washington, Henry Mountains, Utah, central Colorado, and the McDermitt caldera in Nevada and Oregon. 3 figures, 8 tables. (DP)

  4. Uranium(VI) reduction by nanoscale zero-valent iron in anoxic batch systems: The role of Fe(II) and Fe(III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Sen; Chen, Yongheng; Xiang, Wu; Bao, Zhengyu; Liu, Chongxuan; Deng, Baolin

    2014-12-01

    The role of Fe(II) and Fe(III) on U(VI) reduction by nanoscale zerovalent iron (nanoFe0) was investigated using two iron chelators 1,10-phenanthroline and triethanolamine (TEA) under a CO2-free anoxic condition. The results showed U(VI) reduction was strongly inhibited by 1,10-phenanthroline and TEA in a pH range from 6.92 to 9.03. For instance, at pH 6.92 the observed U(VI) reduction rates decreased by 80.7% and 82.3% in the presence of 1,10-phenanthroline and TEA, respectively. The inhibition was attributed to the formation of stable complexes between 1,10-phenanthroline and Fe(II) or TEA and Fe(III). In the absence of iron chelators, U(VI) reduction can be enhanced by surface-bound Fe(II) on nanoFe0. Our results suggested that Fe(III) and Fe(II) probably acted as an electron shuttle to mediate the transfer of electrons from nanoFe0 to U(VI), therefore a combined system with Fe(II), Fe(III) and nanoFe0 can facilitate the U(VI) reductive immobilization in the contaminated groundwater.

  5. Reduction of U(VI) Incorporated in the Structure of Hematite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilton, Eugene S.; Lazama Pacheco, Juan S.; Bargar, John R.; Shi, Zhi; Liu, Juan; Kovarik, Libor; Engelhard, Mark H.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2012-09-04

    U(VI) doped hematite was synthesized and exposed to two different organic reductants with E0 of 0.23 and 0.70 V. A combination of HAADF-TEM and EXAFS provided evidence that uranium was incorporated in hematite in uranate, likely octahedral coordination. XPS indicated that structurally incorporated U(VI) was reduced to U(V), whereas adsorbed U(VI) was reduced to U(IV). Specifically, the experiments indicate that U(V) was the dominant oxidation state of uranium in hematite around Eh -0.24 to -0.28 V and pH 7.7-8.6 for at least up to 5 weeks of reaction time. U(V), but not U(IV), was also detected in hematite at Eh +0.21 V (pH 7.1-7.3). The results support the hypothesis, based on previous experimental and theoretical work, that the stability field of U(V) is widened relative to U(IV) and U(VI) in uranate coordination environments where the coordination number of U is less than 8.

  6. Role of vanadium(V) in the aging of the organic phase in the extraction of uranium(VI) by Alamine 336 from acidic sulfate leach liquors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chagnes, A.; Cote, G.; Courtaud, B.; Thiry, J.

    2008-07-01

    The present work is focussed on the chemical degradation of Alamine 336-tridecanol-n-dodecane solvent which used in the recovery of uranium by solvent extraction. Degradation occurs due to the presence of vanadium(V), an oxidant, in the feed solution. After a brief overview of the chemistry of vanadium, the kinetics of degradation of the solvent when contacted with acidic sulfate leach liquor was investigated and interpreted by the Michelis-Menten mechanism. GCMS analyses evidenced the presence of tridecanoic acid and dioctylamine as degradation products. A mechanism of degradation is discussed. (authors)

  7. Supercritical Fluid Extraction and Separation of Uranium from Other Actinides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donna L. Quach; Bruce J. Mincher; Chien M. Wai

    2014-06-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of separating uranium from other actinides by using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (sc-CO2) as a solvent modified with tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) for the development of an extraction and counter current stripping technique, which would be a more efficient and environmentally benign technology for used nuclear fuel reprocessing compared to traditional solvent extraction. Several actinides (U(VI), Np(VI), Pu(IV), and Am(III)) were extracted in sc-CO2 modified with TBP over a range of nitric acid concentrations and then the actinides were exposed to reducing and complexing agents to suppress their extractability. According to this study, the separation of uranium from plutonium in sc-CO2 modified with TBP was successful at nitric acid concentrations of less than 3 M in the presence of acetohydroxamic acid or oxalic acid, and the separation of uranium from neptunium was successful at nitric acid concentrations of less than 1 M in the presence of acetohydroxamic acid, oxalic acid, or sodium nitrite.

  8. Fiscal year 1986 Department of Energy Authorization (uranium enrichment and electric energy systems, energy storage and small-scale hydropower programs). Volume VI. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Energy Research and Production of the Committee on Science and Technology, US House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session, February 28; March 5, 7, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Volume VI of the hearing record covers three days of testimony on the future of US uranium enrichment and on programs involving electric power and energy storage. There were four areas of concern about uranium enrichment: the choice between atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) and the advanced gas centrifuge (AGC) technologies, cost-effective operation of gaseous diffusion plants, plans for a gas centrifuge enrichment plant, and how the DOE will make its decision. The witnesses represented major government contractors, research laboratories, and energy suppliers. The discussion on the third day focused on the impact of reductions in funding for electric energy systems and energy storage and a small budget increase to encourage small hydropower technology transfer to the private sector. Two appendices with additional statements and correspondence follow the testimony of 17 witnesses.

  9. Uranium immobilization and nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffy, C.J.; Ogard, A.E.

    1982-02-01

    Considerable information useful in nuclear waste storage can be gained by studying the conditions of uranium ore deposit formation. Further information can be gained by comparing the chemistry of uranium to nuclear fission products and other radionuclides of concern to nuclear waste disposal. Redox state appears to be the most important variable in controlling uranium solubility, especially at near neutral pH, which is characteristic of most ground water. This is probably also true of neptunium, plutonium, and technetium. Further, redox conditions that immobilize uranium should immobilize these elements. The mechanisms that have produced uranium ore bodies in the Earth's crust are somewhat less clear. At the temperatures of hydrothermal uranium deposits, equilibrium models are probably adequate, aqueous uranium (VI) being reduced and precipitated by interaction with ferrous-iron-bearing oxides and silicates. In lower temperature roll-type uranium deposits, overall equilibrium may not have been achieved. The involvement of sulfate-reducing bacteria in ore-body formation has been postulated, but is uncertain. Reduced sulfur species do, however, appear to be involved in much of the low temperature uranium precipitation. Assessment of the possibility of uranium transport in natural ground water is complicated because the system is generally not in overall equilibrium. For this reason, Eh measurements are of limited value. If a ground water is to be capable of reducing uranium, it must contain ions capable of reducing uranium both thermodynamically and kinetically. At present, the best candidates are reduced sulfur species.

  10. ALTERATION OF U(VI)-PHASES UNDER OXIDIZING CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.P. Deditius; S. Utsunomiya; R.C. Ewing

    2006-02-21

    Uranium-(VI) phases are the primary alteration products of the UO{sub 2} in spent nuclear fuel and the UO{sub 2+x}, in natural uranium deposits. The U(VI)-phases generally form sheet structures of edge-sharing UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} polyhedra. The complexity of these structures offers numerous possibilities for coupled-substitutions of trace metals and radionuclides. The incorporation of radionuclides into U(VI)-structures provides a potential barrier to their release and transport in a geologic repository that experiences oxidizing conditions. In this study, we have used natural samples of UO{sub 2+x}, to study the U(VI)-phases that form during alteration and to determine the fate of the associated trace elements.

  11. Fermentation and Hydrogen Metabolism Affect Uranium Reduction by Clostridia

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gao, Weimin; Francis, Arokiasamy J.

    2013-01-01

    Previously, it has been shown that not only is uranium reduction under fermentation condition common among clostridia species, but also the strains differed in the extent of their capability and the pH of the culture significantly affected uranium(VI) reduction. In this study, using HPLC and GC techniques, metabolic properties of those clostridial strains active in uranium reduction under fermentation conditions have been characterized and their effects on capability variance of uranium reduction discussed. Then, the relationship between hydrogen metabolism and uranium reduction has been further explored and the important role played by hydrogenase in uranium(VI) and iron(III) reduction bymore » clostridia demonstrated. When hydrogen was provided as the headspace gas, uranium(VI) reduction occurred in the presence of whole cells of clostridia. This is in contrast to that of nitrogen as the headspace gas. Without clostridia cells, hydrogen alone could not result in uranium(VI) reduction. In alignment with this observation, it was also found that either copper(II) addition or iron depletion in the medium could compromise uranium reduction by clostridia. In the end, a comprehensive model was proposed to explain uranium reduction by clostridia and its relationship to the overall metabolism especially hydrogen (H 2 ) production.« less

  12. Reduction of U(VI) and Toxic Metals by Desulfovibrio Cytochrome c3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wall, Judy D.

    2003-06-01

    The project, ''Reduction of U(VI) and toxic metals by Desulfovibrio cytochrome c3'', is designed to obtain spectroscopic information for or against a functional interaction of cytochrome c3 and uranium in the whole cells. That is, is the cytochrome c3 the uranium reductase? Our approach has been to start with purified cytochrome and determine any unique spectral disturbances during electron flow to U(VI). Then we will attempt to identify these signals emanating from cells actively reducing uranium. This project is being carried out in collaboration with Dr. William Woodruff at the Los Alamos National Laboratory where the spectral experiments are being carried out.

  13. High-Quality Draft Genome Sequence of Desulfovibrio carbinoliphilus FW-101-2B, an Organic Acid-Oxidizing Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from Uranium(VI)-Contaminated Groundwater

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ramsay, Bradley D.; Hwang, Chiachi; Woo, Hannah L.; Carroll, Sue L.; Lucas, Susan; Han, James; Lapidus, Alla L.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Samuel; et al

    2015-03-12

    Desulfovibrio carbinoliphilus subsp. oakridgensis FW-101-2B is an anaerobic, organic acid/alcohol-oxidizing, sulfate-reducing δ-proteobacterium. FW-101-2B was isolated from contaminated groundwater at The Field Research Center at Oak Ridge National Lab after in situ stimulation for heavy metal-reducing conditions. The genome will help elucidate the metabolic potential of sulfate-reducing bacteria during uranium reduction.

  14. High-Quality Draft Genome Sequence of Desulfovibrio carbinoliphilus FW-101-2B, an Organic Acid-Oxidizing Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from Uranium(VI)-Contaminated Groundwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsay, Bradley D.; Hwang, Chiachi; Woo, Hannah L.; Carroll, Sue L.; Lucas, Susan; Han, James; Lapidus, Alla L.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Samuel; Peters, Lin; Chertkov, Olga; Held, Brittany; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff S.; Tapia, Roxanne; Land, Miriam L.; Hauser, Loren J.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pagani, Loanna; Woyke, Tanja; Arkin, Adam P.; Dehal, Paramvir; Chivian, Dylan; Criddle, Craig S.; Wu, Weimin; Chakraborty, Romy; Hazen, Terry C.; Fields, Matthew W.

    2015-03-12

    Desulfovibrio carbinoliphilus subsp. oakridgensis FW-101-2B is an anaerobic, organic acid/alcohol-oxidizing, sulfate-reducing ?-proteobacterium. FW-101-2B was isolated from contaminated groundwater at The Field Research Center at Oak Ridge National Lab after in situ stimulation for heavy metal-reducing conditions. The genome will help elucidate the metabolic potential of sulfate-reducing bacteria during uranium reduction.

  15. Uranium Reduction by Clostridia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francis, A.J.; Dodge, Cleveland J.; Gillow, Jeffrey B.

    2006-04-05

    The FRC groundwater and sediment contain significant concentrations of U and Tc and are dominated by low pH, and high nitrate and Al concentrations where dissimilatory metal reducing bacterial activity may be limited. The presence of Clostridia in Area 3 at the FRC site has been confirmed and their ability to reduce uranium under site conditions will be determined. Although the phenomenon of uranium reduction by Clostridia has been firmly established, the molecular mechanisms underlying such a reaction are not very clear. The authors are exploring the hypothesis that U(VI) reduction occurs through hydrogenases and other enzymes (Matin and Francis). Fundamental knowledge of metal reduction using Clostridia will allow us to exploit naturally occurring processes to attenuate radionuclide and metal contaminants in situ in the subsurface. The outline for this report are as follows: (1) Growth of Clostridium sp. under normal culture conditions; (2) Fate of metals and radionuclides in the presence of Clostridia; (3) Bioreduction of uranium associated with nitrate, citrate, and lepidocrocite; and (4) Utilization of Clostridium sp. for immobilization of uranium at the FRC Area 3 site.

  16. In Situ Biological Uranium Remediation within a Highly Contaminated Aquifer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In Situ Biological Uranium Remediation within a Highly Contaminated Aquifer Matthew Ginder-Vogel1, Wei-Min Wu1, Jack Carley2, Phillip Jardine2, Scott Fendorf1 and Craig Criddle1 1Stanford University, Stanford, CA 2Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN Microbial Respiration Figure 1. Uranium(VI) reduction is driven by microbial respiration resulting in the precipitation of uraninite. Uranium contamination of ground and surface waters has been detected at numerous sites throughout the

  17. URANIUM ALLOYS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colbeck, E.W.

    1959-12-29

    A uranium alloy is reported containing from 0.1 to 5 per cent by weight of molybdenum and from 0.1 to 5 per cent by weight of silicon, the balance being uranium.

  18. Sasse Modeling of First Cycle Neptunium (VI) Recovery Flowsheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laurinat, J. E.

    2006-04-01

    A flowsheet has been proposed to separate neptunium from solutions in H-Canyon Tanks 16.4, 12.5, and 11.7 in the First Cycle solvent extraction banks, in which cerium(IV) (Ce(IV)) serves as an agent to oxidize neptunium to neptunium(VI) (Np(VI)). A SASSE (Spreadsheet Algorithm for Stagewise Solvent Extraction) spreadsheet model indicates that the proposed flowsheet is a feasible method for separating neptunium and uranium from sulfates, thorium, and other metal impurities. The proposed flowsheet calls for stripping the sulfates, thorium, and other metal impurities into the 1AW stream and extracting and then stripping the neptunium and uranium into the 1BP stream. SASSE predicts that separation of thorium from the other actinides can be accomplished with actinide losses of 0.01% or less. It is assumed that other metal impurities such as iron, aluminum, and fission products will follow the thorium into 1AW. Due to an organic/aqueous distribution coefficient that is close to one, SASSE predicts that plutonium(VI) (Pu(VI)) is split between the A Bank and B Bank aqueous output streams, with 27% going to 1AW and 73% going to 1BP. An extrapolated distribution coefficient based on unvalidated Ce(IV) distribution measurements at a single nitrate concentration and a comparison with thorium(IV) (Th(IV)) distributions indicates that Ce(IV) could reflux in 1B Bank. If the Ce(IV) distribution coefficient is lower than would be predicted by this single point extrapolation, but still higher than the distribution coefficient for Th(IV), then Ce(IV) would follow Np(VI) and uranium(VI) (U(VI)) into 1BP. The SASSE model was validated using data from a 1964 oxidizing flowsheet for the recovery of Np(VI) in Second Cycle. For the proposed flowsheet to be effective in recovering neptunium, the addition of approximately 0.025 M ceric ammonium nitrate (Ce(NH4)2(NO3)6) to both the 1AF and 1AS streams is required to stabilize the neptunium in the +6

  19. METHOD OF ELECTROPLATING ON URANIUM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rebol, E.W.; Wehrmann, R.F.

    1959-04-28

    This patent relates to a preparation of metallic uranium surfaces for receiving coatings, particularly in order to secure adherent electroplated coatings upon uranium metal. In accordance with the invention the uranium surface is pretreated by degreasing in trichloroethylene, followed by immersion in 25 to 50% nitric acid for several minutes, and then rinsed with running water, prior to pickling in trichloroacetic acid. The last treatment is best accomplished by making the uranium the anode in an aqueous solution of 50 per cent by weight trichloroacetic acid until work-distorted crystals or oxide present on the metal surface have been removed and the basic crystalline structure of the base metal has been exposed. Following these initial steps the metallic uranium is rinsed in dilute nitric acid and then electroplated with nickel. Adnerent firmly-bonded coatings of nickel are obtained.

  20. Determination of the Relative Amount of Fluorine in Uranium Oxyfluoride Particles using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry and Optical Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kips, R; Kristo, M J; Hutcheon, I D; Amonette, J; Wang, Z; Johnson, T; Gerlach, D; Olsen, K B

    2009-05-29

    Both nuclear forensics and environmental sampling depend upon laboratory analysis of nuclear material that has often been exposed to the environment after it has been produced. It is therefore important to understand how those environmental conditions might have changed the chemical composition of the material over time, particularly for chemically sensitive compounds. In the specific case of uranium enrichment facilities, uranium-bearing particles stem from small releases of uranium hexafluoride, a highly reactive gas that hydrolyzes upon contact with moisture from the air to form uranium oxyfluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) particles. The uranium isotopic composition of those particles is used by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to verify whether a facility is compliant with its declarations. The present study, however, aims to demonstrate how knowledge of time-dependent changes in chemical composition, particle morphology and molecular structure can contribute to an even more reliable interpretation of the analytical results. We prepared a set of uranium oxyfluoride particles at the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM, European Commission, Belgium) and followed changes in their composition, morphology and structure with time to see if we could use these properties to place boundaries on the particle exposure time in the environment. Because the rate of change is affected by exposure to UV-light, humidity levels and elevated temperatures, the samples were subjected to varying conditions of those three parameters. The NanoSIMS at LLNL was found to be the optimal tool to measure the relative amount of fluorine in individual uranium oxyfluoride particles. At PNNL, cryogenic laser-induced time-resolved U(VI) fluorescence microspectroscopy (CLIFS) was used to monitor changes in the molecular structure.

  1. Characterization of U(VI) Sorption-Desorption Processes and Model Upscaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachara, John M.

    2003-06-01

    The objectives of the overall collaborative EMSP effort (with which this project is associated) are to characterize sorption and desorption processes of U(VI) on pristine and contaminated Hanford sediments over a range of sediment facies and materials properties. The research is intended to provide new insights on the mechanisms of U(VI) retardation at Hanford, and to develop approaches by which laboratory-characterized geochemical models can be upscaled for defensible predictions of uranium transport in field.

  2. Technical Basis for Assessing Uranium Bioremediation Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PE Long; SB Yabusaki; PD Meyer; CJ Murray; AL N’Guessan

    2008-04-01

    In situ bioremediation of uranium holds significant promise for effective stabilization of U(VI) from groundwater at reduced cost compared to conventional pump and treat. This promise is unlikely to be realized unless researchers and practitioners successfully predict and demonstrate the long-term effectiveness of uranium bioremediation protocols. Field research to date has focused on both proof of principle and a mechanistic level of understanding. Current practice typically involves an engineering approach using proprietary amendments that focuses mainly on monitoring U(VI) concentration for a limited time period. Given the complexity of uranium biogeochemistry and uranium secondary minerals, and the lack of documented case studies, a systematic monitoring approach using multiple performance indicators is needed. This document provides an overview of uranium bioremediation, summarizes design considerations, and identifies and prioritizes field performance indicators for the application of uranium bioremediation. The performance indicators provided as part of this document are based on current biogeochemical understanding of uranium and will enable practitioners to monitor the performance of their system and make a strong case to clients, regulators, and the public that the future performance of the system can be assured and changes in performance addressed as needed. The performance indicators established by this document and the information gained by using these indicators do add to the cost of uranium bioremediation. However, they are vital to the long-term success of the application of uranium bioremediation and provide a significant assurance that regulatory goals will be met. The document also emphasizes the need for systematic development of key information from bench scale tests and pilot scales tests prior to full-scale implementation.

  3. URANIUM COMPOSITIONS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allen, N.P.; Grogan, J.D.

    1959-05-12

    This patent relates to high purity uranium alloys characterized by improved stability to thermal cycling and low thermal neutron absorption. The high purity uranium alloy contains less than 0.1 per cent by weight in total amount of any ore or more of the elements such as aluminum, silicon, phosphorous, tin, lead, bismuth, niobium, and zinc.

  4. Uranium Processing Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Uranium Processing Facility

  5. Uranium industry annual 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-04-01

    This report provides statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing.

  6. Uranium metal reactions with hydrogen and water vapour and the reactivity of the uranium hydride produced

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godfrey, H.; Broan, C.; Goddard, D.; Hodge, N.; Woodhouse, G.; Diggle, A.; Orr, R.

    2013-07-01

    Within the nuclear industry, metallic uranium has been used as a fuel. If this metal is stored in a hydrogen rich environment then the uranium metal can react with the hydrogen to form uranium hydride which can be pyrophoric when exposed to air. The UK National Nuclear Laboratory has been carrying out a programme of research for Sellafield Limited to investigate the conditions required for the formation and persistence of uranium hydride and the reactivity of the material formed. The experimental results presented here have described new results characterising uranium hydride formed from bulk uranium at 50 and 160 C. degrees and measurements of the hydrolysis kinetics of these materials in liquid water. It has been shown that there is an increase in the proportion of alpha-uranium hydride in material formed at lower temperatures and that there is an increase in the rate of reaction with water of uranium hydride formed at lower temperatures. This may at least in part be attributable to a difference in the reaction rate between alpha and beta-uranium hydride. A striking observation is the strong dependence of the hydrolysis reaction rate on the temperature of preparation of the uranium hydride. For example, the reaction rate of uranium hydride prepared at 50 C. degrees was over ten times higher than that prepared at 160 C. degrees at 20% extent of reaction. The decrease in reaction rate with the extent of reaction also depended on the temperature of uranium hydride preparation.

  7. Bicarbonate Impact on U(VI) Bioreduction in a Shallow Alluvial Aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Philip E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Davis, James A.; Fox, Patricia M.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Fang, Yilin; Waichler, Scott R.; Berman, Elena S.; Gupta, Manish; Chandler, Darrell P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Giloteaux, L.; Handley, Kim M.; Lovley, Derek R.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2015-02-01

    Field-scale biostimulation and desorption tracer experiments conducted in a uranium (U) contaminated, shallow alluvial aquifer have provided insight into the coupling of microbiology, biogeochemistry, and hydrogeology that control U mobility in the subsurface. Initial experiments successfully tested the concept that Fe-reducing bacteria such as Geobacter sp. could enzymatically reduce soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) during in situ electron donor amendment (Anderson et al. 2003, Williams et al. 2011). In parallel, in situ desorption tracer tests using bicarbonate amendment demonstrated rate-limited U(VI) desorption (Fox et al. 2012). These results and prior laboratory studies underscored the importance of enzymatic U(VI)-reduction and suggested the ability to combine desorption and bioreduction of U(VI). Here we report the results of a new field experiment in which bicarbonate-promoted uranium desorption and acetate amendment were combined and compared to an acetate amendment-only experiment in the same experimental plot. Results confirm that bicarbonate amendment to alluvial aquifer desorbs U(VI) and increases the abundance of Ca-uranyl-carbonato complexes. At the same time, that the rate of acetate-promoted enzymatic U(VI) reduction was greater in the presence of added bicarbonate in spite of the increased dominance of Ca-uranyl-carbonato aqueous complexes. A model-simulated peak rate of U(VI) reduction was ~3.8 times higher during acetate-bicarbonate treatment than under acetate-only conditions. Lack of consistent differences in microbial community structure between acetate-bicarbonate and acetate-only treatments suggest that a significantly higher rate of U(VI) reduction the bicarbonate-impacted sediment may be due to a higher intrinsic rate of microbial reduction induced by elevated concentrations of the bicarbonate oxyanion. The findings indicate that bicarbonate amendment may be useful in improving the engineered bioremediation of uranium in aquifers.

  8. Evaluation of an automatic uranium titration system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, K.

    1980-01-01

    The titration system utilizes the constant current coulometric titration of Goldbeck and Lerner. U(VI) is reduced to U(IV) by Fe(II). V(V) is generated to titrate the U(IV), and the titration is followed potentiometrically. The evaluation shows that the recovery of uranium is 100% at the 40-mg level. The accuracy is generally +-0.10% or better. The smallest sample weight at which reliable results were obtained was 40 mg of uranium. Time for one analysis is 15 minutes. Advantages and disadvantages of the automated titrator are listed. (DLC)

  9. JACKETING URANIUM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Saller, H.A.; Keeler, J.R.

    1959-07-14

    The bonding to uranium of sheathing of iron or cobalt, or nickel, or alloys thereof is described. The bonding is accomplished by electro-depositing both surfaces to be joined with a coating of silver and amalgamating or alloying the silver layer with mercury or indium. Then the silver alloy is homogenized by exerting pressure on an assembly of the uranium core and the metal jacket, reducing the area of assembly and heating the assembly to homogenize by diffusion.

  10. Title VI | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    VI Title VI Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, and national origin in programs and activities that receive federal financial assistance. The law states, in part, that: No person in the United States shall, on the ground of race, color, or national origin, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance. The Office of

  11. PROCESS FOR PRODUCTION OF URANIUM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crawford, J.W.C.

    1959-09-29

    A process is described for the production of uranium by the autothermic reduction of an anhydrous uranium halide with an alkaline earth metal, preferably magnesium One feature is the initial reduction step which is brought about by locally bringing to reaction temperature a portion of a mixture of the reactants in an open reaction vessel having in contact with the mixture a lining of substantial thickness composed of calcium fluoride. The lining is prepared by coating the interior surface with a plastic mixture of calcium fluoride and water and subsequently heating the coating in situ until at last the exposed surface is substantially anhydrous.

  12. 2015 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    and Development Drilling","Mine Production of Uranium ","Uranium Concentrate Production ","Uranium Concentrate Shipments ","Employment " "Year","Drilling (million feet)"," ...

  13. Fate and Transport of Uranium (VI) in Weathered Saprolite (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sorption kinetics were measured at two initial concentrations (C0; 1, 10 mM) and three soil:solution ratios (Rsw; 0.005, 0.25, 2 kgL) at pH 4.5 (pH of the saprolite). The rate of ...

  14. Uranium isotopes fingerprint biotic reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Wang, Yuheng; Monga, Nikhil; Romaniello, Stephen J.; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2015-04-20

    Knowledge of paleo-redox conditions in the Earth’s history provides a window into events that shaped the evolution of life on our planet. The role of microbial activity in paleo-redox processes remains unexplored due to the inability to discriminate biotic from abiotic redox transformations in the rock record. The ability to deconvolute these two processes would provide a means to identify environmental niches in which microbial activity was prevalent at a specific time in paleo-history and to correlate specific biogeochemical events with the corresponding microbial metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that the isotopic signature associated with microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium (U), i.e., the accumulation of the heavy isotope in the U(IV) phase, is readily distinguishable from that generated by abiotic uranium reduction in laboratory experiments. Thus, isotope signatures preserved in the geologic record through the reductive precipitation of uranium may provide the sought-after tool to probe for biotic processes. Because uranium is a common element in the Earth’s crust and a wide variety of metabolic groups of microorganisms catalyze the biological reduction of U(VI), this tool is applicable to a multiplicity of geological epochs and terrestrial environments. The findings of this study indicate that biological activity contributed to the formation of many authigenic U deposits, including sandstone U deposits of various ages, as well as modern, Cretaceous, and Archean black shales. In addition, engineered bioremediation activities also exhibit a biotic signature, suggesting that, although multiple pathways may be involved in the reduction, direct enzymatic reduction contributes substantially to the immobilization of uranium.

  15. Uranium isotopes fingerprint biotic reduction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Wang, Yuheng; Monga, Nikhil; Romaniello, Stephen J.; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2015-04-20

    Knowledge of paleo-redox conditions in the Earth’s history provides a window into events that shaped the evolution of life on our planet. The role of microbial activity in paleo-redox processes remains unexplored due to the inability to discriminate biotic from abiotic redox transformations in the rock record. The ability to deconvolute these two processes would provide a means to identify environmental niches in which microbial activity was prevalent at a specific time in paleo-history and to correlate specific biogeochemical events with the corresponding microbial metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that the isotopic signature associated with microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium (U),more » i.e., the accumulation of the heavy isotope in the U(IV) phase, is readily distinguishable from that generated by abiotic uranium reduction in laboratory experiments. Thus, isotope signatures preserved in the geologic record through the reductive precipitation of uranium may provide the sought-after tool to probe for biotic processes. Because uranium is a common element in the Earth’s crust and a wide variety of metabolic groups of microorganisms catalyze the biological reduction of U(VI), this tool is applicable to a multiplicity of geological epochs and terrestrial environments. The findings of this study indicate that biological activity contributed to the formation of many authigenic U deposits, including sandstone U deposits of various ages, as well as modern, Cretaceous, and Archean black shales. In addition, engineered bioremediation activities also exhibit a biotic signature, suggesting that, although multiple pathways may be involved in the reduction, direct enzymatic reduction contributes substantially to the immobilization of uranium.« less

  16. Uranium enrichment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    This book presents the GAO's views on the Department of Energy's (DOE) program to develop a new uranium enrichment technology, the atomic vapor laser isotope separation process (AVLIS). Views are drawn from GAO's ongoing review of AVLIS, in which the technical, program, and market issues that need to be addressed before an AVLIS plant is built are examined.

  17. National uranium resource evaluation. Winnemucca Quadrangle, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berridge, W.C.; Wolverson, N.J.

    1982-05-01

    The Winnemucca 2/sup 0/ quadrangle, Nevada, was evaluated for geologic environments favorable for uranium deposits, using criteria developed for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. Reconnaissance radiometric and geochemical surveys were conducted for all geologic environments open to evaluation. Detailed surface and subsurface investigations were conducted in potential host and source environments. Subsurface data collected by private industry were obtained for favorable environments. The results of this investigation indicate environments favorable for hydroallogenic uranium deposits in the Fish Creek Basin sedimentary rocks of Miocene age, and for hydroallogenic and sandstone uranium deposits in the Home Station Wash sedimentary rocks of Miocene age. Environments in the quadrangle considered unfavorable for uranium deposits are exposed sedimentary rocks of Precambrian, Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Tertiary ages (other than those in the Fish Creek Basin and Home Station Wash areas); Mesozoic and Tertiary plutonic rocks; and Mesozoic and Tertiary volcanic rocks. Substantial portions of the quadrangle remain unevaluated because of restricted access or insufficient subsurface data.

  18. Cr(VI) Occurrence and Geochemistry in Water From Public-Supply Wells in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izbicki, John A.; Wright, Michael T.; Seymour, Whitney A.; McCleskey, R. Blaine; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth; Esser, Bradley K.

    2015-08-18

    Hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), in 918 wells sampled throughout California between 2004 and 2012 by the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment Program—Priority Basin Project (GAMA—PBP) ranged from less than the study reporting limit (SRL) of 1 microgram per liter (μg/L) to 32 μg/L. Statewide, Cr(VI) was reported in 31 percent of sampled wells and equaled or exceeded the recently established (2014) California Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for Cr(VI) of 10 μg/L in 4 percent of sampled wells. Cr(VI) data collected for regulatory purposes overestimate Cr(VI) occurrence. Ninety percent of chromium was present as Cr(VI), which was detected more frequently and at higher concentrations in alkaline (pH > 8), oxic water, and more frequently in agricultural and urban land uses compared to native land uses. Chemical, isotopic (tritium and carbon-14), and noble-gas data show high Cr(VI) in water from wells in alluvial aquifers in the southern California deserts result from long groundwater-residence times and geochemical reactions such as silicate weathering that increase pH, while oxic conditions persist. High Cr(VI) in water from wells in alluvial aquifers along the west-side of the Central Valley results from high-chromium abundance in source rock eroded to form those aquifers, and areal recharge processes (including irrigation return) that mobilize chromium from the unsaturated zone. Cr(VI) co-occurred with oxyanions having similar chemistry, including vanadium, selenium, and uranium. Cr(VI) was positively correlated with nitrate, consistent with increased concentrations in areas of agricultural land use and mobilization of chromium from the unsaturated zone by irrigation return.

  19. Cr(VI) Occurrence and Geochemistry in Water From Public-Supply Wells in California

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Izbicki, John A.; Wright, Michael T.; Seymour, Whitney A.; McCleskey, R. Blaine; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth; Esser, Bradley K.

    2015-08-18

    Hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), in 918 wells sampled throughout California between 2004 and 2012 by the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment Program—Priority Basin Project (GAMA—PBP) ranged from less than the study reporting limit (SRL) of 1 microgram per liter (μg/L) to 32 μg/L. Statewide, Cr(VI) was reported in 31 percent of sampled wells and equaled or exceeded the recently established (2014) California Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for Cr(VI) of 10 μg/L in 4 percent of sampled wells. Cr(VI) data collected for regulatory purposes overestimate Cr(VI) occurrence. Ninety percent of chromium was present as Cr(VI), which was detected more frequently and atmore » higher concentrations in alkaline (pH > 8), oxic water, and more frequently in agricultural and urban land uses compared to native land uses. Chemical, isotopic (tritium and carbon-14), and noble-gas data show high Cr(VI) in water from wells in alluvial aquifers in the southern California deserts result from long groundwater-residence times and geochemical reactions such as silicate weathering that increase pH, while oxic conditions persist. High Cr(VI) in water from wells in alluvial aquifers along the west-side of the Central Valley results from high-chromium abundance in source rock eroded to form those aquifers, and areal recharge processes (including irrigation return) that mobilize chromium from the unsaturated zone. Cr(VI) co-occurred with oxyanions having similar chemistry, including vanadium, selenium, and uranium. Cr(VI) was positively correlated with nitrate, consistent with increased concentrations in areas of agricultural land use and mobilization of chromium from the unsaturated zone by irrigation return.« less

  20. Uranium industry annual 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  1. The quantitative ion exchange separation of uranium from impurities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narayanan, U.I.; Mason, P.B.; Zebrowski, J.P.; Rocca, M.; Frank, I.W.; Smith, M.M.; Johnson, K.D.; Orlowicz, G.J.; Dallmann, E.

    1995-03-01

    Two methods were tested for the quantitative separation of uranium from elemental impurities using commercially available resins. The sorption and elution behavior of uranium and the separation of it from a variety of other elements was studied. The first method utilized an anion exchange resin while the second method employed an extraction resin. The first method, the anion exchange of uranium (VI) in an acid chloride medium, was optimized and statistically tested for quantitative recovery of uranium. This procedure involved adsorption of uranium onto Blo-Rad AG 1-X8 or MP-1 ion exchange resins in 8 M HCl, separation of uncompleted or weakly complexed matrix ions with an 8 M HCI wash, and subsequent elution of uranium with 1 M HCl. Matrix ions more strongly adsorbed than uranium were left on the resin. Uranium recoveries with this procedure averaged greater than 99.9% with a standard deviation of 0.1%. In the second method, recovery of uranium on the extraction resin did not meet the criteria of this study and further examination was terminated.

  2. Uranium enrichment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports that in 1990 the Department of Energy began a two-year project to illustrate the technical and economic feasibility of a new uranium enrichment technology-the atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) process. GAO believes that completing the AVLIS demonstration project will provide valuable information about the technical viability and cost of building an AVLIS plant and will keep future plant construction options open. However, Congress should be aware that DOE still needs to adequately demonstrate AVLIS with full-scale equipment and develop convincing cost projects. Program activities, such as the plant-licensing process, that must be completed before a plant is built, could take many years. Further, an updated and expanded uranium enrichment analysis will be needed before any decision is made about building an AVLIS plant. GAO, which has long supported legislation that would restructure DOE's uranium enrichment program as a government corporation, encourages DOE's goal of transferring AVLIS to the corporation. This could reduce the government's financial risk and help ensure that the decision to build an AVLIS plant is based on commercial concerns. DOE, however, has no alternative plans should the government corporation not be formed. Further, by curtailing a planned public access program, which would have given private firms an opportunity to learn about the technology during the demonstration project, DOE may limit its ability to transfer AVLIS to the private sector.

  3. Characterization of U(VI) Sorption-Desorption Processes and Model Upscaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachara, John M.; Brown, Gordon, E.; Lichtner, Peter C.; Ball, William

    2004-06-14

    The objectives of the overall collaborative EMSP effort (with which this project is associated) are to characterize sorption and desorption processes of U(VI) on pristine and contaminated Hanford sediments over a range of sediment facies and materials properties and to relate such characterization both to fundamental molecular-scale understanding and fieldscale models of geochemistry and mass transfer. The research is intended to provide new insights on the mechanisms of U(VI) retardation at Hanford, and to allow the development of approaches by which laboratory-developed geochemical models can be upscaled for defensible field-scale predictions of uranium transport in the environment.

  4. Electrochemical and spectroscopic evidence on the one-electron reduction of U(VI) to U(V) on magnetite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Ke; Ilton, Eugene S.; Antonio, Mark R.; Li, Zhongrui; Cook, Peter J.; Becker, Udo

    2015-05-19

    Reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) on mineral surfaces has been considered as a one-step two electron process. However, stabilized U(V), with no evidence of U(IV), found in recent studies indicates U(VI) can undergo a one electron reduction to U(V) without further progression to U(IV). We investigated the mechanisms of uranium reduction by reducing U(VI) electrochemically on a magnetite electrode at pH 3.4 . The one electron reduction of U(VI) was first confirmed using the cyclic voltammetry method. Formation of nano-size uranium precipitates on the surface of magnetite at reducing potentials and dissolution of the solids at oxidizing potentials were observed by in situ electrochemical AFM. XPS analysis of the magnetite electrodes polarized in uranium solutions at voltages from 0.1 ~ 0.9 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) showed the presence of only U(V) and U(VI). The highest amount of U(V) relative to U(VI) was prepared at 0.7 V, where the longest average UOaxial distance of 2.05 0.01 was evident in the same sample revealed by EXAFS analysis. The results demonstrate that the electrochemical reduction of U(VI) on magnetite only yields U(V), even at a potential of 0.9 V, which favors the one-electron reduction mechanism. U(V) did not disproportionate but stabilized on magnetite through precipitation of mixed-valence state U(VI)/U(V) solids.

  5. Uranium Biomineralization by Natural Microbial Phosphatase Activities in the Subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobecky, Patricia A.

    2015-04-06

    In this project, inter-disciplinary research activities were conducted in collaboration among investigators at The University of Alabama (UA), Georgia Institute of Technology (GT), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), and the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light source (SSRL) to: (i) confirm that phosphatase activities of subsurface bacteria in Area 2 and 3 from the Oak Ridge Field Research Center result in solid U-phosphate precipitation in aerobic and anaerobic conditions; (ii) investigate the eventual competition between uranium biomineralization via U-phosphate precipitation and uranium bioreduction; (iii) determine subsurface microbial community structure changes of Area 2 soils following organophosphate amendments; (iv) obtain the complete genome sequences of the Rahnella sp. Y9-602 and the type-strain Rahnella aquatilis ATCC 33071 isolated from these soils; (v) determine if polyphosphate accumulation and phytate hydrolysis can be used to promote U(VI) biomineralization in subsurface sediments; (vi) characterize the effect of uranium on phytate hydrolysis by a new microorganism isolated from uranium-contaminated sediments; (vii) utilize positron-emission tomography to label and track metabolically-active bacteria in soil columns, and (viii) study the stability of the uranium phosphate mineral product. Microarray analyses and mineral precipitation characterizations were conducted in collaboration with DOE SBR-funded investigators at LBNL. Thus, microbial phosphorus metabolism has been shown to have a contributing role to uranium immobilization in the subsurface.

  6. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2. Maximum anticipated uranium market requirements of owners and operators of U.S. ... Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-858 "Uranium Marketing Annual ...

  7. COPPER COATED URANIUM ARTICLE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, A.G.

    1958-10-01

    Various techniques and methods for obtaining coppercoated uranium are given. Specifically disclosed are a group of complex uranium coatings having successive layers of nickel, copper, lead, and tin.

  8. Uranium Industry Annual, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-28

    The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ``Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,`` is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2.

  9. URANIUM EXTRACTION

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harrington, C.D.; Opie, J.V.

    1958-07-01

    The recovery of uranium values from uranium ore such as pitchblende is described. The ore is first dissolved in nitric acid, and a water soluble nitrate is added as a salting out agent. The resulting feed solution is then contacted with diethyl ether, whereby the bulk of the uranyl nitrate and a portion of the impurities are taken up by the ether. This acid ether extract is then separated from the aqueous raffinate, and contacted with water causing back extractioa of the uranyl nitrate and impurities into the water to form a crude liquor. After separation from the ether extract, this crude liquor is heated to about 118 deg C to obtain molten uranyl nitrate hexahydratc. After being slightly cooled the uranyl nitrate hexahydrate is contacted with acid free diethyl ether whereby the bulk of the uranyl nitrate is dissolved into the ethcr to form a neutral ether solution while most of the impurities remain in the aqueous waste. After separation from the aqueous waste, the resultant ether solution is washed with about l0% of its volume of water to free it of any dissolved impurities and is then contacted with at least one half its volume of water whereby the uranyl nitrate is extracted into the water to form an aqueous product solution.

  10. New Technique for Speciation of Uranium in Sediments Following Acetate-Stimulated Bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-06-22

    Acetate-stimulated bioremediation is a promising new technique for sequestering toxic uranium contamination from groundwater. The speciation of uranium in sediments after such bioremediation attempts remains unknown as a result of low uranium concentration, and is important to analyzing the stability of sequestered uranium. A new technique was developed for investigating the oxidation state and local molecular structure of uranium from field site sediments using X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS), and was implemented at the site of a former uranium mill in Rifle, CO. Glass columns filled with bioactive Rifle sediments were deployed in wells in the contaminated Rifle aquifer and amended with a hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) stock solution to increase uranium concentration while maintaining field conditions. This sediment was harvested and XAS was utilized to analyze the oxidation state and local molecular structure of the uranium in sediment samples. Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) data was collected and compared to known uranium spectra to determine the local molecular structure of the uranium in the sediment. Fitting was used to determine that the field site sediments did not contain uraninite (UO{sub 2}), indicating that models based on bioreduction using pure bacterial cultures are not accurate for bioremediation in the field. Stability tests on the monomeric tetravalent uranium (U(IV)) produced by bioremediation are needed in order to assess the efficacy of acetate-stimulation bioremediation.

  11. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM TETRACHLORIDE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Calkins, V.P.

    1958-12-16

    A process is descrlbed for the production of uranium tetrachloride by contacting uranlum values such as uranium hexafluoride, uranlum tetrafluoride, or uranium oxides with either aluminum chloride, boron chloride, or sodium alumlnum chloride under substantially anhydrous condltlons at such a temperature and pressure that the chlorldes are maintained in the molten form and until the uranium values are completely converted to uranlum tetrachloride.

  12. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM MONOCARBIDE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Powers, R.M.

    1962-07-24

    A method of making essentially stoichiometric uranium monocarbide by pelletizing a mixture of uranium tetrafluoride, silicon, and carbon and reacting the mixture at a temperature of approximately 1500 to 1700 deg C until the reaction goes to completion, forming uranium monocarbide powder and volatile silicon tetrafluoride, is described. The powder is then melted to produce uranium monocarbide in massive form. (AEC)

  13. A Uranium Bioremediation Reactive Transport Benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yabusaki, Steven B.; Sengor, Sevinc; Fang, Yilin

    2015-06-01

    A reactive transport benchmark problem set has been developed based on in situ uranium bio-immobilization experiments that have been performed at a former uranium mill tailings site in Rifle, Colorado, USA. Acetate-amended groundwater stimulates indigenous microorganisms to catalyze the reduction of U(VI) to a sparingly soluble U(IV) mineral. The interplay between the flow, acetate loading periods and rates, microbially-mediated and geochemical reactions leads to dynamic behavior in metal- and sulfate-reducing bacteria, pH, alkalinity, and reactive mineral surfaces. The benchmark is based on an 8.5 m long one-dimensional model domain with constant saturated flow and uniform porosity. The 159-day simulation introduces acetate and bromide through the upgradient boundary in 14-day and 85-day pulses separated by a 10 day interruption. Acetate loading is tripled during the second pulse, which is followed by a 50 day recovery period. Terminal electron accepting processes for goethite, phyllosilicate Fe(III), U(VI), and sulfate are modeled using Monod-type rate laws. Major ion geochemistry modeled includes mineral reactions, as well as aqueous and surface complexation reactions for UO2++, Fe++, and H+. In addition to the dynamics imparted by the transport of the acetate pulses, U(VI) behavior involves the interplay between bioreduction, which is dependent on acetate availability, and speciation-controlled surface complexation, which is dependent on pH, alkalinity and available surface complexation sites. The general difficulty of this benchmark is the large number of reactions (74), multiple rate law formulations, a multisite uranium surface complexation model, and the strong interdependency and sensitivity of the reaction processes. Results are presented for three simulators: HYDROGEOCHEM, PHT3D, and PHREEQC.

  14. DECONTAMINATION OF URANIUM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feder, H.M.; Chellew, N.R.

    1958-02-01

    This patent deals with the separation of rare earth and other fission products from neutron bombarded uranium. This is accomplished by melting the uranium in contact with either thorium oxide, maguesium oxide, alumnum oxide, beryllium oxide, or uranium dioxide. The melting is preferably carried out at from 1150 deg to 1400 deg C in an inert atmosphere, such as argon or helium. During this treatment a scale of uranium dioxide forms on the uranium whtch contains most of the fission products.

  15. Spectroscopic evidence of uranium immobilization in acidic wetlands by natural organic matter and plant roots

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Dien; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Seaman, John C.; Jaffé, Peter R.; Koster van Groos, Paul; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Segre, Carlo U.; Chen, Ning; Jiang, De-Tong; et al

    2015-03-03

    Biogeochemistry of uranium in wetlands plays important roles in U immobilization in storage ponds of U mining and processing facilities but has not been well understood. The objective of this work was to study molecular mechanisms responsible for high U retention by Savannah River Site (SRS) wetland sediments under varying redox and acidic (pH = 2.6–5.8) conditions using U L₃-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Uranium in the SRS wetland sediments existed primarily as U(VI) bonded as a bidentate to carboxylic sites (U–C bond distance at ~2.88 Å), rather than phenolic or other sites of natural organic matter (NOM). In microcosms simulatingmore » the SRS wetland processes, U immobilization on roots was two orders of magnitude higher than on the adjacent brown or more distant white sands in which U was U(VI). Uranium on the roots were both U(IV) and U(VI), which were bonded as a bidentate to carbon, but the U(VI) may also form a U phosphate mineral. After 140 days of air exposure, all U(IV) was re-oxidized to U(VI) but remained as a bidentate bonding to carbon. This study demonstrated NOM and plant roots can highly immobilize U(VI) in the SRS acidic sediments, which has significant implication for the long-term stewardship of U-contaminated wetlands.« less

  16. Spectroscopic evidence of uranium immobilization in acidic wetlands by natural organic matter and plant roots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Dien; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Seaman, John C.; Jaff, Peter R.; Koster van Groos, Paul; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Segre, Carlo U.; Chen, Ning; Jiang, De-Tong; Newville, Matthew; Lanzirotti, Antonio

    2015-03-03

    Biogeochemistry of uranium in wetlands plays important roles in U immobilization in storage ponds of U mining and processing facilities but has not been well understood. The objective of this work was to study molecular mechanisms responsible for high U retention by Savannah River Site (SRS) wetland sediments under varying redox and acidic (pH = 2.65.8) conditions using U L?-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Uranium in the SRS wetland sediments existed primarily as U(VI) bonded as a bidentate to carboxylic sites (UC bond distance at ~2.88 ), rather than phenolic or other sites of natural organic matter (NOM). In microcosms simulating the SRS wetland processes, U immobilization on roots was two orders of magnitude higher than on the adjacent brown or more distant white sands in which U was U(VI). Uranium on the roots were both U(IV) and U(VI), which were bonded as a bidentate to carbon, but the U(VI) may also form a U phosphate mineral. After 140 days of air exposure, all U(IV) was re-oxidized to U(VI) but remained as a bidentate bonding to carbon. This study demonstrated NOM and plant roots can highly immobilize U(VI) in the SRS acidic sediments, which has significant implication for the long-term stewardship of U-contaminated wetlands.

  17. Spectroscopic evidence of uranium immobilization in acidic wetlands by natural organic matter and plant roots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Dien; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Seaman, John C.; Jaffé, Peter R.; Koster van Groos, Paul; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Segre, Carlo U.; Chen, Ning; Jiang, De-Tong; Newville, Matthew; Lanzirotti, Antonio

    2015-03-03

    Biogeochemistry of uranium in wetlands plays important roles in U immobilization in storage ponds of U mining and processing facilities but has not been well understood. The objective of this work was to study molecular mechanisms responsible for high U retention by Savannah River Site (SRS) wetland sediments under varying redox and acidic (pH = 2.6–5.8) conditions using U L₃-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Uranium in the SRS wetland sediments existed primarily as U(VI) bonded as a bidentate to carboxylic sites (U–C bond distance at ~2.88 Å), rather than phenolic or other sites of natural organic matter (NOM). In microcosms simulating the SRS wetland processes, U immobilization on roots was two orders of magnitude higher than on the adjacent brown or more distant white sands in which U was U(VI). Uranium on the roots were both U(IV) and U(VI), which were bonded as a bidentate to carbon, but the U(VI) may also form a U phosphate mineral. After 140 days of air exposure, all U(IV) was re-oxidized to U(VI) but remained as a bidentate bonding to carbon. This study demonstrated NOM and plant roots can highly immobilize U(VI) in the SRS acidic sediments, which has significant implication for the long-term stewardship of U-contaminated wetlands.

  18. Characterization of U(VI) Sorption-Desorption Processes and Model Upscaling: Annual Report for Johns Hopkins University (Contract No. DE-FG07-02ER63498)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ball, William P.

    2003-06-12

    The objectives of the overall collaborative EMSP effort (with which this project is associated) are to characterize sorption and desorption processes of U(VI) on pristine and contaminated Hanford sediments over a range of sediment facies and materials properties. The research is intended to provide new insights on the mechanisms of U(VI) retardation at Hanford, and to develop approaches by which laboratory-characterized geochemical models can be upscaled for defensible predictions of uranium transport in field.

  19. URANIUM DECONTAMINATION

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buckingham, J.S.; Carroll, J.L.

    1959-12-22

    A process is described for reducing the extractability of ruthenium, zirconium, and niobium values into hexone contained in an aqueous nitric acid uranium-containing solution. The solution is made acid-deficient, heated to between 55 and 70 deg C, and at that temperature a water-soluble inorganic thiosulfate is added. By this, a precipitate is formed which carries the bulk of the ruthenium, and the remainder of the ruthenium as well as the zirconium and niobium are converted to a hexone-nonextractable form. The rutheniumcontaining precipitate can either be removed from the solu tion or it can be dissolved as a hexone-non-extractable compound by the addition of sodium dichromate prior to hexone extraction.

  20. SHEATHING URANIUM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colbeck, E.W.

    1959-02-01

    A method is deseribed for forming a conveniently handled corrosion resistant U articlc comprising pouring molten U into an open-ended corrosion resistant metal eontainer such as Cu and its alloys, Al, or austenitic Ni stainless steel. The exposed surface of the cast U is covered with a metallic packing material such as a brazing flux consisting of Al-Si alloy. The container is sealed iii contact with substantially the entire exposed surface of the packing material. The article is then worked mechanically to reduce the cross section. l3651 A thorium--carbon alloy containing 0.1 to 0.5% by weight carbon, whieh is more resistant to water corrosion than pure thorium metal is presented. The alloy is prepared by fusing thorium metal with the desired amount of carbon at a temperature of about 1850 C. It is found that the carbon is present in the alloy as thorium monocarbide

  1. Uranium industry annual 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-05

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1994 (UIA 1994) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing during that survey year. The UIA 1994 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the 10-year period 1985 through 1994 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` (UIAS) provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1994, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. A feature article, ``Comparison of Uranium Mill Tailings Reclamation in the United States and Canada,`` is included in the UIA 1994. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, and uranium inventories, enrichment feed deliveries (actual and projected), and unfilled market requirements are shown in Chapter 2.

  2. Uranium industry annual 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-04-22

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1998 (UIA 1998) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. It contains data for the period 1989 through 2008 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data provides a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1989 through 1998, including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment, are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2008, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, and uranium inventories, are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1998 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. The Form EIA-858 ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is shown in Appendix D. For the readers convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix E along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  3. Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) Characterization of Uranium and Uranium Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCabe, Rodney J.; Kelly, Ann Marie; Clarke, Amy J.; Field, Robert D.; Wenk, H. R.

    2012-07-25

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was used to examine the microstructures of unalloyed uranium, U-6Nb, U-10Mo, and U-0.75Ti. For unalloyed uranium, we used EBSD to examine the effects of various processes on microstructures including casting, rolling and forming, recrystallization, welding, and quasi-static and shock deformation. For U-6Nb we used EBSD to examine the microstructural evolution during shape memory loading. EBSD was used to study chemical homogenization in U-10Mo, and for U-0.75Ti, we used EBSD to study the microstructure and texture evolution during thermal cycling and deformation. The studied uranium alloys have significant microstructural and chemical differences and each of these alloys presents unique preparation challenges. Each of the alloys is prepared by a sequence of mechanical grinding and polishing followed by electropolishing with subtle differences between the alloys. U-6Nb and U-0.75Ti both have martensitic microstructures and both require special care in order to avoid mechanical polishing artifacts. Unalloyed uranium has a tendency to rapidly oxidize when exposed to air and a two-step electropolish is employed, the first step to remove the damaged surface layer resulting from the mechanical preparation and the second step to passivate the surface. All of the alloying additions provide a level of surface passivation and different one and two step electropolishes are employed to create good EBSD surfaces. Because of its low symmetry crystal structure, uranium exhibits complex deformation behavior including operation of multiple deformation twinning modes. EBSD was used to observe and quantify twinning contributions to deformation and to examine the fracture behavior. Figure 1 shows a cross section of two mating fracture surfaces in cast uranium showing the propensity of deformation twinning and intergranular fracture largely between dissimilarly oriented grains. Deformation of U-6Nb in the shape memory regime occurs by the motion

  4. Process for electroslag refining of uranium and uranium alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewis, P.S. Jr.; Agee, W.A.; Bullock, J.S. IV; Condon, J.B.

    1975-07-22

    A process is described for electroslag refining of uranium and uranium alloys wherein molten uranium and uranium alloys are melted in a molten layer of a fluoride slag containing up to about 8 weight percent calcium metal. The calcium metal reduces oxides in the uranium and uranium alloys to provide them with an oxygen content of less than 100 parts per million. (auth)

  5. PRODUCTION OF PURIFIED URANIUM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burris, L. Jr.; Knighton, J.B.; Feder, H.M.

    1960-01-26

    A pyrometallurgical method for processing nuclear reactor fuel elements containing uranium and fission products and for reducing uranium compound; to metallic uranium is reported. If the material proccssed is essentially metallic uranium, it is dissolved in zinc, the sulution is cooled to crystallize UZn/sub 9/ , and the UZn/sub 9/ is distilled to obtain uranium free of fission products. If the material processed is a uranium compound, the sollvent is an alloy of zinc and magnesium and the remaining steps are the same.

  6. URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bailes, R.H.; Long, R.S.; Olson, R.S.; Kerlinger, H.O.

    1959-02-10

    A method is described for recovering uranium values from uranium bearing phosphate solutions such as are encountered in the manufacture of phosphate fertilizers. The solution is first treated with a reducing agent to obtain all the uranium in the tetravalent state. Following this reduction, the solution is treated to co-precipitate the rcduced uranium as a fluoride, together with other insoluble fluorides, thereby accomplishing a substantially complete recovery of even trace amounts of uranium from the phosphate solution. This precipitate usually takes the form of a complex fluoride precipitate, and after appropriate pre-treatment, the uranium fluorides are leached from this precipitate and rccovered from the leach solution.

  7. Method of recovering uranium hexafluoride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schuman, S.

    1975-12-01

    A method of recovering uranium hexafluoride from gaseous mixtures which comprises adsorbing said uranium hexafluoride on activated carbon is described.

  8. In Situ Microbial Community Control of the Stability of Bio-reduced Uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, Brett, R.; Peacock, Aaron, D.; Resch, Charles, T.; Arntzen, Evan; Smithgall, Amanda, N.; Pfiffner, Susan; Gan, M.; McKinley, James, P.; Long, Philip, E.; White, David, C.

    2008-03-28

    In aerobic aquifers typical of many Department of Energy (DOE) legacy waste sites, uranium is present in the oxidized U(VI) form which is more soluble and thus more mobile. Field experiments at the Old Rifle UMTRA site have demonstrated that biostimulation by electron donor addition (acetate) promotes biological U(VI) reduction (2). However, U(VI) reduction is reversible and oxidative dissolution of precipitated U(IV) after the cessation of electron donor addition remains a critical issue for the application of biostimulation as a treatment technology. Despite the potential for oxidative dissolution, field experiments at the Old Rifle site have shown that rapid reoxidation of bio-reduced uranium does not occur and U(VI) concentrations can remain at approximately 20% of background levels for more than one year. The extent of post-amendment U(VI) removal and the maintenance of bioreduced uranium may result from many factors including U(VI) sorption to iron-containing mineral phases, generation of H2S or FeS0.9, or the preferential sorption of U(VI) by microbial cells or biopolymers, but the processes controlling the reduction and in situ reoxidation rates are not known. To investigate the role of microbial community composition in the maintenance of bioreduced uranium, in-well sediment incubators (ISIs) were developed allowing field deployment of amended and native sediments during on-going experiments at the site. Field deployment of the ISIs allows expedient interrogation of microbial community response to field environmental perturbations and varying geochemical conditions.

  9. Validation of the WATEQ4 geochemical model for uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krupka, K.M.; Jenne, E.A.; Deutsch, W.J.

    1983-09-01

    As part of the Geochemical Modeling and Nuclide/Rock/Groundwater Interactions Studies Program, a study was conducted to partially validate the WATEQ4 aqueous speciation-solubility geochemical model for uranium. The solubility controls determined with the WATEQ4 geochemical model were in excellent agreement with those laboratory studies in which the solids schoepite (UO/sub 2/(OH)/sub 2/ . H/sub 2/O), UO/sub 2/(OH)/sub 2/, and rutherfordine ((UO/sub 2/CO/sub 3/) were identified as actual solubility controls for uranium. The results of modeling solution analyses from laboratory studies of uranyl phosphate solids, however, identified possible errors in the characterization of solids in the original solubility experiments. As part of this study, significant deficiencies in the WATEQ4 thermodynamic data base for uranium solutes and solids were corrected. Revisions included recalculation of selected uranium reactions. Additionally, thermodynamic data for the hydroxyl complexes of U(VI), including anionic (VI) species, were evaluated (to the extent permitted by the available data). Vanadium reactions were also added to the thermodynamic data base because uranium-vanadium solids can exist in natural ground-water systems. This study is only a partial validation of the WATEQ4 geochemical model because the available laboratory solubility studies do not cover the range of solid phases, alkaline pH values, and concentrations of inorganic complexing ligands needed to evaluate the potential solubility of uranium in ground waters associated with various proposed nuclear waste repositories. Further validation of this or other geochemical models for uranium will require careful determinations of uraninite solubility over the pH range of 7 to 10 under highly reducing conditions and of uranyl hydroxide and phosphate solubilities over the pH range of 7 to 10 under oxygenated conditions.

  10. Microbial Reductive Transformation of Phyllosilicate Fe(III) and U(VI) in Fluvial Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Ji-Hoon; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Konopka, Allan; Moore, Dean A.; Resch, Charles T.; Phillips, Jerry L.

    2012-04-14

    The microbial reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) were investigated in shallow aquifer sediments collected from subsurface Pleistocene flood deposits near the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River in Washington State. Increases in 0.5 N HCl-extractable Fe(II) were observed in incubated sediments and 57Fe Mssbauer spectroscopy revealed that Fe(III) associated with phyllosilicates and pyroxene was reduced to Fe(II). Aqueous uranium(VI) concentrations decreased in incubated Hanford sediments with the rate and extent being greater in sediment amended with organic carbon. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of bioreduced sediments indicated that 67-77% of the U signal was U(VI), probably as an adsorbed species associated with a new or modified reactive mineral phase. Phylotypes within the Deltaproteobacteria were more common in Hanford sediments incubated with U(VI) than without and in U(VI)-free incubations, members of the Clostridiales were dominant with sulfate-reducing phylotypes more common in the sulfate-amended sediments. These results demonstrate the potential for anaerobic reduction phyllosilicate Fe(III) and sulfate in Hanford unconfined aquifer sediments and biotransformations involving reduction and adsorption leading to decreased aqueous U concentrations.

  11. Uranium Biomineralization By Natural Microbial Phosphatase Activities in the Subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taillefert, Martial

    2015-04-01

    This project investigated the geochemical and microbial processes associated with the biomineralization of radionuclides in subsurface soils. During this study, it was determined that microbial communities from the Oak Ridge Field Research subsurface are able to express phosphatase activities that hydrolyze exogenous organophosphate compounds and result in the non-reductive bioimmobilization of U(VI) phosphate minerals in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The changes of the microbial community structure associated with the biomineralization of U(VI) was determined to identify the main organisms involved in the biomineralization process, and the complete genome of two isolates was sequenced. In addition, it was determined that both phytate, the main source of natural organophosphate compounds in natural environments, and polyphosphate accumulated in cells could also be hydrolyzed by native microbial population to liberate enough orthophosphate and precipitate uranium phosphate minerals. Finally, the minerals produced during this process are stable in low pH conditions or environments where the production of dissolved inorganic carbon is moderate. These findings suggest that the biomineralization of U(VI) phosphate minerals is an attractive bioremediation strategy to uranium bioreduction in low pH uranium-contaminated environments. These efforts support the goals of the SBR long-term performance measure by providing key information on "biological processes influencing the form and mobility of DOE contaminants in the subsurface".

  12. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    5. Shipments of uranium feed by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power ... Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-858 "Uranium Marketing Annual ...

  13. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Inventories of uranium by owner as of end of year, 2011-15 thousand pounds U3O8 equivalent Inventories at the end of the year Owner of uranium inventory 2011 2012 2013 2014 P2015 ...

  14. Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Uranium sellers to owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, 2013-15 2013 2014 2015 American Fuel Resources, LLC Advance Uranium Asset Management Ltd. AREVA ...

  15. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    0. Contracted purchases of uranium from suppliers by owners and operators of U.S. civilian ... Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-858 "Uranium Marketing Annual ...

  16. Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    a. Foreign purchases, foreign sales, and uranium inventories owned by U.S. suppliers and ... Foreign sales U.S. supplier owned uranium inventories Owners and operators of U.S. ...

  17. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Uranium in fuel assemblies loaded into U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by year, 2011-15 thousand pounds U3O8 equivalent Origin of uranium 2011 2012 2013 2014 P2015 ...

  18. METHOD FOR PURIFYING URANIUM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knighton, J.B.; Feder, H.M.

    1960-04-26

    A process is given for purifying a uranium-base nuclear material. The nuclear material is dissolved in zinc or a zinc-magnesium alloy and the concentration of magnesium is increased until uranium precipitates.

  19. NICKEL COATED URANIUM ARTICLE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, A.G.

    1958-10-01

    Nickel coatings on uranium and various methods of obtaining such coatings are described. Specifically disclosed are such nickel or nickel alloy layers as barriers between uranium and aluminum- silicon, chromium, or copper coatings.

  20. PROCESS OF PURIFYING URANIUM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seaborg, G.T.; Orlemann, E.F.; Jensen, L.H.

    1958-12-23

    A method of obtaining substantially pure uranium from a uranium composition contaminated with light element impurities such as sodium, magnesium, beryllium, and the like is described. An acidic aqueous solution containing tetravalent uranium is treated with a soluble molybdate to form insoluble uranous molybdate which is removed. This material after washing is dissolved in concentrated nitric acid to obtaln a uranyl nitrate solution from which highly purified uranium is obtained by extraction with ether.

  1. PREPARATION OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lawroski, S.; Jonke, A.A.; Steunenberg, R.K.

    1959-10-01

    A process is described for preparing uranium hexafluoride from carbonate- leach uranium ore concentrate. The briquetted, crushed, and screened concentrate is reacted with hydrogen fluoride in a fluidized bed, and the uranium tetrafluoride formed is mixed with a solid diluent, such as calcium fluoride. This mixture is fluorinated with fluorine and an inert diluent gas, also in a fluidized bed, and the uranium hexafluoride obtained is finally purified by fractional distillation.

  2. Uranium industry annual 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-05-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1995 (UIA 1995) provides current statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1995 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the period 1986 through 2005 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey``. Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1995, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1986 through 1995 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2005, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1995 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. For the reader`s convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix D along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 14 figs., 56 tabs.

  3. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM TETRAFLUORIDE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaw, W.E.; Spenceley, R.M.; Teetzel, F.M.

    1959-08-01

    A method is presented for producing uranium tetrafluoride from the gaseous hexafluoride by feeding the hexafluoride into a high temperature zone obtained by the recombination of molecularly dissociated hydrogen. The molal ratio of hydrogen to uranium hexnfluoride is preferably about 3 to 1. Uranium tetrafluoride is obtained in a finely divided, anhydrous state.

  4. Final Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) Final Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) Uranium Leasing ...

  5. U.S. Uranium Reserves Estimates

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Major U.S. Uranium Reserves

  6. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spedding, F.H.; Wilhelm, H.A.; Keller, W.H.

    1958-04-15

    The production of uranium metal by the reduction of uranium tetrafluoride is described. Massive uranium metal of high purily is produced by reacting uranium tetrafluoride with 2 to 20% stoichiometric excess of magnesium at a temperature sufficient to promote the reaction and then mantaining the reaction mass in a sealed vessel at temperature in the range of 1150 to 2000 d C, under a superatomospheric pressure of magnesium for a period of time sufficient 10 allow separation of liquid uranium and liquid magnesium fluoride into separate layers.

  7. PROCESS OF RECOVERING URANIUM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carter, J.M.; Larson, C.E.

    1958-10-01

    A process is presented for recovering uranium values from calutron deposits. The process consists in treating such deposits to produce an oxidlzed acidic solution containing uranium together with the following imparities: Cu, Fe, Cr, Ni, Mn, Zn. The uranium is recovered from such an impurity-bearing solution by adjusting the pH of the solution to the range 1.5 to 3.0 and then treating the solution with hydrogen peroxide. This results in the precipitation of uranium peroxide which is substantially free of the metal impurities in the solution. The peroxide precipitate is then separated from the solution, washed, and calcined to produce uranium trioxide.

  8. URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeager, J.H.

    1958-08-12

    In the prior art processing of uranium ores, the ore is flrst digested with nitric acid and filtered, and the uranium values are then extracted tom the filtrate by contacting with an organic solvent. The insoluble residue has been processed separately in order to recover any uranium which it might contain. The improvement consists in contacting a slurry, composed of both solution and residue, with the organic solvent prior to filtration. Tbe result is that uranium values contained in the residue are extracted along with the uranium values contained th the solution in one step.

  9. URANIUM SEPARATION PROCESS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hyde, E.K.; Katzin, L.I.; Wolf, M.J.

    1959-07-14

    The separation of uranium from a mixture of uranium and thorium by organic solvent extraction from an aqueous solution is described. The uranium is separrted from an aqueous mixture of uranium and thorium nitrates 3 N in nitric acid and containing salting out agents such as ammonium nitrate, so as to bring ihe total nitrate ion concentration to a maximum of about 8 N by contacting the mixture with an immiscible aliphatic oxygen containing organic solvent such as diethyl carbinol, hexone, n-amyl acetate and the like. The uranium values may be recovered from the organic phase by back extraction with water.

  10. Flyer, Title VI | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Flyer, Title VI Flyer, Title VI Titles VI and IX of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended prohibit discrimination in programs and activities receiving Federal financial assistance. This flyer explains this probition, and can be downloaded and displayed at your place of work. discrimination flyer July 2011.pdf (259.37 KB) More Documents & Publications NO FEAR Act Notice DOE F 1600.5 DOE F 1600.1

  11. Method for converting uranium oxides to uranium metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duerksen, Walter K.

    1988-01-01

    A process is described for converting scrap and waste uranium oxide to uranium metal. The uranium oxide is sequentially reduced with a suitable reducing agent to a mixture of uranium metal and oxide products. The uranium metal is then converted to uranium hydride and the uranium hydride-containing mixture is then cooled to a temperature less than -100.degree. C. in an inert liquid which renders the uranium hydride ferromagnetic. The uranium hydride is then magnetically separated from the cooled mixture. The separated uranium hydride is readily converted to uranium metal by heating in an inert atmosphere. This process is environmentally acceptable and eliminates the use of hydrogen fluoride as well as the explosive conditions encountered in the previously employed bomb-reduction processes utilized for converting uranium oxides to uranium metal.

  12. National uranium resource evaluation, Marble Canyon Quadrangle, Arizona and Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, M T; Blauvelt, R P

    1982-05-01

    The Marble Canyon Quadrangle (2/sup 0/), northeast Arizona, was evaluated to a depth of 1500 m for uranium favorability using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria. Known mines and prospects were examined; field reconnaissance was done in selected areas of the quadrangle; and a ground-water geochemical survey was made in the southeast third of the quadrangle. The Shinarump and Petrified Forest Members of the Triassic Chinle Formation, which is exposed in the western and northeastern parts of the quadrangle and is present beneath the surface of much of the quadrangle, were found favorable for channel-sandstone uranium deposits. A portion of the Cretaceous Toreva Formation in the southeast part of the quadrangle was found favorable for peneconcordant-sandstone uranium deposits. The western part of the quadrangle was found favorable for uranium concentrations in breccia pipes.

  13. Novel Sensor for the In Situ Measurement of Uranium Fluxes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatfield, Kirk

    2015-02-10

    The goal of this project was to develop a sensor that incorporates the field-tested concepts of the passive flux meter to provide direct in situ measures of flux for uranium and groundwater in porous media. Measurable contaminant fluxes [J] are essentially the product of concentration [C] and groundwater flux or specific discharge [q ]. The sensor measures [J] and [q] by changes in contaminant and tracer amounts respectively on a sorbent. By using measurement rather than inference from static parameters, the sensor can directly advance conceptual and computational models for field scale simulations. The sensor was deployed in conjunction with DOE in obtaining field-scale quantification of subsurface processes affecting uranium transport (e.g., advection) and transformation (e.g., uranium attenuation) at the Rifle IFRC Site in Rifle, Colorado. Project results have expanded our current understanding of how field-scale spatial variations in fluxes of uranium, groundwater and salient electron donor/acceptors are coupled to spatial variations in measured microbial biomass/community composition, effective field-scale uranium mass balances, attenuation, and stability. The coupling between uranium, various nutrients and micro flora can be used to estimate field-scale rates of uranium attenuation and field-scale transitions in microbial communities. This research focuses on uranium (VI), but the sensor principles and design are applicable to field-scale fate and transport of other radionuclides. Laboratory studies focused on sorbent selection and calibration, along with sensor development and validation under controlled conditions. Field studies were conducted at the Rifle IFRC Site in Rifle, Colorado. These studies were closely coordinated with existing SBR (formerly ERSP) projects to complement data collection. Small field tests were conducted during the first two years that focused on evaluating field-scale deployment procedures and validating sensor performance under

  14. Uranium in geologic fluids: Estimates of standard partial molal properties, oxidation potentials, and hydrolysis constants at high temperatures and pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shock, E.L.; Sassani, D.C.; Betz, H.

    1997-10-01

    Theoretical methods are used with the available experimental data to provide estimates of parameters for the revised-HKF equations of state for aqueous uranium species. These parameters are used with standard state thermodynamic data at 25{degrees}C and 1 bar to calculate equilibrium constants for redox reactions among the four most common oxidation states of uranium (U(III), U(IV), U(V), and U(VI)), and their hydrolysis reactions at temperatures to 1000{degrees}C and pressures to 5 kb. A total of nineteen aqueous uranium species are included. The predicted equilibrium constants are used to construct oxidation potential-pH diagrams at elevated temperatures and pressures and to calculate the solubilities of uraninite as functions of temperature and pH, which are compared to experimental data. Oxidation potential-pH diagrams illustrate the relative stabilities of aqueous uranium species and indicate that U(IV) and U(VI) species predominate in aqueous solution in the U-O-H system. Increasing temperature stabilizes U(VI) and U(III) species relative to U(IV) species, but U(IV) species dominate at oxidation states consistent and mineral-buffer assemblages and near-neutral pH. At low pH, U(VI) is stabilized relative to U(IV) suggesting that uranium transport in hydrothermal systems requires either acidic solutions or potent complexes of U(IV). 40 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Uranium redistribution due to water table fluctuations in sandy wetland mesocosms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilson, Emily R.; Huang, Shan; Koster van Groos, Paul G.; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Qafoku, Odeta; Peacock, Aaron D.; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Jaffe, Peter R.

    2015-10-20

    In order to better understand the fate and stability of immobilized uranium (U) in wetland sediments, and how intermittent dry periods affect U stability, we dosed saturated wetland mesocosms planted with Scirpus acutus with low levels of uranyl acetate for 4 months before imposing a short drying and rewetting period. Concentrations of U in mesocosm effluent increased after drying and rewetting, but the cumulative amount of U released following the dry period constituted less than 1% of the total U immobilized in the soil during the 4 months prior. This low level of remobilization suggests, and XAS analyses confirm, that microbial reduction was not the primary means of U immobilization, as the U immobilized in mesocosms was primarily U(VI) rather than U(IV). Drying followed by re-wetting caused a redistribution of U downward in the soil profile and on to root surfaces. While the U on roots before drying was primarily associated with minerals, the U that relocated to the roots during drying and rewetting was bound diffusely to root surfaces. Results show that short periods of drought conditions in a wetland, which expose reduced sediments to air, may impact U distribution, but these conditions may not cause large releases of soil-bound U from planted wetlands to surface waters.

  16. About the Uranium Mine Team | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Uranium Mine Team About the Uranium Mine Team Text coming

  17. 300 Area Uranium Stabilization Through Polyphosphate Injection: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vermeul, Vincent R.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Fritz, Brad G.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Mackley, Rob D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Williams, Mark D.

    2009-06-30

    The objective of the treatability test was to evaluate the efficacy of using polyphosphate injections to treat uranium-contaminated groundwater in situ. A test site consisting of an injection well and 15 monitoring wells was installed in the 300 Area near the process trenches that had previously received uranium-bearing effluents. This report summarizes the work on the polyphosphate injection project, including bench-scale laboratory studies, a field injection test, and the subsequent analysis and interpretation of the results. Previous laboratory tests have demonstrated that when a soluble form of polyphosphate is injected into uranium-bearing saturated porous media, immobilization of uranium occurs due to formation of an insoluble uranyl phosphate, autunite [Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2•nH2O]. These tests were conducted at conditions expected for the aquifer and used Hanford soils and groundwater containing very low concentrations of uranium (10-6 M). Because autunite sequesters uranium in the oxidized form U(VI) rather than forcing reduction to U(IV), the possibility of re-oxidation and subsequent re-mobilization is negated. Extensive testing demonstrated the very low solubility and slow dissolution kinetics of autunite. In addition to autunite, excess phosphorous may result in apatite mineral formation, which provides a long-term source of treatment capacity. Phosphate arrival response data indicate that, under site conditions, the polyphosphate amendment could be effectively distributed over a relatively large lateral extent, with wells located at a radial distance of 23 m (75 ft) reaching from between 40% and 60% of the injection concentration. Given these phosphate transport characteristics, direct treatment of uranium through the formation of uranyl-phosphate mineral phases (i.e., autunite) could likely be effectively implemented at full field scale. However, formation of calcium-phosphate mineral phases using the selected three-phase approach was problematic. Although

  18. Characterization of U(VI) Sorption-Desorption Processes and Model Upscaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, Jing; Dong, Wenming; Ball, William P.

    2006-10-12

    The objectives of the overall collaborative EMSP effort (with which this project is associated) were to characterize sorption and desorption processes of U(VI) on pristine and contaminated Hanford sediments over a range of sediment facies and materials properties and to relate such characterization both to fundamental molecular-scale understanding and field-scale models of geochemistry and mass transfer. The research was intended to provide new insights on the mechanisms of U(VI) retardation at Hanford, and to allow the development of approaches by which laboratory-developed geochemical models could be upscaled for defensible field-scale predictions of uranium transport in the environment. Within this broader context, objectives of the JHU-based project were to test hypotheses regarding the coupled roles of adsorption and impermeable-zone diffusion in controlling the fate and transport of U(VI) species under conditions of comparatively short-term exposure. In particular, this work tested the following hypotheses: (1) the primary adsorption processes in the Hanford sediment over the pH range of 7 to 10 are surface complexation reactions of aqueous U(VI) hydroxycarbonate and carbonate complexes with amphoteric edge sites on detrital phyllosilicates in the silt/clay size fraction; (2) macroscopic adsorption intensity (at given aqueous conditions) is a function of mineral composition and aquatic chemistry; and (3) equilibrium sorption and desorption to apply in short-term, laboratory-spiked pristine sediments; and (4) interparticle diffusion can be fully understood in terms of a model that couples molecular diffusion of uranium species in the porewater with equilibrium sorption under the relevant aqueous conditions. The primary focus of the work was on developing and applying both models and experiments to test the applicability of "local equilibrium" assumptions in the modeling interpretation of sorption retarded interparticle diffusion, as relevant to processes of U(VI

  19. Luteolin inhibits Cr(VI)-induced malignant cell transformation of human lung epithelial cells by targeting ROS mediated multiple cell signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Son, Young-Ok; Divya, Sasidharan Padmaja; Roy, Ram Vinod; Hitron, John Andrew; Wang, Lei; Kim, Donghern; Dai, Jin; Asha, Padmaja; Zhang, Zhuo; Wang, Yitao; Shi, Xianglin

    2014-12-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a well-known human carcinogen associated with the incidence of lung cancer. Inhibition of metal induced carcinogenesis by a dietary antioxidant is a novel approach. Luteolin, a natural dietary flavonoid found in fruits and vegetables, possesses potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. We found that short term exposure of human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) to Cr(VI) (5 μM) showed a drastic increase in ROS generation, NADPH oxidase (NOX) activation, lipid peroxidation, and glutathione depletion, which were significantly inhibited by the treatment with luteolin in a dose dependent manner. Treatment with luteolin decreased AP-1, HIF-1α, COX-2, and iNOS promoter activity induced by Cr(VI) in BEAS-2B cells. In addition, luteolin protected BEAS-2B cells from malignant transformation induced by chronic Cr(VI) exposure. Moreover, luteolin also inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α) and VEGF in chronic Cr(VI) exposed BEAS-2B cells. Western blot analysis showed that luteolin inhibited multiple gene products linked to survival (Akt, Fak, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL), inflammation (MAPK, NF-κB, COX-2, STAT-3, iNOS, TNF-α) and angiogenesis (HIF-1α, VEGF, MMP-9) in chronic Cr(VI) exposed BEAS-2B cells. Nude mice injected with BEAS-2B cells chronically exposed to Cr(VI) in the presence of luteolin showed reduced tumor incidence compared to Cr(VI) alone treated group. Overexpression of catalase (CAT) or SOD2, eliminated Cr(VI)-induced malignant transformation. Overall, our results indicate that luteolin protects BEAS-2B cells from Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis by scavenging ROS and modulating multiple cell signaling mechanisms that are linked to ROS. Luteolin, therefore, serves as a potential chemopreventive agent against Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • Luteolin inhibited Cr(VI)-induced oxidative stress. • Luteolin inhibited chronic Cr(VI)-induced malignant transformation.

  20. The Radiolysis of AmVI Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce J. Mincher

    2013-06-01

    The reduction of bismuthate-produced AmVI by 60Co gamma-rays was measured using post-irradiation UV/Vis spectroscopy. The reduction of AmVI by radiolysis was rapid, producing AmV as the sole product. Relatively low absorbed doses in the ~0.3 kGy range quantitatively reduced a solution of 2.5 x 10-4 M AmVI. The addition of bismuthate to samples during irradiation did not appear to protect AmVI from radiolytic reduction during these experiments. It was also shown here that AmV is very stable toward radiation. The quantitative reduction of the AmVI concentration here corresponds to 1.4 hours of exposure to a process solution, however the actual americium concentrations will be higher and the expected contact times short when using centrifugal contactors. Thus, the reduction rate found in these initial experiments may not be excessive.

  1. Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    S2. Uranium feed deliveries, enrichment services, and uranium loaded by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, 1994-2015 million pounds U3O8 equivalent million separative work units (SWU) Year Feed deliveries by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors Uranium in fuel assemblies loaded into U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors U.S.-origin enrichment services purchased Foreign-origin enrichment services purchased Total purchased enrichment services

  2. Preparation of uranium compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline L; Montreal, Marisa J; Thomson, Robert K; Cantat, Thibault; Travia, Nicholas E

    2013-02-19

    UI.sub.3(1,4-dioxane).sub.1.5 and UI.sub.4(1,4-dioxane).sub.2, were synthesized in high yield by reacting turnings of elemental uranium with iodine dissolved in 1,4-dioxane under mild conditions. These molecular compounds of uranium are thermally stable and excellent precursor materials for synthesizing other molecular compounds of uranium including alkoxide, amide, organometallic, and halide compounds.

  3. Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hayden, H.W. Jr.; Horton, J.A.; Elliott, G.R.B.

    1995-06-06

    A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO{sub 3}), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl{sub 4}), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation. 4 figs.

  4. Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hayden, Jr., Howard W.; Horton, James A.; Elliott, Guy R. B.

    1995-01-01

    A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO.sub.3), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO.sub.2). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl.sub.4), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation.

  5. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruehle, A.E.; Stevenson, J.W.

    1957-11-12

    An improved process is described for the magnesium reduction of UF/sub 4/ to produce uranium metal. In the past, there have been undesirable premature reactions between the Mg and the bomb liner or the UF/sub 4/ before the actual ignition of the bomb reaction. Since these premature reactions impair the yield of uranium metal, they have been inhibited by forming a protective film upon the particles of Mg by reacting it with hydrated uranium tetrafluoride, sodium bifluoride, uranyl fluoride, or uranium trioxide. This may be accomplished by adding about 0.5 to 2% of the additive to the bomb charge.

  6. COATING URANIUM FROM CARBONYLS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gurinsky, D.H.; Storrs, S.S.

    1959-07-14

    Methods are described for making adherent corrosion resistant coatings on uranium metal. According to the invention, the uranium metal is heated in the presence of an organometallic compound such as the carbonyls of nickel, molybdenum, chromium, niobium, and tungsten at a temperature sufficient to decompose the metal carbonyl and dry plate the resultant free metal on the surface of the uranium metal body. The metal coated body is then further heated at a higher temperature to thermally diffuse the coating metal within the uranium bcdy.

  7. Uranium Dispersion & Dosimetry Model.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2002-03-22

    The Uranium Dispersion and Dosimetry (UDAD) program provides estimates of potential radiation exposure to individuals and to the general population in the vicinity of a uranium processing facility such as a uranium mine or mill. Only transport through the air is considered. Exposure results from inhalation, external irradiation from airborne and ground-deposited activity, and ingestion of foodstuffs. Individual dose commitments, population dose commitments, and environmental dose commitments are computed. The program was developed for applicationmore » to uranium mining and milling; however, it may be applied to dispersion of any other pollutant.« less

  8. Uranium Purchases Report

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1996-01-01

    Final issue. This report details natural and enriched uranium purchases as reported by owners and operators of commercial nuclear power plants. 1996 represents the most recent publication year.

  9. URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaufman, D.

    1958-04-15

    A process of recovering uranium from very low-grade ore residues is described. These low-grade uraniumcontaining hydroxide precipitates, which also contain hydrated silica and iron and aluminum hydroxides, are subjected to multiple leachings with aqueous solutions of sodium carbonate at a pH of at least 9. This leaching serves to selectively extract the uranium from the precipitate, but to leave the greater part of the silica, iron, and aluminum with the residue. The uranium is then separated from the leach liquor by the addition of an acid in sufficient amount to destroy the carbonate followed by the addition of ammonia to precipitate uranium as ammonium diuranate.

  10. highly enriched uranium

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    and radioisotope supply capabilities of MURR and Nordion with General Atomics' selective gas extraction technology-which allows their low-enriched uranium (LEU) targets to remain...

  11. METHOD OF ROLLING URANIUM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, C.S.

    1959-08-01

    A method is described for rolling uranium metal at relatively low temperatures and under non-oxidizing conditions. The method involves the steps of heating the uranium to 200 deg C in an oil bath, withdrawing the uranium and permitting the oil to drain so that only a thin protective coating remains and rolling the oil coated uranium at a temperature of 200 deg C to give about a 15% reduction in thickness at each pass. The operation may be repeated to accomplish about a 90% reduction without edge cracking, checking or any appreciable increase in brittleness.

  12. Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Resources, Inc., dba Cameco Resources Smith Ranch-Highland Operation Converse, Wyoming ... Uranium is first processed at the Nichols Ranch plant and then transported to the Smith ...

  13. Influence of uranyl speciation and iron oxides on uranium biogeochemical redox reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, B.D.; Amos, R.T.; Nico, P.S.; Fendorf, S.

    2010-03-15

    Uranium is a pollutant of concern to both human and ecosystem health. Uranium's redox state often dictates its partitioning between the aqueous- and solid-phases, and thus controls its dissolved concentration and, coupled with groundwater flow, its migration within the environment. In anaerobic environments, the more oxidized and mobile form of uranium (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and associated species) may be reduced, directly or indirectly, by microorganisms to U(IV) with subsequent precipitation of UO{sub 2}. However, various factors within soils and sediments may limit biological reduction of U(VI), inclusive of alterations in U(VI) speciation and competitive electron acceptors. Here we elucidate the impact of U(VI) speciation on the extent and rate of reduction with specific emphasis on speciation changes induced by dissolved Ca, and we examine the impact of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides (ferrihydrite, goethite and hematite) varying in free energies of formation on U reduction. The amount of uranium removed from solution during 100 h of incubation with S. putrefaciens was 77% with no Ca or ferrihydrite present but only 24% (with ferrihydrite) and 14% (no ferrihydrite) were removed for systems with 0.8 mM Ca. Imparting an important criterion on uranium reduction, goethite and hematite decrease the dissolved concentration of calcium through adsorption and thus tend to diminish the effect of calcium on uranium reduction. Dissimilatory reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) can proceed through different enzyme pathways, even within a single organism, thus providing a potential second means by which Fe(III) bearing minerals may impact U(VI) reduction. We quantify rate coefficients for simultaneous dissimilatory reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) in systems varying in Ca concentration (0 to 0.8 mM), and using a mathematical construct implemented with the reactive transport code MIN3P, we reveal the predominant influence of uranyl speciation, specifically the formation of uranyl

  14. 2015 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    data set of uranium reserves that were published in the July 2010 report U.S. Uranium Reserves Estimates at http:www.eia.govcneafnuclearpagereservesures.html. ...

  15. 2015 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Domestic Uranium Production Report 2015 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: May 5, 2016 Next Release Date: May 2017 Number of Holes Feet (thousand) Number of Holes ...

  16. URANIUM LEACHING AND RECOVERY PROCESS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McClaine, L.A.

    1959-08-18

    A process is described for recovering uranium from carbonate leach solutions by precipitating uranium as a mixed oxidation state compound. Uranium is recovered by adding a quadrivalent uranium carbon;te solution to the carbonate solution, adjusting the pH to 13 or greater, and precipitating the uranium as a filterable mixed oxidation state compound. In the event vanadium occurs with the uranium, the vanadium is unaffected by the uranium precipitation step and remains in the carbonate solution. The uranium-free solution is electrolyzed in the cathode compartment of a mercury cathode diaphragm cell to reduce and precipitate the vanadium.

  17. 2015 Uranium Market Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U.S. Energy Information Administration 2015 Uranium Marketing Annual Report 2015 Uranium ... received in 2015 Weighted-average price Number of purchase contracts for ...

  18. 2015 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Uranium Marketing Annual Report 2015 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 24, 2016 Next Release Date: May 2017 Number of purchasers Quantity with reported price ...

  19. U.S.Uranium Reserves

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Uranium Reserves Data for: 2003 Release Date: June 2004 Next Release: Not determined Uranium Reserves Estimates The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has reported the...

  20. 2015 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 2015 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 24, 2016 Next Release Date: May ... Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-858 "Uranium Marketing Annual ...

  1. 2015 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U.S. Energy Information Administration 2015 Uranium Marketing Annual Report 2015 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 24, 2016 Next Release Date: May 2017 Minimum ...

  2. 2015 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U.S. Energy Information Administration 2015 Uranium Marketing Annual Report 2015 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 24, 2016 Next Release Date: May 2017 Origin of ...

  3. 2015 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 2015 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 24, 2016 Next Release Date: May ... Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-858 "Uranium Marketing Annual ...

  4. 2015 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 2015 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 24, 2016 Next Release Date: May ... Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-858 "Uranium Marketing Annual ...

  5. 2015 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 2015 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 24, 2016 Next Release Date: May ... Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-858 "Uranium Marketing Annual ...

  6. PROCESS FOR MAKING URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rosen, R.

    1959-07-14

    A process is described for producing uranium hexafluoride by reacting uranium hexachloride with hydrogen fluoride at a temperature below about 150 deg C, under anhydrous conditions.

  7. Disposition of DOE Excess Depleted Uranium, Natural Uranium, and Low-Enriched Uranium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) owns and manages an inventory of depleted uranium (DU), natural uranium (NU), and low-enriched uranium (LEU) that is currently stored in large cylinders as...

  8. URANIUM SEPARATION PROCESS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McVey, W.H.; Reas, W.H.

    1959-03-10

    The separation of uranium from an aqueous solution containing a water soluble uranyl salt is described. The process involves adding an alkali thiocyanate to the aqueous solution, contacting the resulting solution with methyl isobutyl ketons and separating the resulting aqueous and organic phase. The uranium is extracted in the organic phase as UO/sub 2/(SCN)/sub/.

  9. DECONTAMINATION OF URANIUM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spedding, F.H.; Butler, T.A.

    1962-05-15

    A process is given for separating fission products from uranium by extracting the former into molten aluminum. Phase isolation can be accomplished by selectively hydriding the uranium at between 200 and 300 deg C and separating the hydride powder from coarse particles of fissionproduct-containing aluminum. (AEC)

  10. METHOD FOR PURIFYING URANIUM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kennedy, J.W.; Segre, E.G.

    1958-08-26

    A method is presented for obtaining a compound of uranium in an extremely pure state and in such a condition that it can be used in determinations of the isotopic composition of uranium. Uranium deposited in calutron receivers is removed therefrom by washing with cold nitric acid and the resulting solution, coataining uranium and trace amounts of various impurities, such as Fe, Ag, Zn, Pb, and Ni, is then subjected to various analytical manipulations to obtain an impurity-free uranium containing solution. This solution is then evaporated on a platinum disk and the residue is ignited converting it to U2/sub 3//sub 8/. The platinum disk having such a thin film of pure U/sub 2/O/sub 8/ is suitable for use with isotopic determination techaiques.

  11. URANIUM PRECIPITATION PROCESS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thunaes, A.; Brown, E.A.; Smith, H.W.; Simard, R.

    1957-12-01

    A method for the recovery of uranium from sulfuric acid solutions is described. In the present process, sulfuric acid is added to the uranium bearing solution to bring the pH to between 1 and 1.8, preferably to about 1.4, and aluminum metal is then used as a reducing agent to convert hexavalent uranium to the tetravalent state. As the reaction proceeds, the pH rises amd a selective precipitation of uranium occurs resulting in a high grade precipitate. This process is an improvement over the process using metallic iron, in that metallic aluminum reacts less readily than metallic iron with sulfuric acid, thus avoiding consumption of the reducing agent and a raising of the pH without accomplishing the desired reduction of the hexavalent uranium in the solution. Another disadvantage to the use of iron is that positive ferric ions will precipitate with negative phosphate and arsenate ions at the pH range employed.

  12. Uranium dioxide electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willit, James L.; Ackerman, John P.; Williamson, Mark A.

    2009-12-29

    This is a single stage process for treating spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors. The spent nuclear fuel, uranium oxide, UO.sub.2, is added to a solution of UCl.sub.4 dissolved in molten LiCl. A carbon anode and a metallic cathode is positioned in the molten salt bath. A power source is connected to the electrodes and a voltage greater than or equal to 1.3 volts is applied to the bath. At the anode, the carbon is oxidized to form carbon dioxide and uranium chloride. At the cathode, uranium is electroplated. The uranium chloride at the cathode reacts with more uranium oxide to continue the reaction. The process may also be used with other transuranic oxides and rare earth metal oxides.

  13. Uranium Mobility During In Situ Redox Manipulation of the 100 Areas of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szecsody, James E.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Williams, Mark D.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Resch, Charles T.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.

    1998-12-03

    A series of laboratory experiments and computer simulations was conducted to assess the extent of uranium remobilization that is likely to occur at the end of the life cycle of an in situ sediment reduction process. The process is being tested for subsurface remediation of chromate and chlorinated solvent-contaminated sediments at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington. Uranium species that occur naturally in the +6 valence state [U(VI)] at 10 ppb in groundwater at Hanford will accumulate as U(IV) through the reduction and subsequent precipitation conditions of the permeable barrier created by in situ redox manipulation. The precipitated uranium will be remobilized when the reductive capacity of the barrier is exhausted and the sediment is oxidized by the groundwater containing dissolved oxygen and other oxidants such as chromate. Although U(IV) accumulates from years or decades of reduction/precipitation within the reduced zone, U(VI) concentrations in solution are only somewhat elevated during aquifer oxidation because oxidation and dissolution reactions that release U(IV) precipitate to solution are slow. The release rate of uranium into solution was found to be controlled mainly by the oxidation/dissolution rate of the U(IV) precipitate (half-life 200 hours) and partially by the fast oxidation of adsorbed Fe(II) (halflife 5 hours) and the slow oxidation of Fe(II)CO3 (half-life 120 hours) in the reduced sediment. Simulations of uranium transport that incorporated these and other reactions under site-relevant conditions indicated that 35 ppb U(VI) is the maximum concentration likely to result from mobilization of the precipitated U(IV) species. Experiments also indicated that increasing the contact time between the U(IV) precipitates and the reduced sediment, which is likely to occur in the field, results in a slower U(IV) oxidation rate, which, in turn, would lower the maximum concentration of mobilized U(VI)...

  14. Uranium in the Near-shore Aquatic Food Chain: Studies on Periphyton and Asian Clams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunn, Amoret L.; Miley, Terri B.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Brandt, Charles A.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2007-12-31

    The benthic aquatic organisms in the near-shore environment of the Columbia River are the first biological receptors that can be exposed to groundwater contaminants coming from the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. The primary contaminant of concern in the former nuclear fuels processing area at the Site, known as the 300 Area, is uranium. Currently, there are no national clean up criteria for uranium and ecological receptors. This report summarizes efforts to characterize biological uptake of uranium in the food chain of the benthic aquatic organisms and provide information to be used in future assessments of uranium and the ecosystem.

  15. Modeling uranium transport in acidic contaminated groundwater with base addition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Fan; Luo, Wensui; Parker, Jack C.; Brooks, Scott C; Watson, David B; Jardine, Philip; Gu, Baohua

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates reactive transport modeling in a column of uranium(VI)-contaminated sediments with base additions in the circulating influent. The groundwater and sediment exhibit oxic conditions with low pH, high concentrations of NO{sub 3}{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, U and various metal cations. Preliminary batch experiments indicate that additions of strong base induce rapid immobilization of U for this material. In the column experiment that is the focus of the present study, effluent groundwater was titrated with NaOH solution in an inflow reservoir before reinjection to gradually increase the solution pH in the column. An equilibrium hydrolysis, precipitation and ion exchange reaction model developed through simulation of the preliminary batch titration experiments predicted faster reduction of aqueous Al than observed in the column experiment. The model was therefore modified to consider reaction kinetics for the precipitation and dissolution processes which are the major mechanism for Al immobilization. The combined kinetic and equilibrium reaction model adequately described variations in pH, aqueous concentrations of metal cations (Al, Ca, Mg, Sr, Mn, Ni, Co), sulfate and U(VI). The experimental and modeling results indicate that U(VI) can be effectively sequestered with controlled base addition due to sorption by slowly precipitated Al with pH-dependent surface charge. The model may prove useful to predict field-scale U(VI) sequestration and remediation effectiveness.

  16. Assessment of Controlling Processes for Field-Scale Uranium Reactive Transport under Highly Transient Flow Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Liu, Chongxuan; Greskowiak, Janek; Prommer, Henning; Zachara, John M.

    2014-02-13

    This paper presents the results of a comprehensive model-based analysis of a uranium tracer test conducted at the U.S Department of Energy Hanford 300 Area (300A) IFRC site. A three-dimensional multi-component reactive transport model was employed to assess the key factors and processes that control the field-scale uranium reactive transport. Taking into consideration of relevant physical and chemical processes, the selected conceptual/numerical model replicates the spatial and temporal variations of the observed U(VI) concentrations reasonably well in spite of the highly complex field conditions. A sensitivity analysis was performed to interrogate the relative importance of various processes and factors for reactive transport of U(VI) at the field-scale. The results indicate that multi-rate U(VI) sorption/desorption, U(VI) surface complexation reactions, and initial U(VI) concentrations were the most important processes and factors controlling U(VI) migration. On the other hand, cation exchange reactions, the choice of the surface complexation model, and dual-domain mass transfer processes, which were previously identified to be important in laboratory experiments, played less important roles under the field-scale experimental condition at the 300A site. However, the model simulations also revealed that the groundwater chemistry was relatively stable during the uranium tracer experiment and therefore presumably not dynamic enough to appropriately assess the effects of ion exchange reaction and the choice of surface complexation models on U(VI) sorption and desorption. Furthermore, it also showed that the field experimental duration (16 days) was not sufficiently long to precisely assess the role of a majority of the sorption sites that were accessed by slow kinetic processes within the dual domain model. The sensitivity analysis revealed the crucial role of the intraborehole flow that occurred within the long-screened monitoring wells and thus significantly

  17. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Lovelock Quadrangle, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, V.P.; Bradley, M.T.; Nagy, P.A.

    1982-08-01

    Uranium resources of the Lovelock Quadrangle, Nevada and California, were evaluated to a depth of 1500 m using available surface and subsurface geological information. Uranium occurrences reported in the literature and in reports of the Atomic Energy Commission were located, sampled, and described in detail. Areas of anomalous radioactivity, as interpreted from the aerial radiometric reconnaissance survey and from the hydrochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance survey reports, were also investigated. A general reconnaissance of the geologic environments exposed in surface outcrops was carried out; and over 400 rock, sediment, and water geochemical analyses were made from the samples taken. Additionally, 119 rock samples were petrographically studied. A total of 21 occurrences were located, sampled, and described in detail. Six uranium occurrences, previously unreported in the literature, were located during hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance, aerial radiometric reconnaissance survey followup, or general outcrop reconnaissance. Nine areas of uranium favorability were delineated within the Lovelock Quadrangle. One area, which contains the basal units of the Hartford Hill Rhyolite, is favorable for hydroallogenic uranium deposits. Eight areas are favorable for uranium deposits in playa sediments. These playas are considered favorable for nonmarine carbonaceous sediment deposits and evaporative deposits. The total volume of rock in favorable areas of the Lovelock Quadrangle is estimated to be 190 km/sup 3/. The remaining geologic units are considered to be unfavorable for uranium deposits. These include upper Paleozoic and Mesozoic volcanic, plutonic, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Also unfavorable are Tertiary and Quaternary volcanic flows and intrusive phases, tuffs, and sediments.

  18. PROCESS OF RECOVERING URANIUM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kilner, S.B.

    1959-12-29

    A method is presented for separating and recovering uranium from a complex mixure of impurities. The uranium is dissolved to produce an aqueous acidic solution including various impurities. In accordance with one method, with the uranium in the uranyl state, hydrogen cyanide is introduced into the solution to complex the impurities. Subsequently, ammonia is added to the solution to precipitate the uraniunn as ammonium diuranate away from the impurities in the solution. Alternatively, the uranium is precipitated by adding an alkaline metal hydroxide. In accordance with the second method, the uranium is reduced to the uranous state in the solution. The reduced solution is then treated with solid alkali metal cyanide sufficient to render the solution about 0.1 to 1.0 N in cyanide ions whereat cyanide complex ions of the metal impurities are produced and the uranium is simultaneously precipituted as uranous hydroxide. Alternatively, hydrogen cyanide may be added to the reduced solution and the uranium precipitated subsequently by adding ammonium hydroxide or an alkali metal hydroxide. Other refinements of the method are also disclosed.

  19. India's Worsening Uranium Shortage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, Michael M.

    2007-01-15

    As a result of NSG restrictions, India cannot import the natural uranium required to fuel its Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs); consequently, it is forced to rely on the expediency of domestic uranium production. However, domestic production from mines and byproduct sources has not kept pace with demand from commercial reactors. This shortage has been officially confirmed by the Indian Planning Commission’s Mid-Term Appraisal of the country’s current Five Year Plan. The report stresses that as a result of the uranium shortage, Indian PHWR load factors have been continually decreasing. The Uranium Corporation of India Ltd (UCIL) operates a number of underground mines in the Singhbhum Shear Zone of Jharkhand, and it is all processed at a single mill in Jaduguda. UCIL is attempting to aggrandize operations by establishing new mines and mills in other states, but the requisite permit-gathering and development time will defer production until at least 2009. A significant portion of India’s uranium comes from byproduct sources, but a number of these are derived from accumulated stores that are nearing exhaustion. A current maximum estimate of indigenous uranium production is 430t/yr (230t from mines and 200t from byproduct sources); whereas, the current uranium requirement for Indian PHWRs is 455t/yr (depending on plant capacity factor). This deficit is exacerbated by the additional requirements of the Indian weapons program. Present power generation capacity of Indian nuclear plants is 4350 MWe. The power generation target set by the Indian Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) is 20,000 MWe by the year 2020. It is expected that around half of this total will be provided by PHWRs using indigenously supplied uranium with the bulk of the remainder provided by breeder reactors or pressurized water reactors using imported low-enriched uranium.

  20. Depleted uranium management alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.

    1994-08-01

    This report evaluates two management alternatives for Department of Energy depleted uranium: continued storage as uranium hexafluoride, and conversion to uranium metal and fabrication to shielding for spent nuclear fuel containers. The results will be used to compare the costs with other alternatives, such as disposal. Cost estimates for the continued storage alternative are based on a life-cycle of 27 years through the year 2020. Cost estimates for the recycle alternative are based on existing conversion process costs and Capital costs for fabricating the containers. Additionally, the recycle alternative accounts for costs associated with intermediate product resale and secondary waste disposal for materials generated during the conversion process.

  1. Promoting Uranium Immobilization by the Activities of Microbial Phosphatases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert J. Martinez; Melanie J. Beazley; Samuel M. Webb; Martial Taillefert; and Patricia A. Sobecky

    2007-04-19

    The overall objective of this project is to examine the activity of nonspecific phosphohydrolases present in naturally occurring subsurface microorganisms for the purpose of promoting the immobilization of radionuclides through the production of uranium [U(VI)] phosphate precipitates. Specifically, we hypothesize that the precipitation of U(VI) phosphate minerals may be promoted through the microbial release and/or accumulation of PO4 3- as a means to detoxify radionuclides and heavy metals. An experimental approach was designed to determine the extent of phosphatase activity in bacteria previously isolated from contaminated subsurface soils collected at the ERSP Field Research Center (FRC) in Oak Ridge, TN. Screening of 135 metal resistant isolates for phosphatase activity indicated the majority (75 of 135) exhibited a phosphatase-positive phenotype. During this phase of the project, a PCR based approach has also been designed to assay FRC isolates for the presence of one or more classes of the characterized non-specific acid phophastase (NSAP) genes likely to be involved in promoting U(VI) precipitation. Testing of a subset of Pb resistant (Pbr) Arthrobacter, Bacillus and Rahnella strains indicated 4 of the 9 Pbr isolates exhibited phosphatase phenotypes suggestive of the ability to bioprecipitate U(VI). Two FRC strains, a Rahnella sp. strain Y9602 and a Bacillus sp. strain Y9-2, were further characterized. The Rahnella sp. exhibited enhanced phosphatase activity relative to the Bacillus sp. Whole-cell enzyme assays identified a pH optimum of 5.5, and inorganic phosphate accumulated in pH 5.5 synthetic groundwater (designed to mimic FRC conditions) incubations of both strains in the presence of a model organophosphorus substrate provided as the sole C and P source. Kinetic experiments showed that these two organisms can grow in the presence of 200 μM dissolved uranium and that Rahnella is much more efficient in precipitating U(VI) than Bacillus sp. The

  2. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4. Deliveries of uranium feed for enrichment by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by origin country and delivery year, 2013-15 thousand pounds U3O8 ...

  3. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9. Contracted purchases of uranium by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, signed in 2015, by delivery year, 2016-25 thousand pounds U3O8 equivalent Year ...

  4. PURIFICATION OF URANIUM FUELS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Niedrach, L.W.; Glamm, A.C.

    1959-09-01

    An electrolytic process of refining or decontaminating uranium is presented. The impure uranium is made the anode of an electrolytic cell. The molten salt electrolyte of this cell comprises a uranium halide such as UF/sub 4/ or UCl/sub 3/ and an alkaline earth metal halide such as CaCl/sub 2/, BaF/sub 2/, or BaCl/sub 2/. The cathode of the cell is a metal such as Mn, Cr, Co, Fe, or Ni which forms a low melting eutectic with U. The cell is operated at a temperature below the melting point of U. In operation the electrodeposited uranium becomes alloyed with the metal of the cathode, and the low melting alloy thus formed drips from the cathode.

  5. URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stevenson, J.W.; Werkema, R.G.

    1959-07-28

    The recovery of uranium from magnesium fluoride slag obtained as a by- product in the production of uranium metal by the bomb reduction prccess is presented. Generally the recovery is accomplished by finely grinding the slag, roasting ihe ground slag air, and leaching the roasted slag with a hot, aqueous solution containing an excess of the sodium bicarbonate stoichiometrically required to form soluble uranium carbonate complex. The roasting is preferably carried out at between 425 and 485 deg C for about three hours. The leaching is preferably done at 70 to 90 deg C and under pressure. After leaching and filtration the uranium may be recovered from the clear leach liquor by any desired method.

  6. Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9. Summary production statistics of the U.S. uranium industry, 1993-2015 Year Exploration and development surface drilling (million feet) Exploration and development drilling expenditures 1 (million dollars) Mine production of uranium (million pounds U3O8) Uranium concentrate production (million pounds U3O8) Uranium concentrate shipments (million pounds U3O8) Employment (person-years) 1993 1.1 5.7 2.1 3.1 3.4 871 1994 0.7 1.1 2.5 3.4 6.3 980 1995 1.3 2.6 3.5 6.0 5.5 1,107 1996 3.0 7.2 4.7 6.3

  7. URANIUM EXTRACTION PROCESS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baldwin, W.H.; Higgins, C.E.

    1958-12-16

    A process is described for recovering uranium values from acidic aqueous solutions containing hexavalent uranium by contacting the solution with an organic solution comprised of a substantially water-immiscible organlc diluent and an organic phosphate to extract the uranlum values into the organic phase. Carbon tetrachloride and a petroleum hydrocarbon fraction, such as kerosene, are sultable diluents to be used in combination with organlc phosphates such as dibutyl butylphosphonate, trlbutyl phosphine oxide, and tributyl phosphate.

  8. ANODIC TREATMENT OF URANIUM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kolodney, M.

    1959-02-01

    A method is presented for effecting eloctrolytic dissolution of a metallic uranium article at a uniform rate. The uranium is made the anode in an aqueous phosphoric acid solution containing nitrate ions furnished by either ammonium nitrate, lithium nitrate, sodium nitrate, or potassium nitrate. A stainless steel cathode is employed and electrolysls carried out at a current density of about 0.1 to 1 ampere per square inch.

  9. Microbiological, Geochemical and Hydrologic Processes Controlling Uranium Mobility: An Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site at Rifle, Colorado, Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-01-07

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is cleaning up and/or monitoring large, dilute plumes contaminated by metals, such as uranium and chromium, whose mobility and solubility change with redox status. Field-scale experiments with acetate as the electron donor have stimulated metal-reducing bacteria to effectively remove uranium [U(VI)] from groundwater at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Rifle, Colorado. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and a multidisciplinary team of national laboratory and academic collaborators has embarked on a research proposed for the Rifle site, the object of which is to gain a comprehensive and mechanistic understanding of the microbial factors and associated geochemistry controlling uranium mobility so that DOE can confidently remediate uranium plumes as well as support stewardship of uranium-contaminated sites. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Rifle Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Project.

  10. Method for the recovery of uranium values from uranium tetrafluoride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kreuzmann, Alvin B.

    1983-01-01

    The invention is a novel method for the recovery of uranium from dry, particulate uranium tetrafluoride. In one aspect, the invention comprises reacting particulate uranium tetrafluoride and calcium oxide in the presence of gaseous oxygen to effect formation of the corresponding alkaline earth metal uranate and alkaline earth metal fluoride. The product uranate is highly soluble in various acidic solutions wherein the product fluoride is virtually insoluble therein. The product mixture of uranate and alkaline earth metal fluoride is contacted with a suitable acid to provide a uranium-containing solution, from which the uranium is recovered. The invention can achieve quantitative recovery of uranium in highly pure form.

  11. Method for the recovery of uranium values from uranium tetrafluoride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kreuzmann, A.B.

    1982-10-27

    The invention is a novel method for the recovery of uranium from dry, particulate uranium tetrafluoride. In one aspect, the invention comprises reacting particulate uranium tetrafluoride and calcium oxide in the presence of gaseous oxygen to effect formation of the corresponding alkaline earth metal uranate and alkaline earth metal fluoride. The product uranate is highly soluble in various acidic solutions whereas the product fluoride is virtually insoluble therein. The product mixture of uranate and alkaline earth metal fluoride is contacted with a suitable acid to provide a uranium-containing solution, from which the uranium is recovered. The invention can achieve quantitative recovery of uranium in highly pure form.

  12. Evidence for Multiple Modes of Uranium Immobilization by an Anaerobic Bacterium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison E. Ray; John R. Bargar; Alice C. Dohnalkova; Vaidee Sivaswamy; Yoshiko Fujita; Timothy S. Magnuson

    2011-05-01

    ABSTRACT Microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium has been studied widely for its potential role in bioremediation and removal of soluble U(VI) from contaminated groundwater. More recently, some microorganisms have been examined for their role in immobilization of U(VI) via precipitation of uranyl phosphate minerals mediated by microbial phosphate release, alleviating the requirement for long-term redox control. Here, we investigated the mechanism of U(VI) removal mediated by an environmental isolate, strain UFO1, that is indigenous to the Field Research Center (FRC) in Oak Ridge, TN and has been detected in U(VI)-contaminated sediments. U(VI) removal was examined in the presence and absence of the electron-shuttling moiety, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS). Cell suspensions were capable of the near complete removal of 100 uM U(VI) from solution within 48 hours; U(VI) removal was not dependent on the presence of an exogenous electron donor or AQDS, although AQDS increased the rate of U(VI) removal. Profiles of ortho-phosphate concentration over time suggested phosphate liberation from cells. However, X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopic measurements indicated that U(IV) was the predominant oxidation state of uranium in cell suspensions in both the absence and presence of 100 uM AQDS. Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) measurements indicated that 20% of the cell-associated precipitates in a U(VI)-treated suspension that lacked AQDS had spectral characteristics consistent with a uranyl phosphate solid phase. EXAFS fits further show that that U(IV) is present dominantly as a monomeric sorbed complex. TEM-EDS confirmed the presence of uranyl phosphate with a U:P ratio consistent with autunite (1:1). These results suggest that strain UFO1 has the ability to mediate U(VI) removal from solution via both reductive and phosphate precipitation mechanisms, and may potentially be useful for the remediation of U

  13. Evidence for Multiple Modes of Uranium Immobilization by an Anaerobic Bacterium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, Allison; Bargar, John R.; Sivaswamy, Vaideeswaran; Dohnalkova, Alice; Fujita, Yoshiko; Peyton, Brent M.; Magnuson, Timothy S.

    2011-05-15

    Microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium has been studied widely for its potential role in bioremediation and immobilization of soluble U(VI) in contaminated groundwater. More recently, some microorganisms have been examined for their role in immobilization of U(VI) via precipitation of uranyl phosphate minerals mediated by microbial phosphate release, alleviating the requirement for long-term redox control. Here, we investigated the mechanism of U(VI) removal mediated by an environmental isolate, strain UFO1, that is indigenous to the Field Research Center (FRC) in Oak Ridge, TN and has been detected in U(VI)-contaminated sediments. Changes in U(VI) speciation were examined in the presence and absence of the electron-shuttling moiety, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS). Cell suspensions were capable of nearly complete removal of 100 M U(VI) from solution within 48 hours; U(VI) removal was not dependent on the presence of an exogenous electron donor or AQDS, although AQDS increased the rate of U(VI) removal. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopic measurements indicated that U(IV) was the predominant oxidation state of uranium in cell suspensions in both the absence and presence of 100 M AQDS. However, extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) measurements indicated that 17% of the cell-associated precipitates in a U(VI)-treated suspension that lacked AQDS had spectral characteristics consistent with a uranyl phosphate solid phase. The potential involvement of phosphate was consistent with observed increases in soluble phosphate concentrations over time in UFO1 cell suspensions, which suggested phosphate liberation from the cells. TEM-EDS confirmed the presence of uranyl phosphate with a U:P ratio consistent with autunite (1:1). EXAFS analyses further showed that U(IV) was present predominantly as a monomeric complex sorbed to carboxylate functional groups on biomass and also suggested that a fraction of the U(IV) was

  14. Isotopic and geochemical tracers for U(VI) reduction and U mobility at an in situ recovery U mine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, Anirban; Brown, Shaun T.; Christensen, John N.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Reimus, Paul W.; Heikoop, Jeffrey M.; Woldegabriel, Giday; Simmons, Ardyth M.; House, Brian M.; Hartmann, Matt; Maher, Kate

    2015-05-19

    In situ recovery (ISR) uranium (U) mining mobilizes U in its oxidized hexavalent form (U(VI)) by oxidative dissolution of U from the roll-front U deposits. Post-mining natural attenuation of residual U(VI) at ISR mines is a potential remediation strategy. Detection and monitoring of naturally occurring reducing subsurface environments are important for successful implementation of this remediation scheme. We used the isotopic tracers ?U/?U (??U), ?U/?U activity ratio, and ?S/S (??S), and geochemical measurements of U ore and groundwater collected from 32 wells located within, upgradient, and downgradient of a roll-front U deposit to detect U(VI) reduction and U mobility at an ISR mining site at Rosita, TX, USA. The ??U in Rosita groundwater varies from 0.61 to -2.49, with a trend toward lower ??U in downgradient wells. The concurrent decrease in U(VI) concentration and ??U with an ? of 0.48 0.08 is indicative of naturally occurring reducing environments conducive to U(VI) reduction. Additionally, characteristic ?U/?U activity ratio and ??S values may also be used to trace the mobility of the ore zone groundwater after mining has ended. These results support the use of U isotope-based detection of natural attenuation of U(VI) at Rosita and other similar ISR mining sites.

  15. Uranium Processing Facility Team Signs Partnering Agreement ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Processing Facility ... Uranium Processing Facility Team Signs Partnering Agreement ... Nuclear Security, LLC; John Eschenberg, Uranium Processing Facility Project Office; Brian ...

  16. Nuclear Fuel Facts: Uranium | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Facts: Uranium Nuclear Fuel Facts: Uranium Nuclear Fuel Facts: Uranium Uranium is a silvery-white metallic chemical element in the periodic table, with atomic number 92. It is assigned the chemical symbol U. A uranium atom has 92 protons and 92 electrons, of which 6 are valence electrons. Uranium has the highest atomic weight (19 kg m) of all naturally occurring elements. Uranium occurs naturally in low concentrations in soil, rock and water, and is commercially extracted from uranium-bearing

  17. Influence of uranium hydride oxidation on uranium metal behaviour

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patel, N.; Hambley, D.; Clarke, S.A.; Simpson, K.

    2013-07-01

    This work addresses concerns that the rapid, exothermic oxidation of active uranium hydride in air could stimulate an exothermic reaction (burning) involving any adjacent uranium metal, so as to increase the potential hazard arising from a hydride reaction. The effect of the thermal reaction of active uranium hydride, especially in contact with uranium metal, does not increase in proportion with hydride mass, particularly when considering large quantities of hydride. Whether uranium metal continues to burn in the long term is a function of the uranium metal and its surroundings. The source of the initial heat input to the uranium, if sufficient to cause ignition, is not important. Sustained burning of uranium requires the rate of heat generation to be sufficient to offset the total rate of heat loss so as to maintain an elevated temperature. For dense uranium, this is very difficult to achieve in naturally occurring circumstances. Areas of the uranium surface can lose heat but not generate heat. Heat can be lost by conduction, through contact with other materials, and by convection and radiation, e.g. from areas where the uranium surface is covered with a layer of oxidised material, such as burned-out hydride or from fuel cladding. These rates of heat loss are highly significant in relation to the rate of heat generation by sustained oxidation of uranium in air. Finite volume modelling has been used to examine the behaviour of a magnesium-clad uranium metal fuel element within a bottle surrounded by other un-bottled fuel elements. In the event that the bottle is breached, suddenly, in air, it can be concluded that the bulk uranium metal oxidation reaction will not reach a self-sustaining level and the mass of uranium oxidised will likely to be small in relation to mass of uranium hydride oxidised. (authors)

  18. Process for electrolytically preparing uranium metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haas, Paul A.

    1989-01-01

    A process for making uranium metal from uranium oxide by first fluorinating uranium oxide to form uranium tetrafluoride and next electrolytically reducing the uranium tetrafluoride with a carbon anode to form uranium metal and CF.sub.4. The CF.sub.4 is reused in the fluorination reaction rather than being disposed of as a hazardous waste.

  19. Process for electrolytically preparing uranium metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haas, Paul A.

    1989-08-01

    A process for making uranium metal from uranium oxide by first fluorinating uranium oxide to form uranium tetrafluoride and next electrolytically reducing the uranium tetrafluoride with a carbon anode to form uranium metal and CF.sub.4. The CF.sub.4 is reused in the fluorination reaction rather than being disposed of as a hazardous waste.

  20. Model-Based Analysis of the Role of Biological, Hydrological and Geochemical Factors Affecting Uranium Bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Jiao; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan

    2011-01-24

    Uranium contamination is a serious concern at several sites motivating the development of novel treatment strategies such as the Geobacter-mediated reductive immobilization of uranium. However, this bioremediation strategy has not yet been optimized for the sustained uranium removal. While several reactive-transport models have been developed to represent Geobacter-mediated bioremediation of uranium, these models often lack the detailed quantitative description of the microbial process (e.g., biomass build-up in both groundwater and sediments, electron transport system, etc.) and the interaction between biogeochemical and hydrological process. In this study, a novel multi-scale model was developed by integrating our recent model on electron capacitance of Geobacter (Zhao et al., 2010) with a comprehensive simulator of coupled fluid flow, hydrologic transport, heat transfer, and biogeochemical reactions. This mechanistic reactive-transport model accurately reproduces the experimental data for the bioremediation of uranium with acetate amendment. We subsequently performed global sensitivity analysis with the reactive-transport model in order to identify the main sources of prediction uncertainty caused by synergistic effects of biological, geochemical, and hydrological processes. The proposed approach successfully captured significant contributing factors across time and space, thereby improving the structure and parameterization of the comprehensive reactive-transport model. The global sensitivity analysis also provides a potentially useful tool to evaluate uranium bioremediation strategy. The simulations suggest that under difficult environments (e.g., highly contaminated with U(VI) at a high migration rate of solutes), the efficiency of uranium removal can be improved by adding Geobacter species to the contaminated site (bioaugmentation) in conjunction with the addition of electron donor (biostimulation). The simulations also highlight the interactive effect of

  1. Isotopic and geochemical tracers for U(VI) reduction and U mobility at an in situ recovery U mine

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Basu, Anirban; Brown, Shaun T.; Christensen, John N.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Reimus, Paul W.; Heikoop, Jeffrey M.; Woldegabriel, Giday; Simmons, Ardyth M.; House, Brian M.; Hartmann, Matt; et al

    2015-05-19

    In situ recovery (ISR) uranium (U) mining mobilizes U in its oxidized hexavalent form (U(VI)) by oxidative dissolution of U from the roll-front U deposits. Post-mining natural attenuation of residual U(VI) at ISR mines is a potential remediation strategy. Detection and monitoring of naturally occurring reducing subsurface environments are important for successful implementation of this remediation scheme. We used the isotopic tracers ²³⁸U/²³⁵U (δ²³⁸U), ²³⁴U/²³⁸U activity ratio, and ³⁴S/³²S (δ³⁴S), and geochemical measurements of U ore and groundwater collected from 32 wells located within, upgradient, and downgradient of a roll-front U deposit to detect U(VI) reduction and U mobility atmore » an ISR mining site at Rosita, TX, USA. The δ²³⁸U in Rosita groundwater varies from 0.61‰ to -2.49‰, with a trend toward lower δ²³⁸U in downgradient wells. The concurrent decrease in U(VI) concentration and δ²³⁸U with an ε of 0.48‰ ± 0.08‰ is indicative of naturally occurring reducing environments conducive to U(VI) reduction. Additionally, characteristic ²³⁴U/²³⁸U activity ratio and δ³⁴S values may also be used to trace the mobility of the ore zone groundwater after mining has ended. These results support the use of U isotope-based detection of natural attenuation of U(VI) at Rosita and other similar ISR mining sites.« less

  2. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fowler, R.D.

    1957-08-27

    A process for the production of uranium hexafluoride from the oxides of uranium is reported. In accordance with the method, the higher oxides of uranium may be reduced to uranium dioxide (UO/sub 2/), the latter converted into uranium tetrafluoride by reaction with hydrogen fluoride, and the UF/sub 4/ converted to UF/sub 6/ by reaction with a fluorinating agent, such as CoF/sub 3/. The UO/sub 3/ or U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ is placed in a reac tion chamber in a copper boat or tray enclosed in a copper oven, and heated to 500 to 650 deg C while hydrogen gas is passed through the oven. After nitrogen gas is used to sweep out the hydrogen and the water vapor formed, and while continuing to inaintain the temperature between 400 deg C and 600 deg C, anhydrous hydrogen fluoride is passed through. After completion of the conversion of UO/sub 2/ to UF/sub 4/ the temperature of the reaction chamber is lowered to about 400 deg C or less, the UF/sub 4/ is mixed with the requisite quantity of CoF/sub 3/, and after evacuating the chamber, the mixture is heated to 300 to 400 deg C, and the resulting UF/sub 6/ is led off and delivered to a condenser.

  3. Uranium hexafluoride handling. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    The United States Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Field Office, and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., are co-sponsoring this Second International Conference on Uranium Hexafluoride Handling. The conference is offered as a forum for the exchange of information and concepts regarding the technical and regulatory issues and the safety aspects which relate to the handling of uranium hexafluoride. Through the papers presented here, we attempt not only to share technological advances and lessons learned, but also to demonstrate that we are concerned about the health and safety of our workers and the public, and are good stewards of the environment in which we all work and live. These proceedings are a compilation of the work of many experts in that phase of world-wide industry which comprises the nuclear fuel cycle. Their experience spans the entire range over which uranium hexafluoride is involved in the fuel cycle, from the production of UF{sub 6} from the naturally-occurring oxide to its re-conversion to oxide for reactor fuels. The papers furnish insights into the chemical, physical, and nuclear properties of uranium hexafluoride as they influence its transport, storage, and the design and operation of plant-scale facilities for production, processing, and conversion to oxide. The papers demonstrate, in an industry often cited for its excellent safety record, continuing efforts to further improve safety in all areas of handling uranium hexafluoride. Selected papers were processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  4. Structure of Mo(VI) complexes. VI. Mo(VI) oxodiperoxo complexes with urea and some of its derivatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timosheva, A.P.; Kazakova, E.K.; Vul`fson, S.G.

    1995-05-20

    Procedures for synthesizing Mo(VI) oxodiperoxo complexes with urea and some of its derivatives have been described. The dipole moment of the peroxo molybdenum complex with hexametapol and urea, [MoO{sub 5}(HMPT)CO(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}], has been determined, and its structure has been proposed. 10 refs.

  5. Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The 2013 Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan describes a framework for the effective management of the Energy Department’s surplus uranium inventory in support of meeting its critical...

  6. 2015 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Domestic Uranium Production Report 2015 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: May 5, 2016 Next Release Date: May 2017 Table 9. Summary production statistics of the U.S. ...

  7. 2015 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Domestic Uranium Production Report 2015 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: May 5, 2016 Next Release Date: May 2017 State(s) 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 ...

  8. METHOD OF SINTERING URANIUM DIOXIDE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Henderson, C.M.; Stavrolakis, J.A.

    1963-04-30

    This patent relates to a method of sintering uranium dioxide. Uranium dioxide bodies are heated to above 1200 nif- C in hydrogen, sintered in steam, and then cooled in hydrogen. (AEC)

  9. 2015 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Uranium Marketing Annual Report 2015 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 24, 2016 Next Release Date: May 2017 2014 2015 2014 2015 2014 2015 Weighted-average price ...

  10. 2015 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Figure 3. Uranium purchased by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by origin and delivery year, 2011-15 Figure 4. Weighted-average price of uranium ...

  11. METHOD OF RECOVERING URANIUM COMPOUNDS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poirier, R.H.

    1957-10-29

    S>The recovery of uranium compounds which have been adsorbed on anion exchange resins is discussed. The uranium and thorium-containing residues from monazite processed by alkali hydroxide are separated from solution, and leached with an alkali metal carbonate solution, whereby the uranium and thorium hydrorides are dissolved. The carbonate solution is then passed over an anion exchange resin causing the uranium to be adsorbed while the thorium remains in solution. The uranium may be recovered by contacting the uranium-holding resin with an aqueous ammonium carbonate solution whereby the uranium values are eluted from the resin and then heating the eluate whereby carbon dioxide and ammonia are given off, the pH value of the solution is lowered, and the uranium is precipitated.

  12. 2015 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2015 Uranium Marketing Annual Report 2015 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 24, 2016 Next Release Date: May 2017 thousand pounds U 3 O 8 equivalent Year Maximum ...

  13. Uranium-titanium-niobium alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ludtka, Gail M.; Ludtka, Gerard M.

    1990-01-01

    A uranium alloy having small additions of Ti and Nb shows improved strength and ductility in cross section of greater than one inch over prior uranium alloy having only Ti as an alloying element.

  14. EA-389 Greay Bay Energy VI, LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Order authorizing Great Bay Energy to export electric energy to Canada. EA-389 Great Bay ... Great Bay Energy VI, LLC EA-389-A Great Bay Energy VI, LLC EA-342-A Royal Bank of Canada

  15. Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU VI VOC | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    VI VOC Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU VI VOC January 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US ... InstallationName, State: Brookhaven National Laboratory Responsible DOE Office: Office of ...

  16. uranium | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    uranium Klotz visits Y-12 to see progress on new projects and ongoing work on NNSA's national security missions Last week, NNSA Administrator Lt. Gen. Frank Klotz (Ret.) visited the Y-12 National Security Complex to check on the status of ongoing projects like the Uranium Processing Facility as well as the site's continuing uranium operations. He also met with the Region 2 volunteers of the Radiogical... NNSA Announces Arrival of Plutonium and Uranium from Japan's Fast Critical Assembly at

  17. Subsurface Biogeochemical Heterogeneity (Field-scale removal of U(VI) from groundwater in an alluvial aquifer by electron donor amendment)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Philip E.; Lovley, Derek R.; N'Guessan, A. L.; Nevin, Kelly; Resch, C. T.; Arntzen, Evan; Druhan, Jenny; Peacock, Aaron; Baldwin, Brett; Dayvault, Dick; Holmes, Dawn; Williams, Ken; Hubbard, Susan; Yabusaki, Steve; Fang, Yilin; White, D. C.; Komlos, John; Jaffe, Peter

    2006-06-01

    Determine if biostimulation of alluvial aquifers by electron donor amendment can effectively remove U(VI) from groundwater at the field scale. Uranium contamination in groundwater is a significant problem at several DOE sites. In this project, the possibility of accelerating bioreduction of U(VI) to U(IV) as a means of decreasing U(VI) concentrations in groundwater is directly addressed by conducting a series of field-scale experiments. Scientific goals include demonstrating the quantitative linkage between microbial activity and U loss from groundwater and relating the dominant terminal electron accepting processes to the rate of U loss. The project is currently focused on understanding the mechanisms for unexpected long-term ({approx}2 years) removal of U after stopping electron donor amendment. Results obtained in the project successfully position DOE and others to apply biostimulation broadly to U contamination in alluvial aquifers.

  18. Cellulose triacetate based novel optical sensor for uranium estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshi, J.M.; Pathak, P.N.; Pandey, A.K.; Manchanda, V.K.

    2008-07-01

    A cellulose triacetate (CTA) based optode has been developed by immobilizing tricapryl-methyl ammonium chloride (Aliquat 336) as the extractant and 2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5- diethyl-aminophenol (Br-PADAP) as the chromophore. The optode changes color (from yellow to magenta) due to uranium uptake in bicarbonate medium ({approx}10{sup -4} M) at pH 7-8 in the presence of triethanolamine (TEA) buffer. The detection limit of the optode film (dimension: 3 cm x 1 cm) was determined to be {approx}0.3 {mu}g/mL for a 15 mL pure uranium sample at pH 7-8 (in TEA buffer). The effects of experimental parameters have been evaluated in terms of maximum uptake of U(VI), minimum response time, and reproducibility and stability of the Br-PADAP-U(VI ) complex formed in the optode matrix. The applicability of the optimized optode has been examined in the effluent samples obtained during magnesium diuranate precipitation step following the TBP purification cycle. (authors)

  19. EXTRACTION OF URANIUM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kesler, R.D.; Rabb, D.D.

    1959-07-28

    An improved process is presented for recovering uranium from a carnotite ore. In the improved process U/sub 2/O/sub 5/ is added to the comminuted ore along with the usual amount of NaCl prior to roasting. The amount of U/sub 2/O/ sub 5/ is dependent on the amount of free calcium oxide and the uranium in the ore. Specifically, the desirable amount of U/sub 2/O/sub 5/ is 3.2% for each 1% of CaO, and 5 to 6% for each 1% of uranium. The mixture is roasted at about 1560 deg C for about 30 min and then leached with a 3 to 9% aqueous solution of sodium carbonate.

  20. Process for recovering uranium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacWood, G. E.; Wilder, C. D.; Altman, D.

    1959-03-24

    A process useful in recovering uranium from deposits on stainless steel liner surfaces of calutrons is presented. The deposit is removed from the stainless steel surface by washing with aqueous nitric acid. The solution obtained containing uranium, chromium, nickel, copper, and iron is treated with an excess of ammonium hydroxide to precipitnte the uranium, iron, and chromium and convert the nickel and copper to soluble ammonio complexions. The precipitated material is removed, dried and treated with carbon tetrachloride at an elevated temperature of about 500 to 600 deg C to form a vapor mixture of UCl/ sub 4/, UCl/sub 5/, FeCl/sub 3/, and CrCl/sub 4/. The UCl/sub 4/ is separated from this vapor mixture by selective fractional condensation at a temperature of about 500 to 400 deg C.

  1. Uranium industry annual, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-09-29

    This report provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, federal and state agencies, the uranium and utility industries, and the public. It utilizes data from the mandatory ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey,'' Form EIA-858; historical data collected by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) and by the Grand Junction (Colorado) Project Office of the Idaho Operations Office of the US Department of Energy (DOE); and other data from federal agencies that preceded the DOE. The data provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry's annual activities and include some information about industry plans and commitments over the next several years. Where these data are presented in aggregate form, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific data while still conveying an accurate and complete statistical representation of the industry data.

  2. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    . Uranium purchased by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by supplier and delivery year, 2011-15 thousand pounds U3O8 equivalent, dollars per pound U3O8 equivalent Deliveries 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Purchased from U.S. producers Purchases of U.S.-origin and foreign-origin uranium 550 W W W 1,455 Weighted-average price 58.12 W W W 52.35 Purchased from U.S. brokers and traders Purchases of U.S.-origin and foreign-origin uranium 14,778 11,545 12,835 17,111 13,852

  3. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    . Uranium purchased by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by origin and delivery year, 2011-15 thousand pounds U3O8 equivalent; dollars per pound U3O8 equivalent Deliveries 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 U.S.-Origin Uranium Purchases 5,205 9,807 9,484 3,316 3,419 Weighted-Average Price 52.12 59.44 56.37 48.11 43.86 Foreign-Origin Uranium Purchases 49,626 47,713 47,919 50,033 53,106 Weighted-Average Price 55.98 54.07 51.13 46.03 44.14 Total Purchases 54,831 57,520 57,403

  4. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0. U.S. broker and trader purchases of uranium by origin, supplier, and delivery year, 2011-15 thousand pounds U3O8 equivalent; dollars per pound U3O8 equivalent Deliveries 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Received U.S.-origin uranium Purchases 1,668 1,194 W 410 2,702 Weighted-average price 54.85 51.78 W 33.55 35.04 Received foreign-origin uranium Purchases 24,695 24,606 W 28,743 33,014 Weighted-average price 49.69 47.75 W 38.42 39.58 Total received by U.S. brokers and traders Purchases 26,363 25,800

  5. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1. Foreign sales of uranium from U.S. suppliers and owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by origin and delivery year, 2011-15 thousands pounds U3O8 equivalent; dollars per pound U3O8 equivalent Deliveries to foreign suppliers and utilities 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 U.S.-origin uranium Foreign sales 4,387 4,798 4,148 4,210 4,258 Weighted-average price 53.08 47.53 43.10 32.91 37.85 Foreign-origin uranium Foreign sales 12,297 13,185 14,717 15,794 21,465 Weighted-Average Price

  6. PROCESS FOR RECOVERING URANIUM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacWood, G.E.; Wilder, C.D.; Altman, D.

    1959-03-24

    A process is described for recovering uranium from deposits on stainless steel liner surfaces of calutrons. The deposit is removed from the stainless steel surface by washing with aqueous nitric acid. The solution obtained containing uranium, chromium, nickels copper, and iron is treated with excess of ammonium hydroxide to precipitatc the uranium, irons and chromium and convert thc nickel and copper to soluble ammonia complexions. The precipitated material is removed, dried, and treated with carbon tetrachloride at an elevated temperature of about 500 to 600 deg C to form a vapor mixture of UCl/sub 4/, UCl/sub 5/, FeCl/ sub 3/, and CrCl/sub 4/. The UCl/sub 4/ is separated from this vapor mixture by selective fractional condensation at a temprrature of about 300 to400 deg C.

  7. Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3. U.S. uranium concentrate production, shipments, and sales, 2003-15 Activity at U.S. mills and In-Situ-Leach plants 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Estimated contained U3O8 (thousand pounds) Ore from Mines and Stockpiles Fed to Mills1 0 W W W 0 W W W W W W W 0 Other Feed Materials 2 W W W W W W W W W W W W W Total Mill Feed W W W W W W W W W W W W W Uranium Concentrate Produced at U.S. Mills (thousand pounds U3O8) W W W W W W W W W W W W W Uranium Concentrate

  8. PROCESS OF PREPARING URANIUM CARBIDE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, W.E.; Stethers, H.L.; Johnson, T.R.

    1964-03-24

    A process of preparing uranium monocarbide is de scribed. Uranium metal is dissolved in cadmium, zinc, cadmium-- zinc, or magnesium-- zinc alloy and a small quantity of alkali metal is added. Addition of stoichiometric amounts of carbon at 500 to 820 deg C then precipitates uranium monocarbide. (AEC)

  9. Energy balance of ENDF/B-VI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacFarlane, R.E.

    1994-06-01

    ENDF/B-VI through Release 2 has been tested for neutron-photon energy balance using the Heater module of the NJOY nuclear data procesing system. The situation is much improved over ENDF/B-V, but there are still a number of maerials that show problems.

  10. I.D I VI Figure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ~press - ,~,.--;~ 3.1 ,,~-.::;:.--- ~ ( 3.1 ( ;-; t\ I.D I VI Figure 9-1. Location of the original Cypress Grove Set-Aside and the Stave Island and Georgia Power replacement Areas. Set-Aside 9: Cypress Grove, Stave Island, and Georgia Power

  11. TREATMENT OF URANIUM SURFACES

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slunder, C.J.

    1959-02-01

    An improved process is presented for prcparation of uranium surfaces prior to electroplating. The surfacc of the uranium to be electroplated is anodized in a bath comprising a solution of approximately 20 to 602 by weight of phosphoric acid which contains about 20 cc per liter of concentrated hydrochloric acid. Anodization is carried out for approximately 20 minutes at a current density of about 0.5 amperes per square inch at a temperature of about 35 to 45 C. The oxidic film produced by anodization is removed by dipping in strong nitric acid, followed by rinsing with water just prior to electroplating.

  12. PREPARATION OF URANIUM TRIOXIDE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buckingham, J.S.

    1959-09-01

    The production of uranium trioxide from aqueous solutions of uranyl nitrate is discussed. The uranium trioxide is produced by adding sulfur or a sulfur-containing compound, such as thiourea, sulfamic acid, sulfuric acid, and ammonium sulfate, to the uranyl solution in an amount of about 0.5% by weight of the uranyl nitrate hexahydrate, evaporating the solution to dryness, and calcining the dry residue. The trioxide obtained by this method furnished a dioxide with a considerably higher reactivity with hydrogen fluoride than a trioxide prepared without the sulfur additive.

  13. Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    b. Weighted-average price of uranium purchased by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, 1994-2015 dollars per pound U3O8 equivalent Delivery year Total purchased (weighted-average price) Purchased from U.S. producers Purchased from U.S. brokers and traders Purchased from other owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, other U.S. suppliers, (and U.S. government for 2007)1 Purchased from foreign suppliers U.S.-origin uranium (weighted-average price)

  14. Uranium Transport Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bostick, William D.

    2008-01-15

    Uranium contamination is prevalent at many of the U.S. DOE facilities and at several civilian sites that have supported the nuclear fuel cycle. The potential off-site mobility of uranium depends on the partitioning of uranium between aqueous and solid (soil and sediment) phases. Hexavalent U (as uranyl, UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) is relatively mobile, forming strong complexes with ubiquitous carbonate ion which renders it appreciably soluble even under mild reducing conditions. In the presence of carbonate, partition of uranyl to ferri-hydrate and select other mineral phases is usually maximum in the near-neutral pH range {approx} 5-8. The surface complexation reaction of uranyl with iron-containing minerals has been used as one means to model subsurface migration, used in conjunction with information on the site water chemistry and hydrology. Partitioning of uranium is often studied by short-term batch 'equilibrium' or long-term soil column testing ; MCLinc has performed both of these methodologies, with selection of method depending upon the requirements of the client or regulatory authority. Speciation of uranium in soil may be determined directly by instrumental techniques (e.g., x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, XPS; x-ray diffraction, XRD; etc.) or by inference drawn from operational estimates. Often, the technique of choice for evaluating low-level radionuclide partitioning in soils and sediments is the sequential extraction approach. This methodology applies operationally-defined chemical treatments to selectively dissolve specific classes of macro-scale soil or sediment components. These methods recognize that total soil metal inventory is of limited use in understanding bioavailability or metal mobility, and that it is useful to estimate the amount of metal present in different solid-phase forms. Despite some drawbacks, the sequential extraction method can provide a valuable tool to distinguish among trace element fractions of different solubility related to

  15. METHOD OF ELECTROPOLISHING URANIUM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walker, D.E.; Noland, R.A.

    1959-07-14

    A method of electropolishing the surface of uranium articles is presented. The process of this invention is carried out by immersing the uranium anticle into an electrolyte which contains from 35 to 65% by volume sulfuric acid, 1 to 20% by volume glycerine and 25 to 50% by volume of water. The article is made the anode in the cell and polished by electrolyzing at a voltage of from 10 to 15 volts. Discontinuing the electrolysis by intermittently withdrawing the anode from the electrolyte and removing any polarized film formed therein results in an especially bright surface.

  16. PROCESS OF RECOVERING URANIUM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Price, T.D.; Jeung, N.M.

    1958-06-17

    An improved precipitation method is described for the recovery of uranium from aqueous solutions. After removal of all but small amounts of Ni or Cu, and after complexing any iron present, the uranium is separated as the peroxide by adding H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. The improvement lies in the fact that the addition of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and consequent precipitation are carried out at a temperature below the freezing; point of the solution, so that minute crystals of solvent are present as seed crystals for the precipitation.

  17. Corrosion-resistant uranium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hovis, V.M. Jr.; Pullen, W.C.; Kollie, T.G.; Bell, R.T.

    1981-10-21

    The present invention is directed to the protecting of uranium and uranium alloy articles from corrosion by providing the surfaces of the articles with a layer of an ion-plated metal selected from aluminum and zinc to a thickness of at least 60 microinches and then converting at least the outer surface of the ion-plated layer of aluminum or zinc to aluminum chromate or zinc chromate. This conversion of the aluminum or zinc to the chromate form considerably enhances the corrosion resistance of the ion plating so as to effectively protect the coated article from corrosion.

  18. Corrosion-resistant uranium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hovis, Jr., Victor M.; Pullen, William C.; Kollie, Thomas G.; Bell, Richard T.

    1983-01-01

    The present invention is directed to the protecting of uranium and uranium alloy articles from corrosion by providing the surfaces of the articles with a layer of an ion-plated metal selected from aluminum and zinc to a thickness of at least 60 microinches and then converting at least the outer surface of the ion-plated layer of aluminum or zinc to aluminum chromate or zinc chromate. This conversion of the aluminum or zinc to the chromate form considerably enhances the corrosion resistance of the ion plating so as to effectively protect the coated article from corrosion.

  19. Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4. U.S. uranium mills by owner, location, capacity, and operating status at end of the year, 2011-15 Owner Mill and Heap Leach1 Facility name County, state (existing and planned locations) Capacity (short tons of ore per day) Operating status at end of the year 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Anfield Resources Shootaring Canyon Uranium Mill Garfield, Utah 750 Standby Standby Standby Standby Standby EPR White Mesa LLC White Mesa Mill San Juan, Utah 2,000 Operating Operating Operating- Processing

  20. Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    10. Uranium reserve estimates at the end of 2014 and 2015 million pounds U3O8 End of 2014 End of 2015 Forward Cost2 Uranium Reserve Estimates1 by Mine and Property Status, Mining Method, and State(s) $0 to $30 per pound $0 to $50 per pound $0 to $100 per pound $0 to $30 per pound $0 to $50 per pound $0 to $100 per pound Properties with Exploration Completed, Exploration Continuing, and Only Assessment Work W W 154.6 24.3 W 151.6 Properties Under Development for Production and Development

  1. Uranium Lease and Take-Back | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Uranium Lease and Take-Back

  2. RECOVERY OF URANIUM FROM PITCHBLENDE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruehle, A.E.

    1958-06-24

    The decontamination of uranium from molybdenum is described. When acid solutions containing uranyl nitrate are contacted with ether for the purpose of extracting the uranium values, complex molybdenum compounds are coextracted with the uranium and also again back-extracted from the ether with the uranium. This invention provides a process for extracting uranium in which coextraction of molybdenum is avoided. It has been found that polyhydric alcohols form complexes with molybdenum which are preferentially water-soluble are taken up by the ether extractant to only a very minor degree. The preferred embodiment of the process uses mannitol, sorbitol or a mixture of the two as the complexing agent.

  3. High loading uranium fuel plate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wiencek, Thomas C.; Domagala, Robert F.; Thresh, Henry R.

    1990-01-01

    Two embodiments of a high uranium fuel plate are disclosed which contain a meat comprising structured uranium compound confined between a pair of diffusion bonded ductile metal cladding plates uniformly covering the meat, the meat having a uniform high fuel loading comprising a content of uranium compound greater than about 45 Vol. % at a porosity not greater than about 10 Vol. %. In a first embodiment, the meat is a plurality of parallel wires of uranium compound. In a second embodiment, the meat is a dispersion compact containing uranium compound. The fuel plates are fabricated by a hot isostatic pressing process.

  4. Uranium for hydrogen storage applications : a materials science perspective.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shugard, Andrew D.; Tewell, Craig R.; Cowgill, Donald F.; Kolasinski, Robert D.

    2010-08-01

    Under appropriate conditions, uranium will form a hydride phase when exposed to molecular hydrogen. This makes it quite valuable for a variety of applications within the nuclear industry, particularly as a storage medium for tritium. However, some aspects of the U+H system have been characterized much less extensively than other common metal hydrides (particularly Pd+H), likely due to radiological concerns associated with handling. To assess the present understanding, we review the existing literature database for the uranium hydride system in this report and identify gaps in the existing knowledge. Four major areas are emphasized: {sup 3}He release from uranium tritides, the effects of surface contamination on H uptake, the kinetics of the hydride phase formation, and the thermal desorption properties. Our review of these areas is then used to outline potential avenues of future research.

  5. STRIPPING OF URANIUM FROM ORGANIC EXTRACTANTS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crouse, D.J. Jr.

    1962-09-01

    A liquid-liquid extraction method is given for recovering uranium values from uranium-containing solutions. Uranium is removed from a uranium-containing organic solution by contacting said organic solution with an aqueous ammonium carbonate solution substantially saturated in uranium values. A uranium- containing precipitate is thereby formed which is separated from the organic and aqueous phases. Uranium values are recovered from this separated precipitate. (AE C)

  6. URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hyman, H.H.; Dreher, J.L.

    1959-07-01

    The recovery of uranium from the acidic aqueous metal waste solutions resulting from the bismuth phosphate carrier precipitation of plutonium from solutions of neutron irradiated uranium is described. The waste solutions consist of phosphoric acid, sulfuric acid, and uranium as a uranyl salt, together with salts of the fission products normally associated with neutron irradiated uranium. Generally, the process of the invention involves the partial neutralization of the waste solution with sodium hydroxide, followed by conversion of the solution to a pH 11 by mixing therewith sufficient sodium carbonate. The resultant carbonate-complexed waste is contacted with a titanated silica gel and the adsorbent separated from the aqueous medium. The aqueous solution is then mixed with sufficient acetic acid to bring the pH of the aqueous medium to between 4 and 5, whereby sodium uranyl acetate is precipitated. The precipitate is dissolved in nitric acid and the resulting solution preferably provided with salting out agents. Uranyl nitrate is recovered from the solution by extraction with an ether such as diethyl ether.

  7. Thorium and uranium diphosphonates: Syntheses, structures, and spectroscopic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adelani, Pius O.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2012-08-15

    Four new thorium and uranium diphosphonate compounds, [H{sub 3}O]{l_brace}Th{sub 2}[C{sub 6}H{sub 4}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2}F{r_brace} (Thbbp-1), An{sub 2}{l_brace}(O{sub 3}PC{sub 6}H{sub 4}PO{sub 3}H){sub 2}[C{sub 6}H{sub 4}(PO{sub 3}H){sub 2}]{r_brace} [An=Th(IV), U(IV)] (Thbbp-2)/(U4bbp), and [(C{sub 2}H{sub 5})(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}N][(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(O{sub 3}PC{sub 6}H{sub 4}PO{sub 3}H){sub 2}F(H{sub 2}O)] (U6bbp) have been synthesized hydrothermally using 1,4-benzenebisphosphonic acid as ligand. The crystal structures of these compounds were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Thbbp-1 and Thbbp-2 contain seven-coordinate Th(IV) within ThO{sub 6}F and ThO{sub 7} units with capped trigonal prismatic and capped octahedral geometries, respectively. U4bbp is isotypic with Thbbp-2. The structure of U6bbp contains U(VI) is the common seven-coordinate pentagonal bipyramid. - Graphical abstract: Coordination polyhedra and luminescence properties in thorium and uranium compounds. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three-dimensional thorium and uranium complexes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conversion of U(VI) to U(IV) under hydrothermal condition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unusual seven-coordinate thorium complexes exhibiting capped octahedral and capped trigonal prismatic geometries.

  8. Uranium Isotopic Assay Instrument

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Wojcik, Michael D.; Bushaw, Bruce A.

    2006-12-01

    The isotopic assay instrument under development at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is capable of rapid prescreening to detect small and rare particles containing high concentrations of uranium in a heterogeneous sample. The isotopic measurement concept is based on laser vaporization of solid samples followed with sensitive isotope specific detection using either uranium atomic fluorescence emission or uranium atomic absorbance. Both isotopes are measured concurrently, following a single ablation laser pulse, using two external-cavity violet diode lasers. The simultaneous measurement of both isotopes enables the correlation of the fluorescence and absorbance signals on a shot-to-shot basis. This measurement approach demonstrated negligible channel crosstalk between isotopes. Rapid sample scanning provides high spatial resolution isotopic fluorescence and absorbance sample imagery of heterogeneous samples. Laser ablation combined with measurements of laser-induced fluorescence (LALIF) and through-plume laser absorbance (LAPLA) was applied to measure gadolinium isotope ratios in solid samples. Gadolinium has excitation wavelengths very close to the transitions of interest in uranium. Gadolinium has seven stable isotopes, and the natural 152Gd:160Gd ratio of 0.009 is in the range of what will be encountered for 235U:238U isotopic ratios. LAPLA measurements were demonstrated clearly using 152Gd (0.2% isotopic abundance) with a good signal-to-noise ratio. The ability to measure gadolinium abundances at this level indicates that measurements of 235U/238U isotopic ratios for natural (0.72%), depleted (0.25%), and low enriched uranium samples will be feasible.

  9. Uranium in Hanford Site 300 Area: Extraction Data on Borehole Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Guohui; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Lindberg, Michael J.; Um, Wooyong; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Williams, Benjamin D.; Kutynakov, I. V.; Wang, Zheming; Qafoku, Nikolla

    2012-11-26

    In this study, sediments collected from boreholes drilled in 2010 and 2011 as part of a remedial investigation/feasibility study were characterized. The wells, located within or around two process ponds and one process trench waste site, were characterized in terms of total uranium concentration, mobile fraction of uranium, particle size, and moisture content along the borehole depth. In general, the gravel-dominated sediments of the vadose zone Hanford formation in all investigated boreholes had low moisture contents. Based on total uranium content, a total of 48 vadose zone and periodically rewetted zone sediment samples were selected for more detailed characterization, including measuring the concentration of uranium extracted with 8 M nitric acid, and leached using bicarbonate mixed solutions to determine the liable uranium (U(VI)) contents. In addition, water extraction was conducted on 17 selected sediments. Results from the sediment acid and bicarbonate extractions indicated the total concentrations of anthropogenic labile uranium in the sediments varied among the investigated boreholes. The peak uranium concentration (114.84 µg/g, acid extract) in <2-mm size fractions was found in borehole 399 1-55, which was drilled directly in the southwest corner of the North Process Pond. Lower uranium concentrations (~0.3–2.5 µg/g, acid extract) in <2-mm size fractions were found in boreholes 399-1-57, 399-1-58, and 399-1-59, which were drilled either near the Columbia River or inland and upgradient of any waste process ponds or trenches. A general trend of “total” uranium concentrations was observed that increased as the particle size decreased when relating the sediment particle size and acid extractable uranium concentrations in two selected sediment samples. The labile uranium bicarbonate leaching kinetic experiments on three selected sediments indicated a two-step leaching rate: an initial rapid release, followed by a slow continual release of uranium from

  10. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM METAL BY CARBON REDUCTION

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holden, R.B.; Powers, R.M.; Blaber, O.J.

    1959-09-22

    The preparation of uranium metal by the carbon reduction of an oxide of uranium is described. In a preferred embodiment of the invention a charge composed of carbon and uranium oxide is heated to a solid mass after which it is further heated under vacuum to a temperature of about 2000 deg C to produce a fused uranium metal. Slowly ccoling the fused mass produces a dendritic structure of uranium carbide in uranium metal. Reacting the solidified charge with deionized water hydrolyzes the uranium carbide to finely divide uranium dioxide which can be separated from the coarser uranium metal by ordinary filtration methods.

  11. Method of preparation of uranium nitride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline Loetsch; Thomson, Robert Kenneth James

    2013-07-09

    Method for producing terminal uranium nitride complexes comprising providing a suitable starting material comprising uranium; oxidizing the starting material with a suitable oxidant to produce one or more uranium(IV)-azide complexes; and, sufficiently irradiating the uranium(IV)-azide complexes to produce the terminal uranium nitride complexes.

  12. Method of preparing uranium nitride or uranium carbonitride bodies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilhelm, Harley A.; McClusky, James K.

    1976-04-27

    Sintered uranium nitride or uranium carbonitride bodies having a controlled final carbon-to-uranium ratio are prepared, in an essentially continuous process, from U.sub.3 O.sub.8 and carbon by varying the weight ratio of carbon to U.sub.3 O.sub.8 in the feed mixture, which is compressed into a green body and sintered in a continuous heating process under various controlled atmospheric conditions to prepare the sintered bodies.

  13. file://\\fs-f1\shared\uranium\uranium.html

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Glossary Home > Nuclear > U.S. Uranium Reserves Estimates U.S. Uranium Reserves Estimates Data for: 2008 Report Released: July 2010 Next Release Date: 2012 Summary The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) has updated its estimates of uranium reserves for year-end 2008. This represents the first revision of the estimates since 2004. The update is based on analysis of company annual reports, any additional information reported by companies at conferences and in news releases,

  14. PREPARATION OF DENSE URANIUM DIOXIDE PARTICLES FROM URANIUM HEXAFLUORI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A ... A fluid-bed method was developed for the direct preparation from uranium hexafluoride of ...

  15. RECOVERY OF URANIUM FROM ZIRCONIUM-URANIUM NUCLEAR FUELS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gens, T.A.

    1962-07-10

    An improvement was made in a process of recovering uranium from a uranium-zirconium composition which was hydrochlorinated with gsseous hydrogen chloride at a temperature of from 350 to 800 deg C resulting in volatilization of the zirconium, as zirconium tetrachloride, and the formation of a uranium containing nitric acid insoluble residue. The improvement consists of reacting the nitric acid insoluble hydrochlorination residue with gaseous carbon tetrachloride at a temperature in the range 550 to 600 deg C, and thereafter recovering the resulting uranium chloride vapors. (AEC)

  16. Method for fabricating uranium foils and uranium alloy foils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hofman, Gerard L.; Meyer, Mitchell K.; Knighton, Gaven C.; Clark, Curtis R.

    2006-09-05

    A method of producing thin foils of uranium or an alloy. The uranium or alloy is cast as a plate or sheet having a thickness less than about 5 mm and thereafter cold rolled in one or more passes at substantially ambient temperatures until the uranium or alloy thereof is in the shape of a foil having a thickness less than about 1.0 mm. The uranium alloy includes one or more of Zr, Nb, Mo, Cr, Fe, Si, Ni, Cu or Al.

  17. METHOD OF PRODUCING URANIUM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foster, L.S.; Magel, T.T.

    1958-05-13

    A modified process is described for the production of uranium metal by means of a bomb reduction of UF/sub 4/. Difficulty is sometimes experienced in obtaining complete separation of the uranium from the slag when the process is carried out on a snnall scale, i.e., for the production of 10 grams of U or less. Complete separation may be obtained by incorporating in the reaction mixture a quantity of MnCl/sub 2/, so that this compound is reduced along with the UF/sub 4/ . As a result a U--Mn alloy is formed which has a melting point lower than that of pure U, and consequently the metal remains molten for a longer period allowing more complete separation from the slag.

  18. Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Water with Uranium Metal in K Basins Sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2010-01-29

    Means to decrease the rate of hydrogen gas generation from the chemical reaction of uranium metal with water were identified by surveying the technical literature. The underlying chemistry and potential side reactions were explored by conducting 61 principal experiments. Several methods achieved significant hydrogen gas generation rate mitigation. Gas-generating side reactions from interactions of organics or sludge constituents with mitigating agents were observed. Further testing is recommended to develop deeper knowledge of the underlying chemistry and to advance the technology aturation level. Uranium metal reacts with water in K Basin sludge to form uranium hydride (UH3), uranium dioxide or uraninite (UO2), and diatomic hydrogen (H2). Mechanistic studies show that hydrogen radicals (H·) and UH3 serve as intermediates in the reaction of uranium metal with water to produce H2 and UO2. Because H2 is flammable, its release into the gas phase above K Basin sludge during sludge storage, processing, immobilization, shipment, and disposal is a concern to the safety of those operations. Findings from the technical literature and from experimental investigations with simple chemical systems (including uranium metal in water), in the presence of individual sludge simulant components, with complete sludge simulants, and with actual K Basin sludge are presented in this report. Based on the literature review and intermediate lab test results, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, Nochar Acid Bond N960, disodium hydrogen phosphate, and hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] were tested for their effects in decreasing the rate of hydrogen generation from the reaction of uranium metal with water. Nitrate and nitrite each were effective, decreasing hydrogen generation rates in actual sludge by factors of about 100 to 1000 when used at 0.5 molar (M) concentrations. Higher attenuation factors were achieved in tests with aqueous solutions alone. Nochar N960, a water sorbent, decreased hydrogen

  19. PROCESS FOR PRODUCING URANIUM TETRAFLUORIDE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harvey, B.G.

    1954-09-14

    >This patent relates to improvements in the method for producing uranium tetrafluoride by treating an aqueous solutlon of a uranyl salt at an elevated temperature with a reducing agent effective in acld solutlon in the presence of hydrofluoric acid. Uranium tetrafluoride produced this way frequentiy contains impurities in the raw material serving as the source of uranium. Uranium tetrafluoride much less contaminated with impurities than when prepared by the above method can be prepared from materials containing such impurities by first adding a small proportion of reducing agent so as to cause a small fraction, for example 1 to 5% of the uranium tetrafluoride to be precipitated, rejecting such precipitate, and then precipitating and recovering the remainder of the uranium tetrafluoride.

  20. ELECTROLYSIS OF THORIUM AND URANIUM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hansen, W.N.

    1960-09-01

    An electrolytic method is given for obtaining pure thorium, uranium, and thorium-uranium alloys. The electrolytic cell comprises a cathode composed of a metal selected from the class consisting of zinc, cadmium, tin, lead, antimony, and bismuth, an anode composed of at least one of the metals selected from the group consisting of thorium and uranium in an impure state, and an electrolyte composed of a fused salt containing at least one of the salts of the metals selected from the class consisting of thorium, uranium. zinc, cadmium, tin, lead, antimony, and bismuth. Electrolysis of the fused salt while the cathode is maintained in the molten condition deposits thorium, uranium, or thorium-uranium alloys in pure form in the molten cathode which thereafter may be separated from the molten cathode product by distillation.

  1. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    b. Uranium purchased by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors ranked by price and distributed by purchaser, 2013-15 deliveries thousand pounds U3O8 equivalent; dollars per pound U3O8 equivalent Deliveries in 2013 Deliveries in 2014 Deliveries in 2015 Distribution of purchasers Number of purchasers Quantity with reported price Weighted-average price Number of purchasers Quantity with reported price Weighted-average price Number of purchasers Quantity with reported price

  2. WELDED JACKETED URANIUM BODY

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gurinsky, D.H.

    1958-08-26

    A fuel element is presented for a neutronic reactor and is comprised of a uranium body, a non-fissionable jacket surrounding sald body, thu jacket including a portion sealed by a weld, and an inclusion in said sealed jacket at said weld of a fiux having a low neutron capture cross-section. The flux is provided by combining chlorine gas and hydrogen in the intense heat of-the arc, in a "Heliarc" welding muthod, to form dry hydrochloric acid gas.

  3. Program to monitor Department of Energy workers exposed to hazardous and radioactive substances

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    50 CHAPTER 42 SUBCHAPTER VI Part C 5 2733 Program to monitor Department of Energy workers exposed to hazardous and radioactive substances (a) In general The Secretary shall establish and carry out a program for the identification and on-going medical evaluation of current and former Department of Energy employees who are subject to significant health risks as a result of the exposure of such employees to hazardous or radioactive substances during such empIoyment. (b) Implementation of program (

  4. METHOD OF DISSOLVING URANIUM METAL

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slotin, L.A.

    1958-02-18

    This patent relates to an economicai means of dissolving metallic uranium. It has been found that the addition of a small amount of perchloric acid to the concentrated nitric acid in which the uranium is being dissolved greatly shortens the time necessary for dissolution of the metal. Thus the use of about 1 or 2 percent of perchioric acid based on the weight of the nitric acid used, reduces the time of dissolution of uranium by a factor of about 100.

  5. PROCESS FOR PREPARING URANIUM METAL

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prescott, C.H. Jr.; Reynolds, F.L.

    1959-01-13

    A process is presented for producing oxygen-free uranium metal comprising contacting iodine vapor with crude uranium in a reaction zone maintained at 400 to 800 C to produce a vaporous mixture of UI/sub 4/ and iodine. Also disposed within the maction zone is a tungsten filament which is heated to about 1600 C. The UI/sub 4/, upon contacting the hot filament, is decomposed to molten uranium substantially free of oxygen.

  6. Building Conceptual Models of Field-Scale Uranium Reactive Transport in a Dynamic Vadose Zone-Aquifer-River System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yabusaki, Steven B.; Fang, Yilin; Waichler, Scott R.

    2008-12-04

    Subsurface simulation is being used to build, test, and couple conceptual process models to better understand controls on a 0.4 km by 1.0 km uranium plume that has persisted above the drinking water standard in the groundwater of the Hanford 300 Area over the last 15 years. At this site, uranium-contaminated sediments in the vadose zone and aquifer are subject to significant variations in water levels and velocities driven by the diurnal, weekly, seasonal, and episodic Columbia River stage dynamics. Groundwater flow reversals typically occur twice a day with significant exchange of river water and groundwater in the near-river aquifer. Mixing of the dilute solution chemistry of the river with the groundwater complicates the uranium sorption behavior as the mobility of U(VI) has been shown experimentally to be a function of pH, carbonate, calcium, and uranium. Furthermore, uranium mass transfer between solid and aqueous phases has been observed to be rate-limited in the context of the high groundwater velocities resulting from the river stage fluctuations and the highly transmissive sediments (hydraulic conductivities ~1500 m/d). One- and two-dimensional vertical cross-sectional simulations of variably-saturated flow and reactive transport, based on laboratory-derived models of distributed rate mass transfer and equilibrium multicomponent surface complexation, are used to assess uranium transport at the dynamic vadose zone aquifer interface as well as changes to uranium mobility due to incursions of river water into the aquifer.

  7. VANE Uranium One JV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    VANE Uranium One JV Jump to: navigation, search Name: VANE-Uranium One JV Place: London, England, United Kingdom Zip: EC4V 6DX Product: JV between VANE Minerals Plc & Uranium One....

  8. ELECTROLYTIC PRODUCTION OF URANIUM TETRAFLUORIDE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lofthouse, E.

    1954-08-31

    This patent relates to electrolytic methods for the production of uranium tetrafluoride. According to the present invention a process for the production of uranium tetrafluoride comprises submitting to electrolysis an aqueous solution of uranyl fluoride containing free hydrofluoric acid. Advantageously the aqueous solution of uranyl fluoride is obtained by dissolving uranium hexafluoride in water. On electrolysis, the uranyl ions are reduced to uranous tons at the cathode and immediately combine with the fluoride ions in solution to form the insoluble uranium tetrafluoride which is precipitated.

  9. THERMAL DECOMPOSITION OF URANIUM COMPOUNDS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Magel, T.T.; Brewer, L.

    1959-02-10

    A method is presented of preparing uranium metal of high purity consisting contacting impure U metal with halogen vapor at between 450 and 550 C to form uranium halide vapor, contacting the uranium halide vapor in the presence of H/sub 2/ with a refractory surface at about 1400 C to thermally decompose the uranium halides and deposit molten U on the refractory surface and collecting the molten U dripping from the surface. The entire operation is carried on at a sub-atmospheric pressure of below 1 mm mercury.

  10. 2015 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 2015 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 24, 2016 Next Release Date: May 2017 Quantity with reported price Weighted-average price Quantity with reported price ...