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1

NNSA Authorizes Start-Up of Highly Enriched Uranium Materials...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Releases NNSA Authorizes Start-Up of Highly Enriched Uranium ... NNSA Authorizes Start-Up of Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility at Y-12 applicationmsword icon R-10-01...

2

EIS-0359: Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

59: Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, 59: Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky Site EIS-0359: Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky Site Summary This site-specific EIS considers the construction, operation, maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning of the proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) conversion facility at three locations within the Paducah site; transportation of depleted uranium conversion products and waste materials to a disposal facility; transportation and sale of the hydrogen fluoride (HF) produced as a conversion co-product; and neutralization of HF to calcium fluoride and its sale or disposal in the event that the HF product is not sold. This EIS also considers a no action alternative that assumes continued storage of DUF6 at the Paducah site. A

3

Recommendations to the NRC on acceptable standard format and content for the Fundamental Nuclear Material Control (FNMC) Plan required for low-enriched uranium enrichment facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new section, 10 CFR 74.33, has been added to the material control and accounting (MC A) requirements of 10 CFR Part 74. This new section pertains to US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-licensed uranium enrichment facilities that are authorized to produce and to possess more than one effective kilogram of special nuclear material (SNM) of low strategic significance. The new section is patterned after 10 CFR 74.31, which pertains to NRC licensees (other than production or utilization facilities licensed pursuant to 10 CFR Part 50 and 70 and waste disposal facilities) that are authorized to possess and use more than one effective kilogram of unencapsulated SNM of low strategic significance. Because enrichment facilities have the potential capability of producing SNM of moderate strategic significance and also strategic SNM, certain performance objectives and MC A system capabilities are required in 10 CFR 74.33 that are not contained in 10 CFR 74.31. This document recommends to the NRC information that the licensee or applicant should provide in the fundamental nuclear material control (FNMC) plan. This document also describes methods that should be acceptable for compliance with the general performance objectives. While this document is intended to cover various uranium enrichment technologies, the primary focus at this time is gas centrifuge and gaseous diffusion.

Moran, B.W.; Belew, W.L. (Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States)); Hammond, G.A.; Brenner, L.M. (21st Century Industries, Inc., Gaithersburg, MD (United States))

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Special Nuclear Materials: EM Manages Plutonium, Highly Enriched Uranium  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nuclear Materials & Waste » Nuclear Materials & Waste » Special Nuclear Materials: EM Manages Plutonium, Highly Enriched Uranium and Uranium-233 Special Nuclear Materials: EM Manages Plutonium, Highly Enriched Uranium and Uranium-233 105-K building houses the K-Area Material Storage (KAMS) facility, designated for the consolidated storage of surplus plutonium at Savannah River Site pending disposition. The plutonium shipped to KAMS is sealed inside a welded 3013 containers that are nested in 9975 shipping containers. 105-K building houses the K-Area Material Storage (KAMS) facility, designated for the consolidated storage of surplus plutonium at Savannah River Site pending disposition. The plutonium shipped to KAMS is sealed inside a welded 3013 containers that are nested in 9975 shipping

5

Uranium Processing Facility | Y-12 National Security Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

About / Transforming Y-12 / Uranium Processing Facility About / Transforming Y-12 / Uranium Processing Facility Uranium Processing Facility UPF will be a state-of-the-art, consolidated facility for enriched uranium operations including assembly, disassembly, dismantlement, quality evaluation, and product certification. An integral part of Y-12's transformation efforts and a key component of the National Nuclear Security Administration's Uranium Center of Excellence, the Uranium Processing Facility is one of two facilities at Y-12 whose joint mission will be to accomplish the storage and processing of all enriched uranium in one much smaller, centralized area. Safety, security and flexibility are key design attributes of the facility, which is in the preliminary design phase of work. UPF will be built to modern standards and engage new technologies through a responsive and agile

6

EIS-0359: Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

operation, maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning of the proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) conversion facility at three locations within the...

7

Inhalation class for depleted uranium at a major uranium applications facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A primary concern in determining internal dose from inhalation of radioactive material is the half-time of the material within the human body. Inhalation classes have been established by the ICRP for radioactive materials with half-times of a few days (Class D), several weeks (Class W), or periods up to one year (Class Y). Bioassay data at a facility using large quantities of depleted uranium have been collected for several years. These data have been analyzed to estimate the first order decay constant. From the decay constant, the half-time for retention (biological half-life) is determined. This half-time is used to identify the inhalation class for depleted uranium and its oxides. The data presented demonstrate that the retention half-time for depleted uranium and its oxides ranges from about 7 d to about 6 wk, depending on the quantity of material inhaled and the subject`s metabolism. This shows that the correct inhalation class for depleted uranium is Class W.

Barg, D.C.; Grewing, H.L. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

CRAD, Training - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Training - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of the Training Program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Training - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility More Documents & Publications CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide

9

Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as oxide. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will have two missions: (1) convert HEU materials into pure HEU oxide and (2) blend the pure HEU oxide with depleted and natural uranium oxide to produce an LWR grade LEU product. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. To the extent practical, the chemical and isotopic concentrations of blended LEU product will be held within the specifications required for LWR fuel. Such blended LEU product will be offered to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) to be sold as feed material to the commercial nuclear industry. Otherwise, blended LEU will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

NONE

1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

10

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the Plutonium Uranium Extraction Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether these systems are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan will ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated, at a minimum, every 3 years.

Greager, E.M.

1997-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

11

Radiological Safety Training for Uranium Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE HDBK-1113-2008 DOE HDBK-1113-2008 April 2008 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL SAFETY TRAINING FOR URANIUM FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1113-2008 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ DOE-HDBK-1113-2008 iii Foreword This Handbook describes a recommended implementation process for additional training as outlined in DOE-STD-1098-99, Radiological Control (RCS). Its purpose is to assist those individuals, Department of Energy (DOE) employees, Managing and Operating (M&O) contractors, and Managing and Integrating

12

Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facilities...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Thomas L. McCall, Jr. http:www.em.doe.govffaaortsca.html 4252001 Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facilities Compliance Agree.. Page 12 of 26 Deputy...

13

Financial Assurance for In Situ Uranium Facilities (Texas) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Financial Assurance for In Situ Uranium Facilities (Texas) Financial Assurance for In Situ Uranium Facilities (Texas) Financial Assurance for In Situ Uranium Facilities (Texas) < Back Eligibility Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility State/Provincial Govt Utility Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Texas Commission on Environmental Quality Owners or operators are required to provide financial assurance for in situ uranium sites. This money is required for: decommissioning, decontamination, demolition, and waste disposal for buildings, structures, foundations, equipment, and utilities; surface reclamation of contaminated area including operating areas, roads, wellfields, and surface impoundments; groundwater restoration in mining areas; radiological surveying and environmental monitoring; and long-term radiation and

14

CRAD, Training- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of the Training Program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility.

15

CRAD, Management- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of Management program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility.

16

Fission, Fusion Materials Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

is shown in illustration. Materials are the immediate priority of both the fission and fusion communities. Extending the lifetime of the current fleet of light water reactors...

17

EIS-0089: PUREX Plant and Uranium Oxide Plant Facilities, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy developed this statement to evaluate the environmental impacts of resumption of operations of the PUREX/Uranium Oxide facilities at the Hanford Site to produce plutonium and other special nuclear materials for national defense needs.

18

Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as metal. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission of this Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will be to blend surplus HEU metal and alloy with depleted uranium metal to produce an LEU product. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. The blended LEU will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

NONE

1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

19

Long-term criticality control in radioactive waste disposal facilities using depleted uranium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plant photosynthesis has created a unique planetary-wide geochemistry - an oxidizing atmosphere with oxidizing surface waters on a planetary body with chemically reducing conditions near or at some distance below the surface. Uranium is four orders of magnitude more soluble under chemically oxidizing conditions than it is under chemically reducing conditions. Thus, uranium tends to leach from surface rock and disposal sites, move with groundwater, and concentrate where chemically reducing conditions appear. Earth`s geochemistry concentrates uranium and can separate uranium from all other elements except oxygen, hydrogen (in water), and silicon (silicates, etc). Fissile isotopes include {sup 235}U, {sup 233}U, and many higher actinides that eventually decay to one of these two uranium isotopes. The potential for nuclear criticality exists if the precipitated uranium from disposal sites has a significant fissile enrichment, mass, and volume. The earth`s geochemistry suggests that isotopic dilution of fissile materials in waste with {sup 238}U is a preferred strategy to prevent long-term nuclear criticality in and beyond the boundaries of waste disposal facilities because the {sup 238}U does not separate from the fissile uranium isotopes. Geological, laboratory, and theoretical data indicate that the potential for nuclear criticality can be minimized by diluting fissile materials with-{sup 238}U to 1 wt % {sup 235}U equivalent.

Forsberg, C.W.

1997-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

20

Radiological safety training for uranium facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This handbook contains recommended training materials consistent with DOE standardized core radiological training material. These materials consist of a program management guide, instructor`s guide, student guide, and overhead transparencies.

NONE

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium materials facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Uranium-Loaded Water Treatment Resins: 'Equivalent Feed' at NRC and Agreement State-Licensed Uranium Recovery Facilities - 12094  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Community Water Systems (CWSs) are required to remove uranium from drinking water to meet EPA standards. Similarly, mining operations are required to remove uranium from their dewatering discharges to meet permitted surface water discharge limits. Ion exchange (IX) is the primary treatment strategy used by these operations, which loads uranium onto resin beads. Presently, uranium-loaded resin from CWSs and mining operations can be disposed as a waste product or processed by NRC- or Agreement State-licensed uranium recovery facilities if that licensed facility has applied for and received permission to process 'alternate feed'. The disposal of uranium-loaded resin is costly and the cost to amend a uranium recovery license to accept alternate feed can be a strong disincentive to commercial uranium recovery facilities. In response to this issue, the NRC issued a Regulatory Issue Summary (RIS) to clarify the agency's policy that uranium-loaded resin from CWSs and mining operations can be processed by NRC- or Agreement State-licensed uranium recovery facilities without the need for an alternate feed license amendment when these resins are essentially the same, chemically and physically, to resins that licensed uranium recovery facilities currently use (i.e., equivalent feed). NRC staff is clarifying its current alternate feed policy to declare IX resins as equivalent feed. This clarification is necessary to alleviate a regulatory and financial burden on facilities that filter uranium using IX resin, such as CWSs and mine dewatering operations. Disposing of those resins in a licensed facility could be 40 to 50 percent of the total operations and maintenance (O and M) cost for a CWS. Allowing uranium recovery facilities to treat these resins without requiring a license amendment lowers O and M costs and captures a valuable natural resource. (authors)

Camper, Larry W.; Michalak, Paul; Cohen, Stephen; Carter, Ted [Nuclear Regulatory Commission (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

The Uranium Processing Facility Finite Element Meshing Discussion  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) Finite Element Meshing Discussion ...Need picture of Building... October 25, 2011 Department of Energy - Natural Phenomenon Hazard Workshop 1 Loring Wyllie Arne Halterman Degenkolb Engineers, San Francisco Purpose of Presentation * Design vs. Analysis * Discuss the mesh criteria * Discuss the evolution of the mesh of the UPF main building model * Discuss how the mesh affects the analysis process October 25, 2011 2 Department of Energy - Natural Phenomenon Hazard Workshop FEM Modeling * GTStrudl typically used for DOE projects. * Mesh size is important * What is to be captured? * How complex is the system? * Current criteria set to capture in-plane and out-of-plane response. October 25, 2011 3

23

EIS-0329: Proposed Construction, Operation, Decontamination/Decommissioning of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS analyzes DOE's proposal to construct, operate, maintain, and decontaminate and decommission two depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF 6) conversion facilities, at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky.

24

BLENDING LOW ENRICHED URANIUM WITH DEPLETED URANIUM TO CREATE A SOURCE MATERIAL ORE THAT CAN BE PROCESSED FOR THE RECOVERY OF YELLOWCAKE AT A CONVENTIONAL URANIUM MILL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Throughout the United States Department of Energy (DOE) complex, there are a number of streams of low enriched uranium (LEU) that contain various trace contaminants. These surplus nuclear materials require processing in order to meet commercial fuel cycle specifications. To date, they have not been designated as waste for disposal at the DOE's Nevada Test Site (NTS). Currently, with no commercial outlet available, the DOE is evaluating treatment and disposal as the ultimate disposition path for these materials. This paper will describe an innovative program that will provide a solution to DOE that will allow disposition of these materials at a cost that will be competitive with treatment and disposal at the NTS, while at the same time recycling the material to recover a valuable energy resource (yellowcake) for reintroduction into the commercial nuclear fuel cycle. International Uranium (USA) Corporation (IUSA) and Nuclear Fuel Services, Inc. (NFS) have entered into a commercial relationship to pursue the development of this program. The program involves the design of a process and construction of a plant at NFS' site in Erwin, Tennessee, for the blending of contaminated LEU with depleted uranium (DU) to produce a uranium source material ore (USM Ore{trademark}). The USM Ore{trademark} will then be further processed at IUC's White Mesa Mill, located near Blanding, Utah, to produce conventional yellowcake, which can be delivered to conversion facilities, in the same manner as yellowcake that is produced from natural ores or other alternate feed materials. The primary source of feed for the business will be the significant sources of trace contaminated materials within the DOE complex. NFS has developed a dry blending process (DRYSM Process) to blend the surplus LEU material with DU at its Part 70 licensed facility, to produce USM Ore{trademark} with a U235 content within the range of U235 concentrations for source material. By reducing the U235 content to source material levels in this manner, the material will be suitable for processing at a conventional uranium mill under its existing Part 40 license to remove contaminants and enable the product to re-enter the commercial fuel cycle. The tailings from processing the USM Ore{trademark} at the mill will be permanently disposed of in the mill's tailings impoundment as 11e.(2) byproduct material. Blending LEU with DU to make a uranium source material ore that can be returned to the nuclear fuel cycle for processing to produce yellowcake, has never been accomplished before. This program will allow DOE to disposition its surplus LEU and DU in a cost effective manner, and at the same time provide for the recovery of valuable energy resources that would be lost through processing and disposal of the materials. This paper will discuss the nature of the surplus LEU and DU materials, the manner in which the LEU will be blended with DU to form a uranium source material ore, and the legal means by which this blending can be accomplished at a facility licensed under 10 CFR Part 70 to produce ore that can be processed at a conventional uranium mill licensed under 10 CFR Part 40.

Schutt, Stephen M.; Hochstein, Ron F.; Frydenlund, David C.; Thompson, Anthony J.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

25

Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as uranyl nitrate hexahydrate. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will have two missions: (1) convert HEU materials to pure HEU uranyl nitrate (UNH) and (2) blend pure HEU UNH with depleted and natural UNH to produce HEU UNH crystals. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. To the extent practical, the chemical and isotopic concentrations of blended LEU product will be held within the specifications required for LWR fuel. Such blended LEU product will be offered to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) to be sold as feed material to the commercial nuclear industry. Otherwise, blended LEU Will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

NONE

1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

26

Development of Integrated Online Monitoring Systems for Detection of Diversion at Natural Uranium Conversion Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has focused on some source term modeling of uranyl nitrate (UN) as part of a comprehensive validation effort employing gamma-ray detector instrumentation for the detection of diversion from declared conversion activities. Conversion, the process by which natural uranium ore (yellowcake) is purified and converted through a series of chemical processes into uranium hexafluoride gas (UF6), has historically been excluded from the nuclear safeguards requirements of the 235U-based nuclear fuel cycle. The undeclared diversion of this product material could potentially provide feedstock for a clandestine weapons program for state or non-state entities. Given the changing global political environment and the increased availability of dual-use nuclear technology, the International Atomic Energy Agency has evolved its policies to emphasize safeguarding this potential feedstock material in response to dynamic and evolving potential diversion pathways. To meet the demand for instrumentation testing at conversion facilities, ORNL developed the Uranyl Nitrate Calibration Loop Equipment (UNCLE) facility to simulate the full-scale operating conditions of a purified uranium-bearing aqueous stream exiting the solvent extraction process in a natural uranium conversion plant. This work investigates gamma-ray signatures of UN circulating in the UNCLE facility and evaluates detector instrumentation sensitivity to UN for safeguards applications. These detector validation activities include assessing detector responses to the UN gamma-ray signatures for spectrometers based on sodium iodide, lanthanum bromide, and germanium detectors. The results of measurements under static and dynamic operating conditions at concentrations ranging from 10-90g U/L of naturally enriched UN will be presented. A range of gamma-ray lines was examined and self-attenuation factors were calculated, in addition to attenuation for transmission measurement of density, concentration and enrichment. A detailed uncertainty analysis will be presented providing insights into instrumentation limitations to spoofing.

Dewji, Shaheen A [ORNL] [ORNL; Lee, Denise L [ORNL] [ORNL; Croft, Stephen [ORNL] [ORNL; McElroy, Robert Dennis [ORNL] [ORNL; Hertel, Nolan [Georgia Institute of Technology] [Georgia Institute of Technology; Chapman, Jeffrey Allen [ORNL] [ORNL; Cleveland, Steven L [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Advanced Materials Facilities & Capabilites | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research Highlights Research Highlights Facilities and Capabilities Science to Energy Solutions News & Awards Events and Conferences Supporting Organizations Advanced Materials Home | Science & Discovery | Advanced Materials | Facilities and Capabilities SHARE Facilities and Capabilities ORNL has resources that together provide a unique environment for Advanced Materials Researchers. ORNL hosts two of the most advanced neutron research facilities in the world, the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). In addition, the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences offers world-class capabilities and expertise for nanofabrication, scanning probe microscopy, chemical and laser synthesis, spectroscopy, and computational modeling and their. The ORNL

28

The New Generation of Uranium In Situ Recovery Facilities: Design Improvements Should Reduce Radiological Impacts Relative to First Generation Uranium Solution Mining Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the last few years, there has been a significant increase in the demand for Uranium as historical inventories have been consumed and new reactor orders are being placed. Numerous mineralized properties around the world are being evaluated for Uranium recovery and new mining / milling projects are being evaluated and developed. Ore bodies which are considered uneconomical to mine by conventional methods such as tunneling or open pits, can be candidates for non-conventional recovery techniques, involving considerably less capital expenditure. Technologies such as Uranium In Situ Leaching / In Situ Recovery (ISL / ISR - also referred to as 'solution mining'), have enabled commercial scale mining and milling of relatively small ore pockets of lower grade, and are expected to make a significant contribution to overall world wide uranium supplies over the next ten years. Commercial size solution mining production facilities have operated in the US since the mid 1970's. However, current designs are expected to result in less radiological wastes and emissions relative to these 'first' generation plants (which were designed, constructed and operated through the 1980's). These early designs typically used alkaline leach chemistries in situ including use of ammonium carbonate which resulted in groundwater restoration challenges, open to air recovery vessels and high temperature calcining systems for final product drying vs the 'zero emissions' vacuum dryers as typically used today. Improved containment, automation and instrumentation control and use of vacuum dryers in the design of current generation plants are expected to reduce production of secondary waste byproduct material, reduce Radon emissions and reduce potential for employee exposure to uranium concentrate aerosols at the back end of the milling process. In Situ Recovery in the U.S. typically involves the circulation of groundwater, fortified with oxidizing (gaseous oxygen e.g) and complexing agents (carbon dioxide, e.g) into an ore body, solubilizing the uranium in situ, and then pumping the solutions to the surface where they are fed to a processing plant ( mill). Processing involves ion exchange and may also include precipitation, drying or calcining and packaging operations depending on facility specifics. This paper presents an overview of the ISR process and the health physics monitoring programs developed at a number of commercial scale ISL / ISR Uranium recovery and production facilities as a result of the radiological character of these processes. Although many radiological aspects of the process are similar to that of conventional mills, conventional-type tailings as such are not generated. However, liquid and solid byproduct materials may be generated and impounded. The quantity and radiological character of these by products are related to facility specifics. Some special monitoring considerations are presented which are required due to the manner in which radon gas is evolved in the process and the unique aspects of controlling solution flow patterns underground. The radiological character of these processes are described using empirical data collected from many operating facilities. Additionally, the major aspects of the health physics and radiation protection programs that were developed at these first generation facilities are discussed and contrasted to circumstances of the current generation and state of the art of uranium ISR technologies and facilities. In summary: This paper has presented an overview of in situ Uranium recovery processes and associated major radiological aspects and monitoring considerations. Admittedly, the purpose was to present an overview of those special health physics considerations dictated by the in situ Uranium recovery technology, to point out similarities and differences to conventional mill programs and to contrast these alkaline leach facilities to modern day ISR designs. As evidenced by the large number of ISR projects currently under development in the U.S. and worldwide, non conventional Uranium recovery techniques

Brown, S.H. [CHP, SHB INC., Centennial, Colorado (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Treatment of Uranium and Plutonium Solutions Generated in the Atalante Facility, France - 12004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Atalante complex operated by the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) at the Rhone Valley Research Center consolidates research programs on actinide chemistry, especially separation chemistry, processing for recycling spent fuel, and fabrication of actinide targets for innovative concepts in future nuclear systems. The design of future systems (Generation IV reactors, material recycling) will increase the uranium and plutonium flows in the facility, making it important to anticipate the stepped-up activity and provide Atalante with equipment dedicated to processing these solutions to obtain a mixed uranium-plutonium oxide that will be stored pending reuse. Ongoing studies for integral recycling of the actinides have highlighted the need for reserving equipment to produce actinides mixed oxide powder and also minor actinides bearing oxide for R and D purpose. To meet this double objective a new shielded line should be built in the facility and should be operational 6 years after go decision. The main functions of the new unit would be to receive, concentrate and store solutions, purify them, ensure group conversion of actinides and conversion of excess uranium. This new unit will be constructed in a completely refurbished building devoted to subcritical and safe geometry of the process equipments. (author)

Lagrave, Herve [French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission - CEA, Rhone Valley Research Center, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Use of the UNCLE Facility to Assess Integrated Online Monitoring Systems for Detection of Diversions at Uranium Conversion Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historically, the approach to safeguarding nuclear material in the front end of the fuel cycle was implemented only at the stage when UF6 was declared as feedstock for enrichment plants. Recent International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) circulars and policy papers have sought to implement safeguards when any purified aqueous uranium solution or uranium oxides suitable for isotopic enrichment or fuel fabrication exist. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed the Uranyl Nitrate Calibration Loop Equipment (UNCLE) facility to simulate the full-scale operating conditions for a purified uranium-bearing aqueous stream exiting the solvent extraction process conducted in a natural uranium conversion plant (NUCP) operating at 6000 MTU/year. Monitoring instruments, including the 3He passive neutron detector developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Endress+Hauser Promass 83F Coriolis meter, have been tested at UNCLE and field tested at Springfields. The field trials demonstrated the need to perform full-scale equipment testing under controlled conditions prior to field deployment of operations and safeguards monitoring at additional plants. Currently, UNCLE is testing neutron-based monitoring for detection of noncompliant activities; however, gamma-ray source term monitoring is currently being explored complementary to the neutron detector in order to detect undeclared activities in a more timely manner. The preliminary results of gamma-ray source term modeling and monitoring at UNCLE are being analyzed as part of a comprehensive source term and detector benchmarking effort. Based on neutron source term detection capabilities, alternative gamma-based detection and monitoring methods will be proposed to more effectively monitor NUCP operations in verifying or detecting deviations from declared conversion activities.

Dewji, Shaheen A [ORNL; Chapman, Jeffrey Allen [ORNL; Lee, Denise L [ORNL; Rauch, Eric [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Hertel, Nolan [Georgia Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Fernald vacuum transfer system for uranium materials repackaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) is the site of a former Department of Energy (DOE) uranium processing plant. When production was halted, many materials were left in an intermediate state. Some of this product material included enriched uranium compounds that had to be repackaged for shipment of off-site storage. This paper provides an overview, technical description, and status of a new application of existing technology, a vacuum transfer system, to repackage the uranium bearing compounds for shipment. The vacuum transfer system provides a method of transferring compounds from their current storage configuration into packages that meet the Department of Transportation (DOT) shipping requirements for fissile materials. This is a necessary activity, supporting removal of nuclear materials prior to site decontamination and decommissioning, key to the Fernald site's closure process.

Kaushiva, Shirley; Weekley, Clint; Molecke, Martin; Polansky, Gary

2002-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

32

Methods for nondestructive assay holdup measurements in shutdown uranium enrichment facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurement surveys of uranium holdup using nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques are being conducted for shutdown gaseous diffusion facilities at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site (formerly the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant). When in operation, these facilities processed UF{sub 6} with enrichments ranging from 0.2 to 93 wt % {sup 235}U. Following final shutdown of all process facilities, NDA surveys were initiated to provide process holdup data for the planning and implementation of decontamination and decommissioning activities. A three-step process is used to locate and quantify deposits: (1) high-resolution gamma-ray measurements are performed to generally define the relative abundances of radioisotopes present, (2) sizable deposits are identified using gamma-ray scanning methods, and (3) the deposits are quantified using neutron measurement methods. Following initial quantitative measurements, deposit sizes are calculated; high-resolution gamma-ray measurements are then performed on the items containing large deposits. The quantitative estimates for the large deposits are refined on the basis of these measurements. Facility management is using the results of the survey to support a variety of activities including isolation and removal of large deposits; performing health, safety, and environmental analyses; and improving facility nuclear material control and accountability records. 3 refs., 1 tab.

Hagenauer, R.C.; Mayer, R.L. II.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Y-12s Building 9212 and the Uranium Processing Facility, part...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

wings. Never would a facility be designed like that today to process uranium. Yet, the workers at Y-12 have, for years, managed to sustain the Y-12 "Can Do" attitude and generate...

34

Surface water transport and distribution of uranium in contaminated sediments near a nuclear weapons processing facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The extent of remobilization of uranium from contaminated soils adjacent to a nuclear weapons processing facility during episodic rain events was investigated. In addition, information on the solid phase associations of U in floodplain and suspended...

Batson, Vicky Lynn

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Guide of Good Practices for Occupational Radiological Protection in Uranium Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NOT MEASUREMENT NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1136-2009 July 2009 DOE STANDARD GUIDE OF GOOD PRACTICES FOR OCCUPATIONAL RADIOLOGICAL PROTECTION IN URANIUM FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1136-2009 Guide of Good Practices for Occupational Radiological Protection in Uranium Facilities i This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-1136-2009 Guide of Good Practices for Occupational Radiological Protection in Uranium Facilities iii Foreword This Technical Standard (TS) discusses, but does not establish any, requirements for DOE uranium

36

Guide of Good Practices for Occupational Radiological Protection in Uranium Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1136-2009 1136-2009 July 2009 DOE STANDARD GUIDE OF GOOD PRACTICES FOR OCCUPATIONAL RADIOLOGICAL PROTECTION IN URANIUM FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1136-2009 Guide of Good Practices for Occupational Radiological Protection in Uranium Facilities i This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-1136-2009 Guide of Good Practices for Occupational Radiological Protection in Uranium Facilities iii Foreword This Technical Standard (TS) discusses, but does not establish any, requirements for DOE uranium

37

New Prototype Safeguards Technology Offers Improved Confidence and Automation for Uranium Enrichment Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An important requirement for the international safeguards community is the ability to determine the enrichment level of uranium in gas centrifuge enrichment plants and nuclear fuel fabrication facilities. This is essential to ensure that countries with nuclear nonproliferation commitments, such as States Party to the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, are adhering to their obligations. However, current technologies to verify the uranium enrichment level in gas centrifuge enrichment plants or nuclear fuel fabrication facilities are technically challenging and resource-intensive. NNSAs Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NIS) supports the development, testing, and evaluation of future systems that will strengthen and sustain U.S. safeguards and security capabilitiesin this case, by automating the monitoring of uranium enrichment in the entire inventory of a fuel fabrication facility. One such system is HEVAhybrid enrichment verification array. This prototype was developed to provide an automated, nondestructive assay verification technology for uranium hexafluoride (UF6) cylinders at enrichment plants.

Brim, Cornelia P.

2013-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

38

CRAD, Criticality Safety- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of the Criticality Safety program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Facility.

39

CRAD, Conduct of Operations- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January, 2005 assessment of Conduct of Operations program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility.

40

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of Industrial Safety and Industrial Health programs at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium materials facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

CRAD, Radiological Controls- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of the Radiation Protection Program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility.

42

CRAD, Environmental Protection- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of Environmental Compliance program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility.

43

CRAD, DOE Oversight- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a DOE independent oversight assessment of the Y-12 Site Office's programs for oversight of its contractors at the Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility.

44

CRAD, Emergency Management- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of Emergency Management program at the Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility.

45

CRAD, Safety Basis- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of the Safety Basis at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility.

46

Environmental monitoring for detection of uranium enrichment operations: Comparison of LEU and HEU facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1994, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) initiated an ambitious program of worldwide field trials to evaluate the utility of environmental monitoring for safeguards. Part of this program involved two extensive United States field trials conducted at the large uranium enrichment facilities. The Paducah operation involves a large low-enriched uranium (LEU) gaseous diffusion plant while the Portsmouth facilities include a large gaseous diffusion plant that has produced both LEU and high-enriched uranium (HEU) as well as an LEU centrifuge facility. As a result of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, management of the uranium enrichment operations was assumed by the US Enrichment Corporation (USEC). The facilities are operated under contract by Martin Marietta Utility Services. Martin Marietta Energy Systems manages the environmental restoration and waste management programs at Portsmouth and Paducah for DOE. These field trials were conducted. Samples included swipes from inside and outside process buildings, vegetation and soil samples taken from locations up to 8 km from main sites, and hydrologic samples taken on the sites and at varying distances from the sites. Analytical results from bulk analysis were obtained using high abundance sensitivity thermal ionization mm spectrometers (TIMS). Uranium isotopics altered from the normal background percentages were found for all the sample types listed above, even on vegetation 5 km from one of the enrichment facilities. The results from these field trials demonstrate that dilution by natural background uranium does not remove from environmental samples the distinctive signatures that are characteristic of enrichment operations. Data from swipe samples taken within the enrichment facilities were particularly revealing. Particulate analysis of these swipes provided a detailed ``history`` of both facilities, including the assays of the end product and tails for both facilities.

Hembree, D.M. Jr.; Carter, J.A.; Ross, H.H.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Material property correlations for uranium mononitride  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

modeling efforts, the objective of this work was the development of a set of UN material property correlations needed for use in fuel modeling codes. This set of material properties includes the physical properties (lattice parameter, density, and mean..., exponential or power law form, then the FITTER code (Thomas et al, 1987) was employed. For more complicated forms, the SLOWFIT code (Hayes and Thomas 1988), based on a generalized search technique, was required. The PLOTTER code (Senor 1988) allowed...

Hayes, Steven Lowe

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

48

Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Materials Use Roadmap  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 8 U.S. Department of Energy DUF 6 MATERIALS USE ROADMAP Edited by: M. Jonathan Haire Allen G. Croff August 27, 2001 DUF 6 Materials Use Workshop Participants August 24-25, 1999 Name Organization Halil Avci ANL Bob Bernero Consultant Lavelle Clark PNNL Carl Cooley DOE/EM-50 Allen Croff ORNL Juan Ferrada ORNL Charles Forsberg ORNL John Gasper ANL Bob Hightower ORNL Julian Hill PNNL Ed Jones LLNL Asim Khawaja PNNL George Larson Consultant Paul Lessing INEEL Dan O'Connor ORNL Robert Price DOE/NE-30 Nancy Ranek ANL Mark Senderling DOE/RW-46 Roger Spence ORNL John Tseng DOE/EM-21 John Warren DOE/NE-30 Ken Young LLNL iii CONTENTS ACRONYMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v EXECUTIVE SUMMARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii 1. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

49

Y-12 Removes Nuclear Materials from Two Facilities to Reduce...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removes Nuclear Materials from Two Facilities to Reduce Site's Nuclear Footprint (Alpha 5 and 9720-38 No Longer Designated as Nuclear Facilities) | National Nuclear Security...

50

Criteria for Packaging and Storing Uranium-233-Bearing Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3028-2000 3028-2000 July 2000 DOE STANDARD CRITERIA FOR PACKAGING AND STORING URANIUM-233-BEARING MATERIALS U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-3028-2000 iii ABSTRACT This Standard provides guidance for the packaging and long-term (50 years) storage of stabilized, separated uranium-233(

51

EPA Review of Standards for Uranium and Thorium Milling Facilities @ 40 CFR Parts 61 and 192.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will address the following seven questions: 1. Are the existing radiation dose limits in the regulations and results in estimating doses to the public from uranium recovery facilities? 6. What is known about, Part 4) *NOTE: a millirem is a unit of effective radiation dose. It is related to the amount of energy

52

Secretarial Determination of No Adverse Material Impact for Uranium...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

5-15-14.pdf More Documents & Publications Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan 2008 2014 Review of the Potential Impact of DOE Excess Uranium Inventory On the...

53

Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) facility preclosure work plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dangerous waste permit identification number (WA7890008967)was issued by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Washington State Department of Ecology. This identification number encompasses a number of treatment, storage, and/or disposal units within the Hanford Facility. One of these treatment, storage, and/or disposal units is the PUREX Facility,currently undergoing a phased closure. The PUREX Facility Preclosure Work Plan submittal differs from closure plans previously submitted by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office to the Washington State Department of Ecology,in that the closure process occurs in three distinct phases as part of the decommissioning process (i.e., transition,surveillance and maintenance, and disposition). Final closure will occur during the disposition phase. This phased decommissioning process is implemented because development of a complete closure plan during the transition phase is impractical and future land use determinations have not been identified. The objective of the transition phase is to place the PUREX Facility in a safe configuration with respect to human health and the environment. Following the transition phase activities, the PUREX Facility will begin the surveillance and maintenance phase of 10 or more years until disposition phase activities commence. The closure plan for the PUREX facility will be prepared during the disposition phase. For purposes of this documentation, the PUREX Facility does not include the PUREX Storage Tunnels. The PUREX Storage Tunnels are an operating storage unit(DOE/RL-94-24).

Bhatia, R.K., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

54

Design for a fusion materials irradiation facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fusion materials irradiation facility is required for the timely and cost-effective development of economical fusion power. Our conceptual machine provides sufficient neutron fluence for accelerated lifetime material tests in a time span of 1--2 y while producing less than 1 MW of fusion power. Neutral deuterium beams at 150 keV are injected into the center of a high-density warm tritium plasma housed in a 12-m-long cylindrical vessel. Superconducting magnets hold the plasma, which transfers the power to each end of the solenoid. The stainless steel end sections absorb the beam power and are externally cooled by high-pressure water to maintain the plasma-side wall temperature below 740 K. A service loop separates tritium from deuterium in the plasma effluent. Tritium is reinjected at each end. 9 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Walter, C.E.; Coensgen, F.H.

1988-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

55

Material Control and Accountability Experience at the Fuel Conditioning Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) treats spent nuclear fuel using an electrometallurgical process that separates the uranium from the fission products, sodium thermal bond, and cladding materials. Material accountancy is necessary at FCF for two reasons: 1) it provides a mechanism for detecting a potential loss of nuclear material for safeguards and security, and 2) it provides a periodic check of inventories to ensure that processes and materials are within control limits. Material Control and Accountability is also a Department of Energy (DOE) requirement (DOE Order 474.1). The FCF employs a computer based Mass Tracking (MTG) System to collect, store, retrieve, and process data on all operations that directly affect the flow of materials through the FCF. The MTG System is important for the operations of the FCF because it supports activities such as material control and accountability, criticality safety, and process modeling. To conduct material control and accountability checks and to monitor process performance, mass balances are routinely performed around the process equipment. The equipment used in FCF for pyro-processing consists of two mechanical choppers and two electro-refiners (the Mark-IV with the accompanying element chopper and Mark-V with the accompanying blanket chopper for processing driver fuel and blanket, respectively), and a cathode processor (used for processing both driver fuel and blanket) and casting furnace (mostly used for processing driver fuel). Performing mass balances requires the measurement of the masses and compositions of several process streams and equipment inventories. The masses of process streams are obtained via in-cell balances (i.e., load cells) that weigh containers entering and leaving the process equipment. Samples taken at key locations are analyzed to determine the composition of process streams and equipment inventories. In cases where equipment or containers cannot be placed on a balance, others methods (e.g., level measurements, volume calibration equations, calculated density via additive volumes) are utilized to measure the inventory mass. This paper will discuss the material control and accountability experience at the FCF after ten-plus years of processing spent nuclear fuel. A particular area of discussion is the calculated electrolyte density via additive volumes and its importance in determining the mass and composition in the FCF electro-refiners for material control and accountability of special nuclear material. (authors)

Vaden, D.; Fredrickson, G.L. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls ID 83415 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

CMI Unique Facility: Filtration Test Facility | Critical Materials...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and it addresses the grand challenge of developing technologies for separating the rare earth elements. For more information, and to explore using the filtration test facility,...

57

Crystal Chemistry of Early Actinides (Thorium, Uranium, and Neptunium) and Uranium Mesoporous Materials.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Despite their considerable global importance, the structural chemistry of actinides remains understudied. Thorium and uranium fuel cycles are used in commercial nuclear reactors in India (more)

Sigmon, Ginger E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Fire hazards analysis for the uranium oxide (UO{sub 3}) facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fire Hazards Analysis (FHA) documents the deactivation end-point status of the UO{sub 3} complex fire hazards, fire protection and life safety systems. This FHA has been prepared for the Uranium Oxide Facility by Westinghouse Hanford Company in accordance with the criteria established in DOE 5480.7A, Fire Protection and RLID 5480.7, Fire Protection. The purpose of the Fire Hazards Analysis is to comprehensively and quantitatively assess the risk from a fire within individual fire areas in a Department of Energy facility so as to ascertain whether the objectives stated in DOE Order 5480.7, paragraph 4 are met. Particular attention has been paid to RLID 5480.7, Section 8.3, which specifies the criteria for deactivating fire protection in decommission and demolition facilities.

Wyatt, D.M.

1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

59

PLUTONIUM-URANIUM EXTRACTION (PUREX) FACILITY ALARACT DEMONSTRATION FOR FILTER HOUSING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents an As Low As Reasonably Achievable Control Technology (ALARACT) demonstration for evaluating corrosion on the I-beam supporting filter housing No.9 for the 291-A-l emission unit of the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility, located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The PUREX facility is currently in surveillance and maintenance mode. During a State of Washington, Department of Health (WDOH) 291-A-l emission unit inspection, a small amount of corrosion was observed at the base of a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter housing. A series of internal and external inspections identified the source of the corrosion material as oxidation of a small section of one of the carbon steel I-beams that provides support to the stainless steel filter housing. The inspections confirmed the corrosion is isolated to one I-beam support location and does not represent any compromise of the structural support or filter housing integrity. Further testing and inspections of the support beam corrosion and its cause were conducted but did not determine the cause. No definitive evidence was found to support any degradation of the housing. Although no degradation of the housing was found, a conservative approach will be implemented. The following actions will be taken: (1) The current operating filter housing No.9 will be removed from service. (2) The only remaining available filter housings (No.1, No.2, and No.3) will be placed in service. These filter housings have new HEPA filters fitted with stainless steel frames and faceguards which were installed in the spring of 2007. (3) Filter housings No.5 and No.10 will be put on standby as backups. To document the assessment of the unit, a draft ALARACT filter housing demonstration for the PUREX filter housing was prepared, and informally provided to WDOH on August 7, 2008. A follow up WDOH response to the draft ALARACT filter housing demonstration for the PUREX filter housing questioned whether deteriorated galvanized filter faceguards discovered during an internal filter housing inspection met American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) AG-l or Military Specification (MIL) 51068 standards. The filter system was designed and installed prior to the issuance of AG-l, February 1986; however, MIL 51068 did require galvanized faceguards. The faceguards are not necessary for filtration or structural purposes; it is concluded that the system is in compliance with the intent of the applicable standard. Appendix B provides supporting information to address this issue.

LEBARON GJ

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

60

Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility, Major Design Changes...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EIS-0387: Draft Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0387: Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0236-S4: Final Supplemental Programmatic Environmental...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium materials facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Evaluation of Ultra-Low Background Materials for Uranium and Thorium Using ICP-MS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An increasing number of physics experiments require low background materials for their construction. The presence of Uranium and Thorium and their progeny in these materials present a variety of unwanted background sources for these experiments. The sensitivity of the experiments continues to drive the necessary levels of detection ever lower as well. This requirement for greater sensitivity has rendered direct radioassay impractical in many cases requiring large quantities of material, frequently many kilograms, and prolonged counting times, often months. Other assay techniques have been employed such as Neutron Activation Analysis but this requires access to expensive facilities and instrumentation and can be further complicated and delayed by the formation of unwanted radionuclides. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) is a useful tool and recent advancements have increased the sensitivity particularly in the elemental high mass range of U and Th. Unlike direct radioassay, ICP-MS is a destructive technique since it requires the sample to be in liquid form which is aspirated into a high temperature plasma. But it benefits in that it usually requires a very small sample, typically about a gram. Here we will discuss how a variety of low background materials such as copper, polymers, and fused silica are made amenable to ICP-MS assay and how the arduous task of maintaining low backgrounds of U and Th is achieved.

Hoppe, Eric W.; Overman, Nicole R.; LaFerriere, Brian D.

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

62

Uranium(VI) Diffusion in Low-Permeability Subsurface Materials...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Abstract: Uranium(VI) diffusion was investigated in a fine-grained saprolite sediment that was collected from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge site, TN, where...

63

Secretarial Determination of No Adverse Material Impact for Uranium Transfers  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The determination covers the Departments sales or transfers of no more than 2,705 metric tons (MTU) of natural uranium (NU) or NU equivalent in a calendar year. The proposed transfers include up...

64

Chapter 4. Uranium Mine and Extraction Facility Reclamation This chapter is not intended to serve as guidance, or to supplement EPA or other agency environmental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4-1 Chapter 4. Uranium Mine and Extraction Facility Reclamation This chapter is not intended, it is an outline of practices which may or have been used for uranium site restoration. Mining reclamation for uranium mining sites. The existence of bonding requirements and/or financial guarantees in the cases where

65

Radio-Ecological Conditions of Groundwater in the Area of Uranium Mining and Milling Facility - 13525  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Manmade chemical and radioactive contamination of groundwater is one of damaging effects of the uranium mining and milling facilities. Groundwater contamination is of special importance for the area of Priargun Production Mining and Chemical Association, JSC 'PPMCA', because groundwater is the only source of drinking water. The paper describes natural conditions of the site, provides information on changes of near-surface area since the beginning of the company, illustrates the main trends of contaminators migration and assesses manmade impact on the quality and mode of near-surface and ground waters. The paper also provides the results of chemical and radioactive measurements in groundwater at various distances from the sources of manmade contamination to the drinking water supply areas. We show that development of deposits, mine water discharge, leakages from tailing dams and cinder storage facility changed general hydro-chemical balance of the area, contributed to new (overlaid) aureoles and flows of scattering paragenetic uranium elements, which are much smaller in comparison with natural ones. However, increasing flow of groundwater stream at the mouth of Sukhoi Urulyungui due to technological water infiltration, mixing of natural water with filtration streams from industrial reservoirs and sites, containing elevated (relative to natural background) levels of sulfate-, hydro-carbonate and carbonate- ions, led to the development and moving of the uranium contamination aureole from the undeveloped field 'Polevoye' to the water inlet area. The aureole front crossed the southern border of water inlet of drinking purpose. The qualitative composition of groundwater, especially in the southern part of water inlet, steadily changes for the worse. The current Russian intervention levels of gross alpha activity and of some natural radionuclides including {sup 222}Rn are in excess in drinking water; regulations for fluorine and manganese concentrations are also in excess. Possible ways to improve the situation are considered. (authors)

Titov, A.V.; Semenova, M.P.; Seregin, V.A.; Isaev, D.V.; Metlyaev, E.G. [FSBU SRC A.I.Burnasyan Federal Medical Biophysical Center of FMBA of Russia, Zhivopisnaya Street, 46, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [FSBU SRC A.I.Burnasyan Federal Medical Biophysical Center of FMBA of Russia, Zhivopisnaya Street, 46, Moscow (Russian Federation); Glagolev, A.V.; Klimova, T.I.; Sevtinova, E.B. [FSESP 'Hydrospecgeologiya' (Russian Federation)] [FSESP 'Hydrospecgeologiya' (Russian Federation); Zolotukhina, S.B.; Zhuravleva, L.A. [FSHE 'Centre of Hygiene and Epidemiology no. 107' under FMBA of Russia (Russian Federation)] [FSHE 'Centre of Hygiene and Epidemiology no. 107' under FMBA of Russia (Russian Federation)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Wetland and Sensitive Species Survey Report for Y-12: Proposed Uranium Processing Facility (UPF)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of an environmental survey conducted at sites associated with the proposed Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) at the Y-12 National Security Complex in September-October 2009. The survey was conducted in order to evaluate potential impacts of the overall project. This project includes the construction of a haul road, concrete batch plant, wet soil storage area and dry soil storage area. The environmental surveys were conducted by natural resource experts at ORNL who routinely assess the significance of various project activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Natural resource staff assistance on this project included the collection of environmental information that can aid in project location decisions that minimize impacts to sensitive resource such as significant wildlife populations, rare plants and wetlands. Natural resources work was conducted in various habitats, corresponding to the proposed areas of impact. Thc credentials/qualifications of the researchers are contained in Appendix A. The proposed haul road traverses a number of different habitats including a power-line right-of-way. wetlands, streams, forest and mowed areas. It extends from what is known as the New Salvage Yard on the west to the Polaris Parking Lot on the east. This haul road is meant to connect the proposed concrete batch plant to the UPF building site. The proposed site of the concrete batch plant itself is a highly disturbed fenced area. This area of the project is shown in Fig. 1. The proposed Wet Soils Disposal Area is located on the north side of Bear Creek Road at the former Control Burn Study Area. This is a second growth arce containing thick vegetation, and extensive dead and down woody material. This area of the project is shown in Fig. 2. Thc dry soils storage area is proposed for what is currently known as the West Borrow Area. This site is located on the west side of Reeves Road south of Bear Creek Road. The site is an early successional field. This area of the project is shown in Fig. 2.

Giffen, N.; Peterson, M.; Reasor, S.; Pounds, L.; Byrd, G.; Wiest, M. C.; Hill, C. C.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

DOE/EA-1651: FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT Uranium-233 Material Downblending and Disposition Project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (01/13/10)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

URANIUM-233 MATERIAL DOWNBLENDING AND DISPOSITION PROJECT URANIUM-233 MATERIAL DOWNBLENDING AND DISPOSITION PROJECT AT THE OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY, OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) SUMMARY: DOE has completed the Final Environmental Assessment for U-233 Material Downblending and Disposition Project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory [DOE/EA-1651]. This environmental assessment (EA) evaluates the impacts of planned activities to modify selected Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) facilities; process the ORNL inventory of uranium-233 (U-233); and transport the processed material to a long-term disposal facility. Small quantities of similar material currently stored at other DOE sites may also be included in this initiative. The

68

Irradiated Materials Examination and Testing Facility (IMET) | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Irradiated Materials Examination and Testing Facility Irradiated Materials Examination and Testing Facility May 30, 2013 The Irradiated Material Examination and Testing (IMET) Facility was designed and built as a hot cell facility. It is a two-story block and brick structure with a two-story high bay that houses six heavily shielded cells and an array of sixty shielded storage wells. It includes the Specimen Prep Lab (SPL) with its associated laboratory hood and glove boxes, an Operating Area, where the control and monitoring instruments supporting the in-cell test equipment are staged, a utility corridor, a hot equipment storage area, a tank vault room, office space, a trucking area with access to the high bay, and an outside steel building for storage. The tests and examinations are conducted in six examination "hot" cells

69

Developing depleted uranium and gold cocktail hohlraums for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fusion ignition experiments are planned to begin at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. A. Paisner, E. M. Campbell, and W. J. Hogan, Fusion Technol. 26, 755 (1994)] using the indirect drive configuration [J. D. Lindl, P. Amendt, R. L. Berger, S. G. Glendinning, S. H. Glenzer, S. W. Haan, R. L, Kauffman, O. L. Landen, and L. J. Suter, Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)]. Although the x-ray drive in this configuration is highly symmetric, energy is lost in the conversion process due to x-ray penetration into the hohlraum wall. To mitigate this loss, depleted uranium is incorporated into the traditional gold hohlraum to increase the efficiency of the laser to x-ray energy conversion by making the wall more opaque to the x rays [H. Nishumura, T. Endo, H. Shiraga, U. Kato, and S. Nakai, Appl. Phys. Lett. 62, 1344 (1993)]. Multilayered depleted uranium (DU) and gold hohlraums are deposited by sputtering by alternately rotating a hohlraum mold in front of separate DU and Au sources to build up multilayers to the desired wall thickness. This mold is removed to leave a freestanding hohlraum half; two halves are used to assemble the complete NIF hohlraum to the design specifications. In practice, exposed DU oxidizes in air and other chemicals necessary to hohlraum production, so research has focused on developing a fabrication process that protects the U from damaging environments. This paper reports on the most current depleted uranium and gold cocktail hohlraum fabrication techniques, including characterization by Auger electron spectroscopy, which is used to verify sample composition and the amount of oxygen uptake over time.

Wilkens, H. L.; Nikroo, A.; Wall, D. R.; Wall, J. R. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

70

US-Russian collaboration for enhancing nuclear materials protection, control, and accounting at the Elektrostal uranium fuel-fabrication plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In September 1993, an implementing agreement was signed that authorized collaborative projects to enhance Russian national materials control and accounting, physical protection, and regulatory activities, with US assistance funded by the Nunn-Lugar Act. At the first US-Russian technical working group meeting in Moscow in February 1994, it was decided to identify a model facility where materials protection, control, and accounting (MPC and A) and regulatory projects could be carried out using proven technologies and approaches. The low-enriched uranium (LEU or RBMK and VVER) fuel-fabrication process at Elektrostal was selected, and collaborative work began in June 1994. Based on many factors, including initial successes at Elektrostal, the Russians expanded the cooperation by proposing five additional sites for MPC and A development: the Elektrostal medium-enriched uranium (MEU or BN) fuel-fabrication process and additional facilities at Podolsk, Dmitrovgrad, Obninsk, and Mayak. Since that time, multilaboratory teams have been formed to develop and implement MPC and A upgrades at the additional sites, and much new work is underway. This paper summarizes the current status of MPC and A enhancement projects in the LEU fuel-fabrication process and discusses the status of work that addresses similar enhancements in the MEU (BN) fuel processes at Elektrostal, under the recently expanded US-Russian MPC and A cooperation.

Smith, H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Allentuck, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Barham, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Bishop, M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wentz, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Steele, B.; Bricker, K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Cherry, R. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Snegosky, T. [Dept. of Defense, Washington, DC (United States). Defense Nuclear Agency

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Laser and Spectroscopy Facility Center For Microanalysis of Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laser and Spectroscopy Facility Center For Microanalysis of Materials Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory Form revised 03 November 2009 Precautions for the safe use of lasers 1. NEVER LOOK DIRECTLY INTO ANY LASER BEAM, REGARDLESS OF POWER. 2. The lab door safety lamp "LASER in USE" must

Braun, Paul

72

Uranium industry annual 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Public Informational Materials | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

News & Events News & Events Web Articles In the News Upcoming Events Past Events Informational Materials Photo Galleries Public Informational Materials Annual Reports ALCF 2010 Annual Report ALCF 2010 Annual Report May 2011 ALCF 2010 Annual Report 2011 annual report ALCF 2011 Annual Report May 2012 2011 ALCF Annual Report 2012 ALCF Annual Report ALCF 2012 Annual Report July 2013 2012 ALCF Annual Report Fact Sheets ALCF Fact Sheet ALCF Fact Sheet September 2013 ALCF Fact Sheet Blue Gene/Q Systems and Supporting Resources Blue Gene/Q Systems and Supporting Resources June 2013 Blue Gene/Q Systems and Supporting Resources Early Science Program Projects Early Science Program Projects July 2011 Early Science Program Projects Promotional Brochures INCITE in Review INCITE in Review March 2012 INCITE in Review

74

DOE-HDBK-1113-98, CN 1, Reaffirm; Radiological Safety Training for Uranium Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

REAFFIRMATION WITH REAFFIRMATION WITH ERRATA April 2005 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL SAFETY TRAINING FOR URANIUM FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-HDBK-1113-98 ii This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-HDBK-1113-98 iii April 2005 Reaffirmation with Errata Changes to DOE-HDBK-1113-98, Radiological

75

DOE-HDBK-1113-98, CH 1; Radiological Safety Training for Uranium Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3-9 8 February 199 8 CHANGE NOTICE NO. 1 December 2002 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL SAFETY TRAINING FOR URANIUM FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. A pproved for public release; dist ribution is unlim ited. DOE-HDBK-1113-98 This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-HDBK-1113-98 iii Foreword This Handbook describes a recommended implementation process for additional training as outlined in

76

Standard guide for establishing a quality assurance program for uranium conversion facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This guide provides guidance and recommended practices for establishing a comprehensive quality assurance program for uranium conversion facilities. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate health and safety practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. 1.3 The basic elements of a quality assurance program appear in the following order: FUNCTION SECTION Organization 5 Quality Assurance Program 6 Design Control 7 Instructions, Procedures & Drawings 8 Document Control 9 Procurement 10 Identification and Traceability 11 Processes 12 Inspection 13 Control of Measuring and Test Equipment 14 Handling, Storage and Shipping 15 Inspection, Test and Operating Status 16 Control of Nonconforming Items 17 Corrective Actions 18 Quality Assurance Records 19 Audits 20 TABLE 1 NQA-1 Basic Requirements Relat...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility: Addressing advanced nuclear materials research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), based at the Idaho National Laboratory in the United States, is supporting Department of Energy and industry research efforts to ensure the properties of materials in light water reactors are well understood. The ATR NSUF is providing this support through three main efforts: establishing unique infrastructure necessary to conduct research on highly radioactive materials, conducting research in conjunction with industry partners on life extension relevant topics, and providing training courses to encourage more U.S. researchers to understand and address LWR materials issues. In 2010 and 2011, several advanced instruments with capability focused on resolving nuclear material performance issues through analysis on the micro (10-6 m) to atomic (10-10 m) scales were installed primarily at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls, Idaho. These instruments included a local electrode atom probe (LEAP), a field-emission gun scanning transmission electron microscope (FEG-STEM), a focused ion beam (FIB) system, a Raman spectrometer, and an nanoindentor/atomic force microscope. Ongoing capability enhancements intended to support industry efforts include completion of two shielded, irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) test loops, the first of which will come online in early calendar year 2013, a pressurized and controlled chemistry water loop for the ATR center flux trap, and a dedicated facility intended to house post irradiation examination equipment. In addition to capability enhancements at the main site in Idaho, the ATR NSUF also welcomed two new partner facilities in 2011 and two new partner facilities in 2012; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and associated hot cells and the University California Berkeley capabilities in irradiated materials analysis were added in 2011. In 2012, Purdue Universitys Interaction of Materials with Particles and Components Testing (IMPACT) facility and the Pacific Northwest Nuclear Laboratory (PNNL) Radiochemistry Processing Laboratory (RPL) and PIE facilities were added. The ATR NSUF annually hosts a weeklong event called Users Week in which students and faculty from universities as well as other interested parties from regulatory agencies or industry convene in Idaho Falls, Idaho to see presentations from ATR NSUF staff as well as select researchers from the materials research field. Users week provides an overview of current materials research topics of interest and an opportunity for young researchers to understand the process of performing work through ATR NSUF. Additionally, to increase the number of researchers engaged in LWR materials issues, a series of workshops are in progress to introduce research staff to stress corrosion cracking, zirconium alloy degradation, and uranium dioxide degradation during in-reactor use.

John Jackson; Todd Allen; Frances Marshall; Jim Cole

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Retrieval of buried depleted uranium from the T-1 trench  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Trench 1 remediation project will be conducted this year to retrieve depleted uranium and other associated materials from a trench at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site. The excavated materials will be segregated and stabilized for shipment. The depleted uranium will be treated at an offsite facility which utilizes a novel approach for waste minimization and disposal through utilization of a combination of uranium recycling and volume efficient uranium stabilization.

Burmeister, M. [Rocky Mountain Remediation Services, Golden, CO (United States); Castaneda, N. [Dept. of Energy, Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Field Office; Greengard, T. [Kaiser-Hill Co., Golden, CO (United States)]|[Science Applications International Corp. (United States); Hull, C. [S.M. Stoller Corp., Boulder, CO (United States); Barbour, D.; Quapp, W.J. [Starmet Corp. (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Safeguards assessment of gamma-ray detection for process monitoring at natural uranium conversion facilities.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Conversion, the process by which natural uranium ore (yellowcake) is puri?ed and converted through a series of chemical processes into uranium hexa?uoride gas (UF6), has (more)

Dewji, Shaheen Azim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Major Facilities for Materials Research and Related Disciplines  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities for Materials Research and Related Disciplines Major Materials Facilities Committee Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Resources National Research Council NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS Washington, DC 1984 NOTICE: The project that is the subject of this report was approved by the Governing Board of the National Research Council, whose members are drawn from the councils of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine. The members of the committee responsible for the report were chosen for their special competences and with regard for appropriate balance. This report has been reviewed by a group other than the authors according to procedures approved by a Report Review Committee con- sisting of members of the National Academy of Sciences, the National

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium materials facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

DOE-STD-1136-2004; Guide of Good Practices for Occupational Radiological Protection in Uranium Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE-STD-1136-2004 December 2004 DOE STANDARD GUIDE OF GOOD PRACTICES FOR OCCUPATIONAL RADIOLOGICAL PROTECTION IN URANIUM FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U. S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4373, fax (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U. S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-600 DOE-STD-1136-2004 Guide of Good Practices for Occupational Radiological Protection in Uranium Facilities

82

Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT FOR CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION OF A DEPLETED URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE CONVERSION FACILITY AT THE PADUCAH, KENTUCKY, SITE DECEMBER 2003 U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations Office of Environmental Management Cover Sheet Paducah DUF 6 DEIS: December 2003 iii COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE FEDERAL AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site (DOE/EIS-0359) CONTACT: For further information on this environmental impact statement (EIS), contact: Gary S. Hartman DOE-ORO Cultural Resources Management Coordinator U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge, TN 37831

83

Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at Portsmouth, Ohio, Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT FOR CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION OF A DEPLETED URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE CONVERSION FACILITY AT THE PORTSMOUTH, OHIO, SITE DECEMBER 2003 U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations Office of Environmental Management Cover Sheet Portsmouth DUF 6 DEIS: December 2003 iii COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE FEDERAL AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, Site (DOE/EIS-0360) CONTACT: For further information on this environmental impact statement (EIS), contact: Gary S. Hartman DOE-ORO Cultural Resources Management Coordinator U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge, TN 37831

84

Fusion materials irradiations at MaRIE's fission fusion facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory's proposed signature facility, MaRIE, will provide scientists and engineers with new capabilities for modeling, synthesizing, examining, and testing materials of the future that will enhance the USA's energy security and national security. In the area of fusion power, the development of new structural alloys with better tolerance to the harsh radiation environments expected in fusion reactors will lead to improved safety and lower operating costs. The Fission and Fusion Materials Facility (F{sup 3}), one of three pillars of the proposed MaRIE facility, will offer researchers unprecedented access to a neutron radiation environment so that the effects of radiation damage on materials can be measured in-situ, during irradiation. The calculated radiation damage conditions within the F{sup 3} match, in many respects, that of a fusion reactor first wall, making it well suited for testing fusion materials. Here we report in particular on two important characteristics of the radiation environment with relevancy to radiation damage: the primary knock-on atom spectrum and the impact of the pulse structure of the proton beam on temporal characteristics of the atomic displacement rate. With respect to both of these, analyses show the F{sup 3} has conditions that are consistent with those of a steady-state fusion reactor first wall.

Pitcher, Eric J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

85

4.0 RISK FROM URANIUM MINING WASTE IN BUILDING In general, building materials contain low levels of radioactivity. For example, the range of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4.0 RISK FROM URANIUM MINING WASTE IN BUILDING MATERIALS In general, building materials contain low, especially in buildings constructed with materials containing uranium TENORM mine wastes. In the Grand the wastes from uranium mines have been removed from mining sites and used in local and nearby communities

86

Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a site-specific environmental impact statement (EIS) for construction and operation of a proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) conversion facility at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth site in Ohio (Figure S-1). The proposed facility would convert the DUF{sub 6} stored at Portsmouth to a more stable chemical form suitable for use or disposal. The facility would also convert the DUF{sub 6} from the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) site near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In a Notice of Intent (NOI) published in the Federal Register on September 18, 2001 (Federal Register, Volume 66, page 48123 [66 FR 48123]), DOE announced its intention to prepare a single EIS for a proposal to construct, operate, maintain, and decontaminate and decommission two DUF{sub 6} conversion facilities at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (United States Code, Title 42, Section 4321 et seq. [42 USC 4321 et seq.]) and DOE's NEPA implementing procedures (Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 1021 [10 CFR Part 1021]). Subsequent to award of a contract to Uranium Disposition Services, LLC (hereafter referred to as UDS), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, on August 29, 2002, for design, construction, and operation of DUF{sub 6} conversion facilities at Portsmouth and Paducah, DOE reevaluated its approach to the NEPA process and decided to prepare separate site-specific EISs. This change was announced in a Federal Register Notice of Change in NEPA Compliance Approach published on April 28, 2003 (68 FR 22368); the Notice is included as Attachment B to Appendix C of this EIS. This EIS addresses the potential environmental impacts from the construction, operation, maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the proposed conversion facility at three alternative locations within the Portsmouth site; from the transportation of all ETTP cylinders (DUF{sub 6}, low-enriched UF6 [LEU-UF{sub 6}], and empty) to Portsmouth; from the transportation of depleted uranium conversion products to a disposal facility; and from the transportation, sale, use, or disposal of the fluoride-containing conversion products (hydrogen fluoride [HF] or calcium fluoride [CaF{sub 2}]). An option of shipping the ETTP cylinders to Paducah is also considered. In addition, this EIS evaluates a no action alternative, which assumes continued storage of DUF{sub 6} in cylinders at the Portsmouth and ETTP sites. A separate EIS (DOE/EIS-0359) evaluates potential environmental impacts for the proposed Paducah conversion facility.

N /A

2003-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

87

Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 1 Paducah DUF 6 DEIS: December 2003 SUMMARY S.1 INTRODUCTION This document is a site-specific environmental impact statement (EIS) for construction and operation of a proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF 6 ) conversion facility at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Paducah site in northwestern Kentucky (Figure S-1). The proposed facility would convert the DUF 6 stored at Paducah to a more stable chemical form suitable for use or disposal. In a Notice of Intent (NOI) published in the Federal Register (FR) on September 18, 2001 (Federal Register, Volume 66, page 48123 [66 FR 48123]), DOE announced its intention to prepare a single EIS for a proposal to construct, operate, maintain, and decontaminate and decommission two DUF 6 conversion facilities at Portsmouth,

88

Feasibility study on consolidation of Fernald Environmental Management Project depleted uranium materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1991, the DOE made a decision to close the FMPC located in Fernald, Ohio, and end its production mission. The site was renamed FEMP to reflect Fernald`s mission change from uranium production to environmental restoration. As a result of this change, the inventory of strategic uranium materials maintained at Fernald by DOE DP will need to be relocated to other DOE sites. Although considered a liability to the Fernald Plant due to its current D and D mission, the FEMP DU represents a potentially valuable DOE resource. Recognizing its value, it may be important for the DOE to consolidate the material at one site and place it in a safe long-term storage condition until a future DOE programmatic requirement materializes. In August 1995, the DOE Office of Nuclear Weapons Management requested, Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (LMES) to assess the feasibility of consolidating the FEMP DU materials at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). This feasibility study examines various phases associated with the consolidation of the FEMP DU at the ORR. If useful short-term applications for the DU fail to materialize, then long-term storage (up to 50 years) would need to be provided. Phases examined in this report include DU material value; potential uses; sampling; packaging and transportation; material control and accountability; environmental, health and safety issues; storage; project management; noneconomic factors; schedule; and cost.

NONE

1995-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

89

Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a site-specific environmental impact statement (EIS) for construction and operation of a proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) conversion facility at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Paducah site in northwestern Kentucky (Figure S-1). The proposed facility would convert the DUF{sub 6} stored at Paducah to a more stable chemical form suitable for use or disposal. In a Notice of Intent (NOI) published in the ''Federal Register'' (FR) on September 18, 2001 (''Federal Register'', Volume 66, page 48123 [66 FR 48123]), DOE announced its intention to prepare a single EIS for a proposal to construct, operate, maintain, and decontaminate and decommission two DUF{sub 6} conversion facilities at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (''United States Code'', Title 42, Section 4321 et seq. [42 USC 4321 et seq.]) and DOE's NEPA implementing procedures (''Code of Federal Regulations'', Title 10, Part 1021 [10 CFR Part 1021]). Subsequent to award of a contract to Uranium Disposition Services, LLC (hereafter referred to as UDS), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, on August 29, 2002, for design, construction, and operation of DUF{sub 6} conversion facilities at Portsmouth and Paducah, DOE reevaluated its approach to the NEPA process and decided to prepare separate site-specific EISs. This change was announced in a ''Federal Register'' Notice of Change in NEPA Compliance Approach published on April 28, 2003 (68 FR 22368); the Notice is included as Attachment B to Appendix C of this EIS. This EIS addresses the potential environmental impacts from the construction, operation, maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the proposed conversion facility at three alternative locations within the Paducah site; from the transportation of depleted uranium conversion products to a disposal facility; and from the transportation, sale, use, or disposal of the fluoride-containing conversion products (hydrogen fluoride [HF] or calcium fluoride [CaF{sub 2}]). Although not part of the proposed action, an option of shipping all cylinders (DUF{sub 6}, low-enriched UF{sub 6} [LEU-UF{sub 6}], and empty) stored at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to Paducah rather than to Portsmouth is also considered. In addition, this EIS evaluates a no action alternative, which assumes continued storage of DUF{sub 6} in cylinders at the Paducah site. A separate EIS (DOE/EIS-0360) evaluates the potential environmental impacts for the proposed Portsmouth conversion facility.

N /A

2003-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

90

Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting on the Status of Integration of Safety Into the Design of the Uranium Processing Facility, October 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

HSS Independent Activity Report - HSS Independent Activity Report - Rev. 0 Report Number: HIAR-Y-12-2012-10-02 Site: Y-12 UPF Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Public Meeting on the Status of Integration of Safety into the Design of the Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) Dates of Activity: October 2, 2012 Report Preparer: Timothy Mengers Activity Description/Purpose: The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) observed the public hearing of the DNFSB review of the UPF project status for integrating safety into design. The meeting was broken into three parts: a panel discussion and questioning of National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) oversight and execution; a panel discussion and questioning of the B&W Y-12

91

Depleted uranium hexafluoride technogenic raw material for obtaining high-purity inorganic fluorides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The problem of handling depleted uranium hexafluoride is discussed. An effective and ecologically safe variant of complex recycling of depleted uranium hexafluoride with uranium oxides, organic compounds, and hig...

E. P. Magomedbekov; S. V. Chizhevskaya; O. M. Klimenko; A. V. Davydov

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

IMPACT OF TARGET MATERIAL ACTIVATION ON PERSONNEL EXPOSURE AND RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINATION IN THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detailed activation analyses are performed for the different materials under consideration for use in the target capsules and hohlraums used during the ignition campaign on the National Ignition Facility. Results of the target material activation were additionally used to estimate the levels of contamination within the NIF target chamber and the workplace controls necessary for safe operation. The analysis examined the impact of using Be-Cu and Ge-doped CH capsules on the external dose received by workers during maintenance activities. Five days following a 20 MJ shot, dose rates inside the Target Chamber (TC) due to the two proposed capsule materials are small ({approx} 1 {micro}rem/h). Gold and depleted-uranium (DU) are considered as potential hohlraum materials. Following a shot, gold will most probably get deposited on the TC first wall. On the other hand, while noble-gas precursors from the DU are expected to stay in the TC, most of the noble gases are pumped out of the chamber and end up on the cryopumps. The dose rates inside the TC due to activated gold or DU, at 5 days following a 20 MJ shot, are about 1 mrem/h. Dose rates in the vicinity of the cryo-pumps (containing noble 'fission' gases) drop-off to about 1 mrem/h during the first 12 hours following the shot. Contamination from activation of NIF targets will result in the NIF target chamber exceeding DOE surface contamination limits. Objects removed from the TC will need to be managed as radioactive material. However, the results suggest that airborne contamination from resuspension of surface contamination will not be significant and is at levels that can be managed by negative ventilation when accessing the TC attachments.

Khater, H; Epperson, P; Thacker, R; Beale, R; Kohut, T; Brereton, S

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

93

Uranium Certified Reference Materials Price List | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Certified Certified Reference Materials Price List New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) NBL Home About Programs Certified Reference Materials (CRMs) Prices and Certificates Ordering Information Training Categorical Exclusion Determinations News Contact Information New Brunswick Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy Building 350 9800 South Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439-4899 P: (630) 252-2442 (NBL) P: (630) 252-2767 (CRM sales) F: (630) 252-6256 E: usdoe.nbl@ch.doe.gov Prices and Certificates Uranium Certified Reference Materials Price List Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page NOTE: These costs reflect pricing for CRMs shipped to U.S. addresses. Prices for CRMs shipped to non-U.S. addresses can be found on the International Price List. Larger quantities or configurations of most of the Reference Materials are

94

Effect of short-term material balances on the projected uranium measurement uncertainties for the gas centrifuge enrichment plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A program is under way to design an effective International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards system that could be applied to the Portsmouth Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant (GCEP). This system would integrate nuclear material accountability with containment and surveillance. Uncertainties in material balances due to errors in the measurements of the declared uranium streams have been projected on a yearly basis for GCEP under such a system in a previous study. Because of the large uranium flows, the projected balance uncertainties were, in some cases, greater than the IAEA goal quantity of 75 kg of U-235 contained in low-enriched uranium. Therefore, it was decided to investigate the benefits of material balance periods of less than a year in order to improve the sensitivity and timeliness of the nuclear material accountability system. An analysis has been made of projected uranium measurement uncertainties for various short-term material balance periods. To simplify this analysis, only a material balance around the process area is considered and only the major UF/sub 6/ stream measurements are included. That is, storage areas are not considered and uranium waste streams are ignored. It is also assumed that variations in the cascade inventory are negligible compared to other terms in the balance so that the results obtained in this study are independent of the absolute cascade inventory. This study is intended to provide information that will serve as the basis for the future design of a dynamic materials accounting component of the IAEA safeguards system for GCEP.

Younkin, J.M.; Rushton, J.E.

1980-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

95

Materials evaluation programs at the Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been operating a nuclear fuel cycle since the 1950s to produce nuclear materials in support of the national defense effort. About 83 million gallons of high-level waste produced since operations began has been consolidated by evaporation into 33 million gallons at the waste tank farm. The Department of Energy authorized the construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the function of which is to immobilize the waste as a durable borosilicate glass contained in stainless steel canisters prior to the placement of the canisters in a federal repository. The DWPF is now mechanically complete and is undergoing commissioning and run-in activities. A brief description of the DWPF process is provided.

Gee, J.T.; Iverson, D.C.; Bickford, D.F.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Materials evaluation programs at the Defense Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been operating a nuclear fuel cycle since the 1950s to produce nuclear materials in support of the national defense effort. About 83 million gallons of high-level waste produced since operations began has been consolidated by evaporation into 33 million gallons at the waste tank farm. The Department of Energy authorized the construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the function of which is to immobilize the waste as a durable borosilicate glass contained in stainless steel canisters prior to the placement of the canisters in a federal repository. The DWPF is now mechanically complete and is undergoing commissioning and run-in activities. A brief description of the DWPF process is provided.

Gee, J.T.; Iverson, D.C.; Bickford, D.F.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

Prompt neutron decay constants in uranium diluted with matrix material systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rossi-Alpha measurements were performed on uranium diluted with matrix material systems to determine the prompt neutron decay constants. These constants represent an eigenvalue characteristic of these particular critical assemblies, which can be experimentally measured by the Rossi-Alpha or pulse neutron source techniques and calculated by a deterministic or Monte Carlo method. In the measurements presented in this summary, highly enriched foils diluted in various X/{sup 235}U ratios with polyethylene and SiO{sub 2}, and polyethylene and aluminum were assembled to a high multiplication and the prompt neutron decay constants were obtained by the Rossi-Alpha technique.

Sanchez, R. G. (Rene G.); Loaiza, D. J. (David J.); Brunson, G. S. (Glenn S.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Assessment of Facilities, Materials, and Wastes Proposed for Transfer to EM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Facilities, Materials, and Wastes Proposed for Facilities, Materials, and Wastes Proposed for Transfer to EM Assessment of Facilities, Materials, and Wastes Proposed for Transfer to EM In December 2007 the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management (EM-1) invited the DOE Program Secretarial Offices (PSOs) of Nuclear Energy (NE), Science (SC), and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to propose facilities and legacy waste for transfer to Environmental Management (EM) for final disposition or deactivation and decommissioning (D&D). Assessment of Facilities, Materials, and Wastes Proposed for Transfer to EM More Documents & Publications Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory & Y-12 for Transfer of Facilities & Materials to EM

99

Uranium industry annual 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at Portsmouth, Ohio, Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1: Main Text and Appendixes A-H 1: Main Text and Appendixes A-H June 2004 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Cover Sheet Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS iii COVER SHEET * RESPONSIBLE FEDERAL AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, Site (DOE/EIS-0360) CONTACT: For further information on this environmental impact statement (EIS), contact: Gary S. Hartman DOE-ORO Cultural Resources Management Coordinator U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 e-mail: Ports_DUF6@anl.gov phone: 1-866-530-0944 fax: 1-866-530-0943 For general information on the DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, contact:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium materials facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at Portsmouth, Ohio, Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2: Comment and Response Document 2: Comment and Response Document June 2004 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Comment & Response Document Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS iii COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE FEDERAL AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, Site (DOE/EIS-0360) CONTACT: For further information on this environmental impact statement (EIS), contact: Gary S. Hartman DOE-ORO Cultural Resources Management Coordinator U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 e-mail: Ports_DUF6@anl.gov phone: 1-866-530-0944 fax: 1-866-530-0943 For general information on the DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, contact:

102

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2: Comment and Response Document 2: Comment and Response Document June 2004 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Comment & Response Document Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS iii COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE FEDERAL AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site (DOE/EIS-0359) CONTACT: For further information on this environmental impact statement (EIS), contact: Gary S. Hartman DOE-ORO Cultural Resources Management Coordinator U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 e-mail: Pad_DUF6@anl.gov phone: 1-866-530-0944 fax: 1-866-530-0943 For general information on the DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process,

103

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1: Main Text and Appendixes A-H 1: Main Text and Appendixes A-H June 2004 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Cover Sheet Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS iii COVER SHEET * RESPONSIBLE FEDERAL AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site (DOE/EIS-0359) CONTACT: For further information on this environmental impact statement (EIS), contact: Gary S. Hartman DOE-ORO Cultural Resources Management Coordinator U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 e-mail: Pad_DUF6@anl.gov phone: 1-866-530-0944 fax: 1-866-530-0943 For general information on the DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, contact:

104

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at Portsmouth, Ohio, Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Portsmouth DUF Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-1 Regional Map of the Portsmouth, Ohio, Site Vicinity Summary S-18 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-3 Three Alternative Conversion Facility Locations within the Portsmouth Site, with Location A Being the Preferred Alternative (A representative conversion facility footprint is shown within each location.) Summary S-20 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-4 Conceptual Overall Material Flow Diagram for the Portsmouth Conversion Facility Summary S-21 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-5 Conceptual Conversion Facility Site Layout for Portsmouth Summary S-25 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-6 Potential Locations for Construction of a New Cylinder Storage Yard at Portsmouth

105

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-1 Regional Map of the Paducah, Kentucky, Site Vicinity Summary S-18 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-3 Three Alternative Conversion Facility Locations within the Paducah Site, with Location A Being the Preferred Alternative (A representative conversion facility footprint is shown within each location.) Summary S-20 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-4 Conceptual Overall Material Flow Diagram for the Paducah Conversion Facility Summary S-21 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-5 Conceptual Conversion Facility Site Layout for Paducah Summary S-28 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-6 Areas of Potential Impact Evaluated for Each Alternative Alternatives 2-7 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS

106

A Virtual Test Facility for the Simulation of Dynamic Response in Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Center for Simulating Dynamic Response of Materials at the California Institute of Technology is constructing a virtual shock physics facility for studying the response of various target materials to very strong shocks. The Virtual Test Facility ... Keywords: parallel computing, shock physics simulation

Julian Cummings; Michael Aivazis; Ravi Samtaney; Raul Radovitzky; Sean Mauch; Dan Meiron

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Mr. Donald II. Simpson Uranium and Special Projects Unit Hazardous Materials and Waste Management Division  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AUG 0 3 1998 AUG 0 3 1998 Mr. Donald II. Simpson Uranium and Special Projects Unit Hazardous Materials and Waste Management Division Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment 4300 Cherry Creek Dr. S. Denver, Colorado 80222-1530 _,l ' 7. ,;:""" I,!._ -~~ . Dear Mr. Simpson: We have reviewed your letter of July 10, 1998, requesting that the Department of Energy (DOE) reconsider its decision to exclude the Marion Millsite in Boulder County, Colorado, from remediation under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). As you may know, FUSRAP is no longer administered and executed by DOE as Congress transferred the program to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers beginning.in fiscal year 1998. Nonetheless, we weighed the information included in your letter against the

108

EM Plan Accelerates Uranium-233 Disposal, Saves Taxpayers Half Billion  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EM Plan Accelerates Uranium-233 Disposal, Saves Taxpayers Half EM Plan Accelerates Uranium-233 Disposal, Saves Taxpayers Half Billion Dollars EM Plan Accelerates Uranium-233 Disposal, Saves Taxpayers Half Billion Dollars August 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis For more than 50 years, the uranium-233 (U-233) supply has been stored at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL) Building 3019. The facility, located near the center of the ORNL campus, is owned by EM and one of the nation’s few repositories for U-233 and other special nuclear materials dating back to the Manhattan Project. For more than 50 years, the uranium-233 (U-233) supply has been stored at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) Building 3019. The facility, located near the center of the ORNL campus, is owned by EM and one of the nation's few repositories for U-233 and other special nuclear materials

109

EM Plan Accelerates Uranium-233 Disposal, Saves Taxpayers Half Billion  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EM Plan Accelerates Uranium-233 Disposal, Saves Taxpayers Half EM Plan Accelerates Uranium-233 Disposal, Saves Taxpayers Half Billion Dollars EM Plan Accelerates Uranium-233 Disposal, Saves Taxpayers Half Billion Dollars August 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis For more than 50 years, the uranium-233 (U-233) supply has been stored at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL) Building 3019. The facility, located near the center of the ORNL campus, is owned by EM and one of the nation’s few repositories for U-233 and other special nuclear materials dating back to the Manhattan Project. For more than 50 years, the uranium-233 (U-233) supply has been stored at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) Building 3019. The facility, located near the center of the ORNL campus, is owned by EM and one of the nation's few repositories for U-233 and other special nuclear materials

110

Proceedings of a workshop on uses of depleted uranium in storage, transportation and repository facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A workshop on the potential uses of depleted uranium (DU) in the repository was organized to coordinate the planning of future activities. The attendees, the original workshop objective and the agenda are provided in Appendices A, B and C. After some opening remarks and discussions, the objectives of the workshop were revised to: (1) exchange information and views on the status of the Department of Energy (DOE) activities related to repository design and planning; (2) exchange information on DU management and planning; (3) identify potential uses of DU in the storage, transportation, and disposal of high-level waste and spent fuel; and (4) define the future activities that would be needed if potential uses were to be further evaluated and developed. This summary of the workshop is intended to be an integrated resource for planning of any future work related to DU use in the repository. The synopsis of the first day`s presentations is provided in Appendix D. Copies of slides from each presenter are presented in Appendix E.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

111

Identification and quantification of the source terms for uranium in surface waters collected at the Rocky Flats facility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The intent of this study was to determine the fraction of soluble uranium attributable to the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) operations which is recoverable from waters and suspended sediments drawn from ponds on site at RFP. Samples were collected from late 1992 through 1993. Thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) measurement techniques indicate that the water samples contain both naturally occurring uranium and depleted uranium. The uranium concentrations in the waters collected from the terminal ponds contained 0.5% or less of the interim standard calculated derived concentration guide for uranium in waters available to the public.

D.W. Efurd; D.J. Rokop; R.D. Aguilar; F.R. Roensch; J.C. Banar; R.E. Perrin

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Laser shocking of materials: Toward the national ignition facility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In recent years a powerful experimental tool has been added to the arsenal at the disposal of the materials scientist investigating materials response at extreme regimes of strain rates, temperatures, and pressur...

M. A. Meyers; B. A. Remington; B. Maddox; E. M. Bringa

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Alloy of depleted uranium: Material for ?-protection of shipment packing sets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of thermal action on the structure and physical and mechanical properties of an alloy based on depleted uranium and used for biological protection from ionizing...

V. K. Orlov; V. M. Sergeev; A. G. Semenov; V. V. Noskov

114

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Appendix C: Scoping Summary Report for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities - Environmental Impact Statement Scoping Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX C: SCOPING SUMMARY REPORT FOR DEPLETED URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE CONVERSION FACILITIES ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT SCOPING PROCESS Scoping Summary Report C-2 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Scoping Summary Report C-3 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX C This appendix contains the summary report prepared after the initial public scoping period for the depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facilities environmental impact statement (EIS) project. The scoping period for the EIS began with the September 18, 2001, publication of a Notice of Intent (NOI) in the Federal Register (66 FR 23213) and was extended to January 11, 2002. The report summarizes the different types of public involvement opportunities provided and the content of the comments received.

115

LANL: Facility Focus, MST-6 Materials Surface Science Investigations Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

07-018 Spring 2007 07-018 Spring 2007 T he MST-6 Materials Surface Science Investigations Laboratory is home to a one-of-a-kind integrated instrument for surface science and materials research, allowing scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory the unique opportunity to perform coordinated research using ultra-high vacuum surface measurements, in situ reactions, and materials synthesis tools. Housed in the Materials Science Laboratory, the surface science instrument features an ultra-clean integrated system for surface analysis and in situ surface modification, thin film deposition, and surface gas reactions. This integrated system is used for analytical surface science; materials electronic

116

Appraisal of the Uranium Processing Facility Safety Basis Preliminary Safety Design Report Process at the Y-12 National Security Complex, May 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Appraisal of the Appraisal of the Uranium Processing Facility Safety Basis Preliminary Safety Design Report Process at the Y-12 National Security Complex May 2011 May 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U. S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background........................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope..................................................................................................................................................... 2

117

Review of the Long Lead Procurement Processed Used by Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC for the Uranium Processing Facility Proect, July 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Long Lead Procurement Processes Used by Long Lead Procurement Processes Used by Babcock &Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC for the Uranium Processing Facility Project May 2011 July 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1

118

Appraisal of the Uranium Processing Facility Safety Basis Preliminary Safety Design Report Process at the Y-12 National Security Complex, May 2013  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Appraisal of the Appraisal of the Uranium Processing Facility Safety Basis Preliminary Safety Design Report Process at the Y-12 National Security Complex May 2011 May 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U. S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background........................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope..................................................................................................................................................... 2

119

Derivation of residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium in soil at the Middlesex Sampling Plant Site, Middlesex, New Jersey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium in soil were derived for the Middlesex Sampling Plant (MSP) site in Middlesex, New Jersey. This site has been designated for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) of the US Department of Energy. The site became contaminated from operations conducted in support of the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) between 1943 and 1967. Activities conducted at the site included sampling, storage, and shipment of uranium, thorium, and beryllium ores and residues. Uranium guidelines for single radioisotopes and total uranium were derived on the basis of the requirement that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual living or working in the immediate vicinity of the MSP site should not exceed a dose of 30 mrem/yr following remedial action for the current-use and likely future-use scenarios or a dose of 100 mrem/yr for less likely future-use scenarios. The RESRAD computer code, which implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for establishing residual radioactive material guidelines, was used in this evaluation. Four scenarios were considered for the site. These scenarios vary regarding future land use at the site, sources of water used, and sources of food consumed.

Dunning, D.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Interconnected UHV facilities for materials preparation and analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A UHV system for in-situ preparation and analysis of ultra thin films has been built. The system includes a rapid thermal processing furnace which allows production of samples over a wide range of temperatures and pressures using isotopically enriched gases. XPS, AES, and LEED analyses provide information on the surface structure and composition. With a transportable UHV chamber, the samples can be transferred to a 4? ?-ray spectrometer facility (in UHV), where analytical ion beam methods can be used to determine isotopic depth profiles and total amounts of isotopes in the films. Furthermore, an ion beam deposition facility (in UHV) can produce isotopically enriched silicon films on Si substrates for in situ isotopic tracing.

S Kubsky; L Borucki; F Gorris; H.W Becker; C Rolfs; W.H Schulte; I.J.R Baumvol; F.C Stedile

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium materials facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Batteries - Materials Engineering Facility: Scale-Up R&D Bridges Gap  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Argonne's Advanced Battery Materials Synthesis and Manufacturing R&D program Argonne's Advanced Battery Materials Synthesis and Manufacturing R&D program Initial discovery amounts of battery materials are small compared to the kilo-scale amounts needed for validation of new battery technologies. Argonne researcher Sabine Gallagher Argonne researcher Sabine Gallagher loads a sample mount of battery cathode materials for X-ray diffraction, an analysis tool for obtaining information on the crystallographic structure and composition of materials. Materials Engineering Research Facility (MERF) Argonne's new Materials Engineering Research Facility (MERF) supports the laboratory's Advanced Battery Materials Synthesis and Manufacturing R&D Program. The MERF is enabling the development of manufacturing processes for producing advanced battery materials in sufficient quantity for

122

Uranium Industry Annual, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ``Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,`` is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2.

Not Available

1993-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

123

Ross Hazardous and Toxic Materials Handling Facility: Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) owns a 200-acre facility in Washington State known as the Ross Complex. Activities at the Ross Complex routinely involve handling toxic substances such as oil-filled electrical equipment containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organic and inorganic compounds for preserving wood transmission poles, and paints, solvents, waste oils, and pesticides and herbicides. Hazardous waste management is a common activity on-site, and hazardous and toxic substances are often generated from these and off-site activities. The subject of this environmental assessment (EA) concerns the consolidation of hazardous and toxic substances handling at the Complex. This environmental assessment has been developed to identify the potential environmental impacts of the construction and operation of the proposal. It has been prepared to meet the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) to determine if the proposed action is likely to have a significant impact on the environment. In addition to the design elements included within the project, mitigation measures have been identified within various sections that are now incorporated within the project. This facility would be designed to improve the current waste handling practices and to assist BPA in meeting Federal and state regulations.

URS Consultants, Inc.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Assessment of Facilities, Materials, and Wastes Proposed for Transfer to EM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Non-Integrated Facilities Disposition Non-Integrated Facilities Disposition Project Technical Assistance Page 1 of 2 Complex-Wide Multi-State Assessment of Facilities, Materials, and Wastes Proposed for Transfer to EM Challenge In December 2007 the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management (EM-1) invited the DOE Program Secretarial Offices (PSOs) of Nuclear Energy (NE), Science (SC), and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to propose facilities and legacy waste for transfer to Environmental Management (EM) for final disposition or deactivation and decommissioning (D&D). Transfers of facilities, materials, and waste to EM will generate liabilities that are currently unfunded. For purposes of overall planning, it is important to understand the impacts of proposed transfers with regard to technical

125

Safeguards Guidance Document for Designers of Commercial Nuclear Facilities: International Nuclear Safeguards Requirements and Practices For Uranium Enrichment Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the second in a series of guidelines on international safeguards requirements and practices, prepared expressly for the designers of nuclear facilities. The first document in this series is the description of generic international nuclear safeguards requirements pertaining to all types of facilities. These requirements should be understood and considered at the earliest stages of facility design as part of a new process called Safeguards-by-Design. This will help eliminate the costly retrofit of facilities that has occurred in the past to accommodate nuclear safeguards verification activities. The following summarizes the requirements for international nuclear safeguards implementation at enrichment plants, prepared under the Safeguards by Design project, and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Office of NA-243. The purpose of this is to provide designers of nuclear facilities around the world with a simplified set of design requirements and the most common practices for meeting them. The foundation for these requirements is the international safeguards agreement between the country and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), pursuant to the Treaty on the Non-proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). Relevant safeguards requirements are also cited from the Safeguards Criteria for inspecting enrichment plants, found in the IAEA Safeguards Manual, Part SMC-8. IAEA definitions and terms are based on the IAEA Safeguards Glossary, published in 2002. The most current specification for safeguards measurement accuracy is found in the IAEA document STR-327, International Target Values 2000 for Measurement Uncertainties in Safeguarding Nuclear Materials, published in 2001. For this guide to be easier for the designer to use, the requirements have been restated in plainer language per expert interpretation using the source documents noted. The safeguards agreement is fundamentally a legal document. As such, it is written in a legalese that is understood by specialists in international law and treaties, but not by most outside of this field, including designers of nuclear facilities. For this reason, many of the requirements have been simplified and restated. However, in all cases, the relevant source document and passage is noted so that readers may trace the requirement to the source. This is a helpful living guide, since some of these requirements are subject to revision over time. More importantly, the practices by which the requirements are met are continuously modernized by the IAEA and nuclear facility operators to improve not only the effectiveness of international nuclear safeguards, but also the efficiency. As these improvements are made, the following guidelines should be updated and revised accordingly.

Robert Bean; Casey Durst

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Floodplain/wetland assessment of the effects of construction and operation ofa depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Paducah, Kentucky,site.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF{sub 6} inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This floodplain/wetland assessment has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to Executive Order 11988 (''Floodplain Management''), Executive Order 11990 (Protection of Wetlands), and DOE regulations for implementing these Executive Orders as set forth in Title 10, Part 1022, of the ''Code of Federal Regulations'' (10 CFR Part 1022 [''Compliance with Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements'']), to evaluate potential impacts to floodplains and wetlands from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Paducah site. Reconstruction of the bridge crossing Bayou Creek would occur within the Bayou Creek 100-year floodplain. Replacement of bridge components, including the bridge supports, however, would not be expected to result in measurable long-term changes to the floodplain. Approximately 0.16 acre (0.064 ha) of palustrine emergent wetlands would likely be eliminated by direct placement of fill material within Location A. Some wetlands that are not filled may be indirectly affected by an altered hydrologic regime, due to the proximity of construction, possibly resulting in a decreased frequency or duration of inundation or soil saturation and potential loss of hydrology necessary to sustain wetland conditions. Indirect impacts could be minimized by maintaining a buffer near adjacent wetlands. Wetlands would likely be impacted by construction at Location B; however, placement of a facility in the northern portion of this location would minimize wetland impacts. Construction at Location C could potentially result in impacts to wetlands, however placement of a facility in the southeastern portion of this location may best avoid direct impacts to wetlands. The hydrologic characteristics of nearby wetlands could be indirectly affected by adjacent construction. Executive Order 11990, ''Protection of Wetlands'', requires federal agencies to minimize the destruction, loss, or degradation of wetlands, and to preserve and enhance the natural and beneficial uses of wetlands. DOE regulations for implementing Executive Order 11990 as well as Executive Order 11988, ''Floodplain Management'', are set forth in 10 CFR Part 1022. Mitigation for unavoidable impacts may be developed in coordination with the appropriate regulatory agencies. Unavoidable impacts to wetlands that are within the jurisdiction of the USACE may require a CWA Section 404 Permit, which would trigger the requirement for a CWA Section 401 Water Quality Certification from the Commonwealth of Kentucky. A mitigation plan may be required prior to the initiation of construction. Cumulative impacts to floodplains and wetlands are anticipated to be negligible to minor under the proposed action, in conjunction with the effects of existing conditions and other activities. Habitat disturbance would involve settings commonly found i

Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

127

Environmental, economic, and energy impacts of material recovery facilities. A MITE Program evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents an evaluation of the environmental, economic, and energy impacts of material recovery facilities (MRFs) conducted under the Municipal Solid Waste Innovative Technology Evaluation (MITE) Program. The MITE Program is sponsored by the US Environmental Protection Agency to foster the demonstration and development of innovative technologies for the management of municipal solid waste (MSW). This project was also funded by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Material recovery facilities are increasingly being used as one option for managing a significant portion of municipal solid waste (MSW). The owners and operators of these facilities employ a combination of manual and mechanical techniques to separate and sort the recyclable fraction of MSW and to transport the separated materials to recycling facilities.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Long-term desorption behavior of uranium and neptunium in heterogeneous volcanic tuff materials /  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium and neptunium desorption were studied in long-term laboratory experiments using four well-characterized volcanic tuff cores collected from southeast of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The objectives of the experiments were to 1. Demonstrate a methodology aimed at characterizing distributions of sorption parameters (attributes of multiple sorption sites) that can be applied to moderately-sorbing species in heterogeneous systems to provide more realistic reactive transport parameters and a more realistic approach to modeling transport in heterogeneous systems. 2. Focus on uranium and neptunium because of their high solubility, relatively weak sorption, and high contributions to predicted dose in Yucca Mountain performance assessments. Also, uranium is a contaminant of concern at many DOE legacy sites and uranium mining sites.

Dean, Cynthia A.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory), Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Storage Materials Storage Materials Laboratory may include: * CSP technology developers * Utilities * Certification laboratories * Government agencies * Universities * Other National laboratories Contact Us If you are interested in working with NREL's Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory, please contact: ESIF Manager Carolyn Elam Carolyn.Elam@nrel.gov 303-275-4311 Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory The Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) investigates materials that can be used as high-temperature heat transfer fluids or thermal energy storage media in concentrating solar power (CSP) plants. Research objectives include the discovery and evaluation of

130

Materials Corrosion and Mitigation Strategies for APT, Weapons Neutron Research Facility Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Materials Corrosion and Mitigation Strategies for APT, Weapons Neutron Research Facility Experiments: The Effects of 800 MeV Proton Irradiation on the Corrosion of Tungsten, Tantalum, Stainless Steel, and Gold R. Scott Lillard, Darryl P. Butt Materials Corrosion & Environmental Effects Laboratory MST-6

131

Accumulation and Distribution of Uranium in Rats after Implantation with Depleted Uranium Fragments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Rats after Implantation with Depleted Uranium Fragments Guoying Zhu 1 * Mingguang...and distribution of uranium in depleted uranium (DU) implanted rats. Materials...of chronic exposure to DU. Depleted uranium|Bone|Kidney|Distribution......

Guoying Zhu; Mingguang Tan; Yulan Li; Xiqiao Xiang; Heping Hu; Shuquan Zhao

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Nanoparticle-facilitated transport of uranium and nickel in contaminated sediments near a nuclear weapons processing facility.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The Department of Energy???s Savannah River Site (SRS) has released a total of over 44,000 kg of depleted uranium (U) and a similar amount of (more)

Buettner, Shea Westin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Pyroprocessing of fast flux test facility nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Used nuclear fuel from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was recently transferred to the Idaho National Laboratory and processed by pyroprocessing in the Fuel Conditioning Facility. Approximately 213 kg of uranium from sodium-bonded metallic FFTF fuel was processed over a one year period with the equipment previously used for the processing of EBR-II used fuel. The peak burnup of the FFTF fuel ranged from 10 to 15 atom% for the 900+ chopped elements processed. Fifteen low-enriched uranium ingots were cast following the electrorefining and distillation operations to recover approximately 192 kg of uranium. A material balance on the primary fuel constituents, uranium and zirconium, during the FFTF campaign will be presented along with a brief description of operating parameters. Recoverable uranium during the pyroprocessing of FFTF nuclear fuel was greater than 95% while the purity of the final electro-refined uranium products exceeded 99%. (authors)

Westphal, B.R.; Wurth, L.A.; Fredrickson, G.L.; Galbreth, G.G.; Vaden, D.; Elliott, M.D.; Price, J.C.; Honeyfield, E.M.; Patterson, M.N. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID, 83415 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Standard test method for analysis of isotopic composition of uranium in nuclear-grade fuel material by quadrupole inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This test method is applicable to the determination of the isotopic composition of uranium (U) in nuclear-grade fuel material. The following isotopic weight percentages are determined using a quadrupole inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (Q-ICP-MS): 233U, 234U, 235U, 236U, and 238U. The analysis can be performed on various material matrices after acid dissolution and sample dilution into water or dilute nitric (HNO3) acid. These materials include: fuel product, uranium oxide, uranium oxide alloys, uranyl nitrate (UNH) crystals, and solutions. The sample preparation discussed in this test method focuses on fuel product material but may be used for uranium oxide or a uranium oxide alloy. Other preparation techniques may be used and some references are given. Purification of the uranium by anion-exchange extraction is not required for this test method, as it is required by other test methods such as radiochemistry and thermal ionization mass spectroscopy (TIMS). This test method is also described i...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Uranium industry annual 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Uranium Industry Annual 1998 (UIA 1998) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. It contains data for the period 1989 through 2008 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data provides a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1989 through 1998, including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment, are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2008, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, and uranium inventories, are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1998 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. The Form EIA-858 ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is shown in Appendix D. For the readers convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix E along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

NONE

1999-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

136

Uranium industry annual 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Uranium Industry Annual 1994 (UIA 1994) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing during that survey year. The UIA 1994 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the 10-year period 1985 through 1994 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` (UIAS) provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1994, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. A feature article, ``Comparison of Uranium Mill Tailings Reclamation in the United States and Canada,`` is included in the UIA 1994. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, and uranium inventories, enrichment feed deliveries (actual and projected), and unfilled market requirements are shown in Chapter 2.

NONE

1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

137

Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory & Y-12 for Transfer of Facilities & Materials to EM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Integrated Facilities Disposition Project Integrated Facilities Disposition Project Technical Assistance Page 1 of 2 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Y-12 National Security Complex Tennessee Tennessee Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at ORNL & Y-12 for Transfer of Facilities & Materials to EM Challenge In December 2007, the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management (EM-1) invited the DOE Program Secretarial Offices (PSOs) of Nuclear Energy (NE), Science (SC), and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to propose facilities and legacy waste for transfer to Environmental Management (EM) for final disposition or deactivation and decommissioning (D&D). In parallel with the EM-1 initiative, the Oak Ridge Reservation was conducting a Critical

138

Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hexafluoride (UF6) Hexafluoride (UF6) Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6) line line Properties of UF6 UF6 Health Effects Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6) Physical and chemical properties of UF6, and its use in uranium processing. Uranium Hexafluoride and Its Properties Uranium hexafluoride is a chemical compound consisting of one atom of uranium combined with six atoms of fluorine. It is the chemical form of uranium that is used during the uranium enrichment process. Within a reasonable range of temperature and pressure, it can be a solid, liquid, or gas. Solid UF6 is a white, dense, crystalline material that resembles rock salt. UF6 crystals in a glass vial image UF6 crystals in a glass vial. Uranium hexafluoride does not react with oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, or dry air, but it does react with water or water vapor. For this reason,

139

Simulated Irradiation of Samples in HFIR for use as Possible Test Materials in the MPEX (Material Plasma Exposure Experiment) Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The importance of Plasma Material Interaction (PMI) is a major concern in fusion reactor design and analysis. The Material-Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) facility will explore PMI under fusion reactor plasma conditions. Samples with accumulated displacements per atom (DPA) damage produced by irradiations in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will be studied in the MPEX facility. The project presented in this paper involved performing assessments of the induced radioactivity and resulting radiation fields of a variety of potential fusion reactor materials. The scientific code packages MCNP and SCALE were used to simulate irradiation of the samples in HFIR; generation and depletion of nuclides in the material and the subsequent composition, activity levels, gamma radiation fields, and resultant dose rates as a function of cooling time. These state-of-the-art simulation methods were used in addressing the challenge of the MPEX project to minimize the radioactive inventory in the preparation of the samples for inclusion in the MPEX facility.

Ellis, Ronald James [ORNL; Rapp, Juergen [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Public Scoping Meeting Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Public Scoping Meeting Materials Public Scoping Meeting Materials Public Scoping Meeting Materials Fact sheets, presentations, and other information from the Conversion EIS Public Scoping Meetings. The following materials were made available during the DUF6 Conversion EIS public scoping meetings held near Portsmouth, Ohio, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and Paducah, Kentucky, November - December, 2001. Notice of Intent PDF Icon Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities 60 KB details Presentation PDF Icon Overview: Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Management Program 5.97 MB details DUF6 Fact Sheets PDF Icon Overview of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program 174 KB details PDF Icon NEPA Activities for the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium materials facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Transcript of Public Scoping Meeting for Environmental Impact Statement for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, held Nov. 28, 2001, Piketon, Ohio  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENVIRONMENTAL 2 IMPACT STATEMENT 3 FOR DEPLETED URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE 4 CONVERSION FACILITIES 5 AT PORTSMOUTH, OHIO AND PADUCAH, KENTUCKY 6 7 SCOPING MEETING 8 9 November 28, 2001. 10 11 6:00 p.m. 12 13 Riffe Beavercreek Vocational School 14 175 Beavercreek Road 15 Piketon, Ohio 45661 16 17 FACILITATORS: Darryl Armstrong 18 Harold Munroe 19 Kevin Shaw 20 Gary Hartman 21 22 23 24 Professional Reporters, Inc. (614) 460-5000 or (800) 229-0675 2 1 -=0=- 2 PROCEEDINGS 3 -=0=- 4 MR. ARMSTRONG: I have 6:00, 5 according to my watch. Good evening, ladies 6 and gentlemen. If you'll please take your 7 seats, we'll get started. This meeting is 8 now officially convened. 9 On behalf of DOE, we thank you for 10 attending the environmental impact 11 statement, or EIS, scoping meeting this 12 evening for the depleted uranium conversion 13 facilities. My name is Darryl Armstrong. I 14

142

Supramolecular Composite Materials from Cellulose, Chitosan, and Cyclodextrin: Facile Preparation and Their Selective Inclusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supramolecular Composite Materials from Cellulose, Chitosan, and Cyclodextrin: Facile Preparation-performance supramolecular polysaccharide composites from cellulose (CEL), chitosan (CS), and (2,3,6-tri to dissolve and prepare the composites. Because a majority (>88%) of the IL used was recovered for reuse

Reid, Scott A.

143

Evaluation of irradiation facility options for fusion materials research and development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Successful development of fusion energy will require the design of high-performance structural materials that exhibit dimensional stability and good resistance to fusion neutron degradation of mechanical and physical properties. The high levels of gaseous (H, He) transmutation products associated with deuteriumtritium (DT) fusion neutron transmutation reactions, along with displacement damage dose requirements up to 50200displacements per atom (dpa) for a fusion demonstration reactor (DEMO), pose an extraordinary challenge. One or more intense neutron source(s) are needed to address two complementary missions: (1) scientific investigations of radiation degradation phenomena and microstructural evolution under fusion-relevant irradiation conditions (to provide the foundation for designing improved radiation resistant materials), and (2) engineering database development for design and licensing of next-step fusion energy machines such as a fusion DEMO. A wide variety of irradiation facilities have been proposed to investigate materials science phenomena and to test and qualify materials for a DEMO reactor. Some of the key technical considerations for selecting the most appropriate fusion materials irradiation source are summarized. Currently available and proposed facilities include fission reactors (including isotopic and spectral tailoring techniques to modify the rate of H and He production per dpa), dual- and triple-ion accelerator irradiation facilities that enable greatly accelerated irradiation studies with fusion-relevant H and He production rates per dpa within microscopic volumes, DLi stripping reaction and spallation neutron sources, and plasma-based sources. The advantages and limitations of the main proposed fusion materials irradiation facility options are reviewed. Evaluation parameters include irradiation volume, potential for performing accelerated irradiation studies, capital and operating costs, similarity of neutron irradiation spectrum to fusion reactor conditions, temperature and irradiation flux stability/control, ability to perform multiple-effect tests (e.g., irradiation in the presence of a flowing coolant, or in the presence of complex applied stress fields), and technical maturity/risk of the concept. Ultimately, it is anticipated that heavy utilization of ion beam and fission neutron irradiation facilities along with sophisticated materials models, in addition to a dedicated fusion-relevant neutron irradiation facility, will be necessary to provide a comprehensive and cost-effective understanding of anticipated materials evolution in a fusion DEMO and to therefore provide a timely and robust materials database.

Steven J. Zinkle; Anton Mslang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities Facilities LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve other emerging national security and energy challenges. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505) 667-5061 Some LANL facilities are available to researchers at other laboratories, universities, and industry. Unique facilities foster experimental science, support LANL's security mission DARHT accelerator DARHT's electron accelerators use large, circular aluminum structures to create magnetic fields that focus and steer a stream of electrons down the length of the accelerator. Tremendous electrical energy is added along the way. When the stream of high-speed electrons exits the accelerator it is

145

Microsoft PowerPoint - Marsden - IPRC 2012- Uranium Product Purity.29 Aug 2012  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Purity Purity of Uranium Product from Electrochemical Recycling of Used Metallic Fuel K.C. Marsden B.R. Westphal M.N. Patterson B. Pesic 2012 IPRC August 26-29, 2012 Contents  Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) of the INL  Fuel Conditioning Facility  Processing at the Fuel Conditioning Facility  Value of Uranium Product Purity  Inputs - FFTF Fuel and ER Salt  Dendrite Samples  Final Product Samples  Future Studies 2 Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) of the INL  ~ 45 km west of Idaho Falls, ~800 employees  Location of former EBR-II reactor  Two hot cell facilities and multiple laboratories for research with irradiated materials - Irradiated Material Characterization Laboratory (IMCL) - Electron Microscopy Laboratory (EML) - Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) - Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) 3 Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF)  Rectangular

146

President Truman Increases Production of Uranium and Plutonium...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Uranium and Plutonium Washington, DC President Truman approves a 1.4 billion expansion of Atomic Energy Commission facilities to produce uranium and plutonium for nuclear weapons...

147

Evaluation of irradiation facility options for fusion materials research and development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Successful development of fusion energy will require the design of high-performance structural materials that exhibit dimensional stability and good resistance to fusion neutron degradation of mechanical and physical properties. The high levels of gaseous (H, He) transmutation products associated with deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion neutron transmutation reactions, along with displacement damage dose requirements up to 50-200 displacements per atom (dpa) for a fusion demonstration reactor (DEMO), pose an extraordinary challenge. The intense neutron source(s) is needed to address two complimentary missions: 1) Scientific investigations of radiation degradation phenomena and microstructural evolution under fusion-relevant irradiation conditions (to provide the foundation for designing improved radiation resistant materials), and 2) Engineering database development for design and licensing of next-step fusion energy machines such as a fusion DEMO. A wide variety of irradiation facilities have been proposed to investigate materials science phenomena and to test and qualify materials for a DEMO reactor. Currently available and proposed facilities include fission reactors (including isotopic and spectral tailoring techniques to modify the rate of H and He production per dpa), dual- and triple-ion accelerator irradiation facilities that enable greatly accelerated irradiation studies with fusion-relevant H and He production rates per dpa within microscopic volumes, D-Li stripping reaction and spallation neutron sources, and plasma-based sources. The advantages and limitations of the main proposed fusion materials irradiation facility options are reviewed. Evaluation parameters include irradiation volume, potential for performing accelerated irradiation studies, capital and operating costs, similarity of neutron irradiation spectrum to fusion reactor conditions, temperature and irradiation flux stability/control, ability to perform multiple-effect tests (e.g., irradiation in the presence of a flowing coolant, or in the presence of complex applied stress fields), and technical maturity/risk of the concept. Ultimately, it is anticipated that heavy utilization of ion beam and fission neutron irradiation facilities along with sophisticated materials models, in addition to a dedicated fusion-relevant neutron irradiation facility, will be necessary to provide a comprehensive and cost-effective understanding of anticipated materials evolution in a fusion DEMO and to therefore provide a timely and robust materials database.

Zinkle, Steven J [ORNL] [ORNL; Mslang, Anton [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany] [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Qualitative and Quantitative Assessment of Nuclear Materials Contained in High-Activity Waste Arising from the Operations at the 'SHELTER' Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a result of the nuclear accident at the Chernobyl NPP in 1986, the explosion dispeesed nuclear materials contained in the nuclear fuel of the reactor core over the destroyed facilities at Unit No. 4 and over the territory immediately adjacent to the destroyed unit. The debris was buried under the Cascade Wall. Nuclear materials at the SHELTER can be characterized as spent nuclear fuel, fresh fuel assemblies (including fuel assemblies with damaged geometry and integrity, and individual fuel elements), core fragments of the Chernobyl NPP Unit No. 4, finely-dispersed fuel (powder/dust), uranium and plutonium compounds in water solutions, and lava-like nuclear fuel-containing masses. The new safe confinement (NSC) is a facility designed to enclose the Chernobyl NPP Unit No. 4 destroyed by the accident. Construction of the NSC involves excavating operations, which are continuously monitored including for the level of radiation. The findings of such monitoring at the SHELTER site will allow us to characterize the recovered radioactive waste. When a process material categorized as high activity waste (HAW) is detected the following HLW management operations should be involved: HLW collection; HLW fragmentation (if appropriate); loading HAW into the primary package KT-0.2; loading the primary package filled with HAW into the transportation cask KTZV-0.2; and storing the cask in temporary storage facilities for high-level solid waste. The CDAS system is a system of 3He tubes for neutron coincidence counting, and is designed to measure the percentage ratio of specific nuclear materials in a 200-liter drum containing nuclear material intermixed with a matrix. The CDAS consists of panels with helium counter tubes and a polyethylene moderator. The panels are configured to allow one to position a waste-containing drum and a drum manipulator. The system operates on the add a source basis using a small Cf-252 source to identify irregularities in the matrix during an assay. The platform with the source is placed under the measurement chamber. The platform with the source material is moved under the measurement chamber. The design allows one to move the platform with the source in and out, thus moving the drum. The CDAS system and radioactive waste containers have been built. For each drum filled with waste two individual measurements (passive/active) will be made. This paper briefly describes the work carried out to assess qualitatively and quantitatively the nuclear materials contained in high-level waste at the SHELTER facility. These efforts substantially increased nuclear safety and security at the facility.

Cherkas, Dmytro

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Effect of deposits on corrosion of materials exposed in the Coal-Fired Flow Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Candidate heat exchanger materials tested in the Low Mass Flow train at the Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF) at Tullahoma, TN. were analyzed to evaluate their corrosion performance. Tube specimens obtained at each foot of the 14-ft-long Unbend tubes were analyzed for corrosion-scale morphologies, scale thicknesses, and internal penetration depths. Results developed on 1500- and 2000- h exposed specimens were correlated with exposure temperature. In addition, deposit materials collected at several locations in the CFFF were analyzed in detail to characterize the chemical and physical properties of the deposits and their influence on corrosion performance of tube materials.

Natesan, K.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 7, Estimate data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL`s weapons research, development, and testing (WRD&T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL`s inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. This report is organized according to the sections and subsections outlined by Attachment III-2 of DOE Document AL 4700.1, Project Management System. It is organized into seven parts. This document, Part VII - Estimate Data, contains the project cost estimate information.

NONE

1995-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

151

Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 1, Design concept. Part 2, Project management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL`s weapons research, development, and testing (WRD&T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL`s inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. This document provides Part I - Design Concept which describes the selected solution, and Part II - Project Management which describes the management system organization, the elements that make up the system, and the control and reporting system.

NONE

1995-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

152

Design and Implementation of a Facility for Discovering New Scintillator Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe the design and operation of a high-throughput facility for synthesizing thousands of inorganic crystalline samples per year and evaluating them as potential scintillation detector materials. This facility includes a robotic dispenser, arrays of automated furnaces, a dual-beam X-ray generator for diffractometery and luminescence spectroscopy, a pulsed X-ray generator for time response measurements, computer-controlled sample changers, an optical spectrometer, and a network-accessible database management system that captures all synthesis and measurement data.

Derenzo, Stephen; Derenzo, Stephen E; Boswell, Martin S.; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Boutchko, Rostyslav; Budinger, Thomas F.; Canning, Andrew; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Janecek, Martin; Peng, Qiyu; Porter-Chapman, Yetta; Powell, James; Ramsey, Christopher A.; Taylor, Scott E.; Wang, Lin-Wang; Weber, Marvin J.; Wilson, David S.

2008-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

153

General Heat Transfer Characterization and Empirical Models of Material Storage Temperatures for the Los Alamos Nuclear Materials Storage Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Los Alamos National Laboratory's Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) is being renovated for long-term storage of canisters designed to hold heat-generating nuclear materials. A fully passive cooling scheme, relying on the transfer of heat by conduction, free convection, and radiation has been proposed as a reliable means of maintaining material at acceptable storage temperatures. The storage concept involves placing radioactive materials, with a net heat-generation rate of 10 W to 20 W, inside a set of nested steel canisters. The canisters are, in placed in holding fixtures and positioned vertically within a steel storage pipe. Several hundred drywells are arranged in a linear array within a large bay and dissipate the waste heat to the surrounding air, thus creating a buoyancy driven airflow pattern that draws cool air into the storage facility and exhausts heated air through an outlet stack. In this study, an experimental apparatus was designed to investigate the thermal characteristics of simulated nuclear materials placed inside two nested steel canisters positioned vertically on an aluminum fixture plate and placed inside a section of steel pipe. The heat-generating nuclear materials were simulated with a solid aluminum cylinder containing .an embedded electrical resistance heater. Calibrated type T thermocouples (accurate to ~ O.1 C) were used to monitor temperatures at 20 different locations within the apparatus. The purposes of this study were to observe the heat dissipation characteristics of the proposed `canister/fixture plate storage configuration, to investigate how the storage system responds to changes in various parameters, and to develop and validate empirical correlations to predict material temperatures under various operating conditions

J. D. Bernardin; W. S. Gregory

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Depleted uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The potential health effects arising from exposure to depleted uranium have been much in the news of late. Naturally occurring uranium contains the radioisotopes 238U (which dominates, at a current molar proportion of 99.3%), 235U and a small amount of 234U. Depleted uranium has an isotopic concentration of 235U that is below the 0.7% found naturally. This is either because the uranium has passed through a nuclear reactor which uses up some of the fissile 235U that fuels the fission chain-reaction, or because it is the uranium that remains when enriched uranium with an elevated concentration of 235U is produced in an enrichment plant, or because of a combination of these two processes. Depleted uranium has a lower specific activity than naturally occurring uranium because of the lower concentrations of the more radioactive isotopes 235U and 234U, but account must be taken of any contaminating radionuclides or exotic radioisotopes of uranium if the uranium has been irradiated. Uranium is a particularly dense element (about twice as dense as lead), and this property makes it useful in certain military applications, such as armour-piercing munitions. Depleted uranium, rather than natural uranium, is used because of its availability and, since the demise of the fast breeder reactor programme, the lack of alternative use. Depleted uranium weapons were used in the Gulf War of 1990 and also, to a lesser extent, more recently in the Balkans. This has led to speculation that depleted uranium may be associated with `Gulf War Syndrome', or other health effects that have been reported by military and civilian personnel involved in these conflicts and their aftermath. Although, on the basis of present scientific knowledge, it seems most unlikely that exposure to depleted uranium at the levels concerned could produce a detectable excess of adverse health effects, and in such a short timescale, the issue has become one of general concern and contention. As a consequence, any investigation needs to be thorough to produce sufficiently comprehensive evidence to stand up to close scrutiny and gain the support of the public, whatever the conclusions. Unfortunately, it is the nature of such inquiries that they take time, which is frustrating for some. In the UK, the Royal Society has instigated an independent investigation into the health effects of depleted uranium by a working group chaired by Professor Brian Spratt. This inquiry has been underway since the beginning of 2000. The working group's findings will be reviewed by a panel appointed by the Council of the Royal Society, and it is anticipated that the final report will be published in the summer of 2001. Further details can be found at www.royalsoc.ac.uk/templates/press/showpresspage.cfm?file=2001010801.txt. Nick Priest has summarised current knowledge on the toxicity (both radiological and chemical) of depleted uranium in a commentary in The Lancet (27 January 2001, 357 244-6). For those wanting to read a comprehensive review of the literature, in 1999 RAND published `A Review of the Scientific Literature as it Pertains to Gulf War Illnesses, Volume 7: Depleted Uranium' by Naomi Harley and her colleagues, which can be found at www.rand.org/publications/MR/MR1018.7/MR1018.7.html. An interesting article by Jan Olof Snihs and Gustav Akerblom entitled `Use of depleted uranium in military conflicts and possible impact on health and environment' was published in the December 2000 issue of SSI News (pp 1-8), and can be found at the website of the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute: www.ssi.se/tidningar/PDF/lockSSIn/SSI-news2000.pdf. Last year, a paper was published in the June issue of this Journal that is of some relevance to depleted uranium. McGeoghegan and Binks (2000 J. Radiol. Prot. 20 111-37) reported the results of their epidemiological study of the health of workers at the Springfields uranium production facility near Preston during 1946-95. This study included almost 14 000 radiation workers. Although organ-specific doses due to uranium are not yet available for these worker

Richard Wakeford

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Materials and Security Consolidation Complex Facilities Radioactive Waste Management Basis and DOE Manual 435.1-1 Compliance Tables  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management,' along with its associated manual and guidance, requires development and maintenance of a radioactive waste management basis for each radioactive waste management facility, operation, and activity. This document presents a radioactive waste management basis for Idaho National Laboratory's Materials and Security Consolidation Center facilities that manage radioactive waste. The radioactive waste management basis for a facility comprises existing laboratory-wide and facility-specific documents. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' facility compliance tables also are presented for the facilities. The tables serve as a tool for developing the radioactive waste management basis.

Not Listed

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Materials and Fuels Complex Facilities Radioactive Waste Management Basis and DOE Manual 435.1-1 Compliance Tables  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management,' along with its associated manual and guidance, requires development and maintenance of a radioactive waste management basis for each radioactive waste management facility, operation, and activity. This document presents a radioactive waste management basis for Idaho National Laboratory's Materials and Fuels Complex facilities that manage radioactive waste. The radioactive waste management basis for a facility comprises existing laboratory-wide and facility-specific documents. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' facility compliance tables also are presented for the facilities. The tables serve as a tool for developing the radioactive waste management basis.

Lisa Harvego; Brion Bennett

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Uranium industry annual 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Uranium Industry Annual 1995 (UIA 1995) provides current statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1995 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the period 1986 through 2005 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey``. Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1995, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1986 through 1995 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2005, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1995 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. For the reader`s convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix D along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 14 figs., 56 tabs.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Depleted Uranium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Depleted Uranium Depleted Uranium Depleted Uranium line line Uranium Enrichment Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium Depleted uranium is uranium that has had some of its U-235 content removed. Over the last four decades, large quantities of uranium were processed by gaseous diffusion to produce uranium having a higher concentration of uranium-235 than the 0.72% that occurs naturally (called "enriched" uranium) for use in U.S. national defense and civilian applications. "Depleted" uranium is also a product of the enrichment process. However, depleted uranium has been stripped of some of its natural uranium-235 content. Most of the Department of Energy's (DOE) depleted uranium inventory contains between 0.2 to 0.4 weight-percent uranium-235, well

159

Transcript of Public Scoping Meeting for Environmental Impact Statement for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, held Dec. 4, 2001, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

TRANSCRIPT TRANSCRIPT OF MEETING ______________________________________________________ FACILITATOR: MR. DARRYL ARMSTRONG SPEAKER: MR. DALE RECTOR SPEAKER: MR. NORMAN MULVENON SPEAKER: MS. SUSAN GAWARECKI SPEAKER: MR. GENE HOFFMAN DECEMBER 4, 2001 ____________________________________________________ JOAN S. ROBERTS COURT REPORTER P.O. BOX 5924 OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE 37831 (865-457-4027) 2 1 MR. ARMSTRONG: TAKE YOUR SEATS AND WE 2 WILL BEGIN THE MEETING. GOOD EVENING, LADIES 3 AND GENTLEMEN. IF YOU WILL, WE WILL START, THE 4 TIME IS NOW 6:02 P.M. THE MEETING IS 5 OFFICIALLY CONVENED. ON BEHALF OF THE 6 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, WE THANK YOU FOR 7 ATTENDING THIS ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT 8 SCOPING MEETING, ALSO KNOWN AS AN EIS SCOPING 9 MEETING, FOR THE DEPLETED URANIUM CONVERSION 10 FACILITIES. MY NAME IS DARRYL ARMSTRONG. I'M 11 AN INDEPENDENT AND NEUTRAL FACILITATOR HIRED BY 12 AGENCIES

160

Facility Operations 1993 fiscal year work plan: WBS 1.3.1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Facility Operations program is responsible for the safe, secure, and environmentally sound management of several former defense nuclear production facilities, and for the nuclear materials in those facilities. As the mission for Facility Operations plants has shifted from production to support of environmental restoration, each plant is making a transition to support the new mission. The facilities include: K Basins (N Reactor fuel storage); N Reactor; Plutonium-Uranium Reduction Extraction (PUREX) Plant; Uranium Oxide (UO{sub 3}) Plant; 300 Area Fuels Supply (N Reactor fuel supply); Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP).

Not Available

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium materials facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

OGMS: A Facility to Measure Out-gassing Rate of Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract OGMS, the OutGassing Measurement System, is a facility to measure the outgassing rates of materials. The rate is highly important factor in vacuum science dealing with systems working at pressures below 10-6 mbar. In ultra- high vacuum range it plays role in system pressure at given pumping speed. For standard materials the data is available in literature but at times not under condition of specific application. Many application use very specific materials under vacuum conditions. Cryoadsorption Cryopump a project at Institute for plasma Research uses steel samples coated with activated carbon as sorbents. Various kinds of sorbents were used. Necessity to measure the outgassing rate of such unique materials established the OGMS. The OGMS facility has a known conductance of 2.46 l/s and base outgassing rate of ? 3x10-12 mbar-ltr/s-cm2. An ultimate vacuum of < 5 x10-9 mbar was achieved in a sample chamber of volume ?7.5 liters. This paper describes OGMS, its calibration, experiments to find outgassing rate of steel samples and comparison with reported data to establish authenticity for new materials. It also reports results of outgassing rates of cryo-adhesives and activated charcoal coated steel samples.

Ranjana Gangradey; Samiran Mukherjee; Paresh Panchal; N. Ravi Prakash

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

EIS-0360: Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product at the Portsmouth, Ohio  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

60: Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product at the 60: Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product at the Portsmouth, Ohio Site EIS-0360: Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product at the Portsmouth, Ohio Site Summary This site-specific EIS analyzes the construction, operation, maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning of the proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) conversion facility at three alternative locations within the Portsmouth site; transportation of all cylinders (DUF6, enriched, and empty) currently stored at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to Portsmouth; construction of a new cylinder storage yard at Portsmouth (if required) for ETTP cylinders; transportation of depleted uranium conversion products and waste materials to a disposal facility; transportation and sale of the hydrogen fluoride

163

Feasibility studies to establish at the Kazakhstan Ulba metallurgical plant the manufacturing capability to produce low-enriched uranium certified reference materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the salient features of the transition plan that the United States Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) is presently implementing in the Former Soviet Union countries is the availability of uranium certified reference materials for calibration of nondestructive assay (NDA) measurement equipment. To address this challenge, DOE/NNSA and U.S. national laboratories have focused their cooperative efforts on establishing a reliable source for manufacturing, certifying, and supplying of such standards. The Ulba Metallurgical Plant (UMP), Kazakhstan, which processes large quantities of low-enriched uranium to produce ceramic fuel pellets for nuclear-powered reactors, is well situated to become a key supplier of low-enriched uranium certified reference materials for the country and Central Asia region. We have recently completed Phase I of a feasibility study to establish at UMP capabilities of manufacturing these standards. In this paper we will discuss details of a proposed methodology for uranium down-blending, material selection and characterization, and a proposed methodology of measurement by destructive (DA) and non-destructive (NDA) analysis to form a database for material certification by the competent State authorities in the Republic of Kazakhstan. In addition, we will discuss the prospect for manufacturing of such standards at UMP.

Kuzminski, Jozef [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nesuhoff, J [NBL; Cratto, P [NBL; Pfennigwerth, G [Y12 NATIONAL SEC. COMPLEX; Mikhailenko, A [ULBA METALLURGICAL PLANT; Maliutina, I [ULBA METALLURGICAL PLANT; Nations, J [GREGG PROTECTION SERVICES

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Uranium: Prices, rise, then fall  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium prices hit eight-year highs in both market tiers, $16.60/lb U{sub 3}O{sub 8} for non-former Soviet Union (FSU) origin and $15.50 for FSU origin during mid 1996. However, they declined to $14.70 and $13.90, respectively, by the end of the year. Increased uranium prices continue to encourage new production and restarts of production facilities presently on standby. Australia scrapped its {open_quotes}three-mine{close_quotes} policy following the ouster of the Labor party in a March election. The move opens the way for increasing competition with Canada`s low-cost producers. Other events in the industry during 1996 that have current or potential impacts on the market include: approval of legislation outlining the ground rules for privatization of the US Enrichment Corp. (USEC) and the subsequent sales of converted Russian highly enriched uranium (HEU) from its nuclear weapons program, announcement of sales plans for converted US HEU and other surplus material through either the Department of Energy or USEC, and continuation of quotas for uranium from the FSU in the United States and Europe. In Canada, permitting activities continued on the Cigar Lake and McArthur River projects; and construction commenced on the McClean Lake mill.

Pool, T.C.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

A U.S. high-flux neutron facility for fusion materials development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Materials for a fusion reactor first wall and blanket structure must be able to reliably function in an extreme environment that includes 10-15 MW-year/m{sup 2} neutron and heat fluences. The various materials and structural challenges are as difficult and important as achieving a burning plasma. Overcoming radiation damage degradation is the rate-controlling step in fusion materials development. Recent advances with oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels show promise in meeting reactor requirements, while multi-timescale atomistic simulations of defect-grain boundary interactions in model copper systems reveal surprising self-annealing phenomenon. While these results are promising, simultaneous evaluation of radiation effects displacement damage ({le} 200 dpa) and in-situ He generation ({le} 2000 appm) at prototypical reactor temperatures and chemical environments is still required. There is currently no experimental facility in the U.S. that can meet these requirements for macroscopic samples. The E.U. and U.S. fusion communities have recently concluded that a fusion-relevant, high-flux neutron source for accelerated characterization of the effects of radiation damage to materials is a top priority for the next decade. Data from this source will be needed to validate designs for the multi-$B next-generation fusion facilities such as the CTF, ETF, and DEMO, that are envisioned to follow ITER and NIF.

Rei, Donald J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Grout Isolation and Stabilization of Structures and Materials within Nuclear Facilities at the U.S. Department of Energy, Hanford Site, Summary - 12309  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Per regulatory agreement and facility closure design, U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site nuclear fuel cycle structures and materials require in situ isolation in perpetuity and/or interim physicochemical stabilization as a part of final disposal or interim waste removal, respectively. To this end, grout materials are being used to encase facilities structures or are being incorporated within structures containing hazardous and radioactive contaminants. Facilities where grout materials have been recently used for isolation and stabilization include: (1) spent fuel separations, (2) uranium trioxide calcining, (3) reactor fuel storage basin, (4) reactor fuel cooling basin transport rail tanker cars and casks, (5) cold vacuum drying and reactor fuel load-out, and (6) plutonium fuel metal finishing. Grout components primarily include: (1) portland cement, (2) fly ash, (3) aggregate, and (4) chemical admixtures. Mix designs for these typically include aggregate and non aggregate slurries and bulk powders. Placement equipment includes: (1) concrete piston line pump or boom pump truck for grout slurry, (2) progressive cavity and shearing vortex pump systems, and (3) extendable boom fork lift for bulk powder dry grout mix. Grout slurries placed within the interior of facilities were typically conveyed utilizing large diameter slick line and the equivalent diameter flexible high pressure concrete conveyance hose. Other facilities requirements dictated use of much smaller diameter flexible grout conveyance hose. Placement required direct operator location within facilities structures in most cases, whereas due to radiological dose concerns, placement has also been completed remotely with significant standoff distances. Grout performance during placement and subsequent to placement often required unique design. For example, grout placed in fuel basin structures to serve as interim stabilization materials required sufficient bearing i.e., unconfined compressive strength, to sustain heavy equipment yet, low breakout force to permit efficient removal by track hoe bucket or equivalent construction equipment. Further, flow of slurries through small orifice geometries of moderate head pressures was another typical design requirement. Phase separation of less than 1 percent was a typical design requirement for slurries. On the order of 30,000 cubic meters of cementitious grout have recently been placed in the above noted U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site facilities or structures. Each has presented a unique challenge in mix design, equipment, grout injection or placement, and ultimate facility or structure performance. Unconfined compressive and shear strength, flow, density, mass attenuation coefficient, phase separation, air content, wash-out, parameters and others, unique to each facility or structure, dictate the grout mix design for each. Each mix design was tested under laboratory and scaled field conditions as a precursor to field deployment. Further, after injection or placement of each grout formulation, the material was field inspected either by standard laboratory testing protocols, direct physical evaluation, or both. (authors)

Phillips, S.J.; Phillips, M.; Etheridge, D. [Applied Geotechnical Engineering and Construction, Incorporated, Richland, Washington (United States); Chojnacki, D.W.; Herzog, C.B.; Matosich, B.J.; Steffen, J.M.; Sterling, R.T. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, Washington (United States); Flaucher, R.H.; Lloyd, E.R. [Fluor Federal Services, Incorporated, Richland, Washington (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Radiological aspects of in situ uranium recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the last few years, there has been a significant increase in the demand for Uranium as historical inventories have been consumed and new reactor orders are being placed. Numerous mineralized properties around the world are being evaluated for Uranium recovery and new mining / milling projects are being evaluated and developed. Ore bodies which are considered uneconomical to mine by conventional methods such as tunneling or open pits, can be candidates for non-conventional recovery techniques, involving considerably less capital expenditure. Technologies such as Uranium in situ leaching in situ recovery (ISL / ISR), have enabled commercial scale mining and milling of relatively small ore pockets of lower grade, and may make a significant contribution to overall world wide uranium supplies over the next ten years. Commercial size solution mining production facilities have operated in the US since 1975. Solution mining involves the pumping of groundwater, fortified with oxidizing and complexing agents into an ore body, solubilizing the uranium in situ, and then pumping the solutions to the surface where they are fed to a processing plant. Processing involves ion exchange and may also include precipitation, drying or calcining and packaging operations depending on facility specifics. This paper presents an overview of the ISR process and the health physics monitoring programs developed at a number of commercial scale ISL / ISR Uranium recovery and production facilities as a result of the radiological character of these processes. Although many radiological aspects of the process are similar to that of conventional mills, conventional-type tailings as such are not generated. However, liquid and solid byproduct materials may be generated and impounded. The quantity and radiological character of these by products are related to facility specifics. Some special monitoring considerations are presented which are required due to the manner in which Radon gas is evolved in the process and the unique aspects of controlling solution flow patterns underground. An overview of the major aspects of the health physics and radiation protection programs that were developed at these facilities are discussed and contrasted to circumstances of the current generation and state of the art of Uranium ISR technologies and facilities. (authors)

BROWN, STEVEN H. [SHB INC., 7505 S. Xanthia Place, Centennial, Colorado (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Final environmental assessment for the U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations receipt and storage of uranium materials from the Fernald Environmental Management Project site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Through a series of material transfers and sales agreements over the past 6 to 8 years, the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) has reduced its nuclear material inventory from 14,500 to approximately 6,800 metric tons of uranium (MTU). This effort is part of the US Department of energy`s (DOE`s) decision to change the mission of the FEMP site; it is currently shut down and the site is being remediated. This EA focuses on the receipt and storage of uranium materials at various DOE-ORO sites. The packaging and transportation of FEMP uranium material has been evaluated in previous NEPA and other environmental evaluations. A summary of these evaluation efforts is included as Appendix A. The material would be packaged in US Department of Transportation-approved shipping containers and removed from the FEMP site and transported to another site for storage. The Ohio Field Office will assume responsibility for environmental analyses and documentation for packaging and transport of the material as part of the remediation of the site, and ORO is preparing this EA for receipt and storage at one or more sites.

NONE

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Leak-Path Factor Analysis for the Nuclear Materials Storage Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Leak-path factors (LPFs) were calculated for the Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) located in the Plutonium Facility, Building 41 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 55. In the unlikely event of an accidental fire powerful enough to fail a container holding actinides, the subsequent release of oxides, modeled as PuO{sub 2} aerosols, from the facility and into the surrounding environment was predicted. A 1-h nondestructive assay (NDA) laboratory fire accident was simulated with the MELCOR severe accident analysis code. Fire-driven air movement along with wind-driven air infiltration transported a portion of these actinides from the building. This fraction is referred to as the leak-path factor. The potential effect of smoke aerosol on the transport of the actinides was investigated to verify the validity of neglecting the smoke as conservative. The input model for the NMSF consisted of a system of control volumes, flow pathways, and surfaces sufficient to model the thermal-hydraulic conditions within the facility and the aerosol transport data necessary to simulate the transport of PuO{sub 2} particles. The thermal-hydraulic, heat-transfer, and aerosol-transport models are solved simultaneously with data being exchanged between models. A MELCOR input model was designed such that it would reproduce the salient features of the fire per the corresponding CFAST calculation. Air infiltration into and out of the facility would be affected strongly by wind-driven differential pressures across the building. Therefore, differential pressures were applied to each side of the building according to guidance found in the ASHRAE handbook using a standard-velocity head equation with a leading multiplier to account for the orientation of the wind with the building. The model for the transport of aerosols considered all applicable transport processes, but the deposition within the building clearly was dominated by gravitational settling.

Shaffer, C.; Leonard, M.

1999-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

170

Characterization of uranium isotopic abundances in depleted uranium metal assay standard 115  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Certified reference material (CRM) 115, Uranium (Depleted) Metal (Uranium Assay Standard), was analyzed using a ... TRITON Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer to characterize the uranium isotope-amount ratios. T...

K. J. Mathew; G. L. Singleton; R. M. Essex

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Implementation of conduct of operations at Paducah uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) sampling and transfer facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the initial planning and actual field activities associated with the implementation of {open_quotes}Conduct of Operations{close_quotes}. Conduct of Operations is an operating philosophy that was developed through the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO). Conduct of Operations covers many operating practices and is intended to provide formality and discipline to all aspects of plant operation. The implementation of these operating principles at the UF{sub 6} Sampling and Transfer Facility resulted in significant improvements in facility operations.

Penrod, S.R. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., KY (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

172

Implementation of conduct of operations at Paducah uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) sampling and transfer facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the initial planning and actual field activities associated with the implementation of {open_quotes}Conduct of Operations{close_quotes}, Conduct of Operations is an operating philosophy that was developed through the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO). Conduct of Operations covers many operating practices and is intended to provide formality and discipline to all aspects of plant operation. The implementation of these operating principles at the UF{sub 6} Sampling and Transfer Facility resulted in significant improvements in facility operations.

Penrod, S.R. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., KY (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

173

LANSCE | Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Isotope Production Facility (IPF) Lujan Neutron Scattering Center Materials Test Station (MTS) Proton Radiography (pRad) Ultracold Neutrons (UCN) Weapons Neutron Research Facility...

174

Biological assessment of the effects of construction and operation of a depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, site.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF6 inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This biological assessment (BA) has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and the Endangered Species Act of 1974, to evaluate potential impacts to federally listed species from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Paducah site.

Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

175

Overview on backfill materials and permeable reactive barriers for nuclear waste disposal facilities.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A great deal of money and effort has been spent on environmental restoration during the past several decades. Significant progress has been made on improving air quality, cleaning up and preventing leaching from dumps and landfills, and improving surface water quality. However, significant challenges still exist in all of these areas. Among the more difficult and expensive environmental problems, and often the primary factor limiting closure of contaminated sites following surface restoration, is contamination of ground water. The most common technology used for remediating ground water is surface treatment where the water is pumped to the surface, treated and pumped back into the ground or released at a nearby river or lake. Although still useful for certain remediation scenarios, the limitations of pump-and-treat technologies have recently been recognized, along with the need for innovative solutions to ground-water contamination. Even with the current challenges we face there is a strong need to create geological repository systems for dispose of radioactive wastes containing long-lived radionuclides. The potential contamination of groundwater is a major factor in selection of a radioactive waste disposal site, design of the facility, future scenarios such as human intrusion into the repository and possible need for retrieving the radioactive material, and the use of backfills designed to keep the radionuclides immobile. One of the most promising technologies for remediation of contaminated sites and design of radioactive waste repositories is the use of permeable reactive barriers (PRBs). PRBs are constructed of reactive material(s) to intercept and remove the radionuclides from the water and decontaminate the plumes in situ. The concept of PRBs is relatively simple. The reactive material(s) is placed in the subsurface between the waste or contaminated area and the groundwater. Reactive materials used thus far in practice and research include zero valent iron, hydroxyapatite, magnesium oxide, and others. As the contaminant moves through the reactive material, the contaminant is either sorbed by the reactive material or chemically reacts with the material to form a less harmful substance. Because of the high risk associated with failure of a geological repository for nuclear waste, most nations favor a near-field multibarrier engineered system using backfill materials to prevent release of radionuclides into the surrounding groundwater.

Moore, Robert Charles; Hasan, Ahmed Ali Mohamed; Holt, Kathleen Caroline; Hasan, Mahmoud A. (Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo, Egypt)

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Fusion Nuclear Schience Facility-AT: A Material And Component Testing Device  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) is a necessary complement to ITER, especially in the area of materials and components testing, needed for DEMO design development. FNSF-AT, which takes advantage of advanced tokamak (AT) physics should have neutron wall loading of 1-2 MW/m2, continuous operation for periods of up to two weeks, a duty factor goal of 0.3 per year and an accumulated fluence of 3-6 MW-yr/m2 (~30-60 dpa) in ten years to enable the qualification of structural, blanket and functional materials, components and corresponding ancillary equipment necessary for the design and licensing of a DEMO. Base blankets with a ferritic steel structure and selected tritium blanket materials will be tested and used for the demonstration of tritium sufficiency. Additional test ports at the outboard mid-plane will be reserved for test blankets with advanced designs or exotic materials, and electricity production for integrated high fluence testing in a DT fusion spectrum. FNSF-AT will be designed using conservative implementations of all elements of AT physics to produce 150-300 MW fusion power with modest energy gain (Q<7) in a modest sized normal conducting coil device. It will demonstrate and help to select the DEMO plasma facing, structural, tritium breeding, functional materials and ancillary equipment including diagnostics. It will also demonstrate the necessary tritium fuel cycle, design and cooling of the first wall chamber and divertor components. It will contribute to the knowledge on material qualification, licensing, operational safety and remote maintenance necessary for DEMO design

Wong, C. P.; Chan, V. S.; Garofalo, A. M.; Stambaugh, Ron; Sawan, M.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Merrill, Brad

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vehicle Recycling Partnership Plastics Separation Pilot Plant Vehicle Recycling Partnership Plastics Separation Pilot Plant Sam Jody and displays recycled plastics Bassam Jody displays plastics recovered from shredder residue by the Argonne separation process and successfully tested for making auto parts. The Challenge of Separating Plastic Waste Separating plastics at high concentrations from waste streams has been a challenge because many conventional separation methods depend on material density or employ organic solvents. Many plastics have overlapping densities and, therefore, could not be separated from each other based on density differences alone. Organic solvents pose environmental risks. Argonne's Froth-flotation Process Argonne has developed a process for separating individual polymers and groups of compatible polymers from various polymer rich waste streams. The

178

U. S. forms uranium enrichment corporation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After almost 40 years of operation, the federal government is withdrawing from the uranium enrichment business. On July 1, the Department of Energy turned over to a new government-owned entity--the US Enrichment Corp. (USEC)--both the DOE enrichment plants at Paducah, Ky., and Portsmouth, Ohio, and domestic and international marketing of enriched uranium from them. Pushed by the inability of DOE's enrichment operations to meet foreign competition, Congress established USEC under the National Energy Policy Act of 1992, envisioning the new corporation as the first step to full privatization. With gross revenues of $1.5 billion in fiscal 1992, USEC would rank 275th on the Fortune 500 list of top US companies. USEC will lease from DOE the Paducah and Portsmouth facilities, built in the early 1950s, which use the gaseous diffusion process for uranium enrichment. USEC's stock is held by the US Treasury, to which it will pay annual dividends. Martin Marietta Energy Systems, which has operated Paducah since 1984 and Portsmouth since 1986 for DOE, will continue to operate both plants for USEC. Closing one of the two facilities will be studied, especially in light of a 40% world surplus of capacity over demand. USEC also will consider other nuclear-fuel-related ventures. USEC will produce only low-enriched uranium, not weapons-grade material. Indeed, USEC will implement a contract now being completed under which the US will purchase weapons-grade uranium from dismantled Russian nuclear weapons and convert it into low-enriched uranium for power reactor fuel.

Seltzer, R.

1993-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

179

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Facilities - Remote Handling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities * Actinide * Analytical Chemistry * Premium Coal Samples * Electrochemical Analysis * Glovebox * Glassblowing Fundamental Interactions Catalysis & Energy Conversion Electrochemical Energy Storage Nuclear & Environmental Processes National Security Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations Center for Electrical Energy Storage: Tailored Interfaces Contact Us CSE Intranet Remote Handling Mockup Facility Remote Handling Mockup Facility Radiochemist Art Guelis observes technician Kevin Quigley preparing to cut open a surrogate uranium target. Argonne designed and built a Remote Handling Mockup Facility to let engineers simulate the handling of radioactive materials in a non-radioactive environment. The ability to carry out the details of an

180

Fissile Material Disposition Program: Deep Borehole Disposal Facility PEIS data input report for direct disposal. Direct disposal of plutonium metal/plutonium dioxide in compound metal canisters. Version 3.0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is examining options for disposing of excess weapons-usable nuclear materials [principally plutonium (Pu) and highly enriched uranium (HEU)] in a form or condition that is substantially and inherently more difficult to recover and reuse in weapons production. This report is the data input report for the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). The PEIS examines the environmental, safety, and health impacts of implementing each disposition alternative on land use, facility operations, and site infrastructure; air quality and noise; water, geology, and soils; biotic, cultural, and paleontological resources; socioeconomics; human health; normal operations and facility accidents; waste management; and transportation. This data report is prepared to assist in estimating the environmental effects associated with the construction and operation of a Deep Borehole Disposal Facility, an alternative currently included in the PEIS. The facility projects under consideration are, not site specific. This report therefore concentrates on environmental, safety, and health impacts at a generic site appropriate for siting a Deep Borehole Disposal Facility.

Wijesinghe, A.M.; Shaffer, R.J.

1996-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium materials facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Uranium industry annual 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium production in the United States has declined dramatically from a peak of 43.7 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (16.8 thousand metric tons uranium (U)) in 1980 to 3.1 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (1.2 thousand metric tons U) in 1993. This decline is attributed to the world uranium market experiencing oversupply and intense competition. Large inventories of uranium accumulated when optimistic forecasts for growth in nuclear power generation were not realized. The other factor which is affecting U.S. uranium production is that some other countries, notably Australia and Canada, possess higher quality uranium reserves that can be mined at lower costs than those of the United States. Realizing its competitive advantage, Canada was the world`s largest producer in 1993 with an output of 23.9 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (9.2 thousand metric tons U). The U.S. uranium industry, responding to over a decade of declining market prices, has downsized and adopted less costly and more efficient production methods. The main result has been a suspension of production from conventional mines and mills. Since mid-1992, only nonconventional production facilities, chiefly in situ leach (ISL) mining and byproduct recovery, have operated in the United States. In contrast, nonconventional sources provided only 13 percent of the uranium produced in 1980. ISL mining has developed into the most cost efficient and environmentally acceptable method for producing uranium in the United States. The process, also known as solution mining, differs from conventional mining in that solutions are used to recover uranium from the ground without excavating the ore and generating associated solid waste. This article describes the current ISL Yang technology and its regulatory approval process, and provides an analysis of the factors favoring ISL mining over conventional methods in a declining uranium market.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

IFMIF, International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility conceptual design activity cost report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the cost estimate for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) at the completion of the Conceptual Design Activity (CDA). The estimate corresponds to the design documented in the Final IFMIF CDA Report. In order to effectively involve all the collaborating parties in the development of the estimate, a preparatory meeting was held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in March 1996 to jointly establish guidelines to insure that the estimate was uniformly prepared while still permitting each country to use customary costing techniques. These guidelines are described in Section 4. A preliminary cost estimate was issued in July 1996 based on the results of the Second Design Integration Meeting, May 20--27, 1996 at JAERI, Tokai, Japan. This document served as the basis for the final costing and review efforts culminating in a final review during the Third IFMIF Design Integration Meeting, October 14--25, 1996, ENEA, Frascati, Italy. The present estimate is a baseline cost estimate which does not apply to a specific site. A revised cost estimate will be prepared following the assignment of both the site and all the facility responsibilities.

Rennich, M.J. [comp.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Hypersonic test facilities available in Western Europe for aerodynamic/aerothermal and structure/material investigations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of several new facilities in Western Europe. (a) Basic layout...addition to the TPS facilities in Western Europe, a complete test...3. TPS test facilities in Western Europe facility country type...Aerospace Ground Testing Conf., Colorado Springs, CO, USA, June 2023...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Biological assessment of the effects of construction and operation of adepleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio,site.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF{sub 6} inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This biological assessment (BA) has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 and the Endangered Species Act of 1974, to evaluate potential impacts to federally listed species from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Portsmouth site. The Indiana bat is known to occur in the area of the Portsmouth site and may potentially occur on the site during spring or summer. Evaluations of the Portsmouth site indicated that most of the site was found to have poor summer habitat for the Indiana bat because of the small size, isolation, and insufficient maturity of the few woodlands on the site. Potential summer habitat for the Indiana bat was identified outside the developed area bounded by Perimeter Road, within the corridors along Little Beaver Creek, the Northwest Tributary stream, and a wooded area east of the X-100 facility. However, no Indiana bats were collected during surveys of these areas in 1994 and 1996. Locations A, B, and C do not support suitable habitat for the Indiana bat and would be unlikely to be used by Indiana bats. Indiana bat habitat also does not occur at Proposed Areas 1 and 2. Although Locations A and C contain small wooded areas, the small size and lack of suitable maturity of these areas indicate that they would provide poor habitat for Indiana bats. Trees that may be removed during construction would not be expected to be used for summer roosting by Indiana bats. Disturbance of Indiana bats potentially roosting or foraging in the vicinity of the facility during operations would be very unlikely, and any disturbance would be expected to be negligible. On the basis of these considerations, DOE concludes that the proposed action is not likely to adversely affect the Indiana bat. No critical habitat exists for this species in the action area. Although the timber rattlesnake occurs in the vicinity of the Portsmouth site, it has not been observed on the site. In addition, habitat for the timber rattlesnake is not present on the Portsmouth site. Therefore, DOE concludes that the proposed action would not affect the timber rattlesnake.

Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

185

The Vapor Plume at Material Disposal Are C in Relation to Pajarito Corridor Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A vapor plume made up of volatile organic compounds is present beneath Material Disposal Area C (MDA C) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The location and concentrations within the vapor plume are discussed in relation to existing and planned facilities and construction activities along Pajarito Road (the 'Pajarito Corridor') and in terms of worker health and safety. This document provides information that indicates that the vapor plume does not pose a threat to the health of LANL workers nor will it pose a threat to workers during construction of proposed facilities along Pajarito Road. The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) monitors emissions, effluents, and environmental media to meet environmental compliance requirements, determine actions to protect the environment, and monitor the long-term health of the local environment. LANL also studies and characterizes 'legacy' waste from past Laboratory operations to make informed decisions regarding eventual corrective actions and the disposition of that waste. Starting in 1969, these activities have been annually reported in the LANL Environmental Report (formerly Environmental Surveillance Report), and are detailed in publicly accessible technical reports meeting environmental compliance requirements. Included among the legacy sites being investigated are several formerly used material disposal areas (MDAs) set aside by the Laboratory for the general on-site disposal of waste from mission-related activities. One such area is MDA C located in Technical Area 50 (TA-50), which was used for waste disposal between 1948 and 1974. The location of TA-50 is depicted in Figure 1. The present paper uses a series of maps and cross sections to address the public concerns raised about the vapor plume at MDA C. As illustrated here, extensive sampling and data interpretation indicate that the vapor plume at MDA C does not pose a threat to the health of LANL workers nor will it pose a threat to workers during construction of the proposed facilities and utility trenches. The public cannot be directly exposed to the vapor plume beneath MDA C because Pajarito Road is closed to the public.

Masse, William B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

186

Influence of uranium hydride oxidation on uranium metal behaviour  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work addresses concerns that the rapid, exothermic oxidation of active uranium hydride in air could stimulate an exothermic reaction (burning) involving any adjacent uranium metal, so as to increase the potential hazard arising from a hydride reaction. The effect of the thermal reaction of active uranium hydride, especially in contact with uranium metal, does not increase in proportion with hydride mass, particularly when considering large quantities of hydride. Whether uranium metal continues to burn in the long term is a function of the uranium metal and its surroundings. The source of the initial heat input to the uranium, if sufficient to cause ignition, is not important. Sustained burning of uranium requires the rate of heat generation to be sufficient to offset the total rate of heat loss so as to maintain an elevated temperature. For dense uranium, this is very difficult to achieve in naturally occurring circumstances. Areas of the uranium surface can lose heat but not generate heat. Heat can be lost by conduction, through contact with other materials, and by convection and radiation, e.g. from areas where the uranium surface is covered with a layer of oxidised material, such as burned-out hydride or from fuel cladding. These rates of heat loss are highly significant in relation to the rate of heat generation by sustained oxidation of uranium in air. Finite volume modelling has been used to examine the behaviour of a magnesium-clad uranium metal fuel element within a bottle surrounded by other un-bottled fuel elements. In the event that the bottle is breached, suddenly, in air, it can be concluded that the bulk uranium metal oxidation reaction will not reach a self-sustaining level and the mass of uranium oxidised will likely to be small in relation to mass of uranium hydride oxidised. (authors)

Patel, N.; Hambley, D. [National Nuclear Laboratory (United Kingdom); Clarke, S.A. [Sellafield Ltd (United Kingdom); Simpson, K.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

TEMPERATURE PREDICTION IN 3013 CONTAINERS IN K AREA MATERIAL STORAGE (KAMS) FACILITY USING REGRESSION METHODS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

3013 containers are designed in accordance with the DOE-STD-3013-2004. These containers are qualified to store plutonium (Pu) bearing materials such as PuO2 for 50 years. DOT shipping packages such as the 9975 are used to store the 3013 containers in the K-Area Material Storage (KAMS) facility at Savannah River Site (SRS). DOE-STD-3013-2004 requires that a comprehensive surveillance program be set up to ensure that the 3013 container design parameters are not violated during the long term storage. To ensure structural integrity of the 3013 containers, thermal analyses using finite element models were performed to predict the contents and component temperatures for different but well defined parameters such as storage ambient temperature, PuO{sub 2} density, fill heights, weights, and thermal loading. Interpolation is normally used to calculate temperatures if the actual parameter values are different from the analyzed values. A statistical analysis technique using regression methods is proposed to develop simple polynomial relations to predict temperatures for the actual parameter values found in the containers. The analysis shows that regression analysis is a powerful tool to develop simple relations to assess component temperatures.

Gupta, N

2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

188

Programmatic Environmental Assessment for the U. S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Implementation of a Comprehensive Management Program for the Storage, Transportation, and Disposition of Potentially Reusable Uranium Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

IMPMZT IMPMZT PROGR4MMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSME?X FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, OAK RIDGE OPER4TIOSS IMPLEMENTATION OF A COMPREHENSIVE MANAGEMEKT PROGK4hl FOR THE STORAGE, TRANSPORTATION, AND DISPOSITION OF POTENTIALLY REUSABLE URANJUh4 MATERIALS AGEhCY: U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) ACTION: FINDI?iG OF NO SIGNIFICANT 1~IPAC-I SUMI\!L4RY: The U. S. DOE has completed a Programmatic Environmental Assessment (PE:,4) (DOE/E?,- 1393), which is incorporated herein by this reference. Tile purpose of the PEA is in assess potential enJ?ronmental impacts of the implementation of a comprehek-e management program for potentiaIly reusable ICW enriched uranium (LEU). norr,:al uranium (NU), and depleted uranium (DU). --l?prosimately 14,200 MTU (h?etric Tons of Uranium) of potentially reusable uranium is located at 15s

189

Calibration Facilities | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Calibration Facilities Calibration Facilities Calibration Facilities Calibration Facilities Calibration Facilities Calibration Facilities Calibration Facilities DOE supports the development, standardization, and maintenance of calibration facilities for environmental radiation sensors. Radiation standards at the facilities are primarily used to calibrate portable surface gamma-ray survey meters and borehole logging instruments used for uranium and other mineral exploration and remedial action measurements. Standards for calibrating borehole fission neutron devices are also available, but are used infrequently. Radiation standards are constructed of concrete with elevated, uniform concentrations of naturally occurring potassium, uranium, and/or thorium. Pad standards have large, flat surfaces suitable for calibration

190

Assessment of radiation exposure for materials in the LANSCE Spallation Irradiation Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Materials samples were irradiated in the Los Alamos Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) to provide data for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project on the changes in mechanical and physical properties of materials in a spallation target environment. The targets were configured to expose samples to a variety of radiation environments including high-energy protons, mixed protons and neutrons, and predominantly neutrons. The irradiation was driven by an 800 MeV 1 mA proton beam with a circular Gaussian shape of approximately 2{sigma} = 3.5 cm. Two irradiation campaigns were conducted in which samples were exposed for approximately six months and two months, respectively. At the end of this period, the samples were extracted and tested. Activation foils that had been placed in proximity to the materials samples were used to quantify the fluences in various locations. The STAYSL2 code was used to estimate the fluences by combining the activation foil data with calculated data from the LAHET Code System (LCS) and MCNPX. The exposure for each sample was determined from the estimated fluences using interpolation based on a mathematical fitting to the fluence results. The final results included displacement damage (dpa) and gas (H, He) production for each sample from the irradiation. Based on the activation foil analysis, samples from several locations in both irradiation campaigns were characterized. The radiation damage to each sample was highly dependent upon location and varied from 0.023 to 13 dpa and was accompanied by high levels of H and He production.

James, M. R. (Michael R.); Maloy, S. A. (Stuart A.); Sommer, W. F. (Walter F.), Jr.; Fowler, Malcolm M.; Dry, D. E. (Donald E.); Ferguson, P. D. (Phillip D.); Corzine, R. K. (R. Karen); Mueller, G. E. (Gary E.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

PACKAGING AND TRANSFER PACKAGING AND TRANSFER OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND MATERIALS OF NATIONAL SECURITY INTEREST Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Verify that packaging and transportation safety requirements of hazardous materials and materials of national security interest have been established and are in compliance with DOE Orders 461.1 and 460.1B Criteria: Verify that safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of DOE/NNSA offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport have been established [DOE O 460.1B, 1, "Objectives"]. Verify that the contractor transporting a package of hazardous materials is in compliance with the requirements of the Hazardous Materials Regulations

192

Selective leaching of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils: Progress report 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three soils and a sediment contaminated with uranium were used to determine the effectiveness of sodium carbonate and citric acid leaching to decontaminated or remove uranium to acceptable regulatory levels. Two of the soils were surface soils from the DOE facility formerly called the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) at Fernald, Ohio. This facility is presently called the Femald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). Carbonate extractions generally removed from 70 to 90% of the uranium from the Fernald storage pad soil. Uranium was slightly more difficult to extract from the Fernald incinerator and the Y-12 landfarm soils. Very small amounts of uranium could be extracted from the storm sewer sediment. Extraction with carbonate at high solution-to-soil ratios were as effective as extractions at low solution-to-soil ratios, indicating attrition by the paddle mixer was not significantly different than that provided in a rotary extractor. Also, pretreatments such as milling or pulverizing the soil sample did not appear to increase extraction efficiency when carbonate extractions were carried out at elevated temperatures (60[degree]C) or long extraction times (23 h). Adding KMnO[sub 4] in the carbonate extraction appeared to increase extraction efficiency from the Fernald incinerator soil but not the Fernald storage pad soil. The most effective leaching rates (> 90 % from both Fernald soils) were obtained using a citrate/dithionite extraction procedure designed to remove amorphous (noncrystalline) iron/aluminum sesquioxides from surfaces of clay minerals. Citric acid also proved to be a very good extractant for uranium.

Francis, C.W.; Mattus, A.J.; Farr, L.L.; Elless, M.P.; Lee, S.Y.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Selective leaching of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils: Progress report 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three soils and a sediment contaminated with uranium were used to determine the effectiveness of sodium carbonate and citric acid leaching to decontaminated or remove uranium to acceptable regulatory levels. Two of the soils were surface soils from the DOE facility formerly called the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) at Fernald, Ohio. This facility is presently called the Femald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). Carbonate extractions generally removed from 70 to 90% of the uranium from the Fernald storage pad soil. Uranium was slightly more difficult to extract from the Fernald incinerator and the Y-12 landfarm soils. Very small amounts of uranium could be extracted from the storm sewer sediment. Extraction with carbonate at high solution-to-soil ratios were as effective as extractions at low solution-to-soil ratios, indicating attrition by the paddle mixer was not significantly different than that provided in a rotary extractor. Also, pretreatments such as milling or pulverizing the soil sample did not appear to increase extraction efficiency when carbonate extractions were carried out at elevated temperatures (60{degree}C) or long extraction times (23 h). Adding KMnO{sub 4} in the carbonate extraction appeared to increase extraction efficiency from the Fernald incinerator soil but not the Fernald storage pad soil. The most effective leaching rates (> 90 % from both Fernald soils) were obtained using a citrate/dithionite extraction procedure designed to remove amorphous (noncrystalline) iron/aluminum sesquioxides from surfaces of clay minerals. Citric acid also proved to be a very good extractant for uranium.

Francis, C.W.; Mattus, A.J.; Farr, L.L.; Elless, M.P.; Lee, S.Y.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

recycled_uranium.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Recycled Uranium and Transuranics: Recycled Uranium and Transuranics: Their Relationship to Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project Introduction Historical Perspective On August 8, 1999, Energy Secretary Bill Richardson announced a comprehensive set of actions to address issues raised at the Paducah, Kentucky, Gaseous Diffusion Plant that may have had the potential to affect the health of the workers. One of the issues addressed the need to determine the extent and significance of radioactive fission products and transuranic elements in the uranium feed and waste products throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national complex. Subsequently, a DOE agency-wide Recycled Uranium Mass Balance Project (RUMBP) was initiated. For the Weldon Spring Uranium Feed Materials Plant (WSUFMP or later referred to as Weldon Spring),

195

Gamma/neutron time-correlation for special nuclear material characterization %3CU%2B2013%3E active stimulation of highly enriched uranium.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of simulations and experiments were undertaken to explore and evaluate the potential for a novel new technique for fissile material detection and characterization, the timecorrelated pulse-height (TCPH) method, to be used concurrent with active stimulation of potential nuclear materials. In previous work TCPH has been established as a highly sensitive method for the detection and characterization of configurations of fissile material containing Plutonium in passive measurements. By actively stimulating fission with the introduction of an external radiation source, we have shown that TCPH is also an effective method of detecting and characterizing configurations of fissile material containing Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU). The TCPH method is shown to be robust in the presence of the proper choice of external radiation source. An evaluation of potential interrogation sources is presented.

Marleau, Peter; Nowack, Aaron B.; Clarke, Shaun D. [University of Michigan; Monterial, Mateusz [University of Michigan; Paff, Marc [University of Michigan; Pozzi, Sara A. [University of Michigan

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

DUF6 Conversion Facility EIS Alternatives  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Alternatives Alternatives Depleted UF6 Conversion Facility EIS Alternatives Alternatives included in the Depleted UF6 Conversion Facility EISs. Proposed Action The proposed action evaluated in each EIS is to construct and operate a conversion facility at each site for conversion of the DOE DUF6 inventory. The time period considered is a construction period of approximately 2 years, an operational period of 25 years at Paducah and 18 years at Portsmouth, and the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the facility of about 3 years. The EISs assess the potential environmental impacts from the following proposed activities: Construction, operation, maintenance, and D&D of the proposed DUF6 conversion facility at each site; Transportation of uranium conversion products and waste materials to a disposal facility;

197

Preliminary results of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility deuteron injector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the framework of the IFMIF-EVEDA project (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility-Engineering Validation and Engineering Design Activities), CEA/IRFU is in charge of the design, construction, and characterization of the 140 mA continuous deuteron injector, including the source and the low energy beam line. The electron cyclotron resonance ion source which operates at 2.45 GHz is associated with a 4-electrode extraction system in order to minimize beam divergence at the source exit. Krypton gas injection is foreseen in the 2-solenoid low energy beam line. Such Kr injection will allow reaching a high level of space charge compensation in order to improve the beam matching at the radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) entrance. The injector construction is now completed on the Saclay site and the first plasma and beam production has been produced in May 2011. This installation will be tested with proton and deuteron beams either in pulsed or continuous mode at Saclay before shipping to Japan. In this paper, after a brief description of the installation, the preliminary results obtained with hydrogen gas injection into the plasma chamber will be reported.

Gobin, R.; Adroit, G.; Bogard, D.; Bourdelle, G.; Chauvin, N.; Delferriere, O.; Gauthier, Y.; Girardot, P.; Guiho, P.; Harrault, F.; Jannin, J. L.; Loiseau, D.; Mattei, P.; Roger, A.; Sauce, Y.; Senee, F.; Vacher, T. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique et aux Energie Alternatives, CEA/Saclay, DSM/IRFU, 91191-Gif/Yvette (France)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) depleted uranium waste boxes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This safety evaluation for packaging (SEP) allows the one-time shipment of ten metal boxes and one wooden box containing depleted uranium material from the Fast Flux Test Facility to the burial grounds in the 200 West Area for disposal. This SEP provides the analyses and operational controls necessary to demonstrate that the shipment will be safe for the onsite worker and the public.

McCormick, W.A.

1997-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

199

Polyethylene Encapsulated Depleted Uranium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Poly DU Poly DU Polyethylene Encapsulated Depleted Uranium Technology Description: Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has completed preliminary work to investigate the feasibility of encapsulating DU in low density polyethylene to form a stable, dense product. DU loadings as high as 90 wt% were achieved. A maximum product density of 4.2 g/cm3 was achieved using UO3, but increased product density using UO2 is estimated at 6.1 g/cm3. Additional product density improvements up to about 7.2 g/cm3 were projected using DU aggregate in a hybrid technique known as micro/macroencapsulation.[1] A U.S. patent for this process has been received.[2] Figure 1 Figure 1: DU Encapsulated in polyethylene samples produced at BNL containing 80 wt % depleted UO3 A recent DU market study by Kapline Enterprises, Inc. for DOE thoroughly identified and rated potential applications and markets for DU metal and oxide materials.[3] Because of its workability and high DU loading capability, the polyethylene encapsulated DU could readily be fabricated as counterweights/ballast (for use in airplanes, helicopters, ships and missiles), flywheels, armor, and projectiles. Also, polyethylene encapsulated DU is an effective shielding material for both gamma and neutron radiation, with potential application for shielding high activity waste (e.g., ion exchange resins, glass gems), spent fuel dry storage casks, and high energy experimental facilities (e.g., accelerator targets) to reduce radiation exposures to workers and the public.

200

Depleted uranium management alternatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report evaluates two management alternatives for Department of Energy depleted uranium: continued storage as uranium hexafluoride, and conversion to uranium metal and fabrication to shielding for spent nuclear fuel containers. The results will be used to compare the costs with other alternatives, such as disposal. Cost estimates for the continued storage alternative are based on a life-cycle of 27 years through the year 2020. Cost estimates for the recycle alternative are based on existing conversion process costs and Capital costs for fabricating the containers. Additionally, the recycle alternative accounts for costs associated with intermediate product resale and secondary waste disposal for materials generated during the conversion process.

Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium materials facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Polyethylene Encapsulation of Depleted Uranium Trioxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Depleted uranium, in the form of uranium trioxide (UO3) powder, was encapsulated in molten polyethylene forming a stable, dense composite henceforth known as DUPoly (patent pending). Materials were fed by calibra...

J. W. Adams; P. R. Lageraaen; P. D. Kalb

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

S. 2415: Title I may be cited as the Uranium Enrichment Act of 1990; Title II may be cited as the Uranium Security and Tailings Reclamation Act of 1989; and Title III may be cited as The Solar, Wind, Waste, and Geothermal Power Production Incentives Act of 1990, introduced in the Senate, One Hundred First Congress, Second Session, April 4, 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

S. 2415 (which started out as a bill to encourage solar and geothermal power generation) now would amend the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 to redirect uranium enrichment enterprises to further the national interest, respond to competitive market forces, and to ensure the nation's common defense and security. It would establish a United States Enrichment Corporation for the following purposes: to acquire feed materials, enriched uranium, and enrichment facilities; to operate these facilities; to market enriched uranium for governmental purposes and qualified domestic and foreign persons; to conduct research into uranium enrichment; and to operate as a profitable, self-financing, reliable corporation and in a manner consistent with the health and safety of the public. The bill describes powers and duties of the corporation; the organization, finance, and management; decontamination and decommissioning. The second part of the bill would ensure an adequate supply of domestic uranium for defense and power production; provide assistance to the domestic uranium industry; and establish, facilitate, and expedite a comprehensive system for financing reclamation and remedial action at active uranium and thorium processing sites. The third part of the bill would remove the size limitations on power production facilities now part of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978. Solar, wind, waste, or geothermal power facilities would no longer have to be less than 80 MW to qualify as a small power production facility.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

A demonstration of variance and covariance calculations using MAVARIC (Materials Accounting VARIance Calculator) and PROFF (PROcessing and Fuel Facilities calculator)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Good decision-making in materials accounting requires a valid calculation of control limits and detection sensitivity for facilities handling special nuclear materials (SNM). A difficult aspect of this calculation is determining the appropriate variance and covariance values for the terms in the materials balance (MB) equation. Computer software such as MAVARIC (Materials Accounting VARIance Calculator) and PROFF (PROcessing and Fuel Facilities calculator) can efficiently select and combine variance terms. These programs determine the variance and covariance of an MB equation by first obtaining relations for the variance and covariance of each term in the MB equation through propagating instrument errors and then substituting the measured quantities and their uncertainties into these relations. MAVARIC is a custom spreadsheet used with the second release of LOTUS 1-2-3.** PROFF is a stand-alone menu-driven program requiring no commercial software. Programs such as MAVARIC and PROFF facilitate the complex calculations required to determine the detection sensitivity of an SNM facility. These programs can also be used to analyze materials accounting systems.

Barlich, G.L.; Nasseri, S.S.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Operating and life-cycle costs for uranium-contaminated soil treatment technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of a nuclear industry in the US required mining, milling, and fabricating a large variety of uranium products. One of these products was purified uranium metal which was used in the Savannah River and Hanford Site reactors. Most of this feed material was produced at the US Department of Energy (DOE) facility formerly called the Feed Materials Production Center at Fernald, Ohio. During operation of this facility, soils became contaminated with uranium from a variety of sources. To avoid disposal of these soils in low-level radioactive waste burial sites, increasing emphasis has been placed on the remediating soils contaminated with uranium and other radionuclides. To address remediation and management of uranium-contaminated soils at sites owned by DOE, the DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD) evaluates and compares the versatility, efficiency, and economics of various technologies that may be combined into systems designed to characterize and remediate uranium-contaminated soils. Each technology must be able to (1) characterize the uranium in soil, (2) decontaminate or remove uranium from soil, (3) treat or dispose of resulting waste streams, (4) meet necessary state and federal regulations, and (5) meet performance assessment objectives. The role of the performance assessment objectives is to provide the information necessary to conduct evaluations of the technologies. These performance assessments provide the basis for selecting the optimum system for remediation of large areas contaminated with uranium. One of the performance assessment tasks is to address the economics of full-scale implementation of soil treatment technologies. The cost of treating contaminated soil is one of the criteria used in the decision-making process for selecting remedial alternatives.

Douthat, D.M.; Armstrong, A.Q. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Health Sciences Research Div.; Stewart, R.N. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Hypersonic test facilities available in Western Europe for aerodynamic/aerothermal and structure/material investigations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...compiled by L. H. Townend Hypersonic test facilities available in Western Europe...brief description of the hypersonic ground test requirements, the paper first gives an...Gottingen, Germany; and (v) the hot-shot test facility F4 of ONERA in Le Fauga, France...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Facility for high heat flux testing of irradiated fusion materials and components using infrared plasma arc lamps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new high-heat flux testing facility using water-wall stabilized high-power high-pressure argon Plasma Arc Lamps (PALs) has been developed for fusion applications. It can handle irradiated plasma facing component materials and mock-up divertor components. Two PALs currently available at ORNL can provide maximum incident heat fluxes of 4.2 and 27 MW/m2 over a heated area of 9x12 and 1x10 cm2, respectively, which are fusion-prototypical steady state heat flux conditions. The facility will be described and the main differences between the photon-based high-heat flux testing facilities, such as PALs, and the e-beam and particle beam facilities more commonly used for fusion HHF testing are discussed. The components of the test chamber were designed to accommodate radiation safety and materials compatibility requirements posed by high-temperature exposure of low levels irradiated tungsten articles. Issues related to the operation and temperature measurements during testing are presented and discussed.

Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL] [ORNL; Ohriner, Evan Keith [ORNL] [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL] [ORNL; Harper, David C [ORNL] [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL] [ORNL; Schaich, Charles Ross [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

HiRadMat at CERN/SPS - A dedicated facility providing high intensity beam pulses to material samples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HiRadMat (High Radiation to Materials), constructed in 2011, is a facility at CERN designed to provide high?intensity pulsed beams to an irradiation area where material samples as well as accelerator component assemblies (e.g. vacuum windows, high power beam targets, collimators) can be tested. The facility uses a 440 GeV proton beam extracted from the CERN SPS with a pulse length of up to 7.2 us, and with a maximum pulse energy of 3.4 MJ (3xE13 proton/pulse). In addition to protons, ion beams with energy of 440 GeV/charge and total pulse energy of 21 kJ can be provided. The beam parameters can be tuned to match the needs of each experiment. HiRadMat is not an irradiation facility where large doses on equipment can be accumulated. It is rather a test area designed to perform single pulse experiments to evaluate the effect of high?intensity pulsed beams on materials or accelerator component assemblies in a controlled environment. The fa? cility is designed for a maximum of 1E16 protons per year, dist...

Charitonidis, N; Efthymiopoulos, I

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Science Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electron Microscopy Lab Ion Beam Materials Lab Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes (MaRIE) Proton Radiography Trident Laser Facility LOOK INTO LANL - highlights...

209

Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for the U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Implementation of a Comprehensive Management Program for the Storage, Transportation, and Disposition of Potentially Reusable Uranium Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to implement a comprehensive management program to safely, efficiently, and effectively manage its potentially reusable low enriched uranium (LEU), normal uranium (NU), and depleted uranium (DU). Uranium materials, which are presently located at multiple sites, are to be consolidated by transporting the materials to one or several storage locations, to facilitate ultimate disposition. Management would include the storage, transport, and ultimate disposition of these materials. This action is needed because of DOE's current missions and functions; increasing budget pressures; the continuing need for good stewardship of resources, including materials in inventory; and continuing DOE attention to considerations of environment, safety, and health. Also, increased pressure on the federal budget requires that DOE take a closer look at materials management in order to ensure maximum cost effectiveness. This includes an examination of feasible uses of this material, consistent with DOE's mission, as well as an examination of management methods that are consistent with environmental requirements and budgetary constraints. DOE needs to implement a long-term (greater than 20 years) management plan for its inventory of potentially reusable LEU, NU, and DU.

N /A

2002-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

210

A review of uranium economics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The recent increase in the demand for power for commercial use, the challenges facing fossil fuel use and the prospective of cheap nuclear power motivate different countries to plan for the use of nuclear power. This paper reviews many aspects of uranium economics, which includes the advantages and disadvantages of nuclear power, comparisons with other sources of power, nuclear power production and requirements, the uranium market, uranium pricing, spot price and long-term price indicators, and the cost of building a nuclear power facility.

A.K. Mazher

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Uranium hexafluoride handling. Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Field Office, and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., are co-sponsoring this Second International Conference on Uranium Hexafluoride Handling. The conference is offered as a forum for the exchange of information and concepts regarding the technical and regulatory issues and the safety aspects which relate to the handling of uranium hexafluoride. Through the papers presented here, we attempt not only to share technological advances and lessons learned, but also to demonstrate that we are concerned about the health and safety of our workers and the public, and are good stewards of the environment in which we all work and live. These proceedings are a compilation of the work of many experts in that phase of world-wide industry which comprises the nuclear fuel cycle. Their experience spans the entire range over which uranium hexafluoride is involved in the fuel cycle, from the production of UF{sub 6} from the naturally-occurring oxide to its re-conversion to oxide for reactor fuels. The papers furnish insights into the chemical, physical, and nuclear properties of uranium hexafluoride as they influence its transport, storage, and the design and operation of plant-scale facilities for production, processing, and conversion to oxide. The papers demonstrate, in an industry often cited for its excellent safety record, continuing efforts to further improve safety in all areas of handling uranium hexafluoride. Selected papers were processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

212

Facility for high-heat flux testing of irradiated fusion materials and components using infrared plasma arc lamps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new high-heat flux testing (HHFT) facility using water-wall stabilized high-power high-pressure argon plasma arc lamps (PALs) has been developed for fusion applications. Itcan accommodate irradiated plasma facing component materials and sub-size mock-up divertor components. Two PALs currently available at Oak Ridge National Laboratorycan provide maximum incident heat fluxes of 4.2 and 27MWm?2, which are prototypic of fusion steady state heat flux conditions, over a heated area of 9?12 and 1?10cm2, respectively. The use of PAL permits the heat source to be environmentally separated from the components of the test chamber, simplifying the design to accommodate safe testing of low-level irradiated articles and materials under high-heat flux. Issues related to the operation and temperature measurements during testing of tungsten samples are presented and discussed. The relative advantages and disadvantages of this photon-based HHFT facility are compared to existing e-beam and particle beam facilities used for similar purposes.

Adrian S Sabau; Evan K Ohriner; Jim Kiggans; David C Harper; Lance L Snead; Charles R Schaich

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

RELAP5 Model of a Two-phase ThermoSyphon Experimental Facility for Fuels and Materials Irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) does not have a separate materials-irradiation flow loop and requires most materials and all fuel experiments to be placed inside a containment. This is necessary to ensure that internal contaminants such as fission products cannot be released into the primary coolant. As part of the safety basis justification, HFIR also requires that all experiments be able to withstand various accident conditions (e.g., loss of coolant) without generating vapor bubbles on the surface of the experiment in the primary coolant. As with any parallel flow system, HFIR is vulnerable to flow excursion events when vapor is generated in one of those flow paths. The effects of these requirements are to artificially increase experiment temperatures by introducing a barrier between the experimental materials and the HFIR coolant and to reduce experiment heat loads to ensure boiling doesn t occur. A new experimental facility for materials irradiation and testing in the HFIR is currently being developed to overcome these limitations. The new facility is unique in that it will have its own internal cooling flow totally independent of the reactor primary coolant and boiling is permitted. The reactor primary coolant will cool the outside of this facility without contacting the materials inside. The ThermoSyphon Test Loop (TSTL), a full scale prototype of the proposed irradiation facility to be tested outside the reactor, is being designed and fabricated (Ref. 1). The TSTL is a closed system working as a two-phase thermosyphon. A schematic is shown in Fig. 1. The bottom central part is the boiler/evaporator and contains three electric heaters. The vapor generated by the heaters will rise and be condensed in the upper condenser, the condensate will drain down the side walls and be circulated via a downcomer back into the bottom of the boiler. An external flow system provides coolant that simulates the HFIR primary coolant. The two-phase flow code RELAP5-3D (Ref. 2) is the main tool employed in this design. The model has multiple challenges: boiling, condensation and natural convection flows need to be modeled accurately.

Carbajo, Juan J [ORNL] [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel Lee [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

CRAD, Criticality Safety - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CRAD, Criticality Safety - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide CRAD, Criticality Safety - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Criticality Safety - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of the Criticality Safety program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Criticality Safety - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility More Documents & Publications CRAD, DOE Oversight - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion

215

CRAD, Management - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Management - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of Management program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Management - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility More Documents & Publications CRAD, DOE Oversight - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion

216

CRAD, Emergency Management - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Emergency Management - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Emergency Management - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Emergency Management - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of Emergency Management program at the Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Emergency Management - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility More Documents & Publications CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide

217

CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Conduct of Operations - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Conduct of Operations - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January, 2005 assessment of Conduct of Operations program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility More Documents & Publications CRAD, DOE Oversight - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion

218

Integrated NanoMaterials Core Facility California NanoSystems Institute at UCLA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

development, renewable energy platforms, and more. INML Website: http://inml.cnsi.ucla.edu/pages/ Contact skills are required in MBE machine maintenance, III-V semiconductor epitaxy growth, and materials of dissimilar materials using epitaxial processes. Our mission is to offer our users world-class, highly

Jalali. Bahram

219

Technical Basis For Radiological Acceptance Criteria For Uranium At The Y-12 National Security Complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to establish radiological acceptance criteria for uranium. Other factors for acceptance not considered include criticality safety concerns, contaminants to the process stream, and impacts to the Safety Basis for the affected facilities. Three types of criteria were developed in this report. They include limits on external penetrating and non-penetrating radiation and on the internal hazard associated with inhalation of the material. These criteria are intended to alleviate the need for any special controls beyond what are normally utilized for worker protection from uranium hazards. Any proposed exceptions would require case-by-case evaluations to determine cost impacts and feasibility. Since Y-12 has set rigorous ALARA goals for worker doses, the external limits are based on assumptions of work time involved in the movement of accepted material plus the desire that external doses normally received are not exceeded, and set so that no special personnel monitoring would be required. Internal hazard controls were established so that dose contributions from non-uranium nuclides would not exceed 10% of that expected from the uranium component. This was performed using a Hazard Index (HI) previously established for work in areas contaminated with non-uranium nuclides. The radiological acceptance criteria for uranium are summarized in Table 1. Note that these limits are based on the assumption that radioactive daughter products have reached equilibrium.

Veinot, K. G.

2009-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

220

Material Limits Adjusted by a Modified Airborne Release Fraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper will discuss the methods used at a depleted uranium facility to develop a hazard categorization and a limiting condition for operation (LCO) for the inventory based on increased Category 2 threshold quantity values (TV) from DOE Standard 1027-92. A revision to the safety analysis report (SAR) for a Category 3 depleted uranium facility was required to meet current methodologies and isotope content. The previous SAR first approved in 1992, allowed an inventory of depleted uranium that exceeded the Category 2 threshold quantity values in the material storage warehouses using an accident analysis methodology for final hazard categorization. New information regarding the isotopic content of the depleted uranium required an updated hazard categorization evaluation. The DOE Standard 1027-92 requires the evaluation to be based on inventory (Reference 1, 3.1, page 5), therefore, the previous method of performing a hazard consequence and probability analysis could not be used. The standard (1027) requires a facility to be designated as a Category 3 Nuclear facility when the inventory levels in the facility, or facility segments, are greater than Category 3 thresholds and below Category 2 thresholds. A Category 2 Nuclear Facility requires a more in depth hazard and accident analysis. Our categorization was based on an inventory, adjusted by a form and containerization analysis.

Sandvig, Michael Dennis

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium materials facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Depleted Uranium Uses Research and Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DU Uses DU Uses Depleted Uranium Uses Research & Development A Depleted Uranium Uses Research and Development Program was initiated to explore beneficial uses of depleted uranium (DU) and other materials resulting from conversion of depleted UF6. A Depleted Uranium Uses Research and Development Program was initiated to explore the safe, beneficial use of depleted uranium and other materials resulting from conversion of depleted UF6 (e.g., fluorine and empty carbon steel cylinders) for the purposes of resource conservation and cost savings compared with disposal. This program explored the risks and benefits of several depleted uranium uses, including uses as a radiation shielding material, a catalyst, and a semi-conductor material in electronic devices.

222

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomized uranium silicide Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials Science 11 geology and Ranger 1 open-pit uranium mine in Australia Summary: Uranium geology and mining Ranger 1 open-pit uranium mine in Australia Mikael Hk UHDSG...

223

URANIUM IN ALKALINE ROCKS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Greenland," in Uranium Exploration Geology, Int. AtomicOklahoma," 1977 Nure Geology Uranium Symposium, Igneous HostMcNeil, M. , 1977. "Geology of Brazil's Uranium and Thorium

Murphy, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Hanford Site Near-Facility Environmental Monitoring Data Report for Calendar Year 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Near-facility environmental monitoring is defined as monitoring near facilities that have the potential to discharge or have discharged, stored, or disposed of radioactive or hazardous materials. Monitoring locations are associated with nuclear facilities such as the Plutonium Finishing Plant, Canister Storage Building, and the K Basins; inactive nuclear facilities such as N Reactor and the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility; and waste storage or disposal facilities such as burial grounds, cribs, ditches, ponds, tank farms, and trenches. Much of the monitoring consists of collecting and analyzing environmental samples and methodically surveying areas near facilities. The program is also designed to evaluate acquired analytical data, determine the effectiveness of facility effluent monitoring and controls, assess the adequacy of containment at waste disposal units, and detect and monitor unusual conditions.

Perkins, Craig J.; Dorsey, Michael C.; Mckinney, Stephen M.; Wilde, Justin W.; Poston, Ted M.

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

Facile synthesis of nanostructured vanadium oxide as cathode materials for efficient Li-ion batteries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

approximately 100 nm in width and 1­2 mm in length have been fabricated via the hydrothermal process microspheres;10 hydrothermal synthesis of VO2 (B) nanobelts,11,12 nanorods,13 nanoflakes and nanoflowers.14 materials, long fabrication times and complicated processing methods, which in turn result in a high cost

Cao, Guozhong

226

What is Depleted Uranium?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

What is Uranium? What is Uranium? Uranium and Its Compounds line line What is Uranium? Chemical Forms of Uranium Properties of Uranium Compounds Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium Health Effects What is Uranium? Physical and chemical properties, origin, and uses of uranium. Properties of Uranium Uranium is a radioactive element that occurs naturally in varying but small amounts in soil, rocks, water, plants, animals and all human beings. It is the heaviest naturally occurring element, with an atomic number of 92. In its pure form, uranium is a silver-colored heavy metal that is nearly twice as dense as lead. In nature, uranium atoms exist as several isotopes, which are identified by the total number of protons and neutrons in the nucleus: uranium-238, uranium-235, and uranium-234. (Isotopes of an element have the

227

Evapotranspiration And Geochemical Controls On Groundwater Plumes At Arid Sites: Toward Innovative Alternate End-States For Uranium Processing And Tailings Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Management of legacy tailings/waste and groundwater contamination are ongoing at the former uranium milling site in Tuba City AZ. The tailings have been consolidated and effectively isolated using an engineered cover system. For the existing groundwater plume, a system of recovery wells extracts contaminated groundwater for treatment using an advanced distillation process. The ten years of pump and treat (P&T) operations have had minimal impact on the contaminant plume primarily due to geochemical and hydrological limits. A flow net analysis demonstrates that groundwater contamination beneath the former processing site flows in the uppermost portion of the aquifer and exits the groundwater as the plume transits into and beneath a lower terrace in the landscape. The evaluation indicates that contaminated water will not reach Moenkopi Wash, a locally important stream. Instead, shallow groundwater in arid settings such as Tuba City is transferred into the vadose zone and atmosphere via evaporation, transpiration and diffuse seepage. The dissolved constituents are projected to precipitate and accumulate as minerals such as calcite and gypsum in the deep vadose zone (near the capillary fringe), around the roots of phreatophyte plants, and near seeps. The natural hydrologic and geochemical controls common in arid environments such as Tuba City work together to limit the size of the groundwater plume, to naturally attenuate and detoxify groundwater contaminants, and to reduce risks to humans, livestock and the environment. The technical evaluation supports an alternative beneficial reuse (brownfield) scenario for Tuba City. This alternative approach would have low risks, similar to the current P&T scenario, but would eliminate the energy and expense associated with the active treatment and convert the former uranium processing site into a resource for future employment of local citizens and ongoing benefit to the Native American Nations.

Looney, Brian B.; Denham, Miles E.; Eddy-Dilek, Carol A.; Millings, Margaret R.; Kautsky, Mark

2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

228

CRAD, Environmental Protection - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Environmental Protection - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Environmental Protection - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Environmental Protection - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of Environmental Compliance program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Environmental Protection - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility More Documents & Publications

229

CRAD, DOE Oversight - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE Oversight - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide DOE Oversight - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, DOE Oversight - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a DOE independent oversight assessment of the Y-12 Site Office's programs for oversight of its contractors at the Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, DOE Oversight - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility More Documents & Publications

230

High energy beam impact tests on a LHC tertiary collimator at the CERN high-radiation to materials facility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The correct functioning of a collimation system is crucial to safely operate highly energetic particle accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The requirements to handle high intensity beams can be demanding. In this respect, investigating the consequences of LHC particle beams hitting tertiary collimators (TCTs) in the experimental regions is a fundamental issue for machine protection. An experimental test was designed to investigate the robustness and effects of beam accidents on a fully assembled collimator, based on accident scenarios in the LHC. This experiment, carried out at the CERN High-Radiation to Materials (HiRadMat) facility, involved 440GeV proton beam impacts of different intensities on the jaws of a horizontal TCT. This paper presents the experimental setup and the preliminary results obtained, together with some first outcomes from visual inspection and a comparison of such results with numerical simulations.

Marija Cauchi; O. Aberle; R.?W. Assmann; A. Bertarelli; F. Carra; K. Cornelis; A. Dallocchio; D. Deboy; L. Lari; S. Redaelli; A. Rossi; B. Salvachua; P. Mollicone; N. Sammut

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

231

Uranium ores and depleted uranium in the environment, with a reference to uranium in the biosphere from the Erzgebirge/Sachsen, Germany  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Erzgebirge (Ore Mountains) area in the eastern part of Germany was a major source of uranium for Soviet nuclear programs between 1945 and 1989. During this time, the former German Democratic Republic became the third largest uranium producer in the world. The high abundance of uranium in the geological formations of the Erzgebirge are mirrored in the discovery of uranium by M. Klaproth close to Freiberg City in 1789 and the description of the so-called Schneeberg disease, lung cancer caused in miners by the accumulation of the uranium decay product, radon, in the subsurfaces of shafts. Since 1991, remediation and mitigation of uranium at production facilities, rock piles and mill tailings has taken place. In parallel, efforts were initiated to assess the likely adverse effects of uranium mining to humans. The costs of these activities amount to about 6.5 109 Euro. A comparison with concentrations of depleted uranium at certain sites is given.

A Meinrath; P Schneider; G Meinrath

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Uranium Mining and Enrichment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Overview Presentation » Uranium Mining and Enrichment Overview Presentation » Uranium Mining and Enrichment Uranium Mining and Enrichment Uranium is a radioactive element that occurs naturally in the earth's surface. Uranium is used as a fuel for nuclear reactors. Uranium-bearing ores are mined, and the uranium is processed to make reactor fuel. In nature, uranium atoms exist in several forms called isotopes - primarily uranium-238, or U-238, and uranium-235, or U-235. In a typical sample of natural uranium, most of the mass (99.3%) would consist of atoms of U-238, and a very small portion of the total mass (0.7%) would consist of atoms of U-235. Uranium Isotopes Isotopes of Uranium Using uranium as a fuel in the types of nuclear reactors common in the United States requires that the uranium be enriched so that the percentage of U-235 is increased, typically to 3 to 5%.

233

In Vivo Radiobioassay and Research Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bioassay monitoring for intakes of radioactive material is an essential part of the internal dosimetry program for radiation workers at the Department of Energys (DOE) Hanford Site. This monitoring program includes direct measurements of radionuclides in the body by detecting photons that exit the body and analyses of radionuclides in excreta samples. The specialized equipment and instrumentation required to make the direct measurements of these materials in the body are located at the In Vivo Radiobioassay and Research Facility (IVRRF). The IVRRF was originally built in 1960 and was designed expressly for the in vivo measurement of radioactive material in Hanford workers. Most routine in vivo measurements are performed annually and special measurements are performed as needed. The primary source terms at the Hanford Site include fission and activation products (primarily 137Cs and 90Sr), uranium, uranium progeny, and transuranic radionuclides. The facility currently houses five shielded counting systems, mens and womens change rooms and an instrument maintenance and repair shop. Four systems include high purity germanium detectors and one system utilizes large sodium iodide detectors. These systems are used to perform an average of 7,000 measurements annually. This includes approximately 5000 whole body measurements analyzed for fission and activation products and 2000 lung measurements analyzed for americium, uranium, and plutonium. Various other types of measurements are performed periodically to estimate activity in wounds, the thyroid, the liver, and the skeleton. The staff maintains the capability to detect and quantify activity in essentially any tissue or organ. The in vivo monitoring program that utilizes the facility is accredited by the Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program for direct radiobioassay.

Lynch, Timothy P.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment Target Material Radiation Damage Studies Using Energetic Protons of the Brookhaven Linear Isotope Production (BLIP) Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the future multi-MW accelerators is the LBNE Experiment where Fermilab aims to produce a beam of neutrinos with a 2.3 MW proton beam as part of a suite of experiments associated with Project X. Specifically, the LBNE Neutrino Beam Facility aims for a 2+ MW, 60 -120 GeV pulsed, high intensity proton beam produced in the Project X accelerator intercepted by a low Z solid target to facilitate the production of low energy neutrinos. The multi-MW level LBNE proton beam will be characterized by intensities of the order of 1.6 e+14 p/pulse, {\\sigma} radius of 1.5 -3.5 mm and a 9.8 microsecond pulse length. These parameters are expected to push many target materials to their limit thus making the target design very challenging. To address a host of critical design issues revealed by recent high intensity beam on target experience a series of experimental studies on radiation damage and thermal shock response conducted at BNL focusing on low-Z materials have been undertaken with the latest one focusing on LBNE.

Simos, N; Hurh, P; Mokhov, N; Kotsina, Z

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Enhancing Staging Capabilities at the Device Assembly Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radioactive material limits allowed by the Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Device Assembly Facility (DAF) can support larger quantities than the floor space will accommodate. In order to maximize the full staging bunker capability, National Security Technologies, LLC, (NSTec) is developing a plan to take advantage of these high inventory limits and evaluate staging options such as shelves, racks, and mezzanines. This plan will investigate cost and evaluate U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex-wide alternatives used at other sites (Highly Enriched Uranium Manufacturing Facility, Pantex, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, etc.) that addressed similar situations.

Kanning, R. A.; Long, R. G.; Garcia, B. O.; Williams, V. D.

2013-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

236

Aseismic design criteria for uranium enrichment plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper technological, economical, and safety issues of aseismic design of uranium enrichment plants are presented. The role of management in the decision making process surrounding these issues is also discussed. The resolution of the issues and the decisions made by management are controlling factors in developing aseismic design criteria for any facility. Based on past experience in developing aseismic design criteria for the GCEP various recommendations are made for future enrichment facilities, and since uranium enrichment plants are members of the nuclear fuel cycle the discussion and recommendations presented herein are applicable to other nonreactor nuclear facilities.

Beavers, J.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Methodology for comparing the health effects of electricity generation from uranium and coal fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A methodology was developed for comparing the health risks of electricity generation from uranium and coal fuels. The health effects attributable to the construction, operation, and decommissioning of each facility in the two fuel cycle were considered. The methodology is based on defining (1) requirement variables for the materials, energy, etc., (2) effluent variables associated with the requirement variables as well as with the fuel cycle facility operation, and (3) health impact variables for effluents and accidents. The materials, energy, etc., required for construction, operation, and decommissioning of each fuel cycle facility are defined as primary variables. The materials, energy, etc., needed to produce the primary variable are defined as secondary requirement variables. Each requirement variable (primary, secondary, etc.) has associated effluent variables and health impact variables. A diverging chain or tree is formed for each primary variable. Fortunately, most elements reoccur frequently to reduce the level of analysis complexity. 6 references, 11 figures, 6 tables.

Rhyne, W.R.; El-Bassioni, A.A.

1981-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

238

Sandia National Laboratories: Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DETL, Energy, Facilities, Materials Science, News, News & Events, Photovoltaic, Renewable Energy, Research & Capabilities, Solar, Solar Newsletter, Systems Analysis Sandia...

239

DOE Designated Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) Center for Nanoscale Materials Leadership Computing Facility* Brookhaven National...

240

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8. U.S. uranium expenditures, 2003-2012 8. U.S. uranium expenditures, 2003-2012 million dollars Year Drilling Production Land and Other Total Expenditures Total Land and Other Land Exploration Reclamation 2003 W W 31.3 NA NA NA W 2004 10.6 27.8 48.4 NA NA NA 86.9 2005 18.1 58.2 59.7 NA NA NA 136.0 2006 40.1 65.9 115.2 41.0 23.3 50.9 221.2 2007 67.5 90.4 178.2 77.7 50.3 50.2 336.2 2008 81.9 221.2 164.4 65.2 50.2 49.1 467.6 2009 35.4 141.0 104.0 17.3 24.2 62.4 280.5 2010 44.6 133.3 99.5 20.2 34.5 44.7 277.3 2011 53.6 168.8 96.8 19.6 43.5 33.7 319.2 2012 66.6 186.9 99.4 16.8 33.3 49.3 352.9 Drilling: All expenditures directly associated with exploration and development drilling. Production: All expenditures for mining, milling, processing of uranium, and facility expense.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium materials facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

A study Assessing the Genotoxicity in Rats after Chronic Oral Exposure to a Low Dose of Depleted Uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Oral Exposure to a Low Dose of Depleted Uranium Yuhui Hao Rong Li * Yanbing...by chronic oral exposure to depleted uranium (DU). Materials and methods...exposure to a low dose of DU. Depleted uranium|Ingestion|Genotoxicity......

Yuhui Hao; Rong Li; Yanbing Leng; Jiong Ren; Jing Liu; Guoping Ai; Hui Xu; Yongping Su; Tianmin Cheng

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Depleted Uranium Health Effects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium line line Uranium Enrichment Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium Health Effects Discussion of health effects of external exposure, ingestion, and inhalation of depleted uranium. Depleted uranium is not a significant health hazard unless it is taken into the body. External exposure to radiation from depleted uranium is generally not a major concern because the alpha particles emitted by its isotopes travel only a few centimeters in air or can be stopped by a sheet of paper. Also, the uranium-235 that remains in depleted uranium emits only a small amount of low-energy gamma radiation. However, if allowed to enter the body, depleted uranium, like natural uranium, has the potential for both chemical and radiological toxicity with the two important target organs

243

Estimation of internal exposure to uranium with uncertainty from urinalysis data using the InDEP computer code  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Uranium (Bq d1) Depleted Uranium (Bq d1) Enriched...the current NIOSH uranium mortality study...industrial hygiene, and health physics. A single chronic exposure to uranium over the course...facility varied between depleted and less than 2-wt......

Jeri L. Anderson; A. Iulian Apostoaei; Brian A. Thomas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Y-12 Knows Uranium | Y-12 National Security Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Knows Uranium Knows Uranium Y-12 Knows Uranium Posted: July 22, 2013 - 3:45pm | Y-12 Report | Volume 10, Issue 1 | 2013 Y-12 produces many forms of uranium. They may be used in chemical processing steps on-site or shipped elsewhere to serve as raw materials for nuclear fuel or as research tools. All of uranium's uses, defense related and otherwise, are critical to the nation. Y-12's understanding of uranium, coupled with the site's work with enriched uranium metal, alloys, oxides, compounds and solutions, is unique in the Nuclear Security Enterprise. "The Y-12 work force understands both established uranium science and the esoteric things related to uranium's behavior," said engineer Alan Moore. "Such a deep, detailed understanding comes from experience,

245

Facile synthesis of MnO and nitrogen-doped carbon nanocomposites as anode material for lithium ion battery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract MnO and nitrogen-doped carbon (N-C) nanocomposites have been successfully synthesized by a facile thermal-decomposing method using the mixture of glycine and manganese acetate as precursor. As anode material for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), electrochemical results show that the as-prepared MnO/N-C achieves a reversible capacity of 473mAhg?1 after 50 cycles at a current density of 100mAg?1 and the capacities of 631.4, 547.7, 443.1, 294.7, and 161.8mAhg?1 at the current densities of 100, 200, 400, 800, and 1600mAg?1, respectively. The superior cycling and rate performances is attributed to the nanocomposite structure, in which nanosized MnO particles shorten the diffusion path of lithium ions and the N-doped carbon cushions the volume change and improves the electronic conductivity of electrode.

Song Qiu; Xinzhen Wang; Guixia Lu; Jiurong Liu; Cuizhu He

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Colorimetric detection of uranium in water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed are methods, materials and systems that can be used to determine qualitatively or quantitatively the level of uranium contamination in water samples. Beneficially, disclosed systems are relatively simple and cost-effective. For example, disclosed systems can be utilized by consumers having little or no training in chemical analysis techniques. Methods generally include a concentration step and a complexation step. Uranium concentration can be carried out according to an extraction chromatographic process and complexation can chemically bind uranium with a detectable substance such that the formed substance is visually detectable. Methods can detect uranium contamination down to levels even below the MCL as established by the EPA.

DeVol, Timothy A. (Clemson, SC); Hixon, Amy E. (Piedmont, SC); DiPrete, David P. (Evans, GA)

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

247

A Materials Facilities Initiative -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10, G11, G12, G13 Greenwald report identified area of Plasma-wall interactions, where investments to the surface leads to increased surface morphology changes and hence influences: Surface area; Surface to unipoloar arcing) and possibly create W dust of nm size M. Tokitani et al., Nucl. Fusion 51 (2011) 102001 M

248

Removal of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils -- Phase 1: Bench-scale testing. Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To address the management of uranium-contaminated soils at Fernald and other DOE sites, the DOE Office of Technology Development formed the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration (USID) program. The USID has five major tasks. These include the development and demonstration of technologies that are able to (1) characterize the uranium in soil, (2) decontaminate or remove uranium from the soil, (3) treat the soil and dispose of any waste, (4) establish performance assessments, and (5) meet necessary state and federal regulations. This report deals with soil decontamination or removal of uranium from contaminated soils. The report was compiled by the USID task group that addresses soil decontamination; includes data from projects under the management of four DOE facilities [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Savannah River Plant (SRP)]; and consists of four separate reports written by staff at these facilities. The fundamental goal of the soil decontamination task group has been the selective extraction/leaching or removal of uranium from soil faster, cheaper, and safer than current conventional technologies. The objective is to selectively remove uranium from soil without seriously degrading the soil`s physicochemical characteristics or generating waste forms that are difficult to manage and/or dispose of. Emphasis in research was placed more strongly on chemical extraction techniques than physical extraction techniques.

Francis, C. W.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

EPA Uranium Program Update Loren W. Setlow and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

30, 2008 #12;2 Overview EPA Radiation protection program Uranium reports and abandoned mine lands and Liability Act #12;4 Uranium Reports and Abandoned Mine Lands Program ·Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials from Uranium Mining, Volume I: Mining and Reclamation Background (Revised

250

Caulobacter crescentus as a Whole-Cell Uranium Biosensor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...results, we constructed a uranium reporter that places...strongly upregulated under uranium stress conditions. MATERIALS...Pb(NO3)2], and depleted uranyl nitrate [UO2...and by Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation fellowship...specificity for chelated uranium(VI): isolation and...

Nathan J. Hillson; Ping Hu; Gary L. Andersen; Lucy Shapiro

2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

251

The Process, Methods and Tool Used To Integrate Safety During Design of a Category 2 Nuclear Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presenter: Lynn J. Harkey, SDIT Project Engineer, Uranium Processing Facility Project, B&W Y-12 Track 5-2

252

Depleted Uranium (DU) Cermet Waste Package  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Package Package Depleted Uranium (DU) Cermet Waste Package The steel components of the waste package could be replaced with a uranium cermet. The cermet contains uranium dioxide particulates, which are embedded in steel. Cermets are made with outer layers of clean steel; thus, there is no radiation-contamination hazard in handling the waste packages. Because cermets are made of the same materials that would normally be found in the YM repository (uranium dioxide and steel), there are no chemical compatibility issues. From half to all of the DU inventory in the United States could be used for this application. Depleted Uranium Dioxide Steel Cermet Cross Section of a Depleted Uranium Dioxide Steel Cermet Follow the link below for more information on Cermets:

253

Recovery and Blend-Down Uranium for Beneficial use in Commercial Reactors - 13373  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In April 2001 the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) signed an Interagency Agreement to transfer approximately 33 MT of off-specification (off-spec) highly enriched uranium (HEU) from DOE to TVA for conversion to commercial reactor fuel. Since that time additional surplus off-spec HEU material has been added to the program, making the total approximately 46 MT off-spec HEU. The disposition path for approximately half (23 MT) of this 46 MT of surplus HEU material, was down blending through the H-canyon facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The HEU is purified through the H-canyon processes, and then blended with natural uranium (NU) to form low enriched uranium (LEU) solution with a 4.95% U-235 isotopic content. This material was then transported to a TVA subcontractor who converted the solution to uranium oxide and then fabricated into commercial light water reactor (LWR) fuel. This fuel is now powering TVA reactors and supplying electricity to approximately 1 million households in the TVA region. There is still in excess of approximately 10 to 14 MT of off-spec HEU throughout the DOE complex or future foreign and domestic research reactor returns that could be recovered and down blended for use in either currently designed light water reactors, ?5% enriched LEU, or be made available for use in subsequent advanced 'fast' reactor fuel designs, ?19% LEU. (authors)

Magoulas, Virginia [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Facility stabilization project, fiscal year 1998 -- Multi-year workplan (MYWP) for WBS 1.4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary Facility Stabilization mission is to provide minimum safe surveillance and maintenance of facilities and deactivate facilities on the Hanford Site, to reduce risks to workers, the public and environment, transition the facilities to a low cost, long term surveillance and maintenance state, and to provide safe and secure storage of special nuclear materials, nuclear materials, and nuclear fuel. Facility Stabilization will protect the health and safety of the public and workers, protect the environment and provide beneficial use of the facilities and other resources. Work will be in accordance with the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement), local, national, international and other agreements, and in compliance with all applicable Federal, state, and local laws. The stakeholders will be active participants in the decision processes including establishing priorities, and in developing a consistent set of rules, regulations, and laws. The work will be leveraged with a view of providing positive, lasting economic impact in the region. Effectiveness, efficiency, and discipline in all mission activities will enable Hanford Site to achieve its mission in a continuous and substantive manner. As the mission for Facility Stabilization has shifted from production to support of environmental restoration, each facility is making a transition to support the Site mission. The mission goals include the following: (1) Achieve deactivation of facilities for transfer to EM-40, using Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) plant deactivation as a model for future facility deactivation; (2) Manage nuclear materials in a safe and secure condition and where appropriate, in accordance with International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards rules; (3) Treat nuclear materials as necessary, and store onsite in long-term interim safe storage awaiting a final disposition decision by US Department of Energy; (4) Implement nuclear materials disposition directives. In the near term these are anticipated to mostly involve transferring uranium to other locations for beneficial use. Work will be in accordance with the Tri-Party Agreement, and other agreements and in compliance with all applicable Federal, state and local laws. The transition to deactivation will be accomplished through a phased approach, while maintaining the facilities in a safe and compliant configuration. In addition, Facility Stabilization will continue to maintain safe long-term storage facilities for Special Nuclear Material (SNM), Nuclear Material (NM), and Nuclear Fuel (NF). The FSP deactivation strategy aligns with the deactivate facilities mission outlined in Hanford Site SE documentation. Inherent to the FSP strategies are specific Hanford Strategic Plan success indicators such as: reduction of risks to workers, the public and environment; increasing the amount of resources recovered for other uses; reduction/elimination of inventory and materials; and reduction/elimination of costly mortgages.

Floberg, W.C.

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

255

Neurotoxicity of depleted uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Depleted uranium (DU) is a byproduct of the enrichment process of uranium for its more radioactive isotopes to be ... neurotoxicity of DU. This review reports on uranium uses and its published health effects, wit...

George C. -T. Jiang; Michael Aschiner

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 5, Structural/seismic investigation. Section A report, existing conditions calculations/supporting information  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL`s weapons research, development, and testing (WRD&T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL`s inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. Based upon US Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque Operations (DOE/Al) Office and LANL projections, storage space limitations/restrictions will begin to affect LANL`s ability to meet its missions between 1998 and 2002.

NONE

1995-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

257

Thermal and flow analysis of the Fluor Daniel, Inc., Nuclear Material Storage Facility renovation design (initial 30% effort of Title 1)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The computational fluid dynamics code CFX4.2 was used to evaluate steady-state thermal-hydraulic conditions in the Fluor Daniel, Inc., Nuclear Material Storage Facility renovation design (initial 30% of Title 1). Thirteen facility cases were evaluated with varying temperature dependence, drywell-array heat-source magnitude and distribution, location of the inlet tower, and no-flow curtains in the drywell-array vault. Four cases of a detailed model of the inlet-tower top fixture were evaluated to show the effect of the canopy-cruciform fixture design on the air pressure and flow distributions.

Steinke, R.G.; Mueller, C.; Knight, T.D.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Excess Uranium Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department is issuing a Request for Information on the effects of DOE transfers of excess uranium on domestic uranium mining, conversion, and enrichment industries.

259

The chemical-induced genotoxicity of depleted uranium.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Uranium has been mined for many years and used for fuel for nuclear reactors and materials for atomic weapons, ammunition, and armor. While the (more)

Yellowhair, Monica

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Los Alamos probes mysteries of uranium dioxide's thermal conductivity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of nuclear materials into the hands of terrorists and other non-state actors. The depleted uranium dioxide crystals used for the thermal conductivity measurements were...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium materials facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Uranium dose assessment: a Bayesian approach to the problem of dietary background  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......03-1.05 19.8-22.2 Depleted uranium 0.15-0.37 10-19...material is assumed to be depleted uranium, with an assumed isotopic...uranium lung clearance at a uranium processing plant. Health Phys (1995) 68:661-669......

Tom Little; Guthrie Miller; Raymond Guilmette; Luiz Bertelli

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Operating limit evaluation for disposal of uranium enrichment plant wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A proposed solid waste landfill at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) will accept wastes generated during normal plant operations that are considered to be non-radioactive. However, nearly all solid waste from any source or facility contains small amounts of radioactive material, due to the presence in most materials of trace quantities of such naturally occurring radionuclides as uranium and thorium. This paper describes an evaluation of operating limits, which are protective of public health and the environment, that would allow waste materials containing small amounts of radioactive material to be sent to a new solid waste landfill at PGDP. The operating limits are expressed as limits on concentrations of radionuclides in waste materials that could be sent to the landfill based on a site-specific analysis of the performance of the facility. These limits are advantageous to PGDP and DOE for several reasons. Most importantly, substantial cost savings in the management of waste is achieved. In addition, certain liabilities that could result from shipment of wastes to a commercial off-site solid waste landfill are avoided. Finally, assurance that disposal operations at the PGDP landfill are protective of public health and the environment is provided by establishing verifiable operating limits for small amounts of radioactive material; rather than relying solely on administrative controls. The operating limit determined in this study has been presented to the Commonwealth of Kentucky and accepted as a condition to be attached to the operating permit for the solid waste landfill.

Lee, D.W.; Kocher, D.C.; Wang, J.C.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Uranium at Y-12: Accountability | Y-12 National Security Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

... ... Uranium at Y-12: Accountability Posted: July 22, 2013 - 3:37pm | Y-12 Report | Volume 10, Issue 1 | 2013 Accountability of enriched uranium is facilitated by the ability to put uranium into well-blended aqueous, organic, crystalline, powder, granular, metallic and compound forms that can be sampled and analyzed. Periodic inventories are necessary to find and account for all the enriched uranium that hides in equipment corners and crevices. This allows enriched uranium to be processed in large quantities and accounted for by the gram. Y-12 employees know where uranium resides in large, complex facilities and how to use computer tools to track and monitor its movement (see Uranium Track Team). Learn more about some of the complexities in reprocessing and safeguarding

264

Depleted uranium disposition study -- Supplement, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Office of Weapons and Materials Planning has requested a supplemental study to update the recent Depleted Uranium Disposition report. This supplemental study addresses new disposition alternatives and changes in status.

Becker, G.W.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Two-stage coal liquefaction process materials from the Wilsonville Facility operated in the nonintegrated and integrated modes: chemical analyses and biological testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reports the results from chemical analyses and biological testing of process materials sampled during operation of the Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility (Wilsonville, Alabama) in both the noncoupled or nonintegrated (NTSL Run 241) and coupled or integrated (ITSL Run 242) two-stage liquefaction operating modes. Mutagenicity and carcinogenicity assays were conducted in conjunction with chromatographic and mass spectrometric analyses to provide detailed, comparative chemical and biological assessments of several NTSL and ITSL process materials. In general, the NTSL process materials were biologically more active and chemically more refractory than analogous ITSL process materials. To provide perspective, the NTSL and ITSL results are compared with those from similar testing and analyses of other direct coal liquefaction materials from the solvent refined coal (SRC) I, SRC II and EDS processes. Comparisons are also made between two-stage coal liquefaction materials from the Wilsonville pilot plant and the C.E. Lummus PDU-ITSL Facility in an effort to assess scale-up effects in these two similar processes. 36 references, 26 figures, 37 tables.

Later, D.W.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Cost estimate report for the long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride : storage of depleted uranium metal.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains a cost analysis of the long-term storage of depleted uranium in the form of uranium metal. Three options are considered for storage of the depleted uranium. These options are aboveground buildings, partly underground vaults, and mined cavities. Three cases are presented. In the first case, all the depleted uranium metal that would be produced from the conversion of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) generated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) prior to July 1993 would be stored at the storage facility (100% Case). In the second case, half the depleted uranium metal would be stored at this storage facility (50% Case). In the third case, one-quarter of the depleted uranium metal would be stored at the storage facility (25% Case). The technical basis for the cost analysis presented in this report is principally found in the companion report, ANL/EAD/TM-100, ''Engineering Analysis Report for the Long-Term Management of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride: Storage of Depleted Uranium Metal'', prepared by Argonne National Laboratory.

Folga, S.M.; Kier, P.H.; Thimmapuram, P.R.

2001-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

267

Nuclear-fuel-cycle risk assessment: descriptions of representative non-reactor facilities. Sections 1-14  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fuel Cycle Risk Assessment Program was initiated to provide risk assessment methods for assistance in the regulatory process for nuclear fuel cycle facilities other than reactors. This report, the first from the program, defines and describes fuel cycle elements that are being considered in the program. One type of facility (and in some cases two) is described that is representative of each element of the fuel cycle. The descriptions are based on real industrial-scale facilities that are current state-of-the-art, or on conceptual facilities where none now exist. Each representative fuel cycle facility is assumed to be located on the appropriate one of four hypothetical but representative sites described. The fuel cycles considered are for Light Water Reactors with once-through flow of spent fuel, and with plutonium and uranium recycle. Representative facilities for the following fuel cycle elements are described for uranium (or uranium plus plutonium where appropriate): mining, milling, conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication, mixed-oxide fuel refabrication, fuel reprocessing, spent fuel storage, high-level waste storage, transuranic waste storage, spent fuel and high-level and transuranic waste disposal, low-level and intermediate-level waste disposal, and transportation. For each representative facility the description includes: mainline process, effluent processing and waste management, facility and hardware description, safety-related information and potential alternative concepts for that fuel cycle element. The emphasis of the descriptive material is on safety-related information. This includes: operating and maintenance requirements, input/output of major materials, identification and inventories of hazardous materials (particularly radioactive materials), unit operations involved, potential accident driving forces, containment and shielding, and degree of hands-on operation.

Schneider, K.J.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

EA-0995: Drum Storage Facility for Interim Storage of Materials Generated by Environmental Restoration Operations, Golden, Colorado  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to construct and operate a drum storage facility at the U.S. Department of Energy's Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site in Golden,...

269

MATERIALS TRANSFER AGREEMENT  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MTAXX-XXX 1 MATERIAL TRANSFER AGREEMENT for Manufacturing Demonstration Facility and Carbon Fiber Technology Facility In order for the RECIPIENT to obtain materials, the RECIPIENT...

270

DOE/EA-1607: Final Environmental Assessment for Disposition of DOE Excess Depleted Uranium, Natural Uranium, and Low-Enriched Uranium (June 2009)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

μCi/cc microcuries per cubic centimeter μCi/cc microcuries per cubic centimeter MAP mitigation action plan MEI maximally exposed individual mg/kg milligrams per kilogram mrem millirem mSv millisievert MT metric ton MTCA Model Toxics Control Act MTU metric tons of uranium N/A not applicable Final Environmental Assessment: Disposition of DOE Excess Depleted Uranium, Natural Uranium, and Low-Enriched Uranium vi NAAQS National Ambient Air Quality Standards NEF National Enrichment Facility NEPA National Environmental Policy Act NRC U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission NU natural uranium NUF 6 natural uranium hexafluoride pCi/g picocuries per gram PEIS programmatic environmental impact statement PM 2.5 particulate matter with a diameter of 2.5 microns or less PM 10 particulate matter with a diameter of 10 microns or less

271

User Facilities | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

USER PORTAL USER PORTAL BTRICBuilding Technologies Research Integration Center CNMSCenter for Nanophase Materials Sciences CSMBCenter for Structural Molecular Biology CFTFCarbon Fiber Technology Facility HFIRHigh Flux Isotope Reactor MDF Manufacturing Demonstration Facility NTRCNational Transportation Research Center OLCFOak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility SNSSpallation Neutron Source Keeping it fresh at the Spallation Neutron Source Nanophase material sciences' nanotech toolbox Home | User Facilities SHARE ORNL User Facilities ORNL is home to a number of highly sophisticated experimental user facilities that provide unmatched capabilities to the broader scientific community, including a growing user community from universities, industry, and other laboratories research institutions, as well as to ORNL

272

DOE/EA-1471: Environmental Assessment for the Transportation of Highly Enriched Uranium from the Russian Federation to the Y-12 National Security Complex and Finding of No Significant Impact (January 2004)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EA for the Transportation of Highly Enriched Uranium from the Russian Federation to the Y-12 National Security Complex EA for the Transportation of Highly Enriched Uranium from the Russian Federation to the Y-12 National Security Complex i FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR THE TRANSPORTATION OF HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM FROM THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION TO THE Y-12 NATIONAL SECURITY COMPLEX ISSUED BY: United States Department of Energy ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to transport highly enriched uranium (HEU) from Russia to a secure storage facility in Oak Ridge, TN. This proposed action would allow the United States and Russia to accelerate the disposition of excess nuclear weapons materials in the interest of promoting nuclear disarmament, strengthening nonproliferation, and combating terrorism. The HEU

273

8 - Uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Release of uranium (U) to the environment is mainly through the nuclear fuel cycle. In oxic waters, U(VI) is the predominant redox state, while U(IV) is likely to be encountered in anoxic waters. The free uranyl ion ( UO 2 2 + ) dominates dissolved U speciation at low pH while complexes with hydroxides and carbonates prevail in neutral and alkaline conditions. Whether the toxicity of U(VI) to fish can be predicted based on its free ion concentration remains to be demonstrated but a strong influence of pH has been shown. In the field, U accumulates in bone, liver, and kidney, but does not biomagnify. There is certainly potential for uptake of U via the gill based on laboratory studies; however, diet and/or sediment may be the major route of uptake, and may vary with feeding strategy. Uranium toxicity is low relative to many other metals, and is further reduced by increased calcium, magnesium, carbonates, phosphate, and dissolved organic matter in the water. Inside fish, U produces reactive oxygen species and causes oxidative damage at the cellular level. The radiotoxicity of enriched U has been compared with chemical toxicity and it has been postulated that both may work through a mechanism of production of reactive oxygen species. In practical terms, the potential for chemotoxicity of U outweighs the potential for radiotoxicity. The toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics of U are well understood in mammals, where bone is a stable repository and the kidney the target organ for toxic effects from high exposure concentrations. Much less is known about fish, but overall, U is one of the less toxic metals.

Richard R. Goulet; Claude Fortin; Douglas J. Spry

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Programmatic Environmental Assessment for the U. S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Implementation of a Comprehensive Management Program for the Storage, Transportation, and Disposition of Potentially Reusable Uranium Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

93 93 FINAL Programmatic Environmental Assessment for the U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Implementation of a Comprehensive Management Program for the Storage, Transportation, and Disposition of Potentially Reusable Uranium Materials FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPMZT PROGR4MMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSME?X FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, OAK RIDGE OPER4TIOSS IMPLEMENTATION OF A COMPREHENSIVE MANAGEMEKT PROGK4hl FOR THE STORAGE, TRANSPORTATION, AND DISPOSITION OF POTENTIALLY REUSABLE URANJUh4 MATERIALS AGEhCY: U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) ACTION: FINDI?iG OF NO SIGNIFICANT 1~IPAC-I SUMI\!L4RY: The U. S. DOE has completed a Programmatic Environmental Assessment (PE:,4) (DOE/E?,- 1393), which is incorporated herein by this reference. Tile purpose of the

275

Nuclear & Uranium - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nuclear & Uranium Nuclear & Uranium Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Summary Uranium & Nuclear Fuel Nuclear Power Plants Radioactive Waste International All Nuclear Data Reports Analysis & Projections Most Requested Nuclear Plants and Reactors Projections Uranium All Reports Uranium Mill Sites Under the UMTRA Project Remediation of UMTRCA Title I Uranium Mill Sites Under the UMTRA Project Summary Table: Uranium Ore Processed, Disposal Cell Material, and Cost for Remediation as of December 31, 1999 Uranium Ore Processed Remediation Project Cost Remediation Project (Mill Site Name, State) Ore (Million Short Tons) Uranium Production (Million Pounds U3O8) Disposal Cell Remediated Material Volume (Million Cubic Yards) Total Cost A (Thousand U.S. Dollars)02/09 Per Pound Produced (Dollars per Pound U3O8) Per Unit of Remediated Material

276

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE'S H CANYON FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site's (SRS) H Canyon Facility is the only large scale, heavily shielded, nuclear chemical separations plant still in operation in the U.S. The facility's operations historically recovered uranium-235 (U-235) and neptunium-237 (Np-237) from aluminum-clad, enriched-uranium fuel tubes from Site nuclear reactors and other domestic and foreign research reactors. Today the facility, in conjunction with HB Line, is working to provide the initial feed material to the Mixed Oxide Facility also located on SRS. Many additional campaigns are also in the planning process. Furthermore, the facility has started to integrate collaborative research and development (R&D) projects into its schedule. H Canyon can serve as the appropriate testing location for many technologies focused on monitoring the back end of the fuel cycle, due to the nature of the facility and continued operation. H Canyon, in collaboration with the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), has been working with several groups in the DOE complex to conduct testing demonstrations of novel technologies at the facility. The purpose of conducting these demonstrations at H Canyon will be to demonstrate the capabilities of the emerging technologies in an operational environment. This paper will summarize R&D testing activities currently taking place in H Canyon and discuss the possibilities for future collaborations.

Sexton, L.; Fuller, Kenneth

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

277

FEASIBILITY STUDY OF DUPOLY TO RECYCLE DEPLETED URANIUM.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DUPoly, depleted uranium (DU) powder microencapsulated in a low-density polyethylene binder, has been demonstrated as an innovative and efficient recycle product, a very durable high density material with significant commercial appeal. DUPoly was successfully prepared using uranium tetrafluoride (UF{sub 4}) ''green salt'' obtained from Fluor Daniel-Fernald, a U.S. Department of Energy reprocessing facility near Cincinnati, Ohio. Samples containing up to 90 wt% UF{sub 4} were produced using a single screw plastics extruder, with sample densities of up to 3.97 {+-} 0.08 g/cm{sup 3} measured. Compressive strength of as-prepared samples (50-90 wt% UF4 ) ranged from 1682 {+-} 116 psi (11.6 {+-} 0.8 MPa) to 3145 {+-} 57 psi (21.7 {+-} 0.4 MPa). Water immersion testing for a period of 90 days produced no visible degradation of the samples. Leach rates were low, ranging from 0.02 % (2.74 x 10{sup {minus}6} gm/gm/d) for 50 wt% UF{sub 4} samples to 0.72 % (7.98 x 10{sup {minus}5} gm/gm/d) for 90 wt% samples. Sample strength was not compromised by water immersion. DUPoly samples containing uranium trioxide (UO{sub 3}), a DU reprocessing byproduct material stockpiled at the Savannah River Site, were gamma irradiated to 1 x 10{sup 9} rad with no visible deterioration. Compressive strength increased significantly, however: up to 200% for samples with 90 wt% UO{sub 3}. Correspondingly, percent deformation (strain) at failure was decreased for all samples. Gamma attenuation data on UO{sub 3} DUPoly samples yielded mass attenuation coefficients greater than those for lead. Neutron removal coefficients were calculated and shown to correlate well with wt% of DU. Unlike gamma attenuation, both hydrogenous and nonhydrogenous materials interact to attenuate neutrons.

ADAMS,J.W.; LAGERAAEN,P.R.; KALB,P.D.; RUTENKROGER,S.P.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Assuaging Nuclear Energy Risks: The Angarsk International Uranium Enrichment Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recent nuclear renaissance has motivated many countries, especially developing nations, to plan and build nuclear power reactors. However, domestic low enriched uranium demands may trigger nations to construct indigenous enrichment facilities, which could be redirected to fabricate high enriched uranium for nuclear weapons. The potential advantages of establishing multinational uranium enrichment sites are numerous including increased low enrichment uranium access with decreased nuclear proliferation risks. While multinational nuclear initiatives have been discussed, Russia is the first nation to actualize this concept with their Angarsk International Uranium Enrichment Center (IUEC). This paper provides an overview of the historical and modern context of the multinational nuclear fuel cycle as well as the evolution of Russia's IUEC, which exemplifies how international fuel cycle cooperation is an alternative to domestic facilities.

Myers, Astasia [Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA and MonAme Scientific Research Center, Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia)

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

279

CCFE is the fusion research arm of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority Culham Materials Research Facility -for universities,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(beam damage & analysis) to form £15M "NNUF" proposal (National Nuclear Users Facility ­ CCFE, NNL ­ First tranche of funding (£5M for whole NNUF) - to be spent by March · March 2013 - Beddington review. 37MBq (e.g. Oxford) Universities 35TBq (Co60) CCFE Medium activity, structural NNL Most active, fuel

McDonald, Kirk

280

:- : DRILLING URANIUM BILLETS ON A  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

'Xxy";^ ...... ' '. .- -- Metals, Ceramics, and Materials. : . - ,.. ; - . _ : , , ' z . , -, .- . >. ; . .. :- : DRILLING URANIUM BILLETS ON A .-... r .. .. i ' LEBLOND-CARLSTEDT RAPID BORER 4 r . _.i'- ' ...... ' -'".. :-'' ,' :... : , '.- ' ;BY R.' J. ' ANSEN .AEC RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT PERSONAL PROPERTY OF J. F. Schlltz .:- DECLASSIFIED - PER AUTHORITY OF (DAlE) (NhTI L (DATE)UE) FEED MATERIALS PRODUCTION CENTER NATIONAL LFE A COMPANY OF OHIO 26 1 3967 3035406 NLCO - 886 Metals, Ceramics and Materials (TID-4500, 22nd Ed.) DRILLING URANIUM BILLETS ON A LEBLOND-CARLSTEDT RAPID BORER By R. J. Jansen* TECHNICAL DIVISION NATIONAL LEAD COMPANY OF OHIO Date of Issuance: September 13, 1963 Approved By: Approved By: Technical Director Head, Metallurgical Department *Mr. Jansen is presently

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium materials facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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281

Uranium Processing Facility Team Signs Partnering Agreement ...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

management. CNS assumed responsibility as the management and operating contractor for the Pantex Plant, located near Amarillo, Texas, and the Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak...

282

Uranium Processing Facility team signs partnering agreement ...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

2013 (18) August 2013 (17) July 2013 (20) June 2013 (19) May 2013 (25) April 2013 (17) March 2013 (23) February 2013 (22) January 2013 (21) December 2012 (19) November 2012 (19)...

283

Disposition of uranium-233  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US is developing a strategy for the disposition of surplus weapons-usable uranium-233 ({sup 233}U). The strategy (1) identifies the requirements for the disposition of surplus {sup 233}U; (2) identifies potential disposition options, including key issues to be resolved with each option; and (3) defines a road map that identifies future key decisions and actions. The disposition of weapons-usable fissile materials is part of a US international arms-control program for reduction of the number of nuclear weapons and the quantities of nuclear-weapons-usable materials worldwide. The disposition options ultimately lead to waste forms requiring some type of geological disposal. Major options are described herein.

Tousley, D.R. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Fissile Materials Disposition; Forsberg, C.W.; Krichinsky, A.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1997-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

284

Sandia National Laboratories: Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Production Method Could Lead to Better Lights, Lenses, Solar Cells On July 1, 2014, in Capabilities, CINT, Energy, Energy Efficiency, Facilities, Materials Science,...

285

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Pratt and Whitney Corp Canel Facility  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Pratt and Whitney Corp Canel Pratt and Whitney Corp Canel Facility - CT 04 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: PRATT AND WHITNEY CORP., CANEL FACILITY (CT.04) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Middletown , Connecticut CT.04-1 Evaluation Year: 1994 CT.04-2 Site Operations: High temperature materials research and reactor experimentation in the 1960s. CT.04-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - NRC licensed - Remediation activities performed in 1966 by AEC CT.04-1 CT.04-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium CT.04-4 Radiological Survey(s): Yes CT.04-1 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to PRATT AND WHITNEY CORP., CANEL FACILITY

286

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Y-12 Enriched Uranium Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of Industrial Safety and Industrial Health programs at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility More Documents & Publications

287

Test and evaluation of computerized nuclear material accounting methods. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In accordance with the definition of a Material Balance Area (MBA) as a well-defined geographical area involving an Integral operation, the building housing the BFS-1 and BFS-1 critical facilities is considered to consist of one MBA. The BFS materials are in the form of small disks clad in stainless steel and each disk with nuclear material has its own serial number. Fissile material disks in the BFS MBA can be located at three key monitoring points: BFS-1 facility, BFS-2 facility and main storage of BFS fissile materials (storage 1). When used in the BFS-1 or BFS-2 critical facilities, the fissile material disks are loaded in tubes (fuel rods) forming critical assembly cores. The following specific features of the BFS MBA should be taken into account for the purpose of computerized accounting of nuclear material: (1) very large number of nuclear material items (about 70,000 fissile material items); and (2) periodically very intensive shuffling of nuclear material items. Requirements for the computerized system are determined by basic objectives of nuclear material accounting: (1) providing accurate information on the identity and location of all items in the BFS material balance area; (2) providing accurate information on location and identity of tamper-indicating devices; (3) tracking nuclear material inventories; (4) issuing periodic reports; (5) assisting with the detection of material gains or losses; (6) providing a history of nuclear material transactions; (7) preventing unauthorized access to the system and data falsification. In August 1995, the prototype computerized accounting system was installed on the BFS facility for trial operation. Information on two nuclear material types was entered into the data base: weapon-grade plutonium metal and 36% enriched uranium dioxide. The total number of the weapon-grade plutonium disks is 12,690 and the total number of the uranium dioxide disks is 1,700.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

288

HEU to LEU conversion and blending facility: Metal blending alternative to produce LEU oxide for disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

US DOE is examining options for disposing of surplus weapons-usable fissile materials and storage of all weapons-usable fissile materials. The nuclear material is converted to a form more proliferation- resistant than the original form. Blending HEU (highly enriched uranium) with less-enriched uranium to form LEU has been proposed as a disposition option. Five technologies are being assessed for blending HEU. This document provides data to be used in environmental impact analysis for the HEU-LEU disposition option that uses metal blending with an oxide waste product. It is divided into: mission and assumptions, conversion and blending facility descriptions, process descriptions and requirements, resource needs, employment needs, waste and emissions from plant, hazards discussion, and intersite transportation.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Development of a low enrichment uranium core for the MIT reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An investigation has been made into converting the MIT research reactor from using high enrichment uranium (HEU) to low enrichment uranium (LEU) with a newly developed fuel material. The LEU fuel introduces negative ...

Newton, Thomas Henderson

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Evaluation of moisture limits for uranium and plutonium mixed oxides to support on-site transportation packaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains supporting documentation for onsite shipment of uranium and plutonium mixed oxide materials in the 9975 package.

Livingston, R.R.

2000-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

291

Accelerating the Reduction of Excess Russian Highly Enriched Uranium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the latest information on one of the Accelerated Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Disposition initiatives that resulted from the May 2002 Summit meeting between Presidents George W. Bush and Vladimir V. Putin. These initiatives are meant to strengthen nuclear nonproliferation objectives by accelerating the disposition of nuclear weapons-useable materials. The HEU Transparency Implementation Program (TIP), within the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is working to implement one of the selected initiatives that would purchase excess Russian HEU (93% 235U) for use as fuel in U.S. research reactors over the next ten years. This will parallel efforts to convert the reactors' fuel core from HEU to low enriched uranium (LEU) material, where feasible. The paper will examine important aspects associated with the U.S. research reactor HEU purchase. In particular: (1) the establishment of specifications for the Russian HEU, and (2) transportation safeguard considerations for moving the HEU from the Mayak Production Facility in Ozersk, Russia, to the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, TN.

Benton, J; Wall, D; Parker, E; Rutkowski, E

2004-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

292

FAQ 8-What is uranium hexafluoride (UF6)?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

is uranium hexafluoride (UF6)? is uranium hexafluoride (UF6)? What is uranium hexafluoride (UF6)? Uranium hexafluoride is a chemical compound consisting of one atom of uranium combined with six atoms of fluorine. It is the chemical form of uranium that is used during the uranium enrichment process. Within a reasonable range of temperature and pressure, it can be a solid, liquid, or gas. Solid UF6 is a white, dense, crystalline material that resembles rock salt. Liquid UF6 is formed only at temperatures greater than 147° F (64° C) and at pressures greater than 1.5 times atmospheric pressure (22 psia). At atmospheric pressure, solid UF6 will transform directly to UF6 gas (sublimation) when the temperature is raised to 134° F (57° C), without going through a liquid phase.

293

Uranium at Y-12: Recovery | Y-12 National Security Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Recovery Recovery Uranium at Y-12: Recovery Posted: July 22, 2013 - 3:44pm | Y-12 Report | Volume 10, Issue 1 | 2013 Recovery involves reclaiming uranium from numerous sources and configurations and handling uranium in almost any form, including oxides and liquids (see A Rich Resource Requires Recovery). Y-12 has the equipment and expertise to recover uranium that is present in filters, wipes, mop water and elsewhere. For many salvage materials, the uranium is extracted and then manipulated into a uranyl nitrate solution, purified and chemically converted through several stages. Then it is reduced to a mass of uranium metal. This mass, called a button, is used in casting operations. The chemical operators who recover and purify uranium understand and monitor complex chemical reactions, flow rates, temperatures

294

The ultimate disposition of depleted uranium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Depleted uranium (DU) is produced as a by-product of the uranium enrichment process. Over 340,000 MTU of DU in the form of UF{sub 6} have been accumulated at the US government gaseous diffusion plants and the stockpile continues to grow. An overview of issues and objectives associated with the inventory management and the ultimate disposition of this material is presented.

Lemons, T.R. [Uranium Enrichment Organization, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

295

User Facility | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials Center for Nanoscale Materials More Electron Microscopy Center More The Nanoscience and Technology Division hosts the following user facility: The Center for Nanoscale...

296

Assessment of radon concentration and external gamma radiation level in the environs of Narwapahar uranium mine, India and its radiological significance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the environs of uranium mining, milling and processing facilities and in the uranium mineralized terrain, a little higher ambient radon concentration and gamma radiation level may be expected in comparison ...

B. K. Rana; R. M. Tripathi; J. S. Meena

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Manhattan Project: More Uranium Research, 1942  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Cubes of uranium metal, Los Alamos, 1945 MORE URANIUM RESEARCH Cubes of uranium metal, Los Alamos, 1945 MORE URANIUM RESEARCH (1942) Events > Difficult Choices, 1942 More Uranium Research, 1942 More Piles and Plutonium, 1942 Enter the Army, 1942 Groves and the MED, 1942 Picking Horses, November 1942 Final Approval to Build the Bomb, December 1942 During the first half of 1942, several routes to a bomb via uranium continued to be explored. At Columbia University, Harold Urey worked on the gaseous diffusion and centrifuge systems for isotope separation in the codenamed SAM (Substitute or Special Alloy Metals) Laboratory. At Berkeley, Ernest Lawrence continued his investigations on electromagnetic separation using the "calutron" he had converted from his thirty-seven-inch cyclotron. Phillip Abelson, who had moved from the Carnegie Institution and the National Bureau of Standards to the Naval Research Laboratory, continued his work on liquid thermal diffusion but with few positive results, and he had lost all contact with the S-1 Section of the Office of Scientific Research and Development. Meanwhile Eger Murphree's group hurriedly studied ways to move from laboratory experiments to production facilities.

298

Domestic Uranium Production Report - Quarterly - Energy Information  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

All Nuclear Reports All Nuclear Reports Domestic Uranium Production Report - Quarterly Data for 3rd Quarter 2013 | Release Date: October 31, 2013 | Next Release Date: February 2014 | full report Previous Issues Year: 2013-Q2 2013-Q1 2012-Q4 2012-Q3 2012-Q2 2012-Q1 2011-Q4 2011-Q3 2011-Q2 2011-Q1 2010-Q4 2010-Q3 2010-Q2 2010-Q1 2009-Q4 2009-Q3 2009-Q2 2009-Q1 2008-Q4 2008-Q3 2008-Q2 2008-Q1 Go 3rd Quarter 2013 U.S. production of uranium concentrate in the third quarter 2013 was 1,171,278 pounds U3O8, down 16 percent from the previous quarter and up 12 percent from the third quarter 2012. Third quarter 2013 uranium production is at its highest level since 1999. During the third quarter 2013, U.S. uranium was produced at six U.S. uranium facilities. U.S. Uranium Mill in Production (State)

299

Disposition of DOE Excess Depleted Uranium, Natural Uranium, and  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Disposition of DOE Excess Depleted Uranium, Natural Uranium, and Disposition of DOE Excess Depleted Uranium, Natural Uranium, and Low-Enriched Uranium Disposition of DOE Excess Depleted Uranium, Natural Uranium, and Low-Enriched Uranium The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) owns and manages an inventory of depleted uranium (DU), natural uranium (NU), and low-enriched uranium (LEU) that is currently stored in large cylinders as depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6), natural uranium hexafluoride (NUF6), and low-enriched uranium hexafluoride (LEUF6) at the DOE Paducah site in western Kentucky (DOE Paducah) and the DOE Portsmouth site near Piketon in south-central Ohio (DOE Portsmouth)1. This inventory exceeds DOE's current and projected energy and defense program needs. On March 11, 2008, the Secretary of Energy issued a policy statement (the

300

Depleted Uranium Technical Brief  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and radiological health concerns involved with depleted uranium in the environment. This technical brief was developed to address the common misconception that depleted uranium represents only a radiological healthDepleted Uranium Technical Brief United States Environmental Protection Agency Office of Air

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium materials facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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301

DOE-STD-1071-94; DOE Standard Guideline to Good Practices for Material Receipt, Inspection, Handling, Storage, Retrieval, and Issuance at DOE Nuclear Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

71-94 71-94 June 1994 DOE STANDARD GUIDELINE TO GOOD PRACTICES FOR MATERIAL RECEIPT, INSPECTION, HANDLING, STORAGE, RETRIEVAL, AND ISSUANCE AT DOE NUCLEAR FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MNTY Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; (615) 576-8401. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 487-4650. Order No. DE94014949 DOE-STD-1071-94 FOREWORD The Guideline to Good Practices for Material Receipt, Inspection, Handling, Storage,

302

Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 MAG LAB REPORTS Volume 18 No. 1 CONDENSED MATTER SCIENCE Technique development, graphene, magnetism & magnetic materials, topological insulators, quantum fl uids & solids,...

303

Development of Novel Sorbents for Uranium Extraction from Seawater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the uranium resource in terrestrial ores is limited, it is difficult to ensure a long-term sustainable nuclear energy technology. The oceans contain approximately 4.5 billion tons of uranium, which is one thousand times the amount of uranium in terrestrial ores. Development of technologies to recover the uranium from seawater would greatly improve the uranium resource availability, sustaining the fuel supply for nuclear energy. Several methods have been previously evaluated including solvent extraction, ion exchange, flotation, biomass collection, and adsorption; however, none have been found to be suitable for reasons such as cost effectiveness, long term stability, and selectivity. Recent research has focused on the amidoxime functional group as a promising candidate for uranium sorption. Polymer beads and fibers have been functionalized with amidoxime functional groups, and uranium adsorption capacities as high as 1.5 g U/kg adsorbent have recently been reported with these types of materials. As uranium concentration in seawater is only ~3 ppb, great improvements to uranium collection systems must be made in order to make uranium extraction from seawater economically feasible. This proposed research intends to develop transformative technologies for economic uranium extraction from seawater. The Lin group will design advanced porous supports by taking advantage of recent breakthroughs in nanoscience and nanotechnology and incorporate high densities of well-designed chelators into such nanoporous supports to allow selective and efficient binding of uranyl ions from seawater. Several classes of nanoporous materials, including mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs), mesoporous carbon nanoparticles (MCNs), meta-organic frameworks (MOFs), and covalent-organic frameworks (COFs), will be synthesized. Selective uranium-binding liagnds such as amidoxime will be incorporated into the nanoporous materials to afford a new generation of sorbent materials that will be evaluated for their uranium extraction efficiency. The initial testing of these materials for uranium binding will be carried out in the Lin group, but more detailed sorption studies will be carried out by Dr. Taylor-Pashow of Savannah River National Laboratory in order to obtain quantitative uranyl sorption selectivity and kinetics data for the proposed materials. The proposed nanostructured sorbent materials are expected to have higher binding capacities, enhanced extraction kinetics, optimal stripping efficiency for uranyl ions, and enhanced mechanical and chemical stabilities. This transformative research will significantly impact uranium extraction from seawater as well as benefit DOEs efforts on environmental remediation by developing new materials and providing knowledge for enriching and sequestering ultralow concentrations of other metals.

Lin, Wenbin; Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn

2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

304

Final environmental statement related to the Western Nuclear, Inc. , Split Rock Uranium Mill (Fremont County, Wyoming)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed action is the renewal of Source Material License SUA-56 (with amendments) issued to Western Nuclear, Inc. (WNI), for the operation of the Split Rock Uranium Mill near Jeffrey City and the Green Mountain Ion-Exchange Facility, both in Fremont County, Wyoming. The license also permits possession of material from past operations at four ancillary facilities in the Gas Hills mining area - the Bullrush, Day-Loma, Frazier-Lamac, and Rox sites (Docket No. 40-1162). However, although heap leaching operations were previously authorized at Frazier-Lamac, there has never been any processing of material at this site. The Split Rock mill is an acid-leach, ion-exchange and solvent-extraction uranium-ore processing mill with a design capacity of 1540 MT (1700 tons) of ore per day. WNI has proposed by license amendment request to increase the storage capacity of the tailings ponds in order to permit the continuation of present production rates of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ through 1996 using lower-grade ores.

Not Available

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Cyclododecane as support material for clean and facile transfer of large-area few-layer graphene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The transfer of chemical vapor deposited graphene is a crucial process, which can affect the quality of the transferred films and compromise their application in devices. Finding a robust and intrinsically clean material capable of easing the transfer of graphene without interfering with its properties remains a challenge. We here propose the use of an organic compound, cyclododecane, as a transfer material. This material can be easily spin coated on graphene and assist the transfer, leaving no residues and requiring no further removal processes. The effectiveness of this transfer method for few-layer graphene on a large area was evaluated and confirmed by microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and four-point probe measurements. Schottky-barrier solar cells with few-layer graphene were fabricated on silicon wafers by using the cyclododecane transfer method and outperformed reference cells made by standard methods.

Capasso, A.; Leoni, E.; Dikonimos, T.; Buonocore, F.; Lisi, N. [ENEA, Materials Technology Unit, Surface Technology Laboratory, Casaccia Research Centre, Via Anguillarese 301, 00060 Rome (Italy); De Francesco, M. [ENEA, Technical Unit for Renewable Energies Sources, Casaccia Research Center, Via Anguillarese 301, 00060 Rome (Italy); Lancellotti, L.; Bobeico, E. [ENEA, Portici Research Centre, P.le E. Fermi 1, 80055 Portici (Italy); Sarto, M. S.; Tamburrano, A.; De Bellis, G. [Research Center on Nanotechnology Applied to Engineering of Sapienza (CNIS), SSNLab, Sapienza University of Rome, P.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

306

Welding of uranium and uranium alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major reported work on joining uranium comes from the USA, Great Britain, France and the USSR. The driving force for producing this technology base stems from the uses of uranium as a nuclear fuel for energy production, compact structures requiring high density, projectiles, radiation shielding, and nuclear weapons. This review examines the state-of-the-art of this technology and presents current welding process and parameter information. The welding metallurgy of uranium and the influence of microstructure on mechanical properties is developed for a number of the more commonly used welding processes.

Mara, G.L.; Murphy, J.L.

1982-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

307

The solubility of uranium hexafluoride in perfluoroethers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The polyperfluoroethers are compatible with uranium hexafluoride (UF/sub 6/) and are suitable for use in diffusion pumps and in mechanical vacuum pumps which rely on oil as both the lubricant and the seal. The UF/sub 6/ is soluble in all fluids with which it is compatible. Because a number of vacuum pumps in the BOP facilities of the GCEP plant employ these perfluoroether oils as the working fluid and have oil chambers which are large, questions have been raised as to the relationships governing the solubility of UF/sub 6/ in these materials and the maximum quantities of UF/sub 6/ which could be dissolved in these oils under credible accident conditions. This report summarizes these solubility relations and the interaction of the UF/sub 6/ solubility and the pumping capability of this type of vacuum pump. It will be shown that, whereas the solubility of UF/sub 6/ in Fomblin Y25 fluoroether fluid under a UF/sub 6/ pressure of 760 torr and at the pump operating temperature of 160/sup 0/F is about 500 g of UF/sub 6/ per liter of oil, the system controls are such as to isolate the system from the pumps before the quantity of UF/sub 6/ dissolved in the perfluoroether exceeds about 10 g of UF/sub 6/ per liter of oil. 13 refs., 7 figs.

Barber, E.J.

1984-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

308

FAQ 1-What is uranium?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

What is uranium? What is uranium? What is uranium? Uranium is a radioactive element that occurs naturally in low concentrations (a few parts per million) in soil, rock, and surface and groundwater. It is the heaviest naturally occurring element, with an atomic number of 92. Uranium in its pure form is a silver-colored heavy metal that is nearly twice as dense as lead. In nature, uranium atoms exist as several isotopes: primarily uranium-238, uranium-235, and a very small amount of uranium-234. (Isotopes are different forms of an element that have the same number of protons in the nucleus, but a different number of neutrons.) In a typical sample of natural uranium, most of the mass (99.27%) consists of atoms of uranium-238. About 0.72% of the mass consists of atoms of uranium-235, and a very small amount (0.0055% by mass) is uranium-234.

309

Depleted uranium plasma reduction system study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A system life-cycle cost study was conducted of a preliminary design concept for a plasma reduction process for converting depleted uranium to uranium metal and anhydrous HF. The plasma-based process is expected to offer significant economic and environmental advantages over present technology. Depleted Uranium is currently stored in the form of solid UF{sub 6}, of which approximately 575,000 metric tons is stored at three locations in the U.S. The proposed system is preconceptual in nature, but includes all necessary processing equipment and facilities to perform the process. The study has identified total processing cost of approximately $3.00/kg of UF{sub 6} processed. Based on the results of this study, the development of a laboratory-scale system (1 kg/h throughput of UF6) is warranted. Further scaling of the process to pilot scale will be determined after laboratory testing is complete.

Rekemeyer, P.; Feizollahi, F.; Quapp, W.J.; Brown, B.W.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

The intense slow positron beam facility at the PULSTAR reactor and applications in nano-materials study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An intense slow positron beam has been established at the PULSTAR nuclear research reactor of North Carolina State University. The slow positrons are generated by pair production in a tungsten moderator from gammarays produced in the reactor core and by neutron capture reactions in cadmium. The moderated positrons are electrostatically extracted and magnetically guided out of the region near the core. Subsequently, the positrons are used in two spectrometers that are capable of performing positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and positron Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS) to probe the defect and free volume properties of materials. One of the spectrometers (e{sup +}-PALS) utilizes an rf buncher to produce a pulsed beam and has a timing resolution of 277 ps. The second spectrometer (Ps-PALS) uses a secondary electron timing technique and is dedicated to positronium lifetime measurements with an approximately 1 ns timing resolution. PALS measurements have been conducted in the e{sup +}-PALS spectrometer on a series of nano-materials including organic photovoltaic thin films, membranes for filtration, and polymeric fibers. These studies have resulted in understanding some critical issues related to the development of the examined nano-materials.

Liu, Ming; Moxom, Jeremy; Hawari, Ayman I. [Nuclear Reactor Program, Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, P.O. Box 7909, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Gidley, David W. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, 450 Church Street, Ann Arbor MI 48109 (United States)

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

311

Containment of uranium in the proposed Egyptian geologic repository for radioactive waste using hydroxyapatite.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently, the Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority is designing a shallow-land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste. To insure containment and prevent migration of radionuclides from the site, the use of a reactive backfill material is being considered. One material under consideration is hydroxyapatite, Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}, which has a high affinity for the sorption of many radionuclides. Hydroxyapatite has many properties that make it an ideal material for use as a backfill including low water solubility (K{sub sp}>10{sup -40}), high stability under reducing and oxidizing conditions over a wide temperature range, availability, and low cost. However, there is often considerable variation in the properties of apatites depending on source and method of preparation. In this work, we characterized and compared a synthetic hydroxyapatite with hydroxyapatites prepared from cattle bone calcined at 500 C, 700 C, 900 C and 1100 C. The analysis indicated the synthetic hydroxyapatite was similar in morphology to 500 C prepared cattle hydroxyapatite. With increasing calcination temperature the crystallinity and crystal size of the hydroxyapatites increased and the BET surface area and carbonate concentration decreased. Batch sorption experiments were performed to determine the effectiveness of each material to sorb uranium. Sorption of U was strong regardless of apatite type indicating all apatite materials evaluated. Sixty day desorption experiments indicated desorption of uranium for each hydroxyapatite was negligible.

Moore, Robert Charles; Hasan, Ahmed Ali Mohamed; Headley, Thomas Jeffrey; Sanchez, Charles Anthony (University of Arizona, Yuma, AZ); Zhao, Hongting; Salas, Fred Manuel; Hasan, Mahmoud A. (Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo, Egypt); Holt, Kathleen Caroline

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

EPA Update: NESHAP Uranium Activities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for underground uranium mining operations (Subpart B) EPA regulatory requirements for operating uranium mill for Underground Uranium Mining Operations (Subpart B) #12;5 EPA Regulatory Requirements for Underground Uranium uranium mines include: · Applies to 10,000 tons/yr ore production, or 100,000 tons/mine lifetime · Ambient

313

Borehole logging for uranium by measurement of natural ?-radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

?-Ray measurements have been made in boreholes since 1939, for the purpose of detecting the radiation from naturally occuring radioelements in rocks. Logs of the ?-radiation in boreholes have evolved to their present acceptance as a quantitative measurement of uranium concentration for uranium exploration and mining development projects. Many factors influence these ?-ray measurements and consequently new methods of overcoming previous problems have had to be developed. Calibration facilities with model holes have been established in several countries to support quantitative borehole measurements. New high density detector materials have been evaluated and have shown to yield considerable improvements for operation in the restricted environment of the borehole. ?-Ray spectral logging has become available partially as a result of spin-off from parallel developments in surface and airborne ?-ray spectrometric survey equipment. The use of the high resolution solid state detector has proceeded through a series of developments to its present availability as a commercial borehole logging service in spite of the inherent detector cooling problems. Digital measurements are replacing the earlier analog measurements, and minicomputer- or micro processor-based logging systems have enabled new data processing techniques such as inverse filtering, to be implemented in real time at the site of the borehole.

P.G. Killeen

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Number of uranium mills and plants producing uranium concentrate in the United States" 2. Number of uranium mills and plants producing uranium concentrate in the United States" "Uranium Concentrate Processing Facilities","End of 1996","End of 1997","End of 1998","End of 1999","End of 2000","End of 2001","End of 2002","End of 2003","End of 2004","End of 2005","End of 2006","End of 2007","End of 2008","End of 2009","End of 2010","End of 2011","End of 2012","End of 3rd Quarter 2013" "Mills - conventional milling 1",0,0,0,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,0,1,1,1,0 "Mills - other operations 2",2,3,2,2,2,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,0,1,0,0,0,1 "In-Situ-Leach Plants 3",5,6,6,4,3,3,2,2,3,3,5,5,6,3,4,5,5,5

315

Uranium hexafluoride public risk  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The limiting value for uranium toxicity in a human being should be based on the concentration of uranium (U) in the kidneys. The threshold for nephrotoxicity appears to lie very near 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney tissue. There does not appear to be strong scientific support for any other improved estimate, either higher or lower than this, of the threshold for uranium nephrotoxicity in a human being. The value 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney is the concentration that results from a single intake of about 30 mg soluble uranium by inhalation (assuming the metabolism of a standard person). The concentration of uranium continues to increase in the kidneys after long-term, continuous (or chronic) exposure. After chronic intakes of soluble uranium by workers at the rate of 10 mg U per week, the concentration of uranium in the kidneys approaches and may even exceed the nephrotoxic limit of 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney tissue. Precise values of the kidney concentration depend on the biokinetic model and model parameters assumed for such a calculation. Since it is possible for the concentration of uranium in the kidneys to exceed 3 {mu}g per gram tissue at an intake rate of 10 mg U per week over long periods of time, we believe that the kidneys are protected from injury when intakes of soluble uranium at the rate of 10 mg U per week do not continue for more than two consecutive weeks. For long-term, continuous occupational exposure to low-level, soluble uranium, we recommend a reduced weekly intake limit of 5 mg uranium to prevent nephrotoxicity in workers. Our analysis shows that the nephrotoxic limit of 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney tissues is not exceeded after long-term, continuous uranium intake at the intake rate of 5 mg soluble uranium per week.

Fisher, D.R.; Hui, T.E.; Yurconic, M.; Johnson, J.R.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Semiconductive Properties of Uranium Oxides  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SEMICONDUCTIVE PROPERTIES OF URANIUM OXIDES SEMICONDUCTIVE PROPERTIES OF URANIUM OXIDES Thomas Meek Materials Science Engineering Department University of Tennessee Knoxville, TN 37931 Michael Hu and M. Jonathan Haire Chemical Technology Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory * Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6179 August 2000 For the Waste Management 2001 Symposium Tucson, Arizona February 25-March 1, 2001 The submitted manuscript has been authored by a contractor of the U.S. Government under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725. Accordingly, the U.S. Government retains a nonexclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U.S. Government purposes. _________________________ * Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy

317

Final environmental assessment and Finding-of-No-Significant-Impact - drum storage facility for interim storage of materials generated by environmental restoration operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0995, for the construction and operation of a drum storage facility at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado. The proposal for construction of the facility was generated in response to current and anticipated future needs for interim storage of waste materials generated by environmental restoration operations. A public meeting was held on July 20, 1994, at which the scope and analyses of the EA were presented. The scope of the EA included evaluation of alternative methods of storage, including no action. A comment period from July 5, 1994 through August 4, 1994, was provided to the public and the State of Colorado to submit written comment on the EA. No written comments were received regarding this proposed action, therefore no comment response is included in the Final EA. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

The uranium cylinder assay system for enrichment plant safeguards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safeguarding sensitive fuel cycle technology such as uranium enrichment is a critical component in preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. A useful tool for the nuclear materials accountancy of such a plant would be an instrument that measured the uranium content of UF{sub 6} cylinders. The Uranium Cylinder Assay System (UCAS) was designed for Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited (JNFL) for use in the Rokkasho Enrichment Plant in Japan for this purpose. It uses total neutron counting to determine uranium mass in UF{sub 6} cylinders given a known enrichment. This paper describes the design of UCAS, which includes features to allow for unattended operation. It can be used on 30B and 48Y cylinders to measure depleted, natural, and enriched uranium. It can also be used to assess the amount of uranium in decommissioned equipment and waste containers. Experimental measurements have been carried out in the laboratory and these are in good agreement with the Monte Carlo modeling results.

Miller, Karen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marlow, Johnna B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, Howard O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rael, Carlos D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Iwamoto, Tomonori [JNFL; Tamura, Takayuki [JNFL; Aiuchi, Syun [JNFL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials Materials and methods are available as supplementary materials on Science Online. 16. W. Benz, A. G. W. Cameron, H. J. Melosh, Icarus 81, 113 (1989). 17. S. L. Thompson, H. S. Lauson, Technical Rep. SC-RR-710714, Sandia Nat. Labs (1972). 18. H. J. Melosh, Meteorit. Planet. Sci. 42, 2079 (2007). 19. S. Ida, R. M. Canup, G. R. Stewart, Nature 389, 353 (1997). 20. E. Kokubo, J. Makino, S. Ida, Icarus 148, 419 (2000). 21. M. M. M. Meier, A. Reufer, W. Benz, R. Wieler, Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical Society LXXIV, abstr. 5039 (2011). 22. C. B. Agnor, R. M. Canup, H. F. Levison, Icarus 142, 219 (1999). 23. D. P. O'Brien, A. Morbidelli, H. F. Levison, Icarus 184, 39 (2006). 24. R. M. Canup, Science 307, 546 (2005). 25. J. J. Salmon, R. M. Canup, Lunar Planet. Sci. XLIII, 2540 (2012). Acknowledgments: SPH simulation data are contained in tables S2 to S5 of the supplementary materials. Financial support

320

Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. Uranium sellers to owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, 2010-2012 2010 2011 2012 4. Uranium sellers to owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, 2010-2012 2010 2011 2012 American Fuel Resources, LLC Advance Uranium Asset Management Ltd. (was Uranium Asset Management) Advance Uranium Asset Management Ltd. (was Uranium Asset Management) AREVA NC, Inc. (was COGEMA, Inc.) American Fuel Resources, LLC American Fuel Resources, LLC BHP Billiton Olympic Dam Corporation Pty Ltd AREVA NC, Inc. AREVA NC, Inc. CAMECO BHP Billiton Olympic Dam Corporation Pty Ltd BHP Billiton Olympic Dam Corporation Pty Ltd ConverDyn CAMECO CAMECO Denison Mines Corp. ConverDyn ConverDyn Energy Resources of Australia Ltd. Denison Mines Corp. Energy Fuels Resources Energy USA, Inc. Effective Energy N.V. Energy Resources of Australia Ltd.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium materials facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Uranium purchases report 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data reported by domestic nuclear utility companies in their responses to the 1991 and 1992 ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey,`` Form EIA-858, Schedule B ``Uranium Marketing Activities,are provided in response to the requirements in the Energy Policy Act 1992. Data on utility uranium purchases and imports are shown on Table 1. Utility enrichment feed deliveries and secondary market acquisitions of uranium equivalent of US DOE separative work units are shown on Table 2. Appendix A contains a listing of firms that sold uranium to US utilities during 1992 under new domestic purchase contracts. Appendix B contains a similar listing of firms that sold uranium to US utilities during 1992 under new import purchase contracts. Appendix C contains an explanation of Form EIA-858 survey methodologies with emphasis on the processing of Schedule B data.

Not Available

1993-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

322

Technical Competencies for the Safe Interim Storage and Management of 233U at U.S. Department of Energy Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium-233 (with concomitant {sup 232}U) is a man-made fissile isotope of uranium with unique nuclear characteristics which require high-integrity alpha containment biological shielding, and remote handling. The special handling considerations and the fact that much of the {sup 233}U processing and large-scale handling was performed over a decade ago underscore the importance of identifying the people within the DOE complex who are currently working with or have worked with {sup 233}U. The availability of these key personnel is important in ensuring safe interim storage, management and ultimate disposition of {sup 233}U at DOE facilities. Significant programs are ongoing at several DOE sites with actinides. The properties of these actinide materials require many of the same types of facilities and handling expertise as does {sup 233}U.

Campbell, D.O.; Krichinsky, A.M.; Laughlin, S.S.; Van Essen, D.C.; Yong, L.K.

1999-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

323

Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO{sub 3}), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl{sub 4}), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation. 4 figs.

Hayden, H.W. Jr.; Horton, J.A.; Elliott, G.R.B.

1995-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

324

Radiation Shielding Materials and Containers Incorporating Same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved radiation shielding material and storage systems for radioactive materials incorporating the same. The PYRolytic Uranium Compound (''PYRUC'') shielding material is preferably formed by heat and/or pressure treatment of a precursor material comprising microspheres of a uranium compound, such as uranium dioxide or uranium carbide, and a suitable binder. The PYRUC shielding material provides improved radiation shielding, thermal characteristic, cost and ease of use in comparison with other shielding materials. The shielding material can be used to form containment systems, container vessels, shielding structures, and containment storage areas, all of which can be used to house radioactive waste. The preferred shielding system is in the form of a container for storage, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. In addition, improved methods for preparing uranium dioxide and uranium carbide microspheres for use in the radiation shielding materials are also provided.

Mirsky, Steven M.; Krill, Stephen J.; and Murray, Alexander P.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

An integrated video- and weight-monitoring system for the surveillance of highly enriched uranium blend down operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An integrated video-surveillance and weight-monitoring system has been designed and constructed for tracking the blending down of weapons-grade uranium by the US Department of Energy. The instrumentation is being used by the International Atomic Energy Agency in its task of tracking and verifying the blended material at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth, Ohio. The weight instrumentation developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory monitors and records the weight of cylinders of the highly enriched uranium as their contents are fed into the blending facility while the video equipment provided by Sandia National Laboratory records periodic and event triggered images of the blending area. A secure data network between the scales, cameras, and computers insures data integrity and eliminates the possibility of tampering. The details of the weight monitoring instrumentation, video- and weight-system interaction, and the secure data network is discussed.

Lenarduzzi, R.; Castleberry, K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Whitaker, M. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Martinez, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

2013 Uranium Marketing Annual Survey  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for inflation. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-858 "Uranium Marketing Annual Survey" (2013). UF 6 is uranium hexafluoride. The natural UF 6 and enriched...

327

THE ENERGY SPECTRA OF URANIUM ATOMS SPUTTERED FROM URANIUM METAL AND URANIUM DIOXIDE TARGETS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE ENERGY SPECTRA OF URANIUM ATOMS SPUTTERED FROM URANIUM METAL AND URANIUM DIOXIDE TARGETS Thesis. I have benefitted from conversations with many persons w~ile engaged in this project. I would like

Winfree, Erik

328

DOE Designated User Facilities Multiple Laboratories * ARM Climate Research Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Designated User Facilities Designated User Facilities Multiple Laboratories * ARM Climate Research Facility Argonne National Laboratory * Advanced Photon Source (APS) * Electron Microscopy Center for Materials Research * Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) * Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) * Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) * Brookhaven National Laboratory * National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) * Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) * Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) * Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) * National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II ) (under construction) Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory * Fermilab Accelerator Complex Idaho National Laboratory * Advanced Test Reactor ** * Wireless National User Facility (WNUF)

329

Uncertainty clouds uranium enrichment corporation's plans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An expected windfall to the US Treasury from the sale of the Energy Dept.'s commercial fuel enrichment facilities may evaporate in the next few weeks when the Clinton administration submits its fiscal 1994 budget proposal to Congress, according to congressional and administration officials. Under the Energy Policy Act of 1992, DOE is required to lease two uranium enrichment facilities, Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, KY., to the government-owned US Enrichment Corp. (USEC) by July 1. Estimates by OMB and Treasury indicate a potential yearly payoff of $300 million from the government-owned company's sale of fuel for commercial reactors. Those two facilities use a process of gaseous diffusion to enrich uranium to about 3 percent for use as fuel in commercial power plants. DOE has contracts through at least 1996 to provide about 12 million separative work units (SWUs) yearly to US utilities and others world-wide. But under an agreement signed between the US and Russia last August, at least 10 metric tons, or 1.5 million SWUs, of low-enriched uranium (LEU) blended down from Russia warheads is expected to be delivered to the US starting in 1994. It could be sold at $50 to $60 per SWU, far below what DOE currently charges for its SWUs - $135 per SWU for 70 percent of the contract price and $90 per SWU for the remaining 30 percent.

Lane, E.

1993-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

330

DOE Announces Transfer of Depleted Uranium to Advance the U.S...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

transactions under the project would not have an adverse material impact on the domestic uranium mining, enrichment, or conversion industry. The completed analysis, conducted by...

331

Using flow through reactors to study the non-reductive biomineralization of uranium phosphate minerals.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Uranium contaminations of the subsurface in the vicinity of nuclear materials processing sites pose a health risk as the uranyl ion in its oxidized state, (more)

Williams, Anna Rachel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Quantitative NDA Measurements of Advanced Reprocessing Product Materials Containing U, NP, PU, and AM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of this first principle technique have been identified: (1) quantitative measurement of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, and americium materials; (2) quantitative measurement of mixed oxide (MOX) materials; (3) quantitative measurement of uranium materials; and (4...

Goddard, Braden

2013-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

333

Summary of Blast Shield and Material Testing for Development of Solid Debris Collection at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability to collect solid debris from the target chamber following a NIF shot has application for both capsule diagnostics, particularly for fuel-ablator mix, and measuring cross sections relevant to the Stockpile Stewardship program and nuclear astrophysics. Simulations have shown that doping the capsule with up to 10{sup 15} atoms of an impurity not otherwise found in the capsule does not affect its performance. The dopant is an element that will undergo nuclear activations during the NIF implosion, forming radioactive species that can be collected and measured after extraction from the target chamber. For diagnostics, deuteron or alpha induced reactions can be used to probe the fuel-ablator mix. For measuring neutron cross sections, the dopant should be something that is sensitive to the 14 MeV neutrons produced through the fusion of deuterium and tritium. Developing the collector is a challenge due to the extreme environment of the NIF chamber. The collector surface is exposed to a large photon flux from x-rays and unconverted laser light before it is exposed to a debris wind that is formed from vaporized material from the target chamber center. The photons will ablate the collector surface to some extent, possibly impeding the debris from reaching the collector and sticking. In addition, the collector itself must be mechanically strong enough to withstand the large amount of energy it will be exposed to, and it should be something that will be easy to count and chemically process. In order to select the best material for the collector, a variety of different metals have been tested in the NIF chamber. They were exposed to high-energy laser shots in order to evaluate their postshot surface characterization, morphology, degree of melt, and their ability to retain debris from the chamber center. The first set of samples consisted of 1 mm thick pieces of aluminum that had been fielded in the chamber as blast shields protecting the neutron activation diagnostic. Ten of these pieces were fielded at the equator and one was fielded on the pole. The shields were analyzed using a combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), x-ray fluorescence (XRF), neutron activation analysis (NAA) and chemical leaching followed by mass spectrometry. On each shield, gold debris originating from the gold hohlraum was observed, as well as large quantities of debris that were present in the center of the target chamber at the time of the shot (i.e., stainless steel, indium, copper, etc.) Debris was visible in the SEM as large blobs or splats of material that had encountered the surface of the aluminum and stuck. The aluminum itself had obviously melted and condensed, and some of the large debris splats arrived after the surface had already hardened. Melt depth was determined by cross sectioning the pieces and measuring the melted surface layers via SEM. After the SEM analysis was completed, the pieces were sent for NAA at the USGS reactor and were analyzed by U. Greife at the Colorado School of Mines. The NAA showed that the majority of gold mass present on the shields was not in the form of large blobs and splats, but was present as small particulates that had most likely formed as condensed vapor. Further analysis showed that the gold was entrained in the melted aluminum surface layers and did not extend down into the bulk of the aluminum. Once the gold mass was accounted for from the NAA, it was determined that the aluminum fielded at the equator was collecting a fraction of the total gold hohlraum mass equivalent to 120% {+-} 10% of the solid angle subtended by the shield. The attached presentation has more information on the results of the aluminum blast shield analysis. In addition to the information given in the presentation, the surfaces of the shields have been chemically leached and submitted for mass spectrometric analysis. The results from that analysis are expected to arrive after the due date of this report and will be written up at a later time. Based on the results of the aluminum b

Shaughnessy, D A; Gostic, J M; Moody, K J; Grant, P M; Lewis, L A; Hutcheon, I D

2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

334

Characterization of decontamination and decommissioning wastes expected from the major processing facilities in the 200 Areas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was intended to characterize and estimate the amounts of equipment and other materials that are candidates for removal and subsequent processing in a solid waste facility when the major processing and handling facilities in the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site are decontaminated and decommissioned. The facilities in this study were selected based on processing history and on the magnitude of the estimated decommissioning cost cited in the Surplus Facilities Program Plan; Fiscal Year 1993 (Winship and Hughes 1992). The facilities chosen for this study include B Plant (221-B), T Plant (221-T), U Plant (221-U), the Uranium Trioxide (UO{sub 3}) Plant (224-U and 224-UA), the Reduction Oxidation (REDOX) or S Plant (202-S), the Plutonium Concentration Facility for B Plant (224-B), and the Concentration Facility for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and REDOX (233-S). This information is required to support planning activities for current and future solid waste treatment, storage, and disposal operations and facilities.

Amato, L.C.; Franklin, J.D.; Hyre, R.A.; Lowy, R.M.; Millar, J.S.; Pottmeyer, J.A. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Kennewick, WA (United States); Duncan, D.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Poultry Facility Biosecurity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of organic materials on tires and shoes. Design features should include a one-way traff_ic system for all poultry facilities. The system should route personnel, vehicles and poultry from youngest birds to oldest birds, from ?clean? areas to ?dirty? areas... from waterways used by migra - tory waterfowl. Locate new facilities as far as possible from roads handling high volumes of poultry vehicles such as feed trucks or live-haul vehicles. Poultry facilities also need adequate amounts of potable water...

Carey, John B.; Prochaska, J. Fred; Jeffrey, Joan S.

2005-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

336

Review of uranium bioassay techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A variety of analytical techniques is available for evaluating uranium in excreta and tissues at levels appropriate for occupational exposure control and evaluation. A few (fluorometry, kinetic phosphorescence analysis, {alpha}-particle spectrometry, neutron irradiation techniques, and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry) have also been demonstrated as capable of determining uranium in these materials at levels comparable to those which occur naturally. Sample preparation requirements and isotopic sensitivities vary widely among these techniques and should be considered carefully when choosing a method. This report discusses analytical techniques used for evaluating uranium in biological matrices (primarily urine) and limits of detection reported in the literature. No cost comparison is attempted, although references are cited which address cost. Techniques discussed include: {alpha}-particle spectrometry; liquid scintillation spectrometry, fluorometry, phosphorometry, neutron activation analysis, fission-track counting, UV-visible absorption spectrophotometry, resonance ionization mass spectrometry, and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. A summary table of reported limits of detection and of the more important experimental conditions associated with these reported limits is also provided.

Bogard, J.S.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Nano Research Facility Lab Safety Manual Nano Research Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Nano Research Facility Lab Safety Manual Nano Research Facility: Weining Wang Office: Brauer rules and procedures (a) Accidents and spills for chemicals Not containing Nano-Materials Spills of non for chemicals Containing Nano-Materials In a fume hood small spills of nano-materials in a liquid may

Subramanian, Venkat

338

Lawrence Pack, train conductor, and Y-12s uranium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lawrence Pack, train conductor, and Y-12's uranium? Trains were the primary means of long haul transportation in the 1940's. Many trains brought building materials to Y-12 and...

339

Ecological Risk in Territory Uranium Tailing of Kyrgyzstan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During the last 100 years the territory of Kyrgyzstan served for the Czar Russia at the beginning and later the USSR as one of the major mineral and raw materials base (radium, uranium and rear earth elements)...

I. A. Torgoev; Yu. G. Aleshyn

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) environmental checklist forms for 304 Concretion Facility Closure Plan. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 300 Area of the Hanford Site contains reactor fuel manufacturing facilities and several research and development laboratories. Recyclable scrap uranium with zircaloy-2 and copper silicon alloy, uranium-titanium alloy, beryllium/zircaloy-2 alloy, and zircaloy-2 chips and fines were secured in concrete billets (7.5-gallon containers) in the 304 Facility, located in the 300 Area. The beryllium/zircaloy-2 alloy and zircaloy-2 chips and fines are designated as mixed waste with the characteristic of ignitability. The concretion process reduced the ignitability of the fines and chips for safe storage and shipment. This process has been discontinued and the 304 Facility is now undergoing closure as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Dangerous Waste Regulations, WAC 173-303-040. This closure plan presents a description of the 304 Facility, the history of materials and waste managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the 304 Facility. The 304 Facility is located within the 300-FF-3 (source) and 300-FF-5 (groundwater) operable units, as designated in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) (Ecology et al. 1992). Contamination in the operable units 300-FF-3 and 300-FF-5 is scheduled to be addressed through the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980 remedial action process. Therefore, all soil remedial action at the 304 Facility will be conducted as part of the CERCLA remedial action of operable units 300-FF-3 and 300-FF-5.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium materials facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 W W W W W W W W W W W Total Mill Feed W W W W W W W W W W W Uranium Concentrate Produced at U.S. Mills (thousand pounds U3O8) W W W W W W W W W W W Uranium Concentrate...

342

Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Uranium Marketing Uranium Marketing Annual Report May 2011 www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. U.S. Energy Information Administration | 2010 Uranium Marketing Annual Report ii Contacts This report was prepared by the staff of the Renewables and Uranium Statistics Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables, and Uranium Statistics. Questions about the preparation and content of this report may be directed to Michele Simmons, Team Leader,

343

EIS-0126: Remedial Actions at the Former Climax Uranium Company Uranium Mill Site, Grand Junction, Mesa County, Colorado  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy developed this EIS to assess the environmental impacts of remediating the residual radioactive materials left from the inactive uranium processing site and associated properties located in Grand Junction, Colorado.

344

IPNS enriched uranium booster target  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since startup in 1981, IPNS has operated on a fully depleted /sup 238/U target. With the booster as in the present system, high energy protons accelerated to 450 MeV by the Rapid Cycling Synchrotron are directed at the target and by mechanisms of spallation and fission of the uranium, produce fast neutrons. The neutrons from the target pass into adjacent moderator where they slow down to energies useful for spectroscopy. The target cooling systems and monitoring systems have operated very reliably and safely during this period. To provide higher neutron intensity, we have developed plans for an enriched uranium (booster) target. HETC-VIM calculations indicate that the target will produce approx.90 kW of heat, with a nominal x5 gain (k/sub eff/ = 0.80). The neutron beam intensity gain will be a factor of approx.3. Thermal-hydraulic and heat transport calculations indicate that approx.1/2 in. thick /sup 235/U discs are subject to about the same temperatures as the present /sup 238/U 1 in. thick discs. The coolant will be light demineralized water (H/sub 2/O) and the coolant flow rate must be doubled. The broadening of the fast neutron pulse width should not seriously affect the neutron scattering experiments. Delayed neutrons will appear at a level about 3% of the total (currently approx.0.5%). This may affect backgrounds in some experiments, so that we are assessing measures to control and correct for this (e.g., beam tube choppers). Safety analyses and neutronic calculations are nearing completion. Construction of the /sup 235/U discs at the ORNL Y-12 facility is scheduled to begin late 1985. The completion of the booster target and operation are scheduled for late 1986. No enriched uranium target assembly operating at the projected power level now exists in the world. This effort thus represents an important technological experiment as well as being a ''flux enhancer''.

Schulke, A.W. Jr.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Environmental consequences of postulate plutonium releases from Atomics International's Nuclear Materials Development Facility (NMDF), Santa Susana, California, as a result of severe natural phenomena  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Potential environmental consequences in terms of radiation dose to people are presented for postulated plutonium releases caused by severe natural phenomena at the Atomics International's Nuclear Materials Development Facility (NMDF), in the Santa Susana site, California. The severe natural phenomena considered are earthquakes, tornadoes, and high straight-line winds. Plutonium deposition values are given for significant locations around the site. All important potential exposure pathways are examined. The most likely 50-year committed dose equivalents are given for the maximum-exposed individual and the population within a 50-mile radius of the plant. The maximum plutonium deposition values likely to occur offsite are also given. The most likely calculated 50-year collective committed dose equivalents are all much lower than the collective dose equivalent expected from 50 years of exposure to natural background radiation and medical x-rays. The most likely maximum residual plutonium contamination estimated to be deposited offsite following the earthquake, and the 150-mph and 170-mph tornadoes are above the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) proposed guideline for plutonium in the general environment of 0.2 ..mu..Ci/m/sup 2/. The deposition values following the 110-mph and the 130-mph tornadoes are below the EPA proposed guideline.

Jamison, J.D.; Watson, E.C.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Toda Cathode Materials Production Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Europe Toda America Inc. Company Profile 6 7 Project Milestones In commercial production ISO 9001 Certified Milestone Status Target Dates DOE Award Announcement August 2009 DOE...

347

Toda Cathode Materials Production Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

348

Thorium, uranium and rare earth elements content in lanthanide concentrate (LC) and water leach purification (WLP) residue of Lynas advanced materials plant (LAMP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lynas Advanced Materials Plant (LAMP) has been licensed to produce the rare earths elements since early 2013 in Malaysia. LAMP processes lanthanide concentrate (LC) to extract rare earth elements and subsequently produce large volumes of water leach purification (WLP) residue containing naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). This residue has been rising up the environmental issue because it was suspected to accumulate thorium with significant activity concentration and has been classified as radioactive residue. The aim of this study is to determine Th-232, U-238 and rare earth elements in lanthanide concentrate (LC) and water leach purification (WLP) residue collected from LAMP and to evaluate the potential radiological impacts of the WLP residue on the environment. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis and ?-spectrometry were used for determination of Th, U and rare earth elements concentrations. The results of this study found that the concentration of Th in LC was 1289.7 129 ppm (5274.9 527.6Bq/kg) whereas the Th and U concentrations in WLP were determined to be 1952.917.6 ppm (7987.4 71.9 Bq/kg) and 17.2 2.4 ppm respectively. The concentrations of Th and U in LC and WLP samples determined by ?- spectrometry were 1156 ppm (4728 22 Bq/kg) and 18.8 ppm and 1763.2 ppm (7211.4 Bq/kg) and 29.97 ppm respectively. This study showed that thorium concentrations were higher in WLP compare to LC. This study also indicate that WLP residue has high radioactivity of {sup 232}Th compared to Malaysian soil natural background (63 - 110 Bq/kg) and come under preview of Act 304 and regulations. In LC, the Ce and Nd concentrations determined by INAA were 13.2 0.6% and 4.7 0.1% respectively whereas the concentrations of La, Ce, Nd and Sm in WLP were 0.36 0.04%, 1.6%, 0.22% and 0.06% respectively. This result showed that some amount of rare earth had not been extracted and remained in the WLP and may be considered to be reextracted.

AL-Areqi, Wadeeah M., E-mail: walareqi@yahoo.com; Majid, Amran Ab., E-mail: walareqi@yahoo.com; Sarmani, Sukiman, E-mail: walareqi@yahoo.com [Nuclear Science Programme, School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi (Malaysia)

2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

349

Uranium in the Oatman Creek granite of Central Texas and its economic potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

granitic rocks are enriched in uranium. Although at present uranium in granites cannot b compared w1th the h1gh grade concentrat1ons of uran1um in sedimentary rocks, as these h1gh grade ore deposits become depleted, however, gr anites will become a..., however, the need to explore for new materials containing uranium will incr ease as the high grade sedimentary uranium deposits become depleted. A logical place to begin this search lies with the source rock for many of the known sedimentary uranium...

Conrad, Curtis Paul

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

350

Integrated Facilities Disposition Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Facilities Facilities Disposition Program Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting at ORNL Sharon Robinson Dirk Van Hoesen Robert Jubin Brad Patton July 29, 2009 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy The Integrated Facility Disposition Program (IFDP) addresses the remaining EM Scope at both ORNL and Y-12 Cost Range: $7 - $14B Schedule: 26 Years 3 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Scope of work * Treatment and disposition of legacy materials and waste * D&D 327 (1.5 M ft 2 ) excess facilities generating >2 M yd 3 debris * Soil and groundwater remedial actions generating >1 M yd 3 soils * Facilities surveillance and maintenance * Reconfiguration of waste management facilities * Ongoing waste management operations * Project management

351

Evaluation of special nuclear material monitoring instruments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A statistical method to protect against the loss of strategic special nuclear material (SSNM) is presented. A simplified step by step approach to the test procedure is described. Strategic special nuclear material (SSNM) is protected using several layers of physical and administrative controls. In a facility having both enriched and depleted uranium, extensive control is exercised to prevent a diversion of the SSNM, but assurance must also be provided that depleted material is not being removed inasmuch as its low would indicate the possible loss of SSNM through surreptitious substitution. One option for identifying loss of material is to place walkthrough monitors at the pedestrian exits leaving the perimeter of the security boundary enclosing the uranium processing area. Within this security perimeter are the SSNM areas having tight control and restricted access. The monitors for the SSNM are within buildings and are in the benign environment of a working area. Perimeter monitors on the other hand are located at the boundary rotogates and are subject to the ambient conditions varying with the seasons.

Bowman, K.O. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA). Mathematical Sciences Section); Wallace, S.A. (Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (USA))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

MANAGING BERYLLIUM IN NUCLEAR FACILITY APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Beryllium plays important roles in nuclear facilities. Its neutron multiplication capability and low atomic weight make it very useful as a reflector in fission reactors. Its low atomic number and high chemical affinity for oxygen have led to its consideration as a plasma-facing material in fusion reactors. In both applications, the beryllium and the impurities in it become activated by neutrons, transmuting them to radionuclides, some of which are long-lived and difficult to dispose of. Also, gas production, notably helium and tritium, results in swelling, embrittlement, and cracking, which means that the beryllium must be replaced periodically, especially in fission reactors where dimensional tolerances must be maintained. It has long been known that neutron activation of inherent iron and cobalt in the beryllium results in significant {sup 60}Co activity. In 2001, it was discovered that activation of naturally occurring contaminants in the beryllium creates sufficient {sup 14}C and {sup 94}Nb to render the irradiated beryllium 'Greater-Than-Class-C' for disposal in U.S. radioactive waste facilities. It was further found that there was sufficient uranium impurity in beryllium that had been used in fission reactors up to that time that the irradiated beryllium had become transuranic in character, making it even more difficult to dispose of. In this paper we review the extent of the disposal issue, processes that have been investigated or considered for improving the disposability of irradiated beryllium, and approaches for recycling.

R. Rohe; T. N. Tranter

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Nuclear fuel cycle facility accident analysis handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Handbook is to provide guidance on how to calculate the characteristics of releases of radioactive materials and/or hazardous chemicals from nonreactor nuclear facilities. In addition, the Handbook provides guidance on how to calculate the consequences of those releases. There are four major chapters: Hazard Evaluation and Scenario Development; Source Term Determination; Transport Within Containment/Confinement; and Atmospheric Dispersion and Consequences Modeling. These chapters are supported by Appendices, including: a summary of chemical and nuclear information that contains descriptions of various fuel cycle facilities; details on how to calculate the characteristics of source terms for releases of hazardous chemicals; a comparison of NRC, EPA, and OSHA programs that address chemical safety; a summary of the performance of HEPA and other filters; and a discussion of uncertainties. Several sample problems are presented: a free-fall spill of powder, an explosion with radioactive release; a fire with radioactive release; filter failure; hydrogen fluoride release from a tankcar; a uranium hexafluoride cylinder rupture; a liquid spill in a vitrification plant; and a criticality incident. Finally, this Handbook includes a computer model, LPF No.1B, that is intended for use in calculating Leak Path Factors. A list of contributors to the Handbook is presented in Chapter 6. 39 figs., 35 tabs.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. U.S. uranium mills by owner, location, capacity, and operating status at end of the year, 2008-2012 4. U.S. uranium mills by owner, location, capacity, and operating status at end of the year, 2008-2012 Mill Owner Mill Name County, State (existing and planned locations) Milling Capacity (short tons of ore per day) Operating Status at End of the Year 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Cotter Corporation Canon City Mill Fremont, Colorado 0 Standby Standby Standby Reclamation Demolished Denison White Mesa LLC White Mesa Mill San Juan, Utah 2,000 Operating Operating Operating Operating Operating Energy Fuels Resources Corporation Piñon Ridge Mill Montrose, Colorado 500 Developing Developing Developing Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Kennecott Uranium Company/Wyoming Coal Resource Company Sweetwater Uranium Project Sweetwater, Wyoming 3,000 Standby Standby Standby Standby Standby

355

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

6. Employment in the U.S. uranium production industry by category, 2003-13 person-years Year Exploration Mining Milling Processing Reclamation Total 2003 W W W W 117 321 2004 18...

356

Uranium Marketing Annual Report -  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1. Foreign sales of uranium from U.S. suppliers and owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by origin and delivery year, 2009-13 thousands pounds U3O8...

357

Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a. Uranium purchased by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, 1994-2013 million pounds U3O8 equivalent Delivery year Total purchased Purchased from U.S....

358

Uranium Marketing Annual Report -  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9. Contracted purchases of uranium by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, signed in 2013, by delivery year, 2014-23 thousand pounds U3O8 equivalent Year...

359

Uranium purchases report 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data reported by domestic nuclear utility companies in their responses to the 1991 through 1993 ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey,`` Form EIA-858, Schedule B,`` Uranium Marketing Activities,`` are provided in response to the requirements in the Energy Policy Act 1992. Appendix A contains an explanation of Form EIA-858 survey methodologies with emphasis on the processing of Schedule B data. Additional information published in this report not included in Uranium Purchases Report 1992, includes a new data table. Presented in Table 1 are US utility purchases of uranium and enrichment services by origin country. Also, this report contains additional purchase information covering average price and contract duration. Table 2 is an update of Table 1 and Table 3 is an update of Table 2 from the previous year`s report. The report contains a glossary of terms.

Not Available

1994-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

360

Uranium purchases report 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

US utilities are required to report to the Secretary of Energy annually the country of origin and the seller of any uranium or enriched uranium purchased or imported into the US, as well as the country of origin and seller of any enrichment services purchased by the utility. This report compiles these data and also contains a glossary of terms and additional purchase information covering average price and contract duration. 3 tabs.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium materials facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Working with SRNL - Our Facilities - EMRL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Materials Research Laboratory High temperature salt corrosion - SunShot Hollow-glass Microspheres Working with SRNL Our Facilities - Energy Materials Research Laboratory...

362

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10. Uranium reserve estimates at the end of 2012 10. Uranium reserve estimates at the end of 2012 million pounds U3O8 Forward Cost2 Uranium Reserve Estimates1 by Mine and Property Status, Mining Method, and State(s) $0 to $30 per pound $0 to $50 per pound $0 to $100 per pound Properties with Exploration Completed, Exploration Continuing, and Only Assessment Work W W 102.0 Properties Under Development for Production W W W Mines in Production W 21.4 W Mines Closed Temporarily and Closed Permanently W W 133.1 In-Situ Leach Mining W W 128.6 Underground and Open Pit Mining W W 175.4 Arizona, New Mexico and Utah 0 W 164.7 Colorado, Nebraska and Texas W W 40.8 Wyoming W W 98.5 Total 51.8 W 304.0 1 Sixteen respondents reported reserve estimates on 71 mines and properties. These uranium reserve estimates cannot be compared with the much larger historical data set of uranium reserves that were published in the July 2010 report U.S. Uranium Reserves Estimates at http://www.eia.gov/cneaf/nuclear/page/reserves/ures.html. Reserves, as reported here, do not necessarily imply compliance with U.S. or Canadian government definitions for purposes of investment disclosure.

363

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Technology Deployment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering Sciences Experimental Facilities (ESEF) Engineering Sciences Experimental Facilities (ESEF) Technology Deployment Centers Advanced Power Sources Laboratory Engineering Sciences Experimental Facilities (ESEF) Trisonic Wind Tunnel Hypersonic Wind Tunnel High Altitude Chamber Explosive Components Facility Ion Beam Laboratory Materials Science and Engineering Center Pulsed Power and Systems Validation Facility Radiation Detection Materials Characterization Laboratory Shock Thermodynamic Applied Research Facility (STAR) Weapon and Force Protection Center Design, Evaluation and Test Technology Facility Research Engineering Sciences Experimental Facilities (ESEF) The ESEF complex contains several independent laboratories for experiments and advanced diagnostics in the fields of thermodynamics, heat transfer,

364

FAQ 5-Is uranium radioactive?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Is uranium radioactive? Is uranium radioactive? Is uranium radioactive? All isotopes of uranium are radioactive, with most having extremely long half-lives. Half-life is a measure of the time it takes for one half of the atoms of a particular radionuclide to disintegrate (or decay) into another nuclear form. Each radionuclide has a characteristic half-life. Half-lives vary from millionths of a second to billions of years. Because radioactivity is a measure of the rate at which a radionuclide decays (for example, decays per second), the longer the half-life of a radionuclide, the less radioactive it is for a given mass. The half-life of uranium-238 is about 4.5 billion years, uranium-235 about 700 million years, and uranium-234 about 25 thousand years. Uranium atoms decay into other atoms, or radionuclides, that are also radioactive and commonly called "decay products." Uranium and its decay products primarily emit alpha radiation, however, lower levels of both beta and gamma radiation are also emitted. The total activity level of uranium depends on the isotopic composition and processing history. A sample of natural uranium (as mined) is composed of 99.3% uranium-238, 0.7% uranium-235, and a negligible amount of uranium-234 (by weight), as well as a number of radioactive decay products.

365

Dissolution rates of uranium compounds in simulated lung fluid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Maximum dissolution rates of uranium into simulated lung fluid from a variety of materials were measured at 37/sup 0/in the where f/sub i/ is in order to estimate clearance rates from the deep lung. A batch procedure was utilized in which samples containing as little as 10 ..mu..g of natural uranium could be tested. The materials included: products of uranium mining, milling and refining operations, coal fly ash, an environmental sample from a site exposed to multiple uranium sources, and purified samples of (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/U/sub 2/O/sub 7/ U/sub 3/O/sub 8/, UO/sub 2/, and UF/sub 4/. Dissolution of uranium from several materials indicated the presence of more than one type of uranium compound; but in all cases, the fraction F of uranium remaining undissolved at any time t could be represented by the sum of up to three terms in the series: F = ..sigma../sub i/f/sub i/ exp (-0.693t/UPSILON/sub i/), where f/sub i/ is the initial fraction of component i with dissolution half-time epsilon/sub i/. Values of epsilon/sub i/ varied from 0.01 day to several thousand days depending on the physical and chemical form of the uranium. Dissolution occurred predominantly by formation of the (UO/sub 2/(CO/sub 3/)/sub 3/)/sup 4 -/ ion; and as a result, tetravalent uranium compounds dissolved slowly. Dissolution rates of size-separated yellow-cake aerosols were found to be more closely correlated with specific surface area than with aerodynamic diameter.

Kalkwarf, D.R.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Depleted Uranium Uses: Regulatory Requirements and Issues  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 Depleted Uranium Uses Depleted Uranium Uses Regulatory Requirements Regulatory Requirements and Issues and Issues Nancy L. Ranek Nancy L. Ranek Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory August 5, 1998 August 5, 1998 Beneficial Reuse '98 Beneficial Reuse '98 Knoxville, TN Knoxville, TN NOTES Work Performed for: Office of Facilities (NE-40) Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology U.S. Department of Energy Work Performed by: Environmental Assessment Division Argonne National Laboratory 955 L'Enfant Plaza North, S.W. Washington, D.C. 20024 Phone: 202/488-2417 E-mail: ranekn@smtplink.dis.anl.gov 2 2 2 Programmatic Environmental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) Impact Statement (PEIS) Draft PEIS Published 12/97 * Preferred Alternative = 100% Use

367

FAQ 27-Are there any currently-operating disposal facilities that can  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

currently-operating disposal facilities that can accept all of the depleted uranium oxide that would be generated from conversion of DOE's depleted UF6 inventory? currently-operating disposal facilities that can accept all of the depleted uranium oxide that would be generated from conversion of DOE's depleted UF6 inventory? Are there any currently-operating disposal facilities that can accept all of the depleted uranium oxide that would be generated from conversion of DOE's depleted UF6 inventory? With respect to available capacity, three sites could accept the entire inventory of depleted uranium oxide: the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford site in Washington State, DOE's Nevada Test Site, or EnergySolution Clive, Utah Facility, a commercial site. Each of these sites would have sufficient capacity for either the grouted or ungrouted oxide forms of depleted uranium (for the two DOE sites, this also takes into account other projected disposal volumes through the year 2070).

368

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Production Report Domestic Uranium Production Report 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 Activity at U.S. Mills and In-Situ-Leach Plants 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Ore from Underground Mines and Stockpiles Fed to Mills 1 0 W W W 0 W W W W W Other Feed Materials 2 W W W W W W W W W W Total Mill Feed W W W W W W W W W W (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) W W W W W W W W W W (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) W W W W W W W W W W (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) E2,000 2,282 2,689 4,106 4,534 3,902 3,708 4,228 3,991 4,146 (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) E1,600 2,280 2,702 3,838 4,050 4,130 3,620 5,137 4,000 3,911 Deliveries (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) W W W 3,786 3,602 3,656 2,044 2,684 2,870 3,630 Weighted-Average Price (dollars per pound U 3 O 8 ) W W W 28.98 42.11 43.81 36.61 37.59 52.36 49.63 Notes: The 2003 annual amounts were estimated by rounding to the nearest 200,000 pounds to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Totals may not equal sum of components

369

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Colonial Uranium Co - CO 10  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Colonial Uranium Co - CO 10 Colonial Uranium Co - CO 10 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Colonial Uranium Co. (CO.10 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Grand Junction , Colorado CO.10-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CO.10-2 Site Operations: Processed thorium concentrates for commercial market at another site. AEC purchased small quantity (100 lbs) for testing. CO.10-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - Commercial operation CO.10-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Thorium CO.10-1 Radiological Survey(s): No Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to Colonial Uranium Co. CO.10-1 - AEC Memorandum; Faulkner to Sapirie; Subject: Testing of

370

Barriers and Issues Related to Achieving Final Disposition of Depleted Uranium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately 750,000 metric tons (MT) of surplus depleted uranium (DU) in various chemical forms are stored at several Department of Energy (DOE) sites throughout the United States. Most of the DU is in the form of DU hexafluoride (DUF6) that resulted from uranium enrichment operations over the last several decades. DOE plans to convert the DUF6 to ''a more stable form'' that could be any one or combination of DU tetrafluoride (DUF4 or green salt), DU oxide (DUO3, DUO2, or DU3O8), or metal depending on the final disposition chosen for any given quantity. Barriers to final disposition of this material have existed historically and some continue today. Currently, the barriers are more related to finding uses for this material versus disposing as waste. Even though actions are beginning to convert the DUF6, ''final'' disposition of the converted material has yet to be decided. Unless beneficial uses can be implemented, DOE plans to dispose of this material as waste. This expresses the main barrier to DU disposition; DOE's strategy is to dispose unless uses can be found while the strategy should be only dispose as a last resort and make every effort to find uses. To date, only minimal research programs are underway to attempt to develop non-fuel uses for this material. Other issues requiring resolution before these inventories can reach final disposition (uses or disposal) include characterization, disposal of large quantities, storage (current and future), and treatment options. Until final disposition is accomplished, these inventories must be managed in a safe and environmentally sound manner; however, this is becoming more difficult as materials and facilities age. The most noteworthy final disposition technical issues include the development of reuse and treatment options.

Gillas, D. L.; Chambers, B. K.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

371

Controlling uranium reactivity March 18, 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the last decade. Most of their work involves depleted uranium, a more common form of uraniumMarch 2008 Controlling uranium reactivity March 18, 2008 Uranium is an often misunderstood metal uranium research. In reality, uranium presents a wealth of possibilities for funda- mental chemistry. Many

Meyer, Karsten

372

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

April 30, 2006 [Facility News] April 30, 2006 [Facility News] Disdrometer Joins Tipping Bucket to Improve Precipitation Measurements Bookmark and Share At the SGP site, the disdrometer is installed near the site's main instrument cluster, approximately 50 feet east of the Central Facility. To avoid secondary splash contamination, the disdrometer's sensor cone is surrounded by splash-resistant material. At the SGP site, the disdrometer is installed near the site's main instrument cluster, approximately 50 feet east of the Central Facility. To avoid secondary splash contamination, the disdrometer's sensor cone is surrounded by splash-resistant material. This spring, a pair of new distrometers began collecting data at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site and the ARM Darwin site in the Tropical

373

Innovative Elution Processes for Recovering Uranium from Seawater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utilizing amidoxime-based polymer sorbents for extraction of uranium from seawater has attracted considerable interest in recent years. Uranium collected in the sorbent is recovered typically by elution with an acid. One drawback of acid elution is deterioration of the sorbent which is a significant factor that limits the economic competitiveness of the amidoxime-based sorbent systems for sequestering uranium from seawater. Developing innovative elution processes to improve efficiency and to minimize loss of sorbent capacity become essential in order to make this technology economically feasible for large-scale industrial applications. This project has evaluated several elution processes including acid elution, carbonate elution, and supercritical fluid elution for recovering uranium from amidoxime-based polymer sorbents. The elution efficiency, durability and sorbent regeneration for repeated uranium adsorption- desorption cycles in simulated seawater have been studied. Spectroscopic techniques are used to evaluate chemical nature of the sorbent before and after elution. A sodium carbonate-hydrogen peroxide elution process for effective removal of uranium from amidoxime-based sorbent is developed. The cause of this sodium carbonate and hydrogen peroxide synergistic leaching of uranium from amidoxime-based sorbent is attributed to the formation of an extremely stable uranyl peroxo-carbonato complex. The efficiency of uranium elution by the carbonate-hydrogen peroxide method is comparable to that of the hydrochloric acid elution but damage to the sorbent material is much less for the former. The carbonate- hydrogen peroxide elution also does not need any elaborate step to regenerate the sorbent as those required for hydrochloric acid leaching. Several CO2-soluble ligands have been tested for extraction of uranium from the sorbent in supercritical fluid carbon dioxide. A mixture of hexafluoroacetylacetone and tri-n-butylphosphate shows the best result but uranium removal from the sorbent reaches only 80% after 10 hours of leaching. Some information regarding coordination of vanadium with amidoxime molecules and elution of vanadium from amidoxime- based sorbents is also given in the report.

Wai, Chien; Tian, Guoxin; Janke, Christopher

2014-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

374

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation.

1996-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

375

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation.

1995-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

376

Certified Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Industrial Leaders: The industrial facilities shown below are among the first to earn certification for Superior Energy Performance (SEP).

377

BNL | Research Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Brookhaven's Research Facilities Brookhaven's Research Facilities Tools of Discovery Brookhaven National Lab excels at the design, construction, and operation of large-scale, cutting-edge research facilities-some available nowhere else in the world. Each year, thousands of scientists from laboratories, universities, and industries around the world use these facilities to delve into the basic mysteries of physics, chemistry, biology, materials science, energy, and the environment-and develop innovative applications that arise, sometimes at the intersections of these disciplines. construction Brookhaven Lab is noted for the design, construction and operation of large-scale, cutting-edge research facilities that support thousands of scientists worldwide. RHIC tunnel Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

378

2013 Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

year, 2009-13 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-858 "Uranium Marketing Annual Survey" (2009-13). Table 19. Foreign purchases of uranium by U.S. suppliers...

379

SRS - Programs - H Area Nuclear Materials Disposition  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

H Area Nuclear Materials Disposition H Area Nuclear Materials Disposition The primary mission of the H-Canyon Complex is to dissolve, purify and blend-down surplus highly enriched uranium (HEU) and aluminum-clad foreign and domestic research reactor fuel to produce a low enriched uranium (LEU) solution suitable for conversion to commercial reactor fuel. A secondary mission for H-Canyon is to dissolve excess plutonium (Pu) not suitable for MOX and transfer it for vitrification in the Defense Waste Processing Facility at SRS. H Canyon was constructed in the early 1950s and began operations in 1955. The building is called a canyon because of its long rectangular shape and two continuous trenches that contains the process vessels. It is approximately 1,000 feet long with several levels to accommodate the various stages of material stabilization, including control rooms to monitor overall equipment and operating processes, equipment and piping gallery for solution transport, storage, and disposition, and unique overhead bridge cranes to support overall process operations. All work is remotely controlled, and employees are further protected from radiation by thick concrete walls.

380

Effect of twinning on texture evolution of depleted uranium using a viscoplastic self-consistent model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ductility and fracture toughness is a major stumbling block in using depleted uranium as a structural material. The ability to correctly model deformation of uranium can be used to create process path methods to improve its structural design ability. The textural evolution of depleted uranium was simulated using a visco-plastic self consistent model and analyzed by comparing pole figures of the simulations and experimental samples. Depleted uranium has the same structure as alpha uranium, which is an orthorhombic phase of uranium. Both deformation slip and twin systems were compared. The VPSC model was chosen to simulate this material because the model encompasses both low-symmetry materials as well as twinning in materials. This is of particular interest since depleted uranium has a high propensity for twinning, which dominates deformation and texture evolution. Simulated results were compared to experimental results to measure the validity of the model. One specific twin system, the {l_brace}176{r_brace}[512] twin, was of specific notice. The VPSC model was used to simulate the influence of this twin on depleted uranium and was compared with a mechanically shocked depleted uranium sample. Under high strain rate shock deformation conditions, the {l_brace}176{r_brace}[512] twin system appears to be a dominant deformation system. By simulating a compression process using the VPSC model with the {l_brace}176{r_brace}[512] twin as the dominant deformation mode, a favorable comparison could be made between the experimental and simulated textures. (authors)

Ho, J.; Garmestani, H. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0245 (United States); Burrell, R.; Belvin, A. [Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Li, D. [Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); McDowell, D. [Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Atlanta, GA 30332-0245 (United States); Rollett, A. [Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium materials facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Total production of uranium concentrate in the United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3. U.S. uranium mills and heap leach facilities by owner, location, capacity, and operating status 3. U.S. uranium mills and heap leach facilities by owner, location, capacity, and operating status Operating Status at the End of Owner Mill and Heap Leach1 Facility Name County, State (existing and planned locations) Capacity (short tons of ore per day) 2012 1st Quarter 2013 2nd Quarter 2013 3rd Quarter 2013 EFR White Mesa LLC White Mesa Mill San Juan, Utah 2,000 Operating Operating Operating Operating-Processing Alternate Feed Energy Fuels Resources Corporation Piñon Ridge Mill Montrose, Colorado 500 Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Permitted and Licensed Energy Fuels Wyoming Inc Sheep Mountain Fremont, Wyoming 725 - Undeveloped Undeveloped Undeveloped

382

Corrosion-resistant uranium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to the protecting of uranium and uranium alloy articles from corrosion by providing the surfaces of the articles with a layer of an ion-plated metal selected from aluminum and zinc to a thickness of at least 60 microinches and then converting at least the outer surface of the ion-plated layer of aluminum or zinc to aluminum chromate or zinc chromate. This conversion of the aluminum or zinc to the chromate form considerably enhances the corrosion resistance of the ion plating so as to effectively protect the coated article from corrosion.

Hovis, Jr., Victor M. (Kingston, TN); Pullen, William C. (Knoxville, TN); Kollie, Thomas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bell, Richard T. (Knoxville, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Corrosion-resistant uranium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to the protecting of uranium and uranium alloy articles from corrosion by providing the surfaces of the articles with a layer of an ion-plated metal selected from aluminum and zinc to a thickness of at least 60 microinches and then converting at least the outer surface of the ion-plated layer of aluminum or zinc to aluminum chromate or zinc chromate. This conversion of the aluminum or zinc to the chromate form considerably enhances the corrosion resistance of the ion plating so as to effectively protect the coated article from corrosion.

Hovis, V.M. Jr.; Pullen, W.C.; Kollie, T.G.; Bell, R.T.

1981-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

384

Final Safety Evaluation Report to license the construction and operation of a facility to receive, store, and dispose of 11e.(2) byproduct material near Clive, Utah (Docket No. 40-8989)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Final Safety Evaluation Report (FSER) summarizes the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff`s review of Envirocare of Utah, Inc.`s (Envirocare`s) application for a license to receive, store, and dispose of uranium and thorium byproduct material (as defined in Section 11e.(2) of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended) at a site near Clive, Utah. Envirocare proposes to dispose of high-volume, low-activity Section 11e.(2) byproduct material in separate earthen disposal cells on a site where the applicant currently disposes of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), low-level waste, and mixed waste under license by the Utah Department of Environmental Quality. The NRC staff review of the December 23, 1991, license application, as revised by page changes dated July 2 and August 10, 1992, April 5, 7, and 10, 1993, and May 3, 6, 7, 11, and 21, 1993, has identified open issues in geotechnical engineering, water resources protection, radon attenuation, financial assurance, and radiological safety. The NRC will not issue a license for the proposed action until Envirocare adequately resolves these open issues.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Remediation and Recycling of Linde FUSRAP Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During World War II, the Manhattan Engineering District (MED) utilized facilities in the Buffalo, New York area to extract natural uranium from uranium-bearing ores. The Linde property is one of several properties within the Tonawanda, New York Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) site, which includes Linde, Ashland 1, Ashland 2, and Seaway. Union Carbide Corporation's Linde Division was placed under contract with the Manhattan Engineering District (MED) from 1942 to 1946 to extract uranium from seven different ore sources: four African pitchblende ores and three domestic ores. Over the years, erosion and weathering have spread contamination from the residuals handled and disposed of at Linde to adjacent soils. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) negotiated a Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) governing remediation of the Linde property. In Fiscal Year (FY) 1998, Congress transferred cleanup management responsibility for the sites in the FUSRAP program, including the Linde Site, from the DOE to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), with the charge to commence cleanup promptly. All actions by the USACE at the Linde Site are being conducted subject to the administrative, procedural, and regulatory provisions of the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the existing FFA. USACE issued a Proposed Plan for the Linde Property in 1999 and a Final Record of Decision (ROD) in 2000. USACE worked with the local community near the Tonawanda site, and after considering public comment, selected the remedy calling for removing soils that exceed the site-specific cleanup standard, and transporting the contaminated material to off-site locations. The selected remedy is protective of human health and the environment, complies with Federal and State requirements, and meets commitments to the community.

Coutts, P. W.; Franz, J. P.; Rehmann, M. R.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

386

Sandia National Laboratories: National Solar Thermal Test Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Funding Award On June 4, 2014, in Advanced Materials Laboratory, Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Energy Storage, Facilities, National Solar Thermal Test Facility,...

387

NNSA B-Roll: MOX Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1999, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) signed a contract with a consortium, now called Shaw AREVA MOX Services, LLC to design, build, and operate a Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility. This facility will be a major component in the United States program to dispose of surplus weapon-grade plutonium. The facility will take surplus weapon-grade plutonium, remove impurities, and mix it with uranium oxide to form MOX fuel pellets for reactor fuel assemblies. These assemblies will be irradiated in commercial nuclear power reactors.

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

388

Sampling Plan for Assaying Plates Containing Depleted or Normal Uranium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the rationale behind the proposed method for selecting a 'representative' sample of uranium metal plates, portions of which will be destructively assayed at the Y-12 Security Complex. The total inventory of plates is segregated into two populations, one for Material Type 10 (depleted uranium (DU)) and one for Material Type 81 (normal [or natural] uranium (NU)). The plates within each population are further stratified by common dimensions. A spreadsheet gives the collective mass of uranium element (and isotope for DU) and the piece count of all plates within each stratum. These data are summarized in Table 1. All plates are 100% uranium metal, and all but approximately 60% of the NU plates have Kel-F{reg_sign} coating. The book inventory gives an overall U-235 isotopic percentage of 0.22% for the DU plates, ranging from 0.19% to 0.22%. The U-235 ratio of the NU plates is assumed to be 0.71%. As shown in Table 1, the vast majority of the plates are comprised of depleted uranium, so most of the plates will be sampled from the DU population.

Ivan R. Thomas

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

DOE Issues Request for Quotations for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Issues Request for Quotations for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Issues Request for Quotations for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Technical Services DOE Issues Request for Quotations for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Technical Services December 12, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor, 803-952-8564 bill.taylor@srs.gov Cincinnati - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Request for Quotation (RFQ) for engineering and operations technical services to support the Portsmouth Paducah Project Office and the oversight of operations of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Conversion Project located in Paducah KY, and Portsmouth OH. The RFQ is for a Time-and-Materials Task Order for three years with two one-year option periods. The estimated contract value is approximately $15 - 20 million.

390

DOE Issues Request for Quotations for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Issues Request for Quotations for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Issues Request for Quotations for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Technical Services DOE Issues Request for Quotations for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Technical Services December 12, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor, 803-952-8564 bill.taylor@srs.gov Cincinnati - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Request for Quotation (RFQ) for engineering and operations technical services to support the Portsmouth Paducah Project Office and the oversight of operations of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Conversion Project located in Paducah KY, and Portsmouth OH. The RFQ is for a Time-and-Materials Task Order for three years with two one-year option periods. The estimated contract value is approximately $15 - 20 million.

391

Fabrication and Characterization of Uranium-based High Temperature Reactor  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fabrication and Characterization of Uranium-based High Temperature Reactor Fabrication and Characterization of Uranium-based High Temperature Reactor Fuel June 01, 2013 The Uranium Fuel Development Laboratory is a modern R&D scale lab for the fabrication and characterization of uranium-based high temperature reactor fuel. A laboratory-scale coater manufactures tri-isotropic (TRISO) coated fuel particles (CFPs), state-of-the-art materials property characterization is performed, and the CFPs are then pressed into fuel compacts for irradiation testing, all under a NQA-1 compliant Quality Assurance Program. After fuel kernel size and shape are measured by optical shadow imaging, the TRISO coatings are deposited via fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition in a 50-mm diameter conical chamber within the coating furnace. Computer control of temperature and gas composition ensures reproducibility

392

Interim Safety Basis for Fuel Supply Shutdown Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This ISB, in conjunction with the IOSR, provides the required basis for interim operation or restrictions on interim operations and administrative controls for the facility until a SAR is prepared in accordance with the new requirements or the facility is shut down. It is concluded that the risks associated with tha current and anticipated mode of the facility, uranium disposition, clean up, and transition activities required for permanent closure, are within risk guidelines.

BENECKE, M.W.

2000-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

393

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 325 Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Applied Chemistry Laboratory (325 Facility) houses radiochemistry research, radioanalytical service, radiochemical process development, and hazardous and mixed hazardous waste treatment activities. The laboratories and specialized facilities enable work ranging from that with nonradioactive materials to work with picogram to kilogram quantities of fissionable materials and up to megacurie quantities of other radionuclides. The special facilities include two shielded hot-cell areas that provide for process development or analytical chemistry work with highly radioactive materials, and a waste treatment facility for processing hazardous, mixed, low-level, and transuranic wastes generated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Radioactive material storage and usage occur throughout the facility and include a large number of isotopes. This material is in several forms, including solid, liquid, particulate, and gas. Some of these materials are also heated during testing which can produce vapors. The research activities have been assigned to the following activity designations: High-Level Hot Cell, Hazardous Waste Treatment Unit, Waste Form Development, Special Testing Projects, Chemical Process Development, Analytical Hot Cell, and Analytical Chemistry. The following summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

394

Uranium Marketing Annual Report - Release Date: May 31, 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. Uranium purchased by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by origin and material type, 2012 deliveries 4. Uranium purchased by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by origin and material type, 2012 deliveries thousand pounds U3O8 equivalent; dollars per pound U3O8 equivalent Deliveries Uranium Concentrate Natural UF6 Enriched UF6 Natural UF6 and Enriched UF6 Total U.S.-Origin Uranium Purchases W W W W 9,807 Weighted-Average Price W W W W 59.44 Foreign-Origin Uranium Purchases W W W W 47,713 Weighted-Average Price W W W W 54.07 Total Purchases 28,642 W W 28,878 57,520 Weighted-Average Price 54.20 W W 55.80 54.99 W = Data withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Weighted-average prices are not adjusted for inflation. Natural UF6 is uranium hexafluoride. The natural UF6 and enriched UF6 quantity represents only the U3O8 equivalent uranium-component quantity specified in the contract for each delivery of natural UF6 and enriched UF6. The natural UF6 and enriched UF6 weighted-average price represent only the U3O8 equivalent uranium-component price specified in the contract for each delivery of natural UF6 and enriched UF6, and does not include the conversion service and enrichment service components.

395

Nuclear Fuel Facts: Uranium | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Uranium Management and Uranium Management and Policy » Nuclear Fuel Facts: Uranium Nuclear Fuel Facts: Uranium Nuclear Fuel Facts: Uranium Uranium is a silvery-white metallic chemical element in the periodic table, with atomic number 92. It is assigned the chemical symbol U. A uranium atom has 92 protons and 92 electrons, of which 6 are valence electrons. Uranium has the highest atomic weight (19 kg m) of all naturally occurring elements. Uranium occurs naturally in low concentrations in soil, rock and water, and is commercially extracted from uranium-bearing minerals such as uraninite. Uranium ore can be mined from open pits or underground excavations. The ore can then be crushed and treated at a mill to separate the valuable uranium from the ore. Uranium may also be dissolved directly from the ore deposits

396

Uranium from Seawater Program Review; Fuel Resources Uranium from Seawater Program DOE Office of Nuclear Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For nuclear energy to remain sustainable in the United States, economically viable sources of uranium beyond terrestrial ores must be developed. The goal of this program is to develop advanced adsorbents that can extract uranium from seawater at twice the capacity of the best adsorbent developed by researchers at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1.5 mg U/g adsorbent. A multidisciplinary team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and the University of Texas at Austin was assembled to address this challenging problem. Polymeric adsorbents, based on the radiation grafting of acrylonitrile and methacrylic acid onto high surface-area polyethylene fibers followed by conversion of the nitriles to amidoximes, have been developed. These poly(acrylamidoxime-co-methacrylic acid) fibers showed uranium adsorption capacities for the extraction of uranium from seawater that exceed 3 mg U/g adsorbent in testing at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Marine Sciences Laboratory. The essence of this novel technology lies in the unique high surface-area trunk material that considerably increases the grafting yield of functional groups without compromising its mechanical properties. This technology received an R&D100 Award in 2012. In addition, high surface area nanomaterial adsorbents are under development with the goal of increasing uranium adsorption capacity by taking advantage of the high surface areas and tunable porosity of carbon-based nanomaterials. Simultaneously, de novo structure-based computational design methods are being used to design more selective and stable ligands and the most promising candidates are being synthesized, tested and evaluated for incorporation onto a support matrix. Fundamental thermodynamic and kinetic studies are being carried out to improve the adsorption efficiency, the selectivity of uranium over other metals, and the stability of the adsorbents. Understanding the rate-limiting step of uranium uptake from seawater is also essential in designing an effective uranium recovery system. Finally, economic analyses have been used to guide these studies and highlight what parameters, such as capacity, recyclability, and stability, have the largest impact on the cost of extraction of uranium from seawater. Initially, the cost estimates by the JAEA for extraction of uranium from seawater with braided polymeric fibers functionalized with amidoxime ligands were evaluated and updated. The economic analyses were subsequently updated to reflect the results of this project while providing insight for cost reductions in the adsorbent development through cradle-to-grave case studies for the extraction process. This report highlights the progress made over the last three years on the design, synthesis, and testing of new materials to extract uranium for seawater. This report is organized into sections that highlight the major research activities in this project: (1) Chelate Design and Modeling, (2) Thermodynamics, Kinetics and Structure, (3) Advanced Polymeric Adsorbents by Radiation Induced Grafting, (4) Advanced Nanomaterial Adsorbents, (5) Adsorbent Screening and Modeling, (6) Marine Testing, and (7) Cost and Energy Assessment. At the end of each section, future research directions are briefly discussed to highlight the challenges that still remain to reduce the cost of extractions of uranium for seawater. Finally, contributions from the Nuclear Energy University Programs (NEUP), which complement this research program, are included at the end of this report.

none,

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

April 30, 2008 [Facility News] April 30, 2008 [Facility News] ARM Outreach Materials Chosen for Earth Day Display in Washington DC Bookmark and Share Posters for the ARM Mobile Facility and ARM Education and Outreach were selected for the 2008 Earth Day display at DOE Headquarters. Posters for the ARM Mobile Facility and ARM Education and Outreach were selected for the 2008 Earth Day display at DOE Headquarters. Earth Day is officially honored each year on April 22, however, many groups sponsor activities throughout the entire month of April. At DOE Headquarters in Washington DC, two ARM posters were selected to join a poster display representing programs from numerous DOE offices. The display was featured in the Forrestal Building's ground-level and first floor lobby areas throughout the week of April 21. The posters were then displayed at

398

Progress in alkaline peroxide dissolution of low-enriched uranium metal and silicide targets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports recent progress on two alkaline peroxide dissolution processes: the dissolution of low-enriched uranium metal and silicide (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) targets. These processes are being developed to substitute low-enriched for high-enriched uranium in targets used for production of fission-product {sup 99}Mo. Issues that are addressed include (1) dissolution kinetics of silicide targets, (2) {sup 99}Mo lost during aluminum dissolution, (3) modeling of hydrogen peroxide consumption, (4) optimization of the uranium foil dissolution process, and (5) selection of uranium foil barrier materials. Future work associated with these two processes is also briefly discussed.

Chen, L.; Dong, D.; Buchholz, B.A.; Vandegrift, G.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.; Wu, D. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

399

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for Department of Energy facilities, which includes nuclear and explosives safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety, natural phenomena hazards mitigation, and the System Engineer Program. Cancels DOE O 420.1A. DOE O 420.1B Chg 1 issued 4-19-10.

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

400

Microstructure of depleted uranium under uniaxial strain conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Uranium samples of two different purities were used for spall strength measurements. Samples of depleted uranium were taken from very high purity material (38 ppm of carbon) and from material containing 280 ppm carbon. Experimental conditions were chosen to effectively arrest the microstructural damage at two places in the development to full spall separation. Samples were soft recovered and characterized with respect to the microstructure and the form of damage. This allowed determination of the dependence of spall mechanisms on stress level stress state and sample purity. This information is used in developing a model to predict the mode of fracture.

A. K. Zurek; J. D. Embury; A. Kelly; W. R. Thissell; R. L. Gustavsen; J. E. Vorthman; R. S. Hixson

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium materials facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

5.0 POTENTIAL ECOLOGICAL IMPACTS FROM URANIUM MINES This document has focused on the potential risks to humans from exposures to unreclaimed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5.0 POTENTIAL ECOLOGICAL IMPACTS FROM URANIUM MINES This document has focused on the potential risks to humans from exposures to unreclaimed uranium mining materials. The potential effects in the consideration of unreclaimed uranium mines. Although the Superfund characterization process includes

402

Mobile Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Facility Facility AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 2010 Graciosa Island, Azores, 2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, Germany, 2007 Niamey, Niger, 2006 Point Reyes, California, 2005 Mobile Facilities Pictured here in Gan, the second mobile facility is configured in a standard layout. Pictured here in Gan, the second mobile facility is configured in a standard layout. To explore science questions beyond those addressed by ARM's fixed sites at

403

Uranium enrichment management review: summary of analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In May 1980, the Assistant Secretary for Resource Applications within the Department of Energy requested that a group of experienced business executives be assembled to review the operation, financing, and management of the uranium enrichment enterprise as a basis for advising the Secretary of Energy. After extensive investigation, analysis, and discussion, the review group presented its findings and recommendations in a report on December 2, 1980. The following pages contain background material on which that final report was based. This report is arranged in chapters that parallel those of the uranium enrichment management review final report - chapters that contain summaries of the review group's discussion and analyses in six areas: management of operations and construction; long-range planning; marketing of enrichment services; financial management; research and development; and general management. Further information, in-depth analysis, and discussion of suggested alternative management practices are provided in five appendices.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Uranium Oxide Aerosol Transport in Porous Graphite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is to investigate the transport of uranium oxide particles that may be present in carbon dioxide (CO2) gas coolant, into the graphite blocks of gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. The transport of uranium oxide in the coolant system, and subsequent deposition of this material in the graphite, of such reactors is of interest because it has the potential to influence the application of the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM). The GIRM is a technology that has been developed to validate the declared operation of graphite moderated reactors. GIRM exploits isotopic ratio changes that occur in the impurity elements present in the graphite to infer cumulative exposure and hence the reactors lifetime cumulative plutonium production. Reference Gesh, et. al., for a more complete discussion on the GIRM technology.

Blanchard, Jeremy; Gerlach, David C.; Scheele, Randall D.; Stewart, Mark L.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Brown, Charles C.; Iovin, Cristian; Delegard, Calvin H.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Buck, Edgar C.; Riley, Brian J.; Burns, Carolyn A.

2012-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

405

file://\\\\fs-f1\\shared\\uranium\\uranium.html  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

The initial uranium property reserves estimates were based on bore hole radiometric data validated by chemical analysis of samples from cores and drill cuttings. The...

406

Method for fabricating uranium foils and uranium alloy foils  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of producing thin foils of uranium or an alloy. The uranium or alloy is cast as a plate or sheet having a thickness less than about 5 mm and thereafter cold rolled in one or more passes at substantially ambient temperatures until the uranium or alloy thereof is in the shape of a foil having a thickness less than about 1.0 mm. The uranium alloy includes one or more of Zr, Nb, Mo, Cr, Fe, Si, Ni, Cu or Al.

Hofman, Gerard L. (Downers Grove, IL); Meyer, Mitchell K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Knighton, Gaven C. (Moore, ID); Clark, Curtis R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2006-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

407

The assess facility descriptor module  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Facility Descriptor (Facility) module is part of the Analytic System and Software for Evaluating Safeguards and Security (ASSESS). Facility is the foundational software application in the ASSESS system for modelling a nuclear facility's safeguards and security system to determine the effectiveness against theft of special nuclear material. The Facility module provides the tools for an analyst to define a complete description of a facility's physical protection system which can then be used by other ASSESS software modules to determine vulnerability to a spectrum of insider and outsider threats. The analyst can enter a comprehensive description of the protection system layout including all secured areas, target locations, and detailed safeguards specifications. An extensive safeguard component catalog provides the reference data for calculating delay and detection performance. Multiple target locations within the same physical area may be specified, and the facility may be defined for two different operational states such as dayshift and nightshift. 6 refs., 5 figs.

Jordan, S.E.; Winblad, A.; Key, B.; Walker, S.; Renis, T.; Saleh, R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Sandia National Laboratories: Materials Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

20, 2013, in CINT, Facilities, Grid Integration, Infrastructure Security, Materials Science, Partnership, Research & Capabilities, Transmission Grid Integration The nation's...

409

Sandia National Laboratories: Materials Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Grid Integration, Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Facilities, Grid Integration, Infrastructure Security, Materials Science, News, News & Events,...

410

Measurements of CANDU lattice properties in the ZED-2 critical facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1960, the ZED-2 critical facility has performed lattice measurements on various designs of CANDU natural uranium fuel. An extensive database of measurements of properties of CANDU lattices has been developed.

Jones, R.T. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

411

The ultimate disposition of depleted uranium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant amounts of the depleted uranium (DU) created by past uranium enrichment activities have been sold, disposed of commercially, or utilized by defense programs. In recent years, however, the demand for DU has become quite small compared to quantities available, and within the US Department of Energy (DOE) there is concern for any risks and/or cost liabilities that might be associated with the ever-growing inventory of this material. As a result, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), was asked to review options and to develop a comprehensive plan for inventory management and the ultimate disposition of DU accumulated at the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs). An Energy Systems task team, under the chairmanship of T. R. Lemons, was formed in late 1989 to provide advice and guidance for this task. This report reviews options and recommends actions and objectives in the management of working inventories of partially depleted feed (PDF) materials and for the ultimate disposition of fully depleted uranium (FDU). Actions that should be considered are as follows. (1) Inspect UF{sub 6} cylinders on a semiannual basis. (2) Upgrade cylinder maintenance and storage yards. (3) Convert FDU to U{sub 3}O{sub 8} for long-term storage or disposal. This will include provisions for partial recovery of costs to offset those associated with DU inventory management and the ultimate disposal of FDU. Another recommendation is to drop the term tails'' in favor of depleted uranium'' or DU'' because the tails'' label implies that it is waste.'' 13 refs.

Not Available

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

MILDOS - A Computer Program for Calculating Environmental Radiation Doses from Uranium Recovery Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The MILDOS Computer Code estimates impacts from radioactive emissions from uranium milling facilities. These impacts are presented as dose commitments to individuals and the regional population within an 80 km radius of the facility. Only airborne releases of radioactive materials are considered: releases to surface water and to groundwater are not addressed in MILDOS. This code is multi-purposed and can be used to evaluate population doses for NEPA assessments, maximum individual doses for predictive 40 CFR 190 compliance evaluations, or maximum offsite air concentrations for predictive evaluations of 10 CFR 20 compliance. Emissions of radioactive materials from fixed point source locations and from area sources are modeled using a sector-averaged Gaussian plume dispersion model, which utilizes user-provided wind frequency data. Mechanisms such as deposition of particulates, resuspension. radioactive decay and ingrowth of daughter radionuclides are included in the transport model. Annual average air concentrations are computed, from which subsequent impacts to humans through various pathways are computed. Ground surface concentrations are estimated from deposition buildup and ingrowth of radioactive daughters. The surface concentrations are modified by radioactive decay, weathering and other environmental processes. The MILDOS Computer Code allows the user to vary the emission sources as a step function of time by adjustinq the emission rates. which includes shutting them off completely. Thus the results of a computer run can be made to reflect changing processes throughout the facility's operational lifetime. The pathways considered for individual dose commitments and for population impacts are: Inhalation External exposure from ground concentrations External exposure from cloud immersion Ingestioo of vegetables Ingestion of meat Ingestion of milk Dose commitments are calculated using dose conversion factors, which are ultimately based on recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). These factors are fixed internally in the code, and are not part of the input option. Dose commitments which are available from the code are as follows: Individual dose commitments for use in predictive 40 CFR 190 compliance evaluations (Radon and short-lived daughters are excluded) Total individual dose commitments (impacts from all available radionuclides are considered) Annual population dose commitments (regional, extraregional, total and cummulative). This model is primarily designed for uranium mill facilities, and should not be used for operations with different radionuclides or processes.

Strange, D. L.; Bander, T. J.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9. Summary production statistics of the U.S. uranium industry, 1993-2012 9. Summary production statistics of the U.S. uranium industry, 1993-2012 Item 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 E2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Exploration and Development Surface Drilling (million feet) 1.1 0.7 1.3 3.0 4.9 4.6 2.5 1.0 0.7 W W 1.2 1.7 2.7 5.1 5.1 3.7 4.9 6.3 7.2 Drilling Expenditures (million dollars)1 5.7 1.1 2.6 7.2 20.0 18.1 7.9 5.6 2.7 W W 10.6 18.1 40.1 67.5 81.9 35.4 44.6 53.6 66.6 Mine Production of Uranium (million pounds U3O8) 2.1 2.5 3.5 4.7 4.7 4.8 4.5 3.1 2.6 2.4 2.2 2.5 3.0 4.7 4.5 3.9 4.1 4.2 4.1 4.3 Uranium Concentrate Production (million pounds U3O8) 3.1 3.4 6.0 6.3 5.6 4.7 4.6 4.0 2.6 2.3 2.0 2.3 2.7 4.1 4.5 3.9 3.7 4.2 4.0 4.1

414

Total production of uranium concentrate in the United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. Number of uranium mills and plants producing uranium concentrate in the United States 2. Number of uranium mills and plants producing uranium concentrate in the United States Uranium Concentrate Processing Facilities End of 1996 End of 1997 End of 1998 End of 1999 End of 2000 End of 2001 End of 2002 End of 2003 End of 2004 End of 2005 End of 2006 End of 2007 End of 2008 End of 2009 End of 2010 End of 2011 End of 2012 End of 3rd Quarter 2013 Mills - conventional milling1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 Mills - other operators2 2 3 2 2 2 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 In-Situ-Leach Plants3 5 6 6 4 3 3 2 2 3 3 5 5 6 3 4 5 5 5 Byproduct Recovery Plants4 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total 9 11 9 7 6 4 3 2 3 4 6 6 7 4 5 6 6 6

415

Characterization of electron beam melted uranium - 6% niobium ingots  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study was undertaken at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to characterize uranium, 6{percent} niobium ingots produced via electron beam melting,hearth refining and continuous casting and to compare this material with conventional VIM/skull melt /VAR material. Samples of both the ingot and feed material were analyzed for niobium, trace metallic elements, carbon, oxygen and nitrogen. Ingot samples were also inspected metallographically and via microprobe analysis.

McKoon, R.H.

1997-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

416

Assessment of exposure to depleted uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......ingestion of natural uranium in food and drink, and...for the measurement of uranium in urine samples, DU...respect to potential health hazards can be detected...Assessment of exposure to depleted uranium. | In most circumstances......

P. Roth; V. Hllriegl; E. Werner; P. Schramel

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Assessment of exposure to depleted uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Article Assessment of exposure to depleted uranium P. Roth V. Hollriegl E. Werner...for determining the amount of depleted uranium (DU) incorporated. The problems...Assessment of exposure to depleted uranium. | In most circumstances......

P. Roth; V. Hllriegl; E. Werner; P. Schramel

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Specific Activity Specific Activity Low Specific Activity (LSA) material means Class 7 (radioactive) material with limited specific activity which satisfies the descriptions and limits set forth below. Shielding materials surrounding the LSA material may not be considered in determining the estimated average specific activity of the package contents. LSA material must be in one of three groups: LSA-I (i) Ores containing only naturally occurring radionuclides (e.g., uranium, thorium) and uranium or thorium concentrates of such ores; or (ii) Solid unirradiated natural uranium or depleted uranium or natural thorium or their solid or liquid compounds or mixtures; or (iii) Class 7 (radioactive) material, other than fissile material, for which the A2 value is unlimited; or

419

2013 Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

accounted for 32%. The remaining 16% originated from Brazil, China, Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Malawi, Namibia, Niger, Portugal, and South Africa. COOs purchased uranium...

420

U.S.Uranium Reserves  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

conditions. The uranium property reserves estimates were based on bore hole radiometric data validated by chemical analysis of samples from cores and drill cuttings. The...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium materials facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

2013 Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Note: Totals may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-858 "Uranium Marketing Annual Survey" (2013)....

422

2013 Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Industry Annual, Tables 10, 11 and 16. 2003-2013-Form EIA-858, "Uranium Marketing Annual Survey". million pounds U 3 O 8 equivalent 1 Includes purchases between...

423

3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: October 31, 2013 Next Release Date: February 2014 Mills - conventional milling 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 Mills - other operations 2 2 3 2 2 2 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 In-Situ-Leach Plants 3 5 6 6 4 3 3 2 2 3 3 5 5 6 3 4 5 5 5 Byproduct Recovery Plants 4 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total 9 11 9 7 6 4 3 2 3 4 6 6 7 4 5 6 6 6 End of 2005 End of 2006 End of 2007 End of 2008 End of 2009 3 Not including in-situ-leach plants that only produced uranium concentrate from restoration. 4 Uranium concentrate as a byproduct from phosphate production. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-851A and Form EIA-851Q, "Domestic Uranium Production Report." End of 2010 End of 2011 End of 2012 End of 3rd Quarter 2013 1 Milling uranium-bearing ore. 2 Not milling ore, but producing uranium concentrate from other (non-ore) materials.

424

Uranium Atoms Don't Share the Vibe  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Uranium Atoms Don't Share the Vibe Uranium Atoms Don't Share the Vibe Suppose you throw a rock into a pond, but instead of circular waves spreading across the surface, only a single bit of the surface at the rock's entry point oscillates up and down continuously. In the 31 March Physical Review Letters, researchers using the XOR 3-ID-C beamline at the APS report a surprising effect in a crystalline solid: a few-atom-wide vibration that refuses to spread through the material. The team probed heated uranium with x rays and neutrons to study the crystal's vibrations. Although predicted twenty years ago, the effect has never been conclusively seen in a three-dimensional crystal. The result seems to demonstrate the surprising ability of a uniform material to concentrate energy spontaneously. - JR Minkel

425

Depleted uranium as a backfill for nuclear fuel waste package  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for packaging spent nuclear fuel for long-term disposal in a geological repository. At least one spent nuclear fuel assembly is first placed in an unsealed waste package and a depleted uranium fill material is added to the waste package. The depleted uranium fill material comprises flowable particles having a size sufficient to substantially fill any voids in and around the assembly and contains isotopically-depleted uranium in the +4 valence state in an amount sufficient to inhibit dissolution of the spent nuclear fuel from the assembly into a surrounding medium and to lessen the potential for nuclear criticality inside the repository in the event of failure of the waste package. Last, the waste package is sealed, thereby substantially reducing the release of radionuclides into the surrounding medium, while simultaneously providing radiation shielding and increased structural integrity of the waste package.

Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Depleted uranium as a backfill for nuclear fuel waste package  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for packaging spent nuclear fuel for long-term disposal in a geological repository. At least one spent nuclear fuel assembly is first placed in an unsealed waste package and a depleted uranium fill material is added to the waste package. The depleted uranium fill material comprises flowable particles having a size sufficient to substantially fill any voids in and around the assembly and contains isotopically-depleted uranium in the +4 valence state in an amount sufficient to inhibit dissolution of the spent nuclear fuel from the assembly into a surrounding medium and to lessen the potential for nuclear criticality inside the repository in the event of failure of the waste package. Last, the waste package is sealed, thereby substantially reducing the release of radionuclides into the surrounding medium, while simultaneously providing radiation shielding and increased structural integrity of the waste package. 6 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.

1998-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

427

Assessment tool for nuclear material acquisition pathways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be obtained. The two types of material used in nuclear weapons are Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) and Plutonium (Pu). Uranium is an element found in nature and is contained in the soil all over the world. However, certain geological formations contain a... (LEU) portion of the network ..................................... 22 Figure 11 Last seciton of the Pu (LEU) portion of the network...................................... 23 Figure 12 Plutonium Section of the Network produced via Natural Uranium...

Ford, David Grant

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

428

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish facility safety requirements for the Department of Energy, including National Nuclear Security Administration. Cancels DOE O 420.1. Canceled by DOE O 420.1B.

2002-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

429

Marathon/Vitro to seek uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Marathon/Vitro to seek uranium ... Last week, Marathon Oil agreed with Vitro Corp. of America to explore jointly for uranium in North America. ...

1967-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

430