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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium oxide conversion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

EIS-0360: Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product at the Portsmouth...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

60: Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product at the Portsmouth, Ohio Site EIS-0360: Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product at the Portsmouth, Ohio Site Summary This...

2

CRAD, Management - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Management - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of Management program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Management - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility More Documents & Publications CRAD, DOE Oversight - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion

3

CRAD, Training - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Training - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of the Training Program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Training - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility More Documents & Publications CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide

4

CRAD, DOE Oversight - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE Oversight - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide DOE Oversight - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, DOE Oversight - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a DOE independent oversight assessment of the Y-12 Site Office's programs for oversight of its contractors at the Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, DOE Oversight - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility More Documents & Publications

5

CRAD, Training- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of the Training Program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility.

6

CRAD, Management- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of Management program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility.

7

Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as oxide. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will have two missions: (1) convert HEU materials into pure HEU oxide and (2) blend the pure HEU oxide with depleted and natural uranium oxide to produce an LWR grade LEU product. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. To the extent practical, the chemical and isotopic concentrations of blended LEU product will be held within the specifications required for LWR fuel. Such blended LEU product will be offered to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) to be sold as feed material to the commercial nuclear industry. Otherwise, blended LEU will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

NONE

1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

8

EIS-0360: Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product at the Portsmouth, Ohio  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

60: Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product at the 60: Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product at the Portsmouth, Ohio Site EIS-0360: Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product at the Portsmouth, Ohio Site Summary This site-specific EIS analyzes the construction, operation, maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning of the proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) conversion facility at three alternative locations within the Portsmouth site; transportation of all cylinders (DUF6, enriched, and empty) currently stored at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to Portsmouth; construction of a new cylinder storage yard at Portsmouth (if required) for ETTP cylinders; transportation of depleted uranium conversion products and waste materials to a disposal facility; transportation and sale of the hydrogen fluoride

9

CRAD, Conduct of Operations- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January, 2005 assessment of Conduct of Operations program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility.

10

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of Industrial Safety and Industrial Health programs at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility.

11

CRAD, Radiological Controls- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of the Radiation Protection Program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility.

12

CRAD, Environmental Protection- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of Environmental Compliance program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility.

13

CRAD, DOE Oversight- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a DOE independent oversight assessment of the Y-12 Site Office's programs for oversight of its contractors at the Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility.

14

CRAD, Emergency Management- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of Emergency Management program at the Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility.

15

CRAD, Safety Basis- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of the Safety Basis at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility.

16

Standard specification for uranium oxides with a 235U content of less than 5 % for dissolution prior to conversion to nuclear-grade uranium dioxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This specification covers uranium oxides, including processed byproducts or scrap material (powder, pellets, or pieces), that are intended for dissolution into uranyl nitrate solution meeting the requirements of Specification C788 prior to conversion into nuclear grade UO2 powder with a 235U content of less than 5 %. This specification defines the impurity and uranium isotope limits for such urania powders that are to be dissolved prior to processing to nuclear grade UO2 as defined in Specification C753. 1.2 This specification provides the nuclear industry with a general standard for such uranium oxide powders. It recognizes the diversity of conversion processes and the processes to which such powders are subsequently to be subjected (for instance, by solvent extraction). It is therefore anticipated that it may be necessary to include supplementary specification limits by agreement between the buyer and seller. 1.3 The scope of this specification does not comprehensively cover all provisions for prevent...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Draft Supplement Analysis for Location(s) to Dispose of Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product Generated from DOE'S Inventory of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DRAFT SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS FOR LOCATION(S) TO DISPOSE OF DEPLETED DRAFT SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS FOR LOCATION(S) TO DISPOSE OF DEPLETED URANIUM OXIDE CONVERSION PRODUCT GENERATED FROM DOE'S INVENTORY OF DEPLETED URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE (DOE/EIS-0359-SA1 AND DOE/EIS-0360-SA1) March 2007 March 2007 i CONTENTS NOTATION........................................................................................................................... iv 1 INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND ................................................................. 1 1.1 Why DOE Has Prepared This Draft Supplement Analysis .............................. 1 1.2 Background ....................................................................................................... 3 1.3 Proposed Actions Considered in this Draft Supplement Analysis.................... 4

18

CRAD, Criticality Safety- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of the Criticality Safety program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Facility.

19

CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Conduct of Operations - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Conduct of Operations - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January, 2005 assessment of Conduct of Operations program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility More Documents & Publications CRAD, DOE Oversight - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion

20

CRAD, Emergency Management - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Emergency Management - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Emergency Management - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Emergency Management - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of Emergency Management program at the Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Emergency Management - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility More Documents & Publications CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium oxide conversion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

CRAD, Criticality Safety - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CRAD, Criticality Safety - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide CRAD, Criticality Safety - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Criticality Safety - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of the Criticality Safety program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Criticality Safety - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility More Documents & Publications CRAD, DOE Oversight - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion

22

CRAD, Environmental Protection - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Environmental Protection - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Environmental Protection - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Environmental Protection - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of Environmental Compliance program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Environmental Protection - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility More Documents & Publications

23

EIS-0359: Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

operation, maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning of the proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) conversion facility at three locations within the...

24

EIS-0359: Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

59: Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, 59: Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky Site EIS-0359: Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky Site Summary This site-specific EIS considers the construction, operation, maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning of the proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) conversion facility at three locations within the Paducah site; transportation of depleted uranium conversion products and waste materials to a disposal facility; transportation and sale of the hydrogen fluoride (HF) produced as a conversion co-product; and neutralization of HF to calcium fluoride and its sale or disposal in the event that the HF product is not sold. This EIS also considers a no action alternative that assumes continued storage of DUF6 at the Paducah site. A

25

Influence of uranium hydride oxidation on uranium metal behaviour  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work addresses concerns that the rapid, exothermic oxidation of active uranium hydride in air could stimulate an exothermic reaction (burning) involving any adjacent uranium metal, so as to increase the potential hazard arising from a hydride reaction. The effect of the thermal reaction of active uranium hydride, especially in contact with uranium metal, does not increase in proportion with hydride mass, particularly when considering large quantities of hydride. Whether uranium metal continues to burn in the long term is a function of the uranium metal and its surroundings. The source of the initial heat input to the uranium, if sufficient to cause ignition, is not important. Sustained burning of uranium requires the rate of heat generation to be sufficient to offset the total rate of heat loss so as to maintain an elevated temperature. For dense uranium, this is very difficult to achieve in naturally occurring circumstances. Areas of the uranium surface can lose heat but not generate heat. Heat can be lost by conduction, through contact with other materials, and by convection and radiation, e.g. from areas where the uranium surface is covered with a layer of oxidised material, such as burned-out hydride or from fuel cladding. These rates of heat loss are highly significant in relation to the rate of heat generation by sustained oxidation of uranium in air. Finite volume modelling has been used to examine the behaviour of a magnesium-clad uranium metal fuel element within a bottle surrounded by other un-bottled fuel elements. In the event that the bottle is breached, suddenly, in air, it can be concluded that the bulk uranium metal oxidation reaction will not reach a self-sustaining level and the mass of uranium oxidised will likely to be small in relation to mass of uranium hydride oxidised. (authors)

Patel, N.; Hambley, D. [National Nuclear Laboratory (United Kingdom); Clarke, S.A. [Sellafield Ltd (United Kingdom); Simpson, K.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Semiconductive Properties of Uranium Oxides  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SEMICONDUCTIVE PROPERTIES OF URANIUM OXIDES SEMICONDUCTIVE PROPERTIES OF URANIUM OXIDES Thomas Meek Materials Science Engineering Department University of Tennessee Knoxville, TN 37931 Michael Hu and M. Jonathan Haire Chemical Technology Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory * Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6179 August 2000 For the Waste Management 2001 Symposium Tucson, Arizona February 25-March 1, 2001 The submitted manuscript has been authored by a contractor of the U.S. Government under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725. Accordingly, the U.S. Government retains a nonexclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U.S. Government purposes. _________________________ * Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy

27

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Y-12 Enriched Uranium Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of Industrial Safety and Industrial Health programs at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility More Documents & Publications

28

Conversion of depleted uranium hexafluoride to a solid uranium compound  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for converting UF.sub.6 to a solid uranium compound such as UO.sub.2 and CaF. The UF.sub.6 vapor form is contacted with an aqueous solution of NH.sub.4 OH at a pH greater than 7 to precipitate at least some solid uranium values as a solid leaving an aqueous solution containing NH.sub.4 OH and NH.sub.4 F and remaining uranium values. The solid uranium values are separated from the aqueous solution of NH.sub.4 OH and NH.sub.4 F and remaining uranium values which is then diluted with additional water precipitating more uranium values as a solid leaving trace quantities of uranium in a dilute aqueous solution. The dilute aqueous solution is contacted with an ion-exchange resin to remove substantially all the uranium values from the dilute aqueous solution. The dilute solution being contacted with Ca(OH).sub.2 to precipitate CaF.sub.2 leaving dilute NH.sub.4 OH.

Rothman, Alan B. (Willowbrook, IL); Graczyk, Donald G. (Lemont, IL); Essling, Alice M. (Elmhurst, IL); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as metal. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission of this Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will be to blend surplus HEU metal and alloy with depleted uranium metal to produce an LEU product. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. The blended LEU will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

NONE

1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

30

Method for fluorination of uranium oxide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Highly pure uranium hexafluoride is made from uranium oxide and fluorine. The uranium oxide, which includes UO.sub.3, UO.sub.2, U.sub.3 O.sub.8 and mixtures thereof, is introduced together with a small amount of a fluorine-reactive substance, selected from alkali chlorides, silicon dioxide, silicic acid, ferric oxide, and bromine, into a constant volume reaction zone. Sufficient fluorine is charged into the zone at a temperature below approximately 0.degree. C. to provide an initial pressure of at least approximately 600 lbs/sq. in. at the ambient atmospheric temperature. The temperature is then allowed to rise in the reaction zone until reaction occurs.

Petit, George S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Surface Decontamination of System Components in Uranium Conversion Plant at KAERI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A chemical decontamination process using nitric acid solution was selected as in-situ technology for recycle or release with authorization of a large amount of metallic waste including process system components such as tanks, piping, etc., which is generated by dismantling a retired uranium conversion plant at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). The applicability of nitric acid solution for surface decontamination of metallic wastes contaminated with uranium compounds was evaluated through the basic research on the dissolution of UO2 and ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC) powder. Decontamination performance was verified by using the specimens contaminated with such uranium compounds as UO2 and AUC taken from the uranium conversion plant. Dissolution rate of UO2 powder is notably enhanced by the addition of H2O2 as an oxidant even in the condition of a low concentration of nitric acid and low temperature compared with those in a nitric acid solution without H2O2. AUC powders dissolve easily in nitric acid solutions until the solution pH attains about 2.5 {approx} 3. Above that solution pH, however, the uranium concentration in the solution is lowered drastically by precipitation as a form of U3(NH3)4O9 . 5H2O. Decontamination performance tests for the specimens contaminated with UO2 and AUC were quite successful with the application of decontamination conditions obtained through the basic studies on the dissolution of UO2 and AUC powders.

Choi, W. K.; Kim, K. N.; Won, H. J.; Jung, C. H.; Oh, W. Z.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

32

Safeguards assessment of gamma-ray detection for process monitoring at natural uranium conversion facilities.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Conversion, the process by which natural uranium ore (yellowcake) is puri?ed and converted through a series of chemical processes into uranium hexa?uoride gas (UF6), has… (more)

Dewji, Shaheen Azim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

EIS-0329: Proposed Construction, Operation, Decontamination/Decommissioning of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS analyzes DOE's proposal to construct, operate, maintain, and decontaminate and decommission two depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF 6) conversion facilities, at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky.

34

Uranium Oxide Aerosol Transport in Porous Graphite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is to investigate the transport of uranium oxide particles that may be present in carbon dioxide (CO2) gas coolant, into the graphite blocks of gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. The transport of uranium oxide in the coolant system, and subsequent deposition of this material in the graphite, of such reactors is of interest because it has the potential to influence the application of the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM). The GIRM is a technology that has been developed to validate the declared operation of graphite moderated reactors. GIRM exploits isotopic ratio changes that occur in the impurity elements present in the graphite to infer cumulative exposure and hence the reactor’s lifetime cumulative plutonium production. Reference Gesh, et. al., for a more complete discussion on the GIRM technology.

Blanchard, Jeremy; Gerlach, David C.; Scheele, Randall D.; Stewart, Mark L.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Brown, Charles C.; Iovin, Cristian; Delegard, Calvin H.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Buck, Edgar C.; Riley, Brian J.; Burns, Carolyn A.

2012-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

35

Ultrafiltration evaluation with depleted uranium oxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility are using electrodissolution in neutral to alkaline solutions to decontaminate oralloy parts that have surface plutonium contamination. Ultrafiltration of the electrolyte stream removes precipitate so that the electrolyte stream to the decontamination fixture is precipitate free. This report describes small-scale laboratory ultrafiltration experiments that the authors performed to determine conditions necessary for full-scale operation of an ultrafiltration module. Performance was similar to what they observed in the ferric hydroxide system. At 12 psi transmembrane pressure, a shear rate of 12,000 sec{sup {minus}1} was sufficient to sustain membrane permeability. Ultrafiltration of uranium(VI) oxide appears to occur as easily as ultrafiltration of ferric hydroxide. Considering the success reported in this study, the authors plan to add ultrafiltration to the next decontamination system for oralloy parts.

Weisbrod, K.R.; Schake, A.R.; Morgan, A.N.; Purdy, G.M.; Martinez, H.E.; Nelson, T.O.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Glass Based on the oxides of Molybdenum, Tungsten and Uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... IN previous publications from this Laboratory, attention has been directed to glasses of unusual composition based on the oxides of tellurium and vanadium1-4. This article ... the oxides of tellurium and vanadium1-4. This article describes the development of further unusual glasses based on the oxides of molybdenum, tungsten and uranium.

P. L. BAYNTON; H. RAWSON; J. E. STANWORTH

1956-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

37

Designing Semiconductor Metal Oxides for Photoelectrochemical Energy Conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Innovative materials hold the key for renewable energy conversion. In this talk, we will introduce our recent progress in semiconducting metal oxides, which underpin a number of...

Wang, Lianzhou

38

Uranium Oxide as a Highly Reflective Coating from 150-350 eV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of depleted uranium metal (less than 0.2% U-235). After sputtering, the uranium was allowed to oxidize1 Uranium Oxide as a Highly Reflective Coating from 150-350 eV Richard L. Sandberg, David D. Allred.byu.edu ABSTRACT We present the measured reflectances (beamline 6.3.2, ALS at LBNL) of naturally oxidized uranium

Hart, Gus

39

Abstract B41: Depleted uranium-induced oxidative stress in human bronchial epithelial cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Science of Cancer Health Disparities- Feb...AZ Abstract B41: Depleted uranium-induced oxidative...Science of Cancer Health Disparities- Feb...high deposits of uranium or tailings. There...occupational exposures to depleted uranium via military...

Monica Yellowhair; Leigh A. Henricksen; Aneesha Hossain; Kathleen Dixon; and R. Clark Lantz

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Abstract B41: Depleted uranium-induced oxidative stress in human bronchial epithelial cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Association for Cancer Research 1 February...The Science of Cancer Health Disparities...Abstract B41: Depleted uranium-induced oxidative...Carefree, AZ Cancer and mortality...deposits of uranium or tailings...exposures to depleted uranium via...

Monica Yellowhair; Leigh A. Henricksen; Aneesha Hossain; Kathleen Dixon; and R. Clark Lantz

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium oxide conversion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Abstract B41: Depleted uranium-induced oxidative stress in human bronchial epithelial cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Carefree, AZ Abstract B41: Depleted uranium-induced oxidative stress in...as occupational exposures to depleted uranium via military action. Cellular...to evaluate the toxicity of depleted uranium (DU) in its soluble and insoluble...

Monica Yellowhair; Leigh A. Henricksen; Aneesha Hossain; Kathleen Dixon; and R. Clark Lantz

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Oxidation Protection of Uranium Nitride Fuel using Liquid Phase Sintering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two methods are proposed to increase the oxidation resistance of uranium nitride (UN) nuclear fuel. These paths are: (1) Addition of USi{sub x} (e.g. U3Si2) to UN nitride powder, followed by liquid phase sintering, and (2) 'alloying' UN nitride with various compounds (followed by densification via Spark Plasma Sintering or Liquid Phase Sintering) that will greatly increase oxidation resistance. The advantages (high thermal conductivity, very high melting point, and high density) of nitride fuel have long been recognized. The sodium cooled BR-10 reactor in Russia operated for 18 years on uranium nitride fuel (UN was used as the driver fuel for two core loads). However, the potential advantages (large power up-grade, increased cycle lengths, possible high burn-ups) as a Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel are offset by uranium nitride's extremely low oxidation resistance (UN powders oxidize in air and UN pellets decompose in hot water). Innovative research is proposed to solve this problem and thereby provide an accident tolerant LWR fuel that would resist water leaks and high temperature steam oxidation/spalling during an accident. It is proposed that we investigate two methods to increase the oxidation resistance of UN: (1) Addition of USi{sub x} (e.g. U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) to UN nitride powder, followed by liquid phase sintering, and (2) 'alloying' UN nitride with compounds (followed by densification via Spark Plasma Sintering) that will greatly increase oxidation resistance.

Dr. Paul A. Lessing

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Theoretical investigation of solar energy conversion and water oxidation catalysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar energy conversion and water oxidation catalysis are two great scientific and engineering challenges that will play pivotal roles in a future sustainable energy economy. In this work, I apply electronic structure ...

Wang, Lee-Ping

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

International Atomic Energy Agency support of research reactor highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium fuel conversion projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The IAEA has been involved for more than twenty years in supporting international nuclear non- proliferation efforts associated with reducing the amount of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in international commerce. IAEA projects and activities have directly supported the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) programme, as well as directly assisted efforts to convert research reactors from HEU to LEU fuel. HEU to LEU fuel conversion projects differ significantly depending on several factors including the design of the reactor and fuel, technical needs of the member state, local nuclear infrastructure, and available resources. To support such diverse endeavours, the IAEA tailors each project to address the relevant constraints. This paper presents the different approaches taken by the IAEA to address the diverse challenges involved in research reactor HEU to LEU fuel conversion projects. Examples of conversion related projects in different Member States are fully detailed. (author)

Bradley, E.; Adelfang, P.; Goldman, I.N. [Research Reactors Unit, Division of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Technology, International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O. Box 100, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Use of the UNCLE Facility to Assess Integrated Online Monitoring Systems for Detection of Diversions at Uranium Conversion Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historically, the approach to safeguarding nuclear material in the front end of the fuel cycle was implemented only at the stage when UF6 was declared as feedstock for enrichment plants. Recent International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) circulars and policy papers have sought to implement safeguards when any purified aqueous uranium solution or uranium oxides suitable for isotopic enrichment or fuel fabrication exist. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed the Uranyl Nitrate Calibration Loop Equipment (UNCLE) facility to simulate the full-scale operating conditions for a purified uranium-bearing aqueous stream exiting the solvent extraction process conducted in a natural uranium conversion plant (NUCP) operating at 6000 MTU/year. Monitoring instruments, including the 3He passive neutron detector developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Endress+Hauser Promass 83F Coriolis meter, have been tested at UNCLE and field tested at Springfields. The field trials demonstrated the need to perform full-scale equipment testing under controlled conditions prior to field deployment of operations and safeguards monitoring at additional plants. Currently, UNCLE is testing neutron-based monitoring for detection of noncompliant activities; however, gamma-ray source term monitoring is currently being explored complementary to the neutron detector in order to detect undeclared activities in a more timely manner. The preliminary results of gamma-ray source term modeling and monitoring at UNCLE are being analyzed as part of a comprehensive source term and detector benchmarking effort. Based on neutron source term detection capabilities, alternative gamma-based detection and monitoring methods will be proposed to more effectively monitor NUCP operations in verifying or detecting deviations from declared conversion activities.

Dewji, Shaheen A [ORNL; Chapman, Jeffrey Allen [ORNL; Lee, Denise L [ORNL; Rauch, Eric [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Hertel, Nolan [Georgia Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Complex oxides useful for thermoelectric energy conversion  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides for a thermoelectric system comprising a substrate comprising a first complex oxide, wherein the substrate is optionally embedded with a second complex oxide. The thermoelectric system can be used for thermoelectric power generation or thermoelectric cooling.

Majumdar, Arunava (Orinda, CA); Ramesh, Ramamoorthy (Moraga, CA); Yu, Choongho (College Station, TX); Scullin, Matthew L. (Berkeley, CA); Huijben, Mark (Enschede, NL)

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

48

Fabrication of Cerium Oxide and Uranium Oxide Microspheres for Space Nuclear Power Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cerium oxide and uranium oxide microspheres are being produced via an internal gelation sol-gel method to investigate alternative fabrication routes for space nuclear fuels. Depleted uranium and non-radioactive cerium are being utilized as surrogates for plutonium-238 (Pu-238) used in radioisotope thermoelectric generators and for enriched uranium required by nuclear thermal rockets. While current methods used to produce Pu-238 fuels at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) involve the generation of fine powders that pose a respiratory hazard and have a propensity to contaminate glove boxes, the sol-gel route allows for the generation of oxide microsphere fuels through an aqueous route. The sol-gel method does not generate fine powders and may require fewer processing steps than the LANL method with less operator handling. High-quality cerium dioxide microspheres have been fabricated in the desired size range and equipment is being prepared to establish a uranium dioxide microsphere production capability.

Jeffrey A. Katalenich; Michael R. Hartman; Robert C. O'Brien

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

HEU to LEU conversion and blending facility: Metal blending alternative to produce LEU oxide for disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

US DOE is examining options for disposing of surplus weapons-usable fissile materials and storage of all weapons-usable fissile materials. The nuclear material is converted to a form more proliferation- resistant than the original form. Blending HEU (highly enriched uranium) with less-enriched uranium to form LEU has been proposed as a disposition option. Five technologies are being assessed for blending HEU. This document provides data to be used in environmental impact analysis for the HEU-LEU disposition option that uses metal blending with an oxide waste product. It is divided into: mission and assumptions, conversion and blending facility descriptions, process descriptions and requirements, resource needs, employment needs, waste and emissions from plant, hazards discussion, and intersite transportation.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Cost update technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning a reference uranium hexafluoride conversion plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to update the cost estimates developed in a previous report, NUREG/CR-1757 (Elder 1980) for decommissioning a reference uranium hexafluoride conversion plant from the original mid-1981 dollars to values representative of January 1993. The cost updates were performed by using escalation factors derived from cost index trends over the past 11.5 years. Contemporary price quotes wee used for costs that have increased drastically or for which is is difficult to find a cost trend. No changes were made in the decommissioning procedures or cost element requirements assumed in NUREG/CR-1757. This report includes only information that was changed from NUREG/CR-1757. Thus, for those interested in detailed descriptions and associated information for the reference uranium hexafluoride conversion plant, a copy of NUREG/CR-1757 will be needed.

Miles, T.L.; Liu, Y.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Effects of Depleted Uranium on Oxidative Stress, Detoxification, and Defence Parameters of Zebrafish Danio rerio  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, we investigated the effects of depleted uranium (DU), the by-product of nuclear enrichment of uranium, on several parameters related to oxidative stress...Danio rerio. Several parameters were recor...

Beatrice Gagnaire; Isabelle Cavalie…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Development of Integrated Online Monitoring Systems for Detection of Diversion at Natural Uranium Conversion Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has focused on some source term modeling of uranyl nitrate (UN) as part of a comprehensive validation effort employing gamma-ray detector instrumentation for the detection of diversion from declared conversion activities. Conversion, the process by which natural uranium ore (yellowcake) is purified and converted through a series of chemical processes into uranium hexafluoride gas (UF6), has historically been excluded from the nuclear safeguards requirements of the 235U-based nuclear fuel cycle. The undeclared diversion of this product material could potentially provide feedstock for a clandestine weapons program for state or non-state entities. Given the changing global political environment and the increased availability of dual-use nuclear technology, the International Atomic Energy Agency has evolved its policies to emphasize safeguarding this potential feedstock material in response to dynamic and evolving potential diversion pathways. To meet the demand for instrumentation testing at conversion facilities, ORNL developed the Uranyl Nitrate Calibration Loop Equipment (UNCLE) facility to simulate the full-scale operating conditions of a purified uranium-bearing aqueous stream exiting the solvent extraction process in a natural uranium conversion plant. This work investigates gamma-ray signatures of UN circulating in the UNCLE facility and evaluates detector instrumentation sensitivity to UN for safeguards applications. These detector validation activities include assessing detector responses to the UN gamma-ray signatures for spectrometers based on sodium iodide, lanthanum bromide, and germanium detectors. The results of measurements under static and dynamic operating conditions at concentrations ranging from 10-90g U/L of naturally enriched UN will be presented. A range of gamma-ray lines was examined and self-attenuation factors were calculated, in addition to attenuation for transmission measurement of density, concentration and enrichment. A detailed uncertainty analysis will be presented providing insights into instrumentation limitations to spoofing.

Dewji, Shaheen A [ORNL] [ORNL; Lee, Denise L [ORNL] [ORNL; Croft, Stephen [ORNL] [ORNL; McElroy, Robert Dennis [ORNL] [ORNL; Hertel, Nolan [Georgia Institute of Technology] [Georgia Institute of Technology; Chapman, Jeffrey Allen [ORNL] [ORNL; Cleveland, Steven L [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Appendix C: Scoping Summary Report for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities - Environmental Impact Statement Scoping Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX C: SCOPING SUMMARY REPORT FOR DEPLETED URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE CONVERSION FACILITIES ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT SCOPING PROCESS Scoping Summary Report C-2 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Scoping Summary Report C-3 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX C This appendix contains the summary report prepared after the initial public scoping period for the depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facilities environmental impact statement (EIS) project. The scoping period for the EIS began with the September 18, 2001, publication of a Notice of Intent (NOI) in the Federal Register (66 FR 23213) and was extended to January 11, 2002. The report summarizes the different types of public involvement opportunities provided and the content of the comments received.

54

Preconceptual design studies and cost data of depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the more important legacies left with the Department of Energy (DOE) after the privatization of the United States Enrichment Corporation is the large inventory of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6). The DOE Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology (NE) is responsible for the long-term management of some 700,000 metric tons of DUF6 stored at the sites of the two gaseous diffusion plants located at Paducah, Kentucky and Portsmouth, Ohio, and at the East Tennessee Technology Park in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The DUF6 management program resides in NE's Office of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management. The current DUF6 program has largely focused on the ongoing maintenance of the cylinders containing DUF6. However, the long-term management and eventual disposition of DUF6 is the subject of a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) and Public Law 105-204. The first step for future use or disposition is to convert the material, which requires construction and long-term operation of one or more conversion plants. To help inform the DUF6 program's planning activities, it was necessary to perform design and cost studies of likely DUF6 conversion plants at the preconceptual level, beyond the PEIS considerations but not as detailed as required for conceptual designs of actual plants. This report contains the final results from such a preconceptual design study project. In this fast track, three month effort, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Bechtel National Incorporated developed and evaluated seven different preconceptual design cases for a single plant. The preconceptual design, schedules, costs, and issues associated with specific DUF6 conversion approaches, operating periods, and ownership options were evaluated based on criteria established by DOE. The single-plant conversion options studied were similar to the dry-conversion process alternatives from the PEIS. For each of the seven cases considered, this report contains information on the conversion process, preconceptual plant description, rough capital and operating costs, and preliminary project schedule.

Jones, E

1999-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

55

Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as uranyl nitrate hexahydrate. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will have two missions: (1) convert HEU materials to pure HEU uranyl nitrate (UNH) and (2) blend pure HEU UNH with depleted and natural UNH to produce HEU UNH crystals. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. To the extent practical, the chemical and isotopic concentrations of blended LEU product will be held within the specifications required for LWR fuel. Such blended LEU product will be offered to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) to be sold as feed material to the commercial nuclear industry. Otherwise, blended LEU Will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

NONE

1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

56

A study of ZnxZryOz mixed oxides for direct conversion of ethanol...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

study of ZnxZryOz mixed oxides for direct conversion of ethanol to isobutene. A study of ZnxZryOz mixed oxides for direct conversion of ethanol to isobutene. Abstract: ZnxZryOz...

57

Evaluation of moisture limits for uranium and plutonium mixed oxides to support on-site transportation packaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains supporting documentation for onsite shipment of uranium and plutonium mixed oxide materials in the 9975 package.

Livingston, R.R.

2000-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

58

Development of a core design optimization tool and analysis in support of the planned LEU conversion of the MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II) ; Development of a core design optimization tool and analysis in support of the planned low enriched uranium conversion of the MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II) .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II) is currently undergoing analysis for the planned conversion from high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU), as part… (more)

Connaway, Heather M. (Heather Moira)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Standard guide for establishing a quality assurance program for uranium conversion facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This guide provides guidance and recommended practices for establishing a comprehensive quality assurance program for uranium conversion facilities. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate health and safety practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. 1.3 The basic elements of a quality assurance program appear in the following order: FUNCTION SECTION Organization 5 Quality Assurance Program 6 Design Control 7 Instructions, Procedures & Drawings 8 Document Control 9 Procurement 10 Identification and Traceability 11 Processes 12 Inspection 13 Control of Measuring and Test Equipment 14 Handling, Storage and Shipping 15 Inspection, Test and Operating Status 16 Control of Nonconforming Items 17 Corrective Actions 18 Quality Assurance Records 19 Audits 20 TABLE 1 NQA-1 Basic Requirements Relat...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Molten salt extraction of transuranic and reactive fission products from used uranium oxide fuel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Used uranium oxide fuel is detoxified by extracting transuranic and reactive fission products into molten salt. By contacting declad and crushed used uranium oxide fuel with a molten halide salt containing a minor fraction of the respective uranium trihalide, transuranic and reactive fission products partition from the fuel to the molten salt phase, while uranium oxide and non-reactive, or noble metal, fission products remain in an insoluble solid phase. The salt is then separated from the fuel via draining and distillation. By this method, the bulk of the decay heat, fission poisoning capacity, and radiotoxicity are removed from the used fuel. The remaining radioactivity from the noble metal fission products in the detoxified fuel is primarily limited to soft beta emitters. The extracted transuranic and reactive fission products are amenable to existing technologies for group uranium/transuranic product recovery and fission product immobilization in engineered waste forms.

Herrmann, Steven Douglas

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium oxide conversion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Uranium Extraction From Laboratory Synthesized, Uranium-Doped Hydrous Ferric Oxides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The extractability of uranium (U) from synthetic hydrous ferric oxides has been shown to decrease as a function of mineral ripening, consistent with the hypothesis that the ripening process decrease contaminant lability. To evaluate this process, three hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) suspensions were co-precipitated with uranyl (UO22+) and maintained at pH 7.0 ± 0.1. Uranyl was added to the HFO post-precipitation in a fourth suspension. Two suspensions also contained either co-precipitated silicate (Si-U-HFO) or phosphate (P-U-HFO). After precipitation of the HFOs, at time intervals of one week, one month, six months, one year, and 2 years, aliquots of the suspensions were contacted with five solutions for a range of time. The extracts were analyzed for U and iron (Fe). The results are consistent with the hypothesis that U and Fe extractability will decrease as the mineral phase ripens. All extracting solutions exhibited some degree of selectivity for U, as the proportional extraction of U exceeded that for congruent dissolution. Micro X-ray diffraction analysis indicates the transformation from an amorphous phase to a material containing substantial proportions of crystalline goethite and hematite, except the P-U-HFO which remained primarily amorphous. Further analysis of the co-precipitates by the Mössbauer technique and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) provides further evidence of mineralogic ripening

Smith, Steven C.; Douglas, Matthew; Moore, Dean A.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Arey, Bruce W.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Importance of atmospheric inputs and Fe-oxides in controlling soil uranium budgets and behavior along a Hawaiian chronosequence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Importance of atmospheric inputs and Fe-oxides in controlling soil uranium budgets and behavior: D. Rickard Abstract A long-term budget of uranium calculated for a chronosequence of Hawaiian soils extractions on the same soils shows a strong association between Fe-oxides and uranium, especially

Derry, Louis A.

63

Examination of the conversion of the U.S. submarine fleet from highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The nuclear reactors used by the U.S. Navy for submarine propulsion are currently fueled by highly enriched uranium (HEU), but HEU brings administrative and political challenges. This issue has been studied by the Navy ...

McCord, Cameron (Cameron Liam)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Critical experiments on low-enriched uranium oxide systems with H/U = 2. 03  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seven critical experiments were performed on a horizontal split table machine using 4.48% enriched /sup 235/U uranium oxide (U/sub 3/O/sub 8/). The oxide was compacted to a density of 4.68 g/cm/sup 3/ and placed in 152-mm cubical aluminum cans. Water was added to achieve an H/U atomic ratio of 2.03. Various arrays of oxide cans were distributed on each half of the split table and the separation between halves reduced until criticality occurred. The critical table separation varied from 4.3 mm to 29.3 mm. These experiments were performed in both plastic and concrete reflectors. The first five experiments required the addition of a high-enriched (approx. 93% /sup 235/U) metal driver to achieve criticality. Critical uranium driver masses ranged from 2.765 kg to 13.730 kg for 5 x 5 x 5 arrays of uranium oxide cans. In all five cases, the center can of the array was deleted to accommodate the driver. The uranium oxide mass was 1859.6 kg. Two additional experiments in the plastic reflector contained either 9.3-mm- or 24.3-mm-thick plastic moderator material between the oxide cans. These latter experiments did not require a driver to achieve criticality; and the uranium oxide mass was 723.9 kg for the configuration having the thinner interstitial moderator and 452.4 kg for the other.

Rothe, R E; Goebel, G R

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT FOR CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION OF A DEPLETED URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE CONVERSION FACILITY AT THE PADUCAH, KENTUCKY, SITE DECEMBER 2003 U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations Office of Environmental Management Cover Sheet Paducah DUF 6 DEIS: December 2003 iii COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE FEDERAL AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site (DOE/EIS-0359) CONTACT: For further information on this environmental impact statement (EIS), contact: Gary S. Hartman DOE-ORO Cultural Resources Management Coordinator U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge, TN 37831

66

Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at Portsmouth, Ohio, Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT FOR CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION OF A DEPLETED URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE CONVERSION FACILITY AT THE PORTSMOUTH, OHIO, SITE DECEMBER 2003 U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations Office of Environmental Management Cover Sheet Portsmouth DUF 6 DEIS: December 2003 iii COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE FEDERAL AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, Site (DOE/EIS-0360) CONTACT: For further information on this environmental impact statement (EIS), contact: Gary S. Hartman DOE-ORO Cultural Resources Management Coordinator U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge, TN 37831

67

Assessing the Renal Toxicity of Capstone Depleted Uranium Oxides and Other Uranium Compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary target for uranium toxicity is the kidney. The most frequently used guideline for uranium kidney burdens is the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) value of 3 µg U/g kidney, a value that is based largely upon chronic studies in animals. In the present effort, we have developed a risk model equation to assess potential outcomes of acute uranium exposure. Twenty-seven previously published case studies in which workers were acutely exposed to soluble compounds of uranium (as a result of workplace accidents) were analyzed. Kidney burdens of uranium for these individuals were determined based on uranium in the urine, and correlated with health effects observed over a period of up to 38 years. Based upon the severity of health effects, each individual was assigned a score (- to +++) and then placed into an Effect Group. A discriminant analysis was used to build a model equation to predict the Effect Group based on the amount of uranium in the kidneys. The model equation was able to predict the Effect Group with 85% accuracy. The risk model was used to predict the Effect Group for Soldiers exposed to DU as a result of friendly fire incidents during the 1991 Gulf War. This model equation can also be used to predict the Effect Group of new cases in which acute exposures to uranium have occurred.

Roszell, Laurie E.; Hahn, Fletcher; Lee, Robyn B.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

68

Effect of Gadolinium Doping on the Air Oxidation of Uranium Dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) investigated the effects of gadolinia concentration on the air oxidization of gadolinia-doped uranium dioxide using thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry to determine if such doping could improve uranium dioxide's stability as a nuclear fuel during potential accident scenarios in a nuclear reactor or during long-term disposal. We undertook this study to determine whether the resistance of the uranium dioxide to oxidation to the orthorhombic U3O8 with its attendant crystal expansion could be prevented by addition of gadolinia. Our studies found that gadolinium has little effect on the thermal initiation of the first step of the reported two-step air oxidation of UO2; however, increasing gadolinia content does stabilize the initial tetragonal or cubic product allowing significant oxidation before the second expansive step to U3O8 begins.

Scheele, Randall D.; Hanson, Brady D.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Sell, Rachel L.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Snow, Lanee A.

2004-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

69

Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning a Reference Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safety and cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of a commercial uranium hexafluoride conversion (UF{sub 6}) plant. Two basic decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between cost and safety impacts: DECON, and passive SAFSTOR. A third alternative, DECON of the plant and equipment with stabilization and long-term care of lagoon wastes. is also examined. DECON includes the immediate removal (following plant shutdown) of all radioactivity in excess of unrestricted release levels, with subsequent release of the site for public use. Passive SAFSTOR requires decontamination, preparation, maintenance, and surveillance for a period of time after shutdown, followed by deferred decontamination and unrestricted release. DECON with stabilization and long-term care of lagoon wastes (process wastes generated at the reference plant and stored onsite during plant operation} is also considered as a decommissioning method, although its acceptability has not yet been determined by the NRC. The decommissioning methods assumed for use in each decommissioning alternative are based on state-of-the-art technology. The elapsed time following plant shutdown required to perform the decommissioning work in each alternative is estimated to be: for DECON, 8 months; for passive SAFSTOR, 3 months to prepare the plant for safe storage and 8 months to accomplish deferred decontamination. Planning and preparation for decommissioning prior to plant shutdown is estimated to require about 6 months for either DECON or passive SAFSTOR. Planning and preparation prior to starting deferred decontamination is estimated to require an additional 6 months. OECON with lagoon waste stabilization is estimated to take 6 months for planning and about 8 months to perform the decommissioning work. Decommissioning cost, in 1981 dollars, is estimated to be $5.91 million for OECON. For passive SAFSTOR, preparing the facility for safe storage is estimated to cost $0.88 million, the annual maintenance and surveillance cost is estimated to be about $0.095 million, and deferred decontamination is estimated to cost about $6.50 million. Therefore, passive SAFSTOR for 10 years is estimated to cost $8.33 million in nondiscounted 1981 dollars. DECON with lagoon waste stabilization is estimated to cost about $4.59 million, with an annual cost of $0.011 million for long-term care. All of these estimates include a 25% contingency. Waste management costs for DECON, including the net cost of disposal of the solvent extraction lagoon wastes by shipping those wastes to a uranium mill for recovery of residual uranium, comprise about 38% of the total decommissioning cost. Disposal of lagoon waste at a commercial low-level waste burial ground is estimated to add $10.01 million to decommissioning costs. Safety analyses indicate that radiological and nonradiological safety impacts from decommissioning activities should be small. The 50-year committed dose equivalent to members of the public from airborne releases during normal decommissioning activities is estimated to 'Je about 4.0 man-rem. Radiation doses to the public from accidents are found to be very low for all phases of decommissioning. Occupational radiation doses from normal decommissioning operations (excluding transport operations) are estimated to be about 79 man-rem for DECON and about 80 man-rem for passive SAFSTOR with 10 years of safe storage. Doses from DECON with lagoon waste stabilization are about the same as for DECON except there is less dose resulting from transportation of radioactive waste. The number of fatalities and serious lost-time injuries not related to radiation is found to be very small for all decommissioning alternatives. Comparison of the cost estimates shows that DECON with lagoon waste stabilization is the least expensive method. However, this alternative does not allow unrestricted release of the site. The cumulative cost of maintenance and surveillance and the higher cost of deferred decontamination makes passive SAFSTOR more expensive than DECON. Seve

Elder, H. K.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a site-specific environmental impact statement (EIS) for construction and operation of a proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) conversion facility at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth site in Ohio (Figure S-1). The proposed facility would convert the DUF{sub 6} stored at Portsmouth to a more stable chemical form suitable for use or disposal. The facility would also convert the DUF{sub 6} from the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) site near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In a Notice of Intent (NOI) published in the Federal Register on September 18, 2001 (Federal Register, Volume 66, page 48123 [66 FR 48123]), DOE announced its intention to prepare a single EIS for a proposal to construct, operate, maintain, and decontaminate and decommission two DUF{sub 6} conversion facilities at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (United States Code, Title 42, Section 4321 et seq. [42 USC 4321 et seq.]) and DOE's NEPA implementing procedures (Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 1021 [10 CFR Part 1021]). Subsequent to award of a contract to Uranium Disposition Services, LLC (hereafter referred to as UDS), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, on August 29, 2002, for design, construction, and operation of DUF{sub 6} conversion facilities at Portsmouth and Paducah, DOE reevaluated its approach to the NEPA process and decided to prepare separate site-specific EISs. This change was announced in a Federal Register Notice of Change in NEPA Compliance Approach published on April 28, 2003 (68 FR 22368); the Notice is included as Attachment B to Appendix C of this EIS. This EIS addresses the potential environmental impacts from the construction, operation, maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the proposed conversion facility at three alternative locations within the Portsmouth site; from the transportation of all ETTP cylinders (DUF{sub 6}, low-enriched UF6 [LEU-UF{sub 6}], and empty) to Portsmouth; from the transportation of depleted uranium conversion products to a disposal facility; and from the transportation, sale, use, or disposal of the fluoride-containing conversion products (hydrogen fluoride [HF] or calcium fluoride [CaF{sub 2}]). An option of shipping the ETTP cylinders to Paducah is also considered. In addition, this EIS evaluates a no action alternative, which assumes continued storage of DUF{sub 6} in cylinders at the Portsmouth and ETTP sites. A separate EIS (DOE/EIS-0359) evaluates potential environmental impacts for the proposed Paducah conversion facility.

N /A

2003-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

71

Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a site-specific environmental impact statement (EIS) for construction and operation of a proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) conversion facility at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Paducah site in northwestern Kentucky (Figure S-1). The proposed facility would convert the DUF{sub 6} stored at Paducah to a more stable chemical form suitable for use or disposal. In a Notice of Intent (NOI) published in the ''Federal Register'' (FR) on September 18, 2001 (''Federal Register'', Volume 66, page 48123 [66 FR 48123]), DOE announced its intention to prepare a single EIS for a proposal to construct, operate, maintain, and decontaminate and decommission two DUF{sub 6} conversion facilities at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (''United States Code'', Title 42, Section 4321 et seq. [42 USC 4321 et seq.]) and DOE's NEPA implementing procedures (''Code of Federal Regulations'', Title 10, Part 1021 [10 CFR Part 1021]). Subsequent to award of a contract to Uranium Disposition Services, LLC (hereafter referred to as UDS), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, on August 29, 2002, for design, construction, and operation of DUF{sub 6} conversion facilities at Portsmouth and Paducah, DOE reevaluated its approach to the NEPA process and decided to prepare separate site-specific EISs. This change was announced in a ''Federal Register'' Notice of Change in NEPA Compliance Approach published on April 28, 2003 (68 FR 22368); the Notice is included as Attachment B to Appendix C of this EIS. This EIS addresses the potential environmental impacts from the construction, operation, maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the proposed conversion facility at three alternative locations within the Paducah site; from the transportation of depleted uranium conversion products to a disposal facility; and from the transportation, sale, use, or disposal of the fluoride-containing conversion products (hydrogen fluoride [HF] or calcium fluoride [CaF{sub 2}]). Although not part of the proposed action, an option of shipping all cylinders (DUF{sub 6}, low-enriched UF{sub 6} [LEU-UF{sub 6}], and empty) stored at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to Paducah rather than to Portsmouth is also considered. In addition, this EIS evaluates a no action alternative, which assumes continued storage of DUF{sub 6} in cylinders at the Paducah site. A separate EIS (DOE/EIS-0360) evaluates the potential environmental impacts for the proposed Portsmouth conversion facility.

N /A

2003-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

72

Environmental Risks Associated with Conversion of Depleted UF6  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conversion Conversion Depleted UF6 Environmental Risks line line Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Conversion A general discussion of the potential environmental impacts associated with depleted UF6 conversion activities. Impacts Analyzed in the PEIS The potential environmental impacts associated with conversion activities will be evaluated in detail as part of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride management program after a contract is awarded for conversion services. This page discusses in general the types of impacts that might be associated with the conversion process based on the PEIS analysis. The PEIS evaluated the potential environmental impacts for representative conversion facilities. Conversion to uranium oxide and uranium metal were considered. Potential impacts were evaluated for a representative site, and

73

Public Involvement Opportunities for the DUF6 Conversion Facility EISs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Opportunities Opportunities Public Involvement Opportunities The public comment period for the Supplement Analysis for Disposal of Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product Generated from DOE's Inventory of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride is closed. Sorry! The public comment period for the Supplement Analysis for Disposal of Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product Generated from DOE's Inventory of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride is closed. The public comment form is no longer available. For information on other public involvement opportunities, please visit Public Involvement Opportunities. Ways to Provide Comments Comments may be submitted via the Public Comment Form on this Web site. Comments can also be mailed to: DU Disposal Supplement Analysis Comment Argonne National Laboratory

74

Conversion of a regenerative oxidizer into catalytic unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Use of a VOC oxidation catalyst in the existing regenerative thermal oxidizers may greatly reduce fuel consumption and improve the oxidizer performance. This was demonstrated in a commercial 25,000 SCFM unit installed at a printing facility. The paper discusses the principles of the oxidizer retrofit design and test results obtained at various conditions of operation.

Matros, Y.S.; Bunimovich, G.A.; Strots, V.O. [Matros Technologies, Chesterfield, MO (United States)] [and others

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

75

Direct Non-oxidative Methane Conversion by Non-thermal Plasma: Experimental Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The direct non-oxidative conversion of methane to higher hydrocarbons in non-thermal plasma, namely dielectric barrier discharge and corona discharge, has been investigated experimentally at atmospheric pressure....

Yun Yang

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Direct Non-oxidative Methane Conversion by Non-thermal Plasma: Modeling Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The direct non-oxidative conversion of methane to higher hydrocarbons ... dielectric barrier discharges has been investigated theoretically at atmospheric pressure. Preliminary modeling of the results is...2...hy...

Yun Yang

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Physicochemical Characterization of Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols III: Morphologic and Chemical Oxide Analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impact of depleted uranium (DU) penetrators against an armored target causes erosion and fragmentation of the penetrators, the extent of which is dependent on the thickness and material composition of the target. Vigorous oxidation of the DU particles and fragments creates an aerosol of DU oxide particles and DU particle agglomerations combined with target materials. Aerosols from the Capstone DU aerosol study, in which vehicles were perforated by DU penetrators, were evaluated for their oxidation states using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and particle morphologies using scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM/EDS). The oxidation state of a DU aerosol is important as it offers a clue to its solubility in lung fluids. The XRD analysis showed that the aerosols evaluated were a combination primarily of U3O8 (insoluble) and UO3 (relatively more soluble) phases, though intermediate phases resembling U4O9 and other oxides were prominent in some samples. Analysis of particle residues in the micrometer-size range by SEM/EDS provided microstructural information such as phase composition and distribution, fracture morphology, size distribution, and material homogeneity. Observations from SEM analysis show a wide variability in the shapes of the DU particles. Some of the larger particles appear to have been fractured (perhaps as a result of abrasion and comminution); others were spherical, occasionally with dendritic or lobed surface structures. Amorphous conglomerates containing metals other than uranium were also common, especially with the smallest particle sizes. A few samples seemed to contain small chunks of nearly pure uranium metal, which were verified by EDS to have a higher uranium content exceeding that expected for uranium oxides. Results of the XRD and SEM/EDS analyses were used in other studies described in this issue of The Journal of Health Physics to interpret the results of lung solubility studies and in selecting input parameters for dose assessments.

Krupka, Kenneth M.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Gold, Kenneth; Arey, Bruce W.; Jenson, Evan D.; Guilmette, Raymond A.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

AC conductivity of nanoporous metal-oxide photoanodes for solar energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AC conductivity of nanoporous metal-oxide photoanodes for solar energy conversion Steven J. Konezny% solar-to-electric energy conversion efficiency) exploited the large surface area of nanoporous thin of nanoporous thin films without increasing the recombination rate. To ensure efficient charge carrier

Konezny, Steven J.

79

Excess Uranium Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department is issuing a Request for Information on the effects of DOE transfers of excess uranium on domestic uranium mining, conversion, and enrichment industries.

80

Author's personal copy Microbial reduction of chlorite and uranium followed by air oxidation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Author's personal copy Microbial reduction of chlorite and uranium followed by air oxidation, University Park, PA, USA c Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, University of Akron, Akron, OH, USA d Department of Geology, Miami University, Oxford, OH, USA e Biosciences Division, Argonne

Burgos, William

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium oxide conversion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

EIS-0089: PUREX Plant and Uranium Oxide Plant Facilities, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy developed this statement to evaluate the environmental impacts of resumption of operations of the PUREX/Uranium Oxide facilities at the Hanford Site to produce plutonium and other special nuclear materials for national defense needs.

82

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at Portsmouth, Ohio, Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1: Main Text and Appendixes A-H 1: Main Text and Appendixes A-H June 2004 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Cover Sheet Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS iii COVER SHEET * RESPONSIBLE FEDERAL AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, Site (DOE/EIS-0360) CONTACT: For further information on this environmental impact statement (EIS), contact: Gary S. Hartman DOE-ORO Cultural Resources Management Coordinator U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 e-mail: Ports_DUF6@anl.gov phone: 1-866-530-0944 fax: 1-866-530-0943 For general information on the DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, contact:

83

Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 1 Paducah DUF 6 DEIS: December 2003 SUMMARY S.1 INTRODUCTION This document is a site-specific environmental impact statement (EIS) for construction and operation of a proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF 6 ) conversion facility at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Paducah site in northwestern Kentucky (Figure S-1). The proposed facility would convert the DUF 6 stored at Paducah to a more stable chemical form suitable for use or disposal. In a Notice of Intent (NOI) published in the Federal Register (FR) on September 18, 2001 (Federal Register, Volume 66, page 48123 [66 FR 48123]), DOE announced its intention to prepare a single EIS for a proposal to construct, operate, maintain, and decontaminate and decommission two DUF 6 conversion facilities at Portsmouth,

84

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at Portsmouth, Ohio, Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2: Comment and Response Document 2: Comment and Response Document June 2004 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Comment & Response Document Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS iii COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE FEDERAL AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, Site (DOE/EIS-0360) CONTACT: For further information on this environmental impact statement (EIS), contact: Gary S. Hartman DOE-ORO Cultural Resources Management Coordinator U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 e-mail: Ports_DUF6@anl.gov phone: 1-866-530-0944 fax: 1-866-530-0943 For general information on the DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, contact:

85

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2: Comment and Response Document 2: Comment and Response Document June 2004 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Comment & Response Document Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS iii COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE FEDERAL AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site (DOE/EIS-0359) CONTACT: For further information on this environmental impact statement (EIS), contact: Gary S. Hartman DOE-ORO Cultural Resources Management Coordinator U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 e-mail: Pad_DUF6@anl.gov phone: 1-866-530-0944 fax: 1-866-530-0943 For general information on the DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process,

86

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1: Main Text and Appendixes A-H 1: Main Text and Appendixes A-H June 2004 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Cover Sheet Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS iii COVER SHEET * RESPONSIBLE FEDERAL AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site (DOE/EIS-0359) CONTACT: For further information on this environmental impact statement (EIS), contact: Gary S. Hartman DOE-ORO Cultural Resources Management Coordinator U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 e-mail: Pad_DUF6@anl.gov phone: 1-866-530-0944 fax: 1-866-530-0943 For general information on the DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, contact:

87

Uranium hexafluoride handling. Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Field Office, and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., are co-sponsoring this Second International Conference on Uranium Hexafluoride Handling. The conference is offered as a forum for the exchange of information and concepts regarding the technical and regulatory issues and the safety aspects which relate to the handling of uranium hexafluoride. Through the papers presented here, we attempt not only to share technological advances and lessons learned, but also to demonstrate that we are concerned about the health and safety of our workers and the public, and are good stewards of the environment in which we all work and live. These proceedings are a compilation of the work of many experts in that phase of world-wide industry which comprises the nuclear fuel cycle. Their experience spans the entire range over which uranium hexafluoride is involved in the fuel cycle, from the production of UF{sub 6} from the naturally-occurring oxide to its re-conversion to oxide for reactor fuels. The papers furnish insights into the chemical, physical, and nuclear properties of uranium hexafluoride as they influence its transport, storage, and the design and operation of plant-scale facilities for production, processing, and conversion to oxide. The papers demonstrate, in an industry often cited for its excellent safety record, continuing efforts to further improve safety in all areas of handling uranium hexafluoride. Selected papers were processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

88

Feasibility study on AFR-100 fuel conversion from uranium-based fuel to thorium-based fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although thorium has long been considered as an alternative to uranium-based fuels, most of the reactors built to-date have been fueled with uranium-based fuel with the exception of a few reactors. The decision to use uranium-based fuels was initially made based on the technology maturity compared to thorium-based fuels. As a result of this experience, lot of knowledge and data have been accumulated for uranium-based fuels that made it the predominant nuclear fuel type for extant nuclear power. However, following the recent concerns about the extent and availability of uranium resources, thorium-based fuels have regained significant interest worldwide. Thorium is more abundant than uranium and can be readily exploited in many countries and thus is now seen as a possible alternative. As thorium-based fuel technologies mature, fuel conversion from uranium to thorium is expected to become a major interest in both thermal and fast reactors. In this study the feasibility of fuel conversion in a fast reactor is assessed and several possible approaches are proposed. The analyses are performed using the Advanced Fast Reactor (AFR-100) design, a fast reactor core concept recently developed by ANL. The AFR-100 is a small 100 MW{sub e} reactor developed under the US-DOE program relying on innovative fast reactor technologies and advanced structural and cladding materials. It was designed to be inherently safe and offers sufficient margins with respect to the fuel melting temperature and the fuel-cladding eutectic temperature when using U-10Zr binary metal fuel. Thorium-based metal fuel was preferred to other thorium fuel forms because of its higher heavy metal density and it does not need to be alloyed with zirconium to reduce its radiation swelling. The various approaches explored cover the use of pure thorium fuel as well as the use of thorium mixed with transuranics (TRU). Sensitivity studies were performed for the different scenarios envisioned in order to determine the best core performance characteristics for each of them. With the exception of the fuel type and enrichment, the reference AFR-100 core design characteristics were kept unchanged, including the general core layout and dimensions, assembly dimensions, materials and power rating. In addition, the mass of {sup 235}U required was kept within a reasonable range from that of the reference AFR-100 design. The core performance characteristics, kinetics parameters and reactivity feedback coefficients were calculated using the ANL suite of fast reactor analysis code systems. Orifice design calculations and the steady-state thermal-hydraulic analyses were performed using the SE2-ANL code. The thermal margins were evaluated by comparing the peak temperatures to the design limits for parameters such as the fuel melting temperature and the fuel-cladding eutectic temperature. The inherent safety features of AFR-100 cores proposed were assessed using the integral reactivity parameters of the quasi-static reactivity balance analysis. The design objectives and requirements, the computation methods used as well as a description of the core concept are provided in Section 2. The three major approaches considered are introduced in Section 3 and the neutronics performances of those approaches are discussed in the same section. The orifice zoning strategies used and the steady-state thermal-hydraulic performance are provided in Section 4. The kinetics and reactivity coefficients, including the inherent safety characteristics, are provided in Section 5, and the Conclusions in Section 6. Other scenarios studied and sensitivity studies are provided in the Appendix section.

Heidet, F.; Kim, T.; Grandy, C. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

89

Thermal hydraulics analysis of the MIT research reactor in support of a low enrichment uranium (LEU) core conversion .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The MIT research reactor (MITR) is converting from the existing high enrichment uranium (HEU) core to a low enrichment uranium (LEU) core using a high-density… (more)

Ko, Yu-Chih, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Depleted uranium hexafluoride: Waste or resource?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

the US Department of Energy is evaluating technologies for the storage, disposal, or re-use of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}). This paper discusses the following options, and provides a technology assessment for each one: (1) conversion to UO{sub 2} for use as mixed oxide duel, (2) conversion to UO{sub 2} to make DUCRETE for a multi-purpose storage container, (3) conversion to depleted uranium metal for use as shielding, (4) conversion to uranium carbide for use as high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel. In addition, conversion to U{sub 3}O{sub 8} as an option for long-term storage is discussed.

Schwertz, N.; Zoller, J.; Rosen, R.; Patton, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Bradley, C. [USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy, Science, Technology, Washington, DC (United States); Murray, A. [SAIC (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Neptunium(V) Partitioning to Uranium(VI) Oxide and Peroxide Solids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Secondary uranium (U) solids are expected to be the long-term solubility limiting phases in cases of subsurface U contamination (1) and at geological repository sites for the disposal of U-based spent nuclear fuel (SNF) (2). ... Under the moist, oxidizing environment expected at Yucca Mountain, the proposed repository site in the United States, a paragenetic sequence of hexavalent U oxides and silicates is expected to form (4). ... Primary funding for this work was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science Basic Energy Sciences program under contract DE-FG02-01ER15138. ...

Matthew Douglas; Sue B. Clark; Judah I. Friese; Bruce W. Arey; Edgar C. Buck; Brady D. Hanson

2005-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

92

Electrochemical Conversion of Oxide Precursors to Consolidated Zr and Zr?2.5Nb Tubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electrochemical Conversion of Oxide Precursors to Consolidated Zr and Zr?2.5Nb ... Electrochemical reduction of tubular oxide precursors in molten calcium chloride and the subsequent in situ consolidation induced by electro-deoxygenation promise a low energy and fast route for manufacturing of zirconium-alloy-based artifacts, such as the nuclear fuel cladding tubes. ... Zircaloy) in a mold of Plaster of Paris. ...

Junjun Peng; Kai Jiang; Wei Xiao; Dihua Wang; Xianbo Jin; George Z. Chen

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

93

Influence of uranyl speciation and iron oxides on uranium biogeochemical redox reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium is a pollutant of concern to both human and ecosystem health. Uranium's redox state often dictates its partitioning between the aqueous- and solid-phases, and thus controls its dissolved concentration and, coupled with groundwater flow, its migration within the environment. In anaerobic environments, the more oxidized and mobile form of uranium (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and associated species) may be reduced, directly or indirectly, by microorganisms to U(IV) with subsequent precipitation of UO{sub 2}. However, various factors within soils and sediments may limit biological reduction of U(VI), inclusive of alterations in U(VI) speciation and competitive electron acceptors. Here we elucidate the impact of U(VI) speciation on the extent and rate of reduction with specific emphasis on speciation changes induced by dissolved Ca, and we examine the impact of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides (ferrihydrite, goethite and hematite) varying in free energies of formation on U reduction. The amount of uranium removed from solution during 100 h of incubation with S. putrefaciens was 77% with no Ca or ferrihydrite present but only 24% (with ferrihydrite) and 14% (no ferrihydrite) were removed for systems with 0.8 mM Ca. Imparting an important criterion on uranium reduction, goethite and hematite decrease the dissolved concentration of calcium through adsorption and thus tend to diminish the effect of calcium on uranium reduction. Dissimilatory reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) can proceed through different enzyme pathways, even within a single organism, thus providing a potential second means by which Fe(III) bearing minerals may impact U(VI) reduction. We quantify rate coefficients for simultaneous dissimilatory reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) in systems varying in Ca concentration (0 to 0.8 mM), and using a mathematical construct implemented with the reactive transport code MIN3P, we reveal the predominant influence of uranyl speciation, specifically the formation of uranyl-calcium-carbonato complexes, and ferrihydrite on the rate and extent of uranium reduction in complex geochemical systems.

Stewart, B.D.; Amos, R.T.; Nico, P.S.; Fendorf, S.

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

Methane-to-Methanol Conversion by Gas-Phase Transition Metal Oxide Cations: Experiment and Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane-to-Methanol Conversion by Gas-Phase Transition Metal Oxide Cations: Experiment and Theory Ricardo B. Metz Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 USA Abstract Gas such as methanol has attracted great experimental and theoretical interest due to its importance as an industrial

Metz, Ricardo B.

95

Observations of Oxygen Ion Behavior in the Lithium-Based Electrolytic Reduction of Uranium Oxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Parametric studies were performed on a lithium-based electrolytic reduction process at bench-scale to investigate the behavior of oxygen ions in the reduction of uranium oxide for various electrochemical cell configurations. Specifically, a series of eight electrolytic reduction runs was performed in a common salt bath of LiCl – 1 wt% Li2O. The variable parameters included fuel basket containment material (i.e., stainless steel wire mesh and sintered stainless steel) and applied electrical charge (i.e., 75 – 150% of the theoretical charge for complete reduction of uranium oxide in a basket to uranium metal). Samples of the molten salt electrolyte were taken at regular intervals throughout each run and analyzed to produce a time plot of Li2O concentrations in the bulk salt over the course of the runs. Following each run, the fuel basket was sectioned and the fuel was removed. Samples of the fuel were analyzed for the extent of uranium oxide reduction to metal and for the concentration of salt constituents, i.e., LiCl and Li2O. Extents of uranium oxide reduction ranged from 43 – 70% in stainless steel wire mesh baskets and 8 – 33 % in sintered stainless steel baskets. The concentrations of Li2O in the salt phase of the fuel product from the stainless steel wire mesh baskets ranged from 6.2 – 9.2 wt%, while those for the sintered stainless steel baskets ranged from 26 – 46 wt%. Another series of tests was performed to investigate the dissolution of Li2O in LiCl at 650 °C across various cathode containment materials (i.e., stainless steel wire mesh, sintered stainless steel and porous magnesia) and configurations (i.e., stationary and rotating cylindrical baskets). Dissolution of identical loadings of Li2O particulate reached equilibrium within one hour for stationary stainless steel wire mesh baskets, while the same took several hours for sintered stainless steel and porous magnesia baskets. Rotation of an annular cylindrical basket of stainless steel wire mesh accelerated the Li2O dissolution rate by more than a factor of six.

Steven D. Herrmann; Shelly X. Li; Brenda E. Serrano-Rodriguez

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Novel Solar Energy Conversion Materials by Design of Mn(II) Oxides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solar energy conversion materials need to fulfill simultaneously a number of requirements in regard of their band-structure, optical properties, carrier transport, and doping. Despite their desirable chemical properties, e.g., for photo-electrocatalysis, transition-metal oxides usually do not have desirable semiconducting properties. Instead, oxides with open cation d-shells are typically Mott or charge-transfer insulators with notoriously poor transport properties, resulting from large effective electron/hole masses or from carrier self-trapping. Based on the notion that the electronic structure features (p-d interaction) supporting the p-type conductivity in d10 oxides like Cu2O and CuAlO2 occurs in a similar fashion also in the d5 (high-spin) oxides, we recently studied theoretically the band-structure and transport properties of the prototypical binary d5 oxides MnO and Fe2O3 [PRB 85, 201202(R)]. We found that MnO tends to self-trap holes by forming Mn+III, whereas Fe2O3 self-traps electrons by forming Fe+II. However, the self-trapping of holes is suppressed by when Mn is tetrahedrally coordinated, which suggests specific routes to design novel solar conversion materials by considering ternary Mn(II) oxides or oxide alloys. We are presenting theory, synthesis, and initial characterization for these novel energy materials.

Lany, S.; Peng, H.; Ndione, P.; Zakutayev, A.; Ginley, D. S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

A comparison of two lung clearance models based on the dissolution rates of oxidized depleted uranium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of this thesis. I would also like i. o express m/ appreciation to Dr. Richard Cuddihy ai the inhalation Toxicology Research Inst. itute for his assisiance in tIIe development of th1S thesis. I wou'Id also 11ke to thanl: Nr. I loyd wheat and Nr. Kev1n Durgett... uranium (OU) in lung f)uid simulani. in a efi'ort to gather data which r ouId be used to determine the pulmonary to blood t ransfer rate of inhaled oxidized OU. This information was taken one step further by utilizing the data in two biomathematical...

Crist, Kevin Craig

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

98

Assessment of the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office Conduct of Operations Oversight of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plants, May 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Assessment of the Assessment of the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office Conduct of Operations Oversight of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plants May 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 2

99

Assessment of the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office Conduct of Operations Oversight of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plants, May 2012  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Assessment of the Assessment of the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office Conduct of Operations Oversight of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plants May 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 2

100

Examination of the conversion of the U.S. submarine fleet from highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium ; Examination of the conversion of the United States submarine fleet from HEU to low LEU .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The nuclear reactors used by the U.S. Navy for submarine propulsion are currently fueled by highly enriched uranium (HEU), but HEU brings administrative and political… (more)

McCord, Cameron (Cameron Liam)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium oxide conversion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Stability of uranium incorporated into Fe(hydr)oxides under fluctuating redox conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

uranium budgets and behavior along a Hawaiian chronosequence. Chemical GeologyUranium isotopic evidence for the origin of the Bahariya iron deposits, Egypt. Ore Geology

Stewart, B.D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

THE ENERGY SPECTRA OF URANIUM ATOMS SPUTTERED FROM URANIUM METAL AND URANIUM DIOXIDE TARGETS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE ENERGY SPECTRA OF URANIUM ATOMS SPUTTERED FROM URANIUM METAL AND URANIUM DIOXIDE TARGETS Thesis. I have benefitted from conversations with many persons w~ile engaged in this project. I would like

Winfree, Erik

103

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-1 Regional Map of the Paducah, Kentucky, Site Vicinity Summary S-18 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-3 Three Alternative Conversion Facility Locations within the Paducah Site, with Location A Being the Preferred Alternative (A representative conversion facility footprint is shown within each location.) Summary S-20 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-4 Conceptual Overall Material Flow Diagram for the Paducah Conversion Facility Summary S-21 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-5 Conceptual Conversion Facility Site Layout for Paducah Summary S-28 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-6 Areas of Potential Impact Evaluated for Each Alternative Alternatives 2-7 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS

104

Fire hazards analysis for the uranium oxide (UO{sub 3}) facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fire Hazards Analysis (FHA) documents the deactivation end-point status of the UO{sub 3} complex fire hazards, fire protection and life safety systems. This FHA has been prepared for the Uranium Oxide Facility by Westinghouse Hanford Company in accordance with the criteria established in DOE 5480.7A, Fire Protection and RLID 5480.7, Fire Protection. The purpose of the Fire Hazards Analysis is to comprehensively and quantitatively assess the risk from a fire within individual fire areas in a Department of Energy facility so as to ascertain whether the objectives stated in DOE Order 5480.7, paragraph 4 are met. Particular attention has been paid to RLID 5480.7, Section 8.3, which specifies the criteria for deactivating fire protection in decommission and demolition facilities.

Wyatt, D.M.

1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

105

Synthesis and characterization of copper doped zinc oxide nanoparticles and its application in energy conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Solar cells, in general, perform under light source of solar influx, while the heat energy of solar radiation remains unutilized. Using an aqueous suspension of copper doped zinc oxide nanoparticles in specially-designed electrochemical cells we have observed significant voltage (maximum 632.0 mV) and storage duration (?47 h) upon thermal excitation. The cells exhibit reasonable energy conversion efficiency (maximum 1.36%). These cells generate voltage even at room temperature (?30 °C) and the voltage increases gradually with increasing temperature. When the platinum foil separating the two compartments of the electrochemical cell is replaced by a planar lipid membrane, all the parameters e.g., thermovoltage, storage capacity and the energy conversion efficiency increase significantly.

Poonam Bandyopadhyay; Anindita Dey; Ruma Basu; Sukhen Das; Papiya Nandy

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at Portsmouth, Ohio, Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Portsmouth DUF Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-1 Regional Map of the Portsmouth, Ohio, Site Vicinity Summary S-18 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-3 Three Alternative Conversion Facility Locations within the Portsmouth Site, with Location A Being the Preferred Alternative (A representative conversion facility footprint is shown within each location.) Summary S-20 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-4 Conceptual Overall Material Flow Diagram for the Portsmouth Conversion Facility Summary S-21 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-5 Conceptual Conversion Facility Site Layout for Portsmouth Summary S-25 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-6 Potential Locations for Construction of a New Cylinder Storage Yard at Portsmouth

107

Disposition of Uranium -233 (sup 233U) in Plutonium Metal and Oxide at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the position that the concentration of Uranium-233 ({sup 233}U) in plutonium metal and oxide currently stored at the DOE Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) is well below the maximum permissible stabilization, packaging, shipping and storage limits. The {sup 233}U stabilization, packaging and storage limit is 0.5 weight percent (wt%), which is also the shipping limit maximum. These two plutonium products (metal and oxide) are scheduled for processing through the Building 371 Plutonium Stabilization and Packaging System (PuSPS). This justification is supported by written technical reports, personnel interviews, and nuclear material inventories, as compiled in the ''History of Uranium-233 ({sup 233}U) Processing at the Rocky Flats Plant In Support of the RFETS Acceptable Knowledge Program'' RS-090-056, April 1, 1999. Relevant data from this report is summarized for application to the PuSPS metal and oxide processing campaigns.

Freiboth, Cameron J.; Gibbs, Frank E.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Gas conversion impedance: A test geometry effect in characterization of solid oxide fuel cell anodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The appearance of an extra arc in impedance spectra obtained on high performance solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anodes is recognized when experiments are conducted in a test setup where the working and reference electrodes are placed in separate atmospheres. A simple continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) model is used to illustrate how anodes measured with the reference electrode in an atmosphere separate from the working electrode are subject to an impedance contribution from gas conversion. The gas conversion impedance is split into a resistive and a capacitive part, and the dependences of these parameters on gas composition, temperature, gas flow rate, and rig geometry are quantified. The fuel gas flow rate per unit of anode area is decisive for the resistivity, whereas the capacitance is proportional to the CSTR volume of gas over the anode. The model predictions are compared to actual measurements on Ni/yttria stabilized zirconia cermet anodes for SOFC. The contribution of the gas conversion overpotential to dc current-voltage characteristics is deduced for H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O and shown to have a slope of RT/2F in a Tafel plot.

Primdahl, S.; Mogensen, M. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark). Materials Research Dept.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Appendix E: Impacts Associated with HF and CaF2 Conversion Product Sale and Use  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Portsmouth DUF Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX E: IMPACTS ASSOCIATED WITH HF AND CaF 2 CONVERSION PRODUCT SALE AND USE HF and CaF 2 Conversion Products E-2 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS HF and CaF 2 Conversion Products E-3 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX E: IMPACTS ASSOCIATED WITH HF AND CaF 2 CONVERSION PRODUCT SALE AND USE E.1 INTRODUCTION During the conversion of the depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF 6 ) inventory to depleted uranium oxide, products having some potential for sale to commercial users would be produced. These products would include aqueous hydrogen fluoride (HF) and calcium fluoride (CaF 2 , commonly referred to as fluorspar). These products are routinely used as commercial materials, and an investigation into their potential reuse was done; results are included as part of

110

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Appendix E: Impacts Associated with HF and CaF2 Conversion Product Sale and Use  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX E: IMPACTS ASSOCIATED WITH HF AND CaF 2 CONVERSION PRODUCT SALE AND USE HF and CaF 2 Conversion Products E-2 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS HF and CaF 2 Conversion Products E-3 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX E: IMPACTS ASSOCIATED WITH HF AND CaF 2 CONVERSION PRODUCT SALE AND USE E.1 INTRODUCTION During the conversion of the depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF 6 ) inventory to depleted uranium oxide, products having some potential for sale to commercial users would be produced. These products would include aqueous hydrogen fluoride (HF) and calcium fluoride (CaF 2 , commonly referred to as fluorspar). These products are routinely used as commercial materials, and an investigation into their potential reuse was done; results are included as part of

111

MESURE DE 11 POUR L'URANIUM-235 AVEC DES NEUTRONS C 1 -157 leve pour donner lieu une forte conversion interne. SIGNARBIEUX(C.), RIBRAG(M.), NIFENECKER(H.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MESURE DE 11 POUR L'URANIUM-235 AVEC DES NEUTRONS C 1 - 157 élevée pour donner lieu à une forte conversion interne. SIGNARBIEUX(C.), RIBRAG(M.), NIFENECKER(H.) Seule une étude plus approfondie des(K.), North Holland thermique de 235U. Publishing Company, Vol. 2, p. 1533, 1965. MESURE DE 5 POUR L'URANIUM

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

112

Transcript of Public Scoping Meeting for Environmental Impact Statement for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, held Nov. 28, 2001, Piketon, Ohio  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENVIRONMENTAL 2 IMPACT STATEMENT 3 FOR DEPLETED URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE 4 CONVERSION FACILITIES 5 AT PORTSMOUTH, OHIO AND PADUCAH, KENTUCKY 6 7 SCOPING MEETING 8 9 November 28, 2001. 10 11 6:00 p.m. 12 13 Riffe Beavercreek Vocational School 14 175 Beavercreek Road 15 Piketon, Ohio 45661 16 17 FACILITATORS: Darryl Armstrong 18 Harold Munroe 19 Kevin Shaw 20 Gary Hartman 21 22 23 24 Professional Reporters, Inc. (614) 460-5000 or (800) 229-0675 2 1 -=0=- 2 PROCEEDINGS 3 -=0=- 4 MR. ARMSTRONG: I have 6:00, 5 according to my watch. Good evening, ladies 6 and gentlemen. If you'll please take your 7 seats, we'll get started. This meeting is 8 now officially convened. 9 On behalf of DOE, we thank you for 10 attending the environmental impact 11 statement, or EIS, scoping meeting this 12 evening for the depleted uranium conversion 13 facilities. My name is Darryl Armstrong. I 14

113

Biological assessment of the effects of construction and operation of a depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, site.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF6 inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This biological assessment (BA) has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and the Endangered Species Act of 1974, to evaluate potential impacts to federally listed species from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Paducah site.

Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

114

Two-step fuel oxidation to improve efficiency in the conversion of chemical energy into work  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is well known that in the conversion of chemical exergy into work a remarkable percentage of exergy is destroyed during the combustion process. Obviously, hypothetical reversible combustions, as proposed in some papers, are not to be taken into account. On the contrary, recent studies of a new system to increase the efficiency of the conversion of chemical exergy into work appear interesting. The proposed system includes a gas turbine system with chemical-looping combustion where a metal oxide is used as an oxygen carrier. Instead of conventional combustion, the oxidation of fuel is carried out in a two-step reaction. The first step is an endothermic reaction in which a metal oxide is reduced by fuel at low temperature and the second step an exothermic reaction in which the products of the former reaction are subjected to oxidation. The thermal energy of low exergy value in the exhaust gas is employed to drive the endothermic reaction. Various systems have been proposed and tested. The power-generation system (called CLSA), with chemical-looping combustion and air saturation seems the most convenient. When only saturated air is used, exergy destruction becomes small in the middle- and low temperature range. However, the inefficiency in the high temperature range remains. On the other hand, when only chemical-looping combustion is used, exergy destruction becomes small in the high- and middle temperature range. However, the inefficiency in the low-temperature range is now not removed. When both technologies are combined, exergy efficiency may become much greater than that obtained from each individual process. The synergistic effect of combining these two technologies is analogous to the improvement achieved when a combined system was designed as a new power-generation system by combining a gas turbine with a steam turbine. For a model system, an exergy efficiency of 53.3% is obtained when the process water is recovered and a value of about 55% is obtained when water is not recovered. A significant advantage of the CLSA system is that CO{sub 2} can be easily recovered. The CO{sub 2} produced in the reduction reactor is not diluted by air since air and fuel enter different reactors. This is quite different from a traditional combustor in which CO{sub 2} is diluted in air and hence cannot be concentrated and separated economically. In the CLSA system, since the exhaust gas from the reduction reactor is composed only of high-concentration CO{sub 2} and water vapor, CO{sub 2} can be easily recovered by cooling the exhaust gas and removing the liquid water, i.e. very little energy expenditure is required for recovering CO{sub 2} from the exhaust gas. The recovered CO{sub 2} may be utilized, e.g., in artificial photosynthesis, whereas a simple recovery without any utilization but only to reduce greenhouse effect seems questionable. Another significant characteristic of CLSA system is that the most of the water vapor in the exhaust gas can be recovered by cooling the exhaust gas from the oxidation reactor. In chemical-looping combustion, fuel is not burned directly and the gas discharged from the oxidation reactor has no impurities from the fuel. Hence, there will be no corrosion of the apparatus when the exhaust gas is cooled to a very low temperature and low cost materials can be utilized for the heat exchangers. Because of the recycling of the most part of water, the CLSA system can be used in locations with limited water resources. Chemical-looping combustion system can be also combined with an integrated coal gasification and this topic appears very interesting. Indeed, to achieve better conversion efficiencies and lower pollutant emissions in power plants, new technologies that combines coal gasification with a gas turbine based combined cycle have been extensively studied worldwide.

Bisio, G.; Rubatto, R.; Marletta, L.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Survey of Worldwide Light Water Reactor Experience with Mixed Uranium-Plutonium Oxide Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US and the Former Soviet Union (FSU) have recently declared quantities of weapons materials, including weapons-grade (WG) plutonium, excess to strategic requirements. One of the leading candidates for the disposition of excess WG plutonium is irradiation in light water reactors (LWRs) as mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) fuel. A description of the MOX fuel fabrication techniques in worldwide use is presented. A comprehensive examination of the domestic MOX experience in US reactors obtained during the 1960s, 1970s, and early 1980s is also presented. This experience is described by manufacturer and is also categorized by the reactor facility that irradiated the MOX fuel. A limited summary of the international experience with MOX fuels is also presented. A review of MOX fuel and its performance is conducted in view of the special considerations associated with the disposition of WG plutonium. Based on the available information, it appears that adoption of foreign commercial MOX technology from one of the successful MOX fuel vendors will minimize the technical risks to the overall mission. The conclusion is made that the existing MOX fuel experience base suggests that disposition of excess weapons plutonium through irradiation in LWRs is a technically attractive option.

Cowell, B.S.; Fisher, S.E.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

CO2 conversion for syngas production in methane catalytic partial oxidation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The catalytic partial oxidation of methane (CPOM) involves the interaction among methane combustion (MC), steam reforming (SR), and dry reforming (DR), and CO2 generated from MC is utilized for syngas production in DR. To evaluate the potential of CO2 utilization in CPOM for syngas production, a numerical study is carried out where CO2 is added into the feed gas and CPOM is triggered in a rhodium-based catalyst bed. Two important parameters of CO2/O2 ratio and O2/CH4 ratio (or O/C ratio) in the feed gas are taken into account. The predictions suggest that CO2 addition plays no part in MC, but it retards SR and intensifies DR. The CO2 consumption increases with CO2/O2 ratio; however, the CO2 conversion goes down. As a whole, increasing CO2 addition enhances CO formation but reduces H2 formation. The maximum syngas production is exhibited at CO2/O2 = 0.2 when the O/C ratio is 1. At a fixed CO2/O2 ratio, the maximum H2 yield and CO2 consumption are located at O/C = 1.8 and 1.0, respectively. However, the CO2 conversion monotonically decreases with increasing O/C ratio. Within the investigated range of CO2/O2 and O/C ratios, the H2 yield and CO2 conversion in CPOM are in the ranges of approximately 0.42–1.34 mol(mol CH4)?1 and 10–41%, respectively.

Wei-Hsin Chen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Influences of Organic Carbon Supply Rate on Uranium Bioreduction in Initially Oxidizing, Contaminated Sediment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Remediation of uranium (U) contaminated sediments through in-situ stimulation of bioreduction to insoluble UO{sub 2} is a potential treatment strategy under active investigation. Previously, we found that newly reduced U(IV) can be reoxidized under reducing conditions sustained by a continuous supply of organic carbon (OC) because of residual reactive Fe(III) and enhanced U(VI) solubility through complexation with carbonate generated through OC oxidation. That finding motivated this investigation directed at identifying a range of OC supply rates that is optimal for establishing U bioreduction and immobilization in initially oxidizing sediments. The effects of OC supply rate, from 0 to 580 mmol OC (kg sediment){sup -1} year{sup -1}, and OC form (lactate and acetate) on U bioreduction were tested in flow-through columns containing U-contaminated sediments. An intermediate supply rate on the order of 150 mmol OC (kg sediment){sup -1} year{sup -1} was determined to be most effective at immobilizing U. At lower OC supply rates, U bioreduction was not achieved, and U(VI) solubility was enhanced by complexation with carbonate (from OC oxidation). At the highest OC supply rate, resulting highly carbonate-enriched solutions also supported elevated levels of U(VI), even though strongly reducing conditions were established. Lactate and acetate were found to have very similar geochemical impacts on effluent U concentrations (and other measured chemical species), when compared at equivalent OC supply rates. While the catalysts of U(VI) reduction to U(IV) are presumably bacteria, the composition of the bacterial community, the Fe reducing community, and the sulfate reducing community had no direct relationship with effluent U concentrations. The OC supply rate has competing effects of driving reduction of U(VI) to low solubility U(IV) solids, as well as causing formation of highly soluble U(VI)-carbonato complexes. These offsetting influences will require careful control of OC supply rates in order to optimize bioreduction-based U stabilization.

Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Wan, Jiamin; Kim, Yongman; Daly, Rebecca A.; Brodie, Eoin L.; Hazen, Terry C.; Herman, Don; Firestone, Mary K.

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

118

Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work performed for Phase I (October 2001 - August 2006) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41245 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled 'Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Program'. The program focuses on the development of a low-cost, high-performance 3-to-10-kW solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system suitable for a broad spectrum of power-generation applications. During Phase I of the program significant progress has been made in the area of SOFC technology. A high-efficiency low-cost system was designed and supporting technology developed such as fuel processing, controls, thermal management, and power electronics. Phase I culminated in the successful demonstration of a prototype system that achieved a peak efficiency of 41%, a high-volume cost of $724/kW, a peak power of 5.4 kW, and a degradation rate of 1.8% per 500 hours. . An improved prototype system was designed, assembled, and delivered to DOE/NETL at the end of the program. This prototype achieved an extraordinary peak efficiency of 49.6%.

Nguyen Minh

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

119

Transcript of Public Scoping Meeting for Environmental Impact Statement for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, held Dec. 4, 2001, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

TRANSCRIPT TRANSCRIPT OF MEETING ______________________________________________________ FACILITATOR: MR. DARRYL ARMSTRONG SPEAKER: MR. DALE RECTOR SPEAKER: MR. NORMAN MULVENON SPEAKER: MS. SUSAN GAWARECKI SPEAKER: MR. GENE HOFFMAN DECEMBER 4, 2001 ____________________________________________________ JOAN S. ROBERTS COURT REPORTER P.O. BOX 5924 OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE 37831 (865-457-4027) 2 1 MR. ARMSTRONG: TAKE YOUR SEATS AND WE 2 WILL BEGIN THE MEETING. GOOD EVENING, LADIES 3 AND GENTLEMEN. IF YOU WILL, WE WILL START, THE 4 TIME IS NOW 6:02 P.M. THE MEETING IS 5 OFFICIALLY CONVENED. ON BEHALF OF THE 6 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, WE THANK YOU FOR 7 ATTENDING THIS ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT 8 SCOPING MEETING, ALSO KNOWN AS AN EIS SCOPING 9 MEETING, FOR THE DEPLETED URANIUM CONVERSION 10 FACILITIES. MY NAME IS DARRYL ARMSTRONG. I'M 11 AN INDEPENDENT AND NEUTRAL FACILITATOR HIRED BY 12 AGENCIES

120

One-Step Conversion of Biomass-Derived 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural to 1,2,6-Hexanetriol Over Ni–Co–Al Mixed Oxide Catalysts Under Mild Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One-Step Conversion of Biomass-Derived 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural to 1,2,6-Hexanetriol Over Ni–Co–Al Mixed Oxide Catalysts Under Mild Conditions ... A sustainable process with a one-step conversion of biomass-derived 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) to 1,2,6-hexanetriol is presented. ... The conversion of biomass-derived 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) was examined over Ni–Co–Al mixed oxide catalysts derived from corresponding hydrotalcite-like compounds (HTlcs). ...

Shengxi Yao; Xicheng Wang; Yijun Jiang; Feng Wu; Xinguo Chen; Xindong Mu

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium oxide conversion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Uranium redistribution under oxidizing conditions in Oklo natural reactor zone 2, Gabon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This mineralogical study was completed to elucidate the relationships between uranium distribution and alteration products of the host rock of natural reactor zone clays just below the reactor core. Uraninite is preserved without any alteration in the reactor core. Uranium minerals are found to be present in the fractures in the reactor zone clays associated with iron-mineral veins, galena and Ti-bearing minerals. Uranium, for which the phases could not be identified, occurs in iron-mineral veins and the iron-mineral rim of pyrite grains in the reactor zone clays. Uranium is not associated with granular iron minerals occurring in the illite matrix of the reactor zone clays. The degree of crystallinity and uranium content of the three iron-bearing alteration products suggest that they formed under different conditions; the granular iron minerals, under alteration conditions where uranium was not mobilized while the iron-mineral veins and the iron-mineral rim of pyrite, under conditions in which uranium is mobilized after the formation of the granular iron minerals.

Isobe, H.; Ohnuki, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Murakami, T. [Ehime Univ., Matsuyama, Ehime (Japan); Gauthier-Lafaye, F. [CNRS, Strasbourg (France). Centre de Geochemie de la Surface

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

122

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at Portsmouth, Ohio, Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Portsmouth DUF Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX A: TEXT OF PUBLIC LAW 107-206 PERTINENT TO THE MANAGEMENT OF DUF 6 Public Law 107-206 A-2 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Public Law 107-206 A-3 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX A: TEXT OF PUBLIC LAW 107-206 PERTINENT TO THE MANAGEMENT OF DUF 6 Section 502 of Public Law 107-206, "2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States" (signed by the President 08/02/2002) SEC. 502. Section 1 of Public Law 105-204 (112 Stat. 681) is amended - (1) in subsection (b), by striking "until the date" and all that follows and inserting "until the date that is 30 days after the date on which the Secretary of Energy awards a contract under

123

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX A: TEXT OF PUBLIC LAW 107-206 PERTINENT TO THE MANAGEMENT OF DUF 6 Public Law 107-206 A-2 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Public Law 107-206 A-3 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX A: TEXT OF PUBLIC LAW 107-206 PERTINENT TO THE MANAGEMENT OF DUF 6 Section 502 of Public Law 107-206, "2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States" (signed by the President 08/02/2002) SEC. 502. Section 1 of Public Law 105-204 (112 Stat. 681) is amended - (1) in subsection (b), by striking "until the date" and all that follows and inserting "until the date that is 30 days after the date on which the Secretary of Energy awards a contract under

124

Monte Carlo modeling and analyses of YALINA booster subcritical assembly, Part III : low enriched uranium conversion analyses.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study investigates the performance of the YALINA Booster subcritical assembly, located in Belarus, during operation with high (90%), medium (36%), and low (21%) enriched uranium fuels in the assembly's fast zone. The YALINA Booster is a zero-power, subcritical assembly driven by a conventional neutron generator. It was constructed for the purpose of investigating the static and dynamic neutronics properties of accelerator driven subcritical systems, and to serve as a fast neutron source for investigating the properties of nuclear reactions, in particular transmutation reactions involving minor-actinides. The first part of this study analyzes the assembly's performance with several fuel types. The MCNPX and MONK Monte Carlo codes were used to determine effective and source neutron multiplication factors, effective delayed neutron fraction, prompt neutron lifetime, neutron flux profiles and spectra, and neutron reaction rates produced from the use of three neutron sources: californium, deuterium-deuterium, and deuterium-tritium. In the latter two cases, the external neutron source operates in pulsed mode. The results discussed in the first part of this report show that the use of low enriched fuel in the fast zone of the assembly diminishes neutron multiplication. Therefore, the discussion in the second part of the report focuses on finding alternative fuel loading configurations that enhance neutron multiplication while using low enriched uranium fuel. It was found that arranging the interface absorber between the fast and the thermal zones in a circular rather than a square array is an effective method of operating the YALINA Booster subcritical assembly without downgrading neutron multiplication relative to the original value obtained with the use of the high enriched uranium fuels in the fast zone.

Talamo, A.; Gohar, Y. (Nuclear Engineering Division) [Nuclear Engineering Division

2011-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

125

Method of making a catalytic metal oxide selective for the conversion of a gas and a coating system for the selective oxidation of hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is described of making a catalytic metal oxide selective to catalyzing the conversion of given gas species, comprising: intimately supporting a solid film of catalytic metal oxide on an electrically conducting material, said film having an exposed outer surface spaced no greater than 1,000 angstroms from said conducting material and said conducting material being matched to the composition of said oxide to change the electron state of the exposed outer surface to promote a reaction between given gas species and said oxide, said metal oxide being selected from the group consisting of TiO[sub 2], SnO[sub 2], FeO, SrTiO[sub 3], and CoO, and said conducting material being selected from the group consisting of Au, Pt, TiN, Pd, Rh, Ni, and Co.

Logothetis, E.M.; Soltis, R.E.

1993-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

126

Compact reaction cell for homogenizing and down-blending highly enriched uranium metal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a specialized reaction cell for converting uranium metal to uranium oxide. In a preferred form, the reaction cell comprises a reaction chamber with increasing diameter along its length (e.g. a cylindrical chamber having a diameter of about 2 inches in a lower portion and having a diameter of from about 4 to about 12 inches in an upper portion). Such dimensions are important to achieve the necessary conversion while at the same time affording criticality control and transportability of the cell and product. The reaction chamber further comprises an upper port and a lower port, the lower port allowing for the entry of reactant gases into the reaction chamber, the upper port allowing for the exit of gases from the reaction chamber. A diffuser plate is attached to the lower port of the reaction chamber and serves to shape the flow of gas into the reaction chamber. The reaction cell further comprises means for introducing gases into the reaction chamber and a heating means capable of heating the contents of the reaction chamber. The present invention also relates to a method for converting uranium metal to uranium oxide in the reaction cell of the present invention. The invention is useful for down-blending highly enriched uranium metal by the simultaneous conversion of highly enriched uranium metal and natural or depleted uranium metal to uranium oxide within the reaction cell. 4 figs.

McLean, W. II; Miller, P.E.; Horton, J.A.

1995-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

127

Compact reaction cell for homogenizing and down-blanding highly enriched uranium metal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a specialized reaction cell for converting uranium metal to uranium oxide. In a preferred form, the reaction cell comprises a reaction chamber with increasing diameter along its length (e.g. a cylindrical chamber having a diameter of about 2 inches in a lower portion and having a diameter of from about 4 to about 12 inches in an upper portion). Such dimensions are important to achieve the necessary conversion while at the same time affording criticality control and transportability of the cell and product. The reaction chamber further comprises an upper port and a lower port, the lower port allowing for the entry of reactant gasses into the reaction chamber, the upper port allowing for the exit of gasses from the reaction chamber. A diffuser plate is attached to the lower port of the reaction chamber and serves to shape the flow of gas into the reaction chamber. The reaction cell further comprises means for introducing gasses into the reaction chamber and a heating means capable of heating the contents of the reaction chamber. The present invention also relates to a method for converting uranium metal to uranium oxide in the reaction cell of the present invention. The invention is useful for down-blending highly enriched uranium metal by the simultaneous conversion of highly enriched uranium metal and natural or depleted uranium metal to uranium oxide within the reaction cell.

McLean, II, William (Oakland, CA); Miller, Philip E. (Livermore, CA); Horton, James A. (Livermore, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Low-threshold up-conversion luminescence in ZnxCd1?xS with oxidized surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The process of low-threshold up-conversion luminescence in ZnxCd1?xS crystals of solid solutions (where x=0.5–0.9) with oxidized surface has been studied. It has been proved that the centers of excitation of up-conversion luminescence form from (CdO)n and (ZnO)n clusters adsorbed on the surface of ZnxCd1?xS crystals. It has been experimentally proved that up-conversion luminescence is connected with the formation of quantum wells. The excitation of such luminescence appears under the influence of quanta 1.7–2.0 eV with the density 0.005 W/cm2, as a result of cold Auger process.

Mikhail S. Smirnov; Oleg V. Ovchinnikov; Ekaterina A. Kosyakova; Anatoly N. Latyshev; Alexander F. Klinskikh; Elena P. Tat’yanina; Pavel V. Novikov; Mien Hai

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Depleted uranium management alternatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report evaluates two management alternatives for Department of Energy depleted uranium: continued storage as uranium hexafluoride, and conversion to uranium metal and fabrication to shielding for spent nuclear fuel containers. The results will be used to compare the costs with other alternatives, such as disposal. Cost estimates for the continued storage alternative are based on a life-cycle of 27 years through the year 2020. Cost estimates for the recycle alternative are based on existing conversion process costs and Capital costs for fabricating the containers. Additionally, the recycle alternative accounts for costs associated with intermediate product resale and secondary waste disposal for materials generated during the conversion process.

Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Uranium industry annual 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Uranium Industry Annual 1998 (UIA 1998) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. It contains data for the period 1989 through 2008 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data provides a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1989 through 1998, including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment, are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2008, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, and uranium inventories, are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1998 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. The Form EIA-858 ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is shown in Appendix D. For the readers convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix E along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

NONE

1999-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

131

Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO{sub 3}), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl{sub 4}), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation. 4 figs.

Hayden, H.W. Jr.; Horton, J.A.; Elliott, G.R.B.

1995-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

132

Assessment of Preferred Depleted Uranium Disposal Forms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of converting about 700,000 metric tons (MT) of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) containing 475,000 MT of depleted uranium (DU) to a stable form more suitable for long-term storage or disposal. Potential conversion forms include the tetrafluoride (DUF4), oxide (DUO2 or DU3O8), or metal. If worthwhile beneficial uses cannot be found for the DU product form, it will be sent to an appropriate site for disposal. The DU products are considered to be low-level waste (LLW) under both DOE orders and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. The objective of this study was to assess the acceptability of the potential DU conversion products at potential LLW disposal sites to provide a basis for DOE decisions on the preferred DU product form and a path forward that will ensure reliable and efficient disposal.

Croff, A.G.; Hightower, J.R.; Lee, D.W.; Michaels, G.E.; Ranek, N.L.; Trabalka, J.R.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Thermodynamics of the conversion of calcium and magnesium fluorides to the parent metal oxides and hydrogen fluoride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have used thermodynamic modeling to examine the reaction of calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}) and magnesium fluoride (MgF{sub 2}) with water (H{sub 2}O) at elevated temperatures. The calculated, equilibrium composition corresponds to the global free-energy minimum for the system. Optimum, predicted reaction temperatures and reactant mole ratios are reported for the recovery of hydrogen fluoride (HF), a valuable industrial feedstock. Complete conversion of MgF{sub 2} is found at 1,000 C and a ratio of 40 moles of H{sub 2}O per 1 mole of MgF{sub 2}. For CaF{sub 2}, temperatures as high as 1,400 C are required for complete conversion at a corresponding mole ratio of 40 moles of H{sub 2}O per 1 mole of CaF{sub 2}. The authors discuss the presence of minor chemical constituents as well as the stability of various potential container materials for the pyrohydrolysis reactions at elevated temperatures. CaF{sub 2} and MgF{sub 2} slags are available as wastes at former uranium production facilities within the Department of Energy Complex and other facilities regulated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Recovery of HF from these wastes is an example of environmental remediation at such facilities.

West, M.H.; Axler, K.M.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Biological assessment of the effects of construction and operation of adepleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio,site.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF{sub 6} inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This biological assessment (BA) has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 and the Endangered Species Act of 1974, to evaluate potential impacts to federally listed species from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Portsmouth site. The Indiana bat is known to occur in the area of the Portsmouth site and may potentially occur on the site during spring or summer. Evaluations of the Portsmouth site indicated that most of the site was found to have poor summer habitat for the Indiana bat because of the small size, isolation, and insufficient maturity of the few woodlands on the site. Potential summer habitat for the Indiana bat was identified outside the developed area bounded by Perimeter Road, within the corridors along Little Beaver Creek, the Northwest Tributary stream, and a wooded area east of the X-100 facility. However, no Indiana bats were collected during surveys of these areas in 1994 and 1996. Locations A, B, and C do not support suitable habitat for the Indiana bat and would be unlikely to be used by Indiana bats. Indiana bat habitat also does not occur at Proposed Areas 1 and 2. Although Locations A and C contain small wooded areas, the small size and lack of suitable maturity of these areas indicate that they would provide poor habitat for Indiana bats. Trees that may be removed during construction would not be expected to be used for summer roosting by Indiana bats. Disturbance of Indiana bats potentially roosting or foraging in the vicinity of the facility during operations would be very unlikely, and any disturbance would be expected to be negligible. On the basis of these considerations, DOE concludes that the proposed action is not likely to adversely affect the Indiana bat. No critical habitat exists for this species in the action area. Although the timber rattlesnake occurs in the vicinity of the Portsmouth site, it has not been observed on the site. In addition, habitat for the timber rattlesnake is not present on the Portsmouth site. Therefore, DOE concludes that the proposed action would not affect the timber rattlesnake.

Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

135

Floodplain/wetland assessment of the effects of construction and operation ofa depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Paducah, Kentucky,site.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF{sub 6} inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This floodplain/wetland assessment has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to Executive Order 11988 (''Floodplain Management''), Executive Order 11990 (Protection of Wetlands), and DOE regulations for implementing these Executive Orders as set forth in Title 10, Part 1022, of the ''Code of Federal Regulations'' (10 CFR Part 1022 [''Compliance with Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements'']), to evaluate potential impacts to floodplains and wetlands from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Paducah site. Reconstruction of the bridge crossing Bayou Creek would occur within the Bayou Creek 100-year floodplain. Replacement of bridge components, including the bridge supports, however, would not be expected to result in measurable long-term changes to the floodplain. Approximately 0.16 acre (0.064 ha) of palustrine emergent wetlands would likely be eliminated by direct placement of fill material within Location A. Some wetlands that are not filled may be indirectly affected by an altered hydrologic regime, due to the proximity of construction, possibly resulting in a decreased frequency or duration of inundation or soil saturation and potential loss of hydrology necessary to sustain wetland conditions. Indirect impacts could be minimized by maintaining a buffer near adjacent wetlands. Wetlands would likely be impacted by construction at Location B; however, placement of a facility in the northern portion of this location would minimize wetland impacts. Construction at Location C could potentially result in impacts to wetlands, however placement of a facility in the southeastern portion of this location may best avoid direct impacts to wetlands. The hydrologic characteristics of nearby wetlands could be indirectly affected by adjacent construction. Executive Order 11990, ''Protection of Wetlands'', requires federal agencies to minimize the destruction, loss, or degradation of wetlands, and to preserve and enhance the natural and beneficial uses of wetlands. DOE regulations for implementing Executive Order 11990 as well as Executive Order 11988, ''Floodplain Management'', are set forth in 10 CFR Part 1022. Mitigation for unavoidable impacts may be developed in coordination with the appropriate regulatory agencies. Unavoidable impacts to wetlands that are within the jurisdiction of the USACE may require a CWA Section 404 Permit, which would trigger the requirement for a CWA Section 401 Water Quality Certification from the Commonwealth of Kentucky. A mitigation plan may be required prior to the initiation of construction. Cumulative impacts to floodplains and wetlands are anticipated to be negligible to minor under the proposed action, in conjunction with the effects of existing conditions and other activities. Habitat disturbance would involve settings commonly found i

Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

136

Uranium industry annual 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Uranium Industry Annual 1995 (UIA 1995) provides current statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1995 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the period 1986 through 2005 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey``. Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1995, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1986 through 1995 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2005, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1995 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. For the reader`s convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix D along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 14 figs., 56 tabs.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Uranium Sequestration via Phosphate Infiltration/Injection Test...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- Immediate sequestration - Stable mineral form * Apatite formation - Sorbent for uranium - Conversion to autunite 5 Advantages of Phosphate Technology * Direct treatment...

138

Catalytic oxidative conversion of cellulosic biomass to formic acid and acetic acid with exceptionally high yields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Direct conversion of raw biomass materials to fine chemicals is of great significance from both economic and ecological perspectives. In this paper, we report that a Keggin-type vanadium-substituted phosphomolybdic acid catalyst, namely H4PVMo11O40, is capable of converting various biomass-derived substrates to formic acid and acetic acid with high selectivity in a water medium and oxygen atmosphere. Under optimized reaction conditions, \\{H4PVMo11O40\\} gave an exceptionally high yield of formic acid (67.8%) from cellulose, far exceeding the values achieved in previous catalytic systems. Our study demonstrates that heteropoly acids are generally effective catalysts for biomass conversion due to their strong acidities, whereas the composition of metal addenda atoms in the catalysts has crucial influence on the reaction pathway and the product selectivity.

Jizhe Zhang; Miao Sun; Xin Liu; Yu Han

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Direct Conversion of Bio-ethanol to Isobutene on Nanosized ZnxZryOz Mixed Oxides with Balanced Acid–Base Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bio-mass conversion has attracted increasing research interests to produce bio-fuels with bio-ethanol being a major product. Development of advanced processes to further upgrade bio-ethanol to other value added fuels or chemicals are pivotal to improving the economics of biomass conversion and deversifying the utilization of biomass resources. In this paper, for the first time, we report the direct conversion of bio-ethanol to isobutene with high yield (~83%) on a multifunctional ZnxZryOz mixed oxide with a dedicated balance of surface acid-base properties. This work illustrates the significance of rational design of a multifunctional mixed oxide catalyst for one step bio-ethanol conversion to a value-added intermediate, isobutene, for chemical and fuel production. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

Sun, Junming; Zhu, Kake; Gao, Feng; Wang, Chong M.; Liu, Jun; Peden, Charles HF; Wang, Yong

2011-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

140

Depleted Uranium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Depleted Uranium Depleted Uranium Depleted Uranium line line Uranium Enrichment Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium Depleted uranium is uranium that has had some of its U-235 content removed. Over the last four decades, large quantities of uranium were processed by gaseous diffusion to produce uranium having a higher concentration of uranium-235 than the 0.72% that occurs naturally (called "enriched" uranium) for use in U.S. national defense and civilian applications. "Depleted" uranium is also a product of the enrichment process. However, depleted uranium has been stripped of some of its natural uranium-235 content. Most of the Department of Energy's (DOE) depleted uranium inventory contains between 0.2 to 0.4 weight-percent uranium-235, well

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141

Report on Ultra-high Resolution Gamma- / X-ray Analysis of Uranium Skull Oxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have utilized the high energy resolution and high peak-to-background ratio of superconducting TES {gamma}-detectors at very low energies for non-destructive analysis of a skull oxide derived from reprocessed nuclear fuel. Specifically, we demonstrate that superconducting detectors can separate and analyze the strong actinide emission lines in the spectral region below 60 keV that are often obscured in {gamma}-measurements with conventional Ge detectors.

Friedrich, S; Velazquez, M; Drury, O; Salaymeh, S

2009-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

142

Experimental studies and thermodynamic modelling of volatilities of uranium, plutonium, and americium from their oxides and from their oxides interacted with ash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to identify the types and amounts of volatile gaseous species of U, Pu, and Am that are produced in the combustion chamber offgases of mixed waste oxidation processors. Primary emphasis is on the Rocky Flats Plant Fluidized Bed Incinerator. Transpiration experiments have been carried out on U{sub 3}O{sub 8}(s), U{sub 3}O{sub 8} interacted with various ash materials, PuO{sub 2}(s), PuO{sub 2} interacted with ash materials, and a 3%PuO{sub 2}/0.06%AmO{sub 2}/ash material, all in the presence of steam and oxygen, and at temperatures in the vicinity of 1,300 K. UO{sub 3}(g) and UO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}(g) have been identified as the uranium volatile species and thermodynamic data established for them. Pu and Am are found to have very low volatilities, and carryover of Pu and Am as fine dust particulates is found to dominate over vapor transport. The authors are able to set upper limits on Pu and Am volatilities. Very little lowering of U volatility is found for U{sub 3}O{sub 8} interacted with typical ashes. However, ashes high in Na{sub 2}O (6.4 wt %) or in CaO (25 wt %) showed about an order of magnitude reduction in U volatility. Thermodynamic modeling studies were carried out that show that for aluminosilicate ash materials, it is the presence of group I and group II oxides that reduces the activity of the actinide oxides. K{sub 2}O is the most effective followed by Na{sub 2}O and CaO for common ash constituents. A more major effect in actinide activity lowering could be achieved by adding excess group I or group II oxides to exceed their interaction with the ash and lead to direct formation of alkali or alkaline earth uranates, plutonates, and americates.

Krikorian, O.H.; Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Adamson, M.G.; Fontes, A.S. Jr.; Fleming, D.L.

1993-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

A coupled transport and solid mechanics formulation with improved reaction kinetics parameters for modeling oxidation and decomposition in a uranium hydride bed.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modeling of reacting flows in porous media has become particularly important with the increased interest in hydrogen solid-storage beds. An advanced type of storage bed has been proposed that utilizes oxidation of uranium hydride to heat and decompose the hydride, releasing the hydrogen. To reduce the cost and time required to develop these systems experimentally, a valid computational model is required that simulates the reaction of uranium hydride and oxygen gas in a hydrogen storage bed using multiphysics finite element modeling. This SAND report discusses the advancements made in FY12 (since our last SAND report SAND2011-6939) to the model developed as a part of an ASC-P&EM project to address the shortcomings of the previous model. The model considers chemical reactions, heat transport, and mass transport within a hydride bed. Previously, the time-varying permeability and porosity were considered uniform. This led to discrepancies between the simulated results and experimental measurements. In this work, the effects of non-uniform changes in permeability and porosity due to phase and thermal expansion are accounted for. These expansions result in mechanical stresses that lead to bed deformation. To describe this, a simplified solid mechanics model for the local variation of permeability and porosity as a function of the local bed deformation is developed. By using this solid mechanics model, the agreement between our reacting bed model and the experimental data is improved. Additionally, more accurate uranium hydride oxidation kinetics parameters are obtained by fitting the experimental results from a pure uranium hydride oxidation measurement to the ones obtained from the coupled transport-solid mechanics model. Finally, the coupled transport-solid mechanics model governing equations and boundary conditions are summarized and recommendations are made for further development of ARIA and other Sandia codes in order for them to sufficiently implement the model.

Salloum, Maher N.; Shugard, Andrew D.; Kanouff, Michael P.; Gharagozloo, Patricia E.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Notice of Availability of a Draft Supplement Analysis for Disposal of Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Produce Generated from DOE's Inventory of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

69 Federal Register 69 Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 63 / Tuesday, April 3, 2007 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION The Historically Black Colleges and Universities Capital Financing Advisory Board AGENCY: The Historically Black Colleges and Universities Capital Financing Board, Department of Education. ACTION: Notice of an open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice sets forth the schedule and proposed agenda of an upcoming open meeting of the Historically Black Colleges and Universities Capital Financing Advisory Board. The notice also describes the functions of the Board. Notice of this meeting is required by Section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act and is intended to notify the public of their opportunity to attend. DATES: Friday, April 20, 2007. Time: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

145

Raman spectroscopic measurement of oxidation in supercritical water. 2: Conversion of isopropyl alcohol to acetone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The oxidation of isopropyl alcohol in supercritical water has been investigated using Raman spectroscopy. Results for species concentration as a function of residence-time are presented for temperatures ranging from 400 to 480 C at constant pressure, 24.4 {+-} 0.3 MPa, and constant equivalence ratio, 0.88 {+-} 0.0. Acetone has been identified as the principal intermediate formed and subsequently destroyed, during the oxidation process. By assuming first-order kinetics for the destruction of both isopropyl alcohol and acetone, effective first-order rate constants have been determined from fits of the experimental data. Assuming Arrhenius behavior, the fits yield rate constants for isopropyl alcohol, k{sub eff,ipa} = 3.255 {times} 10{sup 22}(s{sup {minus}1}) exp [{minus}301.1 (kJ/mol)/RT], and for acetone, k{sub eff,ace} = 1.948 {times} 10{sup 10}(s{sup {minus}1}) exp[{minus}137.7(kJ/mol)/RT]. These results indicate that for temperatures greater than 425 C, the destruction of isopropyl alcohol proceeds faster than that of acetone.

Hunter, T.B.; Rice, S.F.; Hanush, R.G. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility] [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Documents: DUF6 Conversion EIS Supporting Documents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DUF6 Conversion EIS DUF6 Conversion EIS Search Documents: Search PDF Documents View a list of all documents NEPA Compliance: DUF6 Conversion EIS Supporting Documents PDF Icon Notice of Change in National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Approach for the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Conversion Facilities Project 38 KB details PDF Icon Press Release: DOE Seeks Public Input for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Environmental Impact Statement 90 KB details PDF Icon Advance Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities 52 KB details PDF Icon Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities 60 KB details PDF Icon Overview: Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Management Program

147

Assumptions and Criteria for Performing a Feasability Study of the Conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Core to Use Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computational study will be initiated during fiscal year 2006 to examine the feasibility of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor from highly enriched uranium fuel to low-enriched uranium. The study will be limited to steady-state, nominal operation, reactor physics and thermal-hydraulic analyses of a uranium-molybdenum alloy that would be substituted for the current fuel powder--U{sub 3}O{sub 8} mixed with aluminum. The purposes of this document are to (1) define the scope of studies to be conducted, (2) define the methodologies to be used to conduct the studies, (3) define the assumptions that serve as input to the methodologies, (4) provide an efficient means for communication with the Department of Energy and American research reactor operators, and (5) expedite review and commentary by those parties.

Primm, R.T., III; Ellis, R.J.; Gehin, J.C.; Moses, D.L.; Binder, J.L.; Xoubi, N. (U. of Cincinnati)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Comparison of a new micaceous iron oxide and ilmenite as oxygen carrier for Chemical looping combustion with respect to syngas conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is a promising carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology. One of the challenges is to find the most suitable oxygen carrier (OC). Using solid fuels makes it important to use cheap and natural oxygen carriers, since there will probably be some loss of bed material while discharging ash from the system. Therefore ilmenite and a new micaceous iron oxide (MIOX ME 400) are compared with respect to syngas conversion in a 10 kWth bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) reactor. The OC was alternatively reduced with either CO + H2 or CH4 + H2 and oxidized with air at 900 °C. The conversion of syngas with MIOX ME 400 is always higher (XCO, XH2 > 98%) than that with ilmenite. Conversion of CH4 is also better for MIOX ME 400, even though it is still low. It can be raised by increasing fuel reactor temperature from 900 °C to 950 °C which results in a CH4 conversion of 85–60% instead of 60–40%.

Florian Mayer; Ajay R. Bidwe; Alexander Schopf; Kamran Taheri; Mariusz Zieba; Günter Scheffknecht

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

FAQ 3-What are the common forms of uranium?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

are the common forms of uranium? are the common forms of uranium? What are the common forms of uranium? Uranium can take many chemical forms. In nature, uranium is generally found as an oxide, such as in the olive-green-colored mineral pitchblende. Uranium oxide is also the chemical form most often used for nuclear fuel. Uranium-fluorine compounds are also common in uranium processing, with uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and uranium tetrafluoride (UF4) being the two most common. In its pure form, uranium is a silver-colored metal. The most common forms of uranium oxide are U3O8 and UO2. Both oxide forms have low solubility in water and are relatively stable over a wide range of environmental conditions. Triuranium octaoxide (U3O8) is the most stable form of uranium and is the form most commonly found in nature. Uranium dioxide (UO2) is the form in which uranium is most commonly used as a nuclear reactor fuel. At ambient temperatures, UO2 will gradually convert to U3O8. Because of their stability, uranium oxides are generally considered the preferred chemical form for storage or disposal.

150

FAQ 7-How is depleted uranium produced?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

How is depleted uranium produced? How is depleted uranium produced? How is depleted uranium produced? Depleted uranium is produced during the uranium enrichment process. In the United States, uranium is enriched through the gaseous diffusion process in which the compound uranium hexafluoride (UF6) is heated and converted from a solid to a gas. The gas is then forced through a series of compressors and converters that contain porous barriers. Because uranium-235 has a slightly lighter isotopic mass than uranium-238, UF6 molecules made with uranium-235 diffuse through the barriers at a slightly higher rate than the molecules containing uranium-238. At the end of the process, there are two UF6 streams, with one stream having a higher concentration of uranium-235 than the other. The stream having the greater uranium-235 concentration is referred to as enriched UF6, while the stream that is reduced in its concentration of uranium-235 is referred to as depleted UF6. The depleted UF6 can be converted to other chemical forms, such as depleted uranium oxide or depleted uranium metal.

151

Consent Order, Uranium Disposition Services, LLC- NCO-2010-01  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Issued to Uranium Disposition Services, LLC related to Construction Deficiencies at the DUF6 Conversion Buildings at the Portsmouth and Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plants

152

Separation and Recovery of Uranium Metal from Spent Light Water Reactor Fuel via Electrolytic Reduction and Electrorefining  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of bench-scale experiments was performed in a hot cell at Idaho National Laboratory to demonstrate the separation and recovery of uranium metal from spent light water reactor (LWR) oxide fuel. The experiments involved crushing spent LWR fuel to particulate and separating it from its cladding. Oxide fuel particulate was then converted to metal in a series of six electrolytic reduction runs that were performed in succession with a single salt loading of molten LiCl – 1 wt% Li2O at 650 °C. Analysis of salt samples following the series of electrolytic reduction runs identified the diffusion of select fission products from the spent fuel to the molten salt electrolyte. The extents of metal oxide conversion in the post-test fuel were also quantified, including a nominal 99.7% conversion of uranium oxide to metal. Uranium metal was then separated from the reduced LWR fuel in a series of six electrorefining runs that were performed in succession with a single salt loading of molten LiCl-KCl-UCl3 at 500 °C. Analysis of salt samples following the series of electrorefining runs identified additional partitioning of fission products into the molten salt electrolyte. Analyses of the separated uranium metal were performed, and its decontamination factors were determined.

S. D. Herrmann; S. X. Li

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Corrosion-resistant uranium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to the protecting of uranium and uranium alloy articles from corrosion by providing the surfaces of the articles with a layer of an ion-plated metal selected from aluminum and zinc to a thickness of at least 60 microinches and then converting at least the outer surface of the ion-plated layer of aluminum or zinc to aluminum chromate or zinc chromate. This conversion of the aluminum or zinc to the chromate form considerably enhances the corrosion resistance of the ion plating so as to effectively protect the coated article from corrosion.

Hovis, Jr., Victor M. (Kingston, TN); Pullen, William C. (Knoxville, TN); Kollie, Thomas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bell, Richard T. (Knoxville, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Corrosion-resistant uranium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to the protecting of uranium and uranium alloy articles from corrosion by providing the surfaces of the articles with a layer of an ion-plated metal selected from aluminum and zinc to a thickness of at least 60 microinches and then converting at least the outer surface of the ion-plated layer of aluminum or zinc to aluminum chromate or zinc chromate. This conversion of the aluminum or zinc to the chromate form considerably enhances the corrosion resistance of the ion plating so as to effectively protect the coated article from corrosion.

Hovis, V.M. Jr.; Pullen, W.C.; Kollie, T.G.; Bell, R.T.

1981-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

155

Implications of Fast Reactor Transuranic Conversion Ratio  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Theoretically, the transuranic conversion ratio (CR), i.e. the transuranic production divided by transuranic destruction, in a fast reactor can range from near zero to about 1.9, which is the average neutron yield from Pu239 minus 1. In practice, the possible range will be somewhat less. We have studied the implications of transuranic conversion ratio of 0.0 to 1.7 using the fresh and discharge fuel compositions calculated elsewhere. The corresponding fissile breeding ratio ranges from 0.2 to 1.6. The cases below CR=1 (“burners”) do not have blankets; the cases above CR=1 (“breeders”) have breeding blankets. The burnup was allowed to float while holding the maximum fluence to the cladding constant. We graph the fuel burnup and composition change. As a function of transuranic conversion ratio, we calculate and graph the heat, gamma, and neutron emission of fresh fuel; whether the material is “attractive” for direct weapon use using published criteria; the uranium utilization and rate of consumption of natural uranium; and the long-term radiotoxicity after fuel discharge. For context, other cases and analyses are included, primarily once-through light water reactor (LWR) uranium oxide fuel at 51 MWth-day/kg-iHM burnup (UOX-51). For CR<1, the heat, gamma, and neutron emission increase as material is recycled. The uranium utilization is at or below 1%, just as it is in thermal reactors as both types of reactors require continuing fissile support. For CR>1, heat, gamma, and neutron emission decrease with recycling. The uranium utilization exceeds 1%, especially as all the transuranic elements are recycled. exceeds 1%, especially as all the transuranic elements are recycled. At the system equilibrium, heat and gamma vary by somewhat over an order of magnitude as a function of CR. Isotopes that dominate heat and gamma emission are scattered throughout the actinide chain, so the modest impact of CR is unsurprising. Neutron emitters are preferentially found among the higher actinides, so the neutron emission varies much stronger with CR, about three orders of magnitude.

Steven J. Piet; Edward A. Hoffman; Samuel E. Bays

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Design Study for a Low-Enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents progress made during FY 2008 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. With axial and radial grading of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in reactor performance from the current level. Results of selected benchmark studies imply that calculations of LEU performance are accurate. Scoping experiments with various manufacturing methods for forming the LEU alloy profile are presented.

Primm, Trent [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Pulsed DD Neutron Generator Measurements for HEU Oxide Fuel Pins Using Liquid Scintillators with Pulse Shape Discrimination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measurements have been performed on high-enriched uranium (HEU) oxide fuel pins and depleted uranium metal

Pennycook, Steve

158

Uranium extremophily is an adaptive, rather than intrinsic, feature for extremely thermoacidophilic Metallosphaera species  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2005 ) Oxidation states of uranium in depleted uranium particles from Kuwait . J Environ...HDTR-09-0300 and National Institutes of Health Grant R01 GM090209-01. The...Supporting Information (PDF) Uranium extremophily is an adaptive...

Arpan Mukherjee; Garrett H. Wheaton; Paul H. Blum; Robert M. Kelly

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Depleted uranium hexafluoride – technogenic raw material for obtaining high-purity inorganic fluorides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The problem of handling depleted uranium hexafluoride is discussed. An effective and ecologically safe variant of complex recycling of depleted uranium hexafluoride with uranium oxides, organic compounds, and hig...

E. P. Magomedbekov; S. V. Chizhevskaya; O. M. Klimenko; A. V. Davydov…

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Depleted Uranium Uses Research and Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DU Uses DU Uses Depleted Uranium Uses Research & Development A Depleted Uranium Uses Research and Development Program was initiated to explore beneficial uses of depleted uranium (DU) and other materials resulting from conversion of depleted UF6. A Depleted Uranium Uses Research and Development Program was initiated to explore the safe, beneficial use of depleted uranium and other materials resulting from conversion of depleted UF6 (e.g., fluorine and empty carbon steel cylinders) for the purposes of resource conservation and cost savings compared with disposal. This program explored the risks and benefits of several depleted uranium uses, including uses as a radiation shielding material, a catalyst, and a semi-conductor material in electronic devices.

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161

First-principles investigation of higher oxides of uranium and neptunium: U3O8 and Np2O5  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A computational study is presented of the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of U3O8 and Np2O5, which are actinide oxides in a higher oxidation state than the tetravalent state of the common dioxide phases, UO2 and NpO2. The calculations are based on the density functional theory+U approach, in which additional Coulomb correlations on the actinide atom are taken into account. The calculated properties of these two higher oxidized actinide oxides are analyzed and compared to those of their tetravalent analogs. The optimized structural parameters of these noncubic oxides are found to be in reasonable agreement with available experimental data. U3O8 is predicted to be a magnetic insulator, having one U atom in a hexavalent oxidation state and two U atoms in a pentavalent oxidation state. For Np2O5, which is also predicted to be an insulator, a complicated noncollinear magnetic structure is computed, leading to a nonzero overall magnetization with a slight antiferromagnetic canting. The calculated electronic structures are presented and the variation of the U 5f or Np 5f–O 2p hybridization with the oxidation state is analyzed. With increasing oxygen content, the nearly localized 5f electrons of the actinide elements are more positioned near the Fermi level and the hybridization between 5f and 2p states is markedly increased.

Y. Yun; J. Rusz; M.-T. Suzuki; P. M. Oppeneer

2011-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

162

8 - Uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Release of uranium (U) to the environment is mainly through the nuclear fuel cycle. In oxic waters, U(VI) is the predominant redox state, while U(IV) is likely to be encountered in anoxic waters. The free uranyl ion ( UO 2 2 + ) dominates dissolved U speciation at low pH while complexes with hydroxides and carbonates prevail in neutral and alkaline conditions. Whether the toxicity of U(VI) to fish can be predicted based on its free ion concentration remains to be demonstrated but a strong influence of pH has been shown. In the field, U accumulates in bone, liver, and kidney, but does not biomagnify. There is certainly potential for uptake of U via the gill based on laboratory studies; however, diet and/or sediment may be the major route of uptake, and may vary with feeding strategy. Uranium toxicity is low relative to many other metals, and is further reduced by increased calcium, magnesium, carbonates, phosphate, and dissolved organic matter in the water. Inside fish, U produces reactive oxygen species and causes oxidative damage at the cellular level. The radiotoxicity of enriched U has been compared with chemical toxicity and it has been postulated that both may work through a mechanism of production of reactive oxygen species. In practical terms, the potential for chemotoxicity of U outweighs the potential for radiotoxicity. The toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics of U are well understood in mammals, where bone is a stable repository and the kidney the target organ for toxic effects from high exposure concentrations. Much less is known about fish, but overall, U is one of the less toxic metals.

Richard R. Goulet; Claude Fortin; Douglas J. Spry

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

The removal of uranium(VI) from aqueous solution by graphene oxide–carbon nanotubes hybrid aerogels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Novel graphene oxide–carbon nanotubes (GO–CNTs) hybrid aerogels were fabricated via a freeze-drying method ... solutions of GO and CNTs. The resulting aerogels were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, ...

Zexing Gu; Yun Wang; Jun Tang; Jijun Yang…

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Investigation of the low enrichment conversion of the Texas A and M Nuclear Science Center Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of highly enriched uranium as a fuel research reactors is of concern due to the possibility of diversion for nuclear weapons applications. The Texas A M TRIGA reactor currently uses 70% enriched uranium in a FLIP (Fuel Life Improvement Program) fuel element manufactured by General Atomics. Thus fuel also contains 1.5 weight percent of erbium as a burnable poison to prolong useful core life. US university reactors that use highly enriched uranium will be required to covert to 20% or less enrichment to satisfy Nuclear Regulatory Commission requirements for the next core loading if the fuel is available. This investigation examined the feasibility of a material alternate to uranium-zirconium hydride for LEU conversion of a TRIGA reactor. This material is a beryllium oxide uranium dioxide based fuel. The theoretical aspects of core physics analyses were examined to assess the potential advantages of the alternative fuel. A basic model was developed for the existing core configuration since it is desired to use the present fuel element grid for the replacement core. The computing approach was calibrated to the present core and then applied to a core of BeO-UO{sub 2} fuel elements. Further calculations were performed for the General Atomics TRIGA low-enriched uranium zirconium hydride fuel.

Reuscher, J.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Treatment of Uranium and Plutonium Solutions Generated in the Atalante Facility, France - 12004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Atalante complex operated by the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) at the Rhone Valley Research Center consolidates research programs on actinide chemistry, especially separation chemistry, processing for recycling spent fuel, and fabrication of actinide targets for innovative concepts in future nuclear systems. The design of future systems (Generation IV reactors, material recycling) will increase the uranium and plutonium flows in the facility, making it important to anticipate the stepped-up activity and provide Atalante with equipment dedicated to processing these solutions to obtain a mixed uranium-plutonium oxide that will be stored pending reuse. Ongoing studies for integral recycling of the actinides have highlighted the need for reserving equipment to produce actinides mixed oxide powder and also minor actinides bearing oxide for R and D purpose. To meet this double objective a new shielded line should be built in the facility and should be operational 6 years after go decision. The main functions of the new unit would be to receive, concentrate and store solutions, purify them, ensure group conversion of actinides and conversion of excess uranium. This new unit will be constructed in a completely refurbished building devoted to subcritical and safe geometry of the process equipments. (author)

Lagrave, Herve [French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission - CEA, Rhone Valley Research Center, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Identification of Mn(II)-Oxidizing Bacteria from a Low-pH Contaminated Former Uranium Mine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...decrease in aqueous metal load. The biogenic minerals produced by our isolates at pH 5.5...determination of pH-value of the soil and lime requirement. Handbuch der Bodenuntersuchung...1994. Manganese(II) oxidation at mineral surfaces: a microscopic and spectroscopic...

Denise M. Akob; Tsing Bohu; Andrea Beyer; Franziska Schäffner; Matthias Händel; Carol A. Johnson; Dirk Merten; Georg Büchel; Kai Uwe Totsche; Kirsten Küsel

2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

167

Subsurface Uranium Fate and Transport: Integrated Experiments and Modeling of Coupled Biogeochemical Mechanisms of Nanocrystalline Uraninite Oxidation by Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides - Project Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subsurface bacteria including sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) reduce soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) with subsequent precipitation of UO2. We have shown that SRB reduce U(VI) to nanometer-sized UO2 particles (1-5 nm) which are both intra- and extracellular, with UO2 inside the cell likely physically shielded from subsequent oxidation processes. We evaluated the UO2 nanoparticles produced by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20 under growth and non-growth conditions in the presence of lactate or pyruvate and sulfate, thiosulfate, or fumarate, using ultrafiltration and HR-TEM. Results showed that a significant mass fraction of bioreduced U (35-60%) existed as a mobile phase when the initial concentration of U(VI) was 160 µM. Further experiments with different initial U(VI) concentrations (25 - 900 ?M) in MTM with PIPES or bicarbonate buffers indicated that aggregation of uraninite depended on the initial concentrations of U(VI) and type of buffer. It is known that under some conditions SRB-mediated UO2 nanocrystals can be reoxidized (and thus remobilized) by Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides, common constituents of soils and sediments. To elucidate the mechanism of UO2 reoxidation by Fe(III) (hydr)oxides, we studied the impact of Fe and U chelating compounds (citrate, NTA, and EDTA) on reoxidation rates. Experiments were conducted in anaerobic batch systems in PIPES buffer. Results showed EDTA significantly accelerated UO2 reoxidation with an initial rate of 9.5?M day-1 for ferrihydrite. In all cases, bicarbonate increased the rate and extent of UO2 reoxidation with ferrihydrite. The highest rate of UO2 reoxidation occurred when the chelator promoted UO2 and Fe(III) (hydr)oxide dissolution as demonstrated with EDTA. When UO2 dissolution did not occur, UO2 reoxidation likely proceeded through an aqueous Fe(III) intermediate as observed for both NTA and citrate. To complement to these laboratory studies, we collected U-bearing samples from a surface seep at the Rifle field site and have measured elevated U concentrations in oxic iron-rich sediments. To translate experimental results into numerical analysis of U fate and transport, a reaction network was developed based on Sani et al. (2004) to simulate U(VI) bioreduction with concomitant UO2 reoxidation in the presence of hematite or ferrihydrite. The reduction phase considers SRB reduction (using lactate) with the reductive dissolution of Fe(III) solids, which is set to be microbially mediated as well as abiotically driven by sulfide. Model results show the oxidation of HS– by Fe(III) directly competes with UO2 reoxidation as Fe(III) oxidizes HS– preferentially over UO2. The majority of Fe reduction is predicted to be abiotic, with ferrihydrite becoming fully consumed by reaction with sulfide. Predicted total dissolved carbonate concentrations from the degradation of lactate are elevated (log(pCO2) ~ –1) and, in the hematite system, yield close to two orders-of-magnitude higher U(VI) concentrations than under initial carbonate concentrations of 3 mM. Modeling of U(VI) bioreduction with concomitant reoxidation of UO2 in the presence of ferrihydrite was also extended to a two-dimensional field-scale groundwater flow and biogeochemically reactive transport model for the South Oyster site in eastern Virginia. This model was developed to simulate the field-scale immobilization and subsequent reoxidation of U by a biologically mediated reaction network.

Peyton, Brent M. [Montana State University; Timothy, Ginn R. [University of California Davis; Sani, Rajesh K. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology

2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

168

The catalytic oxidation of propane and propylene with air: total aldehyde production and selectivity at low conversions.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~ Ths writer is izntebteg to pr, P G~ ~och Tor his assistance azsi guidance in this work aC to Br~ J+ 9 Kinds Tor his aery. suggestions eel Succor~ a The oxidation cf propane~ propylene and prcya~cregyimm mbetccres ctver a ~ aiucdna ~st in a flew... formation of aldehyde fran pure grade propane The ~ce of Within the range of variables of this investigation and with propylene ~& aldehyde pr~cn was f'ennd to bs independent of" residence Qorrcgations relating aldehyde pressure to ~ and cncygsn pressure...

Looney, Franklin Sittig

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

169

Uranium industry annual 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

URANIUM IN ALKALINE ROCKS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Greenland," in Uranium Exploration Geology, Int. AtomicOklahoma," 1977 Nure Geology Uranium Symposium, Igneous HostMcNeil, M. , 1977. "Geology of Brazil's Uranium and Thorium

Murphy, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

DOE Announces Transfer of Depleted Uranium to Advance the U.S...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

transactions under the project would not have an adverse material impact on the domestic uranium mining, enrichment, or conversion industry. The completed analysis, conducted by...

172

Probing the Electronic Structures of Low Oxidation-State Uranium Fluoride Molecules UFx- (x=2-4)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the experimental observation of gaseous UFx? (x = 2?4) anions, which are investigated using photoelectron spectroscopy and relativistic quantum chemistry. Vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectra are obtained for all three species and the electron affinities of UFx (x = 2?4) are measured to be 1.16(3), 1.09(3), and 1.58(3) eV, respectively. Significant multi-electron transitions are observed in the photoelectron spectra of U(5f37s2)F2?, as a result of strong electron correlation effects of the two 7s electrons. The U?F symmetric stretching vibrational modes are resolved for the ground states of all UFx (x = 2?4) neutrals. Theoretical calculations are performed to qualitatively understand the photoelectron spectra. The entire UFx? and UFx (x = 1?6) series are considered theoretically to examine the trends of U?F bonding and the electron affinities as a function of fluorine coordination. The increased U?F bond lengths and decreased bond orders from UF2? to UF4? indicate that the U?F bonding becomes weaker as the oxidation state of U increases from I to III.

Li, Wei-Li; Hu, Han-Shi; Jian, Tian; Lopez, Gary V.; Su, Jing; Li, Jun; Wang, Lai-Sheng

2013-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

173

Probing the electronic structures of low oxidation-state uranium fluoride molecules UFx- (x=2-4)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the experimental observation of gaseous UFx- (x = 2-4) anions, which are investigated using photoelectron spectroscopy and relativistic quantum chemistry. Vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectra are obtained for all three species and the electron affinities of UFx (x = 2-4) are measured to be 1.16(3), 1.09(3), and 1.58(3) eV, respectively. Significant multi-electron transitions are observed in the photoelectron spectra of U(5f(3)7s(2)) F-2(-), as a result of strong electron correlation effects of the two 7s electrons. The U-F symmetric stretching vibrational modes are resolved for the ground states of all UFx (x = 2-4) neutrals. Theoretical calculations are performed to qualitatively understand the photoelectron spectra. The entire UFx- and UFx (x = 1-6) series are considered theoretically to examine the trends of U-F bonding and the electron affinities as a function of fluorine coordination. The increased U-F bond lengths and decreased bond orders from UF2- to UF4- indicate that the U-F bonding becomes weaker as the oxidation state of U increases from I to III. (C) 2013 AIP Publishing LLC.

Li, Wei-Li; Hu, Hanshi; Jian, Tian; Lopez, Gary V.; Su, Jing; Li, Jun; Wang, Lai-Sheng

2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

174

Depleted uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The potential health effects arising from exposure to depleted uranium have been much in the news of late. Naturally occurring uranium contains the radioisotopes 238U (which dominates, at a current molar proportion of 99.3%), 235U and a small amount of 234U. Depleted uranium has an isotopic concentration of 235U that is below the 0.7% found naturally. This is either because the uranium has passed through a nuclear reactor which uses up some of the fissile 235U that fuels the fission chain-reaction, or because it is the uranium that remains when enriched uranium with an elevated concentration of 235U is produced in an enrichment plant, or because of a combination of these two processes. Depleted uranium has a lower specific activity than naturally occurring uranium because of the lower concentrations of the more radioactive isotopes 235U and 234U, but account must be taken of any contaminating radionuclides or exotic radioisotopes of uranium if the uranium has been irradiated. Uranium is a particularly dense element (about twice as dense as lead), and this property makes it useful in certain military applications, such as armour-piercing munitions. Depleted uranium, rather than natural uranium, is used because of its availability and, since the demise of the fast breeder reactor programme, the lack of alternative use. Depleted uranium weapons were used in the Gulf War of 1990 and also, to a lesser extent, more recently in the Balkans. This has led to speculation that depleted uranium may be associated with `Gulf War Syndrome', or other health effects that have been reported by military and civilian personnel involved in these conflicts and their aftermath. Although, on the basis of present scientific knowledge, it seems most unlikely that exposure to depleted uranium at the levels concerned could produce a detectable excess of adverse health effects, and in such a short timescale, the issue has become one of general concern and contention. As a consequence, any investigation needs to be thorough to produce sufficiently comprehensive evidence to stand up to close scrutiny and gain the support of the public, whatever the conclusions. Unfortunately, it is the nature of such inquiries that they take time, which is frustrating for some. In the UK, the Royal Society has instigated an independent investigation into the health effects of depleted uranium by a working group chaired by Professor Brian Spratt. This inquiry has been underway since the beginning of 2000. The working group's findings will be reviewed by a panel appointed by the Council of the Royal Society, and it is anticipated that the final report will be published in the summer of 2001. Further details can be found at www.royalsoc.ac.uk/templates/press/showpresspage.cfm?file=2001010801.txt. Nick Priest has summarised current knowledge on the toxicity (both radiological and chemical) of depleted uranium in a commentary in The Lancet (27 January 2001, 357 244-6). For those wanting to read a comprehensive review of the literature, in 1999 RAND published `A Review of the Scientific Literature as it Pertains to Gulf War Illnesses, Volume 7: Depleted Uranium' by Naomi Harley and her colleagues, which can be found at www.rand.org/publications/MR/MR1018.7/MR1018.7.html. An interesting article by Jan Olof Snihs and Gustav Akerblom entitled `Use of depleted uranium in military conflicts and possible impact on health and environment' was published in the December 2000 issue of SSI News (pp 1-8), and can be found at the website of the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute: www.ssi.se/tidningar/PDF/lockSSIn/SSI-news2000.pdf. Last year, a paper was published in the June issue of this Journal that is of some relevance to depleted uranium. McGeoghegan and Binks (2000 J. Radiol. Prot. 20 111-37) reported the results of their epidemiological study of the health of workers at the Springfields uranium production facility near Preston during 1946-95. This study included almost 14 000 radiation workers. Although organ-specific doses due to uranium are not yet available for these worker

Richard Wakeford

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

What is Depleted Uranium?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

What is Uranium? What is Uranium? Uranium and Its Compounds line line What is Uranium? Chemical Forms of Uranium Properties of Uranium Compounds Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium Health Effects What is Uranium? Physical and chemical properties, origin, and uses of uranium. Properties of Uranium Uranium is a radioactive element that occurs naturally in varying but small amounts in soil, rocks, water, plants, animals and all human beings. It is the heaviest naturally occurring element, with an atomic number of 92. In its pure form, uranium is a silver-colored heavy metal that is nearly twice as dense as lead. In nature, uranium atoms exist as several isotopes, which are identified by the total number of protons and neutrons in the nucleus: uranium-238, uranium-235, and uranium-234. (Isotopes of an element have the

176

Report on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the Highly  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Report on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the Report on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the Highly Enriched Uranium Agreement Between the USA and the Russian Federation has on the Domestic Uranium Mining, Conversion, and Enrichment Industries and the Ops of the Gaseous Diffusion Report on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the Highly Enriched Uranium Agreement Between the USA and the Russian Federation has on the Domestic Uranium Mining, Conversion, and Enrichment Industries and the Ops of the Gaseous Diffusion The successful implementation of the HEU Agreement remains a high priority of the U.S. Government. The agreement also serves U.S. and Russian commercial interests. HEU Agreement deliveries are an important source of supply in meeting requirements for U.S. utility uranium, conversion, and

177

Report on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the Highly  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the Highly Enriched Uranium Agreement Between the USA and the Russian Federation has on the Domestic Uranium Mining, Conversion, and Enrichment Industries and the Ops of the Gaseous Diffusion Report on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the Highly Enriched Uranium Agreement Between the USA and the Russian Federation has on the Domestic Uranium Mining, Conversion, and Enrichment Industries and the Ops of the Gaseous Diffusion The successful implementation of the HEU Agreement remains a high priority of the U.S. Government. The agreement also serves U.S. and Russian commercial interests. HEU Agreement deliveries are an important source of supply in meeting requirements for U.S. utility uranium, conversion, and

178

Y-12 Knows Uranium | Y-12 National Security Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Knows Uranium Knows Uranium Y-12 Knows Uranium Posted: July 22, 2013 - 3:45pm | Y-12 Report | Volume 10, Issue 1 | 2013 Y-12 produces many forms of uranium. They may be used in chemical processing steps on-site or shipped elsewhere to serve as raw materials for nuclear fuel or as research tools. All of uranium's uses, defense related and otherwise, are critical to the nation. Y-12's understanding of uranium, coupled with the site's work with enriched uranium metal, alloys, oxides, compounds and solutions, is unique in the Nuclear Security Enterprise. "The Y-12 work force understands both established uranium science and the esoteric things related to uranium's behavior," said engineer Alan Moore. "Such a deep, detailed understanding comes from experience,

179

Microbiological and Geochemical Heterogeneity in an In Situ Uranium Bioremediation Field Site  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Heterogeneity in an In Situ Uranium Bioremediation Field...and microbiology of a uranium-contaminated subsurface...oxides were highly depleted, groundwater sulfate...populations to in situ uranium bioremediation. Uranium...serious threat to human health and the natural environment...

Helen A. Vrionis; Robert T. Anderson; Irene Ortiz-Bernad; Kathleen R. O'Neill; Charles T. Resch; Aaron D. Peacock; Richard Dayvault; David C. White; Philip E. Long; Derek R. Lovley

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Uranium Mining and Enrichment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Overview Presentation » Uranium Mining and Enrichment Overview Presentation » Uranium Mining and Enrichment Uranium Mining and Enrichment Uranium is a radioactive element that occurs naturally in the earth's surface. Uranium is used as a fuel for nuclear reactors. Uranium-bearing ores are mined, and the uranium is processed to make reactor fuel. In nature, uranium atoms exist in several forms called isotopes - primarily uranium-238, or U-238, and uranium-235, or U-235. In a typical sample of natural uranium, most of the mass (99.3%) would consist of atoms of U-238, and a very small portion of the total mass (0.7%) would consist of atoms of U-235. Uranium Isotopes Isotopes of Uranium Using uranium as a fuel in the types of nuclear reactors common in the United States requires that the uranium be enriched so that the percentage of U-235 is increased, typically to 3 to 5%.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium oxide conversion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Health Risks Associated with Conversion of Depleted UF6  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conversion Conversion DUF6 Health Risks line line Accidents Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Transportation Conversion A discussion of health risks associated with conversion of depleted UF6 to another chemical form. General Health Risks of Conversion The potential environmental impacts, including potential health risks, associated with conversion activities will be evaluated in detail as part of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride management program after a contract is awarded for conversion services. This section discusses in general the types of health risks associated with the conversion process. The conversion of depleted UF6 to another chemical form will be done in an industrial facility dedicated to the conversion process. Conversion will involve the handling of depleted UF6 cylinders. Hazardous chemicals, such

182

Performance and Fabrication Status of TREAT LEU Conversion Conceptual Design Concepts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Resumption of transient testing at the TREAT facility was approved in February 2014 to meet U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) objectives. The National Nuclear Security Administration’s Global Threat Reduction Initiative Convert Program is evaluating conversion of TREAT from its existing highly enriched uranium (HEU) core to a new core containing low enriched uranium (LEU). This paper describes briefly the initial pre-conceptual designs screening decisions with more detailed discussions on current feasibility, qualification and fabrication approaches. Feasible fabrication will be shown for a LEU fuel element assembly that can meet TREAT design, performance, and safety requirements. The statement of feasibility recognizes that further development, analysis, and testing must be completed to refine the conceptual design. Engineering challenges such as cladding oxidation, high temperature material properties, and fuel block fabrication along with neutronics performance, will be highlighted. Preliminary engineering and supply chain evaluation provided confidence that the conceptual designs can be achieved.

IJ van Rooyen; SR Morrell; AE Wright; E. P Luther; K Jamison; AL Crawford; HT III Hartman

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

FAQ 32-What are the potential health risks from conversion of depleted  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

conversion of depleted uranium hexafluoride to other forms? conversion of depleted uranium hexafluoride to other forms? What are the potential health risks from conversion of depleted uranium hexafluoride to other forms? Accidental release of UF6 during processing activities could result in injuries. The most immediate hazard from a release would be lung injury or death from inhalation of hydrogen fluoride (HF), a highly corrosive gas formed when UF6 reacts with moisture in air. Uranyl fluoride is also formed. Uranyl fluoride is a particulate that can be dispersed in air and inhaled. Once inhaled, uranyl fluoride is easily absorbed into the bloodstream because it is soluble. If large quantities are inhaled, kidney toxicity will result. Conversion of uranium hexafluoride to oxide or metal may involve hazardous chemicals in addition to UF6; specifically, ammonia (NH3) may be used in the process, and HF may be produced from the process. In the PEIS, the conversion accidents estimated to have the largest potential consequences were accidents involving the rupture of tanks containing either anhydrous HF or ammonia. Such an accident could be caused by a large earthquake. The probability of large earthquakes depends on the location of the facility, and the probability of damage depends on the structural characteristics of the buildings. In the PEIS, the estimated frequency of this type of accident was less than once in one million years. However, if such an extremely unlikely accident did occur, it was estimated that up to 41,000 members of the general public around the conversion facility might experience adverse effects from chemical exposures (mostly mild and temporary effects, such as respiratory irritation or temporary decrease in kidney function). Of these, up to 1,700 individuals might experience irreversible adverse effects (such as lung damage or kidney damage), with the potential for about 30 fatalities. In addition, irreversible or fatal effects among workers very near the accident scene would be possible. (Note: The actual numbers of injuries among the general public would depend on the size and proximity of the population around the conversion facility).

184

The National Conversion Pilot Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Conversion Pilot Project (NCPP) is a recycling project under way at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) in Colorado. The recycling aim of the project is threefold: to reuse existing nuclear weapon component production facilities for the production of commercially marketable products, to reuse existing material (uranium, beryllium, and radioactively contaminated scrap metals) for the production of these products, and to reemploy former Rocky Flats workers in this process.

Roberts, A.V. [BNFL, Inc., Golden, CO (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

185

Recovery and Blend-Down Uranium for Beneficial use in Commercial Reactors - 13373  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In April 2001 the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) signed an Interagency Agreement to transfer approximately 33 MT of off-specification (off-spec) highly enriched uranium (HEU) from DOE to TVA for conversion to commercial reactor fuel. Since that time additional surplus off-spec HEU material has been added to the program, making the total approximately 46 MT off-spec HEU. The disposition path for approximately half (23 MT) of this 46 MT of surplus HEU material, was down blending through the H-canyon facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The HEU is purified through the H-canyon processes, and then blended with natural uranium (NU) to form low enriched uranium (LEU) solution with a 4.95% U-235 isotopic content. This material was then transported to a TVA subcontractor who converted the solution to uranium oxide and then fabricated into commercial light water reactor (LWR) fuel. This fuel is now powering TVA reactors and supplying electricity to approximately 1 million households in the TVA region. There is still in excess of approximately 10 to 14 MT of off-spec HEU throughout the DOE complex or future foreign and domestic research reactor returns that could be recovered and down blended for use in either currently designed light water reactors, ?5% enriched LEU, or be made available for use in subsequent advanced 'fast' reactor fuel designs, ?19% LEU. (authors)

Magoulas, Virginia [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Synthesis of uranium nitride and uranium carbide powder by carbothermic reduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium nitride and uranium carbide are being considered as high burnup fuels in next generation nuclear reactors and accelerated driven systems for the transmutation of nuclear waste. The same characteristics that make nitrides and carbides candidates for these applications (i.e. favorable thermal properties, mutual solubility of nitrides, etc.), also make these compositions candidate fuels for space nuclear reactors. In this paper, we discuss the synthesis and characterization of depleted uranium nitride and carbide for a space nuclear reactor program. Importantly, this project emphasized that to synthesize high quality uranium nitride and carbide, it is necessary to understand the exact stoichiometry of the oxide feedstock. (authors)

Dunwoody, J.T.; Stanek, C.R.; McClellan, K.J.; Voit, S.L.; Volz, H.M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (United States); Hickman, R.R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Depleted Uranium Health Effects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium line line Uranium Enrichment Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium Health Effects Discussion of health effects of external exposure, ingestion, and inhalation of depleted uranium. Depleted uranium is not a significant health hazard unless it is taken into the body. External exposure to radiation from depleted uranium is generally not a major concern because the alpha particles emitted by its isotopes travel only a few centimeters in air or can be stopped by a sheet of paper. Also, the uranium-235 that remains in depleted uranium emits only a small amount of low-energy gamma radiation. However, if allowed to enter the body, depleted uranium, like natural uranium, has the potential for both chemical and radiological toxicity with the two important target organs

188

Uranium industry annual 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Management and Uses Conversion Activities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conversion Conversion Depleted UF6 Conversion DOE is planning to build two depleted UF6 conversion facilities, and site-specific environmental impact statements (EISs) to evaluate project alternatives. The Final Plan for Conversion and the Programmatic EIS The eventual disposition of depleted UF6 remains the subject of considerable interest within the U.S. Congress, and among concerned citizens and other stakeholders. Congress stated its intentions in Public Law (P. L.) 105-204, signed by the President in July 1998. P. L. 105-204 required DOE to develop a plan to build two depleted UF6 conversion facilities, one each at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky. DOE submitted the required plan, Final Plan for the Conversion of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride, to Congress in July 1999. This document provided a discussion of DOE's technical approach and schedule to implement this project. Although much of the information provided in this report is still valid, a few aspects of this plan have changed since its publication.

190

Neurotoxicity of depleted uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Depleted uranium (DU) is a byproduct of the enrichment process of uranium for its more radioactive isotopes to be ... neurotoxicity of DU. This review reports on uranium uses and its published health effects, wit...

George C. -T. Jiang; Michael Aschiner

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Conversion Tables  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center - Conversion Tables Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center - Conversion Tables Contents taken from Glossary: Carbon Dioxide and Climate, 1990. ORNL/CDIAC-39, Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Third Edition. Edited by: Fred O'Hara Jr. 1 - International System of Units (SI) Prefixes 2 - Useful Quantities in CO2 3 - Common Conversion Factors 4 - Common Energy Unit Conversion Factors 5 - Geologic Time Scales 6 - Factors and Units for Calculating Annual CO2 Emissions Using Global Fuel Production Data Table 1. International System of Units (SI) Prefixes Prefix SI Symbol Multiplication Factor exa E 1018 peta P 1015 tera T 1012 giga G 109 mega M 106 kilo k 103 hecto h 102 deka da 10 deci d 10-1 centi c 10-2

192

Biomass Conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Accounting for all of the factors that go into energy demand (population, vehicle miles traveled per ... capita, vehicle efficiency) and land required for energy production (biomass land yields, biomass conversion

Stephen R. Decker; John Sheehan…

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for for DUF 6 Conversion Project Environmental Impact Statement Scoping Meetings November/December 2001 Overview Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF 6 ) Management Program DUF 6 EIS Scoping Briefing 2 DUF 6 Management Program Organizational Chart DUF 6 Management Program Organizational Chart EM-10 Policy EM-40 Project Completion EM-20 Integration EM-50 Science and Technology EM-31 Ohio DUF6 Management Program EM-32 Oak Ridge EM-33 Rocky Flats EM-34 Small Sites EM-30 Office of Site Closure Office of Environmental Management EM-1 DUF 6 EIS Scoping Briefing 3 DUF 6 Management Program DUF 6 Management Program * Mission: Safely and efficiently manage the DOE inventory of DUF 6 in a way that protects the health and safety of workers and the public, and protects the environment DUF 6 EIS Scoping Briefing 4 DUF 6 Inventory Distribution

194

DUF6 Conversion Facility EIS Alternatives  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Alternatives Alternatives Depleted UF6 Conversion Facility EIS Alternatives Alternatives included in the Depleted UF6 Conversion Facility EISs. Proposed Action The proposed action evaluated in each EIS is to construct and operate a conversion facility at each site for conversion of the DOE DUF6 inventory. The time period considered is a construction period of approximately 2 years, an operational period of 25 years at Paducah and 18 years at Portsmouth, and the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the facility of about 3 years. The EISs assess the potential environmental impacts from the following proposed activities: Construction, operation, maintenance, and D&D of the proposed DUF6 conversion facility at each site; Transportation of uranium conversion products and waste materials to a disposal facility;

195

DOE Issues Request for Quotations for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Issues Request for Quotations for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Issues Request for Quotations for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Technical Services DOE Issues Request for Quotations for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Technical Services December 12, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor, 803-952-8564 bill.taylor@srs.gov Cincinnati - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Request for Quotation (RFQ) for engineering and operations technical services to support the Portsmouth Paducah Project Office and the oversight of operations of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Conversion Project located in Paducah KY, and Portsmouth OH. The RFQ is for a Time-and-Materials Task Order for three years with two one-year option periods. The estimated contract value is approximately $15 - 20 million.

196

DOE Issues Request for Quotations for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Issues Request for Quotations for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Issues Request for Quotations for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Technical Services DOE Issues Request for Quotations for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Technical Services December 12, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor, 803-952-8564 bill.taylor@srs.gov Cincinnati - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Request for Quotation (RFQ) for engineering and operations technical services to support the Portsmouth Paducah Project Office and the oversight of operations of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Conversion Project located in Paducah KY, and Portsmouth OH. The RFQ is for a Time-and-Materials Task Order for three years with two one-year option periods. The estimated contract value is approximately $15 - 20 million.

197

Process for recovering uranium from waste hydrocarbon oils containing the same. [Uranium contaminated lubricating oils from gaseous diffusion compressors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for the recovery of uranium from uranium-bearing hydrocarbon oils containing carboxylic acid as a degradation product. In one aspect, the invention comprises providing an emulsion of water and the oil, heating the same to a temperature effecting conversion of the emulsion to an organic phase and to an acidic aqueous phase containing uranium carboxylate, and recovering the uranium from the aqueous phase. The process is effective, simple and comparatively inexpensive. It avoids the use of toxic reagents and the formation of undesirable intermediates.

Conrad, M.C.; Getz, P.A.; Hickman, J.E.; Payne, L.D.

1982-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

198

Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols: Generation and Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a study designed to provide an improved scientific basis for assessing possible health effects from inhaling depleted uranium (DU) aerosols, a series of DU penetrators was fired at an Abrams tank and a Bradley fighting vehicle. A robust sampling system was designed to collect aerosols in this difficult environment and continuously monitor the sampler flow rates. Aerosols collected were analyzed for uranium concentration and particle size distribution as a function of time. They were also analyzed for uranium oxide phases, particle morphology, and dissolution in vitro. The resulting data provide input useful in human health risk assessments.

Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Szrom, Fran; Guilmette, Ray; Holmes, Tom; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L.; Collins, John W.; Sanderson, T. Ellory; Fliszar, Richard W.; Gold, Kenneth; Beckman, John C.; Long, Julie

2004-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

199

Chemiosmotic energy conversion of the archaebacterial thermoacidophile Sulfolobus acidocaldarius: oxidative phosphorylation and the presence of an F0-related N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide-binding proteolipid.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...C. Cox. 1983. Energy conservation in acidophilic...Chapman & Hall, New York. 16. Denda, K...component of the ATP energy-transducing system...J. BACTERIOL. ENERGY CONVERSION AND PROTEOLIPID...ACIDOCALDARIUS 6115 New York. 24. Goulbourne...

M Lübben; G Schäfer

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Expanding and optimizing fuel management and data analysis capabilities of MCODE-FM in support of MIT research reactor (MITR-II) LEU conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Studies are underway in support of the MIT research reactor (MITR-II) conversion from high enriched Uranium (HEU) to low enriched Uranium (LEU), as required by recent non-proliferation policy. With the same core configuration ...

Horelik, Nicholas E. (Nicholas Edward)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium oxide conversion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Uranium Industry Annual, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ``Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,`` is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2.

Not Available

1993-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

202

Indoor Dose Conversion Coefficients for Radon Progeny for Different  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indoor Dose Conversion Coefficients for Radon Progeny for Different Ambient Environments K . N . Y ambient environments on the indoor radon dose (in terms of the dose conversion coefficient or DCC of the human respiratory tract. Epidemiological studies of under- ground miners of uranium and other minerals

Yu, K.N.

203

Uranium at Y-12: Recovery | Y-12 National Security Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Recovery Recovery Uranium at Y-12: Recovery Posted: July 22, 2013 - 3:44pm | Y-12 Report | Volume 10, Issue 1 | 2013 Recovery involves reclaiming uranium from numerous sources and configurations and handling uranium in almost any form, including oxides and liquids (see A Rich Resource Requires Recovery). Y-12 has the equipment and expertise to recover uranium that is present in filters, wipes, mop water and elsewhere. For many salvage materials, the uranium is extracted and then manipulated into a uranyl nitrate solution, purified and chemically converted through several stages. Then it is reduced to a mass of uranium metal. This mass, called a button, is used in casting operations. The chemical operators who recover and purify uranium understand and monitor complex chemical reactions, flow rates, temperatures

204

Using flow through reactors to study the non-reductive biomineralization of uranium phosphate minerals.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Uranium contaminations of the subsurface in the vicinity of nuclear materials processing sites pose a health risk as the uranyl ion in its oxidized state,… (more)

Williams, Anna Rachel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Adsorption study for uranium in Rocky Flats groundwater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Six adsorbents were studied to determine their effectiveness in removing uranium in Rocky Flats groundwater. The bench column and batch (Kd) tests showed that uranium can be removed (>99.9%) by four adsorbents. Bone Charcoal (R1O22); F-1 Alumina (granular activated alumina); BIOFIX (immobilized biological agent); SOPBPLUS (mixed metal oxide); Filtrasorb 300 (granular activated carbon); and Zeolite (clinoptilolite).

Laul, J.C.; Rupert, M.C. [EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States); Harris, M.J. [Science Applications International Corp., Golden, CO (United States); Duran, A. [Environmental Protection Agency, Denver, CO (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hexafluoride (UF6) Hexafluoride (UF6) Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6) line line Properties of UF6 UF6 Health Effects Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6) Physical and chemical properties of UF6, and its use in uranium processing. Uranium Hexafluoride and Its Properties Uranium hexafluoride is a chemical compound consisting of one atom of uranium combined with six atoms of fluorine. It is the chemical form of uranium that is used during the uranium enrichment process. Within a reasonable range of temperature and pressure, it can be a solid, liquid, or gas. Solid UF6 is a white, dense, crystalline material that resembles rock salt. UF6 crystals in a glass vial image UF6 crystals in a glass vial. Uranium hexafluoride does not react with oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, or dry air, but it does react with water or water vapor. For this reason,

207

Uranium industry annual 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Uranium Industry Annual 1994 (UIA 1994) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing during that survey year. The UIA 1994 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the 10-year period 1985 through 1994 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` (UIAS) provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1994, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. A feature article, ``Comparison of Uranium Mill Tailings Reclamation in the United States and Canada,`` is included in the UIA 1994. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, and uranium inventories, enrichment feed deliveries (actual and projected), and unfilled market requirements are shown in Chapter 2.

NONE

1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

208

Uranium-contaminated soils: Ultramicrotomy and electron beam analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium contaminated soils from the Fernald Operation Site, Ohio, have been examined by a combination of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with backscattered electron detection (SEM/BSE), and analytical electron microscopy (AEM). A method is described for preparing of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) thin sections by ultramicrotomy. By using these thin sections, SEM and TEM images can be compared directly. Uranium was found in iron oxides, silicates (soddyite), phosphates (autunites), and fluorite. Little uranium was associated with clays. The distribution of uranium phases was found to be inhomogeneous at the microscopic level.

Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Bates, J.K.; Cunnane, J.C.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Basic metal oxides as cocatalysts for Cu/SiO{sub 2} catalysts in the conversion of synthesis gas to methanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The catalytic behavior of Cu catalysts supported on ultrapure silica and promoted with Ca, Zn, and La oxides was investigated in the hydrogenation of CO and CO{sub 2} to methanol at high pressure. Cu on very pure silica produces hardly any methanol, while the addition of basic oxides and the use of {gamma}-alumina as support improve the catalyst performance. The strong promoting effect of Ca and La oxide on the silica-supported Cu and the weak promoting effect for alumina-supported Cu suggest that the basic oxide additives must be close to or in contact with the Cu particles to be effective in methanol synthesis. The methanol activity of Zn/Cu/SiO{sub 2} increased with increasing CO{sub 2} content in a CO-CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2} mixture, suggesting that CO{sub 2} is the main carbon source for methanol.

Gotti, A.; Prins, R. [Swiss Federal Inst. of Tech., Zuerich (Switzerland). Lab. of Technical Chemistry] [Swiss Federal Inst. of Tech., Zuerich (Switzerland). Lab. of Technical Chemistry

1998-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

210

Cost estimate report for the long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride : storage of depleted uranium metal.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains a cost analysis of the long-term storage of depleted uranium in the form of uranium metal. Three options are considered for storage of the depleted uranium. These options are aboveground buildings, partly underground vaults, and mined cavities. Three cases are presented. In the first case, all the depleted uranium metal that would be produced from the conversion of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) generated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) prior to July 1993 would be stored at the storage facility (100% Case). In the second case, half the depleted uranium metal would be stored at this storage facility (50% Case). In the third case, one-quarter of the depleted uranium metal would be stored at the storage facility (25% Case). The technical basis for the cost analysis presented in this report is principally found in the companion report, ANL/EAD/TM-100, ''Engineering Analysis Report for the Long-Term Management of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride: Storage of Depleted Uranium Metal'', prepared by Argonne National Laboratory.

Folga, S.M.; Kier, P.H.; Thimmapuram, P.R.

2001-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

211

Electron Emission from Slightly Oxidized Depleted Uranium Generated by its Own Radioactivity Measured by Electron Spectroscopy, and Electron-Induced Dissociation and Ionization of Hydrogen Near its Surface.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy dependent electron emission (counts per second) between zero and 1.4 keV generated by the natural reactivity of uranium was measured by an electrostatic spectrometer with known acceptance angle and acceptance area. The electron intensity decreases continuously with energy, but at different rates in different energy regimes, suggesting that a variety of processes may be involved in producing the observed electron emission. The spectrum was converted to energy dependent electron flux (e-/cm{sup 2} s) using the assumption that the emission has a cosine angular distribution. The flux decreased rapidly from {approx}10{sup 6}/cm{sup 2}s to {approx}10{sup 5}/cm{sup 2}s in the energy range from zero to 200 eV, and then more slowly from {approx}10{sup 5}/cm{sup 2}s to {approx}3*10{sup 4}/cm{sup 2} s in the range from 200 to 1400 eV. The energy dependent electron mean free path in gases together with literature cross sections for electron induced reactions were used to determine the number of ionization and dissociation reactions per cm{sup 2}s within the inelastic mean free path of electrons, and found to be about 1.3*10{sup 8}/cm{sup 2}s and 1.5*10{sup 7}/cm{sup 2}s, respectively, for hydrogen. An estimate of the number of ionization and dissociation reactions occurring within the total range, rather than the mean free path of electrons in gases resulted in 6.2*10{sup 9}/cm{sup 2}s and 1.3*10{sup 9}/cm{sup 2}s, respectively. The total energy flux carried by electrons from the surface is suspiciously close to the total possible energy generated by one gram of uranium. A likely source of error is the assumption that the electron emission has a cosine distribution. Angular distribution measurements of the electron emission would check that assumption, and actual measurement of the total current emanating from the surface are needed to confirm the value of the current calculated in section II. These results must therefore be used with caution - until they are confirmed by other measurements.

Siekhaus, W J; Nelson, A J

2011-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

212

Disposition of DOE Excess Depleted Uranium, Natural Uranium, and  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Disposition of DOE Excess Depleted Uranium, Natural Uranium, and Disposition of DOE Excess Depleted Uranium, Natural Uranium, and Low-Enriched Uranium Disposition of DOE Excess Depleted Uranium, Natural Uranium, and Low-Enriched Uranium The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) owns and manages an inventory of depleted uranium (DU), natural uranium (NU), and low-enriched uranium (LEU) that is currently stored in large cylinders as depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6), natural uranium hexafluoride (NUF6), and low-enriched uranium hexafluoride (LEUF6) at the DOE Paducah site in western Kentucky (DOE Paducah) and the DOE Portsmouth site near Piketon in south-central Ohio (DOE Portsmouth)1. This inventory exceeds DOE's current and projected energy and defense program needs. On March 11, 2008, the Secretary of Energy issued a policy statement (the

213

Depleted Uranium Technical Brief  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and radiological health concerns involved with depleted uranium in the environment. This technical brief was developed to address the common misconception that depleted uranium represents only a radiological healthDepleted Uranium Technical Brief United States Environmental Protection Agency Office of Air

214

Depleted uranium storage and disposal trade study: Summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this study were to: identify the most desirable forms for conversion of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) for extended storage, identify the most desirable forms for conversion of DUF6 for disposal, evaluate the comparative costs for extended storage or disposal of the various forms, review benefits of the proposed plasma conversion process, estimate simplified life-cycle costs (LCCs) for five scenarios that entail either disposal or beneficial reuse, and determine whether an overall optimal form for conversion of DUF6 can be selected given current uncertainty about the endpoints (specific disposal site/technology or reuse options).

Hightower, J.R.; Trabalka, J.R.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Developing depleted uranium and gold cocktail hohlraums for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fusion ignition experiments are planned to begin at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. A. Paisner, E. M. Campbell, and W. J. Hogan, Fusion Technol. 26, 755 (1994)] using the indirect drive configuration [J. D. Lindl, P. Amendt, R. L. Berger, S. G. Glendinning, S. H. Glenzer, S. W. Haan, R. L, Kauffman, O. L. Landen, and L. J. Suter, Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)]. Although the x-ray drive in this configuration is highly symmetric, energy is lost in the conversion process due to x-ray penetration into the hohlraum wall. To mitigate this loss, depleted uranium is incorporated into the traditional gold hohlraum to increase the efficiency of the laser to x-ray energy conversion by making the wall more opaque to the x rays [H. Nishumura, T. Endo, H. Shiraga, U. Kato, and S. Nakai, Appl. Phys. Lett. 62, 1344 (1993)]. Multilayered depleted uranium (DU) and gold hohlraums are deposited by sputtering by alternately rotating a hohlraum mold in front of separate DU and Au sources to build up multilayers to the desired wall thickness. This mold is removed to leave a freestanding hohlraum half; two halves are used to assemble the complete NIF hohlraum to the design specifications. In practice, exposed DU oxidizes in air and other chemicals necessary to hohlraum production, so research has focused on developing a fabrication process that protects the U from damaging environments. This paper reports on the most current depleted uranium and gold cocktail hohlraum fabrication techniques, including characterization by Auger electron spectroscopy, which is used to verify sample composition and the amount of oxygen uptake over time.

Wilkens, H. L.; Nikroo, A.; Wall, D. R.; Wall, J. R. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

216

Developing depleted uranium and gold cocktail hohlraums for the National Ignition Facilitya)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fusion ignition experiments are planned to begin at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. A. Paisner E. M. Campbell and W. J. Hogan Fusion Technol.26 755 (1994)] using the indirect drive configuration [J. D. Lindl P. Amendt R. L. Berger S. G. Glendinning S. H. Glenzer S. W. Haan R. L Kauffman O. L. Landen and L. J. Suter Phys. Plasmas11 339 (2004)]. Although the x-ray drive in this configuration is highly symmetric energy is lost in the conversion process due to x-ray penetration into the hohlraum wall. To mitigate this loss depleted uranium is incorporated into the traditional goldhohlraum to increase the efficiency of the laser to x-ray energy conversion by making the wall more opaque to the x rays [H. Nishumura T. Endo H. Shiraga U. Kato and S. Nakai Appl. Phys. Lett.62 1344 (1993)]. Multilayered depleted uranium (DU) and goldhohlraums are deposited by sputtering by alternately rotating a hohlraum mold in front of separate DU and Au sources to build up multilayers to the desired wall thickness. This mold is removed to leave a freestanding hohlraum half; two halves are used to assemble the complete NIF hohlraum to the design specifications. In practice exposed DU oxidizes in air and other chemicals necessary to hohlraum production so research has focused on developing a fabrication process that protects the U from damaging environments. This paper reports on the most current depleted uranium and gold cocktail hohlraum fabrication techniques including characterization by Auger electron spectroscopy which is used to verify sample composition and the amount of oxygen uptake over time.

H. L. Wilkens; A. Nikroo; D. R. Wall; J. R. Wall

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Vapor phase modifiers for oxidative coupling  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Volatilized metal compounds retard vapor phase alkane conversion reactions in oxidative coupling processes that convert lower alkanes to higher hydrocarbons.

Warren, Barbara K. (Charleston, WV)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

An analysis of the impact of having uranium dioxide mixed in with plutonium dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An assessment was performed to show the impact on airborne release fraction, respirable fraction, dose conversion factor and dose consequences of postulated accidents at the Plutonium Finishing Plant involving uranium dioxide rather than plutonium dioxide.

MARUSICH, R.M.

1998-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

219

function of temperature. Similar studies (with neutrons) on uranium led to the dis-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1059 function of temperature. Similar studies (with neutrons) on uranium led to the dis- covery to the North Pole and that there was northward mo- tion of the Pacific plate. Conversely, if all seamounts had

Steinberger, Bernhard

220

FY 12 Award Fee Determination Scorecard Contractor: B&W Conversion...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fee The first PBI was based on the state of readiness of the Paducah and Piketon Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF 6 ) conversion plants as of September 30, 2011. BWCS met...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium oxide conversion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Depleted uranium: A DOE management guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a management challenge and financial liability in the form of 50,000 cylinders containing 555,000 metric tons of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) that are stored at the gaseous diffusion plants. The annual storage and maintenance cost is approximately $10 million. This report summarizes several studies undertaken by the DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD) to evaluate options for long-term depleted uranium management. Based on studies conducted to date, the most likely use of the depleted uranium is for shielding of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) or vitrified high-level waste (HLW) containers. The alternative to finding a use for the depleted uranium is disposal as a radioactive waste. Estimated disposal costs, utilizing existing technologies, range between $3.8 and $11.3 billion, depending on factors such as applicability of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the location of the disposal site. The cost of recycling the depleted uranium in a concrete based shielding in SNF/HLW containers, although substantial, is comparable to or less than the cost of disposal. Consequently, the case can be made that if DOE invests in developing depleted uranium shielded containers instead of disposal, a long-term solution to the UF{sub 6} problem is attained at comparable or lower cost than disposal as a waste. Two concepts for depleted uranium storage casks were considered in these studies. The first is based on standard fabrication concepts previously developed for depleted uranium metal. The second converts the UF{sub 6} to an oxide aggregate that is used in concrete to make dry storage casks.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Welding of uranium and uranium alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major reported work on joining uranium comes from the USA, Great Britain, France and the USSR. The driving force for producing this technology base stems from the uses of uranium as a nuclear fuel for energy production, compact structures requiring high density, projectiles, radiation shielding, and nuclear weapons. This review examines the state-of-the-art of this technology and presents current welding process and parameter information. The welding metallurgy of uranium and the influence of microstructure on mechanical properties is developed for a number of the more commonly used welding processes.

Mara, G.L.; Murphy, J.L.

1982-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

223

Uranium series disequilibrium in the Bargmann property area of Karnes County, Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historical evidence is presented for natural uranium series radioactive disequilibrium in uranium bearing soils in the Bargmann property area of karnes County on the Gulf Coastal Plain of south Texas. The early history of uranium exploration in the area is recounted and records of disequilibrium before milling and mining operations began are given. The property contains an open pit uranium mine associated with a larger ore body. In 1995, the US Department of Energy (DOE) directed Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to evaluate the Bargmann tract for the presence of uranium mill tailings (ORNL 1996). There was a possibility that mill tailings had washed onto or blown onto the property from the former tailings piles in quantities that would warrant remediation under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remediation Action Project. Activity ratios illustrating disequilibrium between {sup 226}Ra and {sup 238}U in background soils during 1986 are listed and discussed. Derivations of uranium mass-to-activity conversion factors are covered in detail.

Davidson, J.R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

FAQ 1-What is uranium?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

What is uranium? What is uranium? What is uranium? Uranium is a radioactive element that occurs naturally in low concentrations (a few parts per million) in soil, rock, and surface and groundwater. It is the heaviest naturally occurring element, with an atomic number of 92. Uranium in its pure form is a silver-colored heavy metal that is nearly twice as dense as lead. In nature, uranium atoms exist as several isotopes: primarily uranium-238, uranium-235, and a very small amount of uranium-234. (Isotopes are different forms of an element that have the same number of protons in the nucleus, but a different number of neutrons.) In a typical sample of natural uranium, most of the mass (99.27%) consists of atoms of uranium-238. About 0.72% of the mass consists of atoms of uranium-235, and a very small amount (0.0055% by mass) is uranium-234.

225

Synthesis of Uranium Trichloride for the Pyrometallurgical Processing of Used Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pyroprocessing of used nuclear fuel via electrorefining requires the continued addition of uranium trichloride to sustain operations. Uranium trichloride is utilized as an oxidant in the system to allow separation of uranium metal from the minor actinides and fission products. The inventory of uranium trichloride had diminished to a point that production was necessary to continue electrorefiner operations. Following initial experimentation, cupric chloride was chosen as a reactant with uranium metal to synthesize uranium trichloride. Despite the variability in equipment and charge characteristics, uranium trichloride was produced in sufficient quantities to maintain operations in the electrorefiner. The results and conclusions from several experiments are presented along with a set of optimized operating conditions for the synthesis of uranium trichloride.

B.R. Westphal; J.C. Price; R.D. Mariani

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

EPA Update: NESHAP Uranium Activities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for underground uranium mining operations (Subpart B) EPA regulatory requirements for operating uranium mill for Underground Uranium Mining Operations (Subpart B) #12;5 EPA Regulatory Requirements for Underground Uranium uranium mines include: · Applies to 10,000 tons/yr ore production, or 100,000 tons/mine lifetime · Ambient

227

Uranium hexafluoride public risk  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The limiting value for uranium toxicity in a human being should be based on the concentration of uranium (U) in the kidneys. The threshold for nephrotoxicity appears to lie very near 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney tissue. There does not appear to be strong scientific support for any other improved estimate, either higher or lower than this, of the threshold for uranium nephrotoxicity in a human being. The value 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney is the concentration that results from a single intake of about 30 mg soluble uranium by inhalation (assuming the metabolism of a standard person). The concentration of uranium continues to increase in the kidneys after long-term, continuous (or chronic) exposure. After chronic intakes of soluble uranium by workers at the rate of 10 mg U per week, the concentration of uranium in the kidneys approaches and may even exceed the nephrotoxic limit of 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney tissue. Precise values of the kidney concentration depend on the biokinetic model and model parameters assumed for such a calculation. Since it is possible for the concentration of uranium in the kidneys to exceed 3 {mu}g per gram tissue at an intake rate of 10 mg U per week over long periods of time, we believe that the kidneys are protected from injury when intakes of soluble uranium at the rate of 10 mg U per week do not continue for more than two consecutive weeks. For long-term, continuous occupational exposure to low-level, soluble uranium, we recommend a reduced weekly intake limit of 5 mg uranium to prevent nephrotoxicity in workers. Our analysis shows that the nephrotoxic limit of 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney tissues is not exceeded after long-term, continuous uranium intake at the intake rate of 5 mg soluble uranium per week.

Fisher, D.R.; Hui, T.E.; Yurconic, M.; Johnson, J.R.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Polyethylene Encapsulated Depleted Uranium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Poly DU Poly DU Polyethylene Encapsulated Depleted Uranium Technology Description: Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has completed preliminary work to investigate the feasibility of encapsulating DU in low density polyethylene to form a stable, dense product. DU loadings as high as 90 wt% were achieved. A maximum product density of 4.2 g/cm3 was achieved using UO3, but increased product density using UO2 is estimated at 6.1 g/cm3. Additional product density improvements up to about 7.2 g/cm3 were projected using DU aggregate in a hybrid technique known as micro/macroencapsulation.[1] A U.S. patent for this process has been received.[2] Figure 1 Figure 1: DU Encapsulated in polyethylene samples produced at BNL containing 80 wt % depleted UO3 A recent DU market study by Kapline Enterprises, Inc. for DOE thoroughly identified and rated potential applications and markets for DU metal and oxide materials.[3] Because of its workability and high DU loading capability, the polyethylene encapsulated DU could readily be fabricated as counterweights/ballast (for use in airplanes, helicopters, ships and missiles), flywheels, armor, and projectiles. Also, polyethylene encapsulated DU is an effective shielding material for both gamma and neutron radiation, with potential application for shielding high activity waste (e.g., ion exchange resins, glass gems), spent fuel dry storage casks, and high energy experimental facilities (e.g., accelerator targets) to reduce radiation exposures to workers and the public.

229

Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. Uranium sellers to owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, 2010-2012 2010 2011 2012 4. Uranium sellers to owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, 2010-2012 2010 2011 2012 American Fuel Resources, LLC Advance Uranium Asset Management Ltd. (was Uranium Asset Management) Advance Uranium Asset Management Ltd. (was Uranium Asset Management) AREVA NC, Inc. (was COGEMA, Inc.) American Fuel Resources, LLC American Fuel Resources, LLC BHP Billiton Olympic Dam Corporation Pty Ltd AREVA NC, Inc. AREVA NC, Inc. CAMECO BHP Billiton Olympic Dam Corporation Pty Ltd BHP Billiton Olympic Dam Corporation Pty Ltd ConverDyn CAMECO CAMECO Denison Mines Corp. ConverDyn ConverDyn Energy Resources of Australia Ltd. Denison Mines Corp. Energy Fuels Resources Energy USA, Inc. Effective Energy N.V. Energy Resources of Australia Ltd.

230

Uranium purchases report 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data reported by domestic nuclear utility companies in their responses to the 1991 and 1992 ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey,`` Form EIA-858, Schedule B ``Uranium Marketing Activities,are provided in response to the requirements in the Energy Policy Act 1992. Data on utility uranium purchases and imports are shown on Table 1. Utility enrichment feed deliveries and secondary market acquisitions of uranium equivalent of US DOE separative work units are shown on Table 2. Appendix A contains a listing of firms that sold uranium to US utilities during 1992 under new domestic purchase contracts. Appendix B contains a similar listing of firms that sold uranium to US utilities during 1992 under new import purchase contracts. Appendix C contains an explanation of Form EIA-858 survey methodologies with emphasis on the processing of Schedule B data.

Not Available

1993-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

231

In Situ Biological Uranium Remediation within a Highly Contaminated Aquifer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

In Situ Biological Uranium Remediation In Situ Biological Uranium Remediation within a Highly Contaminated Aquifer Matthew Ginder-Vogel1, Wei-Min Wu1, Jack Carley2, Phillip Jardine2, Scott Fendorf1 and Craig Criddle1 1Stanford University, Stanford, CA 2Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN Microbial Respiration Figure 1. Uranium(VI) reduction is driven by microbial respiration resulting in the precipitation of uraninite. Uranium contamination of ground and surface waters has been detected at numerous sites throughout the world, including agricultural evaporation ponds (1), U.S. Department of Energy nuclear weapons manufacturing areas, and mine tailings sites (2). In oxygen-containing groundwater, uranium is generally found in the hexavalent oxidation state (3,4), which is a relatively soluble chemical form. As U(VI) is transported through

232

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Summary  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS SUMMARY 1 S.1 INTRODUCTION This document is a site-specific environmental impact statement (EIS) for construction and operation of a proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF 6 ) conversion facility at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Paducah site in northwestern Kentucky (Figure S-1). The proposed facility would convert the DUF 6 stored at Paducah to a more stable chemical form suitable for use or disposal. In a Notice of Intent (NOI) published in the Federal Register (FR) on September 18, 2001 (Federal Register, Volume 66, page 48123 [66 FR 48123]), DOE announced its intention to prepare a single EIS for a proposal to construct, operate, maintain, and decontaminate and decommission two DUF 6 conversion facilities at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, in

233

LANL disassembles "pits," makes mixed-oxide fuel  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

at the MOX facility in South Carolina, the plutonium oxide from LANL will be blended with depleted uranium, fabricated into MOX fuel, and irradiated in domestic nuclear...

234

Probing the electronic structures of low oxidation-state uranium fluoride molecules UF{sub x}{sup ?} (x = 2?4)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the experimental observation of gaseous UF{sub x}{sup ?} (x = 2?4) anions, which are investigated using photoelectron spectroscopy and relativistic quantum chemistry. Vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectra are obtained for all three species and the electron affinities of UF{sub x} (x = 2?4) are measured to be 1.16(3), 1.09(3), and 1.58(3) eV, respectively. Significant multi-electron transitions are observed in the photoelectron spectra of U(5f{sup 3}7s{sup 2})F{sub 2}{sup ?}, as a result of strong electron correlation effects of the two 7s electrons. The U?F symmetric stretching vibrational modes are resolved for the ground states of all UF{sub x} (x = 2?4) neutrals. Theoretical calculations are performed to qualitatively understand the photoelectron spectra. The entire UF{sub x}{sup ?} and UF{sub x} (x = 1?6) series are considered theoretically to examine the trends of U?F bonding and the electron affinities as a function of fluorine coordination. The increased U?F bond lengths and decreased bond orders from UF{sub 2}{sup ?} to UF{sub 4}{sup ?} indicate that the U?F bonding becomes weaker as the oxidation state of U increases from I to III.

Li, Wei-Li; Jian, Tian; Lopez, Gary V.; Wang, Lai-Sheng, E-mail: lai-sheng-wang@brown.edu [Department of Chemistry, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States); Hu, Han-Shi; Li, Jun, E-mail: junli@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry and Key Laboratory of Organic Optoelectronics and Molecular Engineering of Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China) [Department of Chemistry and Key Laboratory of Organic Optoelectronics and Molecular Engineering of Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Su, Jing [Department of Chemistry and Key Laboratory of Organic Optoelectronics and Molecular Engineering of Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)] [Department of Chemistry and Key Laboratory of Organic Optoelectronics and Molecular Engineering of Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

235

Consent Order, Uranium Disposition Services, LLC - NCO-2010-01 | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Uranium Disposition Services, LLC - NCO-2010-01 Uranium Disposition Services, LLC - NCO-2010-01 Consent Order, Uranium Disposition Services, LLC - NCO-2010-01 March 26, 2010 Consent Order issued to Uranium Disposition Services, LLC related to Construction Deficiencies at the DUF6 Conversion Buildings at the Portsmouth and Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plants The Office of Health, Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement has completed its investigation into the facts and circumstances associated with construction deficiencies at the DUF6 Conversion Buildings located at the Portsmouth and Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plants. The investigation reports, dated January 22, 2009, and April 23, 2009, were provided to Uranium Disposition Services, LLC (DDS), and addressed specific areas of potential noncompliance with DOE nuclear safety requirements established in

236

2013 Uranium Marketing Annual Survey  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for inflation. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-858 "Uranium Marketing Annual Survey" (2013). UF 6 is uranium hexafluoride. The natural UF 6 and enriched...

237

Uranium industry annual 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium production in the United States has declined dramatically from a peak of 43.7 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (16.8 thousand metric tons uranium (U)) in 1980 to 3.1 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (1.2 thousand metric tons U) in 1993. This decline is attributed to the world uranium market experiencing oversupply and intense competition. Large inventories of uranium accumulated when optimistic forecasts for growth in nuclear power generation were not realized. The other factor which is affecting U.S. uranium production is that some other countries, notably Australia and Canada, possess higher quality uranium reserves that can be mined at lower costs than those of the United States. Realizing its competitive advantage, Canada was the world`s largest producer in 1993 with an output of 23.9 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (9.2 thousand metric tons U). The U.S. uranium industry, responding to over a decade of declining market prices, has downsized and adopted less costly and more efficient production methods. The main result has been a suspension of production from conventional mines and mills. Since mid-1992, only nonconventional production facilities, chiefly in situ leach (ISL) mining and byproduct recovery, have operated in the United States. In contrast, nonconventional sources provided only 13 percent of the uranium produced in 1980. ISL mining has developed into the most cost efficient and environmentally acceptable method for producing uranium in the United States. The process, also known as solution mining, differs from conventional mining in that solutions are used to recover uranium from the ground without excavating the ore and generating associated solid waste. This article describes the current ISL Yang technology and its regulatory approval process, and provides an analysis of the factors favoring ISL mining over conventional methods in a declining uranium market.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

U.S. domestic reactor conversion program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The RERTR U.S. Domestic Conversion program continues in its support of the Global Treat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) to convert seven U.S reactors to low enriched uranium (LEU) by 2010. These reactors are located at the University of Florida, Texas A and M University, Purdue University, Washington State University, Oregon State University, the University of Wisconsin, and the Idaho National Laboratory. The reactors located at the University of Florida and Texas A and M Nuclear Science Center were successfully converted to LEU in September of 2006 through an integrated and collaborative effort involving INL, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), DOE (headquarters and the field office), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the universities, and the contractors involved in analyses, fuel design and fabrication, and spent nuclear fuel (SNF) shipping and disposition. With this work completed and in anticipation of other impending conversion projects, a meeting was established to engage the project participants in a structured discussion to capture the lessons learned. The objectives of this meeting were to document the observations, insights, issues, concerns, and ideas of those involved in the reactor conversions so that future efforts could be conducted with greater effectiveness, efficiency, and with fewer challenges. The lessons learned from completing the University of Florida and Texas A and M conversions, the Purdue reactor conversion status, and an overview of the upcoming reactor conversions will be presented at the meeting. (author)

Meyer, Dana M.; Woolstenhulme, Eric C. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

239

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 W W W W W W W W W W W Total Mill Feed W W W W W W W W W W W Uranium Concentrate Produced at U.S. Mills (thousand pounds U3O8) W W W W W W W W W W W Uranium Concentrate...

240

Record of Decision for Long-term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Record of Decision for Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride AGENCY: Department of Energy ACTION: Record of Decision SUMMARY: The Department of Energy ("DOE" or "the Department") issued the Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (Final PEIS) on April 23, 1999. DOE has considered the environmental impacts, benefits, costs, and institutional and programmatic needs associated with the management and use of its approximately 700,000 metric tons of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF 6 ). DOE has decided to promptly convert the depleted UF 6 inventory to depleted uranium oxide, depleted uranium metal, or a combination of both. The depleted uranium oxide will be

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium oxide conversion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Porous membrane electrochemical cell for uranium and transuranic recovery from molten salt electrolyte  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved process and device for the recovery of the minor actinides and the transuranic elements (TRU's) from a molten salt electrolyte. The process involves placing the device, an electrically non-conducting barrier between an anode salt and a cathode salt. The porous barrier allows uranium to diffuse between the anode and cathode, yet slows the diffusion of uranium ions so as to cause depletion of uranium ions in the catholyte. This allows for the eventual preferential deposition of transuranics present in spent nuclear fuel such as Np, Pu, Am, Cm. The device also comprises an uranium oxidation anode. The oxidation anode is solid uranium metal in the form of spent nuclear fuel. The spent fuel is placed in a ferric metal anode basket which serves as the electrical lead or contact between the molten electrolyte and the anodic uranium metal.

Willit, James L. (Ratavia, IL)

2007-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

242

Porous membrane electrochemical cell for uranium and transuranic recovery from molten salt electrolyte  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved process and device for the recovery of the minor actinides and the transuranic elements (TRU's) from a molten salt electrolyte. The process involves placing the device, an electrically non-conducting barrier between an anode salt and a cathode salt. The porous barrier allows uranium to diffuse between the anode and cathode, yet slows the diffusion of uranium ions so as to cause depletion of uranium ions in the catholyte. This allows for the eventual preferential deposition of transuranics present in spent nuclear fuel such as Np, Pu, Am, Cm. The device also comprises an uranium oxidation anode. The oxidation anode is solid uranium metal in the form of spent nuclear fuel. The spent fuel is placed in a ferric metal anode basket which serves as the electrical lead or contact between the molten electrolyte and the anodic uranium metal.

Willit, James L. (Batavia, IL)

2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

243

Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Uranium Marketing Uranium Marketing Annual Report May 2011 www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. U.S. Energy Information Administration | 2010 Uranium Marketing Annual Report ii Contacts This report was prepared by the staff of the Renewables and Uranium Statistics Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables, and Uranium Statistics. Questions about the preparation and content of this report may be directed to Michele Simmons, Team Leader,

244

recycled_uranium.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Recycled Uranium and Transuranics: Recycled Uranium and Transuranics: Their Relationship to Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project Introduction Historical Perspective On August 8, 1999, Energy Secretary Bill Richardson announced a comprehensive set of actions to address issues raised at the Paducah, Kentucky, Gaseous Diffusion Plant that may have had the potential to affect the health of the workers. One of the issues addressed the need to determine the extent and significance of radioactive fission products and transuranic elements in the uranium feed and waste products throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national complex. Subsequently, a DOE agency-wide Recycled Uranium Mass Balance Project (RUMBP) was initiated. For the Weldon Spring Uranium Feed Materials Plant (WSUFMP or later referred to as Weldon Spring),

245

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Catalysis & Energy Conversion -  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ceramic Electrochemistry Ceramic Electrochemistry * Members * Contact * Publications * Overview * Solid Oxide Fuel Cells * Steam Electrolysis Catalysis & Energy Conversion Home Ceramic Electrochemistry Dave Carter and solid oxide fuel cell Materials scientist John David Carter prepares a solid oxide electrochemical cell for high temperature testing. Research activities in the Ceramic Electrochemistry Group are focused on the development of ceramic-based electrochemical devices and components, such as Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) and High Temperature Steam Electrolyzers (HTSE). This extends to materials synthesis, fabrication, and characterization. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Research As part of the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Core Technology Program, the goal of this research is the development of solid

246

Process modeling of plutonium conversion and MOX fabrication for plutonium disposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two processes are currently under consideration for the disposition of 35 MT of surplus plutonium through its conversion into fuel for power production. These processes are the ARIES process, by which plutonium metal is converted into a powdered oxide form, and MOX fuel fabrication, where the oxide powder is combined with uranium oxide powder to form ceramic fuel. This study was undertaken to determine the optimal size for both facilities, whereby the 35 MT of plutonium metal will be converted into fuel and burned for power. The bounding conditions used were a plutonium concentration of 3--7%, a burnup of 20,000--40,000 MWd/MTHM, a core fraction of 0.1 to 0.4, and the number of reactors ranging from 2--6. Using these boundary conditions, the optimal cost was found with a plutonium concentration of 7%. This resulted in an optimal throughput ranging from 2,000 to 5,000 kg Pu/year. The data showed minimal costs, resulting from throughputs in this range, at 3,840, 2,779, and 3,497 kg Pu/year, which results in a facility lifetime of 9.1, 12.6, and 10.0 years, respectively.

Schwartz, K.L. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Robust control strategies for hybrid solid oxide fuel cell systems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) systems are electrochemical energy conversion devices characterized by the use of solid oxide as the electrolyte. They operate at high… (more)

Mathew, Anju Ann

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

300 Area Uranium Stabilization Through Polyphosphate Injection: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the treatability test was to evaluate the efficacy of using polyphosphate injections to treat uranium-contaminated groundwater in situ. A test site consisting of an injection well and 15 monitoring wells was installed in the 300 Area near the process trenches that had previously received uranium-bearing effluents. This report summarizes the work on the polyphosphate injection project, including bench-scale laboratory studies, a field injection test, and the subsequent analysis and interpretation of the results. Previous laboratory tests have demonstrated that when a soluble form of polyphosphate is injected into uranium-bearing saturated porous media, immobilization of uranium occurs due to formation of an insoluble uranyl phosphate, autunite [Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2•nH2O]. These tests were conducted at conditions expected for the aquifer and used Hanford soils and groundwater containing very low concentrations of uranium (10-6 M). Because autunite sequesters uranium in the oxidized form U(VI) rather than forcing reduction to U(IV), the possibility of re-oxidation and subsequent re-mobilization is negated. Extensive testing demonstrated the very low solubility and slow dissolution kinetics of autunite. In addition to autunite, excess phosphorous may result in apatite mineral formation, which provides a long-term source of treatment capacity. Phosphate arrival response data indicate that, under site conditions, the polyphosphate amendment could be effectively distributed over a relatively large lateral extent, with wells located at a radial distance of 23 m (75 ft) reaching from between 40% and 60% of the injection concentration. Given these phosphate transport characteristics, direct treatment of uranium through the formation of uranyl-phosphate mineral phases (i.e., autunite) could likely be effectively implemented at full field scale. However, formation of calcium-phosphate mineral phases using the selected three-phase approach was problematic. Although amendment arrival response data indicate some degree of overlap between the reactive species and thus potential for the formation of calcium-phosphate mineral phases (i.e., apatite formation), the efficiency of this treatment approach was relatively poor. In general, uranium performance monitoring results support the hypothesis that limited long-term treatment capacity (i.e., apatite formation) was established during the injection test. Two separate overarching issues affect the efficacy of apatite remediation for uranium sequestration within the 300 Area: 1) the efficacy of apatite for sequestering uranium under the present geochemical and hydrodynamic conditions, and 2) the formation and emplacement of apatite via polyphosphate technology. In addition, the long-term stability of uranium sequestered via apatite is dependent on the chemical speciation of uranium, surface speciation of apatite, and the mechanism of retention, which is highly susceptible to dynamic geochemical conditions. It was expected that uranium sequestration in the presence of hydroxyapatite would occur by sorption and/or surface complexation until all surface sites have been depleted, but that the high carbonate concentrations in the 300 Area would act to inhibit the transformation of sorbed uranium to chernikovite and/or autunite. Adsorption of uranium by apatite was never considered a viable approach for in situ uranium sequestration in and of itself, because by definition, this is a reversible reaction. The efficacy of uranium sequestration by apatite assumes that the adsorbed uranium would subsequently convert to autunite, or other stable uranium phases. Because this appears to not be the case in the 300 Area aquifer, even in locations near the river, apatite may have limited efficacy for the retention and long-term immobilization of uranium at the 300 Area site..

Vermeul, Vincent R.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Fritz, Brad G.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Mackley, Rob D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Williams, Mark D.

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

249

Documents: Paducah DUF6 Conversion Facility Final EIS and ROD  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Paducah DUF6 Final EIS Paducah DUF6 Final EIS Search Documents: Search PDF Documents View a list of all documents Paducah DUF6 Conversion Facility Final EIS and Record of Decision Full text of the Record of Decision and Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site. The full text of the Record of Decision and Paducah DUF6 Conversion Facility Final EIS and ROD is available for downloading or browsing in Adobe Acrobat PDF format through the links below. You may also order a CD-ROM or paper copy of the Depleted UF6 Conversion Facility EISs by submitting a Final EIS Document Request Form. Record of Decision PDF Icon Paducah DUF6 Conversion Facility: Record of Decision 3.6 MB details

250

Documents: Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Facility Final EIS and ROD  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Portsmouth DUF6 Final EIS Portsmouth DUF6 Final EIS Search Documents: Search PDF Documents View a list of all documents Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Facility Final EIS and Record of Decision Full text of the Record of Decision and Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, Site. The full text of the Record of Decision and Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Facility Final EIS and ROD is available for downloading or browsing in Adobe Acrobat PDF format through the links below. Record of Decision PDF Icon Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Facility: Record of Decision 3.8 MB details PDF Icon Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Facility: Record of Decision: As Published in the Federal Register 82 KB details

251

Ethanol Conversion on Cyclic (MO3)3 (M = Mo, W) Clusters. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conversion on Cyclic (MO3)3 (M Mo, W) Clusters. Ethanol Conversion on Cyclic (MO3)3 (M Mo, W) Clusters. Abstract: Oxides of molybdenum and tungsten are an important class of...

252

Neutron field characterisation at mixed oxide fuel plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......plutonium oxide (PuO2) and 70 % depleted uranium oxide (UO2) are blended together...and typical field conditions. Health Phys. (1990) 58(6):691-704...Power Plants Quality Assurance, Health Care Radiation Dosage Radiation......

C. Passmore; M. Million; M. Kirr; J. Bartz; M. S. Akselrod; A. Devita; J. Berard

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

D0 Decomissioning : Storage of Depleted Uranium Modules Inside D0 Calorimeters after the Termination of D0 Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dzero liquid Argon calorimeters contain hadronic modules made of depleted uranium plates. After the termination of DO detector's operation, liquid Argon will be transferred back to Argon storage Dewar, and all three calorimeters will be warmed up. At this point, there is no intention to disassemble the calorimeters. The depleted uranium modules will stay inside the cryostats. Depleted uranium is a by-product of the uranium enrichment process. It is slightly radioactive, emits alpha, beta and gamma radiation. External radiation hazards are minimal. Alpha radiation has no external exposure hazards, as dead layers of skin stop it; beta radiation might have effects only when there is a direct contact with skin; and gamma rays are negligible - levels are extremely low. Depleted uranium is a pyrophoric material. Small particles (such as shavings, powder etc.) may ignite with presence of Oxygen (air). Also, in presence of air and moisture it can oxidize. Depleted uranium can absorb moisture and keep oxidizing later, even after air and moisture are excluded. Uranium oxide can powder and flake off. This powder is also pyrographic. Uranium oxide may create health problems if inhaled. Since uranium oxide is water soluble, it may enter the bloodstream and cause toxic effects.

Sarychev, Michael; /Fermilab

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

254

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. U.S. uranium mills by owner, location, capacity, and operating status at end of the year, 2008-2012 4. U.S. uranium mills by owner, location, capacity, and operating status at end of the year, 2008-2012 Mill Owner Mill Name County, State (existing and planned locations) Milling Capacity (short tons of ore per day) Operating Status at End of the Year 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Cotter Corporation Canon City Mill Fremont, Colorado 0 Standby Standby Standby Reclamation Demolished Denison White Mesa LLC White Mesa Mill San Juan, Utah 2,000 Operating Operating Operating Operating Operating Energy Fuels Resources Corporation Piñon Ridge Mill Montrose, Colorado 500 Developing Developing Developing Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Kennecott Uranium Company/Wyoming Coal Resource Company Sweetwater Uranium Project Sweetwater, Wyoming 3,000 Standby Standby Standby Standby Standby

255

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

6. Employment in the U.S. uranium production industry by category, 2003-13 person-years Year Exploration Mining Milling Processing Reclamation Total 2003 W W W W 117 321 2004 18...

256

Uranium Marketing Annual Report -  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1. Foreign sales of uranium from U.S. suppliers and owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by origin and delivery year, 2009-13 thousands pounds U3O8...

257

Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a. Uranium purchased by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, 1994-2013 million pounds U3O8 equivalent Delivery year Total purchased Purchased from U.S....

258

Uranium Marketing Annual Report -  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9. Contracted purchases of uranium by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, signed in 2013, by delivery year, 2014-23 thousand pounds U3O8 equivalent Year...

259

Uranium purchases report 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data reported by domestic nuclear utility companies in their responses to the 1991 through 1993 ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey,`` Form EIA-858, Schedule B,`` Uranium Marketing Activities,`` are provided in response to the requirements in the Energy Policy Act 1992. Appendix A contains an explanation of Form EIA-858 survey methodologies with emphasis on the processing of Schedule B data. Additional information published in this report not included in Uranium Purchases Report 1992, includes a new data table. Presented in Table 1 are US utility purchases of uranium and enrichment services by origin country. Also, this report contains additional purchase information covering average price and contract duration. Table 2 is an update of Table 1 and Table 3 is an update of Table 2 from the previous year`s report. The report contains a glossary of terms.

Not Available

1994-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

260

BETO Conversion Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 2A—Conversion Technologies II: Bio-Oils, Sugar Intermediates, Precursors, Distributed Models, and Refinery Co-Processing BETO Conversion Program Bryna Berendzen, Technology Manager, Bioenergy Technologies Office, U.S. Department of Energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium oxide conversion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Photoelectrochemical solar energy conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present paper the progress in the field of solar energy conversion for the production of electricity and storable ... critically analyzed in view of their stability and conversion efficiency. A number of factors

Rüdiger Memming

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Solar Thermoelectric Energy Conversion  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SOLID-STATE SOLAR-THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION CENTER NanoEngineering Group Solar Thermoelectric Energy Conversion Gang Chen, 1 Daniel Kraemer, 1 Bed Poudel, 2 Hsien-Ping Feng, 1 J....

263

Uranium purchases report 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

US utilities are required to report to the Secretary of Energy annually the country of origin and the seller of any uranium or enriched uranium purchased or imported into the US, as well as the country of origin and seller of any enrichment services purchased by the utility. This report compiles these data and also contains a glossary of terms and additional purchase information covering average price and contract duration. 3 tabs.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Inhalation class for depleted uranium at a major uranium applications facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A primary concern in determining internal dose from inhalation of radioactive material is the half-time of the material within the human body. Inhalation classes have been established by the ICRP for radioactive materials with half-times of a few days (Class D), several weeks (Class W), or periods up to one year (Class Y). Bioassay data at a facility using large quantities of depleted uranium have been collected for several years. These data have been analyzed to estimate the first order decay constant. From the decay constant, the half-time for retention (biological half-life) is determined. This half-time is used to identify the inhalation class for depleted uranium and its oxides. The data presented demonstrate that the retention half-time for depleted uranium and its oxides ranges from about 7 d to about 6 wk, depending on the quantity of material inhaled and the subject`s metabolism. This shows that the correct inhalation class for depleted uranium is Class W.

Barg, D.C.; Grewing, H.L. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Uranium (VI) solubility in carbonate-free ERDA-6 brine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When present, uranium is usually an element of importance in a nuclear waste repository. In the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), uranium is the most prevalent actinide component by mass, with about 647 metric tons to be placed in the repository. Therefore, the chemistry of uranium, and especially its solubility in the WIPP conditions, needs to be well determined. Long-term experiments were performed to measure the solubility of uranium (VI) in carbonate-free ERDA-6 brine, a simulated WIPP brine, at pC{sub H+} values between 8 and 12.5. These data, obtained from the over-saturation approach, were the first repository-relevant data for the VI actinide oxidation state. The solubility trends observed pointed towards low uranium solubility in WIPP brines and a lack of amphotericity. At the expected pC{sub H+} in the WIPP ({approx} 9.5), measured uranium solubility approached 10{sup -7} M. The objective of these experiments was to establish a baseline solubility to further investigate the effects of carbonate complexation on uranium solubility in WIPP brines.

Lucchini, Jean-francois [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Khaing, Hnin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reed, Donald T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Oxidation of propylene over copper oxide catalysts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the study of propylene oxidation. Dunlop (17) reported that small quantities of iron compounds substantially enhanced the catalytic activity of chromia-alumina catalysts with respect to propylene oxidation, Woodharn (72) has suggested that under... between 360 C and 430oC the rate of propane oxidation decreases as the teznperature is increased, and the rate of conversion to olefins, especially propylene, becomes progressively greater. Above 430 C the proportion of propane converted to ethylene in...

Billingsley, David Stuart

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

267

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10. Uranium reserve estimates at the end of 2012 10. Uranium reserve estimates at the end of 2012 million pounds U3O8 Forward Cost2 Uranium Reserve Estimates1 by Mine and Property Status, Mining Method, and State(s) $0 to $30 per pound $0 to $50 per pound $0 to $100 per pound Properties with Exploration Completed, Exploration Continuing, and Only Assessment Work W W 102.0 Properties Under Development for Production W W W Mines in Production W 21.4 W Mines Closed Temporarily and Closed Permanently W W 133.1 In-Situ Leach Mining W W 128.6 Underground and Open Pit Mining W W 175.4 Arizona, New Mexico and Utah 0 W 164.7 Colorado, Nebraska and Texas W W 40.8 Wyoming W W 98.5 Total 51.8 W 304.0 1 Sixteen respondents reported reserve estimates on 71 mines and properties. These uranium reserve estimates cannot be compared with the much larger historical data set of uranium reserves that were published in the July 2010 report U.S. Uranium Reserves Estimates at http://www.eia.gov/cneaf/nuclear/page/reserves/ures.html. Reserves, as reported here, do not necessarily imply compliance with U.S. or Canadian government definitions for purposes of investment disclosure.

268

FAQ 5-Is uranium radioactive?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Is uranium radioactive? Is uranium radioactive? Is uranium radioactive? All isotopes of uranium are radioactive, with most having extremely long half-lives. Half-life is a measure of the time it takes for one half of the atoms of a particular radionuclide to disintegrate (or decay) into another nuclear form. Each radionuclide has a characteristic half-life. Half-lives vary from millionths of a second to billions of years. Because radioactivity is a measure of the rate at which a radionuclide decays (for example, decays per second), the longer the half-life of a radionuclide, the less radioactive it is for a given mass. The half-life of uranium-238 is about 4.5 billion years, uranium-235 about 700 million years, and uranium-234 about 25 thousand years. Uranium atoms decay into other atoms, or radionuclides, that are also radioactive and commonly called "decay products." Uranium and its decay products primarily emit alpha radiation, however, lower levels of both beta and gamma radiation are also emitted. The total activity level of uranium depends on the isotopic composition and processing history. A sample of natural uranium (as mined) is composed of 99.3% uranium-238, 0.7% uranium-235, and a negligible amount of uranium-234 (by weight), as well as a number of radioactive decay products.

269

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Summary  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Portsmouth DUF Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS SUMMARY 1 S.1 INTRODUCTION This document is a site-specific environmental impact statement (EIS) for construction and operation of a proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF 6 ) conversion facility at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth site in Ohio (Figure S-1). The proposed facility would convert the DUF 6 stored at Portsmouth to a more stable chemical form suitable for use or disposal. The facility would also convert the DUF 6 from the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) site near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In a Notice of Intent (NOI) published in the Federal Register on September 18, 2001 (Federal Register, Volume 66, page 48123 [66 FR 48123]), DOE announced its intention to prepare a single EIS for a proposal to construct, operate, maintain, and decontaminate and

270

Plasmonic conversion of solar energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a novel method of solar energy conversion that can lead tofundamentals of plasmonic energy conversion are reviewed in3. Plasmonic energy conversion fundamentals Surface plasmons

Clavero, Cesar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Mineralogical analysis and uranium distribution of the sediments from the upper Jackson formation, Karnes County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the relationship between uranium distribu- tion and mineralogic composition of the sediment may provide more reliable methods for uranium exploration. Open pit mining and subsequent milling, or in situ leach- ing, are the two methods of uranium recovery... of the oxidized deposits, at and directly above the water table, are larger deposits of generally lower-grade ore that contains unoxidized uranium. The Galen Mine was the first mine in the unoxidized ore. This open pit mine is about two miles (3 km) south...

Fishman, Paul Harold

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Planning Document for an NBSR Conversion Safety Analysis Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) is a reactor-laboratory complex providing the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the nation with a world-class facility for the performance of neutron-based research. The heart of this facility is the National Bureau of Standards Reactor (NBSR). The NBSR is a heavy water moderated and cooled reactor operating at 20 MW. It is fueled with high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel elements. A Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) program is underway to convert the reactor to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This program includes the qualification of the proposed fuel, uranium and molybdenum alloy foil clad in an aluminum alloy, and the development of the fabrication techniques. This report is a planning document for the conversion Safety Analysis Report (SAR) that would be submitted to, and approved by, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) before the reactor could be converted.This report follows the recommended format and content from the NRC codified in NUREG-1537, “Guidelines for Preparing and Reviewing Applications for the Licensing of Non-power Reactors,” Chapter 18, “Highly Enriched to Low-Enriched Uranium Conversions.” The emphasis herein is on the SAR chapters that require significant changes as a result of conversion, primarily Chapter 4, Reactor Description, and Chapter 13, Safety Analysis. The document provides information on the proposed design for the LEU fuel elements and identifies what information is still missing. This document is intended to assist ongoing fuel development efforts, and to provide a platform for the development of the final conversion SAR. This report contributes directly to the reactor conversion pillar of the GTRI program, but also acts as a boundary condition for the fuel development and fuel fabrication pillars.

Diamond D. J.; Baek J.; Hanson, A.L.; Cheng, L-Y.; Brown, N.; Cuadra, A.

2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

273

Iterated multidimensional wave conversion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mode conversion can occur repeatedly in a two-dimensional cavity (e.g., the poloidal cross section of an axisymmetric tokamak). We report on two novel concepts that allow for a complete and global visualization of the ray evolution under iterated conversions. First, iterated conversion is discussed in terms of ray-induced maps from the two-dimensional conversion surface to itself (which can be visualized in terms of three-dimensional rooms). Second, the two-dimensional conversion surface is shown to possess a symplectic structure derived from Dirac constraints associated with the two dispersion surfaces of the interacting waves.

Brizard, A. J. [Dept. Physics, Saint Michael's College, Colchester, VT 05439 (United States); Tracy, E. R.; Johnston, D. [Dept. Physics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187-8795 (United States); Kaufman, A. N. [LBNL and Physics Dept., UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Richardson, A. S. [T-5, LANL, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Zobin, N. [Dept. Mathematics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187-8795 (United States)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

274

Uranium Marketing Annual Report - Release Date: May 31, 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. Uranium purchased by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by origin and material type, 2012 deliveries 4. Uranium purchased by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by origin and material type, 2012 deliveries thousand pounds U3O8 equivalent; dollars per pound U3O8 equivalent Deliveries Uranium Concentrate Natural UF6 Enriched UF6 Natural UF6 and Enriched UF6 Total U.S.-Origin Uranium Purchases W W W W 9,807 Weighted-Average Price W W W W 59.44 Foreign-Origin Uranium Purchases W W W W 47,713 Weighted-Average Price W W W W 54.07 Total Purchases 28,642 W W 28,878 57,520 Weighted-Average Price 54.20 W W 55.80 54.99 W = Data withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Weighted-average prices are not adjusted for inflation. Natural UF6 is uranium hexafluoride. The natural UF6 and enriched UF6 quantity represents only the U3O8 equivalent uranium-component quantity specified in the contract for each delivery of natural UF6 and enriched UF6. The natural UF6 and enriched UF6 weighted-average price represent only the U3O8 equivalent uranium-component price specified in the contract for each delivery of natural UF6 and enriched UF6, and does not include the conversion service and enrichment service components.

275

Controlling uranium reactivity March 18, 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the last decade. Most of their work involves depleted uranium, a more common form of uraniumMarch 2008 Controlling uranium reactivity March 18, 2008 Uranium is an often misunderstood metal uranium research. In reality, uranium presents a wealth of possibilities for funda- mental chemistry. Many

Meyer, Karsten

276

Can Ionic Liquids Be Used As Templating Agents For Controlled Design of Uranium-Containing Nanomaterials?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanostructured uranium oxides have been prepared in ionic liquids as templating agents. Using the ionic liquids as reaction media for inorganic nanomaterials takes advantage of the pre-organized structure of the ionic liquids which in turn controls the morphology of the inorganic nanomaterials. Variation of ionic liquid cation structure was investigated to determine the impact on the uranium oxide morphologies. For two ionic liquid cations, increasing the alkyl chain length increases the aspect ratio of the resulting nanostructured oxides. Understanding the resulting metal oxide morphologies could enhance fuel stability and design.

Visser, A.; Bridges, N.; Tosten, M.

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

277

2013 Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

year, 2009-13 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-858 "Uranium Marketing Annual Survey" (2009-13). Table 19. Foreign purchases of uranium by U.S. suppliers...

278

Corrosion of aluminum-uranium alloys in water vapor at 200 C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Specimens of aluminum-uranium alloys at 10 and 18 wt.% uranium were exposed to a saturated water vapor condition at 200 C up to about 12 weeks and compared to previous results for aluminum 1100. The aluminum-uranium materials exhibited a range of initial corrosion rates and approached similar rates with the formation of a passive film of boehmite (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center{underscore}dot}H{sub 2}O). The initial corrosion rates of the aluminum-uranium materials were one to four times higher than that for aluminum 1100. It is postulated that a micro-galvanic coupling between the large UAl{sub 4} particles and the aluminum matrix has caused this difference. Sectioning the exposed specimens shows different characteristics of the oxide layers. In the oxide on the aluminum-10% uranium alloy (Al-10%U), small uranium aluminide particles can be seen in a boehmite matrix and do not seem to be corroded. The oxide film on the aluminum-18% uranium alloy (Al-18%U) appears to have two distinct oxide layers. The outer layer has mass aggregates in a boehmite matrix, while the inner layer contains UAl{sub 4} particles as in the case of Al-10%U.

Lam, P.S.; Sindelar, R.L.; Barrett, K.Y.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Uranium from Seawater Program Review; Fuel Resources Uranium from Seawater Program DOE Office of Nuclear Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For nuclear energy to remain sustainable in the United States, economically viable sources of uranium beyond terrestrial ores must be developed. The goal of this program is to develop advanced adsorbents that can extract uranium from seawater at twice the capacity of the best adsorbent developed by researchers at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1.5 mg U/g adsorbent. A multidisciplinary team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and the University of Texas at Austin was assembled to address this challenging problem. Polymeric adsorbents, based on the radiation grafting of acrylonitrile and methacrylic acid onto high surface-area polyethylene fibers followed by conversion of the nitriles to amidoximes, have been developed. These poly(acrylamidoxime-co-methacrylic acid) fibers showed uranium adsorption capacities for the extraction of uranium from seawater that exceed 3 mg U/g adsorbent in testing at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Marine Sciences Laboratory. The essence of this novel technology lies in the unique high surface-area trunk material that considerably increases the grafting yield of functional groups without compromising its mechanical properties. This technology received an R&D100 Award in 2012. In addition, high surface area nanomaterial adsorbents are under development with the goal of increasing uranium adsorption capacity by taking advantage of the high surface areas and tunable porosity of carbon-based nanomaterials. Simultaneously, de novo structure-based computational design methods are being used to design more selective and stable ligands and the most promising candidates are being synthesized, tested and evaluated for incorporation onto a support matrix. Fundamental thermodynamic and kinetic studies are being carried out to improve the adsorption efficiency, the selectivity of uranium over other metals, and the stability of the adsorbents. Understanding the rate-limiting step of uranium uptake from seawater is also essential in designing an effective uranium recovery system. Finally, economic analyses have been used to guide these studies and highlight what parameters, such as capacity, recyclability, and stability, have the largest impact on the cost of extraction of uranium from seawater. Initially, the cost estimates by the JAEA for extraction of uranium from seawater with braided polymeric fibers functionalized with amidoxime ligands were evaluated and updated. The economic analyses were subsequently updated to reflect the results of this project while providing insight for cost reductions in the adsorbent development through “cradle-to-grave” case studies for the extraction process. This report highlights the progress made over the last three years on the design, synthesis, and testing of new materials to extract uranium for seawater. This report is organized into sections that highlight the major research activities in this project: (1) Chelate Design and Modeling, (2) Thermodynamics, Kinetics and Structure, (3) Advanced Polymeric Adsorbents by Radiation Induced Grafting, (4) Advanced Nanomaterial Adsorbents, (5) Adsorbent Screening and Modeling, (6) Marine Testing, and (7) Cost and Energy Assessment. At the end of each section, future research directions are briefly discussed to highlight the challenges that still remain to reduce the cost of extractions of uranium for seawater. Finally, contributions from the Nuclear Energy University Programs (NEUP), which complement this research program, are included at the end of this report.

none,

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Tris(bis(trimethylsilyl)amido)uranium: Compounds with tri-, tetra-, and penta-valent uranium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This trivalent uranium compound, serves as a precursor to new tri-, tetra-, and penta-valent uranium species. The geometry about the U atom is pyramidal. Lewis-base coordination compounds of U(N(SiMe/sub 3/)/sub 2/)/sub 3/ with a one-to-one- ratio of Lewis base to uranium were isolated with pyridine, 4-dimethylamino-pyridine, 2,6-Me/sub 2/-C/sub 6/H/sub 3/NC, and TPO. Two-to-one coordination compounds were obtained with t-butylnitrile and t-butylisocyanide. Compounds with more sterically demanding bases could not be isolated. The expected decrease in U-N(SiMe/sub 3/)/sub 2/ bond length with increase in oxidation state is not observed. Reaction of ClU(N(SiMe/sub 3/)/sub 2/)/sub 3/and Li(NH(p-tolyl)) yields the uranium (IV) dimer, U/sub 2/(N(SiMe/sub 3/)/sub 2/)/sub 4/(..mu..-N(p-tolyl))/sub 2/. Reaction with 2,4,6-triemethylaniline produces a dimer. Analogous substitution products could not be obtained with aniline or p-toluidine. t-Bu/sub 3/CO/sup /minus//, t-Bu/sub 2/CHO/sup /minus//, and t-Bu/sub 3/SiO/sup /minus// are used to synthesize new tetravalent, mononuclear uranium compounds. Reaction of ClU(tritox)/sub 3/ with alkyllithium reagents leads to isolation of RU(tritox)/sub 3/. The reaction of U(ditox)/sub 4/ with MeLi affords the addition product U(ditox)/sub 4/(Me)Li, whose crystal structure is described. Preparation of uranium silox compounds is reported. 97 refs., 26 figs., 39 tabs.

Stewart, J.L.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium oxide conversion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

DOE Selects Contractor for Depleted Hexafluoride Conversion Project Support  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE Selects Contractor for Depleted Hexafluoride Conversion Project DOE Selects Contractor for Depleted Hexafluoride Conversion Project Support DOE Selects Contractor for Depleted Hexafluoride Conversion Project Support March 25, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor, 803-952-8564 Bill.Taylor@srs.gov Cincinnati - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a competitive small business task order to Navarro Research and Engineering Inc. of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The award is a $22 million, time and materials task order with a three-year performance period and two one-year extension options. Navarro Research and Engineering Inc. will provide engineering and operations technical support services to the DOE Portsmouth Paducah Project Office (PPPO) in Lexington, Kentucky and the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Conversion Project in Paducah, Kentucky and Portsmouth, Ohio.

282

DOE Selects Contractor for Depleted Hexafluoride Conversion Project Support  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Contractor for Depleted Hexafluoride Conversion Project Contractor for Depleted Hexafluoride Conversion Project Support DOE Selects Contractor for Depleted Hexafluoride Conversion Project Support March 25, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor, 803-952-8564 Bill.Taylor@srs.gov Cincinnati - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a competitive small business task order to Navarro Research and Engineering Inc. of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The award is a $22 million, time and materials task order with a three-year performance period and two one-year extension options. Navarro Research and Engineering Inc. will provide engineering and operations technical support services to the DOE Portsmouth Paducah Project Office (PPPO) in Lexington, Kentucky and the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Conversion Project in Paducah, Kentucky and Portsmouth, Ohio.

283

Radiological aspects of in situ uranium recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the last few years, there has been a significant increase in the demand for Uranium as historical inventories have been consumed and new reactor orders are being placed. Numerous mineralized properties around the world are being evaluated for Uranium recovery and new mining / milling projects are being evaluated and developed. Ore bodies which are considered uneconomical to mine by conventional methods such as tunneling or open pits, can be candidates for non-conventional recovery techniques, involving considerably less capital expenditure. Technologies such as Uranium in situ leaching in situ recovery (ISL / ISR), have enabled commercial scale mining and milling of relatively small ore pockets of lower grade, and may make a significant contribution to overall world wide uranium supplies over the next ten years. Commercial size solution mining production facilities have operated in the US since 1975. Solution mining involves the pumping of groundwater, fortified with oxidizing and complexing agents into an ore body, solubilizing the uranium in situ, and then pumping the solutions to the surface where they are fed to a processing plant. Processing involves ion exchange and may also include precipitation, drying or calcining and packaging operations depending on facility specifics. This paper presents an overview of the ISR process and the health physics monitoring programs developed at a number of commercial scale ISL / ISR Uranium recovery and production facilities as a result of the radiological character of these processes. Although many radiological aspects of the process are similar to that of conventional mills, conventional-type tailings as such are not generated. However, liquid and solid byproduct materials may be generated and impounded. The quantity and radiological character of these by products are related to facility specifics. Some special monitoring considerations are presented which are required due to the manner in which Radon gas is evolved in the process and the unique aspects of controlling solution flow patterns underground. An overview of the major aspects of the health physics and radiation protection programs that were developed at these facilities are discussed and contrasted to circumstances of the current generation and state of the art of Uranium ISR technologies and facilities. (authors)

BROWN, STEVEN H. [SHB INC., 7505 S. Xanthia Place, Centennial, Colorado (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Vapor phase modifiers for oxidative coupling  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Volatilized metal compounds are described which are capable of retarding vapor phase alkane conversion reactions in oxidative coupling processes that convert lower alkanes to higher hydrocarbons.

Warren, B.K.

1991-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

285

E-Print Network 3.0 - actinide mixed oxide Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fuels Mikael JOLKKONEN1;;y Summary: . Examples of such substances are molten actinide carbides and the gaseous forms of many metal oxides... , minor actinides, uranium-free nitride...

286

Extraction of uranium from spent fuels using liquefied gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels, a novel method to extract actinides from spent fuel using highly compressed gases, nitrogen dioxide and carbon dioxide was proposed. As a fundamental study, the nitrate conversion with liquefied nitrogen dioxide and the nitrate extraction with supercritical carbon dioxide were demonstrated by using uranium dioxide powder, uranyl nitrate and tri-n-butylphosphate complex in the present study. (authors)

Sawada, Kayo; Hirabayashi, Daisuke; Enokida, Youichi [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, 464-8603 (Japan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Report on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the Highly Enriched Uranium Agreement Between the Government of the United States and the Government of the Russian Federation has on the  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Report on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Report on the Effect the Low Enriched Uranium Delivered Under the Highly Enriched Uranium Agreement Between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of the Russian Federation has on the Domestic Uranium Mining, Conversion, and Enrichment Industries and the Operation of the Gaseous Diffusion Plant 2008 Information Date: December 31, 2008 1 Introduction The Agreement Between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of the Russian Federation Concerning the Disposition of Highly Enriched Uranium Extracted from Nuclear Weapons (HEU Agreement) was signed on February 18, 1993. The HEU Agreement provides for the purchase over a 20-year period (1994-2013) of 500 metric tons (MT) of weapons-origin highly enriched uranium (HEU) from the Russian Federation

288

Processing and Conversion  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The strategic goal of Conversion Research and Development (R&D) is to develop technologies for converting feedstocks into commercially viable liquid transportation fuels, as well as bioproducts...

289

Algae Harvest Energy Conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Resolution of many workshops on algae harvest energy conversion is that low productivity, high capital intensity ... and maintenance, respiration, and photoinhibition are few factors militating against viability ...

Yung-Tse Hung Ph.D.; P.E.; DEE; O. Sarafadeen Amuda Ph.D.…

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

QUANTUM CONVERSION IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

QUANTUM CONVERSION IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS Melvin Calvin Januaryas it occurs in modern photosynthesis can only take place inof the problem or photosynthesis, or any specific aspect of

Calvin, Melvin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

GLOBAL THREAT REDUCTION INITIATIVE REACTOR CONVERSION PROGRAM: STATUS AND CURRENT PLANS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Reactor Conversion Program supports the minimization, and to the extent possible, elimination of the use of high enriched uranium (HEU) in civilian nuclear applications by working to convert research and test reactors and radioisotope production processes to the use of low enriched uranium (LEU). The Reactor Conversion Program is a technical pillar of the NNSA Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) which is a key organization for implementing U.S. HEU minimization policy and works to reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological material domestically and abroad.

Staples, Parrish A.; Leach, Wayne; Lacey, Jennifer M.

2009-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

292

Photovoltaic Energy Conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photovoltaic Energy Conversion Frank Zimmermann #12;Solar Electricity Generation Consumes no fuel Make solar cells more efficient Theoretical energy conversion efficiency limit of single junction-bandgap photons are not absorbed: Carrier relaxation to band edges: Photon energy exceeding bandgap is lost

Glashausser, Charles

293

The distribution of depleted uranium contamination in Colonie, NY, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Uranium oxide particles were dispersed into the environment from a factory in Colonie (NY, USA) by prevailing winds during the 1960s and '70s. Uranium concentrations and isotope ratios from bulk soil samples have been accurately measured using inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS) without the need for analyte separation chemistry. The natural range of uranium concentrations in the Colonie soils has been estimated as 0.7–2.1 ?g g? 1, with a weighted geometric mean of 1.05 ?g g? 1; the contaminated soil samples comprise uranium up to 500 ± 40 ?g g? 1. A plot of 236U/238U against 235U/238U isotope ratios describes a mixing line between natural uranium and depleted uranium (DU) in bulk soil samples; scatter from this line can be accounted for by heterogeneity in the DU particulate. The end-member of DU compositions aggregated in these bulk samples comprises (2.05 ± 0.06) × 10? 3 235U/238U, (3.2 ± 0.1) × 10? 5 236U/238U, and (7.1 ± 0.3) × 10? 6 234U/238U. The analytical method is sensitive to as little as 50 ng g? 1 DU mixed with the natural uranium occurring in these soils. The contamination footprint has been mapped northward from site, and at least one third of the uranium in a soil sample from the surface 5 cm, collected 5.1 km NNW of the site, is DU. The distribution of contamination within the surface soil horizon follows a trend of exponential decrease with depth, which can be approximated by a simple diffusion model. Bioturbation by earthworms can account for dispersal of contaminant from the soil surface, in the form of primary uranium oxide particulates, and uranyl species that are adsorbed to organic matter. Considering this distribution, the total mass of uranium contamination emitted from the factory is estimated to be c. 4.8 tonnes.

N.S. Lloyd; S.R.N. Chenery; R.R. Parrish

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Accumulation and Distribution of Uranium in Rats after Implantation with Depleted Uranium Fragments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Rats after Implantation with Depleted Uranium Fragments Guoying Zhu 1 * Mingguang...and distribution of uranium in depleted uranium (DU) implanted rats. Materials...of chronic exposure to DU. Depleted uranium|Bone|Kidney|Distribution......

Guoying Zhu; Mingguang Tan; Yulan Li; Xiqiao Xiang; Heping Hu; Shuquan Zhao

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Long-term criticality control in radioactive waste disposal facilities using depleted uranium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plant photosynthesis has created a unique planetary-wide geochemistry - an oxidizing atmosphere with oxidizing surface waters on a planetary body with chemically reducing conditions near or at some distance below the surface. Uranium is four orders of magnitude more soluble under chemically oxidizing conditions than it is under chemically reducing conditions. Thus, uranium tends to leach from surface rock and disposal sites, move with groundwater, and concentrate where chemically reducing conditions appear. Earth`s geochemistry concentrates uranium and can separate uranium from all other elements except oxygen, hydrogen (in water), and silicon (silicates, etc). Fissile isotopes include {sup 235}U, {sup 233}U, and many higher actinides that eventually decay to one of these two uranium isotopes. The potential for nuclear criticality exists if the precipitated uranium from disposal sites has a significant fissile enrichment, mass, and volume. The earth`s geochemistry suggests that isotopic dilution of fissile materials in waste with {sup 238}U is a preferred strategy to prevent long-term nuclear criticality in and beyond the boundaries of waste disposal facilities because the {sup 238}U does not separate from the fissile uranium isotopes. Geological, laboratory, and theoretical data indicate that the potential for nuclear criticality can be minimized by diluting fissile materials with-{sup 238}U to 1 wt % {sup 235}U equivalent.

Forsberg, C.W.

1997-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

296

Colloids generation from metallic uranium fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The possibility of colloid generation from spent fuel in an unsaturated environment has significant implications for storage of these fuels in the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. Because colloids can act as a transport medium for sparingly soluble radionuclides, it might be possible for colloid-associated radionuclides to migrate large distances underground and present a human health concern. This study examines the nature of colloidal materials produced during corrosion of metallic uranium fuel in simulated groundwater at elevated temperature in an unsaturated environment. Colloidal analyses of the leachates from these corrosion tests were performed using dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Results from both techniques indicate a bimodal distribution of small discrete particles and aggregates of the small particles. The average diameters of the small, discrete colloids are {approximately}3--12 nm, and the large aggregates have average diameters of {approximately}100--200 nm. X-ray diffraction of the solids from these tests indicates a mineral composition of uranium oxide or uranium oxy-hydroxide.

Metz, C.; Fortner, J.; Goldberg, M.; Shelton-Davis, C.

2000-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

297

Nuclear Fuel Facts: Uranium | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Uranium Management and Uranium Management and Policy » Nuclear Fuel Facts: Uranium Nuclear Fuel Facts: Uranium Nuclear Fuel Facts: Uranium Uranium is a silvery-white metallic chemical element in the periodic table, with atomic number 92. It is assigned the chemical symbol U. A uranium atom has 92 protons and 92 electrons, of which 6 are valence electrons. Uranium has the highest atomic weight (19 kg m) of all naturally occurring elements. Uranium occurs naturally in low concentrations in soil, rock and water, and is commercially extracted from uranium-bearing minerals such as uraninite. Uranium ore can be mined from open pits or underground excavations. The ore can then be crushed and treated at a mill to separate the valuable uranium from the ore. Uranium may also be dissolved directly from the ore deposits

298

Towards a desalination initiative using cogeneration with an advanced reactor type and uranium recovered from Moroccan phosphoric acid production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Morocco is known to be among the first few countries to produce phosphate and phosphoric acid. Moroccan phosphate contains substantial amounts of uranium. This uranium can be recovered from the phosphate ore as a by-product during the production of phosphoric acid. Uranium extraction processes linked with phosphoric acid fabrication have been used industrially in some countries. This is done mainly by solvent extraction. Although, the present price of uranium is low in the international market, such uranium recovery could be considered as a side product of phosphoric acid production. The price of uranium has a very small impact on the cost of nuclear energy obtained from it. This paper focuses on the extraction of uranium salt from phosphate rock. If uranium is recovered in Morocco in the proposed manner, it could serve as feed for a number of nuclear power plants. The natural uranium product would have to be either enriched or blended as mixed-oxide fuel to manufacture adequate nuclear fuel. Part of this fuel would feed a desalination initiative using a high temperature reactor of the new generation, chosen for its intrinsic safety, sturdiness, ease of maintenance, thermodynamic characteristics and long fuel life between reloads, that is, good economy. ?n international cooperation based on commercial contract schemes would concern: the general project and uranium extraction; uranium enrichment and fuel fabrication services; the nuclear power plant; and the desalination plant. This paper presents the overall feasibility of the general project with some quantitative preliminary figures and cost estimates.

Michel Lung; Abdelaali Kossir; Driss Msatef

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

file://\\\\fs-f1\\shared\\uranium\\uranium.html  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

The initial uranium property reserves estimates were based on bore hole radiometric data validated by chemical analysis of samples from cores and drill cuttings. The...

300

Method for fabricating uranium foils and uranium alloy foils  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of producing thin foils of uranium or an alloy. The uranium or alloy is cast as a plate or sheet having a thickness less than about 5 mm and thereafter cold rolled in one or more passes at substantially ambient temperatures until the uranium or alloy thereof is in the shape of a foil having a thickness less than about 1.0 mm. The uranium alloy includes one or more of Zr, Nb, Mo, Cr, Fe, Si, Ni, Cu or Al.

Hofman, Gerard L. (Downers Grove, IL); Meyer, Mitchell K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Knighton, Gaven C. (Moore, ID); Clark, Curtis R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2006-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium oxide conversion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

BIOMASS ENERGY CONVERSION IN HAWAII  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jones and w.s. Fong, Biomass Conversion of Biomass to Fuels11902 UC-61a BIOMASS ENERGY CONVERSION IN HAWAII RonaldLBL-11902 Biomass Energy Conversion in Hawaii Ronald 1.

Ritschard, Ronald L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Method for providing uranium with a protective copper coating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a method for providing uranium metal with a protective coating of copper. Uranium metal is subjected to a conventional cleaning operation wherein oxides and other surface contaminants are removed, followed by etching and pickling operations. The copper coating is provided by first electrodepositing a thin and relatively porous flash layer of copper on the uranium in a copper cyanide bath. The resulting copper-layered article is then heated in an air or inert atmosphere to volatilize and drive off the volatile material underlying the copper flash layer. After the heating step an adherent and essentially non-porous layer of copper is electro-deposited on the flash layer of copper to provide an adherent, multi-layer copper coating which is essentially impervious to corrosion by most gases.

Waldrop, Forrest B. (Powell, TN); Jones, Edward (Knoxville, TN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Speciation of uranium(VI) sorption complexes on montmorillonite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental contaminant releases that contain uranium are among the most serious problems that must be confronted by restoration programs. To facilitate restoration, information concerning the speciation of uranium is needed. Under oxidizing conditions, dissolved uranium is predominantly in the U(VI) (uranyl) form and is quite mobile in the environment, however sorption onto soils may retard its movement. In this study, we have investigated the effects of changes in solution speciation on the nature of uranyl sorption complexes on montmorillonite, a common soil constituent. Aqueous U(VI) solutions between pH 3 to 7 were batch-equilibrated with montmorillonite for several days; specific pH values were selected such that the solutions consisted of dominantly monomeric, oligomeric, or a mix of monomeric and oligomeric aqueous uranyl species. Emission spectroscopy was used to investigate the nature of U(VI) sorbed to montmorillonite.

Chisholm-Brause, C.J.; Morris, D.E. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Richard, R.E. (Fort Lewis Coll., Durango, CO (United States). Dept. of Chemistry)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9. Summary production statistics of the U.S. uranium industry, 1993-2012 9. Summary production statistics of the U.S. uranium industry, 1993-2012 Item 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 E2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Exploration and Development Surface Drilling (million feet) 1.1 0.7 1.3 3.0 4.9 4.6 2.5 1.0 0.7 W W 1.2 1.7 2.7 5.1 5.1 3.7 4.9 6.3 7.2 Drilling Expenditures (million dollars)1 5.7 1.1 2.6 7.2 20.0 18.1 7.9 5.6 2.7 W W 10.6 18.1 40.1 67.5 81.9 35.4 44.6 53.6 66.6 Mine Production of Uranium (million pounds U3O8) 2.1 2.5 3.5 4.7 4.7 4.8 4.5 3.1 2.6 2.4 2.2 2.5 3.0 4.7 4.5 3.9 4.1 4.2 4.1 4.3 Uranium Concentrate Production (million pounds U3O8) 3.1 3.4 6.0 6.3 5.6 4.7 4.6 4.0 2.6 2.3 2.0 2.3 2.7 4.1 4.5 3.9 3.7 4.2 4.0 4.1

305

Wave Energy Conversion Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wave Energy Conversion Technology Wave Energy Conversion Technology Speaker(s): Mirko Previsic Date: August 2, 2001 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Julie Osborn Scientists have been working on wave power conversion for the past twenty years, but recent advances in offshore and IT technologies have made it economically competitive. Sea Power & Associates is a Berkeley-based renewable energy technology company. We have developed patented technology to generate electricity from ocean wave energy using a system of concrete buoys and highly efficient hydraulic pumps. Our mission is to provide competitively priced, non-polluting, renewable energy for coastal regions worldwide. Mirko Previsic, founder and CEO, of Sea Power & Associates will discuss ocean wave power, existing technologies for its conversion into

306

Avatar augmented online conversation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the most important roles played by technology is connecting people and mediating their communication with one another. Building technology that mediates conversation presents a number of challenging research and ...

Vilhjálmsson, Hannes Högni

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Modern Biomass Conversion Technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article gives an overview of the state-of-the-art of key biomass conversion technologies currently deployed and technologies that may...2...capture and sequestration technology (CCS). In doing so, special at...

Andre Faaij

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

DANISHBIOETHANOLCONCEPT Biomass conversion for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DANISHBIOETHANOLCONCEPT Biomass conversion for transportation fuel Concept developed at RISÃ? and DTU Anne Belinda Thomsen (RISÃ?) Birgitte K. Ahring (DTU) #12;DANISHBIOETHANOLCONCEPT Biomass: Biogas #12;DANISHBIOETHANOLCONCEPT Pre-treatment Step Biomass is macerated The biomass is cut in small

309

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8. U.S. uranium expenditures, 2003-2012 8. U.S. uranium expenditures, 2003-2012 million dollars Year Drilling Production Land and Other Total Expenditures Total Land and Other Land Exploration Reclamation 2003 W W 31.3 NA NA NA W 2004 10.6 27.8 48.4 NA NA NA 86.9 2005 18.1 58.2 59.7 NA NA NA 136.0 2006 40.1 65.9 115.2 41.0 23.3 50.9 221.2 2007 67.5 90.4 178.2 77.7 50.3 50.2 336.2 2008 81.9 221.2 164.4 65.2 50.2 49.1 467.6 2009 35.4 141.0 104.0 17.3 24.2 62.4 280.5 2010 44.6 133.3 99.5 20.2 34.5 44.7 277.3 2011 53.6 168.8 96.8 19.6 43.5 33.7 319.2 2012 66.6 186.9 99.4 16.8 33.3 49.3 352.9 Drilling: All expenditures directly associated with exploration and development drilling. Production: All expenditures for mining, milling, processing of uranium, and facility expense.

310

Semiconductor Nanowires and Nanotubes for Energy Conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of applications, notably energy conversion. As researchnanowires for energy conversion. Chemical Reviews, 2010.Implications for solar energy conversion. Physical Review

Fardy, Melissa Anne

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Assessment of exposure to depleted uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......ingestion of natural uranium in food and drink, and...for the measurement of uranium in urine samples, DU...respect to potential health hazards can be detected...Assessment of exposure to depleted uranium. | In most circumstances......

P. Roth; V. Höllriegl; E. Werner; P. Schramel

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Assessment of exposure to depleted uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Article Assessment of exposure to depleted uranium P. Roth V. Hollriegl E. Werner...for determining the amount of depleted uranium (DU) incorporated. The problems...Assessment of exposure to depleted uranium. | In most circumstances......

P. Roth; V. Höllriegl; E. Werner; P. Schramel

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Structured luminescence conversion layer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus device such as a light source is disclosed which has an OLED device and a structured luminescence conversion layer deposited on the substrate or transparent electrode of said OLED device and on the exterior of said OLED device. The structured luminescence conversion layer contains regions such as color-changing and non-color-changing regions with particular shapes arranged in a particular pattern.

Berben, Dirk; Antoniadis, Homer; Jermann, Frank; Krummacher, Benjamin Claus; Von Malm, Norwin; Zachau, Martin

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

314

Conversion Plan | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

document the conversion plan that clearly defines the system or project's conversion procedures; outlines the installation of new and converted filesdatabases; coordinates the...

315

Plasmonic conversion of solar energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of solar energy into electricity in photovoltaic cells orsolar energy conversion aimed at photovoltaic applicationsenergy conversion, opening a new venue for photovoltaic and

Clavero, Cesar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Plasmonic conversion of solar energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of carriers allows maintaining the energy conversionenergy conversion 8 Timescale of charge separation, carrierin this energy conversion method, i.e. carrier regeneration

Clavero, Cesar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Fuel Grading Study on a Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Design for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An engineering design study that would enable the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium to low-enriched uranium fuel is ongoing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The computational models used to search for a low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel design that would meet the requirements for the conversion study, and the recent results obtained with these models during FY 2009, are documented and discussed in this report. Estimates of relevant reactor performance parameters for the LEU fuel core are presented and compared with the corresponding data for the currently operating high-enriched uranium fuel core. These studies indicate that the LEU fuel design would maintain the current performance of the HFIR with respect to the neutron flux to the central target region, reflector, and beam tube locations.

Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

2013 Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

accounted for 32%. The remaining 16% originated from Brazil, China, Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Malawi, Namibia, Niger, Portugal, and South Africa. COOs purchased uranium...

319

U.S.Uranium Reserves  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

conditions. The uranium property reserves estimates were based on bore hole radiometric data validated by chemical analysis of samples from cores and drill cuttings. The...

320

2013 Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Note: Totals may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-858 "Uranium Marketing Annual Survey" (2013)....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium oxide conversion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

2013 Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Industry Annual, Tables 10, 11 and 16. 2003-2013-Form EIA-858, "Uranium Marketing Annual Survey". million pounds U 3 O 8 equivalent 1 Includes purchases between...

322

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Appendix F: Assessment Methodologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX F: ASSESSMENT METHODOLOGIES Assessment Methodologies F-2 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Assessment Methodologies F-3 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX F: ASSESSMENT METHODOLOGIES In general, the activities assessed in this environmental impact statement (EIS) could affect workers, members of the general public, and the environment during construction of new facilities, during routine operation of facilities, during transportation, and during facility or transportation accidents. Activities could have adverse effects (e.g., human health impairment) or positive effects (e.g., regional socioeconomic benefits, such as the creation of jobs). Some impacts would result primarily from the unique characteristics of the uranium and other chemical

323

Marathon/Vitro to seek uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Marathon/Vitro to seek uranium ... Last week, Marathon Oil agreed with Vitro Corp. of America to explore jointly for uranium in North America. ...

1967-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

324

Final Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for DOE's Uranium Leasing Program, under which DOE administers tracts of land in western Colorado for exploration, development, and the extraction of uranium and vanadium...

325

Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of uranium hexafluoride  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 These test methods cover procedures for subsampling and for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of uranium hexafluoride UF6. Most of these test methods are in routine use to determine conformance to UF6 specifications in the Enrichment and Conversion Facilities. 1.2 The analytical procedures in this document appear in the following order: Note 1—Subcommittee C26.05 will confer with C26.02 concerning the renumbered section in Test Methods C761 to determine how concerns with renumbering these sections, as analytical methods are replaced with stand-alone analytical methods, are best addressed in subsequent publications. Sections Subsampling of Uranium Hexafluoride 7 - 10 Gravimetric Determination of Uranium 11 - 19 Titrimetric Determination of Uranium 20 Preparation of High-Purity U3O 8 21 Isotopic Analysis 22 Isotopic Analysis by Double-Standard Mass-Spectrometer Method 23 - 29 Determination of Hydrocarbons, Chlorocarbons, and Partially Substitut...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Distribution and a possible mechanism of uranium accumulation in the Catahoula Tuff, Live Oak County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- and micro-scopic distribution of' uranium within the Catahoula Tuff. METHODS A uranium ore body exposed in the Pant Tuff' Member of the Catahoula Tuff and exposed by open-pit mining was inves- tigated in this study. The distribution of the uranium... by oil and mining companies and the United States Geological Survey found numerous radiometric anomalies, In 1959, the San Antonio Mine Company began open pit mining of several small, shallow (less than 15 meters deep) . oxidized ore bodies in Karnes...

Parks, Steven Louis

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high photo-conversion efficiency indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cell is spray deposited from a solution containing indium trichloride. The solar cell exhibits an Air Mass One solar conversion efficiency in excess of about 10%.

Feng, Tom (Morris Plains, NJ); Ghosh, Amal K. (New Providence, NJ)

1982-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

328

Digital optical conversion module  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A digital optical conversion module used to convert an analog signal to a computer compatible digital signal including a voltage-to-frequency converter, frequency offset response circuitry, and an electrical-to-optical converter. Also used in conjunction with the digital optical conversion module is an optical link and an interface at the computer for converting the optical signal back to an electrical signal. Suitable for use in hostile environments having high levels of electromagnetic interference, the conversion module retains high resolution of the analog signal while eliminating the potential for errors due to noise and interference. The module can be used to link analog output scientific equipment such as an electrometer used with a mass spectrometer to a computer.

Kotter, Dale K. (North Shelley, ID); Rankin, Richard A. (Ammon, ID)

1991-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

329

Digital optical conversion module  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A digital optical conversion module used to convert an analog signal to a computer compatible digital signal including a voltage-to-frequency converter, frequency offset response circuitry, and an electrical-to-optical converter. Also used in conjunction with the digital optical conversion module is an optical link and an interface at the computer for converting the optical signal back to an electrical signal. Suitable for use in hostile environments having high levels of electromagnetic interference, the conversion module retains high resolution of the analog signal while eliminating the potential for errors due to noise and interference. The module can be used to link analog output scientific equipment such as an electrometer used with a mass spectrometer to a computer. 2 figs.

Kotter, D.K.; Rankin, R.A.

1988-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

330

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 Milling Capacity (short tons of ore per day) 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Cotter Corporation Canon City Mill Fremont, Colorado 0 Standby Standby Standby Reclamation Demolished EFR White Mesa LLC White Mesa Mill San Juan, Utah 2,000 Operating Operating Operating Operating Operating Energy Fuels Resources Corporation Piñon Ridge Mill Montrose, Colorado 500 Developing Developing Developing Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Kennecott Uranium Company/Wyoming Coal Resource Company Sweetwater Uranium Project Sweetwater, Wyoming 3,000 Standby Standby Standby Standby Standby Uranium One Americas, Inc. Shootaring Canyon Uranium Mill Garfield, Utah 750 Changing License To Operational Standby

331

Design Study for a Low-enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents progress made during fiscal year 2007 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium fuel (LEU). Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. A high volume fraction U/Mo-in-Al fuel could attain the same neutron flux performance as with the current, HEU fuel but materials considerations appear to preclude production and irradiation of such a fuel. A diffusion barrier would be required if Al is to be retained as the interstitial medium and the additional volume required for this barrier would degrade performance. Attaining the high volume fraction (55 wt. %) of U/Mo assumed in the computational study while maintaining the current fuel plate acceptance level at the fuel manufacturer is unlikely, i.e. no increase in the percentage of plates rejected for non-compliance with the fuel specification. Substitution of a zirconium alloy for Al would significantly increase the weight of the fuel element, the cost of the fuel element, and introduce an as-yet untried manufacturing process. A monolithic U-10Mo foil is the choice of LEU fuel for HFIR. Preliminary calculations indicate that with a modest increase in reactor power, the flux performance of the reactor can be maintained at the current level. A linearly-graded, radial fuel thickness profile is preferred to the arched profile currently used in HEU fuel because the LEU fuel media is a metal alloy foil rather than a powder. Developments in analysis capability and nuclear data processing techniques are underway with the goal of verifying the preliminary calculations of LEU flux performance. A conceptual study of the operational cost of an LEU fuel fabrication facility yielded the conclusion that the annual fuel cost to the HFIR would increase significantly from the current, HEU fuel cycle. Though manufacturing can be accomplished with existing technology, several engineering proof-of-principle tests would be required. The RERTR program is currently conducting a series of generic fuel qualification tests at the Advanced Test Reactor. A review of these tests and a review of the safety basis for the current, HEU fuel cycle led to the identification of a set of HFIR-specific fuel qualification tests. Much additional study is required to formulate a HFIR-specific fuel qualification plan from this set. However, one such test - creating a graded fuel profile across a flat foil - has been initiated with promising results.

Primm, Trent [ORNL; Ellis, Ronald James [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. U.S. uranium mine production and number of mines and sources, 2003-2012 2. U.S. uranium mine production and number of mines and sources, 2003-2012 Production / Mining Method 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Underground (estimated contained thousand pounds U3O8) W W W W W W W W W W Open Pit (estimated contained thousand pounds U3O8) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 In-Situ Leaching (thousand pounds U3O8) W W 2,681 4,259 W W W W W W Other1 (thousand pounds U3O8) W W W W W W W W W W Total Mine Production (thousand pounds U3O8) E2,200 2,452 3,045 4,692 4,541 3,879 4,145 4,237 4,114 4,335 Number of Operating Mines Underground 1 2 4 5 6 10 14 4 5 6 Open Pit 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 In-Situ Leaching 2 3 4 5 5 6 4 4 5 5 Other Sources1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1

333

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5. U.S. uranium in-situ-leach plants by owner, location, capacity, and operating status at end of the year, 2008-2012 5. U.S. uranium in-situ-leach plants by owner, location, capacity, and operating status at end of the year, 2008-2012 In-Situ-Leach Plant Owner In-Situ-Leach Plant Name County, State (existing and planned locations) Production Capacity (pounds U3O8 per year) Operating Status at End of the Year 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Cameco Crow Butte Operation Dawes, Nebraska 1,000,000 Operating Operating Operating Operating Operating Hydro Resources, Inc. Crownpoint McKinley, New Mexico 1,000,000 Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Hydro Resources,Inc. Church Rock McKinley, New Mexico 1,000,000 Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed

334

Pyroprocessing of oxidized sodium-bonded fast reactor fuel - An experimental study of treatment options for degraded EBR-II fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental study was conducted to assess pyrochemical treatment options for degraded EBR-II fuel. As oxidized material, the degraded fuel would need to be converted back to metal to enable electrorefining within an existing electro-metallurgical treatment process. A lithium-based electrolytic reduction process was studied to assess the efficacy of converting oxide materials to metal with a particular focus on the impact of zirconium oxide and sodium oxide on this process. Bench-scale electrolytic reduction experiments were performed in LiCl-Li{sub 2}O at 650 C. degrees with combinations of manganese oxide (used as a surrogate for uranium oxide), zirconium oxide, and sodium oxide. In the absence of zirconium or sodium oxide, the electrolytic reduction of MnO showed nearly complete conversion to metal. The electrolytic reduction of a blend of MnO-ZrO{sub 2} in LiCl - 1 wt% Li{sub 2}O showed substantial reduction of manganese, but only 8.5% of the zirconium was found in the metal phase. The electrolytic reduction of the same blend of MnO-ZrO{sub 2} in LiCl - 1 wt% Li{sub 2}O - 6.2 wt% Na{sub 2}O showed substantial reduction of manganese, but zirconium reduction was even less at 2.4%. This study concluded that ZrO{sub 2} cannot be substantially reduced to metal in an electrolytic reduction system with LiCl - 1 wt% Li{sub 2}O at 650 C. degrees due to the perceived preferential formation of lithium zirconate. This study also identified a possible interference that sodium oxide may have on the same system by introducing a parasitic and cyclic reaction of dissolved sodium metal between oxidation at the anode and reduction at the cathode. When applied to oxidized sodium-bonded EBR-II fuel (e.g., U-10Zr), the prescribed electrolytic reduction system would not be expected to substantially reduce zirconium oxide, and the accumulation of sodium in the electrolyte could interfere with the reduction of uranium oxide, or at least render it less efficient.

Hermann, S.D.; Gese, N.J. [Separations Department, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Wurth, L.A. [Zinc Air Inc., 5314-A US Hwy 2 West, Columbia Falls, MT 59912 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Corrosion of Aluminum-Uranium Alloys in Water Vapor at 200\\260C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coupons of aluminum-uranium alloys at 10 and 18 weight percent were exposed to a saturated water vapor condition at 200 degrees C up to about 1500 hours and compared to previous results for aluminum 1100. The aluminum-uranium materials exhibited a range of initial corrosion rates and approached similar rates with the formation of a passive film of boehmite (Al2O3oH2O). The cast and extruded 10 percent uranium, having a primary aluminum-eutectic microstructure, was more corrosion resistant than the 18% cast and extruded. The initial corrosion rates of the aluminum-uranium materials were one to four times higher than that for aluminum 1100. It is postulated that a micro-galvanic coupling between the large UAl4 particles and the aluminum matrix has caused the variation. Sectioning the exposed specimens shows different characteristics of the oxide layers. In the case of the cast and extruded Al-10 percent U alloy, small uranium aluminide particles can be seen in the boehmite matrix and do not seem to be corroded. The oxide film of the Al-18 percent U alloy appears to have two distinct oxide layers. The outer layer has mass aggregates formed in the aluminum oxide matrix, while the inner layer contains UAl4 particles as in the case of Al-10 percent U

Lam, P.S.

1998-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

336

Uranyl Protoporphyrin: a New Uranium Complex  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...received 3 times the LD50 of uranium as uranyl protoporphyrin...nitrate, had showed livers depleted of glycogen and kidneys...destruc-tion typical of uranium poisoning. The uranium-damaged...T. Godwin et al., Cancer 8, 601 (1954). 5...excretion of hexavalent uranium in man," in Proc...

ROBERT E. BASES

1957-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

337

Uranium: Environmental Pollution and Health Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Uranium is found ubiquitously in nature in low concentrations in soil, rock, and water. Naturally occurring uranium contains three isotopes, namely 238U, 235U, and 234U. All uranium isotopes have the same chemical properties, but they have different radiological properties. The main civilian use of uranium is to fuel nuclear power plants, whereas high enriched (in 235U) uranium is used in the military sector as nuclear explosives and depleted uranium (DU) as penetrators or tank shielding. Exposure to uranium may cause health problems due to its radiological (uranium is predominantly emitting alpha-particles) and chemical actions (heavy metal toxicity). Uranium uptake may occur by ingestion, inhalation, contaminated wounds, and embedded fragments especially for soldiers. Inhalation of dust is considered the major pathway for uranium uptake in workplaces. Soluble uranium compounds tend to quickly pass through the body, whereas insoluble uranium compounds pose a more serious inhalation exposure hazard. The kidney is the most sensitive organ for uranium chemotoxicity. An important indirect radiological effect of uranium is the increased risk of lung cancers from inhalation of the daughter products of radon, a noble gas in the uranium decay chains that transports uranium-derived radioactivity from soil into the indoor environment. No direct evidence about the carcinogenic effect of DU in humans is available yet.

D. Melo; W. Burkart

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Chapter 1: Introduction  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Portsmouth DUF Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS 1 INTRODUCTION Over the last five decades, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has enriched large quantities of uranium for nuclear applications by means of gaseous diffusion. This enrichment has taken place at three DOE sites located at Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP, formerly known as the K-25 site) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Figure 1-1). "Depleted" uranium hexafluoride (commonly referred to as DUF 6 ) is a product of this process. It is being stored at the three sites. The total DUF 6 inventory at the three sites weighs approximately 700,000 metric tons (t) (770,000 short tons [tons]) 1 and is stored in about 60,000 steel cylinders. This document is a site-specific

339

Energy Conversion to Electricity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

30 May 1974 research-article Energy Conversion to Electricity D. Clark...continuing growth in the demand for energy, and of electricity as the route...the electricity share of the total energy market and of the substitution of electricity...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Solar Energy Conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

If solar energy is to become a practical alternative to fossil fuels we must have efficient ways to convert photons into electricity fuel and heat. The need for better conversion technologies is a driving force behind many recent developments in biology materials and especially nanoscience.

George W. Crabtree; Nathan S. Lewis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium oxide conversion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Campus Conversations: CLIMATE CHANGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

review and input from scholars with expertise in climate change and communication. #12; Welcome Thank youCampus Conversations: CLIMATE CHANGE AND THE CAMPUS Southwestern Pennsylvania Program booklet is an adaptation and updating of Global Warming and Climate Change, a brochure developed in 1994

Attari, Shahzeen Z.

342

Solar energy conversion.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

If solar energy is to become a practical alternative to fossil fuels, we must have efficient ways to convert photons into electricity, fuel, and heat. The need for better conversion technologies is a driving force behind many recent developments in biology, materials, and especially nanoscience. The Sun has the enormous untapped potential to supply our growing energy needs. The barrier to greater use of the solar resource is its high cost relative to the cost of fossil fuels, although the disparity will decrease with the rising prices of fossil fuels and the rising costs of mitigating their impact on the environment and climate. The cost of solar energy is directly related to the low conversion efficiency, the modest energy density of solar radiation, and the costly materials currently required. The development of materials and methods to improve solar energy conversion is primarily a scientific challenge: Breakthroughs in fundamental understanding ought to enable marked progress. There is plenty of room for improvement, since photovoltaic conversion efficiencies for inexpensive organic and dye-sensitized solar cells are currently about 10% or less, the conversion efficiency of photosynthesis is less than 1%, and the best solar thermal efficiency is 30%. The theoretical limits suggest that we can do much better. Solar conversion is a young science. Its major growth began in the 1970s, spurred by the oil crisis that highlighted the pervasive importance of energy to our personal, social, economic, and political lives. In contrast, fossil-fuel science has developed over more than 250 years, stimulated by the Industrial Revolution and the promise of abundant fossil fuels. The science of thermodynamics, for example, is intimately intertwined with the development of the steam engine. The Carnot cycle, the mechanical equivalent of heat, and entropy all played starring roles in the development of thermodynamics and the technology of heat engines. Solar-energy science faces an equally rich future, with nanoscience enabling the discovery of the guiding principles of photonic energy conversion and their use in the development of cost-competitive new technologies.

Crabtree, G. W.; Lewis, N. S. (Materials Science Division); (California Inst. of Tech.)

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

The End of Cheap Uranium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Historic data from many countries demonstrate that on average no more than 50-70% of the uranium in a deposit could be mined. An analysis of more recent data from Canada and Australia leads to a mining model with an average deposit extraction lifetime of 10+- 2 years. This simple model provides an accurate description of the extractable amount of uranium for the recent mining operations. Using this model for all larger existing and planned uranium mines up to 2030, a global uranium mining peak of at most 58 +- 4 ktons around the year 2015 is obtained. Thereafter we predict that uranium mine production will decline to at most 54 +- 5 ktons by 2025 and, with the decline steepening, to at most 41 +- 5 ktons around 2030. This amount will not be sufficient to fuel the existing and planned nuclear power plants during the next 10-20 years. In fact, we find that it will be difficult to avoid supply shortages even under a slow 1%/year worldwide nuclear energy phase-out scenario up to 2025. We thus suggest that a worldwide nuclear energy phase-out is in order. If such a slow global phase-out is not voluntarily effected, the end of the present cheap uranium supply situation will be unavoidable. The result will be that some countries will simply be unable to afford sufficient uranium fuel at that point, which implies involuntary and perhaps chaotic nuclear phase-outs in those countries involving brownouts, blackouts, and worse.

Michael Dittmar

2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

344

X-ray spectroscopic studies of microbial transformations of uranium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several uranium compounds U-metal ({alpha}-phase), UO{sub 2}, U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, {gamma}-UO{sub 3}, uranyl acetate, uranyl nitrate, uranyl sulfate, aqueous and solid forms of 1:1 U:citric acid and 1:1:2 U:Fe:citric acid mixed-metal complexes, and a precipitate obtained by photodegradation of the U-citrate complex were characterized by X-ray spectroscopy using XPS, XANES, and EXAFS. XPS and XANES were used to determine U oxidation states. Spectral shifts were obtained at the U 4f{sub 7/2} and U 4f{sub 5/2} binding energies using XPS, and at the uranium M{sub V} absorption edge using XANES. The magnitude of the energy shift with oxidation state, and the ability to detect mixed-valent forms make these ideal techniques for determining uranium speciation in wastes subjected to bacterial action. The structure of 1:1 U:citric acid complex in both the aqueous and solid state was determined by EXAFS analysis of hexavalent uranium at the L{sub M} absorption edge and suggests the presence of a binuclear complex with a (UO{sub 2}){sub 2}({mu},{eta}{sup 2} {minus}citrato){sub 2} core with a U-U distance of 5.2 {angstrom}. The influence of Fe on the structure of U-citrate complex was determined by EXAFS and the presence of a binuclear mixed-metal citrate complex with a U-Fe distance of 4.8 {angstrom} was confirmed. The precipitate resulting from photodegradation of U-citrate complex was identified as an amorphous form of uranium trioxide by XPS and EXAS.

Dodge, C.J.; Francis, A.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Clayton, C.R. [SUNY at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Safe Operating Procedure SAFETY PROTOCOL: URANIUM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

involve the use of natural or depleted uranium. Natural isotopes of uranium are U-238, U-235 and U-234 (see Table 1 for natural abundances). Depleted uranium contains less of the isotopes: U-235 and U-234. The specific activity of depleted uranium (5.0E-7 Ci/g) is less than that of natural uranium (7.1E-7 Ci

Farritor, Shane

346

A review of uranium economics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The recent increase in the demand for power for commercial use, the challenges facing fossil fuel use and the prospective of cheap nuclear power motivate different countries to plan for the use of nuclear power. This paper reviews many aspects of uranium economics, which includes the advantages and disadvantages of nuclear power, comparisons with other sources of power, nuclear power production and requirements, the uranium market, uranium pricing, spot price and long-term price indicators, and the cost of building a nuclear power facility.

A.K. Mazher

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Uranium Mining Life-Cycle Energy Cost vs. Uranium Resources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The long-term viability of nuclear energy systems depends on the availability of uranium and on the question, whether the overall energy balance of the fuel cycle is positive, taking into account the full life-cy...

W. Eberhard Falck

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Accumulation and Distribution of Uranium in Rats after Implantation with Depleted Uranium Fragments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Environmental and health consequences of depleted uranium use in the 1991 Gulf...Properties, use and health effects of depleted uranium (DU): a general...J. (2002). Health effects of embedded depleted uranium. Mil Med. 167......

Guoying Zhu; Mingguang Tan; Yulan Li; Xiqiao Xiang; Heping Hu; Shuquan Zhao

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Uranium-loaded apoferritin with antibodies attached: molecular design for uranium neutron-capture therapy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Molecular design for uranium neutron-capture therapy (cancer/immunotherapy...methodology for cancer therapy. Boron...system using uranium, as described...800 to =400 uranium atoms per apoferritin...uranyl ions were depleted, and loading...

J F Hainfeld

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Characterization of uranium isotopic abundances in depleted uranium metal assay standard 115  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Certified reference material (CRM) 115, Uranium (Depleted) Metal (Uranium Assay Standard), was analyzed using a ... TRITON Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer to characterize the uranium isotope-amount ratios. T...

K. J. Mathew; G. L. Singleton; R. M. Essex…

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Disposition of uranium-233  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US is developing a strategy for the disposition of surplus weapons-usable uranium-233 ({sup 233}U). The strategy (1) identifies the requirements for the disposition of surplus {sup 233}U; (2) identifies potential disposition options, including key issues to be resolved with each option; and (3) defines a road map that identifies future key decisions and actions. The disposition of weapons-usable fissile materials is part of a US international arms-control program for reduction of the number of nuclear weapons and the quantities of nuclear-weapons-usable materials worldwide. The disposition options ultimately lead to waste forms requiring some type of geological disposal. Major options are described herein.

Tousley, D.R. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Fissile Materials Disposition; Forsberg, C.W.; Krichinsky, A.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1997-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

352

Wind energy conversion system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The wind energy conversion system includes a wind machine having a propeller connected to a generator of electric power, the propeller rotating the generator in response to force of an incident wind. The generator converts the power of the wind to electric power for use by an electric load. Circuitry for varying the duty factor of the generator output power is connected between the generator and the load to thereby alter a loading of the generator and the propeller by the electric load. Wind speed is sensed electro-optically to provide data of wind speed upwind of the propeller, to thereby permit tip speed ratio circuitry to operate the power control circuitry and thereby optimize the tip speed ratio by varying the loading of the propeller. Accordingly, the efficiency of the wind energy conversion system is maximized.

Longrigg, Paul (Golden, CO)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Process for the recovery of uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a process for the recovery of uranium from a wet-process phosphoric acid, comprising treating in an extraction step the preliminarily oxidized acid first with an organic solvent consisting essentially of a dialkylphosphoric acid and a trialkyphosphine oxide dissolved in an inert and unreactive organic solvent whereby there are obtained a uranium-free phosphoric acid and an organic extract consisting essentially of the solvent containing the major portion of uranium; then, in a reextraction step, separating the uranium from the organic extract as ammonium uranyl tricarbonate by reacting the organic extract with ammonium hydroxide and ammonium carbonate; and recycling the uranium-free solvent to the extraction step; an improvement comprises treating the organic extract in a reextraction apparatus having at least two stages, by (A) introducing the extract at the head of the first stage; (B) countercurrently introducing ammonia or ammonium hydroxide solution at the bottom of the first stage; the ph of the first stage being controlled and maintained at a value of 8.0 to 8.5; (C) introducing an ammonium carbonate aqueous solution at the bottom of the last stage; the amount of ammonium carbonate employed being 50-80 percent by weight of the theoretical molar quantity which is necessary to neutralize the dialkylphosphoric acid contained in the solvent and to convert the uranium to ammonium uranyl tricarbonate; and (D) regenerating the ammoniated solvent obtained after the reextraction step by treating it with an acid before recycling it to the extraction step.

Francois, A.; Sialino, A.

1980-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

354

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Domestic Uranium Production Report June 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. U.S. Energy Information Administration | 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report ii Contacts This report was prepared by the staff of the Renewables and Uranium Statistics Team, Office of Electricity,

355

2012 Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Uranium Marketing Annual Uranium Marketing Annual Report May 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 May 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | 2012 Uranium Marketing Annual Report i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. May 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | 2012 Uranium Marketing Annual Report ii

356

Uranium Enrichment's $7-Billion Uncertainty  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...229 : 1407 ( 1985 ). Uranium...claims John R. Longenecker, who heads...because it be-John Longenecker '"ou have...based on gas centrifuges Finally...research on the centrifuge technology...21 June 1985, p. 1407...

COLIN NORMAN

1986-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

357

2013 Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Industry Annual, Tables 28, 29, 30 and 31. 2003-13-Form EIA-858, "Uranium Marketing Annual Survey". Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components because of independent...

358

2013 Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Industry Annual, Tables 10, 11 and 16. 2003-13-Form EIA-858, "Uranium Marketing Annual Survey". dollars per pound U 3 O 8 equivalent dollars per pound U 3 O 8...

359

2013 Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Industry Annual, Tables 28, 29, 30 and 31. 2003-13-Form EIA-858, "Uranium Marketing Annual Survey". million pounds U 3 O 8 equivalent million pounds U 3 O 8 equivalent...

360

2013 Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Industry Annual, Tables 22, 23, 25, and 27. 2003-13-Form EIA-858, "Uranium Marketing Annual Survey". - No data reported. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 1994 1995 1996 1997...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium oxide conversion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. U.S. uranium concentrate production, shipments, and sales, 2003-13" "Activity at U.S. Mills and In-Situ-Leach Plants",2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013...

362

Session: Energy Conversion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hydrothermal Energy Conversion Technology'' by David Robertson and Raymond J. LaSala; ''Materials for Geothermal Production'' by Lawrence E. Kukacka; ''Supersaturated Turbine Expansions for Binary Geothermal Power Plants'' by Carl J. Bliem; ''Geothermal Waster Treatment Biotechnology: Progress and Advantages to the Utilities'' by Eugen T. Premuzic; and ''Geothermal Brine Chemistry Modeling Program'' by John H. Weare.

Robertson, David; LaSala, Raymond J.; Kukacka, Lawrence E.; Bliem, Carl J.; Premuzic, Eugene T.; Weare, John H.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Uranium Resources Inc URI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Uranium Resources Inc URI Uranium Resources Inc URI Jump to: navigation, search Name Uranium Resources, Inc. (URI) Place Lewisville, Texas Zip 75067 Product Uranium Resources, Inc. (URI) is primarily engaged in the business of acquiring, exploring, developing and mining uranium properties using the in situ recovery (ISR) or solution mining process. References Uranium Resources, Inc. (URI)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Uranium Resources, Inc. (URI) is a company located in Lewisville, Texas . References ↑ "Uranium Resources, Inc. (URI)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Uranium_Resources_Inc_URI&oldid=352580" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

364

Conversion of Questionnaire Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the survey, respondents are asked to provide qualitative answers (well, adequate, needs improvement) on how well material control and accountability (MC&A) functions are being performed. These responses can be used to develop failure probabilities for basic events performed during routine operation of the MC&A systems. The failure frequencies for individual events may be used to estimate total system effectiveness using a fault tree in a probabilistic risk analysis (PRA). Numeric risk values are required for the PRA fault tree calculations that are performed to evaluate system effectiveness. So, the performance ratings in the questionnaire must be converted to relative risk values for all of the basic MC&A tasks performed in the facility. If a specific material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) task is being performed at the 'perfect' level, the task is considered to have a near zero risk of failure. If the task is performed at a less than perfect level, the deficiency in performance represents some risk of failure for the event. As the degree of deficiency in performance increases, the risk of failure increases. If a task that should be performed is not being performed, that task is in a state of failure. The failure probabilities of all basic events contribute to the total system risk. Conversion of questionnaire MPC&A system performance data to numeric values is a separate function from the process of completing the questionnaire. When specific questions in the questionnaire are answered, the focus is on correctly assessing and reporting, in an adjectival manner, the actual performance of the related MC&A function. Prior to conversion, consideration should not be given to the numeric value that will be assigned during the conversion process. In the conversion process, adjectival responses to questions on system performance are quantified based on a log normal scale typically used in human error analysis (see A.D. Swain and H.E. Guttmann, 'Handbook of Human Reliability Analysis with Emphasis on Nuclear Power Plant Applications,' NUREG/CR-1278). This conversion produces the basic event risk of failure values required for the fault tree calculations. The fault tree is a deductive logic structure that corresponds to the operational nuclear MC&A system at a nuclear facility. The conventional Delphi process is a time-honored approach commonly used in the risk assessment field to extract numerical values for the failure rates of actions or activities when statistically significant data is absent.

Powell, Danny H [ORNL] [ORNL; Elwood Jr, Robert H [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Semiconductor Nanowires and Nanotubes for Energy Conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanowires and Nanotubes for Energy Conversion By MelissaNanowires and Nanotubes for Energy Conversion by MelissaNanowires and Nanotubes for Energy Conversion by Melissa

Fardy, Melissa Anne

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draft Programmaticof ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. Depart~on Ocean TherUial Energy Conversion, June 18, 1979. Ocean

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Advanced Conversion Roadmap Workshop | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Conversion Roadmap Workshop DOE introduction slides to the Advanced Conversion Roadmap Workshop webinar. ctabwebinardoe.pdf More Documents & Publications Conversion...

368

Inositol hexaphosphate: a potential chelating agent for uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......and staining pigments. Depleted uranium, a by-product of uranium...177-193. 2 World Health Organization (WHO). Uranium in drinking-water...the lethal effect of oral uranium poisoning. Health Phys. (2000) 78(6......

D. Cebrian; A. Tapia; A. Real; M. A. Morcillo

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Uranium chloride extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels containing rare earth and noble metal fission products as well as other fission products is disclosed. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of Ca chloride and a U-Fe alloy which is liquid at about 800 C to dissolve uranium metal and the noble metal fission product metals and transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals leaving Ca chloride having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein. The Ca chloride and CaO and the fission products contained therein are separated from the U-Fe alloy and the metal values dissolved therein. The U-Fe alloy having dissolved therein reduced metals from the spent nuclear fuel is contacted with a mixture of one or more alkali metal or alkaline earth metal halides selected from the class consisting of alkali metal or alkaline earth metal and Fe or U halide or a combination thereof to transfer transuranium actinide metals and rare earth metals to the halide salt leaving the uranium and some noble metal fission products in the U-Fe alloy and thereafter separating the halide salt and the transuranium metals dissolved therein from the U-Fe alloy and the metals dissolved therein. 1 figure.

Miller, W.E.; Ackerman, J.P.; Battles, J.E.; Johnson, T.R.; Pierce, R.D.

1992-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

370

Experimental and Analytical Studies on Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy conversion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .other pyroelectric energy conversion methods . . . . Chapter6 Pyroelectric Energy Conversion using PLZT and

Lee, Felix

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Fuel Cycle System Analysis Implications of Sodium-Cooled Metal-Fueled Fast Reactor Transuranic Conversion Ratio  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

If advanced fuel cycles are to include a large number of fast reactors (FRs), what should be the transuranic (TRU) conversion ratio (CR)? The nuclear energy era started with the assumption that they should be breeder reactors (CR > 1), but the full range of possible CRs eventually received attention. For example, during the recent U.S. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership program, the proposal was burner reactors (CR < 1). Yet, more recently, Massachusetts Institute of Technology's "Future of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle" proposed CR [approximately] 1. Meanwhile, the French company EDF remains focused on breeders. At least one of the reasons for the differences of approach is different fuel cycle objectives. To clarify matters, this paper analyzes the impact of TRU CR on many parameters relevant to fuel cycle systems and therefore spans a broad range of topic areas. The analyses are based on a FR physics parameter scan of TRU CR from 0 to [approximately]1.8 in a sodium-cooled metal-fueled FR (SMFR), in which the fuel from uranium-oxide-fueled light water reactors (LWRs) is recycled directly to FRs and FRs displace LWRs in the fleet. In this instance, the FRs are sodium cooled and metal fueled. Generally, it is assumed that all TRU elements are recycled, which maximizes uranium ore utilization for a given TRU CR and waste radiotoxicity reduction and is consistent with the assumption of used metal fuel separated by electrochemical means. In these analyses, the fuel burnup was constrained by imposing a neutron fluence limit to fuel cladding to the same constant value. This paper first presents static, time-independent measures of performance for the LWR [right arrow] FR fuel cycle, including mass, heat, gamma emission, radiotoxicity, and the two figures of merit for materials for weapon attractiveness developed by C. Bathke et al. No new fuel cycle will achieve a static equilibrium in the foreseeable future. Therefore, additional analyses are shown with dynamic, time-dependent measures of performance including uranium usage, TRU inventory, and radiotoxicity to evaluate the complex impacts of transition from the current uranium-fueled LWR system, and other more realistic impacts that may not be intuited from the time-independent steady-state conditions of the end-state fuel cycle. These analyses were performed using the Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model VISION. Compared with static calculations, dynamic results paint a different picture of option space and the urgency of starting a FR fleet. For example, in a static analysis, there is a sharp increase in uranium utilization as CR exceeds 1.0 (burner versus breeder). However, in dynamic analyses that examine uranium use over the next 1 to 2 centuries, behavior as CR crosses the 1.0 threshold is smooth, and other parameters such as the time required outside of reactors to recycle fuel become important. Overall, we find that there is no unambiguously superior value of TRU CR; preferences depend on the relative importance of different fuel cycle system objectives.

Steven J. Piet; Edward A. Hoffman; Samuel E. Bays; Gretchen E. Matthern; Jacob J. Jacobson; Ryan Clement; David W. Gerts

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Chemomechanics of ionically conductive ceramics for electrical energy conversion and storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Functional materials for energy conversion and storage exhibit strong coupling between electrochemistry and mechanics. For example, ceramics developed as electrodes for both solid oxide fuel cells and batteries exhibit ...

Swallow, Jessica Gabrielle

373

Methane-to-hydrogen conversion in a reversible flow filtration combustion reactor at a high pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The noncatalytic process of partial oxidation of methane to syngas in a reversible flow filtration combustion reactor at high pressures has been considered. ... conversion process — the maximum temperature in the...

Yu. M. Dmitrenko; P. A. Klyovan

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Variations of the Isotopic Ratios of Uranium in Environmental Samples Containing Traces of Depleted Uranium: Theoretical and Experimental Aspects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Samples Containing Traces of Depleted Uranium: Theoretical and Experimental...for the detection of traces of depleted uranium (DU) in environmental samples...percentage composition is about 20% depleted uranium and 80% natural uranium, for......

M. Magnoni; S. Bertino; B. Bellotto; M. Campi

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Efficacy of oral and intraperitoneal administration of CBMIDA for removing uranium in rats after parenteral injections of depleted uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......after parenteral injections of depleted uranium S. Fukuda 1 * M. Ikeda 1 M...intramuscular (i.m.) injections of depleted uranium (DU) was examined and the...with uranium. INTRODUCTION Depleted uranium (DU) can affect human health......

S. Fukuda; M. Ikeda; M. Nakamura; X. Yan; Y. Xie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Standard test method for analysis of urine for uranium-235 and uranium-238 isotopes by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This test method covers the determination of the concentration of uranium-235 and uranium-238 in urine using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry. This test method can be used to support uranium facility bioassay programs. 1.2 This method detection limits for 235U and 238U are 6 ng/L. To meet the requirements of ANSI N13.30, the minimum detectable activity (MDA) of each radionuclide measured must be at least 0.1 pCi/L (0.0037 Bq/L). The MDA translates to 47 ng/L for 235U and 300 ng/L for 238U. Uranium– 234 cannot be determined at the MDA with this test method because of its low mass concentration level equivalent to 0.1 pCi/L. 1.3 The digestion and anion separation of urine may not be necessary when uranium concentrations of more than 100 ng/L are present. 1.4 Units—The values stated in picoCurie per liter units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1....

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Zinc phosphate conversion coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate .alpha.-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal.

Sugama, Toshifumi (Wading River, NY)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Zinc phosphate conversion coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate {alpha}-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal. 33 figs.

Sugama, T.

1997-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

379

Transcript of Public Hearing on DUF6 Conversion Facility Draft EISs, Held Jan. 7, 2004, Waverly, Ohio  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- - - - - - Draft Environmental Impact Statements For the Construction and Operation of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities at the Paducah, Kentucky and Portsmouth, Ohio Sites - - - PUBLIC HEARING JANUARY 7, 2004 - - - LOCATION: Pike County YMCA 400 Pride Drive Waverly, Ohio TIME: 6:00

380

Conversion of synthesis gas and methanol to hydrocarbons using zeolite catalysts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conversion on siiicalite were studied. Various catalysts based on the small-pore zeolites chabazite and erionite, combined with a methanol synthesis component, zinc oxide, were prepared. Certain of the catalysts contained either sulfur or selenium as a... conversion on siiicalite were studied. Various catalysts based on the small-pore zeolites chabazite and erionite, combined with a methanol synthesis component, zinc oxide, were prepared. Certain of the catalysts contained either sulfur or selenium as a...

Matthews, Michael Anthony

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium oxide conversion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Spectrophotometric determination of tantalum in boron, uranium, zirconium, and uranium-Zircaloy-2 alloy with malachite green  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Spectrophotometric determination of tantalum in boron, uranium, zirconium, and uranium-Zircaloy-2 alloy with malachite green ...

Allan R. Eberle; Morris W. Lerner

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

22 - Conversion Factors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter details the viscosity and pressure conversion chart. To convert absolute or dynamic viscosity from one set of units to another, one must locate the given set of units in the left-hand column then multiply the numerical value by the factor shown horizontally to the right-hand side, under the set of units desired. The chapter also explains that to convert kinematic viscosity from one set of units to another, one must locate the given set of units in the left-hand column and multiply the numerical value by the factor shown horizontally to the right-hand side, under the set of units desired. The chapter also defines how the conversion from natural gas to other fuels has progressed from possibility to reality for many companies and will become necessary for many others in months and years ahead. Fuels that are considered practical replacements for gas include coal, heavy fuel oils, middle distillates (such as kerosine–typeturbo fuel and burner fuel oils) and liquefied petroleum gas.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Energy conversion system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The energy conversion system includes a photo-voltaic array for receiving solar radiation and converting such radiation to electrical energy. The photo-voltaic array is mounted on a stretched membrane that is held by a frame. Tracking means for orienting the photo-voltaic array in predetermined positions that provide optimal exposure to solar radiation cooperate with the frame. An enclosure formed of a radiation transmissible material includes an inside containment space that accommodates the photo-voltaic array on the stretched membrane, the frame and the tracking means, and forms a protective shield for all such components. The enclosure is preferably formed of a flexible inflatable material and maintains its preferred form, such as a dome, under the influence of a low air pressure furnished to the dome. Under this arrangement the energy conversion system is streamlined for minimizing wind resistance, sufficiently weatherproof for providing protection against weather hazards such as hail, capable of using diffused light, lightweight for low-cost construction, and operational with a minimal power draw.

Murphy, Lawrence M. (Lakewood, CO)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Energy conversion system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The energy conversion system includes a photo-voltaic array for receiving solar radiation and converting such radiation to electrical energy. The photo-voltaic array is mounted on a stretched membrane that is held by a frame. Tracking means for orienting the photo-voltaic array in predetermined positions that provide optimal exposure to solar radiation cooperate with the frame. An enclosure formed of a radiation transmissible material includes an inside containment space that accommodates the photo-voltaic array on the stretched membrane, the frame and the tracking means, and forms a protective shield for all such components. The enclosure is preferably formed of a flexible inflatable material and maintains its preferred form, such as a dome, under the influence of a low air pressure furnished to the dome. Under this arrangement the energy conversion system is streamlined for minimizing wind resistance, sufficiently weathproof for providing protection against weather hazards such as hail, capable of using diffused light, lightweight for low-cost construction and operational with a minimal power draw.

Murphy, L.M.

1985-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

385

Evidence of uranium biomineralization in sandstone-hosted roll-front uranium deposits, northwestern China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evidence of uranium biomineralization in sandstone-hosted roll-front uranium deposits, northwestern Available online 25 January 2005 Abstract We show evidence that the primary uranium minerals, uraninite-front uranium deposits, Xinjiang, northwestern China were biogenically precipitated and psuedomorphically

Fayek, Mostafa

386

Catalytic oxidation of light alkanes in presence of a base  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The presence of a base in the reaction mixture in a metal-ligand catalyzed partial oxidation of alkanes results in sustained catalyst activity, and in greater percent conversion as compared with oxidation in the absence of base, while maintaining satisfactory selectivity for the desired oxidation, for example the oxidation of isobutane to isobutanol.

Bhinde, Manoj V. (Boothwyn, PA); Bierl, Thomas W. (West Chester, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Catalytic oxidation of light alkanes in presence of a base  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The presence of a base in the reaction mixture in a metal-ligand catalyzed partial oxidation of alkanes results in sustained catalyst activity, and in greater percent conversion as compared with oxidation in the absence of base, while maintaining satisfactory selectivity for the desired oxidation, for example the oxidation of isobutane to isobutanol. 1 fig.

Bhinde, M.V.; Bierl, T.W.

1998-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

388

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Production Report Domestic Uranium Production Report 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 State(s) 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Wyoming 134 139 181 195 245 301 308 348 424 512 Colorado and Texas 48 140 269 263 557 696 340 292 331 248 Nebraska and New Mexico 92 102 123 160 149 160 159 134 127 W Arizona, Utah, and Washington 47 40 75 120 245 360 273 281 W W Alaska, Michigan, Nevada, and South Dakota 0 0 0 16 25 30 W W W W California, Montana, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, and Virginia 0 0 0 0 9 17 W W W W Total 321 420 648 755 1,231 1,563 1,096 1,073 1,191 1,196 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-851A, "Domestic Uranium Production Report" (2003-2012). Table 7. Employment in the U.S. uranium production industry by state, 2003-2012 person-years

389

The End of Cheap Uranium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Historic data from many countries demonstrate that on average no more than 50-70% of the uranium in a deposit could be mined. An analysis of more recent data from Canada and Australia leads to a mining model with an average deposit extraction lifetime of 10+- 2 years. This simple model provides an accurate description of the extractable amount of uranium for the recent mining operations. Using this model for all larger existing and planned uranium mines up to 2030, a global uranium mining peak of at most 58 +- 4 ktons around the year 2015 is obtained. Thereafter we predict that uranium mine production will decline to at most 54 +- 5 ktons by 2025 and, with the decline steepening, to at most 41 +- 5 ktons around 2030. This amount will not be sufficient to fuel the existing and planned nuclear power plants during the next 10-20 years. In fact, we find that it will be difficult to avoid supply shortages even under a slow 1%/year worldwide nuclear energy phase-out scenario up to 2025. We thus suggest that a world...

Dittmar, Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Uranium Metal: Potential for Discovering Commercial Uses  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Uranium Metal Uranium Metal Potential for Discovering Commercial Uses Steven M. Baker, Ph.D. Knoxville Tn 5 August 1998 Summary Uranium Metal is a Valuable Resource 3 Large Inventory of "Depleted Uranium" 3 Need Commercial Uses for Inventory  Avoid Disposal Cost  Real Added Value to Society 3 Uranium Metal Has Valuable Properties  Density  Strength 3 Market will Come if Story is Told Background The Nature of Uranium Background 3 Natural Uranium: 99.3% U238; 0.7% U 235 3 U235 Fissile  Nuclear Weapons  Nuclear Reactors 3 U238 Fertile  Neutron Irradiation of U238 Produces Pu239  Neutrons Come From U235 Fission  Pu239 is Fissile (Weapons, Reactors, etc.) Post World War II Legacy Background 3 "Enriched" Uranium Product  Weapons Program 

391

Domestic Uranium Production Report - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Production Report - Annual Domestic Uranium Production Report - Annual With Data for 2012 | Release Date: June 06, 2013 | Next Release Date: May 2014 |full report Previous domestic uranium production reports Year: 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 Go Drilling Figure 1. U.S. Uranium drilling by number of holes, 2004-2012 U.S. uranium exploration drilling was 5,112 holes covering 3.4 million feet in 2012. Development drilling was 5,970 holes and 3.7 million feet. Combined, total uranium drilling was 11,082 holes covering 7.2 million feet, 5 percent more holes than in 2011. Expenditures for uranium drilling in the United States were $67 million in 2012, an increase of 24 percent compared with 2011. Mining, production, shipments, and sales U.S. uranium mines produced 4.3 million pounds U3O8 in 2012, 5 percent more

392

Polyethylene Encapsulation of Depleted Uranium Trioxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Depleted uranium, in the form of uranium trioxide (UO3) powder, was encapsulated in molten polyethylene forming a stable, dense composite henceforth known as DUPoly (patent pending). Materials were fed by calibra...

J. W. Adams; P. R. Lageraaen; P. D. Kalb…

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Characterization of options and their analysis requirements for the long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is examining alternative strategies for the long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) currently stored at the gaseous diffusion plants at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, and on the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This paper describes the methodology for the comprehensive and ongoing technical analysis of the options being considered. An overview of these options, along with several of the suboptions being considered, is presented. The long-term management strategy alternatives fall into three broad categories: use, storage, or disposal. Conversion of the depleted UF6 to another form such as oxide or metal is needed to implement most of these alternatives. Likewise, transportation of materials is an integral part of constructing the complete pathway between the current storage condition and ultimate disposition. The analysis of options includes development of pre-conceptual designs; estimates of effluents, wastes, and emissions; specification of resource requirements; and preliminary hazards assessments. The results of this analysis will assist DOE in selecting a strategy by providing the engineering information necessary to evaluate the environmental impacts and costs of implementing the management strategy alternatives.

Dubrin, J.W.; Rosen, R.S.; Zoller, J.N.; Harri, J.W.; Schwertz, N.L.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Statistical data of the uranium industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data are presented on US uranium reserves, potential resources, exploration, mining, drilling, milling, and other activities of the uranium industry through 1980. The compendium reflects the basic programs of the Grand Junction Office. Statistics are based primarily on information provided by the uranium exploration, mining, and milling companies. Data on commercial U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ sales and purchases are included. Data on non-US uranium production and resources are presented in the appendix. (DMC)

none,

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A neutronic feasibility study was performed to determine the uranium densities that would be required to convert the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from HEU (93%) to LEU (<20%)fuel. The LEU core that was studied is the same as the current HEU core, except for potential changes in the design of the fuel plates. The study concludes that conversion of HFIR from HEU to LEU fuel would require an advanced fuel with a uranium density of 6-7 gU/cm{sup 3} in the inner fuel element and 9-10 gU/cm{sup 3} in the outer fuel element to match the cycle length of the HEU core. LEU fuel with uranium density up to 4.8 gU/cm{sup 3} is currently qualified for research reactor use. Modifications in fuel grading and burnable poison distribution are needed to produce an acceptable power distribution.

Mo, S. C.

1998-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

396

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

10. Uranium reserve estimates at the end of 2012" 10. Uranium reserve estimates at the end of 2012" "million pounds U3O8" "Uranium Reserve Estimates1 by Mine and Property Status, Mining Method, and State(s)","Forward Cost 2" ,"$0 to $30 per pound","$0 to $50 per pound","$0 to $100 per pound" "Properties with Exploration Completed, Exploration Continuing, and Only Assessment Work","W","W",101.956759 "Properties Under Development for Production","W","W","W" "Mines in Production","W",21.40601,"W" "Mines Closed Temporarily and Closed Permanently","W","W",133.139239 "In-Situ Leach Mining","W","W",128.576534

397

Y-12 Uranium Exposure Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Following the recent restart of operations at the Y-12 Plant, the Radiological Control Organization (RCO) observed that the enriched uranium exposures appeared to involve insoluble rather than soluble uranium that presumably characterized most earlier Y-12 operations. These observations necessitated changes in the bioassay program, particularly the need for routine fecal sampling. In addition, it was not reasonable to interpret the bioassay data using metabolic parameter values established during earlier Y-12 operations. Thus, the recent urinary and fecal bioassay data were interpreted using the default guidance in Publication 54 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP); that is, inhalation of Class Y uranium with an activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) of 1 {micro}m. Faced with apparently new workplace conditions, these actions were appropriate and ensured a cautionary approach to worker protection. As additional bioassay data were accumulated, it became apparent that the data were not consistent with Publication 54. Therefore, this study was undertaken to examine the situation.

Eckerman, K.F.; Kerr, G.D.

1999-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

398

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Production Report Domestic Uranium Production Report 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Cameco Crow Butte Operation Dawes, Nebraska 1,000,000 Operating Operating Operating Operating Operating Hydro Resources, Inc. Church Rock McKinley, New Mexico 1,000,000 Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Hydro Resources, Inc. Crownpoint McKinley, New Mexico 1,000,000 Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Lost Creek ISR LLC Lost Creek Project Sweetwater, Wyoming 2,000,000 Developing

399

Selection of a management strategy for depleted uranium hexafluoride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A consequence of the uranium enrichment process used in the United States (US) is the accumulation of a significant amount of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}). Currently, approximately 560,000 metric tons of the material are stored at three different sites. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recently initiated a program to consider alternative strategies for the cost-effective and environmentally safe long-term management of this inventory of depleted UF{sub 6}. The program involves a technology and engineering assessment of proposed management options (use/reuse, conversion, storage, or disposal) and an analysis of the potential environmental impacts and life-cycle costs of alternative management strategies. The information obtained from the studies will be used by the DOE to select a preferred long-term management strategy. The selection and implementation of a management strategy will involve consideration of a number of important issues such as environmental, health, and safety effects; the balancing of risks versus costs in a context of reduced government spending; socioeconomic implications, including effects on the domestic and international uranium industry; the technical status of proposed uses or technologies; and public involvement in the decision making process. Because of its provisions for considering a wide range of relevant issues and involving the public, this program has become a model for future DOE materials disposition programs. This paper presents an overview of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program. Technical findings of the program to date are presented, and major issues involved in selecting and implementing a management strategy are discussed.

Patton, S.E.; Hanrahan, E.J.; Bradley, C.E.

1995-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

400

The Uranium Institute 24th Annual Symposium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the waste U-238 into Pu-239 for burning. By this means 100 times as much energy can be obtained from it to extract the uranium, enriching the natural uranium in the fissile isotope U-235, burning the U-235 than the uranium fuel it burns, leading to a breeder reactor. In addition, if the reactor is a fast

Laughlin, Robert B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium oxide conversion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

New Findings Allay Concerns Over Depleted Uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...least some of the uranium had been irradiated...not represent a health threat,” says Danesi...VISAR KRYEZIU/AP Depleted uranium is what's left...not represent a health threat, says...VISAR KRYEZIU/AP Depleted uranium is what's left...

Richard Stone

2002-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

402

D Riso-R-429 Automated Uranium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

routinely used analytical techniques for uranium determina- tions in geological samples, fissionCM i D Riso-R-429 Automated Uranium Analysis by Delayed-Neutron Counting H. Kunzendorf, L. Løvborg AUTOMATED URANIUM ANALYSIS BY DELAYED-NEUTRON COUNTING H. Kunzendorf, L. Løvborg and E.M. Christiansen

403

Greater solubility usually = greater toxicity Chromium (Cr) Six oxidation states, +1, +2, +3, +4, +5, +6  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(depleted uranium) · 4 oxidation states (+4, +6 most common) · U(VI) water-soluble, U(IV) in-soluble Metals Uranium ­ heaviest natural element - 17 isotopes · Natural form % = U-238 (99.27), U-235 (0.72), U-234 (0 in nuclear fuel ­ U-235 (readily fissionable) · Used in nuclear and conventional weapons · Uranium enrichment

Bruns, Tom

404

The Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center conversion from HEU to LEU fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2-MW Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center (RINSC) open pool reactor was converted from 93% UAL-High Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel to 20% enrichment U3Si2-AL Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. The conversion included redesign of the core to a more compact size and the addition of beryllium reflectors and a beryllium flux trap. A significant increase in thermal flux level was achieved due to greater neutron leakage in the new compact core configuration. Following the conversion, a second cooling loop and an emergency core cooling system were installed to permit operation at 5 MW. After re-licensing at 2 MW, a power upgrade request will be submitted to the NRC.

Tehan, Terry

2000-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

405

Wind energy conversion system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a wind energy conversion system comprising: a propeller rotatable by force of wind; a generator of electricity mechanically coupled to the propeller for converting power of the wind to electric power for use by an electric load; means coupled between the generator and the electric load for varying the electric power drawn by the electric load to alter the electric loading of the generator; means for electro-optically sensing the speed of the wind at a location upwind from the propeller; and means coupled between the sensing means and the power varying means for operating the power varying means to adjust the electric load of the generator in accordance with a sensed value of wind speed to thereby obtain a desired ratio of wind speed to the speed of a tip of a blade of the propeller.

Longrigg, P.

1987-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

406

Quantum optical waveform conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Currently proposed architectures for long-distance quantum communication rely on networks of quantum processors connected by optical communications channels [1,2]. The key resource for such networks is the entanglement of matter-based quantum systems with quantum optical fields for information transmission. The optical interaction bandwidth of these material systems is a tiny fraction of that available for optical communication, and the temporal shape of the quantum optical output pulse is often poorly suited for long-distance transmission. Here we demonstrate that nonlinear mixing of a quantum light pulse with a spectrally tailored classical field can compress the quantum pulse by more than a factor of 100 and flexibly reshape its temporal waveform, while preserving all quantum properties, including entanglement. Waveform conversion can be used with heralded arrays of quantum light emitters to enable quantum communication at the full data rate of optical telecommunications.

D Kielpinski; JF Corney; HM Wiseman

2010-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

407

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. U.S. uranium mills by owner, location, capacity, and operating status at end of the year, 2008-2012" 4. U.S. uranium mills by owner, location, capacity, and operating status at end of the year, 2008-2012" "Mill Owner","Mill Name","County, State (existing and planned locations)","Milling Capacity","Operating Status at End of the Year" ,,,"(short tons of ore per day)",2008,2009,2010,2011,2012 "Cotter Corporation","Canon City Mill","Fremont, Colorado",0,"Standby","Standby","Standby","Reclamation","Demolished" "EFR White Mesa LLC","White Mesa Mill","San Juan, Utah",2000,"Operating","Operating","Operating","Operating","Operating"

408

BIOMASS ENERGY CONVERSION IN HAWAII  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Operations, vol. 2 of Biomass Energy (Stanford: StanfordPhotosynthethic Pathway Biomass Energy Production," ~c:_! _LBL-11902 UC-61a BIOMASS ENERGY CONVERSION IN HAWAII

Ritschard, Ronald L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Biochemical Conversion | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

by enhancing fuel yields in integrated biorefineries which combine conversion types with heat and power efficiencies to produce fuel and products. Lignocellulose (mainly lignin,...

410

Energy conversion by gravitational waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... out that if such particles are charged, the accelerations will constitute a mechanism for the conversion of gravitational ... of gravitational energy into electromagnetic ...

H. BONDI; F. A. E. PIRANI

1988-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

411

BLENDING LOW ENRICHED URANIUM WITH DEPLETED URANIUM TO CREATE A SOURCE MATERIAL ORE THAT CAN BE PROCESSED FOR THE RECOVERY OF YELLOWCAKE AT A CONVENTIONAL URANIUM MILL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Throughout the United States Department of Energy (DOE) complex, there are a number of streams of low enriched uranium (LEU) that contain various trace contaminants. These surplus nuclear materials require processing in order to meet commercial fuel cycle specifications. To date, they have not been designated as waste for disposal at the DOE's Nevada Test Site (NTS). Currently, with no commercial outlet available, the DOE is evaluating treatment and disposal as the ultimate disposition path for these materials. This paper will describe an innovative program that will provide a solution to DOE that will allow disposition of these materials at a cost that will be competitive with treatment and disposal at the NTS, while at the same time recycling the material to recover a valuable energy resource (yellowcake) for reintroduction into the commercial nuclear fuel cycle. International Uranium (USA) Corporation (IUSA) and Nuclear Fuel Services, Inc. (NFS) have entered into a commercial relationship to pursue the development of this program. The program involves the design of a process and construction of a plant at NFS' site in Erwin, Tennessee, for the blending of contaminated LEU with depleted uranium (DU) to produce a uranium source material ore (USM Ore{trademark}). The USM Ore{trademark} will then be further processed at IUC's White Mesa Mill, located near Blanding, Utah, to produce conventional yellowcake, which can be delivered to conversion facilities, in the same manner as yellowcake that is produced from natural ores or other alternate feed materials. The primary source of feed for the business will be the significant sources of trace contaminated materials within the DOE complex. NFS has developed a dry blending process (DRYSM Process) to blend the surplus LEU material with DU at its Part 70 licensed facility, to produce USM Ore{trademark} with a U235 content within the range of U235 concentrations for source material. By reducing the U235 content to source material levels in this manner, the material will be suitable for processing at a conventional uranium mill under its existing Part 40 license to remove contaminants and enable the product to re-enter the commercial fuel cycle. The tailings from processing the USM Ore{trademark} at the mill will be permanently disposed of in the mill's tailings impoundment as 11e.(2) byproduct material. Blending LEU with DU to make a uranium source material ore that can be returned to the nuclear fuel cycle for processing to produce yellowcake, has never been accomplished before. This program will allow DOE to disposition its surplus LEU and DU in a cost effective manner, and at the same time provide for the recovery of valuable energy resources that would be lost through processing and disposal of the materials. This paper will discuss the nature of the surplus LEU and DU materials, the manner in which the LEU will be blended with DU to form a uranium source material ore, and the legal means by which this blending can be accomplished at a facility licensed under 10 CFR Part 70 to produce ore that can be processed at a conventional uranium mill licensed under 10 CFR Part 40.

Schutt, Stephen M.; Hochstein, Ron F.; Frydenlund, David C.; Thompson, Anthony J.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

412

Modeling of UO{sub 2} oxidation in steam atmosphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear fuel oxidation is an important phenomenon affecting fission product behavior. As indicated by a number of studies, uranium dioxide shows a very wide range of nonstoichiometric states. In steam, fuel oxidation produces a hyperstoichiometric composition, changing the transport properties. Variation of stoichiometry changes diffusion coefficients for oxygen, noble gases, and fission products substantially, affecting the release of fission products.

Dobrov, B.V.; Likhanskii, V.V. [Triniti Research Center, Triniti, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ozrin, V.D. [Nuclear Safety Institute IBREA, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [and others

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Conversion Regulations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Conversion Regulations Conversion Regulations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Conversion Regulations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Conversion Regulations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Conversion Regulations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Conversion Regulations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Conversion Regulations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Conversion Regulations on AddThis.com... Conversion Regulations All vehicle and engine conversions must meet standards instituted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), and state agencies like the California Air Resources Board (CARB).

414

Method for forming indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high photo-conversion efficiency indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cell is spray deposited from a solution containing indium trichloride. The solar cell exhibits an Air Mass One solar conversion efficiency in excess of about 10%.

Feng, Tom (Morris Plains, NJ); Ghosh, Amal K. (New Providence, NJ)

1984-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

415

Symposium on the Physical Chemistry of Solar Energy Conversion, Indianapolis American Chemical Society Meetings, Fall 2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Symposium on the Physical Chemistry of Solar Energy Conversion at the Fall ACS Meeting in Indianapolis, IN (Sept. 8-12) featured the following sessions (approx. 6 speakers per session): (1) Quantum Dots and Nanorods for Solar Energy Conversion (2 half-day sessions); (2) Artificial Photosynthesis: Water Oxidation; (3) Artificial Photosynthesis: Solar Fuels (2 half-day sessions); (4) Organic Solar Cells; (5) Novel Concepts for Solar Energy Conversion (2 half-day sessions); (6) Emerging Techniques for Solar Energy Conversion; (7) Interfacial Electron Transfer

Lian, Tianquan [PI, Emory Univ.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Uranium 2014 resources, production and demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Published every other year, Uranium Resources, Production, and Demand, or the "Red Book" as it is commonly known, is jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency. It is the recognised world reference on uranium and is based on official information received from 43 countries. It presents the results of a thorough review of world uranium supplies and demand and provides a statistical profile of the world uranium industry in the areas of exploration, resource estimates, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantial new information from all major uranium production centres in Africa, Australia, Central Asia, Eastern Europe and North America. Long-term projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements are provided as well as a discussion of long-term uranium supply and demand issues. This edition focuses on recent price and production increases that could signal major changes in the industry.

Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Production Report Domestic Uranium Production Report 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 million pounds U 3 O 8 $0 to $30 per pound $0 to $50 per pound $0 to $100 per pound Properties with Exploration Completed, Exploration Continuing, and Only Assessment Work W W 102.0 Properties Under Development for Production W W W Mines in Production W 21.4 W Mines Closed Temporarily and Closed Permanently W W 133.1 In-Situ Leach Mining W W 128.6 Underground and Open Pit Mining W W 175.4 Arizona, New Mexico and Utah 0 W 164.7 Colorado, Nebraska and Texas W W 40.8 Wyoming W W 98.5 Total 51.8 W 304.0 W = Data withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Note: Totals may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-851A, "Domestic Uranium Production Report"

418

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Production Report Domestic Uranium Production Report 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 Number of Holes Feet (thousand) Number of Holes Feet (thousand) Number of Holes Feet (thousand) 2003 NA NA NA NA W W 2004 W W W W 2,185 1,249 2005 W W W W 3,143 1,668 2006 1,473 821 3,430 1,892 4,903 2,713 2007 4,351 2,200 4,996 2,946 9,347 5,146 2008 5,198 2,543 4,157 2,551 9,355 5,093 2009 1,790 1,051 3,889 2,691 5,679 3,742 2010 2,439 1,460 4,770 3,444 7,209 4,904 2011 5,441 3,322 5,156 3,003 10,597 6,325 2012 5,112 3,447 5,970 3,709 11,082 7,156 NA = Not available. W = Data withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Note: Totals may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-851A, "Domestic Uranium Production Report" (2003-

419

Uranium: Prices, rise, then fall  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium prices hit eight-year highs in both market tiers, $16.60/lb U{sub 3}O{sub 8} for non-former Soviet Union (FSU) origin and $15.50 for FSU origin during mid 1996. However, they declined to $14.70 and $13.90, respectively, by the end of the year. Increased uranium prices continue to encourage new production and restarts of production facilities presently on standby. Australia scrapped its {open_quotes}three-mine{close_quotes} policy following the ouster of the Labor party in a March election. The move opens the way for increasing competition with Canada`s low-cost producers. Other events in the industry during 1996 that have current or potential impacts on the market include: approval of legislation outlining the ground rules for privatization of the US Enrichment Corp. (USEC) and the subsequent sales of converted Russian highly enriched uranium (HEU) from its nuclear weapons program, announcement of sales plans for converted US HEU and other surplus material through either the Department of Energy or USEC, and continuation of quotas for uranium from the FSU in the United States and Europe. In Canada, permitting activities continued on the Cigar Lake and McArthur River projects; and construction commenced on the McClean Lake mill.

Pool, T.C.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Summary production statistics of the U.S. uranium industry, 1993-2012" 9. Summary production statistics of the U.S. uranium industry, 1993-2012" "Item",1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,"E2003",2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012 "Exploration and Development" "Surface Drilling (million feet)",1.1,0.7,1.3,3,4.9,4.6,2.5,1,0.7,"W","W",1.2,1.7,2.7,5.1,5.1,3.7,4.9,6.3,7.2 "Drilling Expenditures (million dollars)1",5.7,1.1,2.6,7.2,20,18.1,7.9,5.6,2.7,"W","W",10.6,18.1,40.1,67.5,81.9,35.4,44.6,53.6,66.6 "Mine Production of Uranium" "(million pounds U3O8)",2.1,2.5,3.5,4.7,4.7,4.8,4.5,3.1,2.6,2.4,2.2,2.5,3,4.7,4.5,3.9,4.1,4.2,4.1,4.3 "Uranium Concentrate Production" "(million pounds U3O8)",3.1,3.4,6,6.3,5.6,4.7,4.6,4,2.6,2.3,2,2.3,2.7,4.1,4.5,3.9,3.7,4.2,4,4.1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium oxide conversion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Radiochemistry of uranium, neptunium and plutonium: an updating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents some procedures used in the radiochemical isolation, purification and/or analysis of uranium, neptunium, and plutonium. In this update of the procedures, we have not attempted to discuss the developments in the chemistry of U, Np, and Pu but have restricted the report to the newer procedures, most of which have resulted from the increased emphasis in environmental concern which requires analysis of extremely small amounts of the actinide element in quite complex matrices. The final section of this report describes several schemes for isolation of actinides by oxidation state.

Roberts, R.A.; Choppin, G.R.; Wild, J.F.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

5, 35333559, 2005 Catalytic conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measurement technique, employing selective gas- phase catalytic conversion of methanol to formaldehyde it the second most abundant organic trace gas after methane. Methanol can play an important role in upper tropoACPD 5, 3533­3559, 2005 Catalytic conversion of methanol to formaldehyde S. J. Solomon et al. Title

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

423

The Sorption/Desorption Behavior of Uranium in Transport Studies Using Yucca Mountain Alluvium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain, Nevada is the proposed site of a geologic repository for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in the United States. In the event repository engineered barriers fail, the saturated alluvium located south of Yucca Mountain is expected to serve as a natural barrier to the migration of radionuclides to the accessible environment. The purpose of this study is to improve the characterization of uranium retardation in the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain to support refinement of an assessment model. The distribution of uranium desorption rates from alluvium obtained from Nye County bore holes EWDP-19IM1, EWDP-10SA, EWDP-22SA were studied to address inconsistencies between results from batch sorption and column transport experiments. The alluvium and groundwater were characterized to better understand the underlying mechanisms of the observed behavior. Desorption rate constants were obtained using an activity based mass balance equation and column desorption experiments were analyzed using a mathematical model utilizing multiple sorption sites with different first-order forward and reverse reaction rates. The uranium desorption rate constants decreased over time, suggesting that the alluvium has multiple types of active sorption sites with different affinities for uranium. While a significant fraction of the initially sorbed uranium desorbed from the alluvium quite rapidly, a roughly equivalent amount remained sorbed after several months of testing. The information obtained through this research suggests that uranium may experience greater effective retardation in the alluvium than simple batch sorption experiments would suggest. Electron Probe Microanalysis shows that uranium is associated with both clay minerals and iron oxides after sorption to alluvial material. These results provide further evidence that the alluvium contains multiple sorption sites for uranium.

C. D. Scism

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

424

Effect of Inhibitors on the Ubiquinone Binding Capacity of the Primary Energy Conversion Site in the Rhodobacter capsulatus Cytochrome bc1 Complex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of Inhibitors on the Ubiquinone Binding Capacity of the Primary Energy Conversion Site-transducing organelles. The key primary energy conversion reaction of this complex is the two-electron oxidation: A key issue concerning the primary conversion (QO) site function in the cytochrome bc1 complex

Gibney, Brian R.

425

Standard test method for analysis of isotopic composition of uranium in nuclear-grade fuel material by quadrupole inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This test method is applicable to the determination of the isotopic composition of uranium (U) in nuclear-grade fuel material. The following isotopic weight percentages are determined using a quadrupole inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (Q-ICP-MS): 233U, 234U, 235U, 236U, and 238U. The analysis can be performed on various material matrices after acid dissolution and sample dilution into water or dilute nitric (HNO3) acid. These materials include: fuel product, uranium oxide, uranium oxide alloys, uranyl nitrate (UNH) crystals, and solutions. The sample preparation discussed in this test method focuses on fuel product material but may be used for uranium oxide or a uranium oxide alloy. Other preparation techniques may be used and some references are given. Purification of the uranium by anion-exchange extraction is not required for this test method, as it is required by other test methods such as radiochemistry and thermal ionization mass spectroscopy (TIMS). This test method is also described i...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

EPA Redesigns Conversion Certification Policies  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

EPA Redesigns EPA Redesigns Conversion Certification Policies At a recent meeting held in Washington, DC, officials from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) opened dialogue about proposed changes to its emission certification policies that affect alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs). "We are trying to accommo- date the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) and Executive Order requirements while trying to change enforce- ment policies and guidance with respect to conversions," said Rich Ackerman of EPA's Enforcement Office. The meeting, attended by representatives of more than 60 organizations, was held to discuss actions addressing AFV emission certification. Specifically, topics included * Conversion emissions perfor- mance data * Status of environmental laws pertaining to alternative fuel

427

Thermal Conversion Process (TCP) Technology  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Changing World Technologies' Changing World Technologies' Thermal Conversion Process Commercial Demonstration Plant DOE/EA 1506 Weld County, Colorado December 2004 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 Thermal Conversion Process (TCP) Technology Commercial Demonstration - Weld County, CO TABLE OF CONTENTS Environmental Assessment Thermal Conversion Process (TCP) Technology Commercial Demonstration Project Weld County, Colorado SUMMARY............................................................................................................................. S-1 1.0 INTRODUCTION.........................................................................................................1-1 1.1. National Environmental Policy Act and Related Procedures...........................1-1

428

Thermal conversion of biomass to valuable fuels, chemical feedstocks and chemicals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A continuous process for the conversion of biomass to form a chemical feedstock is described. The biomass and an exogenous metal oxide, preferably calcium oxide, or metal oxide precursor are continuously fed into a reaction chamber that is operated at a temperature of at least 1400.degree. C. to form reaction products including metal carbide. The metal oxide or metal oxide precursor is capable of forming a hydrolizable metal carbide. The reaction products are quenched to a temperature of 800.degree. C. or less. The resulting metal carbide is separated from the reaction products or, alternatively, when quenched with water, hydolyzed to provide a recoverable hydrocarbon gas feedstock.

Peters, William A. (Lexington, MA); Howard, Jack B. (Winchester, MA); Modestino, Anthony J. (Hanson, MA); Vogel, Fredreric (Villigen PSI, CH); Steffin, Carsten R. (Herne, DE)

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

429

Global terrestrial uranium supply and its policy implications : a probabilistic projection of future uranium costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An accurate outlook on long-term uranium resources is critical in forecasting uranium costresource relationships, and for energy policy planning as regards the development and deployment of nuclear fuel cycle alternatives. ...

Matthews, Isaac A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Model-based Interpretation of the Performance and Degradation of Reformate Fueled Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Solid oxide fuel cells offer great prospects for the sustainable, clean and safe conversion of various fuels into electrical energy. In this thesis, the performance-determining… (more)

Kromp, Alexander

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical conversion of solar energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...multiple carrier generation...renewable energy|solar energy conversion|photovoltaic...photovoltaic energy conversion process...minority carriers in the p-type...efficiency carrier multiplication...for solar energy conversion. Phys...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Conversions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Conversions Conversions Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Conversions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Conversions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Conversions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Conversions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Conversions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Conversions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Conversions on AddThis.com... Vehicle Conversions Photo of converted to run on propane. What kinds of conversions are available? Natural Gas Propane Electric Hybrid Ethanol An aftermarket conversion is a vehicle or engine modified to operate using

433

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Conversions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Conversions to someone by E-mail Conversions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Conversions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Conversions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Conversions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Conversions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Conversions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Conversions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Propane Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Availability Conversions Emissions Laws & Incentives Propane Vehicle Conversions Related Information Conversion Basics Regulations Vehicle conversions provide alternative fuel options beyond what is

434

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. U.S. uranium mine production and number of mines and sources, 2003-2012" 2. U.S. uranium mine production and number of mines and sources, 2003-2012" "Production / Mining Method",2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012 "Underground" "(estimated contained thousand pounds U3O8)","W","W","W","W","W","W","W","W","W","W" "Open Pit" "(estimated contained thousand pounds U3O8)",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "In-Situ Leaching" "(thousand pounds U3O8)","W","W",2681,4259,"W","W","W","W","W","W" "Other1" "(thousand pounds U3O8)","W","W","W","W","W","W","W","W","W","W"

435

:- : DRILLING URANIUM BILLETS ON A  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

'Xxy";^ ...... ' '. .- -- Metals, Ceramics, and Materials. : . - ,.. ; - . _ : , , ' z . , -, .- . >. ; . .. :- : DRILLING URANIUM BILLETS ON A .-... r .. .. i ' LEBLOND-CARLSTEDT RAPID BORER 4 r . _.i'- ' ...... ' -'".. :-'' ,' :... : , '.- ' ;BY R.' J. ' ANSEN .AEC RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT PERSONAL PROPERTY OF J. F. Schlltz .:- DECLASSIFIED - PER AUTHORITY OF (DAlE) (NhTI L (DATE)UE) FEED MATERIALS PRODUCTION CENTER NATIONAL LFE A COMPANY OF OHIO 26 1 3967 3035406 NLCO - 886 Metals, Ceramics and Materials (TID-4500, 22nd Ed.) DRILLING URANIUM BILLETS ON A LEBLOND-CARLSTEDT RAPID BORER By R. J. Jansen* TECHNICAL DIVISION NATIONAL LEAD COMPANY OF OHIO Date of Issuance: September 13, 1963 Approved By: Approved By: Technical Director Head, Metallurgical Department *Mr. Jansen is presently

436

Potential Uses of Depleted Uranium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

POTENTIAL USES OF DEPLETED URANIUM POTENTIAL USES OF DEPLETED URANIUM Robert R. Price U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20874 M. Jonathan Haire and Allen G. Croff Chemical Technology Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory * Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6180 June 2000 For American Nuclear Society 2000 International Winter and Embedded Topical Meetings Washington, D.C. November 12B16, 2000 The submitted manuscript has been authored by a contractor of the U.S. Government under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725. Accordingly, the U.S. Government retains a nonexclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U.S. Government purposes. _________________________

437

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Employment in the U.S. uranium production industry by state, 2003-2012" 7. Employment in the U.S. uranium production industry by state, 2003-2012" "person-years" "State(s)",2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012 "Wyoming",134,139,181,195,245,301,308,348,424,512 "Colorado and Texas",48,140,269,263,557,696,340,292,331,248 "Nebraska and New Mexico",92,102,123,160,149,160,159,134,127,"W" "Arizona, Utah, and Washington",47,40,75,120,245,360,273,281,"W","W" "Alaska, Michigan, Nevada, and South Dakota",0,0,0,16,25,30,"W","W","W","W" "California, Montana, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, and Virginia",0,0,0,0,9,17,"W","W","W","W"

438

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. U.S. uranium in-situ-leach plants by owner, location, capacity, and operating status at end of the year, 2008-2012" 5. U.S. uranium in-situ-leach plants by owner, location, capacity, and operating status at end of the year, 2008-2012" "In-Situ-Leach Plant Owner","In-Situ-Leach Plant Name","County, State (existing and planned locations)","Production Capacity (pounds U3O8 per year)","Operating Status at End of the Year" ,,,,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012 "Cameco","Crow Butte Operation","Dawes, Nebraska",1000000,"Operating","Operating","Operating","Operating","Operating" "Hydro Resources, Inc.","Church Rock","McKinley, New Mexico",1000000,"Partially Permitted And Licensed","Partially Permitted And Licensed","Partially Permitted And Licensed","Partially Permitted And Licensed","Partially Permitted And Licensed"

439

Interaction of uranium dioxide with molten zircaloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory experiments in which gram quantities of molten Zircaloy were held in contact with UO/sub 2/ for known times (20-600 s) and temperatures (1900-2200/sup 0/C) were conducted. Following each experiment, polished sections of the specimen were examined by optical microscopy, electron microprobe, scanning Auger microscopy, and x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. Three closely-related experiments were conducted. In the first, the molten metal was contained in a UO/sub 2/ crucible. The dissolution rate in this system was found to be dominated by natural convection in the melt driven by density gradients established by the dissolving uranium. The mechanism of the interaction also was observed to involve penetration and detachment of the grains of the oxide by the molten metal. Similar tests with single-crystal UO/sub 2/ specimens showed similar dissolution behavior. Less severe attack occurred because of the absence of grain boundaries, although subgrain boundaries or dislocations provided high-diffusivity pathways for preferential oxygen removal. In the third type of test, a disk of UO/sub 2/ was placed at the bottom of a ThO/sub 2/ crucible. This arrangement prevented establishment of unstable density gradients in the liquid phase, resulting in a purely diffusion-controlled interaction.

Kim, K.T.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Depleted Uranium (DU) Cermet Waste Package  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Package Package Depleted Uranium (DU) Cermet Waste Package The steel components of the waste package could be replaced with a uranium cermet. The cermet contains uranium dioxide particulates, which are embedded in steel. Cermets are made with outer layers of clean steel; thus, there is no radiation-contamination hazard in handling the waste packages. Because cermets are made of the same materials that would normally be found in the YM repository (uranium dioxide and steel), there are no chemical compatibility issues. From half to all of the DU inventory in the United States could be used for this application. Depleted Uranium Dioxide Steel Cermet Cross Section of a Depleted Uranium Dioxide Steel Cermet Follow the link below for more information on Cermets:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium oxide conversion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Uranium 2009 resources, production and demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With several countries currently building nuclear power plants and planning the construction of more to meet long-term increases in electricity demand, uranium resources, production and demand remain topics of notable interest. In response to the projected growth in demand for uranium and declining inventories, the uranium industry – the first critical link in the fuel supply chain for nuclear reactors – is boosting production and developing plans for further increases in the near future. Strong market conditions will, however, be necessary to trigger the investments required to meet projected demand. The "Red Book", jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, is a recognised world reference on uranium. It is based on information compiled in 40 countries, including those that are major producers and consumers of uranium. This 23rd edition provides a comprehensive review of world uranium supply and demand as of 1 January 2009, as well as data on global ur...

Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Measuring Aerosols Generated Inside Armoured Vehicles Perforated by Depleted Uranium Ammunition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to questions raised after the Gulf War about the health significance of exposure to depleted uranium (DU), a study was initiated to provide an improved scientific basis for assessment of possible health effects of soldiers in vehicles struck by these munitions. As part of this experimental study, a series of DU penetrators were fired at an Abrams tank and a Bradley fighting vehicle, and the aerosols generated by vehicle perforation were collected and characterized. The aerosol sampling system designed for these tests consisted of filter cassettes, cascade impactors, a five-stage cyclone, and a moving filter. Aerosols collected were analyzed for uranium concentration and particle size distribution as a function of time. The aerosol samples were also analyzed for uranium oxide phases, particle morphology, and in vitro solubility. These data will provide input for use in future prospective and retrospective dose and health risk assessments of DU aerosols.

Parkhurst, MaryAnn

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Chemical Conversions of Natural Precursors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many products from the flavour industry are primary products from renewable resources or secondary products obtained by chemical conversions of the primary products. In general these secondary products are key...

Peter H. van der Schaft

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Solar Energy Conversion Efficiency Project  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Report of a discussion on possible collaborative experimentation to test and refine biomass production models based on the conversion of solar energy by plant stands, and to evaluate alternative models.

J. S. Pereira; J. J. Landsberg

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Plasmonic conversion of solar energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basic Research Needs for Solar Energy Utilization, BasicS. Pillai and M. A. Green, Solar Energy Materials and SolarPlasmonic conversion of solar energy César Clavero Plasma

Clavero, Cesar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 Production / Mining Method 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 (estimated contained thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) W W W W W W W W W W (estimated contained thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) W W 2,681 4,259 W W W W W W (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) W W W W W W W W W W (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) E2,200 2,452 3,045 4,692 4,541 3,879 4,145 4,237 4,114 4,335 Underground 1 2 4 5 6 10 14 4 5 6 Open Pit 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 In-Situ Leaching 2 3 4 5 5 6 4 4 5 5 Other Sources 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 Total Mines and Sources 4 6 10 11 12 17 20 9 11 12 Other 1 Number of Operating Mines Table 2. U.S. uranium mine production and number of mines and sources, 2003-2012 Underground Open Pit In-Situ Leaching Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-851A, "Domestic Uranium Production Report" (2003-2012).

447

Review of uranium bioassay techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A variety of analytical techniques is available for evaluating uranium in excreta and tissues at levels appropriate for occupational exposure control and evaluation. A few (fluorometry, kinetic phosphorescence analysis, {alpha}-particle spectrometry, neutron irradiation techniques, and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry) have also been demonstrated as capable of determining uranium in these materials at levels comparable to those which occur naturally. Sample preparation requirements and isotopic sensitivities vary widely among these techniques and should be considered carefully when choosing a method. This report discusses analytical techniques used for evaluating uranium in biological matrices (primarily urine) and limits of detection reported in the literature. No cost comparison is attempted, although references are cited which address cost. Techniques discussed include: {alpha}-particle spectrometry; liquid scintillation spectrometry, fluorometry, phosphorometry, neutron activation analysis, fission-track counting, UV-visible absorption spectrophotometry, resonance ionization mass spectrometry, and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. A summary table of reported limits of detection and of the more important experimental conditions associated with these reported limits is also provided.

Bogard, J.S.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 9 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 Year Exploration Mining Milling Processing Reclamation Total 2003 W W W W 117 321 2004 18 108 W W 121 420 2005 79 149 142 154 124 648 2006 188 121 W W 155 755 2007 375 378 107 216 155 1,231 2008 457 558 W W 154 1,563 2009 175 441 W W 162 1,096 2010 211 400 W W 125 1,073 2011 208 462 W W 102 1,191 2012 161 462 W W 179 1,196 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-851A, "Domestic Uranium Production Report" (2003-2012). Table 6. Employment in the U.S. uranium production industry by category, 2003-2012 person-years W = Data withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Note: Totals may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008

449

SHEEP MOUNTAIN URANIUM PROJECT CROOKS GAP, WYOMING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;PROJECT OVERVIEW ·Site Location·Site Location ·Fremont , Wyoming ·Existing Uranium Mine Permit 381C·Existing Uranium Mine Permit 381C ·Historical Operation ·Western Nuclear Crooks Gap Project ·Mined 1956 ­ 1988 and Open Pit Mining ·Current Mine Permit (381C) ·Updating POO, Reclamation Plan & Bond ·Uranium Recovery

450

Depleted uranium exposure and health effects in Gulf War veterans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2006 research-article Depleted uranium exposure and health effects in Gulf War...Medicine) Gulf War and health. In Depleted uranium, pyridostigmine bromide...McDiarmid, M.A , Health effects of depleted uranium on exposed Gulf War...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Excretion of depleted uranium by Gulf war veterans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Dosimetry Article Excretion of depleted uranium by Gulf war veterans R. E...personnel had potential intakes of depleted uranium (DU), including shrapnel...excretion rate. Excretion of depleted uranium by Gulf War veterans. | During......

R. E. Toohey

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Depleted uranium - induced malignant transformation in human lung epithelial cells.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Washington, DC Abstract 3590: Depleted uranium-induced leukemia: Epigenetic...with leukemia development. Depleted uranium is used in military missions...Karvelisse Miller, Max Costa. Depleted uranium-induced leukemia: Epigenetic...

Aldona A. Karaczyn; Hong Xie; and John P. Wise

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

453

Uranium Pollution of Meat in Tien-Shan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Uranium in water, soil, fodder and food products (especially meat) was studied in areas of former Soviet uranium industry in Tien-Shan 1950–1970. Uranium environment migration was very intensive in Tien-Shan, due...

Rustam Tuhvatshin; Igor Hadjamberdiev…

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Energy Conversion Devices | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Name: Energy Conversion Devices Place: Rochester Hills, MI Website: http:www.energyconversiondev References: Energy Conversion Devices1...

455

Layered Tantalum Oxynitride Nanorod Array Carpets for Efficient Photoelectrochemical Conversion of Solar Energy: Experimental and DFT Insights  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Layered Tantalum Oxynitride Nanorod Array Carpets for Efficient Photoelectrochemical Conversion of Solar Energy: Experimental and DFT Insights ... This difference in bond energy resulted in narrower band gap energies in oxynitrides compared to their metal oxide counterparts. ...

Nageh K. Allam; Basamat S. Shaheen; Ahmed M. Hafez

2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

456

The United States pit disassembly and conversion project -- Meeting the MOX fuel specification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US is actively involved in demonstrating the disassembly of nuclear weapons pits to an unclassified form readied for disposition. The MOX option is the most likely path forward for plutonium that originated from nuclear weapon pits. The US demonstration line for pit disassembly and conversion is known as ARIES, the advanced recovery and integrated extraction system. The ARIES demonstration line is being used to gather data in an integrated fashion of the technologies needed for pit disassembly and conversion. These activities include the following modules: pit bisection, hydride-dehydride, oxide conversion, canning, electrolytic decontamination, and nondestructive assay (NDA). Pit bisection swages in a pit in half. Hydride-dehydride converts the pit plutonium metal to an unclassified metal button. To convert the plutonium metal to an oxide the US is investigating a number of options. The primary oxide conversion approach involves variations of combining plutonium hydriding and subsequent oxidation. Another approach is to simply oxidize the metal under controlled conditions-direct metal oxidation (DMO). To remove the gallium from the plutonium oxide, a thermal distillation approach is being used. These pyrochemical approaches will substantially reduce the wastes produced for oxide conversion of weapon plutonium, compared to traditional aqueous processing. The packaging of either the plutonium metal or oxide to long term storage criteria involves the canning and electrolytic decontamination modules. The NDA suite of instruments is then used to assay the material in the containers, which enables international verification without the need to open the containers and repackage them. All of these processes are described.

Nelson, T.O.; James, C.A.; Kolman, D.G.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

457

Structural Sequestration of Uranium in Bacteriogenic Manganese...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of metal-contaminated waters (in engineered remediation technologies, for example)?" Uranium is a key contaminant of concern at US DOE sites and shuttered mining and ore...

458

Uranium Weapons Components Successfully Dismantled | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Successfully Dismantled March 20, 2007 Uranium Weapons Components Successfully Dismantled Oak Ridge, TN Continuing its efforts to reduce the size of the U.S. nuclear weapons...