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1

Ground water remediation at the Moab, Utah, USA, former uranium-ore processing site  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Seepage from the Moab, Utah, USA, former uranium-ore processing site resulted in ammonia and uranium contamination of naturally occurring saline ground water in alluvium adjacent to the Colorado River. An interim...

Donald R. Metzler; Joseph D. Ritchey; Kent A. Bostick…

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

An Overview of Process Monitoring Related to the Production of Uranium Ore Concentrate  

SciTech Connect

Uranium ore concentrate (UOC) in various chemical forms, is a high-value commodity in the commercial nuclear market, is a potential target for illicit acquisition, by both State and non-State actors. With the global expansion of uranium production capacity, control of UOC is emerging as a potentially weak link in the nuclear supply chain. Its protection, control and management thus pose a key challenge for the international community, including States, regulatory authorities and industry. This report evaluates current process monitoring practice and makes recommendations for utilization of existing or new techniques for managing the inventory and tracking this material.

McGinnis, Brent [Innovative Solutions Unlimited, LLC] [Innovative Solutions Unlimited, LLC

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

BLENDING LOW ENRICHED URANIUM WITH DEPLETED URANIUM TO CREATE A SOURCE MATERIAL ORE THAT CAN BE PROCESSED FOR THE RECOVERY OF YELLOWCAKE AT A CONVENTIONAL URANIUM MILL  

SciTech Connect

Throughout the United States Department of Energy (DOE) complex, there are a number of streams of low enriched uranium (LEU) that contain various trace contaminants. These surplus nuclear materials require processing in order to meet commercial fuel cycle specifications. To date, they have not been designated as waste for disposal at the DOE's Nevada Test Site (NTS). Currently, with no commercial outlet available, the DOE is evaluating treatment and disposal as the ultimate disposition path for these materials. This paper will describe an innovative program that will provide a solution to DOE that will allow disposition of these materials at a cost that will be competitive with treatment and disposal at the NTS, while at the same time recycling the material to recover a valuable energy resource (yellowcake) for reintroduction into the commercial nuclear fuel cycle. International Uranium (USA) Corporation (IUSA) and Nuclear Fuel Services, Inc. (NFS) have entered into a commercial relationship to pursue the development of this program. The program involves the design of a process and construction of a plant at NFS' site in Erwin, Tennessee, for the blending of contaminated LEU with depleted uranium (DU) to produce a uranium source material ore (USM Ore{trademark}). The USM Ore{trademark} will then be further processed at IUC's White Mesa Mill, located near Blanding, Utah, to produce conventional yellowcake, which can be delivered to conversion facilities, in the same manner as yellowcake that is produced from natural ores or other alternate feed materials. The primary source of feed for the business will be the significant sources of trace contaminated materials within the DOE complex. NFS has developed a dry blending process (DRYSM Process) to blend the surplus LEU material with DU at its Part 70 licensed facility, to produce USM Ore{trademark} with a U235 content within the range of U235 concentrations for source material. By reducing the U235 content to source material levels in this manner, the material will be suitable for processing at a conventional uranium mill under its existing Part 40 license to remove contaminants and enable the product to re-enter the commercial fuel cycle. The tailings from processing the USM Ore{trademark} at the mill will be permanently disposed of in the mill's tailings impoundment as 11e.(2) byproduct material. Blending LEU with DU to make a uranium source material ore that can be returned to the nuclear fuel cycle for processing to produce yellowcake, has never been accomplished before. This program will allow DOE to disposition its surplus LEU and DU in a cost effective manner, and at the same time provide for the recovery of valuable energy resources that would be lost through processing and disposal of the materials. This paper will discuss the nature of the surplus LEU and DU materials, the manner in which the LEU will be blended with DU to form a uranium source material ore, and the legal means by which this blending can be accomplished at a facility licensed under 10 CFR Part 70 to produce ore that can be processed at a conventional uranium mill licensed under 10 CFR Part 40.

Schutt, Stephen M.; Hochstein, Ron F.; Frydenlund, David C.; Thompson, Anthony J.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

4

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Falls City Uranium Ore Stockpile...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Survey(s): Site Status: The history of domestic uranium procurement under U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) contracts identifies a number of ore buying stations (sampling and...

5

E-Print Network 3.0 - albarrana uranium ores Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: albarrana uranium ores Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 geology and Ranger 1 open-pit uranium mine in...

6

PHASE ANALYSES OF URANIUM-BEARING MINERALS FROM THE HIGH GRADE ORE, NOPAL I, PENA BLANCA, MEXICO  

SciTech Connect

The Nopal I uranium deposit is located in the Pena Blanca district, approximately 40 miles north of Chihuahua City, Mexico. The deposit was formed by hydrothermal processes within the fracture zone of welded silicic volcanic tuff. The ages of volcanic formations are between 35 to 44 m.y. and there was secondary silicification of most of the formations. After the formation of at least part of the uranium deposit, the ore body was uplifted above the water table and is presently exposed at the surface. Detailed petrographic characterization, electron microprobe backscatter electron (BSE) imagery, and selected x-ray maps for the samples from Nopal I high-grade ore document different uranium phases in the ore. There are at least two stages of uranium precipitation. A small amount of uraninite is encapsulated in silica. Hexavalent uranium may also have been a primary precipitant. The uranium phases were precipitated along cleavages of feldspars, and along fractures in the tuff. Energy dispersive spectrometer data and x-ray maps suggest that the major uranium phases are uranophane and weeksite. Substitutions of Ca and K occur in both phases, implying that conditions were variable during the mineralization/alteration process, and that compositions of the original minerals have a major influence on later stage alteration. Continued study is needed to fully characterize uranium behavior in these semi-arid to arid conditions.

M. Ren; P. Goodell; A. Kelts; E.Y. Anthony; M. Fayek; C. Fan; C. Beshears

2005-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

7

Safeguards assessment of gamma-ray detection for process monitoring at natural uranium conversion facilities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Conversion, the process by which natural uranium ore (yellowcake) is puri?ed and converted through a series of chemical processes into uranium hexa?uoride gas (UF6), has… (more)

Dewji, Shaheen Azim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Uranium 238U/235U isotope ratios as indicators of reduction: Results from an in situ biostimulation experiment at Rifle, Colorado, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sandstone-type uranium deposits. Economic Geology; 1962; (5)uranium ore deposits: Isotopic signatures of the U reduction process? ; Geology,

Bopp IV, C.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Uranium ores and depleted uranium in the environment, with a reference to uranium in the biosphere from the Erzgebirge/Sachsen, Germany  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Erzgebirge (‘Ore Mountains’) area in the eastern part of Germany was a major source of uranium for Soviet nuclear programs between 1945 and 1989. During this time, the former German Democratic Republic became the third largest uranium producer in the world. The high abundance of uranium in the geological formations of the Erzgebirge are mirrored in the discovery of uranium by M. Klaproth close to Freiberg City in 1789 and the description of the so-called ‘Schneeberg’ disease, lung cancer caused in miners by the accumulation of the uranium decay product, radon, in the subsurfaces of shafts. Since 1991, remediation and mitigation of uranium at production facilities, rock piles and mill tailings has taken place. In parallel, efforts were initiated to assess the likely adverse effects of uranium mining to humans. The costs of these activities amount to about 6.5 109 Euro. A comparison with concentrations of depleted uranium at certain sites is given.

A Meinrath; P Schneider; G Meinrath

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

The Dispersion of Radon Above Deeply Buried Uranium Ore: Millennium Deposit, Athabasca Basin, SK , K Hattori1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Dispersion of Radon Above Deeply Buried Uranium Ore: Millennium Deposit, Athabasca Basin, SK M, Ottawa, ON, 2 Cameco Corporation, Saskatoon, SK Depth Profiles Canada Mining Innovation Council Natural., Portella, P., Olson, R.A., 2007. Unconformity- associated uranium deposits of the Athabasca Basin

11

TOTAL ORE PROCESSING INTEGRATION AND MANAGEMENT  

SciTech Connect

The lessons learned from ore segregation test No.3 were presented to Minntac Mine personnel during the reporting period. Ore was segregated by A-Factor, with low values going to Step 1/2 and high values going to Step 3. During the test, the mine maintained the best split possible for the given production and location constraints. During the test, Step 1&2 A-Factor was lowered more than Step 3 was raised. All other ore quality changes were not manipulated, but the segregation by A-Factor affected most of the other qualities. Magnetic iron, coarse tails, fine tails, silica, and grind changed in response to the split. Segregation was achieved by adding ore from HIS to the Step 3 blend and lowering the amount of LC 1&2 and somewhat lowering the amount of LC 3&4. Conversely, Step 1&2 received less HIS with a corresponding increase in LC 1&2. The amount of IBC was increased to both Steps about one-third of the way into the test. For about the center half of the test, LC 3&4 was reduced to both Steps. The most noticeable layer changes were, then: an increase in the HIS split; a decrease in the LC 1&2 split; adding IBC to both Steps; and lowering LC 3&4 to both Steps. Statistical analysis of the dataset collected during ordinary, non-segregated operation of the mine and mill is continuing. Graphical analysis of blast patterns according to drill monitor data was slowed by student classwork. It is expected to resume after the semester ends in May.

Leslie Gertsch; Richard Gertsch

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

12

Uranium and Thorium Ores Price List | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

and and Thorium Ores Price List New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) NBL Home About Programs Certified Reference Materials (CRMs) Prices and Certificates Ordering Information Training Categorical Exclusion Determinations News Contact Information New Brunswick Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy Building 350 9800 South Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439-4899 P: (630) 252-2442 (NBL) P: (630) 252-2767 (CRM sales) F: (630) 252-6256 E: usdoe.nbl@ch.doe.gov Prices and Certificates Uranium and Thorium Ores Price List Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page NOTE: These costs reflect pricing for CRMs shipped to U.S. addresses. Prices for CRMs shipped to non-U.S. addresses can be found on the International Price List. (Prices are valid December 1, 2012, through December 31, 2013)

13

Uranium Mining and Enrichment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview Presentation » Uranium Mining and Enrichment Overview Presentation » Uranium Mining and Enrichment Uranium Mining and Enrichment Uranium is a radioactive element that occurs naturally in the earth's surface. Uranium is used as a fuel for nuclear reactors. Uranium-bearing ores are mined, and the uranium is processed to make reactor fuel. In nature, uranium atoms exist in several forms called isotopes - primarily uranium-238, or U-238, and uranium-235, or U-235. In a typical sample of natural uranium, most of the mass (99.3%) would consist of atoms of U-238, and a very small portion of the total mass (0.7%) would consist of atoms of U-235. Uranium Isotopes Isotopes of Uranium Using uranium as a fuel in the types of nuclear reactors common in the United States requires that the uranium be enriched so that the percentage of U-235 is increased, typically to 3 to 5%.

14

Swelling related to ettringite crystal formation in chromite ore processing residue  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Several million tons of Chromite Ore Processing Residue (COPR) were deposited at two sites in New Jersey and Maryland, USA, and over time they exhibited extensive heaving phenomena. Ettringite, a needle-shaped mi...

Deok Hyun Moon; Dimitris Dermatas; Mahmoud Wazne…

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Evaluation of ettringite-related swelling mechanisms for treated chromite ore processing residue  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Accelerated one-dimensional unconfined swell tests were conducted for ferrous sulfate chromite ore processing residue (COPR) field-treated samples. The field-treated samples were subjected to wet and dry cycle...

Deok Hyun Moon; Mahmoud Wazne…

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO{sub 3}), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl{sub 4}), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation. 4 figs.

Hayden, H.W. Jr.; Horton, J.A.; Elliott, G.R.B.

1995-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

17

1. Department, Course Number, Title ORE 664, Nearshore Processes and Sediment Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. Department, Course Number, Title ORE 664, Nearshore Processes and Sediment Transport 2 Sediment transport by waves and currents in coastal areas and its effect on morphological processes. Effect Reference books: 1. Beach Processes and Sedimentation, P.D. Komar, 2nd Edition, Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1998 2

Frandsen, Jannette B.

18

Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Naturita uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado: Revision 5  

SciTech Connect

Title 1 of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law (PL) 95-604, authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to perform remedial action at the inactive Naturita, Colorado, uranium processing site to reduce the potential health effects from the radioactive materials at the site and at vicinity properties associated with the site. Title 2 of the UMTRCA authorized the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) or agreement state to regulate the operation and eventual reclamation of active uranium processing sites. The uranium mill tailings at the site were removed and reprocessed from 1977 to 1979. The contaminated areas include the former tailings area, the mill yard, the former ore storage area, and adjacent areas that were contaminated by uranium processing activities and wind and water erosion. The Naturita remedial action would result in the loss of 133 acres (ac) of contaminated soils at the processing site. If supplemental standards are approved by the NRC and the state of Colorado, approximately 112 ac of steeply sloped contaminated soils adjacent to the processing site would not be cleaned up. Cleanup of this contamination would have adverse environmental consequences and would be potentially hazardous to remedial action workers.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Utilization of geothermal energy in the mining and processing of tungsten ore. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The engineering, economic, and environmental feasibility of the use of low and moderate temperature geothermal heat in the mining and processing of tungsten ore is explored. The following are covered: general engineering evaluation, design of a geothermal energy system, economics, the geothermal resource, the institutional barriers assessment, environmental factors, an alternate geothermal energy source, and alternates to geothermal development. (MHR)

Erickson, M.V.; Lacy, S.B.; Lowe, G.D.; Nussbaum, A.M.; Walter, K.M.; Willens, C.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Uranium Processing Facility | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About / Transforming Y-12 / Uranium Processing Facility About / Transforming Y-12 / Uranium Processing Facility Uranium Processing Facility UPF will be a state-of-the-art, consolidated facility for enriched uranium operations including assembly, disassembly, dismantlement, quality evaluation, and product certification. An integral part of Y-12's transformation efforts and a key component of the National Nuclear Security Administration's Uranium Center of Excellence, the Uranium Processing Facility is one of two facilities at Y-12 whose joint mission will be to accomplish the storage and processing of all enriched uranium in one much smaller, centralized area. Safety, security and flexibility are key design attributes of the facility, which is in the preliminary design phase of work. UPF will be built to modern standards and engage new technologies through a responsive and agile

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium ore processing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Processing depleted uranium quad alloy penetrator rods  

SciTech Connect

Two depleted uranium (DU) quad alloys were cast, extruded and rolled to produce penetrator rods. The two alloy combinations were (1) 1 wt % molybdenum (Mo), 1 wt % niobium (Nb), and 0.75 wt % titanium (Ti); and (2) 1 wt % tantalum (Ta), 1 wt % Nb, and 0.75 wt % Ti. This report covers the processing and results with limited metallographic information available. The two alloys were each vacuum induction melted (VIM) into an 8-in. log, extruded into a 3-in. log, then cut into 4 logs and extruded at 4 different temperatures into 0.8-in. bars. From the 8 conditions (2 alloys, 4 extrusion temperatures each), 10 to 13 16-in. rods were cut for rolling and swaging. Due to cracking problems, the final processing changed from rolling and swaging to limited rolling and heat treating. The contracted work was completed with the delivery of 88 rods to Dr. Zabielski. 28 figs.

Bokan, S.L.

1987-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

22

Nuclear & Uranium - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nuclear & Uranium Nuclear & Uranium Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Summary Uranium & Nuclear Fuel Nuclear Power Plants Radioactive Waste International All Nuclear Data Reports Analysis & Projections Most Requested Nuclear Plants and Reactors Projections Uranium All Reports Uranium Mill Sites Under the UMTRA Project Remediation of UMTRCA Title I Uranium Mill Sites Under the UMTRA Project Summary Table: Uranium Ore Processed, Disposal Cell Material, and Cost for Remediation as of December 31, 1999 Uranium Ore Processed Remediation Project Cost Remediation Project (Mill Site Name, State) Ore (Million Short Tons) Uranium Production (Million Pounds U3O8) Disposal Cell Remediated Material Volume (Million Cubic Yards) Total Cost A (Thousand U.S. Dollars)02/09 Per Pound Produced (Dollars per Pound U3O8) Per Unit of Remediated Material

23

Application of Geothermal Energy to Mineral Processing: Cyanide Heap-Leaching of Low-Grade Gold Ore  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The advent of cyanide heap-leaching for low-grade gold and silver ores has resulted in an unprecedented increase in the output of mines throughout the world. This simple and economical process entails open-pit mi...

Thomas Flynn; Dennis Trexler…

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Treatment of phosphogypsum waste produced from phosphate ore processing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Phosphogypsum (PG), primary byproduct from phosphoric acid production, is accumulated in large stockpiles and occupies vast areas of land. Phosphogypsum is a technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material (TE-NORM) that contains radionuclides from 238U and 232Th decay series which are of most radio-toxicity. The reduction in concentration of radionuclides content from PG was based on leaching of 226Ra, 210Pb, 238U and 40K using tri-butyl phosphate (TBP) and tri-octyl phosphine oxide (TOPO) in kerosene. The factors which affect the leaching process such as contact time, concentration of the solvent and temperature were optimized. Based on the experimental results, about 92.1, 88.9, 83.4, 94.6% of 226Ra, 210Pb, 238U and 40K respectively were successfully removed from the PG. The reduction in the concentration of radionuclides was accompanied by reduction in the concentration of rare earth elements (?REE) equals to 80.1%. Using the desired organic extractant under optimum conditions for treatment of the PG waste leads to obtain a decontaminated product that can be safely used in many industrial applications.

H. El-Didamony; H.S. Gado; N.S. Awwad; M.M. Fawzy; M.F. Attallah

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Chapter 2. Uranium Mining and Extraction Processes in the United States In 1946, Congress passed the Atomic Energy Act (AEA), establishing the Atomic Energy Commission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

it is managed. This chapter examines the location and geology of uranium deposits in the United States, the methods used to mine uranium, and the methods used to extract it from ore. Many of the geological, the characteristic geologic forms of uranium ore bodies were small to moderate-sized isolated pods or linear sinuous

26

Biogeochemical Processes In Ethanol Stimulated Uranium Contaminated...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A laboratory incubation experiment was conducted with uranium contaminated subsurface sediment to assess the geochemical and microbial community response to ethanol amendment. A...

27

Innovative Elution Processes for Recovering Uranium from Seawater  

SciTech Connect

Utilizing amidoxime-based polymer sorbents for extraction of uranium from seawater has attracted considerable interest in recent years. Uranium collected in the sorbent is recovered typically by elution with an acid. One drawback of acid elution is deterioration of the sorbent which is a significant factor that limits the economic competitiveness of the amidoxime-based sorbent systems for sequestering uranium from seawater. Developing innovative elution processes to improve efficiency and to minimize loss of sorbent capacity become essential in order to make this technology economically feasible for large-scale industrial applications. This project has evaluated several elution processes including acid elution, carbonate elution, and supercritical fluid elution for recovering uranium from amidoxime-based polymer sorbents. The elution efficiency, durability and sorbent regeneration for repeated uranium adsorption- desorption cycles in simulated seawater have been studied. Spectroscopic techniques are used to evaluate chemical nature of the sorbent before and after elution. A sodium carbonate-hydrogen peroxide elution process for effective removal of uranium from amidoxime-based sorbent is developed. The cause of this sodium carbonate and hydrogen peroxide synergistic leaching of uranium from amidoxime-based sorbent is attributed to the formation of an extremely stable uranyl peroxo-carbonato complex. The efficiency of uranium elution by the carbonate-hydrogen peroxide method is comparable to that of the hydrochloric acid elution but damage to the sorbent material is much less for the former. The carbonate- hydrogen peroxide elution also does not need any elaborate step to regenerate the sorbent as those required for hydrochloric acid leaching. Several CO2-soluble ligands have been tested for extraction of uranium from the sorbent in supercritical fluid carbon dioxide. A mixture of hexafluoroacetylacetone and tri-n-butylphosphate shows the best result but uranium removal from the sorbent reaches only 80% after 10 hours of leaching. Some information regarding coordination of vanadium with amidoxime molecules and elution of vanadium from amidoxime- based sorbents is also given in the report.

Wai, Chien; Tian, Guoxin; Janke, Christopher

2014-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

28

Chapter 1. Introduction Uranium is a common element in nature that has for centuries been used as a coloring agent in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

boom starting immediately after World War II, making uranium the most important commodity in the mining). Some uranium mining continues in the United States, and relatively high-grade resources in other parts contained in the uranium nucleus.1 Another legacy of uranium exploration, mining, and ore processing were

29

Ettringite-Induced Heave in Chromite Ore Processing Residue (COPR) upon Ferrous Sulfate Treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ettringite-Induced Heave in Chromite Ore Processing Residue (COPR) upon Ferrous Sulfate Treatment ... The pH increase caused initially precipitated gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) to progressively convert to ettringite (Ca6Al2(SO4)3·32H2O) and its associated volume expansion under both in situ and ex situ conditions, with a maximum of 0.8 m vertical swell within 40 days of curing. ... While Cr(VI) treatment remains a challenge, the intentional exhaustion of the heave potential of COPR by transforming all Al sources to ettringite emerges as a possible solution to delayed ettringite formation, which would hamper site redevelopment. ...

Dimitris Dermatas; Maria Chrysochoou; Deok Hyun Moon; Dennis G. Grubb; Mahmoud Wazne; Christos Christodoulatos

2006-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

30

Introduction Uranium is a common element in nature, and has been used for centuries as a coloring agent in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(U.S. DOE/EIA 2003a, 2003b, 2006). Another legacy of uranium exploration, mining, and ore processing in a full-blown exploration and mining boom, starting immediately after World War II and making uranium the most important commodity in the mining industry. The greatest period of uranium production spanned from

31

Process for recovering uranium from waste hydrocarbon oils containing the same. [Uranium contaminated lubricating oils from gaseous diffusion compressors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for the recovery of uranium from uranium-bearing hydrocarbon oils containing carboxylic acid as a degradation product. In one aspect, the invention comprises providing an emulsion of water and the oil, heating the same to a temperature effecting conversion of the emulsion to an organic phase and to an acidic aqueous phase containing uranium carboxylate, and recovering the uranium from the aqueous phase. The process is effective, simple and comparatively inexpensive. It avoids the use of toxic reagents and the formation of undesirable intermediates.

Conrad, M.C.; Getz, P.A.; Hickman, J.E.; Payne, L.D.

1982-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

32

The geochemistry of uranium in the Orca Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

inhibit=. vertical mixing between basin brine and overlying seawater. This severely limits the transport of hexa- valent uranium across this boundary. Second, the major depositional process in the basin is mass transport of sediments from... The continuing growth of nuclear power combined with the steady depletion of existing high-grade uranium ore has brought about an increase in the use of and search for lower-grade uranium deposits. According to Lieberman (1976), there is little undiscovered...

Weber, Frederick Fewell

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

33

The Uranium Processing Facility Finite Element Meshing Discussion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) Finite Element Meshing Discussion ...Need picture of Building... October 25, 2011 Department of Energy - Natural Phenomenon Hazard Workshop 1 Loring Wyllie Arne Halterman Degenkolb Engineers, San Francisco Purpose of Presentation * Design vs. Analysis * Discuss the mesh criteria * Discuss the evolution of the mesh of the UPF main building model * Discuss how the mesh affects the analysis process October 25, 2011 2 Department of Energy - Natural Phenomenon Hazard Workshop FEM Modeling * GTStrudl typically used for DOE projects. * Mesh size is important * What is to be captured? * How complex is the system? * Current criteria set to capture in-plane and out-of-plane response. October 25, 2011 3

34

1.0 MAJOR STUDIES SUPPORTING THIS SCOPING RISK The most important period of past U.S. uranium production spanned from approximately 1948  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

plants (U.S. DOE/EIA 2003a, 2003b, 2006). Uranium exploration, mining, and ore processing left a legacy of abandoned uranium mines. The major studies supporting this scoping analysis include EPA's 1983 Report to Congress on the Potential Health and Environmental Hazards of Uranium Mine Wastes (U.S. EPA 1983a, b, c

35

Depleted Uranium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Depleted Uranium Depleted Uranium Depleted Uranium line line Uranium Enrichment Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium Depleted uranium is uranium that has had some of its U-235 content removed. Over the last four decades, large quantities of uranium were processed by gaseous diffusion to produce uranium having a higher concentration of uranium-235 than the 0.72% that occurs naturally (called "enriched" uranium) for use in U.S. national defense and civilian applications. "Depleted" uranium is also a product of the enrichment process. However, depleted uranium has been stripped of some of its natural uranium-235 content. Most of the Department of Energy's (DOE) depleted uranium inventory contains between 0.2 to 0.4 weight-percent uranium-235, well

36

Nuclear Fuel Facts: Uranium | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Uranium Management and Uranium Management and Policy » Nuclear Fuel Facts: Uranium Nuclear Fuel Facts: Uranium Nuclear Fuel Facts: Uranium Uranium is a silvery-white metallic chemical element in the periodic table, with atomic number 92. It is assigned the chemical symbol U. A uranium atom has 92 protons and 92 electrons, of which 6 are valence electrons. Uranium has the highest atomic weight (19 kg m) of all naturally occurring elements. Uranium occurs naturally in low concentrations in soil, rock and water, and is commercially extracted from uranium-bearing minerals such as uraninite. Uranium ore can be mined from open pits or underground excavations. The ore can then be crushed and treated at a mill to separate the valuable uranium from the ore. Uranium may also be dissolved directly from the ore deposits

37

Uranium industry annual 1993  

SciTech Connect

Uranium production in the United States has declined dramatically from a peak of 43.7 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (16.8 thousand metric tons uranium (U)) in 1980 to 3.1 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (1.2 thousand metric tons U) in 1993. This decline is attributed to the world uranium market experiencing oversupply and intense competition. Large inventories of uranium accumulated when optimistic forecasts for growth in nuclear power generation were not realized. The other factor which is affecting U.S. uranium production is that some other countries, notably Australia and Canada, possess higher quality uranium reserves that can be mined at lower costs than those of the United States. Realizing its competitive advantage, Canada was the world`s largest producer in 1993 with an output of 23.9 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (9.2 thousand metric tons U). The U.S. uranium industry, responding to over a decade of declining market prices, has downsized and adopted less costly and more efficient production methods. The main result has been a suspension of production from conventional mines and mills. Since mid-1992, only nonconventional production facilities, chiefly in situ leach (ISL) mining and byproduct recovery, have operated in the United States. In contrast, nonconventional sources provided only 13 percent of the uranium produced in 1980. ISL mining has developed into the most cost efficient and environmentally acceptable method for producing uranium in the United States. The process, also known as solution mining, differs from conventional mining in that solutions are used to recover uranium from the ground without excavating the ore and generating associated solid waste. This article describes the current ISL Yang technology and its regulatory approval process, and provides an analysis of the factors favoring ISL mining over conventional methods in a declining uranium market.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Electrorefining process and apparatus for recovery of uranium and a mixture of uranium and plutonium from spent fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrorefining process and apparatus for the recovery of uranium and a mixture of uranium and plutonium from spent fuels is disclosed using an electrolytic cell having a lower molten cadmium pool containing spent nuclear fuel, an intermediate electrolyte pool, an anode basket containing spent fuels, two cathodes and electrical power means connected to the anode basket, cathodes and lower molten cadmium pool for providing electrical power to the cell. Using this cell, additional amounts of uranium and plutonium from the anode basket are dissolved in the lower molten cadmium pool, and then purified uranium is electrolytically transported and deposited on a first molten cadmium cathode. Subsequently, a mixture of uranium and plutonium is electrotransported and deposited on a second cathode. 3 figs.

Ackerman, J.P.; Miller, W.E.

1987-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

39

Electrorefining process and apparatus for recovery of uranium and a mixture of uranium and plutonium from spent fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrorefining process and apparatus for the recovery of uranium and a mixture of uranium and plutonium from spent fuel using an electrolytic cell having a lower molten cadmium pool containing spent nuclear fuel, an intermediate electrolyte pool, an anode basket containing spent fuel, and two cathodes, the first cathode composed of either a solid alloy or molten cadmium and the second cathode composed of molten cadmium. Using this cell, additional amounts of uranium and plutonium from the anode basket are dissolved in the lower molten cadmium pool, and then substantially pure uranium is electrolytically transported and deposited on the first alloy or molten cadmium cathode. Subsequently, a mixture of uranium and plutonium is electrotransported and deposited on the second molten cadmium cathode.

Ackerman, John P. (Downers Grove, IL); Miller, William E. (Naperville, IL)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Uranium hexaflouride freezer/sublimer process simulator/trainer  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a software and hardware simulation of a freezer/sublimer unit used in gaseous diffusion processing of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}). The objective of the project was to build a plant simulator that reads control signals and produces plant signals to mimic the behavior of an actual plant. The model is based on physical principles and process data. Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ACSL) was used to develop the model. Once the simulation was validated with actual plant process data, the ACSL model was translated into Advanced Communication and Control Oriented Language (ACCOL). A Bristol Babcock Distributed Process Controller (DPC) Model 3330 was the hardware platform used to host the ACCOL model and process the real world signals. The DPC will be used as a surrogate plant to debug control system hardware/software and to train operators to use the new distributed control system without disturbing the process. 2 refs., 4 figs.

Carnal, C.L. (Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (USA)); Belcher, J.D.; Tapp, P.A.; Ruppel, F.R.; Wells, J.C. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium ore processing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

EPA Update: NESHAP Uranium Activities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for underground uranium mining operations (Subpart B) EPA regulatory requirements for operating uranium mill for Underground Uranium Mining Operations (Subpart B) #12;5 EPA Regulatory Requirements for Underground Uranium uranium mines include: · Applies to 10,000 tons/yr ore production, or 100,000 tons/mine lifetime · Ambient

42

Process for the recovery of uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid  

SciTech Connect

In a process for the recovery of uranium from a wet-process phosphoric acid, comprising treating in an extraction step the preliminarily oxidized acid first with an organic solvent consisting essentially of a dialkylphosphoric acid and a trialkyphosphine oxide dissolved in an inert and unreactive organic solvent whereby there are obtained a uranium-free phosphoric acid and an organic extract consisting essentially of the solvent containing the major portion of uranium; then, in a reextraction step, separating the uranium from the organic extract as ammonium uranyl tricarbonate by reacting the organic extract with ammonium hydroxide and ammonium carbonate; and recycling the uranium-free solvent to the extraction step; an improvement comprises treating the organic extract in a reextraction apparatus having at least two stages, by (A) introducing the extract at the head of the first stage; (B) countercurrently introducing ammonia or ammonium hydroxide solution at the bottom of the first stage; the ph of the first stage being controlled and maintained at a value of 8.0 to 8.5; (C) introducing an ammonium carbonate aqueous solution at the bottom of the last stage; the amount of ammonium carbonate employed being 50-80 percent by weight of the theoretical molar quantity which is necessary to neutralize the dialkylphosphoric acid contained in the solvent and to convert the uranium to ammonium uranyl tricarbonate; and (D) regenerating the ammoniated solvent obtained after the reextraction step by treating it with an acid before recycling it to the extraction step.

Francois, A.; Sialino, A.

1980-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

43

Process for producing enriched uranium having a {sup 235}U content of at least 4 wt. % via combination of a gaseous diffusion process and an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process to eliminate uranium hexafluoride tails storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An uranium enrichment process capable of producing an enriched uranium, having a {sup 235}U content greater than about 4 wt. %, is disclosed which will consume less energy and produce metallic uranium tails having a lower {sup 235}U content than the tails normally produced in a gaseous diffusion separation process and, therefore, eliminate UF{sub 6} tails storage and sharply reduce fluorine use. The uranium enrichment process comprises feeding metallic uranium into an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process to produce an enriched metallic uranium isotopic mixture having a {sup 235} U content of at least about 2 wt. % and a metallic uranium residue containing from about 0.1 wt. % to about 0.2 wt. % {sup 235} U; fluorinating this enriched metallic uranium isotopic mixture to form UF{sub 6}; processing the resultant isotopic mixture of UF{sub 6} in a gaseous diffusion process to produce a final enriched uranium product having a {sup 235}U content of at least 4 wt. %, and up to 93.5 wt. % or higher, of the total uranium content of the product, and a low {sup 235}U content UF{sub 6} having a {sup 235}U content of about 0.71 wt. % of the total uranium content of the low {sup 235}U content UF{sub 6}; and converting this low {sup 235}U content UF{sub 6} to metallic uranium for recycle to the atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. 4 figs.

Horton, J.A.; Hayden, H.W. Jr.

1995-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

44

Process for producing enriched uranium having a .sup.235 U content of at least 4 wt. % via combination of a gaseous diffusion process and an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process to eliminate uranium hexafluoride tails storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An uranium enrichment process capable of producing an enriched uranium, having a .sup.235 U content greater than about 4 wt. %, is disclosed which will consume less energy and produce metallic uranium tails having a lower .sup.235 U content than the tails normally produced in a gaseous diffusion separation process and, therefore, eliminate UF.sub.6 tails storage and sharply reduce fluorine use. The uranium enrichment process comprises feeding metallic uranium into an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process to produce an enriched metallic uranium isotopic mixture having a .sup.235 U content of at least about 2 wt. % and a metallic uranium residue containing from about 0.1 wt. % to about 0.2 wt. % .sup.235 U; fluorinating this enriched metallic uranium isotopic mixture to form UF.sub.6 ; processing the resultant isotopic mixture of UF.sub.6 in a gaseous diffusion process to produce a final enriched uranium product having a .sup.235 U content of at least 4 wt. %, and up to 93.5 wt. % or higher, of the total uranium content of the product, and a low .sup.235 U content UF.sub.6 having a .sup.235 U content of about 0.71 wt. % of the total uranium content of the low .sup.235 U content UF.sub.6 ; and converting this low .sup.235 U content UF.sub.6 to metallic uranium for recycle to the atomic vapor laser isotope separation process.

Horton, James A. (Livermore, CA); Hayden, Jr., Howard W. (Oakridge, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Exploration for Uranium Ore (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation describes permitting procedures and requirements for exploration activities. For the purpose of this legislation, exploration is defined as the drilling of test holes or...

46

U.S. Uranium Reserves Estimates  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. U.S. Forward-Cost Uranium Reserves by Mining Method, Year-End 2008 Mining Method 50 per pound 100 per pound Ore (million tons) Gradea (percent U3O8) U3O8 (million pounds) Ore...

47

U.S. Uranium Reserves Estimates  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. U.S. Forward-Cost Uranium Reserves by State, Year-End 2008 State 50lb 100lb Ore (million tons) Gradea (%) U3O8 (million lbs) Ore (million tons) Gradea (%) U3O8 (million lbs)...

48

Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance (March 2012) Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance (March 2012)

49

E-Print Network 3.0 - abandoned iron ore Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

these (now abandoned) ore deposits. ... Source: Connors, Christopher D. - Department of Geology, Washington and Lee University Collection: Geosciences 4 Chapter 2. Uranium Mining...

50

Structural Sequestration of Uranium in Bacteriogenic Manganese...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of metal-contaminated waters (in engineered remediation technologies, for example)?" Uranium is a key contaminant of concern at US DOE sites and shuttered mining and ore...

51

Stability of uranium incorporated into Fe(hydr)oxides under fluctuating redox conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

uranium budgets and behavior along a Hawaiian chronosequence. Chemical GeologyUranium isotopic evidence for the origin of the Bahariya iron deposits, Egypt. Ore Geology

Stewart, B.D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Y-12s Building 9212 and the Uranium Processing Facility, part...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

wings. Never would a facility be designed like that today to process uranium. Yet, the workers at Y-12 have, for years, managed to sustain the Y-12 "Can Do" attitude and generate...

53

Surface water transport and distribution of uranium in contaminated sediments near a nuclear weapons processing facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The extent of remobilization of uranium from contaminated soils adjacent to a nuclear weapons processing facility during episodic rain events was investigated. In addition, information on the solid phase associations of U in floodplain and suspended...

Batson, Vicky Lynn

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Shirley Basin AEC Ore Buying...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Survey(s): Site Status: The history of domestic uranium procurement under U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) contracts identifies a number of ore buying stations (sampling and...

55

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Shiprock AEC Ore Buying...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Survey(s): Site Status: The history of domestic uranium procurement under U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) contracts identifies a number of ore buying stations (sampling and...

56

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Grants AEC Ore Buying Station...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Survey(s): Site Status: The history of domestic uranium procurement under U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) contracts identifies a number of ore buying stations (sampling and...

57

An investigation on recycling the recovered uranium from electro-refining process in a CANDU reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Feasibility studies for recycling the recovered uranium from electro-refining process of pyroprocessing into a Canada Deuterium Uranium (CANDU) reactor have been carried out with a source term analysis code ORIGEN-S, a reactor lattice analysis code WIMS-AECL, and a Monte Carlo analysis code MCNPX. The uranium metal can be recovered in a solid cathode during an electro-refining process and has a form of a dendrite phase with about 99.99% expecting recovery purity. Considering some impurities of transuranic (TRU) elements and fission products in the recovered uranium, sensitivity calculations were also performed for the compositions of impurities. For a typical spent PWR fuel of 3.0 wt.% of uranium enrichment, 30 GWD/tU burnup and 10 years cooling, the recovered uranium exhibited an extended burnup up to 14 GWD/tU. And among the several safety parameters, the void reactivity at the equilibrium state was estimated 15 mk. Additionally, a simple sphere model was constructed to analyze surface dose rates with the Monte Carlo calculations. It was found that the recovered uranium from the spent PWR fuel by electro-refining process has a significant radioactivity depending on the impurities such as fission products.

Chang Je Park; Kweon Ho Kang; Jung Won Lee; Ki Seog Seo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

URANIUM-SERIES CONSTRAINTS ON RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT AND GROUNDWATER FLOW AT NOPAL I URANIUM DEPOSIT, SIERRA PENA BLANCA, MEXICO  

SciTech Connect

Uranium-series data for groundwater samples from the vicinity of the Nopal I uranium ore deposit are used to place constraints on radionuclide transport and hydrologic processes at this site, and also, by analogy, at Yucca Mountain. Decreasing uranium concentrations for wells drilled in 2003 suggest that groundwater flow rates are low (< 10 m/yr). Field tests, well productivity, and uranium isotopic constraints also suggest that groundwater flow and mixing is limited at this site. The uranium isotopic systematics for water collected in the mine adit are consistent with longer rock-water interaction times and higher uranium dissolution rates at the front of the adit where the deposit is located. Short-lived nuclide data for groundwater wells are used to calculate retardation factors that are on the order of 1,000 for radium and 10,000 to 10,000,000 for lead and polonium. Radium has enhanced mobility in adit water and fractures near the deposit.

S. J. Goldstein, S. Luo, T. L. Ku, and M. T. Murrell

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

The reduction of iron ore pellets used in the Fastmet process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......by gas-, oil-, or coal-fired burners, enabling...direct-reduction processes (using coal and gas) require any...lies the interest. The combustion products of Fastmet are...NEVILLE FOWKES 1.2 The chemistry The chemistry occurring...therefore need to be coal-rich, and achieving......

NEVILLE FOWKES

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Dupoly process for treatment of depleted uranium and production of beneficial end products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a process of encapsulating depleted uranium by forming a homogenous mixture of depleted uranium and molten virgin or recycled thermoplastic polymer into desired shapes. Separate streams of depleted uranium and virgin or recycled thermoplastic polymer are simultaneously subjected to heating and mixing conditions. The heating and mixing conditions are provided by a thermokinetic mixer, continuous mixer or an extruder and preferably by a thermokinetic mixer or continuous mixer followed by an extruder. The resulting DUPoly shapes can be molded into radiation shielding material or can be used as counter weights for use in airplanes, helicopters, ships, missiles, armor or projectiles.

Kalb, Paul D. (Wading River, NY); Adams, Jay W. (Stony Brook, NY); Lageraaen, Paul R. (Seaford, NY); Cooley, Carl R. (Gaithersburg, MD)

2000-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium ore processing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Microbial reduction of iron ore  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry.

Hoffmann, Michael R. (Pasadena, CA); Arnold, Robert G. (Pasadena, CA); Stephanopoulos, Gregory (Pasadena, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Microbial reduction of iron ore  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry. 11 figs.

Hoffmann, M.R.; Arnold, R.G.; Stephanopoulos, G.

1989-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

63

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Salt Lake City AEC Ore Buying Station  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AEC Ore Buying AEC Ore Buying Station - UT 0-03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Salt Lake City AEC Ore Buying Station (UT.0-03 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The history of domestic uranium procurement under U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) contracts identifies a number of ore buying stations (sampling and storage sites) that were operated during the period late-1949 through the mid-1960s. During this period the AEC established ore-buying stations in new uranium producing areas where it appeared that ore production would be sufficient to support a uranium milling operation. The ideal scenario was to accumulate a sufficient stockpile of ore and

64

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Mexican Hat AEC Ore Buying Station -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AEC Ore Buying Station AEC Ore Buying Station - UT 0-02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Mexican Hat AEC Ore Buying Station (UT.0-02) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The history of domestic uranium procurement under U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) contracts identifies a number of ore buying stations (sampling and storage sites) that were operated during the period late-1949 through the mid-1960s. During this period the AEC established ore-buying stations in new uranium producing areas where it appeared that ore production would be sufficient to support a uranium milling operation. The ideal scenario was to accumulate a sufficient stockpile of ore and

65

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Tuba City AEC Ore Buying Station - AZ  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AEC Ore Buying Station - AEC Ore Buying Station - AZ 0-02A FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Tuba City AEC Ore Buying Station (AZ.0-02A) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The history of domestic uranium procurement under U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) contracts identifies a number of ore buying stations (sampling and storage sites) that were operated during the period late-1949 through the mid-1960s. During this period the AEC established ore-buying stations in new uranium producing areas where it appeared that ore production would be sufficient to support a uranium milling operation. The ideal scenario was to accumulate a sufficient stockpile of ore and

66

Separation of Zirconium from Uranium in U-Zr Alloys Using a Chlorination Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the nuclear fuel in nitric acid. This acid solution is then mixed with a tributyl phosphate (TBP)/kerosene mixture in order to extract the uranium, plutonium, thorium, or whatever else might be of interest, from the waste-stream [2]. Problems arise during... aqueous processing of uranium-zirconium alloys due to the relative “nobility” of zirconium in nitric acid [3]. This nobility results in sludge formation within the 2 reprocessing equipment. Not only does this sludge clog equipment, but it also...

Parkison, Adam J

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

67

3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report 3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report 3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: October 31, 2013 Next Release Date: February 2014 Capacity (short tons of ore per day) 2012 1st Quarter 2013 2nd Quarter 2013 3rd Quarter 2013 EFR White Mesa LLC White Mesa Mill San Juan, Utah 2,000 Operating Operating Operating Operating-Processing Alternate Feed Energy Fuels Resources Corporation Piñon Ridge Mill Montrose, Colorado 500 Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Permitted And Licensed Energy Fuels Wyoming Inc Sheep Mountain Fremont, Wyoming 725 - Undeveloped Undeveloped Undeveloped Kennecott Uranium Company/Wyoming Coal Resource Company Sweetwater Uranium Project Sweetwater, Wyoming 3,000

68

Uranium hexafluoride: Safe handling, processing, and transporting: Conference proceedings  

SciTech Connect

This conference seeks to provide a forum for the exchange of information and ideas of the safety aspects and technical issue related to the handling of uranium hexafluoride. By allowing operators, engineers, scientists, managers, educators, and others to meet and share experiences of mutual concern, the conference is also intended to provide the participants with a more complete knowledge of technical and operational issues. The topics for the papers in the proceedings are widely varied and include the results of chemical, metallurgical, mechanical, thermal, and analytical investigations, as well as the developed philosophies of operational, managerial, and regulatory guidelines. Papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

Strunk, W.D.; Thornton, S.G. (eds.)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Marysville AEC Ore Buying Station - UT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marysville AEC Ore Buying Station - Marysville AEC Ore Buying Station - UT 05 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Marysville AEC Ore Buying Station (UT.05 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The history of domestic uranium procurement under U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) contracts identifies a number of ore buying stations (sampling and storage sites) that were operated during the period late-1949 through the mid-1960s. During this period the AEC established ore-buying stations in new uranium producing areas where it appeared that ore production would be sufficient to support a uranium milling operation. The

70

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Monticello AEC Ore Buying Station - UT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monticello AEC Ore Buying Station - Monticello AEC Ore Buying Station - UT 03A FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Monticello AEC Ore Buying Station (UT.03A ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The history of domestic uranium procurement under U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) contracts identifies a number of ore buying stations (sampling and storage sites) that were operated during the period late-1949 through the mid-1960s. During this period the AEC established ore-buying stations in new uranium producing areas where it appeared that ore production would be sufficient to support a uranium milling operation. The

71

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Riverton AEC Ore Buying Station - WY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Riverton AEC Ore Buying Station - Riverton AEC Ore Buying Station - WY 0-03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Riverton AEC Ore Buying Station (WY.0-03 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The history of domestic uranium procurement under U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) contracts identifies a number of ore buying stations (sampling and storage sites) that were operated during the period late-1949 through the mid-1960s. During this period the AEC established ore-buying stations in new uranium producing areas where it appeared that ore production would be sufficient to support a uranium milling operation. The

72

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Globe Cutter AEC Ore Buying Station -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Globe Cutter AEC Ore Buying Station Globe Cutter AEC Ore Buying Station - AZ 03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Globe (Cutter) AEC Ore Buying Station (AZ.03 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The history of domestic uranium procurement under U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) contracts identifies a number of ore buying stations (sampling and storage sites) that were operated during the period late-1949 through the mid-1960s. During this period the AEC established ore-buying stations in new uranium producing areas where it appeared that ore production would be sufficient to support a uranium milling operation. The

73

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Blue Water AEC Ore Buying Station - NM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Blue Water AEC Ore Buying Station - Blue Water AEC Ore Buying Station - NM 0-02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Blue Water AEC Ore Buying Station (NM.0-02 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The history of domestic uranium procurement under U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) contracts identifies a number of ore buying stations (sampling and storage sites) that were operated during the period late-1949 through the mid-1960s. During this period the AEC established ore-buying stations in new uranium producing areas where it appeared that ore production would be sufficient to support a uranium milling operation. The

74

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- White Canyon AEC Ore Buying Station -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

White Canyon AEC Ore Buying Station White Canyon AEC Ore Buying Station - UT 04 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: White Canyon AEC Ore Buying Station (UT.04) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The history of domestic uranium procurement under U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) contracts identifies a number of ore buying stations (sampling and storage sites) that were operated during the period late-1949 through the mid-1960s. During this period the AEC established ore-buying stations in new uranium producing areas where it appeared that ore production would be sufficient to support a uranium milling operation. The

75

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Crooks Gap AEC Ore Buying Station - WY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Crooks Gap AEC Ore Buying Station - Crooks Gap AEC Ore Buying Station - WY 0-02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Crooks Gap AEC Ore Buying Station (WY.0-02 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The history of domestic uranium procurement under U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) contracts identifies a number of ore buying stations (sampling and storage sites) that were operated during the period late-1949 through the mid-1960s. During this period the AEC established ore-buying stations in new uranium producing areas where it appeared that ore production would be sufficient to support a uranium milling operation. The

76

A complete remediation process for a uranium-contaminated site and application to other sites  

SciTech Connect

During the summer of 1996 the authors were able to test, at the pilot scale, the concept of leaching uranium (U) from contaminated soils. The results of this pilot scale operation showed that the system they previously had developed at the laboratory scale is applicable at the pilot scale. The paper discusses these results, together with laboratory scale results using soil from the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), Ohio. These FEMP results show how, with suitable adaptations, the process is widely applicable to other sites. The purpose of this paper is to describe results that demonstrate remediation of uranium-contaminated soils may be accomplished through a leach scheme using sodium bicarbonate.

Mason, C.F.V.; Lu, N.; Kitten, H.D.; Williams, M.; Turney, W.R.J.R.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

77

Radiological aspects of in situ uranium recovery  

SciTech Connect

In the last few years, there has been a significant increase in the demand for Uranium as historical inventories have been consumed and new reactor orders are being placed. Numerous mineralized properties around the world are being evaluated for Uranium recovery and new mining / milling projects are being evaluated and developed. Ore bodies which are considered uneconomical to mine by conventional methods such as tunneling or open pits, can be candidates for non-conventional recovery techniques, involving considerably less capital expenditure. Technologies such as Uranium in situ leaching in situ recovery (ISL / ISR), have enabled commercial scale mining and milling of relatively small ore pockets of lower grade, and may make a significant contribution to overall world wide uranium supplies over the next ten years. Commercial size solution mining production facilities have operated in the US since 1975. Solution mining involves the pumping of groundwater, fortified with oxidizing and complexing agents into an ore body, solubilizing the uranium in situ, and then pumping the solutions to the surface where they are fed to a processing plant. Processing involves ion exchange and may also include precipitation, drying or calcining and packaging operations depending on facility specifics. This paper presents an overview of the ISR process and the health physics monitoring programs developed at a number of commercial scale ISL / ISR Uranium recovery and production facilities as a result of the radiological character of these processes. Although many radiological aspects of the process are similar to that of conventional mills, conventional-type tailings as such are not generated. However, liquid and solid byproduct materials may be generated and impounded. The quantity and radiological character of these by products are related to facility specifics. Some special monitoring considerations are presented which are required due to the manner in which Radon gas is evolved in the process and the unique aspects of controlling solution flow patterns underground. An overview of the major aspects of the health physics and radiation protection programs that were developed at these facilities are discussed and contrasted to circumstances of the current generation and state of the art of Uranium ISR technologies and facilities. (authors)

BROWN, STEVEN H. [SHB INC., 7505 S. Xanthia Place, Centennial, Colorado (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Characterization of depleted uranium oxides fabricated using different processing methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Identifying both physical and chemical characteristics of Special Nuclear Material (SNM) production processes is the corner stone of nuclear forensics. Typically, processing markers are based on measuring an inte...

E. P. Hastings; C. Lewis; J. FitzPatrick…

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Development of a Novel Depleted Uranium Treatment Process at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

A three-stage process was developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to treat potentially pyrophoric depleted uranium metal wastes. The three-stage process includes waste sorting/rinsing, acid dissolution of the waste metal with a hydrochloric and phosphoric acid solution, and solidification of the neutralized residuals from the second stage with clay. The final product is a solid waste form that can be transported to and disposed of at a permitted low-level radioactive waste disposal site.

Gates-Anderson, D; Bowers, J; Laue, C; Fitch, T

2007-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

80

Neurotoxicity of depleted uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Depleted uranium (DU) is a byproduct of the enrichment process of uranium for its more radioactive isotopes to be ... neurotoxicity of DU. This review reports on uranium uses and its published health effects, wit...

George C. -T. Jiang; Michael Aschiner

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium ore processing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Fluid dynamics, particulate segregation, chemical processes, and natural ore analog discussions that relate to the potential for criticality in Hanford tanks  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an in-depth review of the potential for nuclear criticality to occur in Hanford defense waste tanks during past, current and future safe storage and maintenance operations. The report also briefly discusses the potential impacts of proposed retrieval activities, although retrieval was not a main focus of scope. After thorough review of fluid dynamic aspects that focus on particle segregation, chemical aspects that focus on solubility and adsorption processes that might concentrate plutonium and/or separate plutonium from the neutron absorbers in the tank waste, and ore-body formation and mining operations, the interdisciplinary team has come to the conclusion that there is negligible risk of nuclear critically under existing storage conditions in Hanford site underground waste storage tanks. Further, for the accident scenarios considered an accidental criticality is incredible.

Barney, G.S.

1996-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

82

Production of small uranium dioxide microspheres for cermet nuclear fuel using the internal gelation process  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is developing a uranium dioxide (UO2)/tungsten cermet fuel for potential use as the nuclear cryogenic propulsion stage (NCPS). The first generation NCPS is expected to be made from dense UO2 microspheres with diameters between 75 and 150 m. Previously, the internal gelation process and a hood-scale apparatus with a vibrating nozzle were used to form gel spheres, which became UO2 kernels with diameters between 350 and 850 m. For the NASA spheres, the vibrating nozzle was replaced with a custom designed, two-fluid nozzle to produce gel spheres in the desired smaller size range. This paper describes the operational methodology used to make 3 kg of uranium oxide microspheres.

Collins, Robert T [ORNL] [ORNL; Collins, Jack Lee [ORNL] [ORNL; Hunt, Rodney Dale [ORNL] [ORNL; Ladd-Lively, Jennifer L [ORNL] [ORNL; Patton, Kaara K [ORNL] [ORNL; Hickman, Robert [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL] [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Ore mineralization related to geological evolution of the Karkonosze–Izera Massif (the Sudetes, Poland) — Towards a model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The Karkonosze–Izera Massif is a large tectonic unit located in the northern periphery of the Bohemian Massif. It includes the Variscan Karkonosze Granite (about 328–304 Ma) surrounded by the following four older units:- Izera–Kowary (the Early Paleozoic continental crust of the Saxothuringian Basin), - Ješt?d (the Middle Devonian to Lower Viséan sedimentary succession deposited on the NE passive margin of the Saxothuringian Terrane), out of the present study area, - Southern Karkonosze (metamorphosed sediments and volcanics filling the Saxothuringian Basin), out of the present study area, - Leszczyniec (Early Ordovician, obducted fragment of Saxothuringian Basin sea floor). The authors present a genetic model of ore mineralization in the Karkonosze–Izera Massif, in which ore deposits and ore minerals occurrences are related to the successive episodes of the geological history of the Karkonosze–Izera Massif:- formation of the Saxothuringian Basin and its passive continental margin (about 500–490 Ma) - Variscan thermal events:- regional metamorphism (360–340 Ma) - Karkonosze Granite intrusion (328–304 Ma) - Late Cretaceous and Neogene-to-Recent hypergenic processes. The oldest ore deposits and ore minerals occurrences of the Karkonosze–Izera Massif are represented by pyrite and magnetite deposits hosted in the Leszczyniec Unit as well as by magnetite deposit and, presumably, by a small part of tin mineralization hosted in the Izera–Kowary Unit. All these deposits and occurrences were subjected to the pre-Variscan regional metamorphism. Most of the Karkonosze–Izera Massif ore deposits and occurrences are related to the Karkonosze Granite intrusion. This group includes a spatially diversified assemblage of small ore deposits and ore mineral occurrences of: Fe, Cu, Sn, As, U, Co, Au, Ag, Pb, Ni, Bi, Zn, Sb, Se, S, Th, REE, Mo, W and Hg located within the granite and in granite-related pegmatites, in the close contact aureole of the granite and within the metamorphic envelope, at various distances from the granite. Assuming world standards, all these deposits are now uneconomic. Various age determinations indicated that ore formation connected with the Karkonosze Granite might have taken place mostly between about 326 and 270 Ma. The last ore-forming episode in the Karkonosze–Izera Massif is related to hypergenic processes, particularly important in the northern part of the massif, in the Izera–Kowary Unit where some uranium deposits and occurrences resulted from the infiltration of ore solutions that originated from the weathering of pre-existing accumulations of uranium minerals. A separate problem is the presence of oxidation zones of ore deposits and occurrences, both the fossil and the recent. A full list of ore minerals identified in described deposits and occurrences of the Karkonosze–Izera Massif together with relevant, key references is presented in the form of an appendix.

Ksenia Mochnacka; Teresa Oberc-Dziedzic; Wojciech Mayer; Adam Pieczka

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

E-Print Network 3.0 - anthropogenic uranium concentration Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Fossil Energy Program Collection: Fossil Fuels 6 geology and Ranger 1 open-pit uranium mine in Australia Summary: in ore formations with...

85

Towards a desalination initiative using cogeneration with an advanced reactor type and uranium recovered from Moroccan phosphoric acid production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Morocco is known to be among the first few countries to produce phosphate and phosphoric acid. Moroccan phosphate contains substantial amounts of uranium. This uranium can be recovered from the phosphate ore as a by-product during the production of phosphoric acid. Uranium extraction processes linked with phosphoric acid fabrication have been used industrially in some countries. This is done mainly by solvent extraction. Although, the present price of uranium is low in the international market, such uranium recovery could be considered as a side product of phosphoric acid production. The price of uranium has a very small impact on the cost of nuclear energy obtained from it. This paper focuses on the extraction of uranium salt from phosphate rock. If uranium is recovered in Morocco in the proposed manner, it could serve as feed for a number of nuclear power plants. The natural uranium product would have to be either enriched or blended as mixed-oxide fuel to manufacture adequate nuclear fuel. Part of this fuel would feed a desalination initiative using a high temperature reactor of the new generation, chosen for its intrinsic safety, sturdiness, ease of maintenance, thermodynamic characteristics and long fuel life between reloads, that is, good economy. ?n international cooperation based on commercial contract schemes would concern: the general project and uranium extraction; uranium enrichment and fuel fabrication services; the nuclear power plant; and the desalination plant. This paper presents the overall feasibility of the general project with some quantitative preliminary figures and cost estimates.

Michel Lung; Abdelaali Kossir; Driss Msatef

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Palmerton Ore Buying Site - PA 33  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Palmerton Ore Buying Site - PA 33 Palmerton Ore Buying Site - PA 33 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: PALMERTON ORE BUYING SITE (PA.33) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: New Jersey Zinc Company PA.33-1 Location: Palmerton , Pennsylvania PA.33-2 Evaluation Year: 1994 PA.33-3 Site Operations: Mid-1950s - AEC leased the New Jersey Zinc Company property and established a uranium ore stockpile on the property in the vicinity of Palmerton, PA. PA.33-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for residual contamination and resulting exposure beyond that associated with natural background radiation considered remote PA.33-3 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium Ore PA.33-4 Radiological Survey(s): Yes PA.33-5

87

EIS-0472: Uranium Leasing Program, Mesa, Montrose, and San Miguel Counties, Colorado  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS evaluated the potential environmental impacts of management alternatives for DOE’s Uranium Leasing Program, under which DOE administers tracts of land in western Colorado for exploration, development, and the extraction of uranium and vanadium ores.

88

Micropixe as a tool to search for uranium-bearing particles in lung tissues  

SciTech Connect

A proton microbeam is proposed as a tool to search for uranium-bearing particles in lung tissues. Preliminary experiments have been undertaken by irradiating with protons lung tissues of dogs previously exposed to uranium ore. 7 references.

Paschoa, A.S.; Wrenn, S.C.; Miller, M.E.; Jones, K.W.; Cholewa, M.; Hanson, A.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

An assessment of the radiological scenario around uranium mines in Singhbhum East district, Jharkhand, India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......storing low-specific active waste after the recovery of uranium...ore mining and radioactive waste around a storage centre from Mexico. Radioprotection...K., Puranik V. D. Long-term management of uranium mill waste: proposal for stewardship......

R. M. Tripathi; S. K. Sahoo; S. Mohapatra; A. C. Patra; P. Lenka; J. S. Dubey; V. N. Jha; V. D. Puranik

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Synthesis of Uranium Trichloride for the Pyrometallurgical Processing of Used Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

The pyroprocessing of used nuclear fuel via electrorefining requires the continued addition of uranium trichloride to sustain operations. Uranium trichloride is utilized as an oxidant in the system to allow separation of uranium metal from the minor actinides and fission products. The inventory of uranium trichloride had diminished to a point that production was necessary to continue electrorefiner operations. Following initial experimentation, cupric chloride was chosen as a reactant with uranium metal to synthesize uranium trichloride. Despite the variability in equipment and charge characteristics, uranium trichloride was produced in sufficient quantities to maintain operations in the electrorefiner. The results and conclusions from several experiments are presented along with a set of optimized operating conditions for the synthesis of uranium trichloride.

B.R. Westphal; J.C. Price; R.D. Mariani

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Chapter 3. Volume and Characteristics of Uranium Mine Wastes Uranium has been found and mined in a wide variety of rocks, including sandstone, carbonates1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3-1 Chapter 3. Volume and Characteristics of Uranium Mine Wastes Uranium has been found and mined conventional mining, solution extraction, and milling of uranium, a principal focus of this report is TENORM, or which may need future reclamation. When uranium mining first started, most of the ores were recovered

92

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. U.S. uranium mills by owner, location, capacity, and operating status at end of the year, 2008-2012 4. U.S. uranium mills by owner, location, capacity, and operating status at end of the year, 2008-2012 Mill Owner Mill Name County, State (existing and planned locations) Milling Capacity (short tons of ore per day) Operating Status at End of the Year 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Cotter Corporation Canon City Mill Fremont, Colorado 0 Standby Standby Standby Reclamation Demolished Denison White Mesa LLC White Mesa Mill San Juan, Utah 2,000 Operating Operating Operating Operating Operating Energy Fuels Resources Corporation Piñon Ridge Mill Montrose, Colorado 500 Developing Developing Developing Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Kennecott Uranium Company/Wyoming Coal Resource Company Sweetwater Uranium Project Sweetwater, Wyoming 3,000 Standby Standby Standby Standby Standby

93

Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hexafluoride (UF6) Hexafluoride (UF6) Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6) line line Properties of UF6 UF6 Health Effects Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6) Physical and chemical properties of UF6, and its use in uranium processing. Uranium Hexafluoride and Its Properties Uranium hexafluoride is a chemical compound consisting of one atom of uranium combined with six atoms of fluorine. It is the chemical form of uranium that is used during the uranium enrichment process. Within a reasonable range of temperature and pressure, it can be a solid, liquid, or gas. Solid UF6 is a white, dense, crystalline material that resembles rock salt. UF6 crystals in a glass vial image UF6 crystals in a glass vial. Uranium hexafluoride does not react with oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, or dry air, but it does react with water or water vapor. For this reason,

94

A Process for Reducing the Licensing Burden for New Products Containing Depleted Uranium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3-01 3-01 A Process for Reducing the Licensing Burden for New Products Containing Depleted Uranium Environmental Assessment Division Argonne National Laboratory Operated by The University of Chicago, under Contract W-31-109-Eng-38, for the United States Department of Energy Argonne National Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science laboratory, is operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38. DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The University of Chicago, nor any of their employees or officers, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes

95

Microbiological, Geochemical and Hydrologic Processes Controlling Uranium Mobility: An Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site at Rifle, Colorado, Quality Assurance Project Plan  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is cleaning up and/or monitoring large, dilute plumes contaminated by metals, such as uranium and chromium, whose mobility and solubility change with redox status. Field-scale experiments with acetate as the electron donor have stimulated metal-reducing bacteria to effectively remove uranium [U(VI)] from groundwater at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Rifle, Colorado. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and a multidisciplinary team of national laboratory and academic collaborators has embarked on a research proposed for the Rifle site, the object of which is to gain a comprehensive and mechanistic understanding of the microbial factors and associated geochemistry controlling uranium mobility so that DOE can confidently remediate uranium plumes as well as support stewardship of uranium-contaminated sites. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Rifle Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Project.

Fix, N. J.

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

96

Uranium Leasing Program: Program Summary | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

which called for the continued leasing of DOE-managed lands for the exploration and production of uranium and vanadium ores. In 1996, DOE reoffered respective leases to the...

97

Review of the Long Lead Procurement Processed Used by Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC for the Uranium Processing Facility Proect, July 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long Lead Procurement Processes Used by Long Lead Procurement Processes Used by Babcock &Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC for the Uranium Processing Facility Project May 2011 July 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1

98

History of Uranium-233(sup233U)Processing at the Rocky Flats Plant. In support of the RFETS Acceptable Knowledge Program  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the processing of Uranium-233 at the Rocky Flats Plant (Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site). The information may be used to meet Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC)and for determining potential Uranium-233 content in applicable residue waste streams.

Moment, R.L.; Gibbs, F.E.; Freiboth, C.J.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 Milling Capacity (short tons of ore per day) 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Cotter Corporation Canon City Mill Fremont, Colorado 0 Standby Standby Standby Reclamation Demolished EFR White Mesa LLC White Mesa Mill San Juan, Utah 2,000 Operating Operating Operating Operating Operating Energy Fuels Resources Corporation Piñon Ridge Mill Montrose, Colorado 500 Developing Developing Developing Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Kennecott Uranium Company/Wyoming Coal Resource Company Sweetwater Uranium Project Sweetwater, Wyoming 3,000 Standby Standby Standby Standby Standby Uranium One Americas, Inc. Shootaring Canyon Uranium Mill Garfield, Utah 750 Changing License To Operational Standby

100

Impact of Uranium Mining and Processing on the Environment of Mountainous areas of Kyrgyzstan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this report the results of analysis of modern geo-ecological situation in areas of uranium mining and milling in the territory of Kyrgyzstan are presented. Major threats for the mountain environment and cit...

I. A. Torgoev; U. G. Aleshyn; H. B. Havenit

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium ore processing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Appraisal of the Uranium Processing Facility Safety Basis Preliminary Safety Design Report Process at the Y-12 National Security Complex, May 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appraisal of the Appraisal of the Uranium Processing Facility Safety Basis Preliminary Safety Design Report Process at the Y-12 National Security Complex May 2011 May 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U. S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background........................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope..................................................................................................................................................... 2

102

Appraisal of the Uranium Processing Facility Safety Basis Preliminary Safety Design Report Process at the Y-12 National Security Complex, May 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Appraisal of the Appraisal of the Uranium Processing Facility Safety Basis Preliminary Safety Design Report Process at the Y-12 National Security Complex May 2011 May 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U. S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background........................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope..................................................................................................................................................... 2

103

Mixed sulphide–oxide lead and zinc ores: Problems and solutions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mixed sulphide–oxide lead and zinc ores are most often found in the transition, and occasionally in the oxidised, zones of lead–zinc ore-bodies. They are of great importance because there are numerous unexploited or abandoned reserves of these ores in the world. However they present difficulties for conventional mineral processing due to complex mineralogy. In this paper, the specific problems associated with these types of ores are described and methods for solving these problems, combining economic and technical considerations, are discussed. The results of experiments carried out at laboratory scale are presented, in which the dissolution of mixed ore in sulphuric acid without oxidising agents was investigated. The results show the feasibility of zinc recovery from mixed sulphide–oxide lead and zinc ores, which underlines the potential of this approach. We also propose a conceptual flow diagram for the hydrometallurgical processing of these ores.

S. Moradi; A.J. Monhemius

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Depleted uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The potential health effects arising from exposure to depleted uranium have been much in the news of late. Naturally occurring uranium contains the radioisotopes 238U (which dominates, at a current molar proportion of 99.3%), 235U and a small amount of 234U. Depleted uranium has an isotopic concentration of 235U that is below the 0.7% found naturally. This is either because the uranium has passed through a nuclear reactor which uses up some of the fissile 235U that fuels the fission chain-reaction, or because it is the uranium that remains when enriched uranium with an elevated concentration of 235U is produced in an enrichment plant, or because of a combination of these two processes. Depleted uranium has a lower specific activity than naturally occurring uranium because of the lower concentrations of the more radioactive isotopes 235U and 234U, but account must be taken of any contaminating radionuclides or exotic radioisotopes of uranium if the uranium has been irradiated. Uranium is a particularly dense element (about twice as dense as lead), and this property makes it useful in certain military applications, such as armour-piercing munitions. Depleted uranium, rather than natural uranium, is used because of its availability and, since the demise of the fast breeder reactor programme, the lack of alternative use. Depleted uranium weapons were used in the Gulf War of 1990 and also, to a lesser extent, more recently in the Balkans. This has led to speculation that depleted uranium may be associated with `Gulf War Syndrome', or other health effects that have been reported by military and civilian personnel involved in these conflicts and their aftermath. Although, on the basis of present scientific knowledge, it seems most unlikely that exposure to depleted uranium at the levels concerned could produce a detectable excess of adverse health effects, and in such a short timescale, the issue has become one of general concern and contention. As a consequence, any investigation needs to be thorough to produce sufficiently comprehensive evidence to stand up to close scrutiny and gain the support of the public, whatever the conclusions. Unfortunately, it is the nature of such inquiries that they take time, which is frustrating for some. In the UK, the Royal Society has instigated an independent investigation into the health effects of depleted uranium by a working group chaired by Professor Brian Spratt. This inquiry has been underway since the beginning of 2000. The working group's findings will be reviewed by a panel appointed by the Council of the Royal Society, and it is anticipated that the final report will be published in the summer of 2001. Further details can be found at www.royalsoc.ac.uk/templates/press/showpresspage.cfm?file=2001010801.txt. Nick Priest has summarised current knowledge on the toxicity (both radiological and chemical) of depleted uranium in a commentary in The Lancet (27 January 2001, 357 244-6). For those wanting to read a comprehensive review of the literature, in 1999 RAND published `A Review of the Scientific Literature as it Pertains to Gulf War Illnesses, Volume 7: Depleted Uranium' by Naomi Harley and her colleagues, which can be found at www.rand.org/publications/MR/MR1018.7/MR1018.7.html. An interesting article by Jan Olof Snihs and Gustav Akerblom entitled `Use of depleted uranium in military conflicts and possible impact on health and environment' was published in the December 2000 issue of SSI News (pp 1-8), and can be found at the website of the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute: www.ssi.se/tidningar/PDF/lockSSIn/SSI-news2000.pdf. Last year, a paper was published in the June issue of this Journal that is of some relevance to depleted uranium. McGeoghegan and Binks (2000 J. Radiol. Prot. 20 111-37) reported the results of their epidemiological study of the health of workers at the Springfields uranium production facility near Preston during 1946-95. This study included almost 14 000 radiation workers. Although organ-specific doses due to uranium are not yet available for these worker

Richard Wakeford

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

A process for reducing the licensing burden for new products containing depleted uranium.  

SciTech Connect

This report is intended to provide guidance on the process for petitioning the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to initiate a rulemaking that could reduce the licensing burden for new products containing depleted uranium (DU), which are being investigated by the DU Uses Research and Development (R&D) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The focus is on requirements of the NRC rulemaking process applicable to establishing new exemptions or general licenses for products and devices containing source material. NRC policies and guidance regarding such requirements are described, including a 1965 policy statement on approval of new exemptions for products containing radionuclides (''Federal Register'', Volume 30, page 3462 [30 FR 3462]; March 16, 1965) and Regulatory Guide 6.7, which addresses the contents of environmental reports that support rulemaking petitions seeking exemptions for radionuclide-containing products. Methodologies for calculating radiological and nonradiological impacts on human health (i.e., risks) associated with distributing, using, and disposing of DU-containing products are presented. Also, methodologies for completing assessments of the potential effects of accidents involving new DU-containing products and of product misuse are described. The report recommends that the U.S. Department of Energy formulate a regulatory plan for deployment of DU-containing products in areas that are not already radiologically controlled. Such a plan is needed because deployment of new DU-containing products may be difficult under existing NRC licensing requirements. To provide a basis for the regulatory plan, it is recommended that detailed assessments of the radiological and nonradiological risks of distributing, using, and disposing of DU-containing products be conducted. Such assessments should be initiated as soon as sufficient data are available from the ongoing DU Uses R&D Program at ORNL to support the analyses.

Ranek, N. L.; Kamboj, S.; Hartmann, H. M.; Avci, H.

2004-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

106

Total production of uranium concentrate in the United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3. U.S. uranium mills and heap leach facilities by owner, location, capacity, and operating status 3. U.S. uranium mills and heap leach facilities by owner, location, capacity, and operating status Operating Status at the End of Owner Mill and Heap Leach1 Facility Name County, State (existing and planned locations) Capacity (short tons of ore per day) 2012 1st Quarter 2013 2nd Quarter 2013 3rd Quarter 2013 EFR White Mesa LLC White Mesa Mill San Juan, Utah 2,000 Operating Operating Operating Operating-Processing Alternate Feed Energy Fuels Resources Corporation Piñon Ridge Mill Montrose, Colorado 500 Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Permitted and Licensed Energy Fuels Wyoming Inc Sheep Mountain Fremont, Wyoming 725 - Undeveloped Undeveloped Undeveloped

107

Kumba Iron Ore | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kumba Iron Ore Jump to: navigation, search Name: Kumba Iron Ore Place: Pretoria, South Africa Zip: 175 Sector: Solar Product: South Africa based mining company. The firm is...

108

Final environmental statement related to the Western Nuclear, Inc. , Split Rock Uranium Mill (Fremont County, Wyoming)  

SciTech Connect

The proposed action is the renewal of Source Material License SUA-56 (with amendments) issued to Western Nuclear, Inc. (WNI), for the operation of the Split Rock Uranium Mill near Jeffrey City and the Green Mountain Ion-Exchange Facility, both in Fremont County, Wyoming. The license also permits possession of material from past operations at four ancillary facilities in the Gas Hills mining area - the Bullrush, Day-Loma, Frazier-Lamac, and Rox sites (Docket No. 40-1162). However, although heap leaching operations were previously authorized at Frazier-Lamac, there has never been any processing of material at this site. The Split Rock mill is an acid-leach, ion-exchange and solvent-extraction uranium-ore processing mill with a design capacity of 1540 MT (1700 tons) of ore per day. WNI has proposed by license amendment request to increase the storage capacity of the tailings ponds in order to permit the continuation of present production rates of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ through 1996 using lower-grade ores.

Not Available

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Alpha spectrometric characterization of process-related particle size distributions from active particle sampling at the Los Alamos National Laboratory uranium foundry  

SciTech Connect

Uranium particles within the respirable size range pose a significant hazard to the health and safety of workers. Significant differences in the deposition and incorporation patterns of aerosols within the respirable range can be identified and integrated into sophisticated health physics models. Data characterizing the uranium particle size distribution resulting from specific foundry-related processes are needed. Using personal air sampling cascade impactors, particles collected from several foundry processes were sorted by activity median aerodynamic diameter onto various Marple substrates. After an initial gravimetric assessment of each impactor stage, the substrates were analyzed by alpha spectrometry to determine the uranium content of each stage. Alpha spectrometry provides rapid nondestructive isotopic data that can distinguish process uranium from natural sources and the degree of uranium contribution to the total accumulated particle load. In addition, the particle size bins utilized by the impactors provide adequate resolution to determine if a process particle size distribution is: lognormal, bimodal, or trimodal. Data on process uranium particle size values and distributions facilitate the development of more sophisticated and accurate models for internal dosimetry, resulting in an improved understanding of foundry worker health and safety.

Plionis, Alexander A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Peterson, Dominic S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tandon, Lav [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lamont, Stephen P [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

The New Generation of Uranium In Situ Recovery Facilities: Design Improvements Should Reduce Radiological Impacts Relative to First Generation Uranium Solution Mining Plants  

SciTech Connect

In the last few years, there has been a significant increase in the demand for Uranium as historical inventories have been consumed and new reactor orders are being placed. Numerous mineralized properties around the world are being evaluated for Uranium recovery and new mining / milling projects are being evaluated and developed. Ore bodies which are considered uneconomical to mine by conventional methods such as tunneling or open pits, can be candidates for non-conventional recovery techniques, involving considerably less capital expenditure. Technologies such as Uranium In Situ Leaching / In Situ Recovery (ISL / ISR - also referred to as 'solution mining'), have enabled commercial scale mining and milling of relatively small ore pockets of lower grade, and are expected to make a significant contribution to overall world wide uranium supplies over the next ten years. Commercial size solution mining production facilities have operated in the US since the mid 1970's. However, current designs are expected to result in less radiological wastes and emissions relative to these 'first' generation plants (which were designed, constructed and operated through the 1980's). These early designs typically used alkaline leach chemistries in situ including use of ammonium carbonate which resulted in groundwater restoration challenges, open to air recovery vessels and high temperature calcining systems for final product drying vs the 'zero emissions' vacuum dryers as typically used today. Improved containment, automation and instrumentation control and use of vacuum dryers in the design of current generation plants are expected to reduce production of secondary waste byproduct material, reduce Radon emissions and reduce potential for employee exposure to uranium concentrate aerosols at the back end of the milling process. In Situ Recovery in the U.S. typically involves the circulation of groundwater, fortified with oxidizing (gaseous oxygen e.g) and complexing agents (carbon dioxide, e.g) into an ore body, solubilizing the uranium in situ, and then pumping the solutions to the surface where they are fed to a processing plant ( mill). Processing involves ion exchange and may also include precipitation, drying or calcining and packaging operations depending on facility specifics. This paper presents an overview of the ISR process and the health physics monitoring programs developed at a number of commercial scale ISL / ISR Uranium recovery and production facilities as a result of the radiological character of these processes. Although many radiological aspects of the process are similar to that of conventional mills, conventional-type tailings as such are not generated. However, liquid and solid byproduct materials may be generated and impounded. The quantity and radiological character of these by products are related to facility specifics. Some special monitoring considerations are presented which are required due to the manner in which radon gas is evolved in the process and the unique aspects of controlling solution flow patterns underground. The radiological character of these processes are described using empirical data collected from many operating facilities. Additionally, the major aspects of the health physics and radiation protection programs that were developed at these first generation facilities are discussed and contrasted to circumstances of the current generation and state of the art of uranium ISR technologies and facilities. In summary: This paper has presented an overview of in situ Uranium recovery processes and associated major radiological aspects and monitoring considerations. Admittedly, the purpose was to present an overview of those special health physics considerations dictated by the in situ Uranium recovery technology, to point out similarities and differences to conventional mill programs and to contrast these alkaline leach facilities to modern day ISR designs. As evidenced by the large number of ISR projects currently under development in the U.S. and worldwide, non conventional Uranium recovery techniques

Brown, S.H. [CHP, SHB INC., Centennial, Colorado (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

ITP Mining: Mining Industry of the Future Mineral Processing...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and activities in the industry and crossed various mined commodities including copper, uranium, iron ore, coal and others. The workshop participants included individuals from...

112

Wetland and Sensitive Species Survey Report for Y-12: Proposed Uranium Processing Facility (UPF)  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of an environmental survey conducted at sites associated with the proposed Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) at the Y-12 National Security Complex in September-October 2009. The survey was conducted in order to evaluate potential impacts of the overall project. This project includes the construction of a haul road, concrete batch plant, wet soil storage area and dry soil storage area. The environmental surveys were conducted by natural resource experts at ORNL who routinely assess the significance of various project activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Natural resource staff assistance on this project included the collection of environmental information that can aid in project location decisions that minimize impacts to sensitive resource such as significant wildlife populations, rare plants and wetlands. Natural resources work was conducted in various habitats, corresponding to the proposed areas of impact. Thc credentials/qualifications of the researchers are contained in Appendix A. The proposed haul road traverses a number of different habitats including a power-line right-of-way. wetlands, streams, forest and mowed areas. It extends from what is known as the New Salvage Yard on the west to the Polaris Parking Lot on the east. This haul road is meant to connect the proposed concrete batch plant to the UPF building site. The proposed site of the concrete batch plant itself is a highly disturbed fenced area. This area of the project is shown in Fig. 1. The proposed Wet Soils Disposal Area is located on the north side of Bear Creek Road at the former Control Burn Study Area. This is a second growth arce containing thick vegetation, and extensive dead and down woody material. This area of the project is shown in Fig. 2. Thc dry soils storage area is proposed for what is currently known as the West Borrow Area. This site is located on the west side of Reeves Road south of Bear Creek Road. The site is an early successional field. This area of the project is shown in Fig. 2.

Giffen, N.; Peterson, M.; Reasor, S.; Pounds, L.; Byrd, G.; Wiest, M. C.; Hill, C. C.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. U.S. uranium mills by owner, location, capacity, and operating status at end of the year, 2008-2012" 4. U.S. uranium mills by owner, location, capacity, and operating status at end of the year, 2008-2012" "Mill Owner","Mill Name","County, State (existing and planned locations)","Milling Capacity","Operating Status at End of the Year" ,,,"(short tons of ore per day)",2008,2009,2010,2011,2012 "Cotter Corporation","Canon City Mill","Fremont, Colorado",0,"Standby","Standby","Standby","Reclamation","Demolished" "EFR White Mesa LLC","White Mesa Mill","San Juan, Utah",2000,"Operating","Operating","Operating","Operating","Operating"

114

Isotopic Fractionation of Uranium in Sandstone  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Lake district 2.3 284270 Uraninite ore, Gambler Pit, Karnes County, Tex. + 1.8 246885 Drill-core sample, Palangana Salt dome, Duval County, Tex 3.3 APP-1/62 Uranium-bearing asphaltite from sandstone, Mine LaMotte, Madison...

John N. Rosholt; William R. Shields; Ernest L. Garner

1963-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

115

In situ exploitation of deep set porphyry ores  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed is a method of economically exploiting deep set porphyry ore bodies of the type containing metal values such as sulfidic copper, nickel, or uranium minerals and minerals capable of absorbing copper, uranium, and nickel ions. The method involves establishing communication with the ore body through access and recovery wells and passing fluids sequentially therethrough. If necessary, thief zones of as low as 25 to 50 md in igneous rock of 1 to 5 md are prevented from distorting flow, by the injection of a polymeric solution of macromolecules with molecular weights of the order of 5 million along the entire wellbore, the higher permeability zones initially accepting the majority of the flow and being impaired at a much faster rate than the less permeable zones. In a first stage, the permeability of the leaching interval is stimulated as an ammoniated solution of sodium, potassium, or ammonium nitrate or chloride contacts calcium containing minerals to promote ion exchange, resulting in clay contraction or calcium carbonate dissolution. In a second stage, the leaching interval is primed as calcium ion is displaced with an aqueous solution of ammonium salt, a calcium sulfate scale inhibitor, and oxygen gas. In a third stage, a two-phase lixiviant comprising entrained oxygen containing bubbles and an ammoniacal leach liquor having a pH less than 10.5 and less than 1.0 mole/liter ammonia is passed through the leaching interval to solubilize copper, nickel, uranium, and other metal values.

Hard, R.A.; Harvey, W.W.; Lingane, P.J.; Park, W.C.; Redman, M.J.

1981-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

116

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Monument Valley uranium mill tailings site Cane Valley, Arizona  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing at UMTRA Project sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to minimize further contamination of ground water. Surface cleanup at the Monument Valley UMTRA Project site near Cane Valley, Arizona, was completed in 1994. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination that resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. Human health may be at risk from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur by drinking water pumped out of a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated areas. Adverse ecological and agricultural effects may also result from exposure to contaminated ground water. For example, livestock should not be watered with contaminated ground water. A risk assessment describes a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the ecological environment may be exposed, and the health or ecological effects that could result from that exposure. This risk assessment is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and potential future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site investigations will be used to determine a compliance strategy to comply with the UMTRA ground water standards.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Welding of uranium and uranium alloys  

SciTech Connect

The major reported work on joining uranium comes from the USA, Great Britain, France and the USSR. The driving force for producing this technology base stems from the uses of uranium as a nuclear fuel for energy production, compact structures requiring high density, projectiles, radiation shielding, and nuclear weapons. This review examines the state-of-the-art of this technology and presents current welding process and parameter information. The welding metallurgy of uranium and the influence of microstructure on mechanical properties is developed for a number of the more commonly used welding processes.

Mara, G.L.; Murphy, J.L.

1982-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

118

Uranium purchases report 1992  

SciTech Connect

Data reported by domestic nuclear utility companies in their responses to the 1991 and 1992 ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey,`` Form EIA-858, Schedule B ``Uranium Marketing Activities,are provided in response to the requirements in the Energy Policy Act 1992. Data on utility uranium purchases and imports are shown on Table 1. Utility enrichment feed deliveries and secondary market acquisitions of uranium equivalent of US DOE separative work units are shown on Table 2. Appendix A contains a listing of firms that sold uranium to US utilities during 1992 under new domestic purchase contracts. Appendix B contains a similar listing of firms that sold uranium to US utilities during 1992 under new import purchase contracts. Appendix C contains an explanation of Form EIA-858 survey methodologies with emphasis on the processing of Schedule B data.

Not Available

1993-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

119

Removing oxygen from a solvent extractant in an uranium recovery process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement in effecting uranium recovery from phosphoric acid solutions is provided by sparging dissolved oxygen contained in solutions and solvents used in a reductive stripping stage with an effective volume of a nonoxidizing gas before the introduction of the solutions and solvents into the stage. Effective volumes of nonoxidizing gases, selected from the group consisting of argon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, helium, hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur dioxide, and mixtures thereof, displace oxygen from the solutions and solvents thereby reduce deleterious effects of oxygen such as excessive consumption of elemental or ferrous and accumulation of complex iron phosphates or cruds.

Hurst, Fred J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Brown, Gilbert M. (Knoxville, TN); Posey, Franz A. (Concord, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Mineralogical analysis and uranium distribution of the sediments from the upper Jackson formation, Karnes County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the relationship between uranium distribu- tion and mineralogic composition of the sediment may provide more reliable methods for uranium exploration. Open pit mining and subsequent milling, or in situ leach- ing, are the two methods of uranium recovery... of the oxidized deposits, at and directly above the water table, are larger deposits of generally lower-grade ore that contains unoxidized uranium. The Galen Mine was the first mine in the unoxidized ore. This open pit mine is about two miles (3 km) south...

Fishman, Paul Harold

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium ore processing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

FAQ 5-Is uranium radioactive?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Is uranium radioactive? Is uranium radioactive? Is uranium radioactive? All isotopes of uranium are radioactive, with most having extremely long half-lives. Half-life is a measure of the time it takes for one half of the atoms of a particular radionuclide to disintegrate (or decay) into another nuclear form. Each radionuclide has a characteristic half-life. Half-lives vary from millionths of a second to billions of years. Because radioactivity is a measure of the rate at which a radionuclide decays (for example, decays per second), the longer the half-life of a radionuclide, the less radioactive it is for a given mass. The half-life of uranium-238 is about 4.5 billion years, uranium-235 about 700 million years, and uranium-234 about 25 thousand years. Uranium atoms decay into other atoms, or radionuclides, that are also radioactive and commonly called "decay products." Uranium and its decay products primarily emit alpha radiation, however, lower levels of both beta and gamma radiation are also emitted. The total activity level of uranium depends on the isotopic composition and processing history. A sample of natural uranium (as mined) is composed of 99.3% uranium-238, 0.7% uranium-235, and a negligible amount of uranium-234 (by weight), as well as a number of radioactive decay products.

122

Chapter 5. Conclusion Uranium, a naturally occurring element, contributes to low levels of natural background radiation in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are extracted from the earth. Protore is mined uranium ore that is not rich enough to meet the market demand conventional open-pit and underground uranium mining include overburden (although most overburden is not necessarily enriched in uranium as is protore), unreclaimed protore, waste rock, evaporites from mine water

123

EA-1037: Uranium Lease Management Program, Grand Junction, Colorado |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

37: Uranium Lease Management Program, Grand Junction, Colorado 37: Uranium Lease Management Program, Grand Junction, Colorado EA-1037: Uranium Lease Management Program, Grand Junction, Colorado SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Grand Junction Projects Office's proposal to maintain and preserve the nation's immediately accessible supply of domestic uranium and vanadium ores, to maintain a viable domestic mining and milling infrastructure required to produce and mill these ores, and to provide assurance of a fair monetary return to the U.S. Government. The Uranium Lease Management Program gives The Department of Energy the flexibility to continue leasing these lands. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD August 22, 1995

124

Uranium from Seawater Program Review; Fuel Resources Uranium from Seawater Program DOE Office of Nuclear Energy  

SciTech Connect

For nuclear energy to remain sustainable in the United States, economically viable sources of uranium beyond terrestrial ores must be developed. The goal of this program is to develop advanced adsorbents that can extract uranium from seawater at twice the capacity of the best adsorbent developed by researchers at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1.5 mg U/g adsorbent. A multidisciplinary team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and the University of Texas at Austin was assembled to address this challenging problem. Polymeric adsorbents, based on the radiation grafting of acrylonitrile and methacrylic acid onto high surface-area polyethylene fibers followed by conversion of the nitriles to amidoximes, have been developed. These poly(acrylamidoxime-co-methacrylic acid) fibers showed uranium adsorption capacities for the extraction of uranium from seawater that exceed 3 mg U/g adsorbent in testing at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Marine Sciences Laboratory. The essence of this novel technology lies in the unique high surface-area trunk material that considerably increases the grafting yield of functional groups without compromising its mechanical properties. This technology received an R&D100 Award in 2012. In addition, high surface area nanomaterial adsorbents are under development with the goal of increasing uranium adsorption capacity by taking advantage of the high surface areas and tunable porosity of carbon-based nanomaterials. Simultaneously, de novo structure-based computational design methods are being used to design more selective and stable ligands and the most promising candidates are being synthesized, tested and evaluated for incorporation onto a support matrix. Fundamental thermodynamic and kinetic studies are being carried out to improve the adsorption efficiency, the selectivity of uranium over other metals, and the stability of the adsorbents. Understanding the rate-limiting step of uranium uptake from seawater is also essential in designing an effective uranium recovery system. Finally, economic analyses have been used to guide these studies and highlight what parameters, such as capacity, recyclability, and stability, have the largest impact on the cost of extraction of uranium from seawater. Initially, the cost estimates by the JAEA for extraction of uranium from seawater with braided polymeric fibers functionalized with amidoxime ligands were evaluated and updated. The economic analyses were subsequently updated to reflect the results of this project while providing insight for cost reductions in the adsorbent development through “cradle-to-grave” case studies for the extraction process. This report highlights the progress made over the last three years on the design, synthesis, and testing of new materials to extract uranium for seawater. This report is organized into sections that highlight the major research activities in this project: (1) Chelate Design and Modeling, (2) Thermodynamics, Kinetics and Structure, (3) Advanced Polymeric Adsorbents by Radiation Induced Grafting, (4) Advanced Nanomaterial Adsorbents, (5) Adsorbent Screening and Modeling, (6) Marine Testing, and (7) Cost and Energy Assessment. At the end of each section, future research directions are briefly discussed to highlight the challenges that still remain to reduce the cost of extractions of uranium for seawater. Finally, contributions from the Nuclear Energy University Programs (NEUP), which complement this research program, are included at the end of this report.

none,

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

A concept of a nonfissile uranium hexafluoride overpack for storage, transport, and processing of corroded cylinders  

SciTech Connect

There is a need to develop a means of safely transporting breached 48-in. cylinders containing depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) from current storage locations to locations where the contents can be safely removed. There is also a need to provide a method of safely and easily transporting degraded cylinders that no longer meet the US Department of Transportation (DOT) and American National Standards Institute, Inc., (ANSI) requirements for shipments of depleted UF{sub 6}. A study has shown that an overpack can be designed and fabricated to satisfy these needs. The envisioned overpack will handle cylinder models 48G, 48X, and 48Y and will also comply with the ANSI N14.1 and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Sect. 8 requirements.

Pope, R.B.; Cash, J.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Singletary, B.H. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

A top-down assessment of energy, water and land use in uranium mining, milling, and refining  

SciTech Connect

Land, water and energy use are key measures of the sustainability of uranium production into the future. As the most attractive, accessible deposits are mined out, future discoveries may prove to be significantly, perhaps unsustainably, more intensive consumers of environmental resources. A number of previous attempts have been made to provide empirical relationships connecting these environmental impact metrics to process variables such as stripping ratio and ore grade. These earlier attempts were often constrained by a lack of real world data and perform poorly when compared against data from modern operations. This paper conditions new empirical models of energy, water and land use in uranium mining, milling, and refining on contemporary data reported by operating mines. It shows that, at present, direct energy use from uranium production represents less than 1% of the electrical energy produced by the once-through fuel cycle. Projections of future energy intensity from uranium production are also possible by coupling the empirical models with estimates of uranium crustal abundance, characteristics of new discoveries, and demand. The projections show that even for the most pessimistic of scenarios considered, by 2100, the direct energy use from uranium production represents less than 3% of the electrical energy produced by the contemporary once-through fuel cycle.

E. Schneider; B. Carlsen; E. Tavrides; C. van der Hoeven; U. Phathanapirom

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Platinum Metals Magmatic Sulfide Ores  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Stumpfl (36) has suggested that hydro-thermal solutions have upgraded the ores. Hiemstra...Silver and Gold (Mineral Bulletin MR 185, Energy, Mines and Resources Canada, Ot-tawa...individuals. Sup-port has been received from Energy, Mines and Resources Canada grant 222-4-78...

A. J. Naldrett; J. M. Duke

1980-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

128

Measurements of uranium in soils and small mammals  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to evaluate the bioavailability of uranium to a single species of small mammal, Peromyscus maniculatus rufinus (Merriam), white-footed deer mouse, from two different source terms: a Los Alamos National Laboratory dynamic weapons testing site in north central New Mexico, where an estimated 70,000 kg of uranium have been expended over a 31-y period; and an inactive uranium mill tailings pile located in west central New Mexico near Grants, which received wastes over a 5-y period from the milling of 2.7 x 10/sup 9/ kg of uranium ore.

Miera, F.R. Jr.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Depleted uranium management alternatives  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates two management alternatives for Department of Energy depleted uranium: continued storage as uranium hexafluoride, and conversion to uranium metal and fabrication to shielding for spent nuclear fuel containers. The results will be used to compare the costs with other alternatives, such as disposal. Cost estimates for the continued storage alternative are based on a life-cycle of 27 years through the year 2020. Cost estimates for the recycle alternative are based on existing conversion process costs and Capital costs for fabricating the containers. Additionally, the recycle alternative accounts for costs associated with intermediate product resale and secondary waste disposal for materials generated during the conversion process.

Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

6. Employment in the U.S. uranium production industry by category, 2003-13 person-years Year Exploration Mining Milling Processing Reclamation Total 2003 W W W W 117 321 2004 18...

131

FAQ 7-How is depleted uranium produced?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How is depleted uranium produced? How is depleted uranium produced? How is depleted uranium produced? Depleted uranium is produced during the uranium enrichment process. In the United States, uranium is enriched through the gaseous diffusion process in which the compound uranium hexafluoride (UF6) is heated and converted from a solid to a gas. The gas is then forced through a series of compressors and converters that contain porous barriers. Because uranium-235 has a slightly lighter isotopic mass than uranium-238, UF6 molecules made with uranium-235 diffuse through the barriers at a slightly higher rate than the molecules containing uranium-238. At the end of the process, there are two UF6 streams, with one stream having a higher concentration of uranium-235 than the other. The stream having the greater uranium-235 concentration is referred to as enriched UF6, while the stream that is reduced in its concentration of uranium-235 is referred to as depleted UF6. The depleted UF6 can be converted to other chemical forms, such as depleted uranium oxide or depleted uranium metal.

132

Uranium Leasing Program: Program Summary | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Uranium Leasing Program » Uranium Leasing Uranium Leasing Program » Uranium Leasing Program: Program Summary Uranium Leasing Program: Program Summary Uranium Leasing Program: Program Summary The Atomic Energy Act and other legislative actions authorized the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), predecessor agency to the DOE, to withdraw lands from the public domain and then lease them to private industry for mineral exploration and for development and mining of uranium and vanadium ore. A total of 25,000 acres of land in southwestern Colorado, northern New Mexico, and southeastern Utah was withdrawn from the public domain during the late 1940s and early 1950s. In 1948, AEC included portions of these lands in 48 mineral leases that were negotiated with adjacent mine owners/operators. This early leasing

133

Management Controls over the Department of Energy's Uranium Leasing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Controls over the Department of Energy's Uranium Leasing Management Controls over the Department of Energy's Uranium Leasing Program, OAS-M-08-05 Management Controls over the Department of Energy's Uranium Leasing Program, OAS-M-08-05 The Department of Energy's Uranium Leasing Program was established by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 to develop a supply of domestic uranium to meet the nation's defense needs. Pursuant to the Act, the Program leases tracts of land to private sector entities for the purpose of mining uranium ore. According to Department officials, one purpose of the Program is to obtain a fair monetary return to the Government. The Program is administered by the Department's Office of Legacy Management through a contractor. The uranium leases issued by the Department include two types of royalty

134

RECOVERY OF URANIUM FROM ORE CONCENTRATES | OSTI, US Dept of...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Re-direct Destination: Temp Data Fields Sheft, I.; Hyman, H.H.; Katz, J.J. Temp Data Storage 3: Argonne National Lab., Lemont, Ill' Short URL for this Page http:t.osti.gov3r7...

135

The Francevillian (Lower Proterozoic) uranium ore deposits of Gabon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Vienna, Inter- nat. Atomic Energy Agency, p. 513-520. FRANCEVILLIANUDEPOSITS...Vienna, Internat. Atomic Energy Agency,p. 307-332. Weber...geothermalenergyresources:Geothermic Spec. Issue2, v. 1, p...Vienna, Internat. Atomic Energy Agency, p. 375-395.

F. Gauthier-Lafaye; F. Weber

136

Defense?Related Uranium Mines Report to Congress (August 2014)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Section 3151 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2013 directed the Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the Secretary of the Interior and the Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), to undertake a review of, and prepare a report on, abandoned uranium mines in the United States that provided uranium ore for atomic energy defense activities of the United States (the mines).

137

Distribution and a possible mechanism of uranium accumulation in the Catahoula Tuff, Live Oak County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- and micro-scopic distribution of' uranium within the Catahoula Tuff. METHODS A uranium ore body exposed in the Pant Tuff' Member of the Catahoula Tuff and exposed by open-pit mining was inves- tigated in this study. The distribution of the uranium... by oil and mining companies and the United States Geological Survey found numerous radiometric anomalies, In 1959, the San Antonio Mine Company began open pit mining of several small, shallow (less than 15 meters deep) . oxidized ore bodies in Karnes...

Parks, Steven Louis

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Processing of bone samples for the determination of ultra low-levels of uranium and plutonium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have developed cleanroom compatible techniques for processing bone samples for ... dried and ashed in quartz crucibles placed inside cleanroom compatible thermal ashing furnaces. The bone ash...238U and 8 femt...

D. W. Efurd; R. E. Steiner; S. P. LaMont…

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Natural Ores as Oxygen Carriers in Chemical Looping Combustion  

SciTech Connect

Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is a combustion technology that utilizes oxygen from oxygen carriers (OC), such as metal oxides, instead of air to combust fuels. The use of natural minerals as oxygen carriers has advantages, such as lower cost and availability. Eight materials, based on copper or iron oxides, were selected for screening tests of CLC processes using coal and methane as fuels. Thermogravimetric experiments and bench-scale fixed-bed reactor tests were conducted to investigate the oxygen transfer capacity, reaction kinetics, and stability during cyclic reduction/oxidation reaction. Most natural minerals showed lower combustion capacity than pure CuO/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} due to low-concentrations of active oxide species in minerals. In coal CLC, chryscolla (Cu-based), magnetite, and limonite (Fe-based) demonstrated better reaction performances than other materials. The addition of steam improved the coal CLC performance when using natural ores because of the steam gasification of coal and the subsequent reaction of gaseous fuels with active oxide species in the natural ores. In methane CLC, chryscolla, hematite, and limonite demonstrated excellent reactivity and stability in 50-cycle thermogravimetric analysis tests. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-based ores possess greater oxygen utilization but require an activation period before achieving full performance in methane CLC. Particle agglomeration issues associated with the application of natural ores in CLC processes were also studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

Tian, Hanjing; Siriwardane, Ranjani; Simonyi, Thomas; Poston, James

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: October 31, 2013 Next Release Date: February 2014 Mills - conventional milling 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 Mills - other operations 2 2 3 2 2 2 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 In-Situ-Leach Plants 3 5 6 6 4 3 3 2 2 3 3 5 5 6 3 4 5 5 5 Byproduct Recovery Plants 4 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total 9 11 9 7 6 4 3 2 3 4 6 6 7 4 5 6 6 6 End of 2005 End of 2006 End of 2007 End of 2008 End of 2009 3 Not including in-situ-leach plants that only produced uranium concentrate from restoration. 4 Uranium concentrate as a byproduct from phosphate production. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-851A and Form EIA-851Q, "Domestic Uranium Production Report." End of 2010 End of 2011 End of 2012 End of 3rd Quarter 2013 1 Milling uranium-bearing ore. 2 Not milling ore, but producing uranium concentrate from other (non-ore) materials.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium ore processing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Nanoparticle-facilitated transport of uranium and nickel in contaminated sediments near a nuclear weapons processing facility.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Department of Energy???s Savannah River Site (SRS) has released a total of over 44,000 kg of depleted uranium (U) and a similar amount of… (more)

Buettner, Shea Westin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Uranium in the Oatman Creek granite of Central Texas and its economic potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

granitic rocks are enriched in uranium. Although at present uranium in granites cannot b compared w1th the h1gh grade concentrat1ons of uran1um in sedimentary rocks, as these h1gh grade ore deposits become depleted, however, gr anites will become a..., however, the need to explore for new materials containing uranium will incr ease as the high grade sedimentary uranium deposits become depleted. A logical place to begin this search lies with the source rock for many of the known sedimentary uranium...

Conrad, Curtis Paul

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

143

Novel Binders and Methods for Agglomeration of Ore  

SciTech Connect

Heap leaching is one of the methods being used to recover metal from low grade ore deposits. The main problem faced during heap leaching is the migration of fine grained particles through the heap, forming impermeable beds which result in poor solution flow. The poor solution flow leads to less contact between the leach solution and the ore, resulting in low recovery rates. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses prevents fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Currently, there is one facility in the United States which uses agglomeration. This operation agglomerates their ore using leach solution (raffinate), but is still experiencing undesirable metal recovery from the heaps due to agglomerate breakdown. The use of a binder, in addition to the leach solution, during agglomeration would help to produce stronger agglomerates that did not break down during processing. However, there are no known binders that will work satisfactorily in the acidic environment of a heap, at a reasonable cost. As a result, operators of many facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. Increasing copper recovery in heap leaching by the use of binders and agglomeration would result in a significant decrease in the amount of energy consumed. Assuming that 70% of all the leaching heaps would convert to using agglomeration technology, as much as 1.64*10{sup 12} BTU per year would be able to be saved if a 25% increase in copper recovery was experienced, which is equivalent to saving approximately 18% of the energy currently being used in leaching heaps. For every week a leach cycle was decreased, a savings of as much as 1.23*10{sup 11} BTU per week would result. This project has identified several acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures. These binders and experimental procedures will be able to be used for use in improving the energy efficiency of heap leaching.

S. K. Kawatra; T. C. Eisele; K. A. Lewandowski; J. A. Gurtler

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

144

Uranium purchases report 1993  

SciTech Connect

Data reported by domestic nuclear utility companies in their responses to the 1991 through 1993 ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey,`` Form EIA-858, Schedule B,`` Uranium Marketing Activities,`` are provided in response to the requirements in the Energy Policy Act 1992. Appendix A contains an explanation of Form EIA-858 survey methodologies with emphasis on the processing of Schedule B data. Additional information published in this report not included in Uranium Purchases Report 1992, includes a new data table. Presented in Table 1 are US utility purchases of uranium and enrichment services by origin country. Also, this report contains additional purchase information covering average price and contract duration. Table 2 is an update of Table 1 and Table 3 is an update of Table 2 from the previous year`s report. The report contains a glossary of terms.

Not Available

1994-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

145

Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance  

SciTech Connect

This document presents guidance for implementing the process that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) will use for assuming perpetual responsibility for a closed uranium mill tailings site. The transition process specifically addresses sites regulated under Title II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) but is applicable in principle to the transition of sites under other regulatory structures, such as the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program.

none,

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Uranium Resources Inc URI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Uranium Resources Inc URI Uranium Resources Inc URI Jump to: navigation, search Name Uranium Resources, Inc. (URI) Place Lewisville, Texas Zip 75067 Product Uranium Resources, Inc. (URI) is primarily engaged in the business of acquiring, exploring, developing and mining uranium properties using the in situ recovery (ISR) or solution mining process. References Uranium Resources, Inc. (URI)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Uranium Resources, Inc. (URI) is a company located in Lewisville, Texas . References ↑ "Uranium Resources, Inc. (URI)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Uranium_Resources_Inc_URI&oldid=352580" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

147

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Appendix C: Scoping Summary Report for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities - Environmental Impact Statement Scoping Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX C: SCOPING SUMMARY REPORT FOR DEPLETED URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE CONVERSION FACILITIES ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT SCOPING PROCESS Scoping Summary Report C-2 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Scoping Summary Report C-3 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX C This appendix contains the summary report prepared after the initial public scoping period for the depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facilities environmental impact statement (EIS) project. The scoping period for the EIS began with the September 18, 2001, publication of a Notice of Intent (NOI) in the Federal Register (66 FR 23213) and was extended to January 11, 2002. The report summarizes the different types of public involvement opportunities provided and the content of the comments received.

148

This fact sheet provides a brief description of the process used to clean up hom  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

a brief description of the process used to clean up homes and businesses in Monticello that are a brief description of the process used to clean up homes and businesses in Monticello that are contaminated with uranium mill tailings. These homes and businesses are called "vicinity properties." The cleanup is part of the Monticello, Utah, Superfund projects being performed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office in conjunction with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the State of Utah. Background The Monticello Vicinity Properties Project (MVPP) involves removing uranium mill tailings from more than 400 residential and business properties in the Monticello area. Tailings and Radon Tailings are the sand-like material that remains after uranium has been extracted from the ore. Throughout the operating period of the Monticello mill, mill tailings

149

NO release during chemical looping combustion with iron ore as an oxygen carrier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is one of the promising technologies to capture CO2 with low cost. Owing to the existence of nitrogen in fuel, the emission of fuel-NOx is a significant concern during the CLC process. This work evaluated NO release in the CLC process of bituminous coal and petcoke using iron ore as an oxygen carrier in a fluidized bed. The effect of several factors was evaluated, including bed material, fuel type, temperature and gasification medium. The results indicate that in the fuel reactor (FR), fuel-NOx due to the reaction between NH3/HCN and iron ore was supported only when the iron ore was reduced from Fe2O3 to Fe3O4. Compared with the case of an inert bed material, NO yield during the gasification in an iron ore bed material was relatively higher due to the enhanced char-gasification and the oxidization effect of iron ore. For the bituminous coal, NO release in FR was mainly due to the volatile release and subsequent oxidation by iron ore. For the petcoke process, NO release in FR could mainly be ascribed to the char-gasification and subsequent oxidization of NOx-precursors by iron ore. The elevated temperature and the use of H2O/N2 in comparison to CO2 could efficiently enhance the fuel conversion and \\{NOx\\} precursors release in FR. Thus, NO yield in FR increased, whereas that in AR correspondingly decreased. Furthermore, the NO release during continuous coal CLC was investigated in a 1 kWth CLC prototype based on the iron ore oxygen carrier. Overall, the elevated fuel reactor temperature and the use of H2O as gasification medium are beneficial to reduce NO release in the CLC system.

Haiming Gu; Laihong Shen; Zhaoping Zhong; Xin Niu; Huijun Ge; Yufei Zhou; Shen Xiao; Shouxi Jiang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Uranium hexafluoride handling. Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Field Office, and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., are co-sponsoring this Second International Conference on Uranium Hexafluoride Handling. The conference is offered as a forum for the exchange of information and concepts regarding the technical and regulatory issues and the safety aspects which relate to the handling of uranium hexafluoride. Through the papers presented here, we attempt not only to share technological advances and lessons learned, but also to demonstrate that we are concerned about the health and safety of our workers and the public, and are good stewards of the environment in which we all work and live. These proceedings are a compilation of the work of many experts in that phase of world-wide industry which comprises the nuclear fuel cycle. Their experience spans the entire range over which uranium hexafluoride is involved in the fuel cycle, from the production of UF{sub 6} from the naturally-occurring oxide to its re-conversion to oxide for reactor fuels. The papers furnish insights into the chemical, physical, and nuclear properties of uranium hexafluoride as they influence its transport, storage, and the design and operation of plant-scale facilities for production, processing, and conversion to oxide. The papers demonstrate, in an industry often cited for its excellent safety record, continuing efforts to further improve safety in all areas of handling uranium hexafluoride. Selected papers were processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

151

Uranium industry annual 1997  

SciTech Connect

This report provides statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

URANIUM IN ALKALINE ROCKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenland," in Uranium Exploration Geology, Int. AtomicOklahoma," 1977 Nure Geology Uranium Symposium, Igneous HostMcNeil, M. , 1977. "Geology of Brazil's Uranium and Thorium

Murphy, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Long-term evaluation of fluoroelastomer O-rings in UF/sub 6/  

SciTech Connect

A major component in the gaseous centrifuge enrichment plant (GCEP) was fluoroelastomer O-rings, which were used to seal the uranium hexafluoride (UF/sub 6/) gas system. A program utilizing accelerated test conditions was used to help identify the best material out of four selected candidates and to predict the service life of these materials at GCEP conditions. The tests included accelerated temperatures, mechanical stress, and UF/sub 6/ exposure. Data were evaluated using the Newman--Keuls/sup 1/ ranking system to identify the best material and a zero-order reaction rate equation to help predict service life. This presentation includes a description of the test facility, the materials tested, the types of tests, objectives of the study, service life predictions, and conclusions. The O-rings are predicted to last approx. 30 years, and a high-molecular-weight polymer had the best performance ranking.

Russell, R.G.; Otey, M.G.; Dippo, G.L.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

What is Depleted Uranium?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What is Uranium? What is Uranium? Uranium and Its Compounds line line What is Uranium? Chemical Forms of Uranium Properties of Uranium Compounds Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium Health Effects What is Uranium? Physical and chemical properties, origin, and uses of uranium. Properties of Uranium Uranium is a radioactive element that occurs naturally in varying but small amounts in soil, rocks, water, plants, animals and all human beings. It is the heaviest naturally occurring element, with an atomic number of 92. In its pure form, uranium is a silver-colored heavy metal that is nearly twice as dense as lead. In nature, uranium atoms exist as several isotopes, which are identified by the total number of protons and neutrons in the nucleus: uranium-238, uranium-235, and uranium-234. (Isotopes of an element have the

155

Conversion of depleted uranium hexafluoride to a solid uranium compound  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for converting UF.sub.6 to a solid uranium compound such as UO.sub.2 and CaF. The UF.sub.6 vapor form is contacted with an aqueous solution of NH.sub.4 OH at a pH greater than 7 to precipitate at least some solid uranium values as a solid leaving an aqueous solution containing NH.sub.4 OH and NH.sub.4 F and remaining uranium values. The solid uranium values are separated from the aqueous solution of NH.sub.4 OH and NH.sub.4 F and remaining uranium values which is then diluted with additional water precipitating more uranium values as a solid leaving trace quantities of uranium in a dilute aqueous solution. The dilute aqueous solution is contacted with an ion-exchange resin to remove substantially all the uranium values from the dilute aqueous solution. The dilute solution being contacted with Ca(OH).sub.2 to precipitate CaF.sub.2 leaving dilute NH.sub.4 OH.

Rothman, Alan B. (Willowbrook, IL); Graczyk, Donald G. (Lemont, IL); Essling, Alice M. (Elmhurst, IL); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Legacy Management Work Progresses on Defense-Related Uranium Mines Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Legacy Management Work Progresses on Defense-Related Uranium Mines Legacy Management Work Progresses on Defense-Related Uranium Mines Report to Congress Legacy Management Work Progresses on Defense-Related Uranium Mines Report to Congress October 23, 2013 - 1:35pm Addthis What does this project do? Goal 4. Optimize the use of land and assets The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (LM) continues to work on a report to Congress regarding defense-related legacy uranium mines. LM was directed by the U.S. Congress in the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2013 to undertake a review of, and prepare a report on, abandoned uranium mines in the United States that provided uranium ore for atomic energy defense activities. The report is due to Congress by July 2014. LM is compiling uranium mine data from federal, state, and tribal agencies

157

Uranium series disequilibrium in the Bargmann property area of Karnes County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Historical evidence is presented for natural uranium series radioactive disequilibrium in uranium bearing soils in the Bargmann property area of karnes County on the Gulf Coastal Plain of south Texas. The early history of uranium exploration in the area is recounted and records of disequilibrium before milling and mining operations began are given. The property contains an open pit uranium mine associated with a larger ore body. In 1995, the US Department of Energy (DOE) directed Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to evaluate the Bargmann tract for the presence of uranium mill tailings (ORNL 1996). There was a possibility that mill tailings had washed onto or blown onto the property from the former tailings piles in quantities that would warrant remediation under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remediation Action Project. Activity ratios illustrating disequilibrium between {sup 226}Ra and {sup 238}U in background soils during 1986 are listed and discussed. Derivations of uranium mass-to-activity conversion factors are covered in detail.

Davidson, J.R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Development of Integrated Online Monitoring Systems for Detection of Diversion at Natural Uranium Conversion Facilities  

SciTech Connect

Recent work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has focused on some source term modeling of uranyl nitrate (UN) as part of a comprehensive validation effort employing gamma-ray detector instrumentation for the detection of diversion from declared conversion activities. Conversion, the process by which natural uranium ore (yellowcake) is purified and converted through a series of chemical processes into uranium hexafluoride gas (UF6), has historically been excluded from the nuclear safeguards requirements of the 235U-based nuclear fuel cycle. The undeclared diversion of this product material could potentially provide feedstock for a clandestine weapons program for state or non-state entities. Given the changing global political environment and the increased availability of dual-use nuclear technology, the International Atomic Energy Agency has evolved its policies to emphasize safeguarding this potential feedstock material in response to dynamic and evolving potential diversion pathways. To meet the demand for instrumentation testing at conversion facilities, ORNL developed the Uranyl Nitrate Calibration Loop Equipment (UNCLE) facility to simulate the full-scale operating conditions of a purified uranium-bearing aqueous stream exiting the solvent extraction process in a natural uranium conversion plant. This work investigates gamma-ray signatures of UN circulating in the UNCLE facility and evaluates detector instrumentation sensitivity to UN for safeguards applications. These detector validation activities include assessing detector responses to the UN gamma-ray signatures for spectrometers based on sodium iodide, lanthanum bromide, and germanium detectors. The results of measurements under static and dynamic operating conditions at concentrations ranging from 10-90g U/L of naturally enriched UN will be presented. A range of gamma-ray lines was examined and self-attenuation factors were calculated, in addition to attenuation for transmission measurement of density, concentration and enrichment. A detailed uncertainty analysis will be presented providing insights into instrumentation limitations to spoofing.

Dewji, Shaheen A [ORNL] [ORNL; Lee, Denise L [ORNL] [ORNL; Croft, Stephen [ORNL] [ORNL; McElroy, Robert Dennis [ORNL] [ORNL; Hertel, Nolan [Georgia Institute of Technology] [Georgia Institute of Technology; Chapman, Jeffrey Allen [ORNL] [ORNL; Cleveland, Steven L [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Development of Novel Sorbents for Uranium Extraction from Seawater  

SciTech Connect

As the uranium resource in terrestrial ores is limited, it is difficult to ensure a long-term sustainable nuclear energy technology. The oceans contain approximately 4.5 billion tons of uranium, which is one thousand times the amount of uranium in terrestrial ores. Development of technologies to recover the uranium from seawater would greatly improve the uranium resource availability, sustaining the fuel supply for nuclear energy. Several methods have been previously evaluated including solvent extraction, ion exchange, flotation, biomass collection, and adsorption; however, none have been found to be suitable for reasons such as cost effectiveness, long term stability, and selectivity. Recent research has focused on the amidoxime functional group as a promising candidate for uranium sorption. Polymer beads and fibers have been functionalized with amidoxime functional groups, and uranium adsorption capacities as high as 1.5 g U/kg adsorbent have recently been reported with these types of materials. As uranium concentration in seawater is only ~3 ppb, great improvements to uranium collection systems must be made in order to make uranium extraction from seawater economically feasible. This proposed research intends to develop transformative technologies for economic uranium extraction from seawater. The Lin group will design advanced porous supports by taking advantage of recent breakthroughs in nanoscience and nanotechnology and incorporate high densities of well-designed chelators into such nanoporous supports to allow selective and efficient binding of uranyl ions from seawater. Several classes of nanoporous materials, including mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs), mesoporous carbon nanoparticles (MCNs), meta-organic frameworks (MOFs), and covalent-organic frameworks (COFs), will be synthesized. Selective uranium-binding liagnds such as amidoxime will be incorporated into the nanoporous materials to afford a new generation of sorbent materials that will be evaluated for their uranium extraction efficiency. The initial testing of these materials for uranium binding will be carried out in the Lin group, but more detailed sorption studies will be carried out by Dr. Taylor-Pashow of Savannah River National Laboratory in order to obtain quantitative uranyl sorption selectivity and kinetics data for the proposed materials. The proposed nanostructured sorbent materials are expected to have higher binding capacities, enhanced extraction kinetics, optimal stripping efficiency for uranyl ions, and enhanced mechanical and chemical stabilities. This transformative research will significantly impact uranium extraction from seawater as well as benefit DOE’s efforts on environmental remediation by developing new materials and providing knowledge for enriching and sequestering ultralow concentrations of other metals.

Lin, Wenbin; Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn

2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

160

1. Department, Course Number, Title ORE 678, Marine Mineral Resources Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nodules and Marine Mining · Deep Sea Mining Technology · Minerals Processing · Offshore Oil and Gas · Oil · Formation Processes of Polymetallic Sulfides (PMS) on the Ocean Floor: Geology of the Smoker and PMS · Chemistry of Hydrothermal Vents and Polymetallic Sulfides · PMS Deposits: From Smoker to an Ore Body · Case

Frandsen, Jannette B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium ore processing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

FAQ 3-What are the common forms of uranium?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are the common forms of uranium? are the common forms of uranium? What are the common forms of uranium? Uranium can take many chemical forms. In nature, uranium is generally found as an oxide, such as in the olive-green-colored mineral pitchblende. Uranium oxide is also the chemical form most often used for nuclear fuel. Uranium-fluorine compounds are also common in uranium processing, with uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and uranium tetrafluoride (UF4) being the two most common. In its pure form, uranium is a silver-colored metal. The most common forms of uranium oxide are U3O8 and UO2. Both oxide forms have low solubility in water and are relatively stable over a wide range of environmental conditions. Triuranium octaoxide (U3O8) is the most stable form of uranium and is the form most commonly found in nature. Uranium dioxide (UO2) is the form in which uranium is most commonly used as a nuclear reactor fuel. At ambient temperatures, UO2 will gradually convert to U3O8. Because of their stability, uranium oxides are generally considered the preferred chemical form for storage or disposal.

162

Results from a "Proof-of-Concept" Demonstration of RF-Based Tracking of UF6 Cylinders during a Processing Operation at a Uranium Enrichment Plant  

SciTech Connect

Approved industry-standard cylinders are used globally for processing, storing, and transporting uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) at uranium enrichment plants. To ensure that cylinder movements at enrichment facilities occur as declared, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) must conduct time-consuming periodic physical inspections to validate facility records, cylinder identity, and containment. By using a robust system design that includes the capability for real-time unattended monitoring (of cylinder movements), site-specific rules-based event detection algorithms, and the capability to integrate with other types of monitoring technologies, one can build a system that will improve overall inspector effectiveness. This type of monitoring system can provide timely detection of safeguard events that could be used to ensure more timely and appropriate responses by the IAEA. It also could reduce reliance on facility records and have the additional benefit of enhancing domestic safeguards at the installed facilities. This paper will discuss the installation and evaluation of a radio-frequency- (RF-) based cylinder tracking system that was installed at a United States Enrichment Corporation Centrifuge Facility. This system was installed primarily to evaluate the feasibility of using RF technology at a site and the operational durability of the components under harsh processing conditions. The installation included a basic system that is designed to support layering with other safeguard system technologies and that applies fundamental rules-based event processing methodologies. This paper will discuss the fundamental elements of the system design, the results from this site installation, and future efforts needed to make this technology ready for IAEA consideration.

Pickett, Chris A [ORNL] [ORNL; Kovacic, Donald N [ORNL] [ORNL; Whitaker, J Michael [ORNL] [ORNL; Younkin, James R [ORNL] [ORNL; Hines, Jairus B [ORNL] [ORNL; Laughter, Mark D [ORNL] [ORNL; Morgan, Jim [Innovative Solutions] [Innovative Solutions; Carrick, Bernie [USEC] [USEC; Boyer, Brian [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Whittle, K. [USEC] [USEC

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Evapotranspiration And Geochemical Controls On Groundwater Plumes At Arid Sites: Toward Innovative Alternate End-States For Uranium Processing And Tailings Facilities  

SciTech Connect

Management of legacy tailings/waste and groundwater contamination are ongoing at the former uranium milling site in Tuba City AZ. The tailings have been consolidated and effectively isolated using an engineered cover system. For the existing groundwater plume, a system of recovery wells extracts contaminated groundwater for treatment using an advanced distillation process. The ten years of pump and treat (P&T) operations have had minimal impact on the contaminant plume – primarily due to geochemical and hydrological limits. A flow net analysis demonstrates that groundwater contamination beneath the former processing site flows in the uppermost portion of the aquifer and exits the groundwater as the plume transits into and beneath a lower terrace in the landscape. The evaluation indicates that contaminated water will not reach Moenkopi Wash, a locally important stream. Instead, shallow groundwater in arid settings such as Tuba City is transferred into the vadose zone and atmosphere via evaporation, transpiration and diffuse seepage. The dissolved constituents are projected to precipitate and accumulate as minerals such as calcite and gypsum in the deep vadose zone (near the capillary fringe), around the roots of phreatophyte plants, and near seeps. The natural hydrologic and geochemical controls common in arid environments such as Tuba City work together to limit the size of the groundwater plume, to naturally attenuate and detoxify groundwater contaminants, and to reduce risks to humans, livestock and the environment. The technical evaluation supports an alternative beneficial reuse (“brownfield”) scenario for Tuba City. This alternative approach would have low risks, similar to the current P&T scenario, but would eliminate the energy and expense associated with the active treatment and convert the former uranium processing site into a resource for future employment of local citizens and ongoing benefit to the Native American Nations.

Looney, Brian B.; Denham, Miles E.; Eddy-Dilek, Carol A.; Millings, Margaret R.; Kautsky, Mark

2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

164

Depleted Uranium Health Effects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium line line Uranium Enrichment Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium Health Effects Discussion of health effects of external exposure, ingestion, and inhalation of depleted uranium. Depleted uranium is not a significant health hazard unless it is taken into the body. External exposure to radiation from depleted uranium is generally not a major concern because the alpha particles emitted by its isotopes travel only a few centimeters in air or can be stopped by a sheet of paper. Also, the uranium-235 that remains in depleted uranium emits only a small amount of low-energy gamma radiation. However, if allowed to enter the body, depleted uranium, like natural uranium, has the potential for both chemical and radiological toxicity with the two important target organs

165

Uranium industry annual 1996  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting on the Status of Integration of Safety Into the Design of the Uranium Processing Facility, October 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HSS Independent Activity Report - HSS Independent Activity Report - Rev. 0 Report Number: HIAR-Y-12-2012-10-02 Site: Y-12 UPF Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Public Meeting on the Status of Integration of Safety into the Design of the Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) Dates of Activity: October 2, 2012 Report Preparer: Timothy Mengers Activity Description/Purpose: The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) observed the public hearing of the DNFSB review of the UPF project status for integrating safety into design. The meeting was broken into three parts: a panel discussion and questioning of National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) oversight and execution; a panel discussion and questioning of the B&W Y-12

167

Lung cancer in uranium miners and the implications of the U/V ratio in uranium-bearing particles  

SciTech Connect

Several geological formations mined for uranium ore during and after the second World War had been mined earlier for vanadium. Most miners and millers from the Utah-Colorado mining region worked with this ore or its tailings at one time or another. Preliminary investigation to determine the size and location of uranium-bearing particles retained in the lungs of a former uranium miner and miller from this region, who died of lung cancer (mesothelioma), showed a high nonuniform distribution of vanadium. This observation leads to the hypothesis that the vanadium content in that lung could be associated with inhaled particles. Further examination of spectra of characteristic x-rays obtained by scanning microPIXE (particle induced x-ray emission) of an autopsy sample of this lung indicated that vanadium was indeed present in localized sites within the 20 ..mu..m spatial resolution of the proton beam. This work points out that the vanadium found in the lungs of this former miner and miller is nonuniformly distributed, and can be used for site localization and size determination of inhaled particles retained in the lungs. The meaning of U/V ratios in dust particles and in lungs is discussed. Further studies are in progress to: (1) locate uranium-bearing particles in lung tissues of former uranium miners and millers; and (2) evaluate the local alpha doses received from these particles. 11 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Paschoa, A.S.; Wrenn, M.E.; Singh, N.P.; Bruenger, F.W.; Miller, S.C.; Cholewa, M.; Jones, K.W.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

LM Progressing with Uranium Mines Report to Congress | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Progressing with Uranium Mines Report to Congress Progressing with Uranium Mines Report to Congress LM Progressing with Uranium Mines Report to Congress July 12, 2013 - 10:50am Addthis As reported in an earlier Program Update newsletter, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) is compiling data for a Report to Congress on defense-related uranium mines. DOE was directed by the U.S. Congress in this year's National Defense Authorization Act to undertake a review of, and prepare a report on, abandoned uranium mines (AUM) in the U.S. that provided ore for atomic energy defense activities. The report must be completed by July 2014. The article, "Abandoned Uranium Mines Report to Congress: LM Wants Your Input" from the January-March 2013 issue of the LM Program Update provides additional

169

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Nuclear & Environmental Processes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HESS HESS * Members * Publications * Overview * Recent Research Results Nuclear & Environmental Processes Home Heavy Element and Separations Science (HESS) Three dimensional reconstruction of the structure of a plutonium-containing protein in solution from small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the structure of a plutonium-containing protein in solution from small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data. Except for ultra-trace amounts of neptunium (Np) and plutonium (Pu) naturally generated by neutrons in uranium ores, all of the elements heavier than uranium (with atomic number 92) found in the geosphere are man made. The study of their chemistries began with the synthetic production of Np by Edwin McMillan and Philip H. Abelson in 1940. Since that time, much

170

3rd Quarter 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of ore per day)",2013,"1st quarter 2014","2nd quarter 2014","3rd quarter 2014" "EFR White Mesa LLC","White Mesa Mill","San Juan, Utah",2000,"Operating-Processing Alternate...

171

Ore-magmatic systems of the Noril’sk ore field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Plutonogenic ore-magmatic systems of the Noril’sk ore field are unique constituents of the P2–T1 trap formation in the East Siberian Platform. We consider the formation of ore-bearing intrusions, evolution of Cr-spinels in intrusive magmatites, possible mechanisms of formation of massive, disseminated, and impregnated magmatic sulfide ores, possible reasons for the abundance of sulfide melts, quasi-anhydrite isotopic composition of sulfur of sulfide ores, and products of interaction of sulfide melts with ore-hosting basites. The unique contents of PGE, Ag, and Au in ores (eutectic Iss–PbSss intergrowths, crystallization products of low-temperature Ni-Fe-Cu-Pb-S melts) have been estimated for the first time. We have established that pneumatolytic Ag-Au-Pt-Pd mineralization is intimately related to the fluid aureoles near magmatic sulfide bodies. Pneumatolytic PGM are subdivided into early (tetraferroplatinum with lamellae atokite, paolovite with lamellae of insizwaite-geversite and niggliite, etc.), middle (rustenburgite-atokite-zvyagintsevite, mayakite, stannopalladinite, polarite, plumbopalladinite, maslovite, tatiyanite-taimyrite, Pd-Pt-containing tetraauricupride, etc.), late (sobolevskite, froodite, hessite, michenerite, cabriite, minerals of Au-Ag series, etc.), and the latest (sperrylite). The direct, reverse, oscillation, and complex zoning of gold particles is much due to variations in the Te activity in the fluids. Pneumatolytic noble-metal minerals were produced at <490 ºC in strongly reducing conditions with extremely low S2 fugacity. The Pb isotope composition evidences that all systems of the trap formation in the Noril’sk region had the same mantle source. The Pb isotope compositions of ore-bearing intrusions, magmatic sulfide ores, PbSss, and Pd-Pt intermetallides in the Noril’sk and Talnakh ore clusters differ significantly: Lead in the Talnakh cluster is more radiogenic. This evidences genetic relations between sulfide ores and particular intrusions as well as different intermediate magma chambers in the Noril’sk and Talnakh clusters, and a higher degree of contamination of mantle magmas in the Talnakh cluster, which might be the explanation of its giant area.

E.M. Spiridonov

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Remedial actions at the former Climax Uranium Company, Uranium Mill site, Grand Junction, Mesa County, Colorado. Volume 1, Text: Final environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect

This statement evaluates and compares the environmental impacts associated with the remedial actions of the residual radioactive materials remaining at the inactive uranium processing site and associated vicinity properties at Grand Junction, Mesa County, Colorado. This statement is also intended to aid the BLM in amending their management framework plans and final resource management plan, as well as assisting in compliance with the withdrawal application as appropriate. The site is a 114-acre tract of private and state owned land which contains approximately 3.1 million cubic yards of tailings and associated contaminated soils. The vicinity properties are homes, businesses, public buildings, and vacant lots which may have been contaminated during construction by the use of tailings as building material. An estimated 3465 vicinity properties would be cleaned up during remedial action of the tailings pile. The tailings were produced by the former Climax Uranium Company which processed uranium ore, which it sold to the US Atomic Energy Commission from 1951 to 1966 and to private sources from 1966 to 1970. This statement evaluates six alternatives for stabilization and disposal of the tailings and other contaminated materials: (1) No action. (2) Stabilization at the Grand Junction site. (3) Disposal at the Cheney Reservoir site with truck transport. (4) Disposal at the Cheney Reservoir site with train and truck transport. (5) Disposal at the Two Road site with truck transport. (6) Disposal at the Two Road site with train and truck transport. All of the alternatives except no action include remedial action at an estimated 3465 vicinity properties. Alternative 3 is DOE`s preferred alternative.

None

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Excess Uranium Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department is issuing a Request for Information on the effects of DOE transfers of excess uranium on domestic uranium mining, conversion, and enrichment industries.

174

Y-12 Knows Uranium | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Knows Uranium Knows Uranium Y-12 Knows Uranium Posted: July 22, 2013 - 3:45pm | Y-12 Report | Volume 10, Issue 1 | 2013 Y-12 produces many forms of uranium. They may be used in chemical processing steps on-site or shipped elsewhere to serve as raw materials for nuclear fuel or as research tools. All of uranium's uses, defense related and otherwise, are critical to the nation. Y-12's understanding of uranium, coupled with the site's work with enriched uranium metal, alloys, oxides, compounds and solutions, is unique in the Nuclear Security Enterprise. "The Y-12 work force understands both established uranium science and the esoteric things related to uranium's behavior," said engineer Alan Moore. "Such a deep, detailed understanding comes from experience,

175

The Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFC Focused on Hanford’s 300 Area Uranium Plume Quality Assurance Project Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the project is to conduct research at an Integrated Field-Scale Research Challenge Site in the Hanford Site 300 Area, CERCLA OU 300-FF-5 (Figure 1), to investigate multi-scale mass transfer processes associated with a subsurface uranium plume impacting both the vadose zone and groundwater. The project will investigate a series of science questions posed for research related to the effect of spatial heterogeneities, the importance of scale, coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes, and measurements/approaches needed to characterize a mass-transfer dominated system. The research will be conducted by evaluating three (3) different hypotheses focused on multi-scale mass transfer processes in the vadose zone and groundwater, their influence on field-scale U(VI) biogeochemistry and transport, and their implications to natural systems and remediation. The project also includes goals to 1) provide relevant materials and field experimental opportunities for other ERSD researchers and 2) generate a lasting, accessible, and high-quality field experimental database that can be used by the scientific community for testing and validation of new conceptual and numerical models of subsurface reactive transport.

Fix, N. J.

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

176

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Production Report Domestic Uranium Production Report 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 Activity at U.S. Mills and In-Situ-Leach Plants 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Ore from Underground Mines and Stockpiles Fed to Mills 1 0 W W W 0 W W W W W Other Feed Materials 2 W W W W W W W W W W Total Mill Feed W W W W W W W W W W (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) W W W W W W W W W W (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) W W W W W W W W W W (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) E2,000 2,282 2,689 4,106 4,534 3,902 3,708 4,228 3,991 4,146 (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) E1,600 2,280 2,702 3,838 4,050 4,130 3,620 5,137 4,000 3,911 Deliveries (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) W W W 3,786 3,602 3,656 2,044 2,684 2,870 3,630 Weighted-Average Price (dollars per pound U 3 O 8 ) W W W 28.98 42.11 43.81 36.61 37.59 52.36 49.63 Notes: The 2003 annual amounts were estimated by rounding to the nearest 200,000 pounds to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Totals may not equal sum of components

177

Colorimetric detection of uranium in water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are methods, materials and systems that can be used to determine qualitatively or quantitatively the level of uranium contamination in water samples. Beneficially, disclosed systems are relatively simple and cost-effective. For example, disclosed systems can be utilized by consumers having little or no training in chemical analysis techniques. Methods generally include a concentration step and a complexation step. Uranium concentration can be carried out according to an extraction chromatographic process and complexation can chemically bind uranium with a detectable substance such that the formed substance is visually detectable. Methods can detect uranium contamination down to levels even below the MCL as established by the EPA.

DeVol, Timothy A. (Clemson, SC); Hixon, Amy E. (Piedmont, SC); DiPrete, David P. (Evans, GA)

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

178

Uranium Industry Annual, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ``Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,`` is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2.

Not Available

1993-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

179

Investigation of different manganese ores as oxygen carriers in chemical-looping combustion (CLC) for solid fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The chemical-looping combustion (CLC) process is a novel solution for efficient combustion with direct capture of carbon dioxide. The process uses a metal oxide as an oxygen carrier to transfer oxygen from an air to a fuel reactor, where the fuel reacts with the solid oxygen carrier. In this work, six different manganese ores are investigated as oxygen carriers for CLC application. The chemical-looping characteristics of the oxygen carriers were evaluated in a laboratory-scale fluidized-bed reactor in the temperature range of 900–970 °C during alternating reducing and oxidizing conditions. Three of the manganese ores showed a small oxygen release in inert environment between 850 and 950 °C. During reactivity tests, the gas yield with methane increased with the temperature and complete conversion of 50% CO in H2 was obtained for all of the ores. The rates of char gasification of two fuels, namely Mexican petroleum coke and Swedish wood char, were compared for the different manganese ores at 970 °C and with 50% H2O in N2 as fluidizing gas. Ilmenite and a manufactured Mn-oxide oxygen carrier consisting of Mn3O4 and MgO-stabilized ZrO2 as support were also included for comparison. The char gasification rate and the gas conversion were higher with the manganese ores and the Mn-oxide oxygen carrier compared to ilmenite. However, the higher reactivity of the manganese ores with H2 and the ensuing decrease in H2 inhibition for manganese ores is not sufficient to explain their higher rate of char gasification. Surface analysis of partially gasified petcoke particles in the presence of manganese ores showed formation of cavities and channels as well as a uniform distribution of potassium and sodium elements. The rate of char gasification also increased with the concentration of potassium and sodium impurities in the manganese ores. Thus the results suggest that the increased rate of char conversion for manganese ores is due to alkali-catalyzed steam gasification. The increase in rate of char gasification, in combination with potentially low costs of these materials suggests that manganese ores could be interesting materials for CLC with solid fuels.

Mehdi Arjmand; Henrik Leion; Tobias Mattisson; Anders Lyngfelt

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8. U.S. uranium expenditures, 2003-2012 8. U.S. uranium expenditures, 2003-2012 million dollars Year Drilling Production Land and Other Total Expenditures Total Land and Other Land Exploration Reclamation 2003 W W 31.3 NA NA NA W 2004 10.6 27.8 48.4 NA NA NA 86.9 2005 18.1 58.2 59.7 NA NA NA 136.0 2006 40.1 65.9 115.2 41.0 23.3 50.9 221.2 2007 67.5 90.4 178.2 77.7 50.3 50.2 336.2 2008 81.9 221.2 164.4 65.2 50.2 49.1 467.6 2009 35.4 141.0 104.0 17.3 24.2 62.4 280.5 2010 44.6 133.3 99.5 20.2 34.5 44.7 277.3 2011 53.6 168.8 96.8 19.6 43.5 33.7 319.2 2012 66.6 186.9 99.4 16.8 33.3 49.3 352.9 Drilling: All expenditures directly associated with exploration and development drilling. Production: All expenditures for mining, milling, processing of uranium, and facility expense.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium ore processing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Neptunium - Uranium - Plutonium Co-Extraction in TBP-based Solvent Extraction Processes for Spent Nuclear Fuel Recycling  

SciTech Connect

The US, through the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership, is currently engaged in efforts aimed at closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Neptunium behavior is important to understand for transuranic recycling because of its complex oxidation chemistry. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is investigating neptunium oxidation chemistry in the context of the PUREX process. Neptunium extraction in the PUREX process relies on maintaining either IV or V oxidation states. Qualitative conversion of neptunium(V) to neptunium(VI) was achieved within 5 hours in 6 M nitric acid at 95 deg. C. However, the VI state was not maintained during a batch contact test simulating the PUREX process and neptunium reduced to the V state, rendering it inextractable. Vanadium(V) was found to be effective in maintaining neptunium(VI) by adding it to a simulated irradiated nuclear fuel feed in 6 M nitric acid and to the scrub acid in the batch contact simulation of the PUREX process. Computer simulations of the PUREX process with a typical irradiated nuclear fuel in 6 M nitric acid as feed indicated little impact of the higher acid concentration on the behavior of fission products of moderate extractability. We plan to perform countercurrent tests of this modified PUREX process in the near future. (authors)

Arm, S.T.; Abrefah, J.; Lumetta, G.J.; Sinkov, S.I. [Battelle PNWD, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, PO Box 999, Richland, Washington, 99352 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

In-Situ Measurements of Low Enrichment Uranium Holdup Process Gas Piping at K-25 - Paper for Waste Management Symposia 2010 East Tennessee Technology Park Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final version of a paper submitted to the Waste Management Symposia, Phoenix, 2010, abstract BJC/OR-3280. The primary document from which this paper was condensed is In-Situ Measurement of Low Enrichment Uranium Holdup in Process Gas Piping at K-25 Using NaI/HMS4 Gamma Detection Systems, BJC/OR-3355. This work explores the sufficiency and limitations of the Holdup Measurement System 4 (HJVIS4) software algorithms applied to measurements of low enriched uranium holdup in gaseous diffusion process gas piping. HMS4 has been used extensively during the decommissioning and demolition project of the K-25 building for U-235 holdup quantification. The HMS4 software is an integral part of one of the primary nondestructive assay (NDA) systems which was successfully tested and qualified for holdup deposit quantification in the process gas piping of the K-25 building. The initial qualification focused on the measurement of highly enriched UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} deposits. The purpose of this work was to determine if that qualification could be extended to include the quantification of holdup in UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} deposits of lower enrichment. Sample field data are presented to provide evidence in support of the theoretical foundation. The HMS4 algorithms were investigated in detail and found to sufficiently compensate for UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} source self-attenuation effects, over the range of expected enrichment (4-40%), in the North and East Wings of the K-25 building. The limitations of the HMS4 algorithms were explored for a described set of conditions with respect to area source measurements of low enriched UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} deposits when used in conjunction with a 1 inch by 1/2 inch sodium iodide (NaI) scintillation detector. The theoretical limitations of HMS4, based on the expected conditions in the process gas system of the K-25 building, are related back to the required data quality objectives (DQO) for the NBA measurement system established for the K-25 demolition project. The combined review of the HMS software algorithms and supporting field measurements lead to the conclusion that the majority of process gas pipe measurements are adequately corrected for source self-attenuation using HMS4. While there will be instances where the UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} holdup mass presents an infinitely thick deposit to the NaI-HMS4 system these situations are expected to be infrequent. This work confirms that the HMS4 system can quantify UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} holdup, in its current configuration (deposition, enrichment, and geometry), below the DQO levels for the K-25 building decommissioning and demolition project. For an area measurement of process gas pipe in the K-25 building, if an infinitely thick UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} deposit is identified in the range of enrichment of {approx}4-40%, the holdup quantity exceeds the corresponding DQO established for the K-25 building demolition project.

Rasmussen B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Overview of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE's DUF DOE's DUF 6 Cylinder Inventory a Location Number of Cylinders DUF 6 (MT) b Paducah, Kentucky 36,910 450,000 Portsmouth, Ohio 16,041 198,000 Oak Ridge (ETTP), Tennessee 4,683 56,000 Total 57,634 704,000 a The DOE inventory includes DUF 6 generated by the government, as well as DUF 6 transferred from U.S. Enrichment Corporation pursuant to two memoranda of agreement. b A metric ton (MT) is equal to 1,000 kilograms, or 2,200 pounds. Overview of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program Over the last four decades, large quantities of uranium were processed by gaseous diffusion to produce enriched uranium for U.S. national defense and civilian purposes. The gaseous diffusion process uses uranium in the form of uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ), primarily because UF 6 can conveniently be used in

184

EIS-0472: Uranium Leasing Program, Mesa, Montrose, and San Miguel Counties,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Uranium Leasing Program, Mesa, Montrose, and San Miguel 2: Uranium Leasing Program, Mesa, Montrose, and San Miguel Counties, Colorado EIS-0472: Uranium Leasing Program, Mesa, Montrose, and San Miguel Counties, Colorado Summary This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of management alternatives for DOE's Uranium Leasing Program, under which DOE administers tracts of land in western Colorado for exploration, development, and the extraction of uranium and vanadium ores. The cooperating agencies are U.S. Department of the Interior; Bureau of Land Management; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Colorado Department of Transportation; Colorado Division of Reclamation, Mining, and Safety; Colorado Parks and Wildlife; Mesa County Commission; Montrose County Commission; San Juan County Commission; San Miguel County Board of

185

8 - Uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Release of uranium (U) to the environment is mainly through the nuclear fuel cycle. In oxic waters, U(VI) is the predominant redox state, while U(IV) is likely to be encountered in anoxic waters. The free uranyl ion ( UO 2 2 + ) dominates dissolved U speciation at low pH while complexes with hydroxides and carbonates prevail in neutral and alkaline conditions. Whether the toxicity of U(VI) to fish can be predicted based on its free ion concentration remains to be demonstrated but a strong influence of pH has been shown. In the field, U accumulates in bone, liver, and kidney, but does not biomagnify. There is certainly potential for uptake of U via the gill based on laboratory studies; however, diet and/or sediment may be the major route of uptake, and may vary with feeding strategy. Uranium toxicity is low relative to many other metals, and is further reduced by increased calcium, magnesium, carbonates, phosphate, and dissolved organic matter in the water. Inside fish, U produces reactive oxygen species and causes oxidative damage at the cellular level. The radiotoxicity of enriched U has been compared with chemical toxicity and it has been postulated that both may work through a mechanism of production of reactive oxygen species. In practical terms, the potential for chemotoxicity of U outweighs the potential for radiotoxicity. The toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics of U are well understood in mammals, where bone is a stable repository and the kidney the target organ for toxic effects from high exposure concentrations. Much less is known about fish, but overall, U is one of the less toxic metals.

Richard R. Goulet; Claude Fortin; Douglas J. Spry

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Uranium dose assessment: a Bayesian approach to the problem of dietary background  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......03-1.05 19.8-22.2 Depleted uranium 0.15-0.37 10-19...material is assumed to be depleted uranium, with an assumed isotopic...uranium lung clearance at a uranium processing plant. Health Phys (1995) 68:661-669......

Tom Little; Guthrie Miller; Raymond Guilmette; Luiz Bertelli

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Quantification of Hydrological, Geochemical, and Mineralogical Processes Governing the Fate and Transport of Uranium over Multiple Scales in Hanford Sediments  

SciTech Connect

A long-term measure of the DOE Environmental Remediation Sciences Division is to provide sufficient scientific understanding to allow a significant fraction of DOE sites to incorporate coupled biological, chemical, and physical processes into decision making for environmental remediation and long-term stewardship by 2015. Our research targets two related, major obstacles to understanding and predicting contaminant transport at DOE sites: the heterogeneity of subsurface geologic media, and the scale dependence of experimental and modeled results.

Fendorf, Scott; Mayes, Melanie A.; Perfect, Edmund; van den Berg, Elmer; Parker, Jack C.; Jardine, Philip M.; Tang, Guoping

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

Uranium industry annual 1998  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Industry Annual 1998 (UIA 1998) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. It contains data for the period 1989 through 2008 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data provides a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1989 through 1998, including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment, are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2008, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, and uranium inventories, are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1998 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. The Form EIA-858 ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is shown in Appendix D. For the readers convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix E along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

NONE

1999-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

189

Uranium industry annual 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Industry Annual 1994 (UIA 1994) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing during that survey year. The UIA 1994 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the 10-year period 1985 through 1994 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` (UIAS) provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1994, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. A feature article, ``Comparison of Uranium Mill Tailings Reclamation in the United States and Canada,`` is included in the UIA 1994. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, and uranium inventories, enrichment feed deliveries (actual and projected), and unfilled market requirements are shown in Chapter 2.

NONE

1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

190

Radiological Conditions in the Dnieper River Basin: Assessment by an international expert team and recommendations for an action plan. ? STI/PUB/1230, International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O. Box 100, A-1400, Vienna, Austria. ISBN 92-0-104905-6, 200 pp, 2006, 38.00 Euro (softbound).  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......tributaries, uranium mining and ore processing...strategic action plan and individual government national plans. The discussion...below the applicable standards, and do not present...region. The report reviews the environmental impacts of uranium mining and ore processing......

Bruce A. Napier

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Plutonium recovery from spent reactor fuel by uranium displacement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for separating uranium values and transuranic values from fission products containing rare earth values when the values are contained together in a molten chloride salt electrolyte. A molten chloride salt electrolyte with a first ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride is contacted with both a solid cathode and an anode having values of uranium and fission products including plutonium. A voltage is applied across the anode and cathode electrolytically to transfer uranium and plutonium from the anode to the electrolyte while uranium values in the electrolyte electrolytically deposit as uranium metal on the solid cathode in an amount equal to the uranium and plutonium transferred from the anode causing the electrolyte to have a second ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride. Then the solid cathode with the uranium metal deposited thereon is removed and molten cadmium having uranium dissolved therein is brought into contact with the electrolyte resulting in chemical transfer of plutonium values from the electrolyte to the molten cadmium and transfer of uranium values from the molten cadmium to the electrolyte until the first ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride is reestablished.

Ackerman, J.P.

1992-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

192

Uranium industry annual 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Industry Annual 1995 (UIA 1995) provides current statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1995 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the period 1986 through 2005 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey``. Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1995, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1986 through 1995 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2005, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1995 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. For the reader`s convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix D along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 14 figs., 56 tabs.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Induction slag reduction process for making titanium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Continuous process for preparing titanium comprising fluorinating titanium ore, and reducing the formed alkaline earth fluotitanate with an alkaline earth metal in an induction slag reactor.

Traut, Davis E. (Corvallis, OR)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Uranium mineralization in fluorine-enriched volcanic rocks  

SciTech Connect

Several uranium and other lithophile element deposits are located within or adjacent to small middle to late Cenozoic, fluorine-rich rhyolitic dome complexes. Examples studied include Spor Mountain, Utah (Be-U-F), the Honeycomb Hills, Utah (Be-U), the Wah Wah Mountains, Utah (U-F), and the Black Range-Sierra Cuchillo, New Mexico (Sn-Be-W-F). The formation of these and similar deposits begins with the emplacement of a rhyolitic magma, enriched in lithophile metals and complexing fluorine, that rises to a shallow crustal level, where its roof zone may become further enriched in volatiles and the ore elements. During initial explosive volcanic activity, aprons of lithicrich tuffs are erupted around the vents. These early pyroclastic deposits commonly host the mineralization, due to their initial enrichment in the lithophile elements, their permeability, and the reactivity of their foreign lithic inclusions (particularly carbonate rocks). The pyroclastics are capped and preserved by thick topaz rhyolite domes and flows that can serve as a source of heat and of additional quantities of ore elements. Devitrification, vapor-phase crystallization, or fumarolic alteration may free the ore elements from the glassy matrix and place them in a form readily leached by percolating meteoric waters. Heat from the rhyolitic sheets drives such waters through the system, generally into and up the vents and out through the early tuffs. Secondary alteration zones (K-feldspar, sericite, silica, clays, fluorite, carbonate, and zeolites) and economic mineral concentrations may form in response to this low temperature (less than 200 C) circulation. After cooling, meteoric water continues to migrate through the system, modifying the distribution and concentration of the ore elements (especially uranium).

Burt, D.M.; Sheridan, M.F.; Bikun, J.; Christiansen, E.; Correa, B.; Murphy, B.; Self, S.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Disposition of DOE Excess Depleted Uranium, Natural Uranium, and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposition of DOE Excess Depleted Uranium, Natural Uranium, and Disposition of DOE Excess Depleted Uranium, Natural Uranium, and Low-Enriched Uranium Disposition of DOE Excess Depleted Uranium, Natural Uranium, and Low-Enriched Uranium The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) owns and manages an inventory of depleted uranium (DU), natural uranium (NU), and low-enriched uranium (LEU) that is currently stored in large cylinders as depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6), natural uranium hexafluoride (NUF6), and low-enriched uranium hexafluoride (LEUF6) at the DOE Paducah site in western Kentucky (DOE Paducah) and the DOE Portsmouth site near Piketon in south-central Ohio (DOE Portsmouth)1. This inventory exceeds DOE's current and projected energy and defense program needs. On March 11, 2008, the Secretary of Energy issued a policy statement (the

196

Depleted Uranium Technical Brief  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and radiological health concerns involved with depleted uranium in the environment. This technical brief was developed to address the common misconception that depleted uranium represents only a radiological healthDepleted Uranium Technical Brief United States Environmental Protection Agency Office of Air

197

Depleted uranium plasma reduction system study  

SciTech Connect

A system life-cycle cost study was conducted of a preliminary design concept for a plasma reduction process for converting depleted uranium to uranium metal and anhydrous HF. The plasma-based process is expected to offer significant economic and environmental advantages over present technology. Depleted Uranium is currently stored in the form of solid UF{sub 6}, of which approximately 575,000 metric tons is stored at three locations in the U.S. The proposed system is preconceptual in nature, but includes all necessary processing equipment and facilities to perform the process. The study has identified total processing cost of approximately $3.00/kg of UF{sub 6} processed. Based on the results of this study, the development of a laboratory-scale system (1 kg/h throughput of UF6) is warranted. Further scaling of the process to pilot scale will be determined after laboratory testing is complete.

Rekemeyer, P.; Feizollahi, F.; Quapp, W.J.; Brown, B.W.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Demand side management of a run-of-mine ore milling circuit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Increasing electricity costs coupled with lower prices for some metals such as platinum group metals require a reevaluation of the operation of grinding processes. Demand side management (DSM) has received increasing attention in the field of industrial control as an opportunity to reduce operating costs. DSM through grinding mill power load shifting is presented in this paper using model predictive control and a real-time optimizer. Simulation results indicate that mill power load shifting can potentially achieve cost reductions of $9.90 per kg of unrefined product when applied to a run-of-mine (ROM) ore milling circuit processing platinum bearing ore. DSM is however still not economically feasible when there is a demand to continuously run the milling circuit at maximum throughput.

B. Matthews; I.K. Craig

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Evolution of isotopic composition of reprocessed uranium during the multiple recycling in light water reactors with natural uranium feed  

SciTech Connect

A complex approach based on the consistent modeling of neutron-physics processes and processes of cascade separation of isotopes is applied for analyzing physical problems of the multiple usage of reprocessed uranium in the fuel cycle of light water reactors. A number of scenarios of multiple recycling of reprocessed uranium in light water reactors are considered. In the process, an excess absorption of neutrons by the {sup 236}U isotope is compensated by re-enrichment in the {sup 235}U isotope. Specific consumptions of natural uranium for re-enrichment of the reprocessed uranium depending on the content of the {sup 232}U isotope are obtained.

Smirnov, A. Yu., E-mail: a.y.smirnoff@rambler.ru; Sulaberidze, G. A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russian Federation); Alekseev, P. N.; Dudnikov, A. A.; Nevinitsa, V. A., E-mail: neva@dhtp.kiae.ru; Proselkov, V. N.; Chibinyaev, A. V. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

200

Kinetics of Iron Ore Reduction by Methane for Chemical Looping Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Kinetics of Iron Ore Reduction by Methane for Chemical Looping Combustion ... Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a promising concept that can be used in power generation, which integrates power production and CO2 capture. ... With this in mind, chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a promising concept that can be used in power generation, with the inherent capture of CO2 during the process cycle. ...

Somaye Nasr; Kevin P. Plucknett

2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium ore processing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Uranium at Y-12: Accountability | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

... ... Uranium at Y-12: Accountability Posted: July 22, 2013 - 3:37pm | Y-12 Report | Volume 10, Issue 1 | 2013 Accountability of enriched uranium is facilitated by the ability to put uranium into well-blended aqueous, organic, crystalline, powder, granular, metallic and compound forms that can be sampled and analyzed. Periodic inventories are necessary to find and account for all the enriched uranium that hides in equipment corners and crevices. This allows enriched uranium to be processed in large quantities and accounted for by the gram. Y-12 employees know where uranium resides in large, complex facilities and how to use computer tools to track and monitor its movement (see Uranium Track Team). Learn more about some of the complexities in reprocessing and safeguarding

202

FAQ 8-What is uranium hexafluoride (UF6)?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is uranium hexafluoride (UF6)? is uranium hexafluoride (UF6)? What is uranium hexafluoride (UF6)? Uranium hexafluoride is a chemical compound consisting of one atom of uranium combined with six atoms of fluorine. It is the chemical form of uranium that is used during the uranium enrichment process. Within a reasonable range of temperature and pressure, it can be a solid, liquid, or gas. Solid UF6 is a white, dense, crystalline material that resembles rock salt. Liquid UF6 is formed only at temperatures greater than 147° F (64° C) and at pressures greater than 1.5 times atmospheric pressure (22 psia). At atmospheric pressure, solid UF6 will transform directly to UF6 gas (sublimation) when the temperature is raised to 134° F (57° C), without going through a liquid phase.

203

Purification of trona ores by conditioning with an oil-in-water emulsion  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a trona concentrate and a process for floating gangue material from trona ore that comprises forming an emulsion, conditioning the trona ore at a high solids content in a saturated trona suspension, and then floating and removing the gangue material. The process for separating trona from gangue materials in trona ore can include emulsifying an oil in an aqueous solution to form an oil-in-water emulsion. A saturated trona suspension having a high solids content can also be formed having trona of a desired particle size. The undissolved trona in the saturated suspension can be conditioned by mixing the saturated suspension and the oil-in-water emulsion to form a conditioning solid suspension of trona and gangue material. A gas can be injected through the conditioning solid suspension to float the gangue material. Thus, the floated gangue material can be readily separated from the trona to form a purified trona concentrate without requirements of additional heat or other expensive processing steps.

Miller, J. D. (Salt Lake City, UT); Wang, Xuming (Salt Lake City, UT); Li, Minhua (Salt Lake City, UT)

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

204

STRATIGRAPHY OF THE PB-1 WELL, NOPAL I URANIUM DEPOSIT, SIERRA PENA BLANCA, CHIHUAHUA, MEXICO  

SciTech Connect

Three wells, PB-1, PB-2, and PB-3, were drilled in 2003 at the Nopal I uranium deposit as part of a natural analogue study to evaluate radionuclide transport processes. The wells penetrate through the Tertiary volcanic section down to the Cretaceous limestone basement, and intersect the top of the regional aquifer system. The PB-1 well, drilled immediately adjacent to the Nopal I ore body, was cored to a depth of 250 m, thus providing an opportunity to document the local stratigraphy. The uppermost unit encountered in the PB-1 well is the Nopal Formation, a densely welded, crystal-rich rhyolitic ash-flow tuff. The cored section is highly altered and devitrified, with kaolinite, quartz, chlorite, and montmorillonite replacing feldspars and much of the groundmass. Breccia zones within the tuff contain fracture fillings of hematite, limonite, and goethite. A zone of intense clay alteration encountered in the depth interval 17.45-22.30 m was interpreted to represent the basal vitrophyre of this unit. Underlying the basal vitrophyre is the Coloradas Formation, which consists of a welded, lithic-rich rhyolitic ash-flow tuff. The cored section of this unit has undergone devitrification and oxidation, and has a similar alteration mineralogy to that observed in the Nopal tuff. The Nopal I ore body is restricted to a brecciated zone that intersects these two volcanic units. A sharp contact between the Coloradas tuff and the underlying Pozos Formation was observed at a depth of 136.38 m. The Pozos Formation in the PB-1 core consists of interbedded, poorly sorted sandstone and conglomerate layers. The conglomeratic clasts consist of subangular to subrounded fragments of volcanic rocks, limestone, and chert. Thin (2-6 m) intervals of intercalated pumiceous tuffs were observed within this unit. The contact between the Pozos Formation and the underlying Cretaceous limestone basement was observed at a depth of 244.4 m.

NA

2005-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

205

The ultimate disposition of depleted uranium  

SciTech Connect

Depleted uranium (DU) is produced as a by-product of the uranium enrichment process. Over 340,000 MTU of DU in the form of UF{sub 6} have been accumulated at the US government gaseous diffusion plants and the stockpile continues to grow. An overview of issues and objectives associated with the inventory management and the ultimate disposition of this material is presented.

Lemons, T.R. [Uranium Enrichment Organization, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

206

Population doses from terrestrial exposure in the vicinity of abandoned uranium mines in Serbia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A uranium mineralized area of Stara Planina Mt., Serbia, where uranium ore was exploited for seven years was characterized radiologically. Results were compared with those for an area of background radiation in the northern part of the mountain. The terrestrial gamma dose rate due to 238U, 232Th and 40K in the area affected by mining activities was twofold higher than that of background area. The radiological situation of the affected area is not of immediate concern, except one location with elevated external hazard index where remediative measures taking into account site-specific ecological characteristics should be planned and implemented.

M. Mom?ilovi?; J. Kova?evi?; S. Dragovi?

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Spatial analysis techniques applied to uranium prospecting in Chihuahua State, Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To estimate the distribution of uranium minerals in Chihuahua the advanced statistical model "Maximun Entropy Method" (MaxEnt) was applied. A distinguishing feature of this method is that it can fit more complex models in case of small datasets (x and y data) as is the location of uranium ores in the State of Chihuahua. For georeferencing uranium ores a database from the United States Geological Survey and workgroup of experts in Mexico was used. The main contribution of this paper is the proposal of maximum entropy techniques to obtain the mineral's potential distribution. For this model were used 24 environmental layers like topography gravimetry climate (worldclim) soil properties and others that were useful to project the uranium's distribution across the study area. For the validation of the places predicted by the model comparisons were done with other research of the Mexican Service of Geological Survey with direct exploration of specific areas and by talks with former exploration workers of the enterprise "Uranio de Mexico". Results. New uranium areas predicted by the model were validated finding some relationship between the model predictions and geological faults. Conclusions. Modeling by spatial analysis provides additional information to the energy and mineral resources sectors.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

FAQ 1-What is uranium?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What is uranium? What is uranium? What is uranium? Uranium is a radioactive element that occurs naturally in low concentrations (a few parts per million) in soil, rock, and surface and groundwater. It is the heaviest naturally occurring element, with an atomic number of 92. Uranium in its pure form is a silver-colored heavy metal that is nearly twice as dense as lead. In nature, uranium atoms exist as several isotopes: primarily uranium-238, uranium-235, and a very small amount of uranium-234. (Isotopes are different forms of an element that have the same number of protons in the nucleus, but a different number of neutrons.) In a typical sample of natural uranium, most of the mass (99.27%) consists of atoms of uranium-238. About 0.72% of the mass consists of atoms of uranium-235, and a very small amount (0.0055% by mass) is uranium-234.

209

Uranium hexafluoride public risk  

SciTech Connect

The limiting value for uranium toxicity in a human being should be based on the concentration of uranium (U) in the kidneys. The threshold for nephrotoxicity appears to lie very near 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney tissue. There does not appear to be strong scientific support for any other improved estimate, either higher or lower than this, of the threshold for uranium nephrotoxicity in a human being. The value 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney is the concentration that results from a single intake of about 30 mg soluble uranium by inhalation (assuming the metabolism of a standard person). The concentration of uranium continues to increase in the kidneys after long-term, continuous (or chronic) exposure. After chronic intakes of soluble uranium by workers at the rate of 10 mg U per week, the concentration of uranium in the kidneys approaches and may even exceed the nephrotoxic limit of 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney tissue. Precise values of the kidney concentration depend on the biokinetic model and model parameters assumed for such a calculation. Since it is possible for the concentration of uranium in the kidneys to exceed 3 {mu}g per gram tissue at an intake rate of 10 mg U per week over long periods of time, we believe that the kidneys are protected from injury when intakes of soluble uranium at the rate of 10 mg U per week do not continue for more than two consecutive weeks. For long-term, continuous occupational exposure to low-level, soluble uranium, we recommend a reduced weekly intake limit of 5 mg uranium to prevent nephrotoxicity in workers. Our analysis shows that the nephrotoxic limit of 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney tissues is not exceeded after long-term, continuous uranium intake at the intake rate of 5 mg soluble uranium per week.

Fisher, D.R.; Hui, T.E.; Yurconic, M.; Johnson, J.R.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFRC Focused on Hanford’s 300 Area Uranium Plume  

SciTech Connect

The Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFRC) at the Hanford Site 300 Area uranium (U) plume addresses multi-scale mass transfer processes in a complex hydrogeologic setting where groundwater and riverwater interact. A series of forefront science questions on mass transfer are posed for research which relate to the effect of spatial heterogeneities; the importance of scale; coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes; and measurements and approaches needed to characterize and model a mass-transfer dominated system. The project was initiated in February 2007, with CY 2007 and CY 2008 progress summarized in preceding reports. The site has 35 instrumented wells, and an extensive monitoring system. It includes a deep borehole for microbiologic and biogeochemical research that sampled the entire thickness of the unconfined 300 A aquifer. Significant, impactful progress has been made in CY 2009 with completion of extensive laboratory measurements on field sediments, field hydrologic and geophysical characterization, four field experiments, and modeling. The laboratory characterization results are being subjected to geostatistical analyses to develop spatial heterogeneity models of U concentration and chemical, physical, and hydrologic properties needed for reactive transport modeling. The field experiments focused on: (1) physical characterization of the groundwater flow field during a period of stable hydrologic conditions in early spring, (2) comprehensive groundwater monitoring during spring to characterize the release of U(VI) from the lower vadose zone to the aquifer during water table rise and fall, (3) dynamic geophysical monitoring of salt-plume migration during summer, and (4) a U reactive tracer experiment (desorption) during the fall. Geophysical characterization of the well field was completed using the down-well Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) array, with results subjected to robust, geostatistically constrained inversion analyses. These measurements along with hydrologic characterization have yielded 3D distributions of hydraulic properties that have been incorporated into an updated and increasingly robust hydrologic model. Based on significant findings from the microbiologic characterization of deep borehole sediments in CY 2008, down-hole biogeochemistry studies were initiated where colonization substrates and spatially discrete water and gas samplers were deployed to select wells. The increasingly comprehensive field experimental results, along with the field and laboratory characterization, are leading to a new conceptual model of U(VI) flow and transport in the IFRC footprint and the 300 Area in general, and insights on the microbiological community and associated biogeochemical processes. A significant issue related to vertical flow in the IFRC wells was identified and evaluated during the spring and fall field experimental campaigns. Both upward and downward flows were observed in response to dynamic Columbia River stage. The vertical flows are caused by the interaction of pressure gradients with our heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity field. These impacts are being evaluated with additional modeling and field activities to facilitate interpretation and mitigation. The project moves into CY 2010 with ambitious plans for a drilling additional wells for the IFRC well field, additional experiments, and modeling. This research is part of the ERSP Hanford IFRC at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Zachara, John M.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Christensen, John N.; Conrad, Mark E.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Freshley, Mark D.; Haggerty, Roy; Hammon, Glenn; Kent, Douglas B.; Konopka, Allan; Lichtner, Peter C.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Rubin, Yoram; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Versteeg, Roelof J.; Ward, Anderson L.; Zheng, Chunmiao

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Use of manganese ore in chemical-looping combustion (CLC)—Effect on steam gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The chemical-looping combustion (CLC) process is a novel solution for efficient combustion with direct separation of carbon dioxide. The process uses a metal oxide as an oxygen carrier to transfer oxygen from an air to a fuel reactor, where the fuel reacts with the solid oxygen carrier. When solid fuel is used in CLC, the char needs to be gasified by e.g. steam to form H2 and CO that can be subsequently oxidized to H2O and CO2 by the oxygen carrier. In this work, the influence of the oxygen carrier on the rate of steam gasification is studied, by comparing the conversion of petcoke in the presence of manganese ore to that of ilmenite. The experiments were carried out in a fluidized-bed reactor at 970 °C using a fluidization gas of 50% steam in nitrogen. The manganese ore shows an increase by a factor five in the rate of steam gasification of char as compared to ilmenite. The dramatic increase in rate of steam gasification, in combination with potentially low costs of this material suggests that manganese ore could be an interesting material for CLC with solid fuels.

Mehdi Arjmand; Henrik Leion; Anders Lyngfelt; Tobias Mattisson

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Uranium-Loaded Water Treatment Resins: 'Equivalent Feed' at NRC and Agreement State-Licensed Uranium Recovery Facilities - 12094  

SciTech Connect

Community Water Systems (CWSs) are required to remove uranium from drinking water to meet EPA standards. Similarly, mining operations are required to remove uranium from their dewatering discharges to meet permitted surface water discharge limits. Ion exchange (IX) is the primary treatment strategy used by these operations, which loads uranium onto resin beads. Presently, uranium-loaded resin from CWSs and mining operations can be disposed as a waste product or processed by NRC- or Agreement State-licensed uranium recovery facilities if that licensed facility has applied for and received permission to process 'alternate feed'. The disposal of uranium-loaded resin is costly and the cost to amend a uranium recovery license to accept alternate feed can be a strong disincentive to commercial uranium recovery facilities. In response to this issue, the NRC issued a Regulatory Issue Summary (RIS) to clarify the agency's policy that uranium-loaded resin from CWSs and mining operations can be processed by NRC- or Agreement State-licensed uranium recovery facilities without the need for an alternate feed license amendment when these resins are essentially the same, chemically and physically, to resins that licensed uranium recovery facilities currently use (i.e., equivalent feed). NRC staff is clarifying its current alternate feed policy to declare IX resins as equivalent feed. This clarification is necessary to alleviate a regulatory and financial burden on facilities that filter uranium using IX resin, such as CWSs and mine dewatering operations. Disposing of those resins in a licensed facility could be 40 to 50 percent of the total operations and maintenance (O and M) cost for a CWS. Allowing uranium recovery facilities to treat these resins without requiring a license amendment lowers O and M costs and captures a valuable natural resource. (authors)

Camper, Larry W.; Michalak, Paul; Cohen, Stephen; Carter, Ted [Nuclear Regulatory Commission (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Uranium and its relationship to host rock mineralogy in an unoxidized roll front in the Jackson group, South Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-to-the-coast antithetic fault. Fault sets of this tyoe have affected uranium mineralization by serving as conduits for the miqration of ore solutions and reductants (Eargle and Weeks, 1961; Dickinson and Duval, 1977). There are also many diapiric salt intrusions... in south Texas, though none occur in the area of the ore deposit studied. The intru- sions developed from gravitational instability caused by the rapid accu- mulation of Tertiary sediments on top of a Jurassic salt layer. Urani- um is not commonly...

Prasse, Eric Martin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

214

Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. Uranium sellers to owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, 2010-2012 2010 2011 2012 4. Uranium sellers to owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, 2010-2012 2010 2011 2012 American Fuel Resources, LLC Advance Uranium Asset Management Ltd. (was Uranium Asset Management) Advance Uranium Asset Management Ltd. (was Uranium Asset Management) AREVA NC, Inc. (was COGEMA, Inc.) American Fuel Resources, LLC American Fuel Resources, LLC BHP Billiton Olympic Dam Corporation Pty Ltd AREVA NC, Inc. AREVA NC, Inc. CAMECO BHP Billiton Olympic Dam Corporation Pty Ltd BHP Billiton Olympic Dam Corporation Pty Ltd ConverDyn CAMECO CAMECO Denison Mines Corp. ConverDyn ConverDyn Energy Resources of Australia Ltd. Denison Mines Corp. Energy Fuels Resources Energy USA, Inc. Effective Energy N.V. Energy Resources of Australia Ltd.

215

Natural Ores as Oxygen Carriers in Chemical Looping Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural Ores as Oxygen Carriers in Chemical Looping Combustion ... Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is a combustion technology that utilizes oxygen from oxygen carriers (OC), such as metal oxides, instead of air to combust fuels. ...

Hanjing Tian; Ranjani Siriwardane; Thomas Simonyi; James Poston

2013-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

216

IN-SITU MINING OF PHOSPHATE ORES  

SciTech Connect

Presently the mining of Florida phosphate requires the movement of over a 100-ton of materials (overburden, sand, clay) for every ton of phosphate concentrate recovered. Not only is this energy intensive, but it also causes significant stress on the environment. In 2003, the Department of Energy solicited ideas for innovative mining ideas that could significantly improve the efficiency of mining. An award was made to the University of Florida Engineering Research Center to evaluate the in situ mining of phosphates using an aqueous CO{sub 2} solution. Tests were carried out in a 15.2 cm (6-inch) diameter column, 1.83 meter (6 feet) long at pressures up to 117.2 kg/cm{sup 2} (40 psi). Results to date demonstrate that initially the MgO is leached from the ore and then the phosphate. While the tests are continuing, so far they have not demonstrated P{sub 2}O{sub 5} concentrations that are economically attractive.

H. El-Shall; R. Stana; A. El-Midany; S. Malekzadah

2004-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

217

2013 Uranium Marketing Annual Survey  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for inflation. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-858 "Uranium Marketing Annual Survey" (2013). UF 6 is uranium hexafluoride. The natural UF 6 and enriched...

218

THE ENERGY SPECTRA OF URANIUM ATOMS SPUTTERED FROM URANIUM METAL AND URANIUM DIOXIDE TARGETS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE ENERGY SPECTRA OF URANIUM ATOMS SPUTTERED FROM URANIUM METAL AND URANIUM DIOXIDE TARGETS Thesis. I have benefitted from conversations with many persons w~ile engaged in this project. I would like

Winfree, Erik

219

Uranium contamination of the Aral Sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Located in an endorrheic basin, the Aral Sea is mainly fed by water from two large rivers, the Syrdarya and the Amudarya. As a result, contaminants in dissolved and suspended form discharged by the rivers are accumulating in the lake. The northern Small Aral water contained 37 µg l? 1uranium and water in the western basin of the Large Aral up to 141 µg l? 1uranium in 2002, 2004 and 2006. The present day uranium concentrations in Aral Sea water mainly originate from the Syrdarya River due to uranium mining and tailings in the river watershed, and have been elevated up to 5 times compared to the pre-desiccation times by the ongoing desiccation in the western basin of the Large Aral. Current data indicate that groundwater does not seem to contribute much to the uranium budget. The uranium concentration in the lake is controlled by internal lake processes. Due to the high ionic strength of the Aral Sea water uranium is kept soluble. 238U/Cl?mass ratios range from 5.88 to 6.15 µg g? 1in the Small Aral and from 3.00 to 3.32 µg g? 1in the Large Aral. Based on the238U/Cl?mass ratios, a removal rate of 8% uranium from the water column inventory to the sediments has been estimated for anoxic waters, and it ranges between 2% and 5% in oxic waters, over periods of time without mixing. Most of the uranium removal seems to occur by co-precipitation with calcite and gypsum both in anoxic and oxic waters. According to simulations with PHREEQC, uraninite precipitation contributes little to the removal from anoxic Aral Sea water. In most of the sampled locations, water column removal of uranium matches the sediment inventory. Based on budget calculations, the future development of uranium load in the Aral Sea has been estimated for different scenarios. If the Syrdarya River discharge is below or in balance with the loss by evaporation, the uranium concentration in the Small Aral will increase from 37 µg l–1to 55 µg l? 1in 20 years time. When the river discharge is larger than loss by evaporation, present-day uranium concentration in the lake may be kept at the current level or even decrease slightly. From the ecotoxicological point of view, an increase in Syrdarya River discharge as the major water source will be crucial for the water quality of the Small Aral, despite its high uranium load. However, as it is intended to restore fishery in the Small Aral, accumulation of uranium in fish has to be monitored. Since the western basin of the Large Aral received no Syrdarya River water since 2005, and may become disconnected from the eastern basin, the slightly higher observed uranium removal from anoxic waters may result in a decrease in uranium concentrations in the western basin by 20% in 20 years time.

Jana Friedrich

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beerten et al. 2009. Uranium Conversion After the uraniummilling of the uranium ore; conversion of the uranium oreMining and Milling Uranium ore Conversion Enrichment Fuel

Zheng, Nina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium ore processing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 W W W W W W W W W W W Total Mill Feed W W W W W W W W W W W Uranium Concentrate Produced at U.S. Mills (thousand pounds U3O8) W W W W W W W W W W W Uranium Concentrate...

222

Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as metal. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The mission of this Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will be to blend surplus HEU metal and alloy with depleted uranium metal to produce an LEU product. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. The blended LEU will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

NONE

1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

223

Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Uranium Marketing Uranium Marketing Annual Report May 2011 www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. U.S. Energy Information Administration | 2010 Uranium Marketing Annual Report ii Contacts This report was prepared by the staff of the Renewables and Uranium Statistics Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables, and Uranium Statistics. Questions about the preparation and content of this report may be directed to Michele Simmons, Team Leader,

224

recycled_uranium.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Recycled Uranium and Transuranics: Recycled Uranium and Transuranics: Their Relationship to Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project Introduction Historical Perspective On August 8, 1999, Energy Secretary Bill Richardson announced a comprehensive set of actions to address issues raised at the Paducah, Kentucky, Gaseous Diffusion Plant that may have had the potential to affect the health of the workers. One of the issues addressed the need to determine the extent and significance of radioactive fission products and transuranic elements in the uranium feed and waste products throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national complex. Subsequently, a DOE agency-wide Recycled Uranium Mass Balance Project (RUMBP) was initiated. For the Weldon Spring Uranium Feed Materials Plant (WSUFMP or later referred to as Weldon Spring),

225

Uranium and Thorium Ores Price List | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Determinations News Contact Information New Brunswick Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy Building 350 9800 South Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439-4899 P: (630) 252-2442 (NBL)...

226

A study of uranium distribution in an upper Jackson lignite-sandstone ore body, South Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the caprock of the Palangana salt dome (Weeks and Eargl e, 1960) . Many of the deposits are located at depths too great for open- pi t mining, and ' n situ leaching is being attempted . As this method advances the Duval district will undoubtably gain... in the caprock of the Palangana salt dome (Weeks and Eargl e, 1960) . Many of the deposits are located at depths too great for open- pi t mining, and ' n situ leaching is being attempted . As this method advances the Duval district will undoubtably gain...

Chatham, James Randall

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

227

Evaporation of Enriched Uranium Solutions Containing Organophosphates  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site has enriched uranium (EU) solution which has been stored for almost 10 years since being purified in the second uranium cycle of the H area solvent extraction process. The preliminary SRTC data, in conjunction with information in the literature, is promising. However, very few experiments have been run, and none of the results have been confirmed with repeat tests. As a result, it is believed that insufficient data exists at this time to warrant Separations making any process or program changes based on the information contained in this report. When this data is confirmed in future testing, recommendations will be presented.

Pierce, R.A.

1999-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

228

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 9 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 Year Exploration Mining Milling Processing Reclamation Total 2003 W W W W 117 321 2004 18 108 W W 121 420 2005 79 149 142 154 124 648 2006 188 121 W W 155 755 2007 375 378 107 216 155 1,231 2008 457 558 W W 154 1,563 2009 175 441 W W 162 1,096 2010 211 400 W W 125 1,073 2011 208 462 W W 102 1,191 2012 161 462 W W 179 1,196 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-851A, "Domestic Uranium Production Report" (2003-2012). Table 6. Employment in the U.S. uranium production industry by category, 2003-2012 person-years W = Data withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Note: Totals may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008

229

Designation Survey - Palmerton, Pa. Ore Storage Site William Bibb  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Designation Survey - Palmerton, Pa. Ore Storage Site Designation Survey - Palmerton, Pa. Ore Storage Site William Bibb Oak Ridge Operations Office Based on the information furnished in Aerospace's Review of the.subject site (Attachment 1) and the ORKL/RASA (Attachment 2), it Is requested that designation survey of the Palmerton Ore Storage Pennsylvania. The survey should be detailed to and subsurface data to make up for the lack of the previous AEC surveys and in keeping with ORNL/RASA group should furnish a draft survey approval prior to conducting any survey activities. If there are any questions, please call Edward DeLaney 04 FTS 253-4716. Arthur J. Whitman / '/ Division of Facility and Site ' Deconrnissioning P,rojects Office of Nuclear Energy : 2 Attachments I bee: I E. Keller, OR, w/attachs:

230

Polyethylene Encapsulated Depleted Uranium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Poly DU Poly DU Polyethylene Encapsulated Depleted Uranium Technology Description: Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has completed preliminary work to investigate the feasibility of encapsulating DU in low density polyethylene to form a stable, dense product. DU loadings as high as 90 wt% were achieved. A maximum product density of 4.2 g/cm3 was achieved using UO3, but increased product density using UO2 is estimated at 6.1 g/cm3. Additional product density improvements up to about 7.2 g/cm3 were projected using DU aggregate in a hybrid technique known as micro/macroencapsulation.[1] A U.S. patent for this process has been received.[2] Figure 1 Figure 1: DU Encapsulated in polyethylene samples produced at BNL containing 80 wt % depleted UO3 A recent DU market study by Kapline Enterprises, Inc. for DOE thoroughly identified and rated potential applications and markets for DU metal and oxide materials.[3] Because of its workability and high DU loading capability, the polyethylene encapsulated DU could readily be fabricated as counterweights/ballast (for use in airplanes, helicopters, ships and missiles), flywheels, armor, and projectiles. Also, polyethylene encapsulated DU is an effective shielding material for both gamma and neutron radiation, with potential application for shielding high activity waste (e.g., ion exchange resins, glass gems), spent fuel dry storage casks, and high energy experimental facilities (e.g., accelerator targets) to reduce radiation exposures to workers and the public.

231

Development and demonstration of biosorbents for clean-up of uranium in water. CRADA final report  

SciTech Connect

Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain CSU, a nongenetically engineered bacterial strain known to bind dissolved hexavalent uranium, shows particular promise as the basis of an immobilized-cell process for removal of dissolved uranium from contaminated wastewaters. It was characterized with respect to its sorptive active. Living, heat-killed, permeabilized, and unreconstituted lyophilized cells were all capable of binding uranium. The uranium biosorption equilibrium could be described by the Langmuir isotherm. The rate of uranium adsorption increased following permeabilization of the outer and/or cytoplasmic membrane by organic solvents such as acetone. P. aeruginosa CSU biomass was significantly more sorptive toward uranium than certain novel, patented biosorbents derived from algal or fungal biomass sources. P. aeruginosa CSU biomass was also competitive with commercial cation-exchange resins, particularly in the presence of dissolved transition metals. Uranium binding by P. aeruginosa was clearly pH dependent. Uranium loading capacity increased with increasing pH under acidic conditions, presumably as a function of uranium speciation and due to the H{sup +} competition at some binding sites. Nevertheless, preliminary evidence suggests that this microorganism is also capable of binding anionic hexavalent uranium complexes. Ferric iron was a strong inhibitor of uranium binding to P. aeruginosa CSU biomass, and the presence of uranium also decreased the Fe{sup 3+} loading when the biomass was not saturated with Fe{sup 3+}, suggesting that Fe{sup 3+} and uranium may share the same binding sites on biomass.

Faison, B.D.; Hu, M.Z.C.; Norman, J.M.; Reeves, M.E.; Williams, L.; Schmidt-Kuster, W.; Darnell, K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Ogden Environmental Service, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Fault tree analysis of spontaneous combustion of sulphide ores and its risk assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A logic fault tree of mine spontaneous combustion of sulphide ores was built by the fault tree analysis (FTA) based on a lot of mechanism investigation of sulphide ore spontaneous combustion in more than ten m...

Chao Wu

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Uranium Marketing Annual Report -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1. Foreign sales of uranium from U.S. suppliers and owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by origin and delivery year, 2009-13 thousands pounds U3O8...

234

Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a. Uranium purchased by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, 1994-2013 million pounds U3O8 equivalent Delivery year Total purchased Purchased from U.S....

235

Uranium Marketing Annual Report -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9. Contracted purchases of uranium by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, signed in 2013, by delivery year, 2014-23 thousand pounds U3O8 equivalent Year...

236

Challenges dealing with depleted uranium in Germany - Reuse or disposal  

SciTech Connect

During enrichment large amounts of depleted Uranium are produced. In Germany every year 2.800 tons of depleted uranium are generated. In Germany depleted uranium is not classified as radioactive waste but a resource for further enrichment. Therefore since 1996 depleted Uranium is sent to ROSATOM in Russia. However it still has to be dealt with the second generation of depleted Uranium. To evaluate the alternative actions in case a solution has to be found in Germany, several studies have been initiated by the Federal Ministry of the Environment. The work that has been carried out evaluated various possibilities to deal with depleted uranium. The international studies on this field and the situation in Germany have been analyzed. In case no further enrichment is planned the depleted uranium has to be stored. In the enrichment process UF{sub 6} is generated. It is an international consensus that for storage it should be converted to U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. The necessary technique is well established. If the depleted Uranium would have to be characterized as radioactive waste, a final disposal would become necessary. For the planned Konrad repository - a repository for non heat generating radioactive waste - the amount of Uranium is limited by the licensing authority. The existing license would not allow the final disposal of large amounts of depleted Uranium in the Konrad repository. The potential effect on the safety case has not been roughly analyzed. As a result it may be necessary to think about alternatives. Several possibilities for the use of depleted uranium in the industry have been identified. Studies indicate that the properties of Uranium would make it useful in some industrial fields. Nevertheless many practical and legal questions are open. One further option may be the use as shielding e.g. in casks for transport or disposal. Possible techniques for using depleted Uranium as shielding are the use of the metallic Uranium as well as the inclusion in concrete. Another possibility could be the use of depleted uranium for the blending of High enriched Uranium (HEU) or with Plutonium to MOX-elements. (authors)

Moeller, Kai D. [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz - BFS, Postfach 10 01 49, D-38201 Salzgitter (Germany)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Uranium purchases report 1994  

SciTech Connect

US utilities are required to report to the Secretary of Energy annually the country of origin and the seller of any uranium or enriched uranium purchased or imported into the US, as well as the country of origin and seller of any enrichment services purchased by the utility. This report compiles these data and also contains a glossary of terms and additional purchase information covering average price and contract duration. 3 tabs.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Uranium in prehistoric Indian pottery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

present in the sample, and the cross l section of the process (the measure of the probability of a neutron interacting with an uranium atom), In general, a daughter product 235 of U fission is analyzed on a detector which counts either gamma rays... for quantitative analysis of various elements on archaeological artifacts, Manganese has been determined in Mesoamerican pot sherds (Bennyhoff and Heizer 1965). A Pu-Be radioisotope neutron source with a flux of 4 x 10 4 -2 -1 neutrons cm sec was used...

Filberth, Ernest William

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

239

Geology and recognition criteria for sandstone uranium deposits in mixed fluvial-shallow marine sedimentary sequences, South Texas. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Uranium deposits in the South Texas Uranium Region are classical roll-type deposits that formed at the margin of tongues of altered sandstone by the encroachment of oxidizing, uraniferous solutions into reduced aquifers containing pyrite and, in a few cases, carbonaceous plant material. Many of the uranium deposits in South Texas are dissimilar from the roll fronts of the Wyoming basins. The host sands for many of the deposits contain essentially no carbonaceous plant material, only abundant disseminated pyrite. Many of the deposits do not occur at the margin of altered (ferric oxide-bearing) sandstone tongues but rather occur entirely within reduced, pyurite-bearing sandstone. The abundance of pyrite within the sands probably reflects the introduction of H/sub 2/S up along faults from hydrocarbon accumulations at depth. Such introductions before ore formation prepared the sands for roll-front development, whereas post-ore introductions produced re-reduction of portions of the altered tongue, leaving the deposit suspended in reduced sandstone. Evidence from three deposits suggests that ore formation was not accompanied by the introduction of significant amounts of H/sub 2/S.

Adams, S.S.; Smith, R.B.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10. Uranium reserve estimates at the end of 2012 10. Uranium reserve estimates at the end of 2012 million pounds U3O8 Forward Cost2 Uranium Reserve Estimates1 by Mine and Property Status, Mining Method, and State(s) $0 to $30 per pound $0 to $50 per pound $0 to $100 per pound Properties with Exploration Completed, Exploration Continuing, and Only Assessment Work W W 102.0 Properties Under Development for Production W W W Mines in Production W 21.4 W Mines Closed Temporarily and Closed Permanently W W 133.1 In-Situ Leach Mining W W 128.6 Underground and Open Pit Mining W W 175.4 Arizona, New Mexico and Utah 0 W 164.7 Colorado, Nebraska and Texas W W 40.8 Wyoming W W 98.5 Total 51.8 W 304.0 1 Sixteen respondents reported reserve estimates on 71 mines and properties. These uranium reserve estimates cannot be compared with the much larger historical data set of uranium reserves that were published in the July 2010 report U.S. Uranium Reserves Estimates at http://www.eia.gov/cneaf/nuclear/page/reserves/ures.html. Reserves, as reported here, do not necessarily imply compliance with U.S. or Canadian government definitions for purposes of investment disclosure.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium ore processing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Radiological health aspects of uranium milling  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the operation of conventional and unconventional uranium milling processes, the potential for occupational exposure to ionizing radiation at the mill, methods for radiological safety, methods of evaluating occupational radiation exposures, and current government regulations for protecting workers and ensuring that standards for radiation protection are adhered to. In addition, a survey of current radiological health practices is summarized.

Fisher, D.R.; Stoetzel, G.A.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Aseismic design criteria for uranium enrichment plants  

SciTech Connect

In this paper technological, economical, and safety issues of aseismic design of uranium enrichment plants are presented. The role of management in the decision making process surrounding these issues is also discussed. The resolution of the issues and the decisions made by management are controlling factors in developing aseismic design criteria for any facility. Based on past experience in developing aseismic design criteria for the GCEP various recommendations are made for future enrichment facilities, and since uranium enrichment plants are members of the nuclear fuel cycle the discussion and recommendations presented herein are applicable to other nonreactor nuclear facilities.

Beavers, J.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

POMERIGGIO -GREEN WORKSHOP Ore 17:00 La riqualificazione edilizia in chiave green.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

POMERIGGIO - GREEN WORKSHOP Ore 17:00 La riqualificazione edilizia in chiave green. Rifiuti urbani - SPETTACOLO Ore 22:00 Proiezione del docufilm "Green Generation", prodotto da Maiora Film in collaborazione con Rai Cinema. POMERIGGIO - GREEN WORKSHOP Ore 17:00 Mobilit� sostenibile e Smart City. Soluzioni tra

Di Pillo, Gianni

244

Methods of minimizing ground-water contamination from in situ leach uranium mining. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of a research project designed to study methods of minimizing ground-water contamination from in situ leach uranium mining. Fieldwork and laboratory experiments were conducted to identify excursion indicators for monitoring purposes during mining, and to evaluate effective aquifer restoration techniques following mining. Many of the solution constituents were found to be too reactive with the aquifer sediments to reliably indicate excursion of leaching solution from the ore zone; however, in many cases, the concentrations of chloride and sulfate and the total dissolved solids level of the solution were found to be good excursion indicators. Aquifer restoration by ground-water sweeping consumed large quantities of ground water and was not effective for the redox-sensitive contaminants often present in the ore zone. Surface treatment methods such as reverse osmosis and electrodialysis were effective in reducing the amount of water used, but also had the potential for creating conditions in the aquifer under which the redox-sensitive contaminants would be mobile. In situ restoration by chemical reduction, in which a reducing agent is added to the solution recirculated through the ore zone during restoration, can restore the ore-zone sediment as well as the ground water. This method could lead to a stable chemical condition in the aquifer similar to conditions before mining. 41 figures.

Deutsch, W.J.; Martin, W.J.; Eary, L.E.; Serne, R.J.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Method to Remove Uranium/Vanadium Contamination from Groundwater  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing uranium/vanadium-based contaminants from groundwater using a primary in-ground treatment media and a pretreatment media that chemically adjusts the groundwater contaminant to provide for optimum treatment by the primary treatment media.

Metzler, Donald R.; Morrison Stanley

2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

246

Progress in alkaline peroxide dissolution of low-enriched uranium metal and silicide targets  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports recent progress on two alkaline peroxide dissolution processes: the dissolution of low-enriched uranium metal and silicide (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) targets. These processes are being developed to substitute low-enriched for high-enriched uranium in targets used for production of fission-product {sup 99}Mo. Issues that are addressed include (1) dissolution kinetics of silicide targets, (2) {sup 99}Mo lost during aluminum dissolution, (3) modeling of hydrogen peroxide consumption, (4) optimization of the uranium foil dissolution process, and (5) selection of uranium foil barrier materials. Future work associated with these two processes is also briefly discussed.

Chen, L.; Dong, D.; Buchholz, B.A.; Vandegrift, G.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.; Wu, D. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

247

Using flow through reactors to study the non-reductive biomineralization of uranium phosphate minerals.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Uranium contaminations of the subsurface in the vicinity of nuclear materials processing sites pose a health risk as the uranyl ion in its oxidized state,… (more)

Williams, Anna Rachel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Number of uranium mills and plants producing uranium concentrate in the United States" 2. Number of uranium mills and plants producing uranium concentrate in the United States" "Uranium Concentrate Processing Facilities","End of 1996","End of 1997","End of 1998","End of 1999","End of 2000","End of 2001","End of 2002","End of 2003","End of 2004","End of 2005","End of 2006","End of 2007","End of 2008","End of 2009","End of 2010","End of 2011","End of 2012","End of 3rd Quarter 2013" "Mills - conventional milling 1",0,0,0,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,0,1,1,1,0 "Mills - other operations 2",2,3,2,2,2,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,0,1,0,0,0,1 "In-Situ-Leach Plants 3",5,6,6,4,3,3,2,2,3,3,5,5,6,3,4,5,5,5

249

EIS-0126: Remedial Actions at the Former Climax Uranium Company Uranium Mill Site, Grand Junction, Mesa County, Colorado  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy developed this EIS to assess the environmental impacts of remediating the residual radioactive materials left from the inactive uranium processing site and associated properties located in Grand Junction, Colorado.

250

Pressurized chemical-looping combustion of coal with an iron ore-based oxygen carrier  

SciTech Connect

Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a new combustion technology with inherent separation of CO{sub 2}. Most of the previous investigations on CLC of solid fuels were conducted under atmospheric pressure. A pressurized CLC combined cycle (PCLC-CC) system is proposed as a promising coal combustion technology with potential higher system efficiency, higher fuel conversion, and lower cost for CO{sub 2} sequestration. In this study pressurized CLC of coal with Companhia Valedo Rio Doce (CVRD) iron ore was investigated in a laboratory fixed bed reactor. CVRD iron ore particles were exposed alternately to reduction by 0.4 g of Chinese Xuzhou bituminous coal gasified with 87.2% steam/N{sub 2} mixture and oxidation with 5% O{sub 2} in N{sub 2} at 970 C. The operating pressure was varied between 0.1 MPa and 0.6 MPa. First, control experiments of steam coal gasification over quartz sand were performed. H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} are the major components of the gasification products, and the operating pressure influences the gas composition. Higher concentrations of CO{sub 2} and lower fractions of CO, CH{sub 4}, and H{sub 2} during the reduction process with CVRD iron ore was achieved under higher pressures. The effects of pressure on the coal gasification rate in the presence of the oxygen carrier were different for pyrolysis and char gasification. The pressurized condition suppresses the initial coal pyrolysis process while it also enhances coal char gasification and reduction with iron ore in steam, and thus improves the overall reaction rate of CLC. The oxidation rates and variation of oxygen carrier conversion are higher at elevated pressures reflecting higher reduction level in the previous reduction period. Scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) analyses show that particles become porous after experiments but maintain structure and size after several cycles. Agglomeration was not observed in this study. An EDX analysis demonstrates that there is very little coal ash deposited on the oxygen carrier particles but no appreciable crystalline phases change as verified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Overall, the limited pressurized CLC experiments carried out in the present work suggest that PCLC of coal is promising and further investigations are necessary. (author)

Xiao, Rui; Song, Min; Zhang, Shuai; Shen, Laihong [School of Energy and Environment, Southeast University, Sipailou No. 2, Nanjing 210096 (China); Song, Qilei [School of Energy and Environment, Southeast University, Sipailou No. 2, Nanjing 210096 (China); Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3RA (United Kingdom); Lu, Zuoji [School of Energy and Environment, Southeast University, Sipailou No. 2, Nanjing 210096 (China); GCL Engineering Limited, Zhujiang No. 1, Nanjing 210008 (China)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

Controlling uranium reactivity March 18, 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the last decade. Most of their work involves depleted uranium, a more common form of uraniumMarch 2008 Controlling uranium reactivity March 18, 2008 Uranium is an often misunderstood metal uranium research. In reality, uranium presents a wealth of possibilities for funda- mental chemistry. Many

Meyer, Karsten

252

40 CFR Ch. I (7101 Edition)Pt. 61, Subpt. V, Table 2 TABLE 2 TO PART 61, SUBPART V.--SURGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Ore bodies depleted by uranium solution extraction and which remain under- ground do not constitute to owners or operators of facilities li- censed to manage uranium byproduct materials during and following the processing of uranium ores, commonly referred to as uranium mills and their associated tailings. This subpart

253

Influence of uranium hydride oxidation on uranium metal behaviour  

SciTech Connect

This work addresses concerns that the rapid, exothermic oxidation of active uranium hydride in air could stimulate an exothermic reaction (burning) involving any adjacent uranium metal, so as to increase the potential hazard arising from a hydride reaction. The effect of the thermal reaction of active uranium hydride, especially in contact with uranium metal, does not increase in proportion with hydride mass, particularly when considering large quantities of hydride. Whether uranium metal continues to burn in the long term is a function of the uranium metal and its surroundings. The source of the initial heat input to the uranium, if sufficient to cause ignition, is not important. Sustained burning of uranium requires the rate of heat generation to be sufficient to offset the total rate of heat loss so as to maintain an elevated temperature. For dense uranium, this is very difficult to achieve in naturally occurring circumstances. Areas of the uranium surface can lose heat but not generate heat. Heat can be lost by conduction, through contact with other materials, and by convection and radiation, e.g. from areas where the uranium surface is covered with a layer of oxidised material, such as burned-out hydride or from fuel cladding. These rates of heat loss are highly significant in relation to the rate of heat generation by sustained oxidation of uranium in air. Finite volume modelling has been used to examine the behaviour of a magnesium-clad uranium metal fuel element within a bottle surrounded by other un-bottled fuel elements. In the event that the bottle is breached, suddenly, in air, it can be concluded that the bulk uranium metal oxidation reaction will not reach a self-sustaining level and the mass of uranium oxidised will likely to be small in relation to mass of uranium hydride oxidised. (authors)

Patel, N.; Hambley, D. [National Nuclear Laboratory (United Kingdom); Clarke, S.A. [Sellafield Ltd (United Kingdom); Simpson, K.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

SRP Scientific Meeting: Depleted Uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

London, January 2002 The meeting was organised by the SRP to review current research and discuss the use, dispersion into the environment and radiological impact of depleted uranium (DU) by the UK and US in recent military conflicts. Brian Spratt chaired the morning session of the meeting and stressed the need to gauge the actual risks involved in using DU and to balance professional opinions with public mistrust of scientists and government bodies. He asked whether more could be done by the radiation protection profession to improve communication with the media, pressure groups and the public in general. Ron Brown, of the MOD Dstl Radiological Protection Services, gave a thorough overview of the origins and properties of DU, focusing on munitions, in the UK and abroad and public concerns arising from its use in the 1991 Gulf War. He gave a brief overview of past DU munitions studies by the UK and US governments and contrasted this with the lack of hard data used to back up claims made by pressure groups. He compared the known risks of DU with other battlefield risks, e.g. biological agents, chemical attacks and vaccines, and questioned whether peacetime dose limits should apply to soldiers on the battlefield. Barry Smith, of the British Geological Survey, spoke on DU transport, pathways and exposure routes focusing on groundwater as an important example in the Former Yugoslav Republic of Kosovo. He discussed the large amount of work that has already been done on natural uranium in groundwater, with particular emphasis on its mobility within the soil and rock profile being strongly dependent on precipitation and the local geochemical conditions. Therefore, generic risk assessments will not be sufficient in gauging risks to local populations after the introduction of DU into their environment; local geochemical conditions must be taken into account. However, experiments are required to fully appreciate the extent to which DU, particularly DU:Ti alloys used in munitions, disperses into the environment in a variety of soil types. Barry outlined recent computer modelling work investigating the time taken for DU to migrate from a buried munition to a borehole in three different scenarios. The modelling revealed times from 30 years to 5 ? 109 years depending on the local geochemical environment and the depth of the DU penetrator in the soil profile. This suggests the real possibility of borehole contamination within a human lifetime in wet conditions similar to those found in Kosovo. Nick Priest, of Middlesex University, discussed methods of biological monitoring for natural and depleted uranium. The preferred method of detection is by 24 h urine sampling, with measurement of the total mass or isotopic ratios of uranium using mass spectroscopy (ICPMS). This is because uranium is only deposited in new areas of bone growth, a slow process in healthy adults, the remainder is filtered by the kidneys and excreted in urine, giving a non-invasive and rapid sample collection method. Nick also described a rapid assessment technique to look for total uranium and DU in a sample, using a multi-collector ICPMS, specifically looking at the 235U:238U ratio with 236U as a tracer to determine the total mass of uranium present and its source. The MC-ICPMS method was applied in a BBC Scotland funded study of uptakes of uranium in three populations in the Balkans during March 2001. Variable levels of DU were found in each population. The age of the subject was found to influence the excretion of natural uranium and DU to the same degree, increasing age leading to increased excretion. Overall, the levels of DU were extremely small (tens of µg), but DU was found to be present in each population investigated. The MC-ICPMS method is capable of detecting  1% DU in natural uranium and Nick intends to extend the study to include ground and drinking water samples and food in the same populations. Neil Stradling gave a talk on the contribution of the NRPB to the WHO report on DU published in April 2001. It addressed the biokinetics of inhaled uranium

David Kestell

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

In-line assay monitor for uranium hexafluoride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An in-line assay monitor for determining the content of uranium-235 in a uranium hexafluoride gas isotopic separation system is provided which removes the necessity of complete access to the operating parameters of the system for determining the uranium-235 content. The monitor is intended for uses such as safeguard applications to assure that weapons grade uranium is not being produced in an enrichment cascade. The method and monitor for carrying out the method involve cooling of a radiation pervious chamber connected in fluid communication with the selected point in the system to withdraw a specimen and solidify the specimen in the chamber. The specimen is irradiated by means of an ionizing radiation source of energy different from that of the 185 keV gamma emissions from the uranium-235 present in the specimen. Simultaneously, the gamma emissions from the uranium-235 of the specimen and the source emissions transmitted through the sample are counted and stored in a multiple channel analyzer. The uranium-235 content of the specimen is determined from the comparison of the accumulated 185 keV energy counts and the reference energy counts. The latter is used to measure the total uranium isotopic content of the specimen. The process eliminates the necessity of knowing the system operating conditions and yet obtains the necessary data without need for large scintillation crystals and sophisticated mechanical designs.

Wallace, Steven A. (Knoxville, TN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Assessment of the radiological impact of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah  

SciTech Connect

High surface soil concentrations of /sup 226/Ra and high above-ground measurements of gamma-ray intensity in the vicinity of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Mexican Hat show both wind and water erosion of the tailings. The former mill area, occupied by a trade school at the time of this survey, shows a comparatively high level of contamination, probably from unprocessed ore on the surface of the ore storage area near the location of the former mill buildings. However, the estimated health effect of exposure to gamma rays during a 2000-hr work year in the area represents an increase of 0.1% in the risk of death from cancer. Exposure of less than 600 persons within 1.6 km of the tailings to radon daughters results in an estimated 0.2%/year increase in risk of lung cancer.

Haywood, F.F.; Goldsmith, W.A.; Ellis, B.S.; Hubbard, H.M. Jr.; Fox, W.F.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

2013 Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

year, 2009-13 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-858 "Uranium Marketing Annual Survey" (2009-13). Table 19. Foreign purchases of uranium by U.S. suppliers...

258

U. S. forms uranium enrichment corporation  

SciTech Connect

After almost 40 years of operation, the federal government is withdrawing from the uranium enrichment business. On July 1, the Department of Energy turned over to a new government-owned entity--the US Enrichment Corp. (USEC)--both the DOE enrichment plants at Paducah, Ky., and Portsmouth, Ohio, and domestic and international marketing of enriched uranium from them. Pushed by the inability of DOE's enrichment operations to meet foreign competition, Congress established USEC under the National Energy Policy Act of 1992, envisioning the new corporation as the first step to full privatization. With gross revenues of $1.5 billion in fiscal 1992, USEC would rank 275th on the Fortune 500 list of top US companies. USEC will lease from DOE the Paducah and Portsmouth facilities, built in the early 1950s, which use the gaseous diffusion process for uranium enrichment. USEC's stock is held by the US Treasury, to which it will pay annual dividends. Martin Marietta Energy Systems, which has operated Paducah since 1984 and Portsmouth since 1986 for DOE, will continue to operate both plants for USEC. Closing one of the two facilities will be studied, especially in light of a 40% world surplus of capacity over demand. USEC also will consider other nuclear-fuel-related ventures. USEC will produce only low-enriched uranium, not weapons-grade material. Indeed, USEC will implement a contract now being completed under which the US will purchase weapons-grade uranium from dismantled Russian nuclear weapons and convert it into low-enriched uranium for power reactor fuel.

Seltzer, R.

1993-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

259

Corrosion-resistant uranium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to the protecting of uranium and uranium alloy articles from corrosion by providing the surfaces of the articles with a layer of an ion-plated metal selected from aluminum and zinc to a thickness of at least 60 microinches and then converting at least the outer surface of the ion-plated layer of aluminum or zinc to aluminum chromate or zinc chromate. This conversion of the aluminum or zinc to the chromate form considerably enhances the corrosion resistance of the ion plating so as to effectively protect the coated article from corrosion.

Hovis, Jr., Victor M. (Kingston, TN); Pullen, William C. (Knoxville, TN); Kollie, Thomas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bell, Richard T. (Knoxville, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Corrosion-resistant uranium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to the protecting of uranium and uranium alloy articles from corrosion by providing the surfaces of the articles with a layer of an ion-plated metal selected from aluminum and zinc to a thickness of at least 60 microinches and then converting at least the outer surface of the ion-plated layer of aluminum or zinc to aluminum chromate or zinc chromate. This conversion of the aluminum or zinc to the chromate form considerably enhances the corrosion resistance of the ion plating so as to effectively protect the coated article from corrosion.

Hovis, V.M. Jr.; Pullen, W.C.; Kollie, T.G.; Bell, R.T.

1981-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium ore processing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

INITIAL TEST WELL CONDITIONING AT NOPAL I URANIUM DEPOSIT, SIERRA PENA BLANCA, CHIHUAHUA, MEXICO  

SciTech Connect

Three test wells, PB-1, PB-2, and PB-3, were drilled at the Nopal I uranium deposit as part of a natural analogue study to evaluate radionuclide transport processes during March-April 2003. The initial pumping to condition the wells was completed during December 2003. The PB-1 well, drilled immediately adjacent to the Nopal I ore body, was continuously cored to a depth of 250 m, terminating 20 m below the top of the measured water level. The PB-2 and PB-3 wells, which were drilled on opposite sides of PB-1 at a radial distance of approximately 40 to 50 m outside of the remaining projected ore body, were also drilled to about 20 m below the top of the measured water level. Each test well was completed with 4-inch (10.2-cm) diameter PVC casing with a slotted liner below the water table. Initial conditioning of all three wells using a submersible pump at low pump rates [less than 1 gallon (3.8 1) per minute] resulted in measurable draw down and recoveries. The greatest drawdown ({approx}15 m) was observed in PB-2, whereas only minor (<1 m) drawdown occurred in PB-3. For PB-1 and PB-2, the water turbidity decreased as the wells were pumped and the pH values decreased, indicating that the contamination from the drilling fluid was reduced as the wells were conditioned. Test wells PB-1 and PB-2 showed increased inflow after several borehole volumes of fluid were removed, but their inflow rates remained less that the pumping rate. Test well PB-3 showed the smallest drawdown and least change in pH and conductivity during initial pumping and quickest recovery with a rise in measured water level after conditioning. The 195 gallons (750 l) of water pumped from PB-3 during conditioning was discharged through a household sponge. That sponge showed measurable gamma radiation, which decayed to background values in less than 12 hours. Preliminary interpretations include filtration of a radioisotope source with a short half-life or of a radioisotope that volatized as the sponge dried, such as Rn-222 and its short-lived daughters. No filtration was used during the pumping of PB-1 or PB-2.

R.D. Oliver; J.C. Dinsmoor; S.J. Goldstein; I. Reyes; R. De La Garza

2005-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

262

Method of winning aluminum metal from aluminous ore  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aluminous ore such as bauxite containing alumina is blended with coke or other suitable form of carbon and reacted with sulfur gas at an elevated temperature. For handling, the ore and coke can be extruded into conveniently sized pellets. The reaction with sulfur gas produces molten aluminum sulfide which is separated from residual solid reactants and impurities. The aluminum sulfide is further increased in temperature to cause its decomposition or sublimation, yielding aluminum subsulfide liquid (AlS) and sulfur gas that is recycled. The aluminum monosulfide is then cooled to below its disproportionation temperature to again form molten aluminum sulfide and aluminum metal. A liquid-liquid or liquid-solid separation, depending on the separation temperature, provides product aluminum and aluminum sulfide for recycle to the disproportionation step.

Loutfy, Raouf O. (Naperville, IL); Keller, Rudolf (Naperville, IL); Yao, Neng-Ping (Clarendon Hills, IL)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

300 Area Uranium Stabilization Through Polyphosphate Injection: Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the treatability test was to evaluate the efficacy of using polyphosphate injections to treat uranium-contaminated groundwater in situ. A test site consisting of an injection well and 15 monitoring wells was installed in the 300 Area near the process trenches that had previously received uranium-bearing effluents. This report summarizes the work on the polyphosphate injection project, including bench-scale laboratory studies, a field injection test, and the subsequent analysis and interpretation of the results. Previous laboratory tests have demonstrated that when a soluble form of polyphosphate is injected into uranium-bearing saturated porous media, immobilization of uranium occurs due to formation of an insoluble uranyl phosphate, autunite [Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2•nH2O]. These tests were conducted at conditions expected for the aquifer and used Hanford soils and groundwater containing very low concentrations of uranium (10-6 M). Because autunite sequesters uranium in the oxidized form U(VI) rather than forcing reduction to U(IV), the possibility of re-oxidation and subsequent re-mobilization is negated. Extensive testing demonstrated the very low solubility and slow dissolution kinetics of autunite. In addition to autunite, excess phosphorous may result in apatite mineral formation, which provides a long-term source of treatment capacity. Phosphate arrival response data indicate that, under site conditions, the polyphosphate amendment could be effectively distributed over a relatively large lateral extent, with wells located at a radial distance of 23 m (75 ft) reaching from between 40% and 60% of the injection concentration. Given these phosphate transport characteristics, direct treatment of uranium through the formation of uranyl-phosphate mineral phases (i.e., autunite) could likely be effectively implemented at full field scale. However, formation of calcium-phosphate mineral phases using the selected three-phase approach was problematic. Although amendment arrival response data indicate some degree of overlap between the reactive species and thus potential for the formation of calcium-phosphate mineral phases (i.e., apatite formation), the efficiency of this treatment approach was relatively poor. In general, uranium performance monitoring results support the hypothesis that limited long-term treatment capacity (i.e., apatite formation) was established during the injection test. Two separate overarching issues affect the efficacy of apatite remediation for uranium sequestration within the 300 Area: 1) the efficacy of apatite for sequestering uranium under the present geochemical and hydrodynamic conditions, and 2) the formation and emplacement of apatite via polyphosphate technology. In addition, the long-term stability of uranium sequestered via apatite is dependent on the chemical speciation of uranium, surface speciation of apatite, and the mechanism of retention, which is highly susceptible to dynamic geochemical conditions. It was expected that uranium sequestration in the presence of hydroxyapatite would occur by sorption and/or surface complexation until all surface sites have been depleted, but that the high carbonate concentrations in the 300 Area would act to inhibit the transformation of sorbed uranium to chernikovite and/or autunite. Adsorption of uranium by apatite was never considered a viable approach for in situ uranium sequestration in and of itself, because by definition, this is a reversible reaction. The efficacy of uranium sequestration by apatite assumes that the adsorbed uranium would subsequently convert to autunite, or other stable uranium phases. Because this appears to not be the case in the 300 Area aquifer, even in locations near the river, apatite may have limited efficacy for the retention and long-term immobilization of uranium at the 300 Area site..

Vermeul, Vincent R.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Fritz, Brad G.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Mackley, Rob D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Williams, Mark D.

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

264

Accumulation and Distribution of Uranium in Rats after Implantation with Depleted Uranium Fragments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Rats after Implantation with Depleted Uranium Fragments Guoying Zhu 1 * Mingguang...and distribution of uranium in depleted uranium (DU) implanted rats. Materials...of chronic exposure to DU. Depleted uranium|Bone|Kidney|Distribution......

Guoying Zhu; Mingguang Tan; Yulan Li; Xiqiao Xiang; Heping Hu; Shuquan Zhao

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Assessment of radon concentration and external gamma radiation level in the environs of Narwapahar uranium mine, India and its radiological significance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the environs of uranium mining, milling and processing facilities and in the uranium mineralized terrain, a little higher ambient radon concentration and gamma radiation level may be expected in comparison ...

B. K. Rana; R. M. Tripathi; J. S. Meena…

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Porous membrane electrochemical cell for uranium and transuranic recovery from molten salt electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process and device for the recovery of the minor actinides and the transuranic elements (TRU's) from a molten salt electrolyte. The process involves placing the device, an electrically non-conducting barrier between an anode salt and a cathode salt. The porous barrier allows uranium to diffuse between the anode and cathode, yet slows the diffusion of uranium ions so as to cause depletion of uranium ions in the catholyte. This allows for the eventual preferential deposition of transuranics present in spent nuclear fuel such as Np, Pu, Am, Cm. The device also comprises an uranium oxidation anode. The oxidation anode is solid uranium metal in the form of spent nuclear fuel. The spent fuel is placed in a ferric metal anode basket which serves as the electrical lead or contact between the molten electrolyte and the anodic uranium metal.

Willit, James L. (Ratavia, IL)

2007-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

267

Porous membrane electrochemical cell for uranium and transuranic recovery from molten salt electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process and device for the recovery of the minor actinides and the transuranic elements (TRU's) from a molten salt electrolyte. The process involves placing the device, an electrically non-conducting barrier between an anode salt and a cathode salt. The porous barrier allows uranium to diffuse between the anode and cathode, yet slows the diffusion of uranium ions so as to cause depletion of uranium ions in the catholyte. This allows for the eventual preferential deposition of transuranics present in spent nuclear fuel such as Np, Pu, Am, Cm. The device also comprises an uranium oxidation anode. The oxidation anode is solid uranium metal in the form of spent nuclear fuel. The spent fuel is placed in a ferric metal anode basket which serves as the electrical lead or contact between the molten electrolyte and the anodic uranium metal.

Willit, James L. (Batavia, IL)

2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

268

Uranio impoverito: perché? (Depleted uranium: why?)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we develop a simple model of the penetration process of a long rod through an uniform target. Applying the momentum and energy conservation laws, we derive an analytical relation which shows how the penetration depth depends upon the density of the rod, given a fixed kinetic energy. This work was sparked off by the necessity of understanding the effectiveness of high density penetrators (e.g. depleted uranium penetrators) as anti-tank weapons.

Germano D'Abramo

2003-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

269

file://\\\\fs-f1\\shared\\uranium\\uranium.html  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

The initial uranium property reserves estimates were based on bore hole radiometric data validated by chemical analysis of samples from cores and drill cuttings. The...

270

Method for fabricating uranium foils and uranium alloy foils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of producing thin foils of uranium or an alloy. The uranium or alloy is cast as a plate or sheet having a thickness less than about 5 mm and thereafter cold rolled in one or more passes at substantially ambient temperatures until the uranium or alloy thereof is in the shape of a foil having a thickness less than about 1.0 mm. The uranium alloy includes one or more of Zr, Nb, Mo, Cr, Fe, Si, Ni, Cu or Al.

Hofman, Gerard L. (Downers Grove, IL); Meyer, Mitchell K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Knighton, Gaven C. (Moore, ID); Clark, Curtis R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2006-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

271

The conceptual design of an integrated energy efficient ore reduction plant / Albertus André du Toit.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study explores ways to determine the energy efficiency of a pyrometallurgical ore reduction plant and measures to improve it. The feasibility of building a… (more)

Du Toit, Albertus André

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9. Summary production statistics of the U.S. uranium industry, 1993-2012 9. Summary production statistics of the U.S. uranium industry, 1993-2012 Item 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 E2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Exploration and Development Surface Drilling (million feet) 1.1 0.7 1.3 3.0 4.9 4.6 2.5 1.0 0.7 W W 1.2 1.7 2.7 5.1 5.1 3.7 4.9 6.3 7.2 Drilling Expenditures (million dollars)1 5.7 1.1 2.6 7.2 20.0 18.1 7.9 5.6 2.7 W W 10.6 18.1 40.1 67.5 81.9 35.4 44.6 53.6 66.6 Mine Production of Uranium (million pounds U3O8) 2.1 2.5 3.5 4.7 4.7 4.8 4.5 3.1 2.6 2.4 2.2 2.5 3.0 4.7 4.5 3.9 4.1 4.2 4.1 4.3 Uranium Concentrate Production (million pounds U3O8) 3.1 3.4 6.0 6.3 5.6 4.7 4.6 4.0 2.6 2.3 2.0 2.3 2.7 4.1 4.5 3.9 3.7 4.2 4.0 4.1

273

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Colonial Uranium Co - CO 10  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Colonial Uranium Co - CO 10 Colonial Uranium Co - CO 10 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Colonial Uranium Co. (CO.10 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Grand Junction , Colorado CO.10-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CO.10-2 Site Operations: Processed thorium concentrates for commercial market at another site. AEC purchased small quantity (100 lbs) for testing. CO.10-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - Commercial operation CO.10-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Thorium CO.10-1 Radiological Survey(s): No Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to Colonial Uranium Co. CO.10-1 - AEC Memorandum; Faulkner to Sapirie; Subject: Testing of

274

Assessment of exposure to depleted uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......ingestion of natural uranium in food and drink, and...for the measurement of uranium in urine samples, DU...respect to potential health hazards can be detected...Assessment of exposure to depleted uranium. | In most circumstances......

P. Roth; V. Höllriegl; E. Werner; P. Schramel

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Assessment of exposure to depleted uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Article Assessment of exposure to depleted uranium P. Roth V. Hollriegl E. Werner...for determining the amount of depleted uranium (DU) incorporated. The problems...Assessment of exposure to depleted uranium. | In most circumstances......

P. Roth; V. Höllriegl; E. Werner; P. Schramel

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Modeling the role of bacteria in leaching of low-grade ores  

SciTech Connect

A robustious structural model is developed to describe the role of bacteria in the leaching process of low-grade ores under conditions controlled by intraparticle diffusion. The main impetus behind developing this model is to provide an insight into such systems, together with a suitable framework for interpreting experimental data. The model is derived in detail with respect to reaction chemistry and the role of bacteria in catalyzing these reactions, specifically the synergism of chemistry, physics and biology in determining the overall behavior of the system. The model is used to simulate the atmospheric oxidation of iron disulfide contained in porous solids in the presence of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans (T. ferrooxidans). The experimental data are predicted well by the model, which demonstrates its applicability and supports the view that the rate of intraparticle diffusion is the controlling mechanism for this system.

Batarseh, K.I.; Stiller, A.H. (West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

2013 Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

accounted for 32%. The remaining 16% originated from Brazil, China, Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Malawi, Namibia, Niger, Portugal, and South Africa. COOs purchased uranium...

278

U.S.Uranium Reserves  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

conditions. The uranium property reserves estimates were based on bore hole radiometric data validated by chemical analysis of samples from cores and drill cuttings. The...

279

2013 Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Note: Totals may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-858 "Uranium Marketing Annual Survey" (2013)....

280

2013 Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industry Annual, Tables 10, 11 and 16. 2003-2013-Form EIA-858, "Uranium Marketing Annual Survey". million pounds U 3 O 8 equivalent 1 Includes purchases between...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium ore processing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Marathon/Vitro to seek uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Marathon/Vitro to seek uranium ... Last week, Marathon Oil agreed with Vitro Corp. of America to explore jointly for uranium in North America. ...

1967-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

282

Final Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for DOE's Uranium Leasing Program, under which DOE administers tracts of land in western Colorado for exploration, development, and the extraction of uranium and vanadium...

283

FIFTH INTERIM STATUS REPORT: MODEL 9975 PCV O-RING FIXTURE LONG-TERM LEAK PERFORMANCE  

SciTech Connect

A series of experiments to monitor the aging performance of Viton{reg_sign} GLT O-rings used in the Model 9975 package has been ongoing for six years at the Savannah River National Laboratory. Sixty-seven mock-ups of 9975 Primary Containment Vessels (PCVs) were assembled and heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 450 F. They were leak-tested initially and have been tested at nominal six month intervals to determine if they meet the criterion of leaktightness defined in ANSI standard N14.5-97. Fourteen additional tests were initiated in 2008 with GLT-S O-rings heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 400 F. High temperature aging continues for 36 GLT O-ring fixtures at 200-350 F. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in 6 of the GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 300 and 350 F, and in all 3 of the GLT O-ring fixtures aging at higher temperatures. No failures have yet been observed in GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 200 F for 30-48 months, which is still bounding to O-ring temperatures during storage in KAMS. High temperature aging continues for 6 GLT-S O-ring fixtures at 200-300 F. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in all 8 of the GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 350 and 400 F. No failures have yet been observed in GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 200 or 300 F for 19 months. For O-ring fixtures that have failed the room temperature leak test and been disassembled, the Orings displayed a compression set ranging from 51-95%. This is significantly greater than seen to date for packages inspected during KAMS field surveillance (23% average). For GLT O-rings, service life based on the room temperature leak rate criterion is comparable to that predicted by compression stress relaxation (CSR) data at higher temperatures (350-400 F). While there are no comparable failure data yet at aging temperatures below 300 F, extrapolations of the data for GLT O-rings suggests the CSR model predictions provide a conservative prediction of service life relative to the leak rate criterion. Failure data at lower temperatures are needed to verify this apparent trend. Insufficient failure data exist currently to perform a similar comparison for GLT-S O-rings. Aging and periodic leak testing will continue for the remaining fixtures.

Daugherty, W.; Hoffman, E.

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

284

FIFTH INTERIM STATUS REPORT: MODEL 9975 PCV O-RING FIXTURE LONG-TERM LEAK PERFORMANCE  

SciTech Connect

A series of experiments to monitor the aging performance of Viton{sup reg.} GLT O-rings used in the Model 9975 package has been ongoing for six years at the Savannah River National Laboratory. Sixty-seven mock-ups of 9975 Primary Containment Vessels (PCVs) were assembled and heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 450 F. They were leak-tested initially and have been tested at nominal six month intervals to determine if they meet the criterion of leaktightness defined in ANSI standard N14.5-97. Fourteen additional tests were initiated in 2008 with GLT-S O-rings heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 400 F. High temperature aging continues for 36 GLT O-ring fixtures at 200--350 F. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in 5 of the GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 300 and 350 F, and in all 3 of the GLT O-ring fixtures aging at higher temperatures. No failures have yet been observed in GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 200 F for 30--48 months, which is still bounding to O-ring temperatures during storage in KAMS. High temperature aging continues for 6 GLT-S O-ring fixtures at 200--300 F. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in all 8 of the GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 350 and 400 F. No failures have yet been observed in GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 200 or 300 F for 19 months. For O-ring fixtures that have failed the room temperature leak test and been disassembled, the O-rings displayed a compression set ranging from 51--95%. This is significantly greater than seen to date for packages inspected during KAMS field surveillance (23% average). For GLT O-rings, service life based on the room temperature leak rate criterion is comparable to that predicted by compression stress relaxation (CSR) data at higher temperatures (350--400 F). While there are no comparable failure data yet at aging temperatures below 300 F, extrapolations of the data for GLT O-rings suggests that CSR model predictions provide a conservative prediction of service life relative to the leak rate criterion. Failure data at lower temperatures is needed to verify this apparent trend. Insufficient failure data exist currently to perform a similar comparison for GLT-S O-rings. Aging and periodic leak testing will continue for the remaining fixtures.

Daugherty, W.; Hoffman, E.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Radon releases from Australian uranium mining and milling projects: assessing the UNSCEAR approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The release of radon gas and progeny from the mining and milling of uranium-bearing ores has long been recognised as a potential radiological health hazard. The standards for exposure to radon and progeny have decreased over time as the understanding of their health risk has improved. In recent years there has been debate on the long-term releases (10,000 years) of radon from uranium mining and milling sites, focusing on abandoned, operational and rehabilitated sites. The primary purpose has been estimates of the radiation exposure of both local and global populations. Although there has been an increasing number of radon release studies over recent years in the USA, Australia, Canada and elsewhere, a systematic evaluation of this work has yet to be published in the international literature. This paper presents a detailed compilation and analysis of Australian studies. In order to quantify radon sources, a review of data on uranium mining and milling wastes in Australia, as they influence radon releases, is presented. An extensive compilation of the available radon release data is then assembled for the various projects, including a comparison to predictions of radon behaviour where available. An analysis of cumulative radon releases is then developed and compared to the UNSCEAR approach. The implications for the various assessments of long-term releases of radon are discussed, including aspects such as the need for ongoing monitoring of rehabilitation at uranium mining and milling sites and life-cycle accounting.

Gavin M. Mudd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Assessment of Preferred Depleted Uranium Disposal Forms  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of converting about 700,000 metric tons (MT) of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) containing 475,000 MT of depleted uranium (DU) to a stable form more suitable for long-term storage or disposal. Potential conversion forms include the tetrafluoride (DUF4), oxide (DUO2 or DU3O8), or metal. If worthwhile beneficial uses cannot be found for the DU product form, it will be sent to an appropriate site for disposal. The DU products are considered to be low-level waste (LLW) under both DOE orders and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. The objective of this study was to assess the acceptability of the potential DU conversion products at potential LLW disposal sites to provide a basis for DOE decisions on the preferred DU product form and a path forward that will ensure reliable and efficient disposal.

Croff, A.G.; Hightower, J.R.; Lee, D.W.; Michaels, G.E.; Ranek, N.L.; Trabalka, J.R.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Uranium in the Near-shore Aquatic Food Chain: Studies on Periphyton and Asian Clams  

SciTech Connect

The benthic aquatic organisms in the near-shore environment of the Columbia River are the first biological receptors that can be exposed to groundwater contaminants coming from the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. The primary contaminant of concern in the former nuclear fuels processing area at the Site, known as the 300 Area, is uranium. Currently, there are no national clean up criteria for uranium and ecological receptors. This report summarizes efforts to characterize biological uptake of uranium in the food chain of the benthic aquatic organisms and provide information to be used in future assessments of uranium and the ecosystem.

Bunn, Amoret L.; Miley, Terri B.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Brandt, Charles A.; Napier, Bruce A.

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

288

Determination of Uranium Metal Concentration in Irradiated Fuel Storage Basin Sludge Using Selective Dissolution  

SciTech Connect

Uranium metal corroding in water-saturated sludges now held in the US Department of Energy Hanford Site K West irradiated fuel storage basin can create hazardous hydrogen atmospheres during handling, immobilization, or subsequent transport and storage. Knowledge of uranium metal concentration in sludge thus is essential to safe sludge management and process design, requiring an expeditious routine analytical method to detect uranium metal concentrations as low as 0.03 wt% in sludge even in the presence of 30 wt% or higher total uranium concentrations.

Delegard, Calvin H.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Chenault, Jeffrey W.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Welsh, Terri L.; Pool, Karl N.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Effect of twinning on texture evolution of depleted uranium using a viscoplastic self-consistent model  

SciTech Connect

Ductility and fracture toughness is a major stumbling block in using depleted uranium as a structural material. The ability to correctly model deformation of uranium can be used to create process path methods to improve its structural design ability. The textural evolution of depleted uranium was simulated using a visco-plastic self consistent model and analyzed by comparing pole figures of the simulations and experimental samples. Depleted uranium has the same structure as alpha uranium, which is an orthorhombic phase of uranium. Both deformation slip and twin systems were compared. The VPSC model was chosen to simulate this material because the model encompasses both low-symmetry materials as well as twinning in materials. This is of particular interest since depleted uranium has a high propensity for twinning, which dominates deformation and texture evolution. Simulated results were compared to experimental results to measure the validity of the model. One specific twin system, the {l_brace}176{r_brace}[512] twin, was of specific notice. The VPSC model was used to simulate the influence of this twin on depleted uranium and was compared with a mechanically shocked depleted uranium sample. Under high strain rate shock deformation conditions, the {l_brace}176{r_brace}[512] twin system appears to be a dominant deformation system. By simulating a compression process using the VPSC model with the {l_brace}176{r_brace}[512] twin as the dominant deformation mode, a favorable comparison could be made between the experimental and simulated textures. (authors)

Ho, J.; Garmestani, H. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0245 (United States); Burrell, R.; Belvin, A. [Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Li, D. [Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); McDowell, D. [Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Atlanta, GA 30332-0245 (United States); Rollett, A. [Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Convergence of a MFEFV method for two phase flow with applications to heap leaching of copper ores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Convergence of a MFE­FV method for two phase flow with applications to heap leaching of copper ores in porous media, with applications to heap leaching of copper ores. These approximations are based on mixed

Sepúlveda, Mauricio

291

Butyl rubber O-ring seals: Revision of test procedures for stockpile materials  

SciTech Connect

Extensive testing showed little correlation between test slab and O-ring performance. New procedures, comparable to those used with the traditional test slabs, were defined for hardness, compression set, and tensile property testing on sacrificial O-ring specimens. Changes in target performance values were made as needed and were, in one case, tightened to reflect the O-ring performance data. An additional study was carried out on O-ring and slab performance vs cure cycle and showed little sensitivity of material performance to large changes in curing time. Aging and spectra of certain materials indicated that two sets of test slabs from current vendor were accidently made from EPDM rather than butyl rubber. Random testing found no O-rings made from EPDM. As a result, and additional spectroscope test will be added to the product acceptance procedures to verify the type of rubber compound used.

Domeier, L.A.; Wagter, K.R.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

5.0 POTENTIAL ECOLOGICAL IMPACTS FROM URANIUM MINES This document has focused on the potential risks to humans from exposures to unreclaimed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5.0 POTENTIAL ECOLOGICAL IMPACTS FROM URANIUM MINES This document has focused on the potential risks to humans from exposures to unreclaimed uranium mining materials. The potential effects in the consideration of unreclaimed uranium mines. Although the Superfund characterization process includes

293

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. U.S. uranium mine production and number of mines and sources, 2003-2012 2. U.S. uranium mine production and number of mines and sources, 2003-2012 Production / Mining Method 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Underground (estimated contained thousand pounds U3O8) W W W W W W W W W W Open Pit (estimated contained thousand pounds U3O8) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 In-Situ Leaching (thousand pounds U3O8) W W 2,681 4,259 W W W W W W Other1 (thousand pounds U3O8) W W W W W W W W W W Total Mine Production (thousand pounds U3O8) E2,200 2,452 3,045 4,692 4,541 3,879 4,145 4,237 4,114 4,335 Number of Operating Mines Underground 1 2 4 5 6 10 14 4 5 6 Open Pit 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 In-Situ Leaching 2 3 4 5 5 6 4 4 5 5 Other Sources1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1

294

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5. U.S. uranium in-situ-leach plants by owner, location, capacity, and operating status at end of the year, 2008-2012 5. U.S. uranium in-situ-leach plants by owner, location, capacity, and operating status at end of the year, 2008-2012 In-Situ-Leach Plant Owner In-Situ-Leach Plant Name County, State (existing and planned locations) Production Capacity (pounds U3O8 per year) Operating Status at End of the Year 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Cameco Crow Butte Operation Dawes, Nebraska 1,000,000 Operating Operating Operating Operating Operating Hydro Resources, Inc. Crownpoint McKinley, New Mexico 1,000,000 Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Hydro Resources,Inc. Church Rock McKinley, New Mexico 1,000,000 Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed

295

Uranyl Protoporphyrin: a New Uranium Complex  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...received 3 times the LD50 of uranium as uranyl protoporphyrin...nitrate, had showed livers depleted of glycogen and kidneys...destruc-tion typical of uranium poisoning. The uranium-damaged...T. Godwin et al., Cancer 8, 601 (1954). 5...excretion of hexavalent uranium in man," in Proc...

ROBERT E. BASES

1957-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

296

Uranium: Environmental Pollution and Health Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Uranium is found ubiquitously in nature in low concentrations in soil, rock, and water. Naturally occurring uranium contains three isotopes, namely 238U, 235U, and 234U. All uranium isotopes have the same chemical properties, but they have different radiological properties. The main civilian use of uranium is to fuel nuclear power plants, whereas high enriched (in 235U) uranium is used in the military sector as nuclear explosives and depleted uranium (DU) as penetrators or tank shielding. Exposure to uranium may cause health problems due to its radiological (uranium is predominantly emitting alpha-particles) and chemical actions (heavy metal toxicity). Uranium uptake may occur by ingestion, inhalation, contaminated wounds, and embedded fragments especially for soldiers. Inhalation of dust is considered the major pathway for uranium uptake in workplaces. Soluble uranium compounds tend to quickly pass through the body, whereas insoluble uranium compounds pose a more serious inhalation exposure hazard. The kidney is the most sensitive organ for uranium chemotoxicity. An important indirect radiological effect of uranium is the increased risk of lung cancers from inhalation of the daughter products of radon, a noble gas in the uranium decay chains that transports uranium-derived radioactivity from soil into the indoor environment. No direct evidence about the carcinogenic effect of DU in humans is available yet.

D. Melo; W. Burkart

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Uncertainty clouds uranium enrichment corporation's plans  

SciTech Connect

An expected windfall to the US Treasury from the sale of the Energy Dept.'s commercial fuel enrichment facilities may evaporate in the next few weeks when the Clinton administration submits its fiscal 1994 budget proposal to Congress, according to congressional and administration officials. Under the Energy Policy Act of 1992, DOE is required to lease two uranium enrichment facilities, Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, KY., to the government-owned US Enrichment Corp. (USEC) by July 1. Estimates by OMB and Treasury indicate a potential yearly payoff of $300 million from the government-owned company's sale of fuel for commercial reactors. Those two facilities use a process of gaseous diffusion to enrich uranium to about 3 percent for use as fuel in commercial power plants. DOE has contracts through at least 1996 to provide about 12 million separative work units (SWUs) yearly to US utilities and others world-wide. But under an agreement signed between the US and Russia last August, at least 10 metric tons, or 1.5 million SWUs, of low-enriched uranium (LEU) blended down from Russia warheads is expected to be delivered to the US starting in 1994. It could be sold at $50 to $60 per SWU, far below what DOE currently charges for its SWUs - $135 per SWU for 70 percent of the contract price and $90 per SWU for the remaining 30 percent.

Lane, E.

1993-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

298

Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings  

SciTech Connect

The Grand Junction site has been reevaluated in order to revise the October 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Grand Junction, Colorado. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 1.9 million tons of tailings at the Grand Junction site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. The eight alternative actions presented herein range from millsite and off-site decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option I), to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site (Options II through VIII). Cost estimates for the eight options range from about $10,200,000 for stabilization in-place to about $39,500,000 for disposal in the DeBeque area, at a distance of about 35 mi, using transportation by rail. If transportation to DeBeque were by truck, the cost estimated to be about $41,900,000. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Grand Junction tailings were examined: (a) heap leaching; (b) treatment at an existing mill; and (c) reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $200/lb by heap leach and $150/lb by conventional plant processes. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery appears not to be economically attractive.

Not Available

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

The End of Cheap Uranium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historic data from many countries demonstrate that on average no more than 50-70% of the uranium in a deposit could be mined. An analysis of more recent data from Canada and Australia leads to a mining model with an average deposit extraction lifetime of 10+- 2 years. This simple model provides an accurate description of the extractable amount of uranium for the recent mining operations. Using this model for all larger existing and planned uranium mines up to 2030, a global uranium mining peak of at most 58 +- 4 ktons around the year 2015 is obtained. Thereafter we predict that uranium mine production will decline to at most 54 +- 5 ktons by 2025 and, with the decline steepening, to at most 41 +- 5 ktons around 2030. This amount will not be sufficient to fuel the existing and planned nuclear power plants during the next 10-20 years. In fact, we find that it will be difficult to avoid supply shortages even under a slow 1%/year worldwide nuclear energy phase-out scenario up to 2025. We thus suggest that a worldwide nuclear energy phase-out is in order. If such a slow global phase-out is not voluntarily effected, the end of the present cheap uranium supply situation will be unavoidable. The result will be that some countries will simply be unable to afford sufficient uranium fuel at that point, which implies involuntary and perhaps chaotic nuclear phase-outs in those countries involving brownouts, blackouts, and worse.

Michael Dittmar

2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

300

Uranium Processing Facility Team Signs Partnering Agreement ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

management. CNS assumed responsibility as the management and operating contractor for the Pantex Plant, located near Amarillo, Texas, and the Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium ore processing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Uranium Processing Facility team signs partnering agreement ...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

2013 (18) August 2013 (17) July 2013 (20) June 2013 (19) May 2013 (25) April 2013 (17) March 2013 (23) February 2013 (22) January 2013 (21) December 2012 (19) November 2012 (19)...

302

US developments in technology for uranium enrichment  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to review recent progress and the status of the work in the United States on that part of the fuel cycle concerned with uranium enrichment. The United States has one enrichment process, gaseous diffusion, which has been continuously operated in large-scale production for the past 37 years; another process, gas centrifugation, which is now in the construction phase; and three new processes, molecular laser isotope separation, atomic vapor laser isotope separation, plasma separation process, in which the US has also invested sizable research and development efforts over the last few years. The emphasis in this paper is on the technical aspects of the various processes, but the important economic factors which will define the technological mix which may be applied in the next two decades are also discussed.

Wilcox, W.J. Jr.; McGill, R.M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Fernald vacuum transfer system for uranium materials repackaging  

SciTech Connect

The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) is the site of a former Department of Energy (DOE) uranium processing plant. When production was halted, many materials were left in an intermediate state. Some of this product material included enriched uranium compounds that had to be repackaged for shipment of off-site storage. This paper provides an overview, technical description, and status of a new application of existing technology, a vacuum transfer system, to repackage the uranium bearing compounds for shipment. The vacuum transfer system provides a method of transferring compounds from their current storage configuration into packages that meet the Department of Transportation (DOT) shipping requirements for fissile materials. This is a necessary activity, supporting removal of nuclear materials prior to site decontamination and decommissioning, key to the Fernald site's closure process.

Kaushiva, Shirley; Weekley, Clint; Molecke, Martin; Polansky, Gary

2002-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

304

Safe Operating Procedure SAFETY PROTOCOL: URANIUM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

involve the use of natural or depleted uranium. Natural isotopes of uranium are U-238, U-235 and U-234 (see Table 1 for natural abundances). Depleted uranium contains less of the isotopes: U-235 and U-234. The specific activity of depleted uranium (5.0E-7 Ci/g) is less than that of natural uranium (7.1E-7 Ci

Farritor, Shane

305

A review of uranium economics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The recent increase in the demand for power for commercial use, the challenges facing fossil fuel use and the prospective of cheap nuclear power motivate different countries to plan for the use of nuclear power. This paper reviews many aspects of uranium economics, which includes the advantages and disadvantages of nuclear power, comparisons with other sources of power, nuclear power production and requirements, the uranium market, uranium pricing, spot price and long-term price indicators, and the cost of building a nuclear power facility.

A.K. Mazher

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Uranium Mining Life-Cycle Energy Cost vs. Uranium Resources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The long-term viability of nuclear energy systems depends on the availability of uranium and on the question, whether the overall energy balance of the fuel cycle is positive, taking into account the full life-cy...

W. Eberhard Falck

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Accumulation and Distribution of Uranium in Rats after Implantation with Depleted Uranium Fragments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Environmental and health consequences of depleted uranium use in the 1991 Gulf...Properties, use and health effects of depleted uranium (DU): a general...J. (2002). Health effects of embedded depleted uranium. Mil Med. 167......

Guoying Zhu; Mingguang Tan; Yulan Li; Xiqiao Xiang; Heping Hu; Shuquan Zhao

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Uranium-loaded apoferritin with antibodies attached: molecular design for uranium neutron-capture therapy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Molecular design for uranium neutron-capture therapy (cancer/immunotherapy...methodology for cancer therapy. Boron...system using uranium, as described...800 to =400 uranium atoms per apoferritin...uranyl ions were depleted, and loading...

J F Hainfeld

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Characterization of uranium isotopic abundances in depleted uranium metal assay standard 115  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Certified reference material (CRM) 115, Uranium (Depleted) Metal (Uranium Assay Standard), was analyzed using a ... TRITON Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer to characterize the uranium isotope-amount ratios. T...

K. J. Mathew; G. L. Singleton; R. M. Essex…

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for for DUF 6 Conversion Project Environmental Impact Statement Scoping Meetings November/December 2001 Overview Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF 6 ) Management Program DUF 6 EIS Scoping Briefing 2 DUF 6 Management Program Organizational Chart DUF 6 Management Program Organizational Chart EM-10 Policy EM-40 Project Completion EM-20 Integration EM-50 Science and Technology EM-31 Ohio DUF6 Management Program EM-32 Oak Ridge EM-33 Rocky Flats EM-34 Small Sites EM-30 Office of Site Closure Office of Environmental Management EM-1 DUF 6 EIS Scoping Briefing 3 DUF 6 Management Program DUF 6 Management Program * Mission: Safely and efficiently manage the DOE inventory of DUF 6 in a way that protects the health and safety of workers and the public, and protects the environment DUF 6 EIS Scoping Briefing 4 DUF 6 Inventory Distribution

311

Disposition of uranium-233  

SciTech Connect

The US is developing a strategy for the disposition of surplus weapons-usable uranium-233 ({sup 233}U). The strategy (1) identifies the requirements for the disposition of surplus {sup 233}U; (2) identifies potential disposition options, including key issues to be resolved with each option; and (3) defines a road map that identifies future key decisions and actions. The disposition of weapons-usable fissile materials is part of a US international arms-control program for reduction of the number of nuclear weapons and the quantities of nuclear-weapons-usable materials worldwide. The disposition options ultimately lead to waste forms requiring some type of geological disposal. Major options are described herein.

Tousley, D.R. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Fissile Materials Disposition; Forsberg, C.W.; Krichinsky, A.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1997-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

312

Uranium Pyrophoricity Phenomena and Prediction (FAI/00-39)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a topical reference on the phenomena and prediction of uranium pyrophoricity for the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project with specific applications to SNF Project processes and situations. Spent metallic uranium nuclear fuel is currently stored underwater at the K basins in the Hanford 100 area, and planned processing steps include: (1) At the basins, cleaning and placing fuel elements and scrap into stainless steel multi-canister overpacks (MCOs) holding about 6 MT of fuel apiece; (2) At nearby cold vacuum drying (CVD) stations, draining, vacuum drying, and mechanically sealing the MCOs; (3) Shipping the MCOs to the Canister Storage Building (CSB) on the 200 Area plateau; and (4) Welding shut and placing the MCOs for interim (40 year) dry storage in closed CSB storage tubes cooled by natural air circulation through the surrounding vault. Damaged fuel elements have exposed and corroded fuel surfaces, which can exothermically react with water vapor and oxygen during normal process steps and in off-normal situations, A key process safety concern is the rate of reaction of damaged fuel and the potential for self-sustaining or runaway reactions, also known as uranium fires or fuel ignition. Uranium metal and one of its corrosion products, uranium hydride, are potentially pyrophoric materials. Dangers of pyrophoricity of uranium and its hydride have long been known in the U.S. Department of Energy (Atomic Energy Commission/DOE) complex and will be discussed more below; it is sufficient here to note that there are numerous documented instances of uranium fires during normal operations. The motivation for this work is to place the safety of the present process in proper perspective given past operational experience. Steps in development of such a perspective are: (1) Description of underlying physical causes for runaway reactions, (2) Modeling physical processes to explain runaway reactions, (3) Validation of the method against experimental data, (4) Application of the method to plausibly explain operational experience, and (5) Application of the method to present process steps to demonstrate process safety and margin. Essentially, the logic above is used to demonstrate that runaway reactions cannot occur during normal SNF Project process steps, and to illustrate the depth of the technical basis for such a conclusion. Some off-normal conditions are identified here that could potentially lead to runaway reactions. However, this document is not intended to provide an exhaustive analysis of such cases. In summary, this report provides a ''toolkit'' of models and approaches for analysis of pyrophoricity safety issues at Hanford, and the technical basis for the recommended approaches. A summary of recommended methods appears in Section 9.0.

PLYS, M.G.

2000-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

313

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Domestic Uranium Production Report June 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. U.S. Energy Information Administration | 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report ii Contacts This report was prepared by the staff of the Renewables and Uranium Statistics Team, Office of Electricity,

314

2012 Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Uranium Marketing Annual Uranium Marketing Annual Report May 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 May 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | 2012 Uranium Marketing Annual Report i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. May 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | 2012 Uranium Marketing Annual Report ii

315

Uranium Enrichment's $7-Billion Uncertainty  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...229 : 1407 ( 1985 ). Uranium...claims John R. Longenecker, who heads...because it be-John Longenecker '"ou have...based on gas centrifuges Finally...research on the centrifuge technology...21 June 1985, p. 1407...

COLIN NORMAN

1986-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

316

2013 Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industry Annual, Tables 28, 29, 30 and 31. 2003-13-Form EIA-858, "Uranium Marketing Annual Survey". Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components because of independent...

317

2013 Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industry Annual, Tables 10, 11 and 16. 2003-13-Form EIA-858, "Uranium Marketing Annual Survey". dollars per pound U 3 O 8 equivalent dollars per pound U 3 O 8...

318

2013 Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industry Annual, Tables 28, 29, 30 and 31. 2003-13-Form EIA-858, "Uranium Marketing Annual Survey". million pounds U 3 O 8 equivalent million pounds U 3 O 8 equivalent...

319

2013 Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industry Annual, Tables 22, 23, 25, and 27. 2003-13-Form EIA-858, "Uranium Marketing Annual Survey". - No data reported. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 1994 1995 1996 1997...

320

2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. U.S. uranium concentrate production, shipments, and sales, 2003-13" "Activity at U.S. Mills and In-Situ-Leach Plants",2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium ore processing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Paired Straight Hearth Furnace-Transformational Ironmaking Process  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

based on the Paired Straight Hearth Furnace (PSH) for iron ore reduction y PSH is a coal and natural gas coke-free process most suitable for American fine concentrates y PSH...

322

Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as oxide. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will have two missions: (1) convert HEU materials into pure HEU oxide and (2) blend the pure HEU oxide with depleted and natural uranium oxide to produce an LWR grade LEU product. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. To the extent practical, the chemical and isotopic concentrations of blended LEU product will be held within the specifications required for LWR fuel. Such blended LEU product will be offered to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) to be sold as feed material to the commercial nuclear industry. Otherwise, blended LEU will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

NONE

1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

323

Geographical Coincidence of High Heat Flow, High Seismicity, and Upwelling, with Hydrocarbon Deposits, Phosphorites, Evaporites, and Uranium Ores  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sea and seismicity and geothermal heat flux. We suggest...upwelling caused by the geothermal heat (2), which brings...sedimentary rocks. High geothermal heat fluxes correlate...Lawrence River, as well as a fourth line along...Arizona, Montana, New Mexico, and Utah. Lignites...

L. M. Libby; W. F. Libby

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Field Projects: Cañon City, Colorado  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In June 2000, Cotter Corporation installed a PRB at its uranium ore processing millsite in Cañon City, Colorado. The PRB contains zero-valent iron (ZVI) that treated molybdenum and uranium...

325

Inositol hexaphosphate: a potential chelating agent for uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......and staining pigments. Depleted uranium, a by-product of uranium...177-193. 2 World Health Organization (WHO). Uranium in drinking-water...the lethal effect of oral uranium poisoning. Health Phys. (2000) 78(6......

D. Cebrian; A. Tapia; A. Real; M. A. Morcillo

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Total production of uranium concentrate in the United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. Number of uranium mills and plants producing uranium concentrate in the United States 2. Number of uranium mills and plants producing uranium concentrate in the United States Uranium Concentrate Processing Facilities End of 1996 End of 1997 End of 1998 End of 1999 End of 2000 End of 2001 End of 2002 End of 2003 End of 2004 End of 2005 End of 2006 End of 2007 End of 2008 End of 2009 End of 2010 End of 2011 End of 2012 End of 3rd Quarter 2013 Mills - conventional milling1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 Mills - other operators2 2 3 2 2 2 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 In-Situ-Leach Plants3 5 6 6 4 3 3 2 2 3 3 5 5 6 3 4 5 5 5 Byproduct Recovery Plants4 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total 9 11 9 7 6 4 3 2 3 4 6 6 7 4 5 6 6 6

327

Separation of uranium from technetium in recovery of spent nuclear fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for decontaminating uranium product from the Purex 5 process comprises addition of hydrazine to the product uranyl nitrate stream from the Purex process, which contains hexavalent (UO/sub 2//sup 2 +/) uranium and heptavalent technetium (TcO/sub 4/-). Technetium in the product stream is reduced and then complexed by the addition of oxalic acid (H/sub 2/C/sub 2/O/sub 4/), and the Tc-oxalate complex is readily separated from the 10 uranium by solvent extraction with 30 vol % tributyl phosphate in n-dodecane.

Friedman, H.A.

1984-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

328

Fluorination of a depleted uranium-plutonium-nitride fuel with elemental fluorine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A physical and a mathematical model have been developed to describe the physicochemical process of torch fluorination of an uranium-plutonium-nitride fuel. An algorithm for calculating the velocity, temperatur...

V. A. Karelin; V. N. Brendakov; M. V. Popadeikin

329

Monitoring and remediation of the legacy sites of uranium mining in Central Asia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results are presented of an IAEA Regional Project dealing with the present state and challenges of remediation of the uranium mining and processing legacy sites in Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan and Ka...

Alex Jakubick; Mykola Kurylchyk; Oleg Voitsekhovich…

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Micro-Scale Heterogeneity in Biogeochemical Uranium Cycling  

SciTech Connect

One method for the in situ remediation of uranium contaminated subsurface environments is the removal of highly soluble U(VI) from groundwater by microbial reduction to the sparingly soluble U(IV) mineral uraninite. Success of this remediation strategy will, in part, be determined by the extent and products of microbial reduction. In heterogeneous subsurface environments, microbial processes will likely yield a combination of U(IV) and U(VI) phases distributed throughout the soil matrix. Here, we use a combination of bulk X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and micro-focused XAS and X-ray diffraction to determine uranium speciation and distribution with sediment from a pilot-scale uranium remediation project located in Oak Ridge, TN.

Ginder-Vogel, M.; Wu, W.-M.; Kelly, S.; Criddle, C.S.; Carley, J.; Jardine, P.; Kemner, K.M.; Fendorf, S.

2009-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

331

A Study Of Scale Deposition- An Analogue Of Meso- To Epithermal Ore  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Study Of Scale Deposition- An Analogue Of Meso- To Epithermal Ore Study Of Scale Deposition- An Analogue Of Meso- To Epithermal Ore Formation In The Volcano Of Milos, Aegean Arc, Greece Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Study Of Scale Deposition- An Analogue Of Meso- To Epithermal Ore Formation In The Volcano Of Milos, Aegean Arc, Greece Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The viability of boiling as a mechanism for meso- to epithermal ore formation has been tested in the Milos volcano, Aegean Island Arc, by investigating rates of deposition and composition of scale, and by drawing an analogy between the results and actual field occurrences on the island. Milos offers ideal conditions for such testing: it consists of predominantly felsic volcanic rocks with numerous late-stage hydrovolcanic

332

The coefficient of variation; a guide to the sampling of ore deposits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...deposits Reference Ore deposit C Homestake Saddle project, Nevada Loraine, SouthAfrica (basal reef). Freddle , South Africa President...vein) AMEXJoint Venture project, Crescent Valley, Nevada Loraine, South Africa (Breef) iRaridleases, South Africa (black...

George S. Koch; Richard F. Link

333

An Approach to Overseas Iron Ore Investment Risk Assessment Based on Fuzzy Neural Network  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The iron ore investment overseas influenced by a variety of risk factors including geological reserves risk, market risk, the risk of the investment environment, political and legal risks, and etc. Based on the t...

Li Guo; Caiwu Lu; Zhen Yang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Iron ore and coal: pricing and volume up for these key export commodities  

SciTech Connect

Australia's huge coal and iron ore industries are booming. Up until now, the majors have benefited handsomely, but smaller players are beginning to muscle in. The article discusses development in both industries. 1 fig., 4 photos.

NONE

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

335

Aging of Weapon Seals – An Update on Butyl O-ring Issues  

SciTech Connect

During testing under the Enhanced Surveillance Campaign in 2001, preliminary data detected a previously unknown and potentially serious concern with recently procured butyl o-rings on several programs. All butyl o-rings molded from a proprietary formulation throughout the period circa 1999 through 2001 had less than a full cure. Engineering judgment was that under curing is detrimental and could possibly lead to sub-optimum performance or, in the worst case, premature seal failure. An aging study was undertaken to ensure that suspect o-rings installed in the stockpile will retain sufficient sealing force for a minimum ten-year service life. A new prediction model developed for this study indicates suspect o-rings do not need to be replaced before the ten-year service life. Long-term testing results are reported on a yearly basis to validate the prediction model. This report documents the aging results for the period September 2002 to January 2011.

Wilson, Mark H.

2011-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

336

Variations of the Isotopic Ratios of Uranium in Environmental Samples Containing Traces of Depleted Uranium: Theoretical and Experimental Aspects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Samples Containing Traces of Depleted Uranium: Theoretical and Experimental...for the detection of traces of depleted uranium (DU) in environmental samples...percentage composition is about 20% depleted uranium and 80% natural uranium, for......

M. Magnoni; S. Bertino; B. Bellotto; M. Campi

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Efficacy of oral and intraperitoneal administration of CBMIDA for removing uranium in rats after parenteral injections of depleted uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......after parenteral injections of depleted uranium S. Fukuda 1 * M. Ikeda 1 M...intramuscular (i.m.) injections of depleted uranium (DU) was examined and the...with uranium. INTRODUCTION Depleted uranium (DU) can affect human health......

S. Fukuda; M. Ikeda; M. Nakamura; X. Yan; Y. Xie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Spectrophotometric determination of tantalum in boron, uranium, zirconium, and uranium-Zircaloy-2 alloy with malachite green  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Spectrophotometric determination of tantalum in boron, uranium, zirconium, and uranium-Zircaloy-2 alloy with malachite green ...

Allan R. Eberle; Morris W. Lerner

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Uranium in Hanford Site 300 Area: Extraction Data on Borehole Sediments  

SciTech Connect

In this study, sediments collected from boreholes drilled in 2010 and 2011 as part of a remedial investigation/feasibility study were characterized. The wells, located within or around two process ponds and one process trench waste site, were characterized in terms of total uranium concentration, mobile fraction of uranium, particle size, and moisture content along the borehole depth. In general, the gravel-dominated sediments of the vadose zone Hanford formation in all investigated boreholes had low moisture contents. Based on total uranium content, a total of 48 vadose zone and periodically rewetted zone sediment samples were selected for more detailed characterization, including measuring the concentration of uranium extracted with 8 M nitric acid, and leached using bicarbonate mixed solutions to determine the liable uranium (U(VI)) contents. In addition, water extraction was conducted on 17 selected sediments. Results from the sediment acid and bicarbonate extractions indicated the total concentrations of anthropogenic labile uranium in the sediments varied among the investigated boreholes. The peak uranium concentration (114.84 µg/g, acid extract) in <2-mm size fractions was found in borehole 399 1-55, which was drilled directly in the southwest corner of the North Process Pond. Lower uranium concentrations (~0.3–2.5 µg/g, acid extract) in <2-mm size fractions were found in boreholes 399-1-57, 399-1-58, and 399-1-59, which were drilled either near the Columbia River or inland and upgradient of any waste process ponds or trenches. A general trend of “total” uranium concentrations was observed that increased as the particle size decreased when relating the sediment particle size and acid extractable uranium concentrations in two selected sediment samples. The labile uranium bicarbonate leaching kinetic experiments on three selected sediments indicated a two-step leaching rate: an initial rapid release, followed by a slow continual release of uranium from the sediment. Based on the uranium leaching kinetic results, quasi equilibrium can be assumed after 1000-h batch reaction time in this study.

Wang, Guohui; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Lindberg, Michael J.; Um, Wooyong; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Williams, Benjamin D.; Kutynakov, I. V.; Wang, Zheming; Qafoku, Nikolla

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

340

Evidence of uranium biomineralization in sandstone-hosted roll-front uranium deposits, northwestern China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evidence of uranium biomineralization in sandstone-hosted roll-front uranium deposits, northwestern Available online 25 January 2005 Abstract We show evidence that the primary uranium minerals, uraninite-front uranium deposits, Xinjiang, northwestern China were biogenically precipitated and psuedomorphically

Fayek, Mostafa

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium ore processing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

NINTH INTERIM STATUS REPORT: MODEL 9975 PCV O-RING FIXTURE LONG-TERM LEAK PERFORMANCE  

SciTech Connect

A series of experiments to monitor the aging performance of Viton® GLT O-rings used in the Model 9975 package has been ongoing since 2004 at the Savannah River National Laboratory. One approach has been to periodically evaluate the leak performance of O-rings being aged in mock-up 9975 Primary Containment Vessels (PCVs) at elevated temperatures. Other methods such as compression-stress relaxation (CSR) tests and field surveillance are also on-going to evaluate O-ring behavior. Seventy tests using PCV mock-ups were assembled and heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 450 ºF. They were leak-tested initially and have been tested periodically to determine if they continue to meet the leak-tightness criterion defined in ANSI standard N14.5-97. Due to material substitution, fourteen additional tests were initiated in 2008 with GLT-S O-rings heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 400 ºF. High temperature aging continues for 23 GLT O-ring fixtures at 200 – 270 ºF. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in all of the GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 350 ºF and higher temperatures, and in 8 fixtures aging at 300 ºF. The earliest 300 °F GLT O-ring fixture failure was observed at 34 months. The remaining GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 300 ºF have been retired from testing following more than 5 years at temperature without failure. No failures have yet been observed in GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 200 ºF for 72 - 96 months, which bounds O-ring temperatures anticipated during storage in K-Area Complex (KAC). Based on expectations that the 200 ºF fixtures will remain leak-tight for a significant period yet to come, 2 additional fixtures began aging in 2011 at 270 ºF, with hopes that they may reach a failure condition before the 200 ºF fixtures, thus providing additional time to failure data. High temperature aging continues for 6 GLT-S O-ring fixtures at 200 – 300 ºF. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in all 8 of the GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 350 and 400 ºF. No failures have yet been observed in GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 200 - 300 ºF for 54 - 57 months. No additional O-ring failures have been observed since the last interim report was issued. Aging and periodic leak testing will continue for the remaining PCV fixtures. Additional irradiation of several fixtures is recommended to maintain a balance between thermal and radiation exposures similar to that experienced in storage, and to show the degree of consistency of radiation response between GLT and GLT-S O-rings.

Daugherty, W.

2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

342

Derivation of residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium in soil at the Middlesex Sampling Plant Site, Middlesex, New Jersey  

SciTech Connect

Residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium in soil were derived for the Middlesex Sampling Plant (MSP) site in Middlesex, New Jersey. This site has been designated for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) of the US Department of Energy. The site became contaminated from operations conducted in support of the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) between 1943 and 1967. Activities conducted at the site included sampling, storage, and shipment of uranium, thorium, and beryllium ores and residues. Uranium guidelines for single radioisotopes and total uranium were derived on the basis of the requirement that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual living or working in the immediate vicinity of the MSP site should not exceed a dose of 30 mrem/yr following remedial action for the current-use and likely future-use scenarios or a dose of 100 mrem/yr for less likely future-use scenarios. The RESRAD computer code, which implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for establishing residual radioactive material guidelines, was used in this evaluation. Four scenarios were considered for the site. These scenarios vary regarding future land use at the site, sources of water used, and sources of food consumed.

Dunning, D.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Production Report Domestic Uranium Production Report 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 State(s) 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Wyoming 134 139 181 195 245 301 308 348 424 512 Colorado and Texas 48 140 269 263 557 696 340 292 331 248 Nebraska and New Mexico 92 102 123 160 149 160 159 134 127 W Arizona, Utah, and Washington 47 40 75 120 245 360 273 281 W W Alaska, Michigan, Nevada, and South Dakota 0 0 0 16 25 30 W W W W California, Montana, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, and Virginia 0 0 0 0 9 17 W W W W Total 321 420 648 755 1,231 1,563 1,096 1,073 1,191 1,196 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-851A, "Domestic Uranium Production Report" (2003-2012). Table 7. Employment in the U.S. uranium production industry by state, 2003-2012 person-years

344

The End of Cheap Uranium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historic data from many countries demonstrate that on average no more than 50-70% of the uranium in a deposit could be mined. An analysis of more recent data from Canada and Australia leads to a mining model with an average deposit extraction lifetime of 10+- 2 years. This simple model provides an accurate description of the extractable amount of uranium for the recent mining operations. Using this model for all larger existing and planned uranium mines up to 2030, a global uranium mining peak of at most 58 +- 4 ktons around the year 2015 is obtained. Thereafter we predict that uranium mine production will decline to at most 54 +- 5 ktons by 2025 and, with the decline steepening, to at most 41 +- 5 ktons around 2030. This amount will not be sufficient to fuel the existing and planned nuclear power plants during the next 10-20 years. In fact, we find that it will be difficult to avoid supply shortages even under a slow 1%/year worldwide nuclear energy phase-out scenario up to 2025. We thus suggest that a world...

Dittmar, Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Uranium Metal: Potential for Discovering Commercial Uses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Uranium Metal Uranium Metal Potential for Discovering Commercial Uses Steven M. Baker, Ph.D. Knoxville Tn 5 August 1998 Summary Uranium Metal is a Valuable Resource 3 Large Inventory of "Depleted Uranium" 3 Need Commercial Uses for Inventory  Avoid Disposal Cost  Real Added Value to Society 3 Uranium Metal Has Valuable Properties  Density  Strength 3 Market will Come if Story is Told Background The Nature of Uranium Background 3 Natural Uranium: 99.3% U238; 0.7% U 235 3 U235 Fissile  Nuclear Weapons  Nuclear Reactors 3 U238 Fertile  Neutron Irradiation of U238 Produces Pu239  Neutrons Come From U235 Fission  Pu239 is Fissile (Weapons, Reactors, etc.) Post World War II Legacy Background 3 "Enriched" Uranium Product  Weapons Program 

346

Domestic Uranium Production Report - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Production Report - Annual Domestic Uranium Production Report - Annual With Data for 2012 | Release Date: June 06, 2013 | Next Release Date: May 2014 |full report Previous domestic uranium production reports Year: 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 Go Drilling Figure 1. U.S. Uranium drilling by number of holes, 2004-2012 U.S. uranium exploration drilling was 5,112 holes covering 3.4 million feet in 2012. Development drilling was 5,970 holes and 3.7 million feet. Combined, total uranium drilling was 11,082 holes covering 7.2 million feet, 5 percent more holes than in 2011. Expenditures for uranium drilling in the United States were $67 million in 2012, an increase of 24 percent compared with 2011. Mining, production, shipments, and sales U.S. uranium mines produced 4.3 million pounds U3O8 in 2012, 5 percent more

347

Polyethylene Encapsulation of Depleted Uranium Trioxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Depleted uranium, in the form of uranium trioxide (UO3) powder, was encapsulated in molten polyethylene forming a stable, dense composite henceforth known as DUPoly (patent pending). Materials were fed by calibra...

J. W. Adams; P. R. Lageraaen; P. D. Kalb…

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Statistical data of the uranium industry  

SciTech Connect

Data are presented on US uranium reserves, potential resources, exploration, mining, drilling, milling, and other activities of the uranium industry through 1980. The compendium reflects the basic programs of the Grand Junction Office. Statistics are based primarily on information provided by the uranium exploration, mining, and milling companies. Data on commercial U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ sales and purchases are included. Data on non-US uranium production and resources are presented in the appendix. (DMC)

none,

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

10. Uranium reserve estimates at the end of 2012" 10. Uranium reserve estimates at the end of 2012" "million pounds U3O8" "Uranium Reserve Estimates1 by Mine and Property Status, Mining Method, and State(s)","Forward Cost 2" ,"$0 to $30 per pound","$0 to $50 per pound","$0 to $100 per pound" "Properties with Exploration Completed, Exploration Continuing, and Only Assessment Work","W","W",101.956759 "Properties Under Development for Production","W","W","W" "Mines in Production","W",21.40601,"W" "Mines Closed Temporarily and Closed Permanently","W","W",133.139239 "In-Situ Leach Mining","W","W",128.576534

350

Y-12 Uranium Exposure Study  

SciTech Connect

Following the recent restart of operations at the Y-12 Plant, the Radiological Control Organization (RCO) observed that the enriched uranium exposures appeared to involve insoluble rather than soluble uranium that presumably characterized most earlier Y-12 operations. These observations necessitated changes in the bioassay program, particularly the need for routine fecal sampling. In addition, it was not reasonable to interpret the bioassay data using metabolic parameter values established during earlier Y-12 operations. Thus, the recent urinary and fecal bioassay data were interpreted using the default guidance in Publication 54 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP); that is, inhalation of Class Y uranium with an activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) of 1 {micro}m. Faced with apparently new workplace conditions, these actions were appropriate and ensured a cautionary approach to worker protection. As additional bioassay data were accumulated, it became apparent that the data were not consistent with Publication 54. Therefore, this study was undertaken to examine the situation.

Eckerman, K.F.; Kerr, G.D.

1999-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

351

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Production Report Domestic Uranium Production Report 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Cameco Crow Butte Operation Dawes, Nebraska 1,000,000 Operating Operating Operating Operating Operating Hydro Resources, Inc. Church Rock McKinley, New Mexico 1,000,000 Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Hydro Resources, Inc. Crownpoint McKinley, New Mexico 1,000,000 Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Lost Creek ISR LLC Lost Creek Project Sweetwater, Wyoming 2,000,000 Developing

352

The Uranium Institute 24th Annual Symposium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the waste U-238 into Pu-239 for burning. By this means 100 times as much energy can be obtained from it to extract the uranium, enriching the natural uranium in the fissile isotope U-235, burning the U-235 than the uranium fuel it burns, leading to a breeder reactor. In addition, if the reactor is a fast

Laughlin, Robert B.

353

New Findings Allay Concerns Over Depleted Uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...least some of the uranium had been irradiated...not represent a health threat,” says Danesi...VISAR KRYEZIU/AP Depleted uranium is what's left...not represent a health threat, says...VISAR KRYEZIU/AP Depleted uranium is what's left...

Richard Stone

2002-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

354

D Riso-R-429 Automated Uranium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

routinely used analytical techniques for uranium determina- tions in geological samples, fissionCM i D Riso-R-429 Automated Uranium Analysis by Delayed-Neutron Counting H. Kunzendorf, L. Løvborg AUTOMATED URANIUM ANALYSIS BY DELAYED-NEUTRON COUNTING H. Kunzendorf, L. Løvborg and E.M. Christiansen

355

SIXTH INTERIM STATUS REPORT: MODEL 9975 PCV O-RING FIXTURE LONG-TERM LEAK PERFORMANCE  

SciTech Connect

A series of experiments to monitor the aging performance of Viton{reg_sign} GLT O-rings used in the Model 9975 package has been ongoing for seven years at the Savannah River National Laboratory. Seventy tests using mock-ups of 9975 Primary Containment Vessels (PCVs) were assembled and heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 450 F. They were leak-tested initially and have been tested periodically to determine if they meet the criterion of leak-tightness defined in ANSI standard N14.5-97. Fourteen additional tests were initiated in 2008 with GLT-S O-rings heated to temperatures ranging from 200 to 400 F. High temperature aging continues for 33 GLT O-ring fixtures at 200-300 F. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in all of the GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 350 F and higher temperatures, and in 7 fixtures aging at 300 F. No failures have yet been observed in GLT O-ring fixtures aging at 200 F for 41-60 months, which is still bounding to O-ring temperatures during storage in K-Area Complex (KAC). Based on expectations that the fixtures aging at 200 F will remain leak-tight for a significant period yet to come, 2 additional fixtures began aging within the past year at an intermediate temperature of 270 F, with hopes that they may leak before the 200 F fixtures. High temperature aging continues for 6 GLT-S O-ring fixtures at 200-300 F. Room temperature leak test failures have been experienced in all 8 of the GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 350 and 400 F. No failures have yet been observed in GLT-S O-ring fixtures aging at 200-300 F for up to 26 months. For O-ring fixtures that have failed the room temperature leak test and been disassembled, the Orings displayed a compression set ranging from 51-96%. This is greater than seen to date for packages inspected during KAC field surveillance (24% average). For GLT O-rings, separate service life estimates have been made based on the O-ring fixture leak test data and based on compression stress relaxation (CSR) data. These two predictive models show reasonable agreement at higher temperatures (350-400 F). However, at 300 F, the room temperature leak test failures to date experienced longer aging times than predicted by the CSR-based model. This suggests that extrapolations of the CSR model predictions to temperatures below 300 F will provide a conservative prediction of service life relative to the leak rate criterion. Leak test failure data at lower temperatures are needed to verify this apparent trend. Insufficient failure data exist currently to perform a similar comparison for GLT-S O-rings. Aging and periodic leak testing will continue for the remaining fixtures.

Daugherty, W.

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

356

Regulation of New Depleted Uranium Uses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2-5 2-5 Regulation of New Depleted Uranium Uses Environmental Assessment Division Argonne National Laboratory Operated by The University of Chicago, under Contract W-31-109-Eng-38, for the United States Department of Energy DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The University of Chicago, nor any of their employees or officers, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark,

357

Mobility of uranium, thorium and lanthanides around the Bangombe natural nuclear reactor (Gabon)  

SciTech Connect

New mineralogical and isotopic studies were carried out on samples form the Bangombe natural nuclear reactor. This reactor is located at shallow depth in the weathering profile and has been subjected to severe supergene alteration. Textural evidence indicates partial dissolution of uraninite in the Bangombe ore related to precipitation of Fe-Ti oxyhydroxides and clay minerals (kaolinite and metahalloysite). As a consequence of the alteration of the uraninite, uranium and fissiogenic rare earth elements were released in the clayey border of the reactor, whereas radiogenic {sup 232}Th remained confined in the close vicinity of the core. A retention effect is also evidenced, under reducing conditions, in the black shales located above the reactor.

Bros, R. [CEA CEN Cadarache, Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Gauthier-Lafaye, F.; Larque, P.; Samual, J.; Stille, P. [CNRS, Strasbourg (France)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

358

Stratigraphy of the PB-1 well, Nopal I uranium deposit, Sierra Pena Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The Nopal I site in the Pena Blanca uranium district has a number of geologic and hydrologic similarities to the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, making it a useful analogue to evaluate process models for radionuclide transport. The PB-1 well was drilled in 2003 at the Nopal I uranium deposit as part of a DOE-sponsored natural analogue study to constrain processes affecting radionuclide transport. The well penetrates through the Tertiary volcanic section down to Cretaceous limestone and intersects the regional aquifer system. The well, drilled along the margin of the Nopal I ore body, was continuously cored to a depth of 250 m, thus providing an opportunity to document the local stratigraphy. Detailed observations of these units were afforded through petrographic description and rock-property measurements of the core, together with geophysical logs of the well. The uppermost unit encountered in the PB-1 well is the Nopal Formation, a densely welded, crystal-rich, rhyolitic ash-flow tuff. This cored section is highly altered and devitrified, with kaolinite, quartz, chlorite, and montmorillonite replacing feldspars and much of the groundmass. Breccia zones within the tuff contain fracture fillings of hematite, limonite, goethite, jarosite, and opal. A zone of intense clay alteration encountered in the depth interval 17.45-22.30 m was interpreted to represent the basal vitrophyre of this unit. Underlying the Nopal Formation is the Coloradas Formation, which consists of a welded lithic-rich rhyolitic ash-flow tuff. The cored section of this unit has undergone devitrification and oxidation, and has a similar alteration mineralogy to that observed in the Nopal tuff. A sharp contact between the Coloradas tuff and the underlying Pozos Formation was observed at a depth of 136.38 m. The Pozos Formation consists of poorly sorted conglomerate containing clasts of subangular to subrounded fragments of volcanic rocks, limestone, and chert. Three thin (2-6 m) intervals of intercalated pumiceous tuffs were observed within this unit. The contact between the Pozos Formation and the underlying Cretaceous limestone basement was observed at a depth of 244.40 m. The water table is located at a depth of {approx}223 m. Several zones with elevated radioactivity in the PB-1 core are located above the current water table. These zones may be associated with changes in redox conditions that could have resulted in the precipitation of uraninite from downward flowing waters transporting U from the overlying Nopal deposit. All of the intersected units have low (typically submillidarcy) matrix permeability, thus fluid flow in this area is dominated by fracture flow. These stratigraphic and rock-property observations can be used to constrain flow and transport models for the Pena Blanca natural analogue.

Dobson, P.; Fayek, M.; Goodell, P.; Ghezzehei, T.; Melchor, F.; Murrell, M.; Oliver, R.; Reyes-Cortes, I.A.; de la Garza, R.; Simmons, A.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

RIB Production with Photofission of Uranium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The process of uranium photofission with electron beams of 20 div 50 MeV is considered in terms of the production of fission fragments. It is shown that in the interaction between an electron beam (25 MeV in energy and 20 mu A in intensity), produced by a compact accelerator of the microtron type, and a uranium target of about 40 g/cm^2 in thickness, an average of 1.5 cdot 10^11 fission events/second is generated. According to the calculations and test experiments, this corresponds to the yield of ^132 Sn and ^142 Xe isotopes of approximately 2 cdot 10^9/s. The results of experiments on the optimal design of the U-target are presented. Problems are discussed connected with the separation of isotopes and isobars for their furher acceleration up to energies of 5-18 MeV/n. The photofission reactions of a heavy nucleus are compared with other methods of RIB production of medium mass nuclei.

Oganessian, Yu T; Kliman, J; Maslov, O D; Starodub, G Ya; Belov, A G; Tretyakova, S P

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Standard specification for uranium oxides with a 235U content of less than 5 % for dissolution prior to conversion to nuclear-grade uranium dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This specification covers uranium oxides, including processed byproducts or scrap material (powder, pellets, or pieces), that are intended for dissolution into uranyl nitrate solution meeting the requirements of Specification C788 prior to conversion into nuclear grade UO2 powder with a 235U content of less than 5 %. This specification defines the impurity and uranium isotope limits for such urania powders that are to be dissolved prior to processing to nuclear grade UO2 as defined in Specification C753. 1.2 This specification provides the nuclear industry with a general standard for such uranium oxide powders. It recognizes the diversity of conversion processes and the processes to which such powders are subsequently to be subjected (for instance, by solvent extraction). It is therefore anticipated that it may be necessary to include supplementary specification limits by agreement between the buyer and seller. 1.3 The scope of this specification does not comprehensively cover all provisions for prevent...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium ore processing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Uranium 2014 resources, production and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Published every other year, Uranium Resources, Production, and Demand, or the "Red Book" as it is commonly known, is jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency. It is the recognised world reference on uranium and is based on official information received from 43 countries. It presents the results of a thorough review of world uranium supplies and demand and provides a statistical profile of the world uranium industry in the areas of exploration, resource estimates, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantial new information from all major uranium production centres in Africa, Australia, Central Asia, Eastern Europe and North America. Long-term projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements are provided as well as a discussion of long-term uranium supply and demand issues. This edition focuses on recent price and production increases that could signal major changes in the industry.

Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Nuclear & Environmental Processes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recycling Long-lived Fissile Materials as Fuel Recycling Long-lived Fissile Materials as Fuel Used Fuel Assembly Uranium accounts for the bulk of used fuel. The fissile component comprises less than 1 percent of the uranium, near the fraction found in the natural ore. This uranium may be disposable as low-level waste or stored for eventual re-enrichment for reactor fuel. Used fuel contains essentially all of the elements in the periodic table. However, nearly all of the risk associated with the disposal of spent fuel comes from approximately 1 percent of its content-primarily the transuranic elements: plutonium, neptunium, americium, and curium, and the long-lived isotopes of iodine and technetium. The very high short-term radioactivity comes primarily from two elements, cesium and strontium. In a

363

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Production Report Domestic Uranium Production Report 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 million pounds U 3 O 8 $0 to $30 per pound $0 to $50 per pound $0 to $100 per pound Properties with Exploration Completed, Exploration Continuing, and Only Assessment Work W W 102.0 Properties Under Development for Production W W W Mines in Production W 21.4 W Mines Closed Temporarily and Closed Permanently W W 133.1 In-Situ Leach Mining W W 128.6 Underground and Open Pit Mining W W 175.4 Arizona, New Mexico and Utah 0 W 164.7 Colorado, Nebraska and Texas W W 40.8 Wyoming W W 98.5 Total 51.8 W 304.0 W = Data withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Note: Totals may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-851A, "Domestic Uranium Production Report"

364

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Production Report Domestic Uranium Production Report 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 Number of Holes Feet (thousand) Number of Holes Feet (thousand) Number of Holes Feet (thousand) 2003 NA NA NA NA W W 2004 W W W W 2,185 1,249 2005 W W W W 3,143 1,668 2006 1,473 821 3,430 1,892 4,903 2,713 2007 4,351 2,200 4,996 2,946 9,347 5,146 2008 5,198 2,543 4,157 2,551 9,355 5,093 2009 1,790 1,051 3,889 2,691 5,679 3,742 2010 2,439 1,460 4,770 3,444 7,209 4,904 2011 5,441 3,322 5,156 3,003 10,597 6,325 2012 5,112 3,447 5,970 3,709 11,082 7,156 NA = Not available. W = Data withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Note: Totals may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-851A, "Domestic Uranium Production Report" (2003-

365

Uranium: Prices, rise, then fall  

SciTech Connect

Uranium prices hit eight-year highs in both market tiers, $16.60/lb U{sub 3}O{sub 8} for non-former Soviet Union (FSU) origin and $15.50 for FSU origin during mid 1996. However, they declined to $14.70 and $13.90, respectively, by the end of the year. Increased uranium prices continue to encourage new production and restarts of production facilities presently on standby. Australia scrapped its {open_quotes}three-mine{close_quotes} policy following the ouster of the Labor party in a March election. The move opens the way for increasing competition with Canada`s low-cost producers. Other events in the industry during 1996 that have current or potential impacts on the market include: approval of legislation outlining the ground rules for privatization of the US Enrichment Corp. (USEC) and the subsequent sales of converted Russian highly enriched uranium (HEU) from its nuclear weapons program, announcement of sales plans for converted US HEU and other surplus material through either the Department of Energy or USEC, and continuation of quotas for uranium from the FSU in the United States and Europe. In Canada, permitting activities continued on the Cigar Lake and McArthur River projects; and construction commenced on the McClean Lake mill.

Pool, T.C.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Summary production statistics of the U.S. uranium industry, 1993-2012" 9. Summary production statistics of the U.S. uranium industry, 1993-2012" "Item",1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,"E2003",2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012 "Exploration and Development" "Surface Drilling (million feet)",1.1,0.7,1.3,3,4.9,4.6,2.5,1,0.7,"W","W",1.2,1.7,2.7,5.1,5.1,3.7,4.9,6.3,7.2 "Drilling Expenditures (million dollars)1",5.7,1.1,2.6,7.2,20,18.1,7.9,5.6,2.7,"W","W",10.6,18.1,40.1,67.5,81.9,35.4,44.6,53.6,66.6 "Mine Production of Uranium" "(million pounds U3O8)",2.1,2.5,3.5,4.7,4.7,4.8,4.5,3.1,2.6,2.4,2.2,2.5,3,4.7,4.5,3.9,4.1,4.2,4.1,4.3 "Uranium Concentrate Production" "(million pounds U3O8)",3.1,3.4,6,6.3,5.6,4.7,4.6,4,2.6,2.3,2,2.3,2.7,4.1,4.5,3.9,3.7,4.2,4,4.1

367

Interactions of Jet Fuels with Nitrile O-Rings: Petroleum-Derived versus Synthetic Fuels  

SciTech Connect

A transition from petroleum-derived jet fuels to blends with Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) fuels, and ultimately fully synthetic hydro-isomerized F-T fuels has raised concern about the fate of plasticizers in nitrile-butadiene rubber o-rings that are contacted by the fuels as this transition occurs. The partitioning of plasticizers and fuel molecules between nitrile o-rings and petroleum-derived, synthetic, and additized-synthetic jet fuels has been measured. Thermal desorption of o-rings soaked in the various jet fuels followed by gas chromatographic analysis with a mass spectrometric detector showed many of the plasticizer and stabilizer compounds were removed from the o-rings regardless of the contact fuel. Fuel molecules were observed to migrate into the o-rings for the petroleum-derived fuel as did both the fuel and additive for a synthetic F-T jet fuel additized with benzyl alcohol, but less for the unadditized synthetic fuel. The specific compounds or classes of compounds involved in the partitioning were identified and a semiquantitative comparison of relative partitioning of the compounds of interest was made. The results provide another step forward in improving the confidence level of using additized, fuIly synthetic jet fuel in the place of petroleum-derived fueL

Gormley, R.J.; Link, D.D.; Baltrus, J.P.; Zandhuis, P.H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

The Process, Methods and Tool Used To Integrate Safety During Design of a Category 2 Nuclear Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presenter: Lynn J. Harkey, SDIT Project Engineer, Uranium Processing Facility Project, B&W Y-12 Track 5-2

369

D0 Decomissioning : Storage of Depleted Uranium Modules Inside D0 Calorimeters after the Termination of D0 Experiment  

SciTech Connect

Dzero liquid Argon calorimeters contain hadronic modules made of depleted uranium plates. After the termination of DO detector's operation, liquid Argon will be transferred back to Argon storage Dewar, and all three calorimeters will be warmed up. At this point, there is no intention to disassemble the calorimeters. The depleted uranium modules will stay inside the cryostats. Depleted uranium is a by-product of the uranium enrichment process. It is slightly radioactive, emits alpha, beta and gamma radiation. External radiation hazards are minimal. Alpha radiation has no external exposure hazards, as dead layers of skin stop it; beta radiation might have effects only when there is a direct contact with skin; and gamma rays are negligible - levels are extremely low. Depleted uranium is a pyrophoric material. Small particles (such as shavings, powder etc.) may ignite with presence of Oxygen (air). Also, in presence of air and moisture it can oxidize. Depleted uranium can absorb moisture and keep oxidizing later, even after air and moisture are excluded. Uranium oxide can powder and flake off. This powder is also pyrographic. Uranium oxide may create health problems if inhaled. Since uranium oxide is water soluble, it may enter the bloodstream and cause toxic effects.

Sarychev, Michael; /Fermilab

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

370

Updated Conceptual Model for the 300 Area Uranium Groundwater Plume  

SciTech Connect

The 300 Area uranium groundwater plume in the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit is residual from past discharge of nuclear fuel fabrication wastes to a number of liquid (and solid) disposal sites. The source zones in the disposal sites were remediated by excavation and backfilled to grade, but sorbed uranium remains in deeper, unexcavated vadose zone sediments. In spite of source term removal, the groundwater plume has shown remarkable persistence, with concentrations exceeding the drinking water standard over an area of approximately 1 km2. The plume resides within a coupled vadose zone, groundwater, river zone system of immense complexity and scale. Interactions between geologic structure, the hydrologic system driven by the Columbia River, groundwater-river exchange points, and the geochemistry of uranium contribute to persistence of the plume. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently completed a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) to document characterization of the 300 Area uranium plume and plan for beginning to implement proposed remedial actions. As part of the RI/FS document, a conceptual model was developed that integrates knowledge of the hydrogeologic and geochemical properties of the 300 Area and controlling processes to yield an understanding of how the system behaves and the variables that control it. Recent results from the Hanford Integrated Field Research Challenge site and the Subsurface Biogeochemistry Scientific Focus Area Project funded by the DOE Office of Science were used to update the conceptual model and provide an assessment of key factors controlling plume persistence.

Zachara, John M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Last, George V.; Peterson, Robert E.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

GRR/Section 14-OR-e - Water Pollution Control Facility Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-OR-e - Water Pollution Control Facility Permit GRR/Section 14-OR-e - Water Pollution Control Facility Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-OR-e - Water Pollution Control Facility Permit 14OREWaterPollutionControlFacilityPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Oregon Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies OAR Division 45 Regulations Pertaining to NPDES and WPCF Permits Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14OREWaterPollutionControlFacilityPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ) issues Water

372

GRR/Section 3-OR-e - Noncompetitive Geothermal Lease | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-OR-e - Noncompetitive Geothermal Lease 3-OR-e - Noncompetitive Geothermal Lease < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-OR-e - Noncompetitive Geothermal Lease 03ORENoncompetitiveGeothermalLease.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Oregon Department of State Lands Oregon Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies OAR 141-075-0010 Geothermal Lease Regulations Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03ORENoncompetitiveGeothermalLease.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Noncompetitive geothermal leases are the default leasing option for

373

Method for the production of mineral wool and iron from serpentine ore  

SciTech Connect

Magnesium silicate mineral wools having a relatively high liquidus temperature of at least about 1400.degree. C. and to methods for the production thereof are provided. The methods of the present invention comprise melting a magnesium silicate feedstock (e.g., comprising a serpentine or olivine ore) having a liquidus temperature of at least about 1400.degree. C. to form a molten magnesium silicate, and subsequently fiberizing the molten magnesium silicate to produce a magnesium silicate mineral wool. In one embodiment, the magnesium silicate feedstock contains iron oxide (e.g., up to about 12% by weight). Preferably, the melting is performed in the presence of a reducing agent to produce an iron alloy, which can be separated from the molten ore. Useful magnesium silicate feedstocks include, without limitation, serpentine and olivine ores. Optionally, silicon dioxide can be added to the feedstock to lower the liquidus temperature thereof.

O'Connor, William K. (Albany, OR); Rush, Gilbert E. (Scio, OR); Soltau, Glen F. (Lebanon, OR)

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

374

Dendritic Chelating Agents. 2. U(VI) Binding to Poly(amidoamine) and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Introduction The mining and processing of uranium ores and the production, reprocessing and disposal of uranium streams is a key compo- nent of the uranium nuclear fuel cycle (1­4). Uranyl [U(VI)] is the most stable uranium species under the typical oxidizing conditionsencounteredinthetreatmentofaqueouseffluents (3

Goddard III, William A.

375

United States Office of Radiation and EPA 402-B-00-001 Environmental Protection Indoor Air August 2000  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Underground Mining of Uranium Ore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 The Uranium Fuel Cycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Uranium and Thorium Mill Tailings

376

Radiological Safety Training for Uranium Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE HDBK-1113-2008 DOE HDBK-1113-2008 April 2008 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL SAFETY TRAINING FOR URANIUM FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1113-2008 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ DOE-HDBK-1113-2008 iii Foreword This Handbook describes a recommended implementation process for additional training as outlined in DOE-STD-1098-99, Radiological Control (RCS). Its purpose is to assist those individuals, Department of Energy (DOE) employees, Managing and Operating (M&O) contractors, and Managing and Integrating

377

Shock induced multi-mode damage in depleted uranium  

SciTech Connect

Recent dynamic damage studies on depleted uranium samples have revealed mixed mode failure mechanisms leading to incipient cracking as well as ductile failure processes. Results show that delamination of inclusions upon compression may provide nucleation sites for damage initiation in the form of crack tip production. However, under tension the material propagates cracks in a mixed shear localization and mode-I ductile tearing and cracking. Cracks tips appear to link up through regions of severe, shear dominated plastic flow. Shock recovery experiments were conducted on a 50 mm single stage light gas gun. Serial metallographic sectioning was conducted on the recovered samples to characterize the bulk response of the sample. Experiments show delaminated inclusions due to uniaxial compression without damage propagation. Further results show the propagation of the damage through tensile loading to the incipient state, illustrating ductile processes coupled with mixed mode-I tensile ductile tearing, shear localization, and mode-I cracking in depleted uranium.

Koller, Darcie D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cerreta, Ellen K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gray, Ill, George T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Evaluation of Background Concentrations of Contaminants in an Unusual Desert Arroyo Near a Uranium Mill Tailings Disposal Cell - 12260  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) manages 27 sites that have groundwater containing uranium concentrations above background levels. The distal portions of the plumes merge into background groundwater that can have 50 ?g/L or more uranium. Distinguishing background from site-related uranium is often problematic, but it is critical to determining if remediation is warranted, establishing appropriate remediation goals, and evaluating disposal cell performance. In particular, groundwater at disposal cells located on the upper Cretaceous Mancos Shale may have relatively high background concentrations of uranium. Elevated concentrations of nitrate, selenium, and sulfate accompany the uranium. LM used geologic analogs and uranium isotopic signatures to distinguish background groundwater from groundwater contaminated by a former uranium processing site. The same suite of contaminants is present in groundwater near former uranium processing sites and in groundwater seeps emanating from the Mancos Shale over a broad area. The concentrations of these contaminants in Many Devils Wash, located near LM's Shiprock disposal cell, are similar to those in samples collected from many Mancos seeps, including two analog sites that are 8 to 11 km from the disposal cell. Samples collected from Many Devils Wash and the analog sites have high AR values (about 2.0)-in contrast, groundwater samples collected near the tailings disposal cell have AR values near 1.0. These chemical signatures raise questions about the origin of the contamination seeping into Many Devils Wash. (authors)

Bush, Richard P. [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (United States); Morrison, Stan J. [S.M. Stoller Corporation (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Separation Processes, Second Edition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by; Uranium isotopes separation) Iteration methods (seemethod for activity coefficients, 43, 481 Uranium isotopes separation,

King, C. Judson

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Uranio impoverito: perch'e? (Depleted uranium: why?)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we develop a simple model of the penetration process of a long rod through an uniform target. Applying the momentum and energy conservation laws, we derive an analytical relation which shows how the penetration depth depends upon the density of the rod, given a fixed kinetic energy. This work was sparked off by the necessity of the author of understanding the reasons of the effectiveness of high density penetrators (e.g. depleted uranium penetrators) as anti-tank weapons.

D'Abramo, G

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium ore processing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Operating and life-cycle costs for uranium-contaminated soil treatment technologies  

SciTech Connect

The development of a nuclear industry in the US required mining, milling, and fabricating a large variety of uranium products. One of these products was purified uranium metal which was used in the Savannah River and Hanford Site reactors. Most of this feed material was produced at the US Department of Energy (DOE) facility formerly called the Feed Materials Production Center at Fernald, Ohio. During operation of this facility, soils became contaminated with uranium from a variety of sources. To avoid disposal of these soils in low-level radioactive waste burial sites, increasing emphasis has been placed on the remediating soils contaminated with uranium and other radionuclides. To address remediation and management of uranium-contaminated soils at sites owned by DOE, the DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD) evaluates and compares the versatility, efficiency, and economics of various technologies that may be combined into systems designed to characterize and remediate uranium-contaminated soils. Each technology must be able to (1) characterize the uranium in soil, (2) decontaminate or remove uranium from soil, (3) treat or dispose of resulting waste streams, (4) meet necessary state and federal regulations, and (5) meet performance assessment objectives. The role of the performance assessment objectives is to provide the information necessary to conduct evaluations of the technologies. These performance assessments provide the basis for selecting the optimum system for remediation of large areas contaminated with uranium. One of the performance assessment tasks is to address the economics of full-scale implementation of soil treatment technologies. The cost of treating contaminated soil is one of the criteria used in the decision-making process for selecting remedial alternatives.

Douthat, D.M.; Armstrong, A.Q. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Health Sciences Research Div.; Stewart, R.N. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Global terrestrial uranium supply and its policy implications : a probabilistic projection of future uranium costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An accurate outlook on long-term uranium resources is critical in forecasting uranium costresource relationships, and for energy policy planning as regards the development and deployment of nuclear fuel cycle alternatives. ...

Matthews, Isaac A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. U.S. uranium mine production and number of mines and sources, 2003-2012" 2. U.S. uranium mine production and number of mines and sources, 2003-2012" "Production / Mining Method",2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012 "Underground" "(estimated contained thousand pounds U3O8)","W","W","W","W","W","W","W","W","W","W" "Open Pit" "(estimated contained thousand pounds U3O8)",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "In-Situ Leaching" "(thousand pounds U3O8)","W","W",2681,4259,"W","W","W","W","W","W" "Other1" "(thousand pounds U3O8)","W","W","W","W","W","W","W","W","W","W"

384

:- : DRILLING URANIUM BILLETS ON A  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

'Xxy";^ ...... ' '. .- -- Metals, Ceramics, and Materials. : . - ,.. ; - . _ : , , ' z . , -, .- . >. ; . .. :- : DRILLING URANIUM BILLETS ON A .-... r .. .. i ' LEBLOND-CARLSTEDT RAPID BORER 4 r . _.i'- ' ...... ' -'".. :-'' ,' :... : , '.- ' ;BY R.' J. ' ANSEN .AEC RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT PERSONAL PROPERTY OF J. F. Schlltz .:- DECLASSIFIED - PER AUTHORITY OF (DAlE) (NhTI L (DATE)UE) FEED MATERIALS PRODUCTION CENTER NATIONAL LFE A COMPANY OF OHIO 26 1 3967 3035406 NLCO - 886 Metals, Ceramics and Materials (TID-4500, 22nd Ed.) DRILLING URANIUM BILLETS ON A LEBLOND-CARLSTEDT RAPID BORER By R. J. Jansen* TECHNICAL DIVISION NATIONAL LEAD COMPANY OF OHIO Date of Issuance: September 13, 1963 Approved By: Approved By: Technical Director Head, Metallurgical Department *Mr. Jansen is presently

385

Potential Uses of Depleted Uranium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

POTENTIAL USES OF DEPLETED URANIUM POTENTIAL USES OF DEPLETED URANIUM Robert R. Price U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20874 M. Jonathan Haire and Allen G. Croff Chemical Technology Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory * Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6180 June 2000 For American Nuclear Society 2000 International Winter and Embedded Topical Meetings Washington, D.C. November 12B16, 2000 The submitted manuscript has been authored by a contractor of the U.S. Government under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725. Accordingly, the U.S. Government retains a nonexclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U.S. Government purposes. _________________________

386

Semiconductive Properties of Uranium Oxides  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SEMICONDUCTIVE PROPERTIES OF URANIUM OXIDES SEMICONDUCTIVE PROPERTIES OF URANIUM OXIDES Thomas Meek Materials Science Engineering Department University of Tennessee Knoxville, TN 37931 Michael Hu and M. Jonathan Haire Chemical Technology Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory * Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6179 August 2000 For the Waste Management 2001 Symposium Tucson, Arizona February 25-March 1, 2001 The submitted manuscript has been authored by a contractor of the U.S. Government under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725. Accordingly, the U.S. Government retains a nonexclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U.S. Government purposes. _________________________ * Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy

387

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Employment in the U.S. uranium production industry by state, 2003-2012" 7. Employment in the U.S. uranium production industry by state, 2003-2012" "person-years" "State(s)",2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012 "Wyoming",134,139,181,195,245,301,308,348,424,512 "Colorado and Texas",48,140,269,263,557,696,340,292,331,248 "Nebraska and New Mexico",92,102,123,160,149,160,159,134,127,"W" "Arizona, Utah, and Washington",47,40,75,120,245,360,273,281,"W","W" "Alaska, Michigan, Nevada, and South Dakota",0,0,0,16,25,30,"W","W","W","W" "California, Montana, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, and Virginia",0,0,0,0,9,17,"W","W","W","W"

388

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. U.S. uranium in-situ-leach plants by owner, location, capacity, and operating status at end of the year, 2008-2012" 5. U.S. uranium in-situ-leach plants by owner, location, capacity, and operating status at end of the year, 2008-2012" "In-Situ-Leach Plant Owner","In-Situ-Leach Plant Name","County, State (existing and planned locations)","Production Capacity (pounds U3O8 per year)","Operating Status at End of the Year" ,,,,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012 "Cameco","Crow Butte Operation","Dawes, Nebraska",1000000,"Operating","Operating","Operating","Operating","Operating" "Hydro Resources, Inc.","Church Rock","McKinley, New Mexico",1000000,"Partially Permitted And Licensed","Partially Permitted And Licensed","Partially Permitted And Licensed","Partially Permitted And Licensed","Partially Permitted And Licensed"

389

Depleted Uranium (DU) Cermet Waste Package  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Package Package Depleted Uranium (DU) Cermet Waste Package The steel components of the waste package could be replaced with a uranium cermet. The cermet contains uranium dioxide particulates, which are embedded in steel. Cermets are made with outer layers of clean steel; thus, there is no radiation-contamination hazard in handling the waste packages. Because cermets are made of the same materials that would normally be found in the YM repository (uranium dioxide and steel), there are no chemical compatibility issues. From half to all of the DU inventory in the United States could be used for this application. Depleted Uranium Dioxide Steel Cermet Cross Section of a Depleted Uranium Dioxide Steel Cermet Follow the link below for more information on Cermets:

390

Depleted Uranium Uses Research and Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DU Uses DU Uses Depleted Uranium Uses Research & Development A Depleted Uranium Uses Research and Development Program was initiated to explore beneficial uses of depleted uranium (DU) and other materials resulting from conversion of depleted UF6. A Depleted Uranium Uses Research and Development Program was initiated to explore the safe, beneficial use of depleted uranium and other materials resulting from conversion of depleted UF6 (e.g., fluorine and empty carbon steel cylinders) for the purposes of resource conservation and cost savings compared with disposal. This program explored the risks and benefits of several depleted uranium uses, including uses as a radiation shielding material, a catalyst, and a semi-conductor material in electronic devices.

391

Uranium 2009 resources, production and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With several countries currently building nuclear power plants and planning the construction of more to meet long-term increases in electricity demand, uranium resources, production and demand remain topics of notable interest. In response to the projected growth in demand for uranium and declining inventories, the uranium industry – the first critical link in the fuel supply chain for nuclear reactors – is boosting production and developing plans for further increases in the near future. Strong market conditions will, however, be necessary to trigger the investments required to meet projected demand. The "Red Book", jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, is a recognised world reference on uranium. It is based on information compiled in 40 countries, including those that are major producers and consumers of uranium. This 23rd edition provides a comprehensive review of world uranium supply and demand as of 1 January 2009, as well as data on global ur...

Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Deep liquid-chromatographic purification of uranium extract from technetium  

SciTech Connect

The recycling of uranium in the nuclear fuel cycle requires the removal of a number of radioactive and stable impurities like {sup 99}Tc from spent fuels. In order to improve the grade of uranium extract purification from technetium the method of liquid chromatography and the apparatus for its performance have been developed. Process of technetium extraction and concentrating in aqueous solution containing reducing agent has been studied on simulated solutions (U-Tc-HNO{sub 3}-30% TBP-isoparM). The dynamic tests of the method have been carried out on the laboratory unit. Solution of diformyl-hydrazine in nitric acid was used as a stationary phase. Silica gel with specific surface of 186 m{sup 2}/g was used as a carrier of the stationary phase. It is shown that the volume of purified extract increases as the solution temperature increases, concentration of reducing agent increases and extract flow rate decreases. It is established that the technetium content in uranium by this method could achieve a value below 0.3 ppm. Some variants of overload and composition of the stationary phase containing the extracted technetium have been offered and tested. It is defined that the method provides reduction of processing medium-active wastes by more than 10 times during finish refining process. (authors)

Volk, V.; Dvoeglazov, K; Podrezova, L.; Vidanov, V.; Pavlyukevich, E. [OAO State Research Center - VNIINM, Rogov str., bld. 5, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Uranium at Y-12: Rolling and Forming | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rolling ... Rolling ... Uranium at Y-12: Rolling and Forming Posted: July 22, 2013 - 3:40pm | Y-12 Report | Volume 10, Issue 1 | 2013 Rolling involves preheating a uranium or uranium alloy workpiece and passing it through a mill to reduce its thickness. This is useful in creating reactor fuel element foils and other products. Rolling mill operators possess a strong grasp of thickness-reduction limits, reheating intervals and temperatures, metallurgical phases, rolling speed and force, impurity influences and other techniques. Forming of enriched uranium is done through a process called hydroforming, a way of shaping malleable metals. Y-12 hydroform operators are highly skilled and trained machinists. Forming requires knowledge of friction on the workpiece, high-pressure application, tooling temperature and other

394

Fabrication of Cerium Oxide and Uranium Oxide Microspheres for Space Nuclear Power Applications  

SciTech Connect

Cerium oxide and uranium oxide microspheres are being produced via an internal gelation sol-gel method to investigate alternative fabrication routes for space nuclear fuels. Depleted uranium and non-radioactive cerium are being utilized as surrogates for plutonium-238 (Pu-238) used in radioisotope thermoelectric generators and for enriched uranium required by nuclear thermal rockets. While current methods used to produce Pu-238 fuels at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) involve the generation of fine powders that pose a respiratory hazard and have a propensity to contaminate glove boxes, the sol-gel route allows for the generation of oxide microsphere fuels through an aqueous route. The sol-gel method does not generate fine powders and may require fewer processing steps than the LANL method with less operator handling. High-quality cerium dioxide microspheres have been fabricated in the desired size range and equipment is being prepared to establish a uranium dioxide microsphere production capability.

Jeffrey A. Katalenich; Michael R. Hartman; Robert C. O'Brien

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 Production / Mining Method 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 (estimated contained thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) W W W W W W W W W W (estimated contained thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) W W 2,681 4,259 W W W W W W (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) W W W W W W W W W W (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) E2,200 2,452 3,045 4,692 4,541 3,879 4,145 4,237 4,114 4,335 Underground 1 2 4 5 6 10 14 4 5 6 Open Pit 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 In-Situ Leaching 2 3 4 5 5 6 4 4 5 5 Other Sources 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 Total Mines and Sources 4 6 10 11 12 17 20 9 11 12 Other 1 Number of Operating Mines Table 2. U.S. uranium mine production and number of mines and sources, 2003-2012 Underground Open Pit In-Situ Leaching Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-851A, "Domestic Uranium Production Report" (2003-2012).

396

Review of uranium bioassay techniques  

SciTech Connect

A variety of analytical techniques is available for evaluating uranium in excreta and tissues at levels appropriate for occupational exposure control and evaluation. A few (fluorometry, kinetic phosphorescence analysis, {alpha}-particle spectrometry, neutron irradiation techniques, and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry) have also been demonstrated as capable of determining uranium in these materials at levels comparable to those which occur naturally. Sample preparation requirements and isotopic sensitivities vary widely among these techniques and should be considered carefully when choosing a method. This report discusses analytical techniques used for evaluating uranium in biological matrices (primarily urine) and limits of detection reported in the literature. No cost comparison is attempted, although references are cited which address cost. Techniques discussed include: {alpha}-particle spectrometry; liquid scintillation spectrometry, fluorometry, phosphorometry, neutron activation analysis, fission-track counting, UV-visible absorption spectrophotometry, resonance ionization mass spectrometry, and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. A summary table of reported limits of detection and of the more important experimental conditions associated with these reported limits is also provided.

Bogard, J.S.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

SHEEP MOUNTAIN URANIUM PROJECT CROOKS GAP, WYOMING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;PROJECT OVERVIEW ·Site Location·Site Location ·Fremont , Wyoming ·Existing Uranium Mine Permit 381C·Existing Uranium Mine Permit 381C ·Historical Operation ·Western Nuclear Crooks Gap Project ·Mined 1956 ­ 1988 and Open Pit Mining ·Current Mine Permit (381C) ·Updating POO, Reclamation Plan & Bond ·Uranium Recovery

398

Depleted uranium exposure and health effects in Gulf War veterans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2006 research-article Depleted uranium exposure and health effects in Gulf War...Medicine) Gulf War and health. In Depleted uranium, pyridostigmine bromide...McDiarmid, M.A , Health effects of depleted uranium on exposed Gulf War...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Excretion of depleted uranium by Gulf war veterans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Dosimetry Article Excretion of depleted uranium by Gulf war veterans R. E...personnel had potential intakes of depleted uranium (DU), including shrapnel...excretion rate. Excretion of depleted uranium by Gulf War veterans. | During......

R. E. Toohey

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Depleted uranium - induced malignant transformation in human lung epithelial cells.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Washington, DC Abstract 3590: Depleted uranium-induced leukemia: Epigenetic...with leukemia development. Depleted uranium is used in military missions...Karvelisse Miller, Max Costa. Depleted uranium-induced leukemia: Epigenetic...

Aldona A. Karaczyn; Hong Xie; and John P. Wise

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium ore processing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Uranium Pollution of Meat in Tien-Shan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Uranium in water, soil, fodder and food products (especially meat) was studied in areas of former Soviet uranium industry in Tien-Shan 1950–1970. Uranium environment migration was very intensive in Tien-Shan, due...

Rustam Tuhvatshin; Igor Hadjamberdiev…

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Standard specification for uranium hexafluoride enriched to less than 5 % 235U  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This specification covers nuclear grade uranium hexafluoride (UF6) that either has been processed through an enrichment plant, or has been produced by the blending of Highly Enriched Uranium with other uranium to obtain uranium of any 235U concentration below 5 % and that is intended for fuel fabrication. The objectives of this specification are twofold: (1) To define the impurity and uranium isotope limits for Enriched Commercial Grade UF6 so that, with respect to fuel design and manufacture, it is essentially equivalent to enriched uranium made from natural UF6; and (2) To define limits for Enriched Reprocessed UF6 to be expected if Reprocessed UF6 is to be enriched without dilution with Commercial Natural UF6. For such UF6, special provisions, not defined herein, may be needed to ensure fuel performance and to protect the work force, process equipment, and the environment. 1.2 This specification is intended to provide the nuclear industry with a standard for enriched UF6 that is to be used in the pro...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Natural radioactivity measurements and dose calculations to the public: Case of the uranium-bearing region of Poli in Cameroon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to carry out a baseline study of the uranium-bearing region of Poli in which lies the uranium deposit of Kitongo, prior to its impending exploitation. This study required sampling soil, water and foodstuffs representative of the radioactivity exposure and food consumption patterns of the population of Poli. After sampling and radioactivity measurements were taken, our results indicated that the activities of natural series in soil and water samples are low. However, high levels of 210Po and 210Pb in foodstuffs (vegetables) were discovered and elevated activities of 40K were observed in some soil samples. All components of the total dose were assessed and lead to an average value of 5.2 mSv/year, slightly higher than the average worldwide value of 2.4 mSv/year. Most of this dose is attributable to the ingestion dose caused by the high levels of 210Po and 210Pb contained in vegetables, food items which constitute an important part of the diet in Northern Cameroon. Consequently, bringing uranium ore from underground to the surface might lead to an increased dose for the population of Poli through a higher deposition of 222Rn decay products on leafy vegetables.

Saïdou; François O. Bochud; Sébastien Baechler; Kwato Njock Moïse; Ngachin Merlin; Pascal Froidevaux

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Uranium Weapons Components Successfully Dismantled | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Successfully Dismantled March 20, 2007 Uranium Weapons Components Successfully Dismantled Oak Ridge, TN Continuing its efforts to reduce the size of the U.S. nuclear weapons...

405

U.S. Uranium Reserves Estimates  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The initial uranium property reserves estimates were based on bore hole radiometric data validated by chemical analysis of samples from cores and drill cuttings. The...

406

Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetric Measurements of Trace Uranium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurements of Trace Uranium at the Bismuth Film Electrode. Abstract: Bismuth-coated carbon-fiber electrodes have been successfully applied for adsorptive-stripping...

407

Statistical data of the uranium industry  

SciTech Connect

Statistical Data of the Uranium Industry is a compendium of information relating to US uranium reserves and potential resources and to exploration, mining, milling, and other activities of the uranium industry through 1981. The statistics are based primarily on data provided voluntarily by the uranium exploration, mining, and milling companies. The compendium has been published annually since 1968 and reflects the basic programs of the Grand Junction Area Office (GJAO) of the US Department of Energy. The production, reserves, and drilling information is reported in a manner which avoids disclosure of proprietary information.

none,

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Investigation of Uranium Polymorphs  

SciTech Connect

The UO3-water system is complex and has not been fully characterized, even though these species are common throughout the nuclear fuel cycle. As an example, most production schemes for UO3 result in a mixture of up to six or more different polymorphic phases, and small differences in these conditions will affect phase genesis that ultimately result in measureable changes to the end product. As a result, this feature of the UO3-water system may be useful as a means for determining process history. This research effort attempts to better characterize the UO3-water system with a variety of optical techniques for the purpose of developing some predictive capability for estimating process history in polymorphic phases of unknown origin. Three commercially relevant preparation methods for the production of UO3 were explored. Previously unreported low temperature routes to ?- and ?-UO3 were discovered. Raman and fluorescence spectroscopic libraries were established for pure and mixed polymorphic forms of UO3 in addition to the common hydrolysis products of UO3. An advantage of the sensitivity of optical fluorescence microscopy over XRD has been demonstrated. Preliminary aging studies of the ? and ? forms of UO3 have been conducted. In addition, development of a 3-D phase field model used to predict phase genesis of the system was initiated. Thermodynamic and structural constants that will feed the model have been gathered from the literature for most of the UO3 polymorphic phases.

Sweet, Lucas E.; Henager, Charles H.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Meier, David E.; Peper, Shane M.; Schwantes, Jon M.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

MOBILE SYSTEMS FOR DILUTION OF HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM AND URANIUM CONTAINING COMPONENTS  

SciTech Connect

A mobile melt-dilute (MMD) module for the treatment of aluminum research reactor spent fuel is being developed. The process utilizes a closed system approach to retain fission products/gases inside a sealed canister after treatment. The MMD process melts and dilutes spent fuel with depleted uranium to obtain a fissile fraction of less than 0.2. The final ingot is solidified inside the sealed canister and can be stored safely either wet or dry until final disposition or reprocessing. The MMD module can be staged at or near the research reactor fuel storage sites to facilitate the melt-dilute treatment of the spent fuel into a stable non-proliferable form.

Adams, T

2007-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

410

Efficacy of oral and intraperitoneal administration of CBMIDA for removing uranium in rats after parenteral injections of depleted uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......chemical forms of the uranium in the body after intake...REFERENCES 1 Mould R. F. Depleted uranium and radiation-induced lung cancer and leukaemia. Br. J...Abou-Donia M. B. Depleted and natural uranium: chemistry and toxicological......

S. Fukuda; M. Ikeda; M. Nakamura; X. Yan; Y. Xie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Efficacy of oral and intraperitoneal administration of CBMIDA for removing uranium in rats after parenteral injections of depleted uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......contaminated accidentally with uranium. INTRODUCTION Depleted uranium (DU) can affect human health via chemical and radiation...B. Teratogenicity of depleted uranium aerosols: a review from...perspective. Environ. Health (2005) 4:17-35......

S. Fukuda; M. Ikeda; M. Nakamura; X. Yan; Y. Xie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Pre-Colombian Mercury Pollution Associated with the Smelting of Argentiferous Ores in the Bolivian Andes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

large-scale Hg emissions. Pre-industrial emissions of heavy metals associated with mineral extraction) (Lee et al. 2008). In the New World, early metal pollution appears to be limited Ã? Royal SwedishREPORT Pre-Colombian Mercury Pollution Associated with the Smelting of Argentiferous Ores

Wolfe, Alexander P.

413

COURSE INFORMATION AND OUTLINE ORE 609 -HYDRODYNAMICS OF FLUID-BODY INTERACTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IN THE ORE LIBRARY · Sarpkaya and Isaacson: Mechanics of Wave Forces on Offshore Structures · Newman: Marine Hydrodynamics · Currie: Fundamental Mechanics of Fluids · Ippen: Estuary and Coastline Hydrodynamics · Mei: The Applied Dynamics of Ocean Surface Waves · Abramowitz and Stegun: Handbook of Mathematical Functions

Frandsen, Jannette B.

414

REVIEW OF AGING DATA ON EPDM O-RINGS IN THE H1616 SHIPPING PACKAGE  

SciTech Connect

Currently, all H1616 shipping package containers undergo annual re-verification testing, including containment vessel leak testing to verify leak-tightness (<1 x 10{sup -7} ref cc/sec air) as per ANSI N14.5. The purpose of this literature review is to supplement aging studies currently being performed by SRNL on the EPDM O-rings to provide the technical basis for extending annual re-verification testing for the H1616 shipping package and to predict the life of the seals at bounding service conditions. The available data suggest that the EPDM O-rings can retain significant mechanical properties and sealing force at or below bounding service temperatures (169 F or 76 C) beyond the 1 year maintenance period. Interpretation of available data suggests that a service life of at least 2 years and potentially 4-6 years may be possible at bounding temperatures. Seal lifetimes at lower, more realistic temperatures will likely be longer. Being a hydrocarbon elastomer, EPDM O-rings may exhibit an inhibition period due to the presence of antioxidants. Once antioxidants are consumed, mechanical properties and seal performance could decline at a faster rate. Testing is being performed to validate the assumptions outlined in this report and to assess the long-term performance of O-ring seals under actual service conditions.

Skidmore, E.

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

415

Mined Land Reclamation on DOE's Uranium Lease Tracts, Southwestern...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Mined Land Reclamation on DOE's Uranium Lease Tracts, Southwestern Colorado Mined Land Reclamation on DOE's Uranium Lease Tracts, Southwestern Colorado Mined Land Reclamation on...

416

Legacy Management Work Progresses on Defense-Related Uranium...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Most recently, LM visited 84 defense-related legacy uranium mine sites located within 11 uranium mining districts in 6 western states. At these sites, photographs and global...

417

Secretarial Determination for the Sale or Transfer of Uranium...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Uranium.pdf More Documents & Publications Secretarial Determination Pursuant to USEC Privatization Act for the Sale or Transfer of Low-Enriched Uranium Secretarial...

418

Secretarial Determination of No Adverse Material Impact for Uranium...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

5-15-14.pdf More Documents & Publications Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan 2008 2014 Review of the Potential Impact of DOE Excess Uranium Inventory On the...

419

President Truman Increases Production of Uranium and Plutonium...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Uranium and Plutonium Washington, DC President Truman approves a 1.4 billion expansion of Atomic Energy Commission facilities to produce uranium and plutonium for nuclear weapons...

420

Editorial - Depleted Uranium: A Problem of Perception rather than Reality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Radiation Protection Dosimetry Editorial Editorial - Depleted Uranium: A Problem of Perception rather than Reality R. L. Kathren Depleted uranium: a problem of perception rather than reality......

R. L. Kathren

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium ore processing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Modeling of Depleted Uranium Transport in Subsurface Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Groundwater and soil contamination with depleted uranium (DU) isan important public concern because ... four extremecases of climate and existing conditions of uranium penetrator fragments. The simulations demons...

J. Paul Chen; Sotira Yiacoumi

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

EIS-0360: Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product at the Portsmouth...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

60: Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product at the Portsmouth, Ohio Site EIS-0360: Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product at the Portsmouth, Ohio Site Summary This...

423

3rd Quarter 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Form EIA-851A and Form EIA-851Q, ""Domestic Uranium Production Report.""" " U.S. Energy Information Administration 3rd Quarter 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report...

424

Microbial Reduction of Uranium under Iron- and Sulfate-reducing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Uranium under Iron- and Sulfate-reducing Conditions: Effect of Amended Goethite on Microbial Community Microbial Reduction of Uranium under Iron- and Sulfate-reducing Conditions:...

425

Morphological characterization of O-rings from the GCEP long-term test program. [Dupont 1141, 3M 4762 and 4768, and Parker V884-75 O-rings  

SciTech Connect

Based on the results of the morphological and structural characterizations reported herein the following conclusions have been reached. (1) O-rings of any of the four materials studied should last at least 10 years when employed in a standard static seal configuration utilizing a groove that holds the O-ring. (2) Such a static seal provides considerable protection from reaction. (3) The reaction of UF/sub 6/ with the O-ring material is the dominant degradation reaction; however there are effects on a least one compound that appear to be related to HF penetration into the O-ring matrix. The slow nature of the reaction of UF/sub 6/ with the flanged O-rings makes life projections quite difficult using any means. It would appear that one of the best methods for determining the life of these materials would be actual use combined with routine long-term inspection/sampling of a selected typical subset of O-rings. At GCEP conditions it would not be surprising to find the actual life of the O-rings is longer than any anticipated operation time of the plant facility. 16 figures, 1 table.

Hughes, M.R.; Nolan, T.A.

1984-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

426

The influence of fractal size distribution of covers on radon exhalation from uranium mill tailings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tailings produced during mining and milling of uranium ores represent potentially large volumes of low level radioactive materials. A typical environmental problem associated with mill tailings is radon emanation. Covering tailings is widely applied to reduce radon exhalation rate. In this paper, the fractal theories and field covering tests are used to study the fractal characters of size distribution of six types of covering materials, including waste rock, sand, laterite, kaolin, mixture of sand and laterite, and mixture of waste rock and laterite, and their influences on radon exhalation. The size distributions of uranium tailings and the six aforementioned covering materials all exhibit a good fractal structure. The contents of fine grain increase with the increasing value of fractal dimension. The results of field radon measurement show that the radon emanation rate of tailings without covers is 14.7–18.6 Bq/m2 s. Covering tests were carried out of the six abovementioned covering materials with thickness of 0.4 m, 0.8 m, 1.2 m, 1.6 m and 2.0 m. The results indicate that the application of these materials for cover layers can decrease the radon exhalation rate markedly. The effectiveness of a cover layer in reducing radon exhalation is related to its fractal texture of size distribution. Under the same thickness conditions, the attenuation coefficient of radon exhalation rate increases with the increasing fractal dimension of size distribution of covers. The empirical expressions of the attenuation coefficients in relation to fractal dimension D of size distribution and thickness x of covers is obtained for evaluating the effectiveness of final covers for uranium tailings impoundments.

Kaixuan Tan; Zehua Liu; Liangshu Xia; Junwen Lv; Hanqiao Hu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Selection of a management strategy for depleted uranium hexafluoride  

SciTech Connect

A consequence of the uranium enrichment process used in the United States (US) is the accumulation of a significant amount of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}). Currently, approximately 560,000 metric tons of the material are stored at three different sites. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recently initiated a program to consider alternative strategies for the cost-effective and environmentally safe long-term management of this inventory of depleted UF{sub 6}. The program involves a technology and engineering assessment of proposed management options (use/reuse, conversion, storage, or disposal) and an analysis of the potential environmental impacts and life-cycle costs of alternative management strategies. The information obtained from the studies will be used by the DOE to select a preferred long-term management strategy. The selection and implementation of a management strategy will involve consideration of a number of important issues such as environmental, health, and safety effects; the balancing of risks versus costs in a context of reduced government spending; socioeconomic implications, including effects on the domestic and international uranium industry; the technical status of proposed uses or technologies; and public involvement in the decision making process. Because of its provisions for considering a wide range of relevant issues and involving the public, this program has become a model for future DOE materials disposition programs. This paper presents an overview of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program. Technical findings of the program to date are presented, and major issues involved in selecting and implementing a management strategy are discussed.

Patton, S.E.; Hanrahan, E.J.; Bradley, C.E.

1995-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

428

New Findings Allay Concerns Over Depleted Uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...poses virtually no cancer risk. Moreover, Danesi's...VISAR KRYEZIU/AP Depleted uranium is what's left...the munitions to cancer cases, particularly...VISAR KRYEZIU/AP Depleted uranium is what's left...the munitions to cancer cases, particularly...

Richard Stone

2002-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

429

IPNS enriched uranium booster target  

SciTech Connect

Since startup in 1981, IPNS has operated on a fully depleted /sup 238/U target. With the booster as in the present system, high energy protons accelerated to 450 MeV by the Rapid Cycling Synchrotron are directed at the target and by mechanisms of spallation and fission of the uranium, produce fast neutrons. The neutrons from the target pass into adjacent moderator where they slow down to energies useful for spectroscopy. The target cooling systems and monitoring systems have operated very reliably and safely during this period. To provide higher neutron intensity, we have developed plans for an enriched uranium (booster) target. HETC-VIM calculations indicate that the target will produce approx.90 kW of heat, with a nominal x5 gain (k/sub eff/ = 0.80). The neutron beam intensity gain will be a factor of approx.3. Thermal-hydraulic and heat transport calculations indicate that approx.1/2 in. thick /sup 235/U discs are subject to about the same temperatures as the present /sup 238/U 1 in. thick discs. The coolant will be light demineralized water (H/sub 2/O) and the coolant flow rate must be doubled. The broadening of the fast neutron pulse width should not seriously affect the neutron scattering experiments. Delayed neutrons will appear at a level about 3% of the total (currently approx.0.5%). This may affect backgrounds in some experiments, so that we are assessing measures to control and correct for this (e.g., beam tube choppers). Safety analyses and neutronic calculations are nearing completion. Construction of the /sup 235/U discs at the ORNL Y-12 facility is scheduled to begin late 1985. The completion of the booster target and operation are scheduled for late 1986. No enriched uranium target assembly operating at the projected power level now exists in the world. This effort thus represents an important technological experiment as well as being a ''flux enhancer''.

Schulke, A.W. Jr.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Simulation of uranium aluminide dissolution in a continuous aluminum dissolver system  

SciTech Connect

This mission of the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) is to recover highly-enriched uranium from spent nuclear reactor fuel. One fuel type is dissolved in mercury-catalyzed nitric acid, and the uranium is extracted from the resulting dissolver product by an organic solvent. This fuel is composed of an aluminum-alloy-clad matrix of particulate uranium aluminide, which dissolves more slowly than the cladding. Because of the content of fissile {sup 235}U, suspended uranium aluminide or dissolved uranyl nitrate can form a critical mass under some circumstances. The dissolver and piping are geometrically favorable from the criticality standpoint, so the digester is where a criticality event would be most likely to occur. In the digester, the mass limit for {sup 235}U (as suspended uranium aluminide particles) is approximately 790 g. depending on the uranyl nitrate concentration. In a clear dissolver product (no suspended UAl{sub 3}), the concentration limit is 7 g {sup 235}U/L (as uranyl nitrate). Both limits are substantially below the lowest values at which a criticality event could possibly occur. This document a dynamic model of uranium aluminide dissolution in a continuous dissolver system, report typical calculated results, and advance appropriate conclusions.

Evans, D.R.; Farman, R.F.; Christian, J.D.

1990-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

431

Advective Desorption of Uranium (VI) from Contaminated Hanford Vadose Zone Sediments under Saturated and Unsaturated Conditions  

SciTech Connect

Sedimentary, hydrologic, and geochemical variations in the Hanford subsurface environment, as well as compositional differences in contaminating waste streams, have created vast differences in the migration and mobility of uranium within the subsurface environment. A series of hydraulically-saturated and -unsaturated column experiments were performed to i.) assess the effect of water content on the advective desorption and migration of uranium from contaminated sediments, and ii.) evaluate the uranium concentration that can develop in porewater and/or groundwater as a result of desorption/dissolution reactions. Flow rate and moisture content were varied to evaluate the influence of contact time, pore water velocity, and macropore desaturation on aqueous uranium concentrations. Sediments were collected from the T-TX-TY tank farm complex and the 300 Area Process Ponds located on the Hanford Site, southeastern Washington State. The sediments vary in depth, mineralogy, and in contamination events. Experiments were conducted under mildly alkaline/calcareous conditions representative of conditions commonly encountered at repository sites across the arid western United States and, in particular, the Hanford site. Results illustrate the release of uranium from these sediments is kinetically controlled and low water contents encountered within the Hanford vadose zone result in the formation of mobile-immobile water regimes, which isolate a fraction of the reactive sites within the sediments, effectively reducing the concentration of uranium released into migrating porewaters.

Wellman, Dawn M.; Zachara, John M.; Liu, Chongxuan; Qafoku, Nikolla; Smith, Steven C.; Forrester, Steven W.

2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

432

Technical Basis For Radiological Acceptance Criteria For Uranium At The Y-12 National Security Complex  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to establish radiological acceptance criteria for uranium. Other factors for acceptance not considered include criticality safety concerns, contaminants to the process stream, and impacts to the Safety Basis for the affected facilities. Three types of criteria were developed in this report. They include limits on external penetrating and non-penetrating radiation and on the internal hazard associated with inhalation of the material. These criteria are intended to alleviate the need for any special controls beyond what are normally utilized for worker protection from uranium hazards. Any proposed exceptions would require case-by-case evaluations to determine cost impacts and feasibility. Since Y-12 has set rigorous ALARA goals for worker doses, the external limits are based on assumptions of work time involved in the movement of accepted material plus the desire that external doses normally received are not exceeded, and set so that no special personnel monitoring would be required. Internal hazard controls were established so that dose contributions from non-uranium nuclides would not exceed 10% of that expected from the uranium component. This was performed using a Hazard Index (HI) previously established for work in areas contaminated with non-uranium nuclides. The radiological acceptance criteria for uranium are summarized in Table 1. Note that these limits are based on the assumption that radioactive daughter products have reached equilibrium.

Veinot, K. G.

2009-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

433

National Uranium Resource Evaluation, Tonopah quadrangle, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Tonopah Quadrangle, Nevada, was evaluated using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria to identify and delineate areas favorable for uranium deposits. Investigations included reconnaissance and detailed surface geologic and radiometric studies, geochemical sampling and evaluation, analysis and ground-truth followup of aerial radiometric and hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance data, and subsurface data evaluation. The results of these investigations indicate environments favorable for hydroallogenic uranium deposits in Miocene lacustrine sediments of the Big Smoky Valley west of Tonopah. The northern portion of the Toquima granitic pluton is favorable for authigenic uranium deposits. Environments considered unfavorable for uranium deposits include Quaternary sediments; intermediate and mafic volcanic and metavolcanic rocks; Mesozoic, Paleozoic, and Precambrian sedimentary and metasedimentary rocks; those plutonic rocks not included within favorable areas; and those felsic volcanic rocks not within the Northumberland and Mount Jefferson calderas.

Hurley, B W; Parker, D P

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Disposition of excess highly enriched uranium status and update  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the status of the US DOE program charged with the disposition of excess highly enriched uranium (HEU). Approximately 174 metric tonnes of HEU, with varying assays above 20 percent, has been declared excess from US nuclear weapons. A progress report on the identification and characterization of specific batches of excess HEU is provided, and plans for processing it into commercial nuclear fuel or low-level radioactive waste are described. The resultant quantities of low enriched fuel material expected from processing are given, as well as the estimated schedule for introducing the material into the commercial reactor fuel market. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Williams, C.K. III; Arbital, J.G.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Microstructural analyses of Cr(VI) speciation in chromite ore processing Residue (COPR)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

periclase hydrogarnet brucite CAC (total) hydrotalcitehydrotalcite, and possibly brucite. These phases are stableFigure S1), consisting of brucite-like sheets, held together

CHRYSOCHOOU, MARIA

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Microstructural analyses of Cr(VI) speciation in chromite ore processing Residue (COPR)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Christodoulatos, C. Ettringite-Induced Heave in Chromite Orehydrotalcite calcite quartz ettringite amorphous HB n.d.of the total Cr(VI). Ettringite (Ca 6 Al 2 (SO 4 ) 3 (OH) 12

CHRYSOCHOOU, MARIA

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Utilization of geothermal energy in the mining and processing of tungsten ore. 2nd quarterly report  

SciTech Connect

The completed geochemical analysis of groundwater in the Pine Creek area for evaluation of the geothermal potential of this location is presented. Also included is an environmental constraints analysis of Pine Creek noting any potential environmental problems if a geothermal system was developed onsite. Design of a geothermal system is discussed for site-specific applications and is discussed in detail with equipment recommendations and material specifications. A preliminary financial, economic, and institutional assessment of geothermal system located totally on Union Carbide property at Pine Creek is included. (MHR)

Erickson, M.V.; Willens, C.A.; Walter, K.M.; Carrico, R.L.; Lowe, G.D.; Lacy, S.B.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Removal of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils -- Phase 1: Bench-scale testing. Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

To address the management of uranium-contaminated soils at Fernald and other DOE sites, the DOE Office of Technology Development formed the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration (USID) program. The USID has five major tasks. These include the development and demonstration of technologies that are able to (1) characterize the uranium in soil, (2) decontaminate or remove uranium from the soil, (3) treat the soil and dispose of any waste, (4) establish performance assessments, and (5) meet necessary state and federal regulations. This report deals with soil decontamination or removal of uranium from contaminated soils. The report was compiled by the USID task group that addresses soil decontamination; includes data from projects under the management of four DOE facilities [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Savannah River Plant (SRP)]; and consists of four separate reports written by staff at these facilities. The fundamental goal of the soil decontamination task group has been the selective extraction/leaching or removal of uranium from soil faster, cheaper, and safer than current conventional technologies. The objective is to selectively remove uranium from soil without seriously degrading the soil`s physicochemical characteristics or generating waste forms that are difficult to manage and/or dispose of. Emphasis in research was placed more strongly on chemical extraction techniques than physical extraction techniques.

Francis, C. W.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Reassessment of individual dosimetry of long-lived alpha radionuclides of uranium miners through experimental determination of urinary excretion of uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......iranium in urine of uranium miners as a tool for...230Th in excreta of uranium mill crushermen. Health Phys. (1983) 45...Measurement of daily urinary uranium excretion in German...potential intakes of depleted uranium(DU). Sci......

I. Malátová; V. Becková; L. Tomásek; M. Slezáková-Marusiaková; J. Hulka

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Manhattan Project: Processes  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Processes Processes Uranium Mining, Milling, and Refining Uranium Isotope Separation Plutonium Production Bomb Design, Development, and Production Bomb Testing and Weapon Effects Processes PLEASE NOTE: The Processes pages are not yet available. Links to the pages listed below and to the left will be activated as content is developed. Select topics relating to the industrial processes of the Manhattan Project have been grouped into the categories listed to the left. A quick overview of processes involved in the mission of the Manhattan Project can be obtained by reading the summary pages for each of the categories, located in the left navigation bar. Each summary page also has a listing of all the subtopics included within that category. For a complete menu of all process pages, see the comprehensive list of topics below.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium ore processing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Depleted-Uranium Weapons the Whys and Wherefores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The only military application in which present-day depleted-uranium (DU) alloys out-perform tungsten alloys is long-rod penetration into a main battle-tank's armor. However, this advantage is only on the order of 10% and disappearing when the comparison is made in terms of actual lethality of complete anti-tank systems instead of laboratory-type steel penetration capability. Therefore, new micro- and nano-engineered tungsten alloys may soon out-perform existing DU alloys, enabling the production of tungsten munition which will be better than uranium munition, and whose overall life-cycle cost will be less due to the absence of the problems related to the radioactivity of uranium. The reasons why DU weapons have been introduced and used are analysed from the perspective that their radioactivity must have played an important role in the decision making process. It is found that DU weapons belong to the diffuse category of low-radiological-impact nuclear weapons to which emerging types of low-yield, i.e., fourth...

Gsponer, A

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Uranium chloride extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels containing rare earth and noble metal fission products as well as other fission products is disclosed. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of Ca chloride and a U-Fe alloy which is liquid at about 800 C to dissolve uranium metal and the noble metal fission product metals and transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals leaving Ca chloride having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein. The Ca chloride and CaO and the fission products contained therein are separated from the U-Fe alloy and the metal values dissolved therein. The U-Fe alloy having dissolved therein reduced metals from the spent nuclear fuel is contacted with a mixture of one or more alkali metal or alkaline earth metal halides selected from the class consisting of alkali metal or alkaline earth metal and Fe or U halide or a combination thereof to transfer transuranium actinide metals and rare earth metals to the halide salt leaving the uranium and some noble metal fission products in the U-Fe alloy and thereafter separating the halide salt and the transuranium metals dissolved therein from the U-Fe alloy and the metals dissolved therein. 1 figure.

Miller, W.E.; Ackerman, J.P.; Battles, J.E.; Johnson, T.R.; Pierce, R.D.

1992-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

443

Rock-water interaction and evolution of sulphide ores in the late Archaean Chitradurga greenstone belt of southern India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sulphide ore mineralization developed in proximity to iron formations in a cyclic volcano-sedimentary sequence that forms the offshore part of the late Archaean intracratonic basin of the Chitradurga greenston...

H. N. Bhattacharyay; A. D. Mukherjee; P. K. Bhattacharyay

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Influence of the batch's coke-ore ratio and distribution on the porosity of the melting zone  

SciTech Connect

The variation in gas permeability in the melting zone is considered as a function of the height and configuration of the coke packing and the ore component of the batch.

V.P. Tarasov; L.V. Bykov; P.V. Tarasov [Priazovsk State Technical University, Mariupol (Ukraine)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

445

Chemical Looping Combustion of Biomass/Coal with Natural Iron Ore as Oxygen Carrier in a Continuous Reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical Looping Combustion of Biomass/Coal with Natural Iron Ore as Oxygen Carrier in a Continuous Reactor ... Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is a new innovative technology with inherent separation of CO2 without energy penalty. ... Experiments on chemical looping combustion of biomass/coal were conducted in a 1 kWth continuous reactor, and an Australia iron ore was selected as oxygen carrier. ...

Haiming Gu; Laihong Shen; Jun Xiao; Siwen Zhang; Tao Song

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

446

JV Task 95-Particulate Control Consulting for Minnesota Ore Operations  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the project was to assist U.S. Steel in the evaluation, selection, planning, design, and testing of potential approaches to help meet U.S. Steel's goal for low-particulate matter emissions and regulatory compliance. The energy-intensive process for producing iron pellets includes treating the pellets in high-temperature kilns in which the iron is converted from magnetite to hematite. The kilns can be fired with either natural gas or a combination of gas and coal or biomass fuel and are equipped with wet venturi scrubbers for particulate control. Particulate measurements at the inlet and outlet of the scrubbers and analysis of size-fractionated particulate samples led to an understanding of the effect of process variables on the measured emissions and an approach to meet regulatory compliance.

Stanley Miller

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

447

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Production Report Domestic Uranium Production Report 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 Item 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 E2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Surface Drilling (million feet) 1.1 0.7 1.3 3.0 4.9 4.6 2.5 1.0 0.7 W W 1.2 1.7 2.7 5.1 5.1 3.7 4.9 6.3 7.2 Drilling Expenditures (million dollars) 1 5.7 1.1 2.6 7.2 20.0 18.1 7.9 5.6 2.7 W W 10.6 18.1 40.1 67.5 81.9 35.4 44.6 53.6 66.6 (million pounds U 3 O 8 ) 2.1 2.5 3.5 4.7 4.7 4.8 4.5 3.1 2.6 2.4 2.2 2.5 3.0 4.7 4.5 3.9 4.1 4.2 4.1 4.3 (million pounds U 3 O 8 ) 3.1 3.4 6.0 6.3 5.6 4.7 4.6 4.0 2.6 2.3 2.0 2.3 2.7 4.1 4.5 3.9 3.7 4.2 4.0 4.1 (million pounds U 3 O 8 ) 3.4 6.3 5.5 6.0 5.8 4.9 5.5 3.2 2.2 3.8 1.6 2.3 2.7 3.8 4.0 4.1 3.6 5.1 4.0 3.9 (person-years) 871 980 1,107 1,118 1,097 1,120 848 627 423 426 321 420 648 755 1,231 1,563 1,096 1,073 1,191 1,196

448

Carbonate Leaching of Uranium from Contaminated Soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Uranium (U) was successfully removed from contaminated soils from the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) site near Fernald, Ohio. ... The concentrations of uranium and other metals in the effluent were analyzed using a Varian Liberty 200 inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrophotometer (ICP-AES) or a kinetic phosphorescence analyzer (KPA). ... When 30% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was added prior to the carbonate solution, no increase in the removal of uranium was detected (data not shown) due to effervescence with heating, liberating carbon dioxide, and thus preventing uniform distribution of H2O2. ...

C. F. V. Mason; W. R. J. R. Turney; B. M. Thomson; N. Lu; P. A. Longmire; C. J. Chisholm-Brause

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

449

Statistical data of the uranium industry  

SciTech Connect

This report is a compendium of information relating to US uranium reserves and potential resources and to exploration, mining, milling, and other activities of the uranium industry through 1982. The statistics are based primarily on data provided voluntarily by the uranium exploration, mining and milling companies. The compendium has been published annually since 1968 and reflects the basic programs of the Grand Junction Area Office of the US Department of Energy. Statistical data obtained from surveys conducted by the Energy Information Administration are included in Section IX. The production, reserves, and drilling data are reported in a manner which avoids disclosure of proprietary information.

none,

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols: Generation and Characterization  

SciTech Connect

In a study designed to provide an improved scientific basis for assessing possible health effects from inhaling depleted uranium (DU) aerosols, a series of DU penetrators was fired at an Abrams tank and a Bradley fighting vehicle. A robust sampling system was designed to collect aerosols in this difficult environment and continuously monitor the sampler flow rates. Aerosols collected were analyzed for uranium concentration and particle size distribution as a function of time. They were also analyzed for uranium oxide phases, particle morphology, and dissolution in vitro. The resulting data provide input useful in human health risk assessments.

Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Szrom, Fran; Guilmette, Ray; Holmes, Tom; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L.; Collins, John W.; Sanderson, T. Ellory; Fliszar, Richard W.; Gold, Kenneth; Beckman, John C.; Long, Julie

2004-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

451

Surface Decontamination of System Components in Uranium Conversion Plant at KAERI  

SciTech Connect

A chemical decontamination process using nitric acid solution was selected as in-situ technology for recycle or release with authorization of a large amount of metallic waste including process system components such as tanks, piping, etc., which is generated by dismantling a retired uranium conversion plant at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). The applicability of nitric acid solution for surface decontamination of metallic wastes contaminated with uranium compounds was evaluated through the basic research on the dissolution of UO2 and ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC) powder. Decontamination performance was verified by using the specimens contaminated with such uranium compounds as UO2 and AUC taken from the uranium conversion plant. Dissolution rate of UO2 powder is notably enhanced by the addition of H2O2 as an oxidant even in the condition of a low concentration of nitric acid and low temperature compared with those in a nitric acid solution without H2O2. AUC powders dissolve easily in nitric acid solutions until the solution pH attains about 2.5 {approx} 3. Above that solution pH, however, the uranium concentration in the solution is lowered drastically by precipitation as a form of U3(NH3)4O9 . 5H2O. Decontamination performance tests for the specimens contaminated with UO2 and AUC were quite successful with the application of decontamination conditions obtained through the basic studies on the dissolution of UO2 and AUC powders.

Choi, W. K.; Kim, K. N.; Won, H. J.; Jung, C. H.; Oh, W. Z.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

452

Corrosion of Uranium in Desert Soil, with Application to GCD Source Term M  

SciTech Connect

Uranium fragments from the Sandia Sled Track were studied as analogues for weapons components and depleted uranium buried at the Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) site in Nevada. The Sled Track uranium fragments originated as weapons mockups and counterweights impacted on concrete and soil barriers, and experienced heating and fragmentation similar to processes thought to affect the Nuclear Weapons Accident Residues (NWAR) at GCD. Furthermore, the Sandia uranium was buried in unsaturated desert soils for 10 to 40 years, and has undergone weathering processes expected to affect the GCD wastes. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and microprobe analyses of the fragments show rapid alteration from metals to dominantly VI-valent oxy-hydroxides. Leaching studies of the samples give results consistent with published U-oxide dissolution rates, and suggest longer experimental periods (ca. 1 year) would be required to reach equilibrium solution concentrations. Thermochemical modeling with the EQ3/6 code indicates that the uranium concentrations in solutions saturated with becquerelite could increase as the pore waters evaporate, due to changes in carbonate equilibria and increased ionic strength.

ANDERSON, HOWARD L.; BACA, JULIANNE; KRUMHANSL, JAMES L.; STOCKMAN, HARLAN W.; THOMPSON, MOLLIE E.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

canonsburg.cdr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Disposal Site Disposal Site The Canonsburg Disposal Site is a former uranium ore processing facility located in the Borough of Canonsburg, Washington County, in southwestern Pennsylvania, approximately 20 miles southwest of downtown Pittsburgh. The site lies between Chartiers Creek and the Pittsburgh and Ohio Central Railroad tracks. The surrounding land is primarily residential and is moderately populated. The former mill processed uranium and other ores at the site between 1911 and 1957 and provided uranium for the U.S. Government national defense programs. Standard Chemical operated the site as a radium extraction plant from 1911 to 1922. Later, Vitro Corporation of America acquired the property and processed ore to extract radium and uranium salts. From 1942 until 1957, Vitro was under contract to the federal government to recover uranium from ore and scrap. Processing operations

454

Bacterial Community Succession During in situ Uranium Bioremediation: Spatial Similarities Along Controlled Flow Paths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

problem, and the use of depleted uranium and other heavyenvironmental hazard. Depleted uranium is weakly radioactiveMB. (2004). Depleted and natural uranium: chemistry and

Hwang, Chiachi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Interactions of Jet Fuels with Nitrile O-Rings: Petroleum-Derived versus Synthetic Fuels  

SciTech Connect

A transition from petroleum-derived jet fuels to blends with Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) fuels, and ultimately fully synthetic hydro-isomerized F-T fuels has raised concern about the fate of plasticizers in nitrile-butadiene rubber a-rings that are contacted by the fuels as this transition occurs. The partitioning of plasticizers and fuel molecules between nitrile a-rings and petroleum-derived, synthetic, and additized-synthetic jet fuels has been measured. Thermal desorption of o-rings soaked in the various jet fuels followed by gas chromatographic analysis with a mass spectrometric detector showed many of the plasticizer and stabilizer compounds were removed from the o-rings regardless of the contact fuel. Fuel molecules were observed to migrate into the o-rings for the petroleum-derived fuel as did both the fuel and additive for a synthetic F-T jet fuel additized with benzyl alcohol, but less for the unadditized synthetic fuel. The specific compounds or classes of compounds involved in the partitioning were identified and a semiquantitative comparison of relative partitioning of the compounds of interest was made. The results provide another step forward in improving the confidence level of using additized, fully synthetic jet fuel in the place of petroleum-derived fuel.

Gormley, R.J.; Link, D.D.; Baltrus, J.P.; Zandhuis, P.H.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Geochemical Fingerprinting of Coltan Ores by Machine Learning on Uneven Datasets  

SciTech Connect

Two modern machine learning techniques, Linear Programming Boosting (LPBoost) and Support Vector Machines (SVMs), are introduced and applied to a geochemical dataset of niobium-tantalum ('coltan') ores from Central Africa to demonstrate how such information may be used to distinguish ore provenance, i.e., place of origin. The compositional data used include uni- and multivariate outliers and elemental distributions are not described by parametric frequency distribution functions. The 'soft margin' techniques of LPBoost and SVMs can be applied to such data. Optimization of their learning parameters results in an average accuracy of up to c. 92%, if spot measurements are assessed to estimate the provenance of ore samples originating from two geographically defined source areas. A parameterized performance measure, together with common methods for its optimization, was evaluated to account for the presence of uneven datasets. Optimization of the classification function threshold improves the performance, as class importance is shifted towards one of those classes. For this dataset, the average performance of the SVMs is significantly better compared to that of LPBoost.

Savu-Krohn, Christian, E-mail: christian.savu-krohn@unileoben.ac.at; Rantitsch, Gerd, E-mail: gerd.rantitsch@unileoben.ac.at [Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Department of Applied Geosciences and Geophysics (Austria); Auer, Peter, E-mail: auer@unileoben.ac.at [Chair for Information Technology, Montanuniversitaet Leoben (Austria); Melcher, Frank, E-mail: frank.melcher@bgr.de; Graupner, Torsten, E-mail: torsten.graupner@bgr.de [Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (Germany)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

457

Synthesis of uranium nitride and uranium carbide powder by carbothermic reduction  

SciTech Connect

Uranium nitride and uranium carbide are being considered as high burnup fuels in next generation nuclear reactors and accelerated driven systems for the transmutation of nuclear waste. The same characteristics that make nitrides and carbides candidates for these applications (i.e. favorable thermal properties, mutual solubility of nitrides, etc.), also make these compositions candidate fuels for space nuclear reactors. In this paper, we discuss the synthesis and characterization of depleted uranium nitride and carbide for a space nuclear reactor program. Importantly, this project emphasized that to synthesize high quality uranium nitride and carbide, it is necessary to understand the exact stoichiometry of the oxide feedstock. (authors)

Dunwoody, J.T.; Stanek, C.R.; McClellan, K.J.; Voit, S.L.; Volz, H.M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (United States); Hickman, R.R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z