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1

FAQ 17-Where is uranium hexafluoride stored in the United States...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Where is uranium hexafluoride stored in the United States? Where is uranium hexafluoride stored in the United States? Most of the depleted UF6 accumulated since the 1940s is stored...

2

FAQ 22-What is going to happen to the uranium hexafluoride stored...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

going to happen to the uranium hexafluoride stored in the United States? What is going to happen to the uranium hexafluoride stored in the United States? The DOE has been...

3

What is going to happen to the uranium hexafluoride stored in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What is going to happen to the uranium hexafluoride stored in the United States? The DOE has been evaluating the alternative strategies for long-term management and use of the...

4

FAQ 16-How much depleted uranium hexafluoride is stored in the United  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How much depleted uranium hexafluoride is stored in the United States? How much depleted uranium hexafluoride is stored in the United States? How much depleted uranium hexafluoride is stored in the United States? U.S. DOE's inventory of depleted UF6 consists of approximately 700,000 metric tons of depleted UF6, containing about 470,000 metric tons of uranium, currently stored at the Paducah Site in Kentucky, the Portsmouth Site in Ohio, and the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Tennessee (formerly known as the K-25 Site). This inventory of depleted UF6 is stored in about 57,000 steel cylinders. The inventory is listed in the table below. DOE Inventory of Depleted UF6 Location Total Cylinders Total Depleted UF6 (metric tons) Paducah, Kentucky 36,191 436,400 Portsmouth, Ohio 16,109 195,800 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 4,822 54,300

5

Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OFFICE OF DEPLETED URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE MANAGEMENT Issuance Of Final Report On Preconceptual Designs For Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plants The Department of Energy...

6

Method of recovering uranium hexafluoride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of recovering uranium hexafluoride from gaseous mixtures which comprises adsorbing said uranium hexafluoride on activated carbon is described.

Schuman, S.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hexafluoride (UF6) Hexafluoride (UF6) Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6) line line Properties of UF6 UF6 Health Effects Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6) Physical and chemical properties of UF6, and its use in uranium processing. Uranium Hexafluoride and Its Properties Uranium hexafluoride is a chemical compound consisting of one atom of uranium combined with six atoms of fluorine. It is the chemical form of uranium that is used during the uranium enrichment process. Within a reasonable range of temperature and pressure, it can be a solid, liquid, or gas. Solid UF6 is a white, dense, crystalline material that resembles rock salt. UF6 crystals in a glass vial image UF6 crystals in a glass vial. Uranium hexafluoride does not react with oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, or dry air, but it does react with water or water vapor. For this reason,

8

FAQ 10-Why is uranium hexafluoride used?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

uranium hexafluoride used? Why is uranium hexafluoride used? Uranium hexafluoride is used in uranium processing because its unique properties make it very convenient. It can...

9

PREPARATION OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for preparing uranium hexafluoride from carbonate- leach uranium ore concentrate. The briquetted, crushed, and screened concentrate is reacted with hydrogen fluoride in a fluidized bed, and the uranium tetrafluoride formed is mixed with a solid diluent, such as calcium fluoride. This mixture is fluorinated with fluorine and an inert diluent gas, also in a fluidized bed, and the uranium hexafluoride obtained is finally purified by fractional distillation.

Lawroski, S.; Jonke, A.A.; Steunenberg, R.K.

1959-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Uranium hexafluoride handling. Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Field Office, and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., are co-sponsoring this Second International Conference on Uranium Hexafluoride Handling. The conference is offered as a forum for the exchange of information and concepts regarding the technical and regulatory issues and the safety aspects which relate to the handling of uranium hexafluoride. Through the papers presented here, we attempt not only to share technological advances and lessons learned, but also to demonstrate that we are concerned about the health and safety of our workers and the public, and are good stewards of the environment in which we all work and live. These proceedings are a compilation of the work of many experts in that phase of world-wide industry which comprises the nuclear fuel cycle. Their experience spans the entire range over which uranium hexafluoride is involved in the fuel cycle, from the production of UF{sub 6} from the naturally-occurring oxide to its re-conversion to oxide for reactor fuels. The papers furnish insights into the chemical, physical, and nuclear properties of uranium hexafluoride as they influence its transport, storage, and the design and operation of plant-scale facilities for production, processing, and conversion to oxide. The papers demonstrate, in an industry often cited for its excellent safety record, continuing efforts to further improve safety in all areas of handling uranium hexafluoride. Selected papers were processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

11

PROCESS FOR MAKING URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for producing uranium hexafluoride by reacting uranium hexachloride with hydrogen fluoride at a temperature below about 150 deg C, under anhydrous conditions.

Rosen, R.

1959-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

12

PRODUCTION OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the production of uranium hexafluoride from the oxides of uranium is reported. In accordance with the method, the higher oxides of uranium may be reduced to uranium dioxide (UO/sub 2/), the latter converted into uranium tetrafluoride by reaction with hydrogen fluoride, and the UF/sub 4/ converted to UF/sub 6/ by reaction with a fluorinating agent, such as CoF/sub 3/. The UO/sub 3/ or U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ is placed in a reac tion chamber in a copper boat or tray enclosed in a copper oven, and heated to 500 to 650 deg C while hydrogen gas is passed through the oven. After nitrogen gas is used to sweep out the hydrogen and the water vapor formed, and while continuing to inaintain the temperature between 400 deg C and 600 deg C, anhydrous hydrogen fluoride is passed through. After completion of the conversion of UO/sub 2/ to UF/sub 4/ the temperature of the reaction chamber is lowered to about 400 deg C or less, the UF/sub 4/ is mixed with the requisite quantity of CoF/sub 3/, and after evacuating the chamber, the mixture is heated to 300 to 400 deg C, and the resulting UF/sub 6/ is led off and delivered to a condenser.

Fowler, R.D.

1957-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

13

FAQ 11-What are the properties of uranium hexafluoride?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

properties of uranium hexafluoride? What are the properties of uranium hexafluoride? Uranium hexafluoride can be a solid, liquid, or gas, depending on its temperature and pressure....

14

Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for for DUF 6 Conversion Project Environmental Impact Statement Scoping Meetings November/December 2001 Overview Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF 6 ) Management Program DUF 6 EIS Scoping Briefing 2 DUF 6 Management Program Organizational Chart DUF 6 Management Program Organizational Chart EM-10 Policy EM-40 Project Completion EM-20 Integration EM-50 Science and Technology EM-31 Ohio DUF6 Management Program EM-32 Oak Ridge EM-33 Rocky Flats EM-34 Small Sites EM-30 Office of Site Closure Office of Environmental Management EM-1 DUF 6 EIS Scoping Briefing 3 DUF 6 Management Program DUF 6 Management Program * Mission: Safely and efficiently manage the DOE inventory of DUF 6 in a way that protects the health and safety of workers and the public, and protects the environment DUF 6 EIS Scoping Briefing 4 DUF 6 Inventory Distribution

15

Video: The Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Story  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Depleted UF6 Story The Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Story An overview of Uranium, its isotopes, the need and history of diffusive separation, the handling of the Depleted Uranium...

16

Uranium hexafluoride public risk  

SciTech Connect

The limiting value for uranium toxicity in a human being should be based on the concentration of uranium (U) in the kidneys. The threshold for nephrotoxicity appears to lie very near 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney tissue. There does not appear to be strong scientific support for any other improved estimate, either higher or lower than this, of the threshold for uranium nephrotoxicity in a human being. The value 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney is the concentration that results from a single intake of about 30 mg soluble uranium by inhalation (assuming the metabolism of a standard person). The concentration of uranium continues to increase in the kidneys after long-term, continuous (or chronic) exposure. After chronic intakes of soluble uranium by workers at the rate of 10 mg U per week, the concentration of uranium in the kidneys approaches and may even exceed the nephrotoxic limit of 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney tissue. Precise values of the kidney concentration depend on the biokinetic model and model parameters assumed for such a calculation. Since it is possible for the concentration of uranium in the kidneys to exceed 3 {mu}g per gram tissue at an intake rate of 10 mg U per week over long periods of time, we believe that the kidneys are protected from injury when intakes of soluble uranium at the rate of 10 mg U per week do not continue for more than two consecutive weeks. For long-term, continuous occupational exposure to low-level, soluble uranium, we recommend a reduced weekly intake limit of 5 mg uranium to prevent nephrotoxicity in workers. Our analysis shows that the nephrotoxic limit of 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney tissues is not exceeded after long-term, continuous uranium intake at the intake rate of 5 mg soluble uranium per week.

Fisher, D.R.; Hui, T.E.; Yurconic, M.; Johnson, J.R.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Health Effects Associated with Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hexafluoride (UF6) UF6 Health Effects Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6) line line Properties of UF6 UF6 Health Effects Health Effects Associated with Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6) Uranium...

18

FAQ 14-What does a depleted uranium hexafluoride cylinder look...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

depleted uranium hexafluoride cylinder look like? What does a depleted uranium hexafluoride cylinder look like? A picture is worth a thousand words The pictures below show typical...

19

Audit Report on "Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion," DOE...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Audit Report on "Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion," DOEIG-0642 Audit Report on "Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride...

20

Follow-up of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion, IG-0751...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Follow-up of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion, IG-0751 Follow-up of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium hexafluoride stored" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

FAQ 12-What are the hazards associated with uranium hexafluoride...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hazards associated with uranium hexafluoride? What are the hazards associated with uranium hexafluoride? The characteristics of UF6 pose potential health risks, and the material is...

22

PROCESS FOR PRODUCING URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the production of uranium hexafluoride from the oxides of uranium is reported. In accordance with the method the higher oxides of uranium may be reduced to uranium dioxide (UO/sub 2/), the latter converted into uranium tetrafluoride by reaction with hydrogen fluoride, and the UF/sub 4/ convented to UF/sub 6/ by reaction with a fluorinating agent. The UO/sub 3/ or U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ is placed in a reaction chamber in a copper boat or tray enclosed in a copper oven, and heated to 500 to 650 deg C while hydrogen gas is passed through the oven. The oven is then swept clean of hydrogen and the water vapor formed by means of nitrogen and then while continuing to maintain the temperature between 400 and 600 deg C, anhydrous hydrogen fluoride is passed through. After completion of the conversion to uranium tetrafluoride, the temperature of the reaction chamber is lowered to ahout 400 deg C, and elemental fluorine is used as the fluorinating agent for the conversion of UF/sub 4/ into UF/sub 6/. The fluorine gas is passed into the chamber, and the UF/sub 6/ formed passes out and is delivered to a condenser.

Fowler, R.D.

1957-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

23

FAQ 9-Where does uranium hexafluoride come from?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hexafluoride come from? Where does uranium hexafluoride come from? The gaseous diffusion process used to enrich uranium requires uranium in the form of UF6. In the first step of...

24

FAQ 19-Is storage of uranium hexafluoride safe?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

storage of uranium hexafluoride safe? Is storage of uranium hexafluoride safe? The advanced age of some of the steel cylinders in which the depleted UF6 is contained, and the way...

25

PROCESS FOR PRODUCTION OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for the manufacture of uranium bexafluoride which consists in contacting an oxide of uranium simultaneously with elemental carbon and elemental fluorine at an elevated temperature, using a proportion of the carbon to the oxide about 50% in excess of that theoretically required to combine with f the oxygen as C0/.sub 2/. The process has the advantage that the uranium oxide is reduced by tbe carbon aad converted to the hexafluoride in a single operation.

Fowler, R.D.

1958-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Overview of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE's DUF DOE's DUF 6 Cylinder Inventory a Location Number of Cylinders DUF 6 (MT) b Paducah, Kentucky 36,910 450,000 Portsmouth, Ohio 16,041 198,000 Oak Ridge (ETTP), Tennessee 4,683 56,000 Total 57,634 704,000 a The DOE inventory includes DUF 6 generated by the government, as well as DUF 6 transferred from U.S. Enrichment Corporation pursuant to two memoranda of agreement. b A metric ton (MT) is equal to 1,000 kilograms, or 2,200 pounds. Overview of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program Over the last four decades, large quantities of uranium were processed by gaseous diffusion to produce enriched uranium for U.S. national defense and civilian purposes. The gaseous diffusion process uses uranium in the form of uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ), primarily because UF 6 can conveniently be used in

27

Video: Metamorphosis (Physical Characteristics of Uranium Hexafluoride)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Metamorphosis Metamorphosis Metamorphosis (Physical Characteristics of Uranium Hexafluoride) The Uranium Hexafluoride phase diagram is investigated. An experimental setup is shown to look at the gas, liquid, and solid phases at various temperatures and pressures. This information is used to understand what happens inside a DUF6 storage cylinder. View this Video in Real Player format Download free RealPlayer SP Highlights of the Video: Video 00:12 Metamorphosis from the U.S. Department of Energy Video 00:45 Laboratory setup to examine the phases of UF6 Video 01:45 UF6 Phase Diagram Video 03:25 Liquid UF6 appearing in a glass tube Video 03:38 Cloud of HF from moisture reaction dissolving in UF6 gas Video 04:27 Beginning of UF6 phase change from liquid to solid Video 04:40 Formation of porous solid structure

28

REDUCTION OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE RETENTION ON BEDS OF MAGNESIUM FLUORIDE USED FOR REMOVAL OF TECHNETIUM HEXAFLUORIDE  

SciTech Connect

The excessive loss of uranium incurred when discarding magnesium fluoride, (the adsorber used to selectively remove technetium hexafluoride from uranium hexafluoride streams) is a problem common to all volatility processes for recovering enriched uranium fuels. As a result of the work described, two schemes for the release of the uranium hexafluoride from the magnesium fluoride and its separation from the technetium hexafluoride are proposed. One scheme depends on preferential thermal desorption of the uranium hexafluoride at 350 deg C and the other on selective adsorption of the uranium hexafluoride on sodium fluoride pellets following the codesorption of the two hexafluorides with fluorine at 500 deg C from the magnesium fluoride pellets. These proposals are aimed at reducing the amount of retained uranium to less than 1 g per 1000 g of discardable magnesium fluoride. In the work reported, the deposition of uranium on magnesium fluoride as a function of heating, fluorination, and hydrogen fluoride pretreatment of the magnesium fluoride pellets prior to exposure to uranium hexafluoride was characterized in a series of gasometric studies. The dependence of the quantity of uranium hexafluoride adsorbed on pressure and temperature was also determined. The data show that physical adsorption is the mechanism for the deposition of most of the uranium hexafluoride on well- stabilized magnesium fluoride pellets. More than 90% of the adsorbate can be removed by heating to 350 deg C. Chemisorption (formation of a double salt) is probably not involved because of the small (<0.05) mole ratio of UF/sub 6//MgF/ sub 2/ observed. (auth)

Katz, S.

1964-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

29

Press Release: DOE Seeks Public Input for Depleted Uranium Hexafluorid...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Perry, (865) 576-0885 September 24, 2001 www.oakridge.doe.gov DOE SEEKS PUBLIC INPUT FOR DEPLETED URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT Public Meetings Planned in...

30

FAQ 20-How is uranium hexafluoride being managed now?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

being managed now? How is uranium hexafluoride being managed now? Since 1990, DOE has conducted a program of cylinder inspections, recoatings, and relocations to assure that...

31

FAQ 8-What is uranium hexafluoride (UF6)?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is uranium hexafluoride (UF6)? is uranium hexafluoride (UF6)? What is uranium hexafluoride (UF6)? Uranium hexafluoride is a chemical compound consisting of one atom of uranium combined with six atoms of fluorine. It is the chemical form of uranium that is used during the uranium enrichment process. Within a reasonable range of temperature and pressure, it can be a solid, liquid, or gas. Solid UF6 is a white, dense, crystalline material that resembles rock salt. Liquid UF6 is formed only at temperatures greater than 147° F (64° C) and at pressures greater than 1.5 times atmospheric pressure (22 psia). At atmospheric pressure, solid UF6 will transform directly to UF6 gas (sublimation) when the temperature is raised to 134° F (57° C), without going through a liquid phase.

32

In-line assay monitor for uranium hexafluoride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An in-line assay monitor for determining the content of uranium-235 in a uranium hexafluoride gas isotopic separation system is provided which removes the necessity of complete access to the operating parameters of the system for determining the uranium-235 content. The monitor is intended for uses such as safeguard applications to assure that weapons grade uranium is not being produced in an enrichment cascade. The method and monitor for carrying out the method involve cooling of a radiation pervious chamber connected in fluid communication with the selected point in the system to withdraw a specimen and solidify the specimen in the chamber. The specimen is irradiated by means of an ionizing radiation source of energy different from that of the 185 keV gamma emissions from the uranium-235 present in the specimen. Simultaneously, the gamma emissions from the uranium-235 of the specimen and the source emissions transmitted through the sample are counted and stored in a multiple channel analyzer. The uranium-235 content of the specimen is determined from the comparison of the accumulated 185 keV energy counts and the reference energy counts. The latter is used to measure the total uranium isotopic content of the specimen. The process eliminates the necessity of knowing the system operating conditions and yet obtains the necessary data without need for large scintillation crystals and sophisticated mechanical designs.

Wallace, Steven A. (Knoxville, TN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

EIS-0359: Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

59: Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, 59: Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky Site EIS-0359: Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky Site Summary This site-specific EIS considers the construction, operation, maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning of the proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) conversion facility at three locations within the Paducah site; transportation of depleted uranium conversion products and waste materials to a disposal facility; transportation and sale of the hydrogen fluoride (HF) produced as a conversion co-product; and neutralization of HF to calcium fluoride and its sale or disposal in the event that the HF product is not sold. This EIS also considers a no action alternative that assumes continued storage of DUF6 at the Paducah site. A

34

DOE Issues Request for Quotations for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Issues Request for Quotations for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Issues Request for Quotations for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Technical Services DOE Issues Request for Quotations for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Technical Services December 12, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor, 803-952-8564 bill.taylor@srs.gov Cincinnati - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Request for Quotation (RFQ) for engineering and operations technical services to support the Portsmouth Paducah Project Office and the oversight of operations of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Conversion Project located in Paducah KY, and Portsmouth OH. The RFQ is for a Time-and-Materials Task Order for three years with two one-year option periods. The estimated contract value is approximately $15 - 20 million.

35

DOE Issues Request for Quotations for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Issues Request for Quotations for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Issues Request for Quotations for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Technical Services DOE Issues Request for Quotations for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Technical Services December 12, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor, 803-952-8564 bill.taylor@srs.gov Cincinnati - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Request for Quotation (RFQ) for engineering and operations technical services to support the Portsmouth Paducah Project Office and the oversight of operations of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Conversion Project located in Paducah KY, and Portsmouth OH. The RFQ is for a Time-and-Materials Task Order for three years with two one-year option periods. The estimated contract value is approximately $15 - 20 million.

36

BASIC STUDIES OF THE SEPARATION OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE FROM MIXTURES CONTAINING CHLORINE TRIFLUORIDE AND HYDROGEN FLUORIDE  

SciTech Connect

Processes for the conversion of uranium compounds or uranium metal to uranium hexafluoride ordinarily involve the use of a powerful fluorinating agent. Elemental fluorine is used when the scale of operations justifies the construction of a fluorine generating plant, but for smaller operation the use of the interhalogens of fluorine has definite advantages. These compounds provide a high concentration of fluorinating power at moderate temperatures and pressures and are more easily stored and transported than fluorine. In addition, fluorinations in the liquid phase often proceed more smoothly than those with gaseous fluorine. However, the use of . the interhalogens introduces the problem of separating the uranium hexafluoride from the unreacted reagent and from any by-products which may have been formed. The present work is concerned with the determination of the phase equilibrai among the materials uranium hexafluoride, chlorine trifluoride, and hydrogen fluoride. metal with chlorine trifluoride-hydrogen fluoride solutions or as a result of treating many uranium compounds and ores with chlorine trifluoride. These phase equilibria define the physical conditions necessary for separating the components by the processes of crystallization or distillation and have made possinle the successful Operation of a pilot plant for the direct recovery of uranium hexafluoride from spent metallic uranium fuel elements. (auth)

Bernhardt, H.A.; Barber, E.J.; Davis, W. Jr.; McGill, R.M.

1958-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

37

Selection of a management strategy for depleted uranium hexafluoride  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A consequence of the uranium enrichment process used in the United States (US) is the accumulation of a significant amount of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}). Currently, approximately 560,000 metric tons of the material are stored at three different sites. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recently initiated a program to consider alternative strategies for the cost-effective and environmentally safe long-term management of this inventory of depleted UF{sub 6}. The program involves a technology and engineering assessment of proposed management options (use/reuse, conversion, storage, or disposal) and an analysis of the potential environmental impacts and life-cycle costs of alternative management strategies. The information obtained from the studies will be used by the DOE to select a preferred long-term management strategy. The selection and implementation of a management strategy will involve consideration of a number of important issues such as environmental, health, and safety effects; the balancing of risks versus costs in a context of reduced government spending; socioeconomic implications, including effects on the domestic and international uranium industry; the technical status of proposed uses or technologies; and public involvement in the decision making process. Because of its provisions for considering a wide range of relevant issues and involving the public, this program has become a model for future DOE materials disposition programs. This paper presents an overview of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program. Technical findings of the program to date are presented, and major issues involved in selecting and implementing a management strategy are discussed.

Patton, S.E.; Hanrahan, E.J.; Bradley, C.E.

1995-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

38

FAQ 23-How much depleted uranium -- including depleted uranium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is stored in the United States? How much depleted uranium -- including depleted uranium hexafluoride -- is stored in the United States? In addition to the depleted uranium stored...

39

RADIATION EFFECTS OF ALPHA PARTICLES ON URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE  

SciTech Connect

Alpha irradiation of uranium hexafluoride results in the formation of fluorine and intermediate, solid uranium fluorides: these products react with each other, apparently by a radiation-induced process. to reform uranium hexifluoride. The number of molecules of uranium hexafluoride decomposed, excluding recombiapproximately 1 in the temperature range 21 to 87 deg C. Irradiation of a mixture of fluorine and uranium hexafluoride in a vessel containing uranium fluorides substantistes the postulated mechanism. At fluorine pressures of 50 to 100 mm Hg, there is an increase, rather than a decrease, in uranium hexafluoride pressure. Rates of both decomposition and recombination processes appear to depend only on the rates of radiation energy absorption. Equations formnulated to describe the combined decomposition and reformation reactions can be used to calculate equilibrium concentrations of uranium hexfluoride and fluorine when the intensity of the radiation source is defined. The effects of three diluent gases, helium, nitrogen and oxygen, were studied in an attempt to find possible electron transfer processes. (auth)

Bernhardt, H.A.; Davis, W. Jr.; Shiflett, C.H.

1958-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Including environmental concerns in management strategies for depleted uranium hexafluoride  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the major programs within the Office of Nuclear Energy, Science, and Technology of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) management program. The program is intended to find a long-term management strategy for the DUF{sub 6} that is currently stored in approximately 46,400 cylinders at Paducah, KY; Portsmouth, OH; and Oak Ridge, TN, USA. The program has four major components: technology assessment, engineering analysis, cost analysis, and the environmental impact statement (EIS). From the beginning of the program, the DOE has incorporated the environmental considerations into the process of strategy selection. Currently, the DOE has no preferred alternative. The results of the environmental impacts assessment from the EIS, as well as the results from the other components of the program, will be factored into the strategy selection process. In addition to the DOE`s current management plan, other alternatives continued storage, reuse, or disposal of depleted uranium, will be considered in the EIS. The EIS is expected to be completed and issued in its final form in the fall of 1997.

Goldberg, M. [Argonne National Laboratory, Washington, DC (United States); Avci, H.I. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Bradley, C.E. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium hexafluoride stored" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A PILOT PLANT FOR THE REDUCTION OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE TO URANIUM TETRAFLUORIDE WITH TRICHLOROETHYLENE  

SciTech Connect

Pilot plant experiments are described in which trichloroethylene was used for the reduction of uranium hexafluoride to uranium tetrafluoride. After unsatisfactory preliminary results with liquid phase reduction, satisfactory results were obtained with a vapor phase reduction system. It was found that vapor phase reduction at approximately 450 deg F, produced a low density product which contained only small quantities of uranium(VI); sintering the uranium tetrafluoride in a hydrogen fluoride atmosphere increased the product density to approximately 3 g/cc. The reduction was essentially complete, and the effluent gas contained less than 1 ppm of uranium hexafluoride. The purity of the uranium tetrafluoride produced was equivalent to that of the uranium hexafluoride used as feed. A complete discussion is given of the operation of the various parts of the system. (auth)

Baker, J.E.; Klaus, H.V.; Schmidt, R.A.; Smiley, S.H.

1956-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

42

FAQ 13-How is uranium hexafluoride stored?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

atmospheric pressure in the top. The UF6 inside the cylinder combines with the iron on the inner surfaces to form a surface layer of iron fluoride that inhibits internal corrosion...

43

In-line assay monitor for uranium hexafluoride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An in-line assay monitor for determining the content of uranium-235 in a uranium hexafluoride gas isotopic separation system is provided which removes the necessity of complete access to the operating parameters of the system for determining the uranium-235 content. The method and monitor for carrying out the method involve cooling of a radiation pervious chamber connected in fluid communication with the selected point in the system to withdraw a specimen and solidify the specimen in the chamber. The specimen is irradiated by means of an ionizing radiation source of energy different from that of the 185 keV gamma emissions from uranium-235. The uranium-235 content of the specimen is determined from comparison of the accumulated 185 keV energy counts and reference energy counts. The latter is used to measure the total uranium isotopic content of the specimen.

Wallace, S.A.

1980-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

44

Video: The Inside Story (of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Cylinder)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Inside Story Inside Story The Inside Story The Inside Story (of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Cylinder) Probes are used to look at the inside of a Uranium Hexafluoride cylinder. The distribution and structure of the contents are discussed. View this Video in Real Player format Download free RealPlayer SP Highlights of the Video: Video 00:42 10 ton 48Xcylinder of UF6 Video 01:19 Liquid UF6 filling 95% of cylinder volume Video 02:15 Liquid UF6 Video 02:23 Beginning of UF6 phase change from liquid to solid Video 02:32 Solid UF6 Video 03:00 Probe and instrument to investigate inside cylinder Video 04:09 Workers preparing to insert TV camera probe into 48X cylinder containing 10 tons of solid UF6 Video 04:28 Inner surface of head of cylinder showing no corrosion

45

Video: Part of the 'Hole' Story (of Uranium Hexafluoride Cylinders)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hole Story Hole Story Part of the "Hole" Story (of Uranium Hexafluoride Cylinders) Holes in the depleted Uranium Hexafluoride storage cylinders are investigated. It is shown that corrosion products cause the openings to be self-healing. View this Video in Real Player format Download free RealPlayer SP Highlights of the Video: Video 00:00 Part of the 'Hole' Story Video 00:05 One of the depleted UF6 cylinder storage lots at Portsmouth Video 00:28 48G cylinders, each containing 14 tons of depleted UF6, in storage Video 00:52 Stacked 48G cylinders Video 01:35 UF6 sealed in glass tube Video 02:01 A lifting lug of one cylinder damaging a neighboring cylinder Video 02:37 Damage to small hole cylinder from impact with a lifting lub of an adjoining cylinder

46

Criticality concerns in cleaning large uranium hexafluoride cylinders  

SciTech Connect

Cleaning large cylinders used to transport low-enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) presents several challenges to nuclear criticality safety. This paper presents a brief overview of the cleaning process, the criticality controls typically employed and their bases. Potential shortfalls in implementing these controls are highlighted, and a simple example to illustrate the difficulties in complying with the Double Contingency Principle is discussed. Finally, a summary of recommended criticality controls for large cylinder cleaning operations is presented.

Sheaffer, M.K.; Keeton, S.C.; Lutz, H.F.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Conversion of depleted uranium hexafluoride to a solid uranium compound  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for converting UF.sub.6 to a solid uranium compound such as UO.sub.2 and CaF. The UF.sub.6 vapor form is contacted with an aqueous solution of NH.sub.4 OH at a pH greater than 7 to precipitate at least some solid uranium values as a solid leaving an aqueous solution containing NH.sub.4 OH and NH.sub.4 F and remaining uranium values. The solid uranium values are separated from the aqueous solution of NH.sub.4 OH and NH.sub.4 F and remaining uranium values which is then diluted with additional water precipitating more uranium values as a solid leaving trace quantities of uranium in a dilute aqueous solution. The dilute aqueous solution is contacted with an ion-exchange resin to remove substantially all the uranium values from the dilute aqueous solution. The dilute solution being contacted with Ca(OH).sub.2 to precipitate CaF.sub.2 leaving dilute NH.sub.4 OH.

Rothman, Alan B. (Willowbrook, IL); Graczyk, Donald G. (Lemont, IL); Essling, Alice M. (Elmhurst, IL); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Record of Decision for Long-term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Record of Decision for Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride AGENCY: Department of Energy ACTION: Record of Decision SUMMARY: The Department of Energy ("DOE" or "the Department") issued the Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (Final PEIS) on April 23, 1999. DOE has considered the environmental impacts, benefits, costs, and institutional and programmatic needs associated with the management and use of its approximately 700,000 metric tons of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF 6 ). DOE has decided to promptly convert the depleted UF 6 inventory to depleted uranium oxide, depleted uranium metal, or a combination of both. The depleted uranium oxide will be

49

Containment and storage of uranium hexafluoride at US Department of Energy uranium enrichment plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Isotopically depleted UF{sub 6} (uranium hexafluoride) accumulates at a rate five to ten times greater than the enriched product and is stored in steel vessels at the enrichment plant sites. There are approximately 55,000 large cylinders now in storage at Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Most of them contain a nominal 14 tons of depleted UF{sub 6}. Some of these cylinders have been in the unprotected outdoor storage environment for periods approaching 40 years. Storage experience, supplemented by limited corrosion data, suggests a service life of about 70 years under optimum conditions for the 48-in. diameter, 5/16-in.-wall pressure vessels (100 psi working pressure), using a conservative industry-established 1/4-in.-wall thickness as the service limit. In the past few years, however, factors other than atmospheric corrosion have become apparent that adversely affect the serviceability of small numbers of the storage containers and that indicate the need for a managed program to ensure maintenance ofcontainment integrity for all the cylinders in storage. The program includes periodic visual inspections of cylinders and storage yards with documentation for comparison with other inspections, a group of corrosion test programs to permit cylinder life forecasts, and identification of (and scheduling for remedial action) situations in which defects, due to handling damage or accelerated corrosion, can seriously shorten the storage life or compromise the containment integrity of individual cylinders. The program also includes rupture testing to assess the effects of certain classes of damage on overall cylinder strength, aswell as ongoing reviews of specifications, procedures, practices, and inspection results to effect improvements in handling safety, containment integrity, and storage life.

Barlow, C.R.; Alderson, J.H.; Blue, S.C.; Boelens, R.A.; Conkel, M.E.; Dorning, R.E.; Ecklund, C.D.; Halicks, W.G.; Henson, H.M.; Newman, V.S.; Philpot, H.E.; Taylor, M.S.; Vournazos, J.P. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States). UEO Enrichment Technical Operations Div.; Russell, J.R. [USDOE Oak Ridge Field Office, TN (United States); Pryor, W.A. [PAI Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ziehlke, K.T. [MJB Technical Associates (United States)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Uranium hexafluoride: A manual of good handling practices. Revision 7  

SciTech Connect

The United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) is continuing the policy of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies in sharing with the nuclear industry their experience in the area of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) shipping containers and handling procedures. The USEC has reviewed Revision 6 or ORO-651 and is issuing this new edition to assure that the document includes the most recent information on UF{sub 6} handling procedures and reflects the policies of the USEC. This manual updates the material contained in earlier issues. It covers the essential aspects of UF{sub 6} handling, cylinder filling and emptying, general principles of weighing and sampling, shipping, and the use of protective overpacks. The physical and chemical properties of UF{sub 6} are also described. The procedures and systems described for safe handling of UF{sub 6} presented in this document have been developed and evaluated during more than 40 years of handling vast quantities of UF{sub 6}. With proper consideration for its nuclear properties, UF{sub 6} may be safely handled in essentially the same manner as any other corrosive and/or toxic chemical.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Preconceptual design studies and cost data of depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion plants  

SciTech Connect

One of the more important legacies left with the Department of Energy (DOE) after the privatization of the United States Enrichment Corporation is the large inventory of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6). The DOE Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology (NE) is responsible for the long-term management of some 700,000 metric tons of DUF6 stored at the sites of the two gaseous diffusion plants located at Paducah, Kentucky and Portsmouth, Ohio, and at the East Tennessee Technology Park in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The DUF6 management program resides in NE's Office of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management. The current DUF6 program has largely focused on the ongoing maintenance of the cylinders containing DUF6. However, the long-term management and eventual disposition of DUF6 is the subject of a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) and Public Law 105-204. The first step for future use or disposition is to convert the material, which requires construction and long-term operation of one or more conversion plants. To help inform the DUF6 program's planning activities, it was necessary to perform design and cost studies of likely DUF6 conversion plants at the preconceptual level, beyond the PEIS considerations but not as detailed as required for conceptual designs of actual plants. This report contains the final results from such a preconceptual design study project. In this fast track, three month effort, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Bechtel National Incorporated developed and evaluated seven different preconceptual design cases for a single plant. The preconceptual design, schedules, costs, and issues associated with specific DUF6 conversion approaches, operating periods, and ownership options were evaluated based on criteria established by DOE. The single-plant conversion options studied were similar to the dry-conversion process alternatives from the PEIS. For each of the seven cases considered, this report contains information on the conversion process, preconceptual plant description, rough capital and operating costs, and preliminary project schedule.

Jones, E

1999-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

52

Summary of the engineering analysis report for the long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is reviewing ideas for the long-term management and use of its depleted uranium hexafluoride. DOE owns about 560,000 metric tons (over a billion pounds) of depleted uranium hexafluoride. This material is contained in steel cylinders located in storage yards near Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and at the East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly the K-25 Site) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. On November 10, 1994, DOE announced its new Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program by issuing a Request for Recommendations and an Advance Notice of Intent in the Federal Register (59 FR 56324 and 56325). The first part of this program consists of engineering, costs and environmental impact studies. Part one will conclude with the selection of a long-term management plan or strategy. Part two will carry out the selected strategy.

Dubrin, J.W., Rahm-Crites, L.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

FAQ 15-What are the dimensions of a depleted uranium hexafluoride cylinder?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are the dimensions of a depleted uranium hexafluoride cylinder? are the dimensions of a depleted uranium hexafluoride cylinder? What are the dimensions of a depleted uranium hexafluoride cylinder? Several different cylinder types are in use, although the vast majority of cylinders are designed to contain 14-tons (12-metric tons) of depleted UF6. The 14-ton-capacity cylinders are 12 ft (3.7 m) long by 4 ft (1.2 m) in diameter, with most having an initial wall thickness of 5/16 in. (0.79 cm) of steel. The cylinders have external stiffening rings that provide support. Lifting lugs for handling are attached to the stiffening rings. A small percentage of the cylinders have skirted ends (extensions of the cylinder walls past the rounded ends of the cylinder). Each cylinder has a single valve for filling and emptying located on one end at the 12 o'clock position. Similar, but slightly smaller, cylinders designed to contain 10 tons (9 metric tons) of depleted UF6 are also in use. Cylinders are manufactured in accordance with an American National Standards Institute standard (ANSI N14.1, American National Standard for Nuclear Materials - Uranium Hexafluoride - Packaging for Transport) as specified in 49 CFR 173.420, the federal regulations governing transport of depleted UF6.

54

Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of uranium hexafluoride  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 These test methods cover procedures for subsampling and for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of uranium hexafluoride UF6. Most of these test methods are in routine use to determine conformance to UF6 specifications in the Enrichment and Conversion Facilities. 1.2 The analytical procedures in this document appear in the following order: Note 1Subcommittee C26.05 will confer with C26.02 concerning the renumbered section in Test Methods C761 to determine how concerns with renumbering these sections, as analytical methods are replaced with stand-alone analytical methods, are best addressed in subsequent publications. Sections Subsampling of Uranium Hexafluoride 7 - 10 Gravimetric Determination of Uranium 11 - 19 Titrimetric Determination of Uranium 20 Preparation of High-Purity U3O 8 21 Isotopic Analysis 22 Isotopic Analysis by Double-Standard Mass-Spectrometer Method 23 - 29 Determination of Hydrocarbons, Chlorocarbons, and Partially Substitut...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

DEVELOPMENT OF THE CONTINUOUS METHOD FOR THE REDUCTION OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE WITH HYDROGEN-PROCESS DEVELOPMENT. HOT WALL REACTOR  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

>A continuous process for the reduction of uranium hexafluoride to uranium tetrafluoride was developed and proved on a pilot-plant scale. Complete conversion to uranium tetrafluoride was realized by contacting gaseous uranium hexafluoride with hydrogen in a heated, vertical, open-tube reactor. The purity and density of the solid product met metal grade uranium tetrafluoride specifications. Some difficulty with the accumulation of fused uranium fluorides in the tower was encountered, however, and it was necessary to stop and desing the unit about every 8 to 24 hours. The reaction of uranium hexafluoride with gaseous trichloroethylene was stadied before the tests with hydrogen were made. Although the reduction to uranium tetrafluoride was complete, the solid product was highly contaminated with the organic by-products of the reaction and was quite low in density. Tests of this method were discontinued when promising results were obtained with hydrogen as the reductant. (auth)

Smiley, S H; Brater, D C

1958-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

56

uranium hexafluoride - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy. ... UF 6 is the form of uranium required for the enrichment process. Thank You.

57

Cost update technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning a reference uranium hexafluoride conversion plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to update the cost estimates developed in a previous report, NUREG/CR-1757 (Elder 1980) for decommissioning a reference uranium hexafluoride conversion plant from the original mid-1981 dollars to values representative of January 1993. The cost updates were performed by using escalation factors derived from cost index trends over the past 11.5 years. Contemporary price quotes wee used for costs that have increased drastically or for which is is difficult to find a cost trend. No changes were made in the decommissioning procedures or cost element requirements assumed in NUREG/CR-1757. This report includes only information that was changed from NUREG/CR-1757. Thus, for those interested in detailed descriptions and associated information for the reference uranium hexafluoride conversion plant, a copy of NUREG/CR-1757 will be needed.

Miles, T.L.; Liu, Y.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Paducah DUF 6 DEIS: December 2003 SUMMARY S.1 INTRODUCTION This document is a site-specific environmental impact statement (EIS) for construction and operation of a proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF 6 ) conversion facility at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Paducah site in northwestern Kentucky (Figure S-1). The proposed facility would convert the DUF 6 stored at Paducah to a more stable chemical form suitable for use or disposal. In a Notice of Intent (NOI) published in the Federal Register (FR) on September 18, 2001 (Federal Register, Volume 66, page 48123 [66 FR 48123]), DOE announced its intention to prepare a single EIS for a proposal to construct, operate, maintain, and decontaminate and decommission two DUF 6 conversion facilities at Portsmouth,

59

Moderation control in low enriched {sup 235}U uranium hexafluoride packaging operations and transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Moderation control is the basic parameter for ensuring nuclear criticality safety during the packaging and transport of low {sup 235}U enriched uranium hexafluoride before its conversion to nuclear power reactor fuel. Moderation control has permitted the shipment of bulk quantities in large cylinders instead of in many smaller cylinders and, therefore, has resulted in economies without compromising safety. Overall safety and uranium accountability have been enhanced through the use of the moderation control. This paper discusses moderation control and the operating procedures to ensure that moderation control is maintained during packaging operations and transportation.

Dyer, R.H. [USDOE Oak Ridge Operations Office, TN (United States); Kovac, F.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Pryor, W.A. [PAI Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Refurbishment of uranium hexafluoride cylinder storage yards C-745-K, L, M, N, and P and construction of a new uranium hexafluoride cylinder storage yard (C-745-T) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) is a uranium enrichment facility owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE). A residual of the uranium enrichment process is depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6). Depleted UF6, a solid at ambient temperature, is stored in 32,200 steel cylinders that hold a maximum of 14 tons each. Storage conditions are suboptimal and have resulted in accelerated corrosion of cylinders, increasing the potential for a release of hazardous substances. Consequently, the DOE is proposing refurbishment of certain existing yards and construction of a new storage yard. This environmental assessment (EA) evaluates the impacts of the proposed action and no action and considers alternate sites for the proposed new storage yard. The proposed action includes (1) renovating five existing cylinder yards; (2) constructing a new UF6 storage yard; handling and onsite transport of cylinders among existing yards to accommodate construction; and (4) after refurbishment and construction, restacking of cylinders to meet spacing and inspection requirements. Based on the results of the analysis reported in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the context of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. Therefore, DOE is issuing a Finding of No Significant Impact. Additionally, it is reported in this EA that the loss of less than one acre of wetlands at the proposed project site would not be a significant adverse impact.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium hexafluoride stored" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Standard specification for uranium hexafluoride enriched to less than 5 % 235U  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This specification covers nuclear grade uranium hexafluoride (UF6) that either has been processed through an enrichment plant, or has been produced by the blending of Highly Enriched Uranium with other uranium to obtain uranium of any 235U concentration below 5 % and that is intended for fuel fabrication. The objectives of this specification are twofold: (1) To define the impurity and uranium isotope limits for Enriched Commercial Grade UF6 so that, with respect to fuel design and manufacture, it is essentially equivalent to enriched uranium made from natural UF6; and (2) To define limits for Enriched Reprocessed UF6 to be expected if Reprocessed UF6 is to be enriched without dilution with Commercial Natural UF6. For such UF6, special provisions, not defined herein, may be needed to ensure fuel performance and to protect the work force, process equipment, and the environment. 1.2 This specification is intended to provide the nuclear industry with a standard for enriched UF6 that is to be used in the pro...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Summary of the cost analysis report for the long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride  

SciTech Connect

This report is a summary of the Cost Analysis Report which provides comparative cost data for the management strategy alternatives. The PEIS and the Cost Analysis Report will help DOE select a management strategy. The Record of Decision, expected in 1998, will complete the first part of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program. The second part of the Program will look at specific sites and technologies for carrying out the selected strategy. The Cost Analysis Report estimates the primary capital and operating costs for the different alternatives. It reflects the costs of technology development construction of facilities, operation, and decontamination and decommissioning. It also includes potential revenues from the sale of by-products such as anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (ABF). These estimates are based on early designs. They are intended to help in comparing alternatives, rather than to indicate absolute costs for project budgets or bidding purposes. More detailed estimates and specific funding sources will be considered in part two of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program.

Dubrin, J.W.; Rahm-Crites, L.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning a Reference Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safety and cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of a commercial uranium hexafluoride conversion (UF{sub 6}) plant. Two basic decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between cost and safety impacts: DECON, and passive SAFSTOR. A third alternative, DECON of the plant and equipment with stabilization and long-term care of lagoon wastes. is also examined. DECON includes the immediate removal (following plant shutdown) of all radioactivity in excess of unrestricted release levels, with subsequent release of the site for public use. Passive SAFSTOR requires decontamination, preparation, maintenance, and surveillance for a period of time after shutdown, followed by deferred decontamination and unrestricted release. DECON with stabilization and long-term care of lagoon wastes (process wastes generated at the reference plant and stored onsite during plant operation} is also considered as a decommissioning method, although its acceptability has not yet been determined by the NRC. The decommissioning methods assumed for use in each decommissioning alternative are based on state-of-the-art technology. The elapsed time following plant shutdown required to perform the decommissioning work in each alternative is estimated to be: for DECON, 8 months; for passive SAFSTOR, 3 months to prepare the plant for safe storage and 8 months to accomplish deferred decontamination. Planning and preparation for decommissioning prior to plant shutdown is estimated to require about 6 months for either DECON or passive SAFSTOR. Planning and preparation prior to starting deferred decontamination is estimated to require an additional 6 months. OECON with lagoon waste stabilization is estimated to take 6 months for planning and about 8 months to perform the decommissioning work. Decommissioning cost, in 1981 dollars, is estimated to be $5.91 million for OECON. For passive SAFSTOR, preparing the facility for safe storage is estimated to cost $0.88 million, the annual maintenance and surveillance cost is estimated to be about $0.095 million, and deferred decontamination is estimated to cost about $6.50 million. Therefore, passive SAFSTOR for 10 years is estimated to cost $8.33 million in nondiscounted 1981 dollars. DECON with lagoon waste stabilization is estimated to cost about $4.59 million, with an annual cost of $0.011 million for long-term care. All of these estimates include a 25% contingency. Waste management costs for DECON, including the net cost of disposal of the solvent extraction lagoon wastes by shipping those wastes to a uranium mill for recovery of residual uranium, comprise about 38% of the total decommissioning cost. Disposal of lagoon waste at a commercial low-level waste burial ground is estimated to add $10.01 million to decommissioning costs. Safety analyses indicate that radiological and nonradiological safety impacts from decommissioning activities should be small. The 50-year committed dose equivalent to members of the public from airborne releases during normal decommissioning activities is estimated to 'Je about 4.0 man-rem. Radiation doses to the public from accidents are found to be very low for all phases of decommissioning. Occupational radiation doses from normal decommissioning operations (excluding transport operations) are estimated to be about 79 man-rem for DECON and about 80 man-rem for passive SAFSTOR with 10 years of safe storage. Doses from DECON with lagoon waste stabilization are about the same as for DECON except there is less dose resulting from transportation of radioactive waste. The number of fatalities and serious lost-time injuries not related to radiation is found to be very small for all decommissioning alternatives. Comparison of the cost estimates shows that DECON with lagoon waste stabilization is the least expensive method. However, this alternative does not allow unrestricted release of the site. The cumulative cost of maintenance and surveillance and the higher cost of deferred decontamination makes passive SAFSTOR more expensive than DECON. Seve

Elder, H. K.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Conversion and Blending Facility Highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as uranium hexafluoride. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) which will have two missions: (1) convert surplus HEU materials to pure HEU UF{sub 6} and a (2) blend the pure HEU UF{sub 6} with diluent UF{sub 6} to produce LWR grade LEU-UF{sub 6}. The primary emphasis of this blending be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. The chemical and isotopic concentrations of the blended LEU product will be held within the specifications required for LWR fuel. The blended LEU product will be offered to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) to be sold as feed material to the commercial nuclear industry.

1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

65

Uranium hexafluoride packaging tiedown systems overview at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) in Piketon, Ohio, is operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., through the US Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO) for the US Department of Energy-Headquarters, Office of Nuclear Energy. The PORTS conducts those operations that are necessary for the production, packaging, and shipment of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}). Uranium hexafluoride enriched uranium than 1.0 wt percent {sup 235}U shall be packaged in accordance with the US Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations of Title 49 CFR Parts 173 (Reference 1) and 178 (Reference 2), or in US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) or US Department of Energy (DOE) certified package designs. Concerns have been expressed regarding the various tiedown methods and condition of the trailers being used by some shippers/carriers for international transport of the UF{sub 6} cylinders/overpacks. Because of the concerns about international shipments, the US Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Office of Nuclear Energy, through DOE-HQ Transportation Management Division, requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) to review UF{sub 6} packaging tiedown and shipping practices used by PORTS, and where possible and appropriate, provide recommendations for enhancing these practices. Consequently, a team of two individuals from Westinghouse Hanford visited PORTS on March 5 and 6, 1990, for the purpose of conducting this review. The paper provides a brief discussion of the review activities and a summary of the resulting findings and recommendations. A detailed reporting of the is documented in Reference 4.

Becker, D.L.; Green, D.J.; Lindquist, M.R.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program: Data Compilation for the Paducah Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program: Data Compilation for the Paducah Site in Support of Site-Specific NEPA Requirements for Continued Cylinder Storage, Cylinder Preparation, Conversion, and Long-Term Storage Activities Environmental Assessment Division Argonne National Laboratory Operated by The University of Chicago, under Contract W-31-109-Eng-38, for the United States Department of Energy Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory, with facilities in the states of Illinois and Idaho, is owned by the United States Government and operated by The University of Chicago under the provisions of a contract with the Department of Energy. This technical memorandum is a product of Argonne's Environmental Assessment Division (EAD). For information on the division's scientific and engineering

67

A concept of a nonfissile uranium hexafluoride overpack for storage, transport, and processing of corroded cylinders  

SciTech Connect

There is a need to develop a means of safely transporting breached 48-in. cylinders containing depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) from current storage locations to locations where the contents can be safely removed. There is also a need to provide a method of safely and easily transporting degraded cylinders that no longer meet the US Department of Transportation (DOT) and American National Standards Institute, Inc., (ANSI) requirements for shipments of depleted UF{sub 6}. A study has shown that an overpack can be designed and fabricated to satisfy these needs. The envisioned overpack will handle cylinder models 48G, 48X, and 48Y and will also comply with the ANSI N14.1 and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Sect. 8 requirements.

Pope, R.B.; Cash, J.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Singletary, B.H. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Characterization of options and their analysis requirements for the long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is examining alternative strategies for the long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) currently stored at the gaseous diffusion plants at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, and on the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This paper describes the methodology for the comprehensive and ongoing technical analysis of the options being considered. An overview of these options, along with several of the suboptions being considered, is presented. The long-term management strategy alternatives fall into three broad categories: use, storage, or disposal. Conversion of the depleted UF6 to another form such as oxide or metal is needed to implement most of these alternatives. Likewise, transportation of materials is an integral part of constructing the complete pathway between the current storage condition and ultimate disposition. The analysis of options includes development of pre-conceptual designs; estimates of effluents, wastes, and emissions; specification of resource requirements; and preliminary hazards assessments. The results of this analysis will assist DOE in selecting a strategy by providing the engineering information necessary to evaluate the environmental impacts and costs of implementing the management strategy alternatives.

Dubrin, J.W.; Rosen, R.S.; Zoller, J.N.; Harri, J.W.; Schwertz, N.L.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Some Investigations of the Reaction of Activated Charcoal with Fluorine and Uranium Hexafluoride  

SciTech Connect

The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been shut down since 1969, when the fuel salt was drained from the core into two Hastelloy N drain tanks at the reactor site. Over time, fluorine (F{sub 2}) and uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) moved from the salt through the gas piping to a charcoal bed, where they reacted with the activated charcoal. Some of the immediate concerns related to the migration of F{sub 2} and UF{sub 6} to the charcoal bed were the possibility of explosive reactions between the charcoal and F{sub 2}, the existence of conditions that could induce a criticality accident, and the removal and recovery of the fissile uranium from the charcoal. This report addresses the reactions and reactivity of species produced by the reaction of fluorine and activated charcoal and between charcoal and F{sub 2}-UF{sub 6} gas mixtures in order to support remediation of the MSRE auxiliary charcoal bed (ACB) and the recovery of the fissile uranium. The chemical identity, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, and potential for explosive decomposition of the primary reaction product, fluorinated charcoal, was determined.

Del Cul, G.D.; Fiedor, J.N.; Simmons, D.W.; Toth, L.M.; Trowbridge, L.D.; Williams

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is a site-specific environmental impact statement (EIS) for construction and operation of a proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) conversion facility at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Paducah site in northwestern Kentucky (Figure S-1). The proposed facility would convert the DUF{sub 6} stored at Paducah to a more stable chemical form suitable for use or disposal. In a Notice of Intent (NOI) published in the ''Federal Register'' (FR) on September 18, 2001 (''Federal Register'', Volume 66, page 48123 [66 FR 48123]), DOE announced its intention to prepare a single EIS for a proposal to construct, operate, maintain, and decontaminate and decommission two DUF{sub 6} conversion facilities at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (''United States Code'', Title 42, Section 4321 et seq. [42 USC 4321 et seq.]) and DOE's NEPA implementing procedures (''Code of Federal Regulations'', Title 10, Part 1021 [10 CFR Part 1021]). Subsequent to award of a contract to Uranium Disposition Services, LLC (hereafter referred to as UDS), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, on August 29, 2002, for design, construction, and operation of DUF{sub 6} conversion facilities at Portsmouth and Paducah, DOE reevaluated its approach to the NEPA process and decided to prepare separate site-specific EISs. This change was announced in a ''Federal Register'' Notice of Change in NEPA Compliance Approach published on April 28, 2003 (68 FR 22368); the Notice is included as Attachment B to Appendix C of this EIS. This EIS addresses the potential environmental impacts from the construction, operation, maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the proposed conversion facility at three alternative locations within the Paducah site; from the transportation of depleted uranium conversion products to a disposal facility; and from the transportation, sale, use, or disposal of the fluoride-containing conversion products (hydrogen fluoride [HF] or calcium fluoride [CaF{sub 2}]). Although not part of the proposed action, an option of shipping all cylinders (DUF{sub 6}, low-enriched UF{sub 6} [LEU-UF{sub 6}], and empty) stored at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to Paducah rather than to Portsmouth is also considered. In addition, this EIS evaluates a no action alternative, which assumes continued storage of DUF{sub 6} in cylinders at the Paducah site. A separate EIS (DOE/EIS-0360) evaluates the potential environmental impacts for the proposed Portsmouth conversion facility.

N /A

2003-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

71

Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT FOR CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION OF A DEPLETED URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE CONVERSION FACILITY AT THE PADUCAH, KENTUCKY, SITE DECEMBER 2003 U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations Office of Environmental Management Cover Sheet Paducah DUF 6 DEIS: December 2003 iii COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE FEDERAL AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site (DOE/EIS-0359) CONTACT: For further information on this environmental impact statement (EIS), contact: Gary S. Hartman DOE-ORO Cultural Resources Management Coordinator U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge, TN 37831

72

Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at Portsmouth, Ohio, Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT FOR CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION OF A DEPLETED URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE CONVERSION FACILITY AT THE PORTSMOUTH, OHIO, SITE DECEMBER 2003 U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations Office of Environmental Management Cover Sheet Portsmouth DUF 6 DEIS: December 2003 iii COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE FEDERAL AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, Site (DOE/EIS-0360) CONTACT: For further information on this environmental impact statement (EIS), contact: Gary S. Hartman DOE-ORO Cultural Resources Management Coordinator U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge, TN 37831

73

Depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) management system--a decision tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management System (DMS) is being developed as a decision tool to provide cost and risk data for evaluation of short-and long-term management strategies for depleted uranium. It can be used to assist decision makers on a programmatic or site-specific level. Currently, the DMS allows evaluation of near-term cylinder management strategies such as storage yard improvements, cylinder restocking, and reconditioning. The DMS has been designed to provide the user with maximum flexibility for modifying data and impact factors (e.g., unit costs and risk factors). Sensitivity analysis can be performed on all key parameters such as cylinder corrosion rate, inspection frequency, and impact factors. Analysis may be conducted on a system-wide, site, or yard basis. The costs and risks from different scenarios may be compared in graphic or tabular format. Ongoing development of the DMS will allow similar evaluation of long-term management strategies such as conversion to other chemical forms. The DMS is a Microsoft Windows 3.1 based, stand-alone computer application. It can be operated on a 486 or faster computer with VGA, 4 MB of RAM, and 10 MB of disk space.

Gasper, J.R.; Sutter, R.J.; Avci, H.I. [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

74

Disposition of DOE Excess Depleted Uranium, Natural Uranium, and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposition of DOE Excess Depleted Uranium, Natural Uranium, and Disposition of DOE Excess Depleted Uranium, Natural Uranium, and Low-Enriched Uranium Disposition of DOE Excess Depleted Uranium, Natural Uranium, and Low-Enriched Uranium The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) owns and manages an inventory of depleted uranium (DU), natural uranium (NU), and low-enriched uranium (LEU) that is currently stored in large cylinders as depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6), natural uranium hexafluoride (NUF6), and low-enriched uranium hexafluoride (LEUF6) at the DOE Paducah site in western Kentucky (DOE Paducah) and the DOE Portsmouth site near Piketon in south-central Ohio (DOE Portsmouth)1. This inventory exceeds DOE's current and projected energy and defense program needs. On March 11, 2008, the Secretary of Energy issued a policy statement (the

75

Biological assessment of the effects of construction and operation of a depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, site.  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF6 inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This biological assessment (BA) has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and the Endangered Species Act of 1974, to evaluate potential impacts to federally listed species from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Paducah site.

Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

76

Biological assessment of the effects of construction and operation of a depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, site.  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF6 inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This biological assessment (BA) has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and the Endangered Species Act of 1974, to evaluate potential impacts to federally listed species from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Paducah site.

Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

77

Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is a site-specific environmental impact statement (EIS) for construction and operation of a proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) conversion facility at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth site in Ohio (Figure S-1). The proposed facility would convert the DUF{sub 6} stored at Portsmouth to a more stable chemical form suitable for use or disposal. The facility would also convert the DUF{sub 6} from the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) site near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In a Notice of Intent (NOI) published in the Federal Register on September 18, 2001 (Federal Register, Volume 66, page 48123 [66 FR 48123]), DOE announced its intention to prepare a single EIS for a proposal to construct, operate, maintain, and decontaminate and decommission two DUF{sub 6} conversion facilities at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (United States Code, Title 42, Section 4321 et seq. [42 USC 4321 et seq.]) and DOE's NEPA implementing procedures (Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 1021 [10 CFR Part 1021]). Subsequent to award of a contract to Uranium Disposition Services, LLC (hereafter referred to as UDS), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, on August 29, 2002, for design, construction, and operation of DUF{sub 6} conversion facilities at Portsmouth and Paducah, DOE reevaluated its approach to the NEPA process and decided to prepare separate site-specific EISs. This change was announced in a Federal Register Notice of Change in NEPA Compliance Approach published on April 28, 2003 (68 FR 22368); the Notice is included as Attachment B to Appendix C of this EIS. This EIS addresses the potential environmental impacts from the construction, operation, maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the proposed conversion facility at three alternative locations within the Portsmouth site; from the transportation of all ETTP cylinders (DUF{sub 6}, low-enriched UF6 [LEU-UF{sub 6}], and empty) to Portsmouth; from the transportation of depleted uranium conversion products to a disposal facility; and from the transportation, sale, use, or disposal of the fluoride-containing conversion products (hydrogen fluoride [HF] or calcium fluoride [CaF{sub 2}]). An option of shipping the ETTP cylinders to Paducah is also considered. In addition, this EIS evaluates a no action alternative, which assumes continued storage of DUF{sub 6} in cylinders at the Portsmouth and ETTP sites. A separate EIS (DOE/EIS-0359) evaluates potential environmental impacts for the proposed Paducah conversion facility.

N /A

2003-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

78

Draft Supplement Analysis for Location(s) to Dispose of Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product Generated from DOE'S Inventory of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DRAFT SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS FOR LOCATION(S) TO DISPOSE OF DEPLETED DRAFT SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS FOR LOCATION(S) TO DISPOSE OF DEPLETED URANIUM OXIDE CONVERSION PRODUCT GENERATED FROM DOE'S INVENTORY OF DEPLETED URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE (DOE/EIS-0359-SA1 AND DOE/EIS-0360-SA1) March 2007 March 2007 i CONTENTS NOTATION........................................................................................................................... iv 1 INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND ................................................................. 1 1.1 Why DOE Has Prepared This Draft Supplement Analysis .............................. 1 1.2 Background ....................................................................................................... 3 1.3 Proposed Actions Considered in this Draft Supplement Analysis.................... 4

79

Results of the remote sensing feasibility study for the uranium hexafluoride storage cylinder yard program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US DOE manages the safe storage of approximately 650,000 tons of depleted uranium hexafluoride remaining from the Cold War. This slightly radioactive, but chemically active, material is contained in more than 46,000 steel storage cylinders that are located at Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Paducah, Kentucky; and Portsmouth, Ohio. Some of the cylinders are more than 40 years old, and approximately 17,500 are considered problem cylinders because their physical integrity is questionable. These cylinders require an annual visual inspection. The remainder of the 46,000-plus cylinders must be visually inspected every four years. Currently, the cylinder inspection program is extremely labor intensive. Because these inspections are accomplished visually, they may not be effective in the early detection of leaking cylinders. The inspection program requires approximately 12--14 full-time-equivalent (FTE) employees. At the cost of approximately $125K per FTE, this translates to $1,500K per annum just for cylinder inspection. As part of the technology-development portion of the DOE Cylinder Management Program, the DOE Office of Facility Management requested the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) to evaluate remote sensing techniques that have potential to increase the effectiveness of the inspection program and, at the same time, reduce inspection costs and personnel radiation exposure. During two site visits (March and May 1996) to the K-25 Site at Oak Ridge, TN, RSL personnel tested and characterized seven different operating systems believed to detect leakage, surface contamination, thickness and corrosion of cylinder walls, and general area contamination resulting from breached cylinders. The following techniques were used and their performances are discussed: Laser-induced fluorescent imaging; Long-range alpha detection; Neutron activation analysis; Differential gamma-ray attenuation; Compton scatterometry; Active infrared inspection; and Passive thermal infrared imaging.

Balick, L.K.; Bowman, D.R. [Bechtel Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Remote Sensing Lab.; Bounds, J.H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Indirect NMR detection of 235U in gaseous uranium hexafluoride National Center for Physics, P.O. Box MG-6, Bucharest, Romania  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L-493 Indirect NMR detection of 235U in gaseous uranium hexafluoride I. Ursu National Center- vation of235 U NMR signal in liquid UF6 at B = 11.747 T has been recently reported [7]. The aim of this Letter is to investigate the effect of the 23 5U enrichment on the 19F NMR spectra in gaseous UF6. Using

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

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81

Benchmark Gamma Spectroscopy Measurements of Uranium Hexafluoride in Aluminmum Pipe with a Sodium Iodide Detector  

SciTech Connect

The expected increased demand in fuel for nuclear power plants, combined with the fact that a significant portion of the current supply from the blend down of weapons-source material will soon be coming to an end, has led to the need for new sources of enriched uranium for nuclear fuel. As a result, a number of countries have announced plans, or are currently building, gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) to supply this material. GCEPs have the potential to produce uranium at enrichments above the level necessary for nuclear fuel purposes-enrichments that make the uranium potentially usable for nuclear weapons. As a result, there is a critical need to monitor these facilities to ensure that nuclear material is not inappropriately enriched or diverted for unintended use. Significant advances have been made in instrument capability since the current International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) monitoring methods were developed. In numerous cases, advances have been made in other fields that have the potential, with modest development, to be applied in safeguards applications at enrichment facilities. A particular example of one of these advances is the flow and enrichment monitor (FEMO). (See Gunning, J. E. et al., 'FEMO: A Flow and Enrichment Monitor for Verifying Compliance with International Safeguards Requirements at a Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Facility,' Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Facility Operations - Safeguards Interface. Portland, Oregon, March 30-April 4th, 2008.) The FEMO is a conceptual instrument capable of continuously measuring, unattended, the enrichment and mass flow of {sup 235}U in pipes at a GCEP, and consequently increase the probability that the potential production of HEU and/or diversion of fissile material will be detected. The FEMO requires no piping penetrations and can be installed on pipes containing the flow of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) at a GCEP. This FEMO consists of separate parts, a flow monitor (FM) and an enrichment monitor (EM). Development of the FM is primarily the responsibility of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and development of the EM is primarily the responsibility of Los Alamos National Laboratory. The FM will measure {sup 235}U mass flow rate by combining information from measuring the UF{sub 6} volumetric flow rate and the {sup 235}U density. The UF{sub 6} flow rate will be measured using characteristics of the process pumps used in product and tail UF{sub 6} header process lines of many GCEPs, and the {sup 235}U density will be measured using commercially available sodium iodide (NaI) gamma ray scintillation detectors. This report describes the calibration of the portion of the FM that measures the {sup 235}U density. Research has been performed to define a methodology and collect data necessary to perform this calibration without the need for plant declarations. The {sup 235}U density detector is a commercially available system (GammaRad made by Amptek, www.amptek.com) that contains the NaI crystal, photomultiplier tube, signal conditioning electronics, and a multichannel analyzer (MCA). Measurements were made with the detector system installed near four {sup 235}U sources. Two of the sources were made of solid uranium, and the other two were in the form of UF{sub 6} gas in aluminum piping. One of the UF{sub 6} gas sources was located at ORNL and the other at LANL. The ORNL source consisted of two pipe sections (schedule 40 aluminum pipe of 4-inch and 8-inch outside diameter) with 5.36% {sup 235}U enrichment, and the LANL source was a 4-inch schedule 40 aluminum pipe with 3.3% {sup 235}U enrichment. The configurations of the detector on these test sources, as well as on long straight pipe configurations expected to exist at GCEPs, were modeled using the computer code MCNP. The results of the MCNP calculations were used to define geometric correction factors between the test source and the GCEP application. Using these geometric correction factors, the experimental 186 keV counts in the test geometry were extrapolated to the expected GCEP ge

March-Leuba, Jose A [ORNL; Uckan, Taner [ORNL; Gunning, John E [ORNL; Brukiewa, Patrick D [ORNL; Upadhyaya, Belle R [ORNL; Revis, Stephen M [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at Portsmouth, Ohio, Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Main Text and Appendixes A-H 1: Main Text and Appendixes A-H June 2004 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Cover Sheet Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS iii COVER SHEET * RESPONSIBLE FEDERAL AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, Site (DOE/EIS-0360) CONTACT: For further information on this environmental impact statement (EIS), contact: Gary S. Hartman DOE-ORO Cultural Resources Management Coordinator U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 e-mail: Ports_DUF6@anl.gov phone: 1-866-530-0944 fax: 1-866-530-0943 For general information on the DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, contact:

83

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at Portsmouth, Ohio, Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Comment and Response Document 2: Comment and Response Document June 2004 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Comment & Response Document Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS iii COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE FEDERAL AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, Site (DOE/EIS-0360) CONTACT: For further information on this environmental impact statement (EIS), contact: Gary S. Hartman DOE-ORO Cultural Resources Management Coordinator U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 e-mail: Ports_DUF6@anl.gov phone: 1-866-530-0944 fax: 1-866-530-0943 For general information on the DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, contact:

84

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Comment and Response Document 2: Comment and Response Document June 2004 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Comment & Response Document Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS iii COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE FEDERAL AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site (DOE/EIS-0359) CONTACT: For further information on this environmental impact statement (EIS), contact: Gary S. Hartman DOE-ORO Cultural Resources Management Coordinator U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 e-mail: Pad_DUF6@anl.gov phone: 1-866-530-0944 fax: 1-866-530-0943 For general information on the DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process,

85

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Main Text and Appendixes A-H 1: Main Text and Appendixes A-H June 2004 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Cover Sheet Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS iii COVER SHEET * RESPONSIBLE FEDERAL AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site (DOE/EIS-0359) CONTACT: For further information on this environmental impact statement (EIS), contact: Gary S. Hartman DOE-ORO Cultural Resources Management Coordinator U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 e-mail: Pad_DUF6@anl.gov phone: 1-866-530-0944 fax: 1-866-530-0943 For general information on the DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, contact:

86

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Appendix C: Scoping Summary Report for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities - Environmental Impact Statement Scoping Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX C: SCOPING SUMMARY REPORT FOR DEPLETED URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE CONVERSION FACILITIES ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT SCOPING PROCESS Scoping Summary Report C-2 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Scoping Summary Report C-3 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX C This appendix contains the summary report prepared after the initial public scoping period for the depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facilities environmental impact statement (EIS) project. The scoping period for the EIS began with the September 18, 2001, publication of a Notice of Intent (NOI) in the Federal Register (66 FR 23213) and was extended to January 11, 2002. The report summarizes the different types of public involvement opportunities provided and the content of the comments received.

87

DOE Selects Contractor for Depleted Hexafluoride Conversion Project...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in Paducah, Kentucky and Portsmouth, Ohio. For several decades DOE was responsible for uranium enrichment, the uranium hexafluoride depleted in the 235U isotope (typically down...

88

Assessment of the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office Conduct of Operations Oversight of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plants, May 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment of the Assessment of the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office Conduct of Operations Oversight of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plants May 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 2

89

Assessment of the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office Conduct of Operations Oversight of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plants, May 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment of the Assessment of the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office Conduct of Operations Oversight of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plants May 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 2

90

Floodplain/wetland assessment of the effects of construction and operation ofa depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Paducah, Kentucky,site.  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF{sub 6} inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This floodplain/wetland assessment has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to Executive Order 11988 (''Floodplain Management''), Executive Order 11990 (Protection of Wetlands), and DOE regulations for implementing these Executive Orders as set forth in Title 10, Part 1022, of the ''Code of Federal Regulations'' (10 CFR Part 1022 [''Compliance with Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements'']), to evaluate potential impacts to floodplains and wetlands from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Paducah site. Reconstruction of the bridge crossing Bayou Creek would occur within the Bayou Creek 100-year floodplain. Replacement of bridge components, including the bridge supports, however, would not be expected to result in measurable long-term changes to the floodplain. Approximately 0.16 acre (0.064 ha) of palustrine emergent wetlands would likely be eliminated by direct placement of fill material within Location A. Some wetlands that are not filled may be indirectly affected by an altered hydrologic regime, due to the proximity of construction, possibly resulting in a decreased frequency or duration of inundation or soil saturation and potential loss of hydrology necessary to sustain wetland conditions. Indirect impacts could be minimized by maintaining a buffer near adjacent wetlands. Wetlands would likely be impacted by construction at Location B; however, placement of a facility in the northern portion of this location would minimize wetland impacts. Construction at Location C could potentially result in impacts to wetlands, however placement of a facility in the southeastern portion of this location may best avoid direct impacts to wetlands. The hydrologic characteristics of nearby wetlands could be indirectly affected by adjacent construction. Executive Order 11990, ''Protection of Wetlands'', requires federal agencies to minimize the destruction, loss, or degradation of wetlands, and to preserve and enhance the natural and beneficial uses of wetlands. DOE regulations for implementing Executive Order 11990 as well as Executive Order 11988, ''Floodplain Management'', are set forth in 10 CFR Part 1022. Mitigation for unavoidable impacts may be developed in coordination with the appropriate regulatory agencies. Unavoidable impacts to wetlands that are within the jurisdiction of the USACE may require a CWA Section 404 Permit, which would trigger the requirement for a CWA Section 401 Water Quality Certification from the Commonwealth of Kentucky. A mitigation plan may be required prior to the initiation of construction. Cumulative impacts to floodplains and wetlands are anticipated to be negligible to minor under the proposed action, in conjunction with the effects of existing conditions and other activities. Habitat disturbance would involve settings commonly found i

Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

91

Biological assessment of the effects of construction and operation of adepleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio,site.  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF{sub 6} inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This biological assessment (BA) has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 and the Endangered Species Act of 1974, to evaluate potential impacts to federally listed species from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Portsmouth site. The Indiana bat is known to occur in the area of the Portsmouth site and may potentially occur on the site during spring or summer. Evaluations of the Portsmouth site indicated that most of the site was found to have poor summer habitat for the Indiana bat because of the small size, isolation, and insufficient maturity of the few woodlands on the site. Potential summer habitat for the Indiana bat was identified outside the developed area bounded by Perimeter Road, within the corridors along Little Beaver Creek, the Northwest Tributary stream, and a wooded area east of the X-100 facility. However, no Indiana bats were collected during surveys of these areas in 1994 and 1996. Locations A, B, and C do not support suitable habitat for the Indiana bat and would be unlikely to be used by Indiana bats. Indiana bat habitat also does not occur at Proposed Areas 1 and 2. Although Locations A and C contain small wooded areas, the small size and lack of suitable maturity of these areas indicate that they would provide poor habitat for Indiana bats. Trees that may be removed during construction would not be expected to be used for summer roosting by Indiana bats. Disturbance of Indiana bats potentially roosting or foraging in the vicinity of the facility during operations would be very unlikely, and any disturbance would be expected to be negligible. On the basis of these considerations, DOE concludes that the proposed action is not likely to adversely affect the Indiana bat. No critical habitat exists for this species in the action area. Although the timber rattlesnake occurs in the vicinity of the Portsmouth site, it has not been observed on the site. In addition, habitat for the timber rattlesnake is not present on the Portsmouth site. Therefore, DOE concludes that the proposed action would not affect the timber rattlesnake.

Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

92

Biological assessment of the effects of construction and operation of adepleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio,site.  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF{sub 6} inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This biological assessment (BA) has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 and the Endangered Species Act of 1974, to evaluate potential impacts to federally listed species from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Portsmouth site. The Indiana bat is known to occur in the area of the Portsmouth site and may potentially occur on the site during spring or summer. Evaluations of the Portsmouth site indicated that most of the site was found to have poor summer habitat for the Indiana bat because of the small size, isolation, and insufficient maturity of the few woodlands on the site. Potential summer habitat for the Indiana bat was identified outside the developed area bounded by Perimeter Road, within the corridors along Little Beaver Creek, the Northwest Tributary stream, and a wooded area east of the X-100 facility. However, no Indiana bats were collected during surveys of these areas in 1994 and 1996. Locations A, B, and C do not support suitable habitat for the Indiana bat and would be unlikely to be used by Indiana bats. Indiana bat habitat also does not occur at Proposed Areas 1 and 2. Although Locations A and C contain small wooded areas, the small size and lack of suitable maturity of these areas indicate that they would provide poor habitat for Indiana bats. Trees that may be removed during construction would not be expected to be used for summer roosting by Indiana bats. Disturbance of Indiana bats potentially roosting or foraging in the vicinity of the facility during operations would be very unlikely, and any disturbance would be expected to be negligible. On the basis of these considerations, DOE concludes that the proposed action is not likely to adversely affect the Indiana bat. No critical habitat exists for this species in the action area. Although the timber rattlesnake occurs in the vicinity of the Portsmouth site, it has not been observed on the site. In addition, habitat for the timber rattlesnake is not present on the Portsmouth site. Therefore, DOE concludes that the proposed action would not affect the timber rattlesnake.

Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

93

Criteria for Packaging and Storing Uranium-233-Bearing Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3028-2000 3028-2000 July 2000 DOE STANDARD CRITERIA FOR PACKAGING AND STORING URANIUM-233-BEARING MATERIALS U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-3028-2000 iii ABSTRACT This Standard provides guidance for the packaging and long-term (50 years) storage of stabilized, separated uranium-233(

94

Standard test method for the analysis of refrigerant 114, plus other carbon-containing and fluorine-containing compounds in uranium hexafluoride via fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method covers determining the concentrations of refrigerant-114, other carbon-containing and fluorine-containing compounds, hydrocarbons, and partially or completely substituted halohydrocarbons that may be impurities in uranium hexafluoride. The two options are outlined for this test method. They are designated as Part A and Part B. 1.1.1 To provide instructions for performing Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic analysis for the possible presence of Refrigerant-114 impurity in a gaseous sample of uranium hexafluoride, collected in a "2S" container or equivalent at room temperature. The all gas procedure applies to the analysis of possible Refrigerant-114 impurity in uranium hexafluoride, and to the gas manifold system used for FTIR applications. The pressure and temperatures must be controlled to maintain a gaseous sample. The concentration units are in mole percent. This is Part A. 1.2 Part B involves a high pressure liquid sample of uranium hexafluoride. This method can be appli...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Transcript of Public Scoping Meeting for Environmental Impact Statement for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, held Nov. 28, 2001, Piketon, Ohio  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENVIRONMENTAL 2 IMPACT STATEMENT 3 FOR DEPLETED URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE 4 CONVERSION FACILITIES 5 AT PORTSMOUTH, OHIO AND PADUCAH, KENTUCKY 6 7 SCOPING MEETING 8 9 November 28, 2001. 10 11 6:00 p.m. 12 13 Riffe Beavercreek Vocational School 14 175 Beavercreek Road 15 Piketon, Ohio 45661 16 17 FACILITATORS: Darryl Armstrong 18 Harold Munroe 19 Kevin Shaw 20 Gary Hartman 21 22 23 24 Professional Reporters, Inc. (614) 460-5000 or (800) 229-0675 2 1 -=0=- 2 PROCEEDINGS 3 -=0=- 4 MR. ARMSTRONG: I have 6:00, 5 according to my watch. Good evening, ladies 6 and gentlemen. If you'll please take your 7 seats, we'll get started. This meeting is 8 now officially convened. 9 On behalf of DOE, we thank you for 10 attending the environmental impact 11 statement, or EIS, scoping meeting this 12 evening for the depleted uranium conversion 13 facilities. My name is Darryl Armstrong. I 14

96

Tungsten Cladding of Tungsten-Uranium Dioxide (W-UO2) Composites by Deposition from Tungsten Hexafluoride (WF6)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

?A program is being conducted to develop a process for cladding tungsten and tungsten cermet fuels with tungsten deposited from the vapor state by the hydrogen reduction of tungsten hexafluoride. Early work was performed using recrystallized, high purity, commercial tungsten as the substrate material. Temperatures in the range 660 to 12950F (350 to 1700C) and pressures from 10 to 350 mm Hg were investigated. Hydrogen to WF 6 ratios of 10: 1 to 150: 1 were utilized. Efforts were directed toward optimizing deposition process parameters to attain control of qualities such as coating thickness, uniformity, density, impurity content, and surface quality. Substrate penetration methods have been investigated in the interest of completely eliminating the interface between the fueled substrate and cladding. In addition, the effects of process parameters and post-cladding heat treatments on the fuel retention properties of clad composites at 4500 degrees F (2480 degrees C) in hydrogen for 2 hours have been evaluated. As a result of work performed during the first phase of the program it has been shown that the rate of deposition of tungsten from WF 6 and the uniformity of the deposit can be varied in a predictable and reproducible manner by exercising control over the temperature, pressure, and gas flow rates at which the deposits are produced. A significant result of the study is the discovery that substrate nucleation and epitaxial growth in deposits made on both unfueled tungsten and fueled substrates may be effected by pretreating the substrates in hydrogen. High temperature fuel retention testing of tungsten clad W-U02 at 45000F (2480 degrees C) in hydrogen for 2 hours has demonstrated that the vapor deposited layer effectively and consistently restricts fuel loss.

Lamartine, J.T.; Hoppe, A.W.

1965-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

97

Production and Handling Slide 43: The Uranium Fuel Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presentation Table of Contents The Uranium Fuel Cycle Refer to caption below for image description Enriched uranium hexafluoride, generally containing 3 to 5% uranium-235, is sent...

98

PRODUCTION OF URANIUM TETRAFLUORIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is presented for producing uranium tetrafluoride from the gaseous hexafluoride by feeding the hexafluoride into a high temperature zone obtained by the recombination of molecularly dissociated hydrogen. The molal ratio of hydrogen to uranium hexnfluoride is preferably about 3 to 1. Uranium tetrafluoride is obtained in a finely divided, anhydrous state.

Shaw, W.E.; Spenceley, R.M.; Teetzel, F.M.

1959-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Transportation Impact Assessment for Shipment of Uranium Hexafluoride (UF<sub>6</sub>) Cylinders from the East Tennessee Technology Park to the Portsmouth and Paducah Gaseous Diffusion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Transportation Impact Assessment for Shipment of Uranium Hexafluoride (UF 6 ) Cylinders from the East Tennessee Technology Park to the Portsmouth and Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plants Environmental Assessment Division Argonne National Laboratory Operated by The University of Chicago, under Contract W-31-109-Eng-38, for the United States Department of Energy Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory, with facilities in the states of Illinois and Idaho, is owned by the United States Government and operated by The University of Chicago under the provisions of a contract with the Department of Energy. This technical memorandum is a product of Argonne's Environmental Assessment Division (EAD). For information on the division's scientific and engineering

100

DOE Selects Contractor for Depleted Hexafluoride Conversion Project Support  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Selects Contractor for Depleted Hexafluoride Conversion Project DOE Selects Contractor for Depleted Hexafluoride Conversion Project Support DOE Selects Contractor for Depleted Hexafluoride Conversion Project Support March 25, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor, 803-952-8564 Bill.Taylor@srs.gov Cincinnati - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a competitive small business task order to Navarro Research and Engineering Inc. of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The award is a $22 million, time and materials task order with a three-year performance period and two one-year extension options. Navarro Research and Engineering Inc. will provide engineering and operations technical support services to the DOE Portsmouth Paducah Project Office (PPPO) in Lexington, Kentucky and the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Conversion Project in Paducah, Kentucky and Portsmouth, Ohio.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium hexafluoride stored" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

DOE Selects Contractor for Depleted Hexafluoride Conversion Project Support  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contractor for Depleted Hexafluoride Conversion Project Contractor for Depleted Hexafluoride Conversion Project Support DOE Selects Contractor for Depleted Hexafluoride Conversion Project Support March 25, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor, 803-952-8564 Bill.Taylor@srs.gov Cincinnati - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a competitive small business task order to Navarro Research and Engineering Inc. of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The award is a $22 million, time and materials task order with a three-year performance period and two one-year extension options. Navarro Research and Engineering Inc. will provide engineering and operations technical support services to the DOE Portsmouth Paducah Project Office (PPPO) in Lexington, Kentucky and the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Conversion Project in Paducah, Kentucky and Portsmouth, Ohio.

102

Correlation of radioactive-waste-treatment costs and the environmental impact of waste effluents in the nuclear fuel cycle: conversion of yellow cake to uranium hexafluoride. Part II. The solvent extraction-fluorination process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A cost/benefit study was made to determine the cost and effectiveness of radioactive waste (radwaste) treatment systems for decreasing the release of radioactive materials and chemicals from a model uranium hexafluoride (UF/sub 6/) production plant using the solvent extraction-fluorination process, and to evaluate the radiological impact (dose commitment) of the release materials on the environment. The model plant processes 10,000 metric tons of uranium per year. Base-case waste treatment is the minimum necessary to operate the process. Effluents meet the radiological requirements listed in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 20 (10 CFR 20), Appendix B, Table II, but may not be acceptable chemically at all sites. Additional radwaste treatment techniques are applied to the base-case plant in a series of case studies to decrease the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the radiological dose commitment to the population in the surrounding area. The costs for the added waste treatment operations and the corresponding dose committment are correlated with the annual cost for treatment of the radwastes. The status of the radwaste treatment methods used in the case studies is discussed. Much of the technology used in the advanced cases will require development and demonstration, or else is proprietary and unavailable for immediate use. The methodology and assumptions for the radiological doses are found in ORNL-4992.

Sears, M.B.; Etnier, E.L.; Hill, G.S.; Patton, B.D.; Witherspoon, J.P.; Yen, S.N.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

THE RECOVERY OF URANIUM FROM GAS MIXTURE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of separating uranium from a mixture of uranium hexafluoride and other gases is described that comprises bringing the mixture into contact with anhydrous calcium sulfate to preferentially absorb the uranium hexafluoride on the sulfate. The calcium sulfate is then leached with a selective solvent for the adsorbed uranium. (AEC)

Jury, S.H.

1964-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

104

Production and Handling Slide 5: The Uranium Fuel Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Refer to caption below for image description The third step in the uranium fuel cycle involves the conversion of "yellowcake" to uranium hexafluoride (UF6), the chemical form...

105

Production and Handling Slide 37: The Uranium Fuel Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Table of Contents The Uranium Fuel Cycle Refer to caption below for image description The enrichment process generates two streams of uranium hexafluoride, one enriched in...

106

PRODUCTION OF URANIUM TETRACHLORIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is descrlbed for the production of uranium tetrachloride by contacting uranlum values such as uranium hexafluoride, uranlum tetrafluoride, or uranium oxides with either aluminum chloride, boron chloride, or sodium alumlnum chloride under substantially anhydrous condltlons at such a temperature and pressure that the chlorldes are maintained in the molten form and until the uranium values are completely converted to uranlum tetrachloride.

Calkins, V.P.

1958-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

107

Process for producing enriched uranium having a {sup 235}U content of at least 4 wt. % via combination of a gaseous diffusion process and an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process to eliminate uranium hexafluoride tails storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An uranium enrichment process capable of producing an enriched uranium, having a {sup 235}U content greater than about 4 wt. %, is disclosed which will consume less energy and produce metallic uranium tails having a lower {sup 235}U content than the tails normally produced in a gaseous diffusion separation process and, therefore, eliminate UF{sub 6} tails storage and sharply reduce fluorine use. The uranium enrichment process comprises feeding metallic uranium into an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process to produce an enriched metallic uranium isotopic mixture having a {sup 235} U content of at least about 2 wt. % and a metallic uranium residue containing from about 0.1 wt. % to about 0.2 wt. % {sup 235} U; fluorinating this enriched metallic uranium isotopic mixture to form UF{sub 6}; processing the resultant isotopic mixture of UF{sub 6} in a gaseous diffusion process to produce a final enriched uranium product having a {sup 235}U content of at least 4 wt. %, and up to 93.5 wt. % or higher, of the total uranium content of the product, and a low {sup 235}U content UF{sub 6} having a {sup 235}U content of about 0.71 wt. % of the total uranium content of the low {sup 235}U content UF{sub 6}; and converting this low {sup 235}U content UF{sub 6} to metallic uranium for recycle to the atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. 4 figs.

Horton, J.A.; Hayden, H.W. Jr.

1995-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

108

Process for producing enriched uranium having a .sup.235 U content of at least 4 wt. % via combination of a gaseous diffusion process and an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process to eliminate uranium hexafluoride tails storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An uranium enrichment process capable of producing an enriched uranium, having a .sup.235 U content greater than about 4 wt. %, is disclosed which will consume less energy and produce metallic uranium tails having a lower .sup.235 U content than the tails normally produced in a gaseous diffusion separation process and, therefore, eliminate UF.sub.6 tails storage and sharply reduce fluorine use. The uranium enrichment process comprises feeding metallic uranium into an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process to produce an enriched metallic uranium isotopic mixture having a .sup.235 U content of at least about 2 wt. % and a metallic uranium residue containing from about 0.1 wt. % to about 0.2 wt. % .sup.235 U; fluorinating this enriched metallic uranium isotopic mixture to form UF.sub.6 ; processing the resultant isotopic mixture of UF.sub.6 in a gaseous diffusion process to produce a final enriched uranium product having a .sup.235 U content of at least 4 wt. %, and up to 93.5 wt. % or higher, of the total uranium content of the product, and a low .sup.235 U content UF.sub.6 having a .sup.235 U content of about 0.71 wt. % of the total uranium content of the low .sup.235 U content UF.sub.6 ; and converting this low .sup.235 U content UF.sub.6 to metallic uranium for recycle to the atomic vapor laser isotope separation process.

Horton, James A. (Livermore, CA); Hayden, Jr., Howard W. (Oakridge, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Safeguarding a NWS International Enrichment Center as an Enriched Uranium Store  

SciTech Connect

The operational and regulatory singularities of a multilateral facility designed to provide enriched uranium to a consortium of members may engender a new sub-category of safeguard criteria for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This paper introduces the contingency of monitoring such a facility as a uranium storage center with cylinders containing low-enriched uranium (LEU) as the principal, and perhaps only, material open to verification. Accountancy and verification techniques will be proffered together with disparate means for maintaining continuity of knowledge (CoK) on verified stock.

Curtis, Michael M.

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

110

Derived enriched uranium market  

SciTech Connect

The potential impact on the uranium market of highly enriched uranium from nuclear weapons dismantling in the Russian Federation and the USA is analyzed. Uranium supply, conversion, and enrichment factors are outlined for each country; inventories are also listed. The enrichment component and conversion components are expected to cause little disruption to uranium markets. The uranium component of Russian derived enriched uranium hexafluoride is unresolved; US legislation places constraints on its introduction into the US market.

Rutkowski, E.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Transcript of Public Scoping Meeting for Environmental Impact Statement for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, held Dec. 4, 2001, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TRANSCRIPT TRANSCRIPT OF MEETING ______________________________________________________ FACILITATOR: MR. DARRYL ARMSTRONG SPEAKER: MR. DALE RECTOR SPEAKER: MR. NORMAN MULVENON SPEAKER: MS. SUSAN GAWARECKI SPEAKER: MR. GENE HOFFMAN DECEMBER 4, 2001 ____________________________________________________ JOAN S. ROBERTS COURT REPORTER P.O. BOX 5924 OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE 37831 (865-457-4027) 2 1 MR. ARMSTRONG: TAKE YOUR SEATS AND WE 2 WILL BEGIN THE MEETING. GOOD EVENING, LADIES 3 AND GENTLEMEN. IF YOU WILL, WE WILL START, THE 4 TIME IS NOW 6:02 P.M. THE MEETING IS 5 OFFICIALLY CONVENED. ON BEHALF OF THE 6 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, WE THANK YOU FOR 7 ATTENDING THIS ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT 8 SCOPING MEETING, ALSO KNOWN AS AN EIS SCOPING 9 MEETING, FOR THE DEPLETED URANIUM CONVERSION 10 FACILITIES. MY NAME IS DARRYL ARMSTRONG. I'M 11 AN INDEPENDENT AND NEUTRAL FACILITATOR HIRED BY 12 AGENCIES

112

Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program: Data Compilation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Code USEC United States Enrichment Corporation Chemicals AlF 3 aluminum trifluoride CaF 2 calcium fluoride CO carbon monoxide Fe iron HF hydrogen fluoride HNO 3 nitric acid Mg...

113

Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program: Data Compilation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts Associated with Continued Storage of the Entire Portsmouth Site Cylinder Inventory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-51 3.5.1 Approach Used to...

114

Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Materials Use Roadmap  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 U.S. Department of Energy DUF 6 MATERIALS USE ROADMAP Edited by: M. Jonathan Haire Allen G. Croff August 27, 2001 DUF 6 Materials Use Workshop Participants August 24-25, 1999 Name Organization Halil Avci ANL Bob Bernero Consultant Lavelle Clark PNNL Carl Cooley DOE/EM-50 Allen Croff ORNL Juan Ferrada ORNL Charles Forsberg ORNL John Gasper ANL Bob Hightower ORNL Julian Hill PNNL Ed Jones LLNL Asim Khawaja PNNL George Larson Consultant Paul Lessing INEEL Dan O'Connor ORNL Robert Price DOE/NE-30 Nancy Ranek ANL Mark Senderling DOE/RW-46 Roger Spence ORNL John Tseng DOE/EM-21 John Warren DOE/NE-30 Ken Young LLNL iii CONTENTS ACRONYMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v EXECUTIVE SUMMARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii 1. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

115

EIS-0360: Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product at the Portsmouth, Ohio  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

60: Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product at the 60: Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product at the Portsmouth, Ohio Site EIS-0360: Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product at the Portsmouth, Ohio Site Summary This site-specific EIS analyzes the construction, operation, maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning of the proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) conversion facility at three alternative locations within the Portsmouth site; transportation of all cylinders (DUF6, enriched, and empty) currently stored at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to Portsmouth; construction of a new cylinder storage yard at Portsmouth (if required) for ETTP cylinders; transportation of depleted uranium conversion products and waste materials to a disposal facility; transportation and sale of the hydrogen fluoride

116

DISSOLUTION OF URANIUM FUELS BY MONOOR DIFLUOROPHOSPHORIC ACID  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of dissolving and separating uranium from a uranium matrix fuel element by dissolving the uraniumcontaining matrix in monofluorophosphoric acid and/or difluorophosphoric acid at temperatures ranging from 150 to 275 un. Concent 85% C, thereafter neutralizing the solution to precipitate uranium solids, and converting the solids to uranium hexafluoride by treatment with a halogen trifluoride is presented. (AEC)

Johnson, R.; Horn, F.L.; Strickland, G.

1963-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Depleted uranium: A DOE management guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a management challenge and financial liability in the form of 50,000 cylinders containing 555,000 metric tons of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) that are stored at the gaseous diffusion plants. The annual storage and maintenance cost is approximately $10 million. This report summarizes several studies undertaken by the DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD) to evaluate options for long-term depleted uranium management. Based on studies conducted to date, the most likely use of the depleted uranium is for shielding of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) or vitrified high-level waste (HLW) containers. The alternative to finding a use for the depleted uranium is disposal as a radioactive waste. Estimated disposal costs, utilizing existing technologies, range between $3.8 and $11.3 billion, depending on factors such as applicability of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the location of the disposal site. The cost of recycling the depleted uranium in a concrete based shielding in SNF/HLW containers, although substantial, is comparable to or less than the cost of disposal. Consequently, the case can be made that if DOE invests in developing depleted uranium shielded containers instead of disposal, a long-term solution to the UF{sub 6} problem is attained at comparable or lower cost than disposal as a waste. Two concepts for depleted uranium storage casks were considered in these studies. The first is based on standard fabrication concepts previously developed for depleted uranium metal. The second converts the UF{sub 6} to an oxide aggregate that is used in concrete to make dry storage casks.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Reducing Sulfur Hexafluoride Use at LANSCE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U N C L A S S I F I E D U N C L A S S I F I E D Reducing Sulfur Hexafluoride Use at LANSCE Hank Alvestad presents to the Fugitive Emissions Working Group September 8, 2011...

119

Depleted uranium management alternatives  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates two management alternatives for Department of Energy depleted uranium: continued storage as uranium hexafluoride, and conversion to uranium metal and fabrication to shielding for spent nuclear fuel containers. The results will be used to compare the costs with other alternatives, such as disposal. Cost estimates for the continued storage alternative are based on a life-cycle of 27 years through the year 2020. Cost estimates for the recycle alternative are based on existing conversion process costs and Capital costs for fabricating the containers. Additionally, the recycle alternative accounts for costs associated with intermediate product resale and secondary waste disposal for materials generated during the conversion process.

Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

METHOD OF DEHYDRATING URANIUM TETRAFLUORIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Drying and dehydration of aqueous-precipitated uranium tetrafluoride are described. The UF/sub 4/ which normally contains 3 to 4% water, is dispersed into the reaction zone of an operating reactor wherein uranium hexafluoride is being reduced to UF/sub 4/ with hydrogen. The water-containing UF/sub 4/ is dried and blended with the UF/sub 4/ produced in the reactor without interfering with the reduction reaction. (AEC)

Davis, J.O.; Fogel, C.C.; Palmer, W.E.

1962-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium hexafluoride stored" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

ELECTROLYTIC PRODUCTION OF URANIUM TETRAFLUORIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to electrolytic methods for the production of uranium tetrafluoride. According to the present invention a process for the production of uranium tetrafluoride comprises submitting to electrolysis an aqueous solution of uranyl fluoride containing free hydrofluoric acid. Advantageously the aqueous solution of uranyl fluoride is obtained by dissolving uranium hexafluoride in water. On electrolysis, the uranyl ions are reduced to uranous tons at the cathode and immediately combine with the fluoride ions in solution to form the insoluble uranium tetrafluoride which is precipitated.

Lofthouse, E.

1954-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

122

Wetland assessment of the effects of construction and operation of a depleteduranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, site.  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF{sub 6} inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This wetland assessment has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to Executive Order 11990 (''Protection of Wetlands'') and DOE regulations for implementing this Executive Order as set forth in Title 10, Part 1022, of the ''Code of Federal Regulations'' (10 CFR Part 1022 [Compliance with Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements]), to evaluate potential impacts to wetlands from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Portsmouth site. Approximately 0.02 acre (0.009 ha) of a 0.08-acre (0.03-ha) palustrine emergent wetland would likely be eliminated by direct placement of fill material during facility construction at Location A. Portions of this wetland that are not filled may be indirectly affected by an altered hydrologic regime because of the proximity of construction, possibly resulting in a decreased frequency or duration of inundation or soil saturation, and potential loss of hydrology necessary to sustain wetland conditions. Construction at Locations B or C would not result in direct impacts to wetlands. However, the hydrologic characteristics of nearby wetlands could be indirectly affected by adjacent construction. Executive Order 11990, ''Protection of Wetlands'', requires federal agencies to minimize the destruction, loss, or degradation of wetlands, and to preserve and enhance the natural and beneficial uses of wetlands. DOE regulations for implementing Executive Order 11990 are set forth in 10 CFR Part 1022. The impacts at Location A may potentially be avoided by an alternative routing of the entrance road, or mitigation may be developed in coordination with the appropriate regulatory agencies. Unavoidable impacts to wetlands that are within the jurisdiction of the USACE may require a CWA Section 404 Permit, which would trigger the requirement for a CWA Section 401 Water Quality Certification from the State of Ohio. Unavoidable impacts to isolated wetlands may require an Isolated Wetlands Permit from the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency. A mitigation plan may be required prior to the initiation of construction. Cumulative impacts to wetlands are anticipated to be negligible to minor for the proposed action, in conjunction with the effects of existing conditions and other activities. Habitat disturbance would involve settings commonly found in this part of Ohio, which in many cases involve previously disturbed habitats.

Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

123

FAQ 30-Have there been accidents involving uranium hexafluoride...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UF6 was released, which reacted with steam from the process and created HF and uranyl fluoride. This accident resulted in two deaths from HF inhalation and three individuals...

124

NEPA Activities for the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ETTP) to some other stable chemical form acceptable for transportation, beneficial usereuse, andor disposal. Conversion facilities will be constructed at Paducah and...

125

U.S. transparency monitoring of HEU oxide conversion and blending to LEU hexafluoride at three Russian blending plants  

SciTech Connect

The down-blending of Russian highly enriched uranium (HEU) takes place at three Russian gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants. The fluorination of HEU oxide and down-blending of HEU hexafluoride began in 1994, and shipments of low enriched uranium (LEU) hexafluoride product to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) began in 1995 US transparency monitoring under the HEU Purchase Agreement began in 1996 and includes a permanent monitoring presence US transparency monitoring at these facilities is intended to provide confidence that HEU is received and down-blended to LEU for shipment to USEC The monitoring begins with observation of the receipt of HEU oxide shipments, including confirmation of enrichment using US nondestructive assay equipment The feeding of HEU oxide to the fluorination process and the withdrawal of HEU hexafluoride are monitored Monitoring is also conducted where the blending takes place and where shipping cylinders are filled with LEU product. A series of process and material accountancy documents are provided to US monitors.

Leich, D., LLNL

1998-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

126

Trifluoromethyl Sulfur Pentafluoride (SF5CF3) and Sulfur Hexafluoride...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sulfur Pentafluoride (SF5CF3) and Sulfur Hexafluoride (SF6) from Dome Concordia graphics Graphics data Data Investigators W. T. Sturges,1 T. J. Wallington,2 M. D. Hurley,2 K....

127

Anchor Stores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Planned shopping malls usually have one or more department stores (anchor stores) and multiple specialized retail stores in each commodity category. This paper presents a model of shopping malls in which these two types of stores sell noncomplementary commodities. If anchor stores sell standard (riskless yet low-value) commodities and retail stores sell specialized (high variance yet high expected value) commodities, then each type of store may benefit from collocating with the other, even though the stores sell substitutable products. The underlying intuition is that the presence of each type of retailer enhances consumer traffic at the shopping mall, which benefits the retailer or retailers of the other type. Under some parametric restrictions, the value of this increased traffic more than offsets the loss in markups due to competition from additional sellers at the mall. In this case, it is in a land developer's interest to rent retail space in the mall to both types of retailers. A Tiebout-like argument explains the striking similarity in the composition of stores in planned shopping malls.

Hideo Konishi; Michael T. Sandfort

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

FAQ 7-How is depleted uranium produced?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How is depleted uranium produced? How is depleted uranium produced? How is depleted uranium produced? Depleted uranium is produced during the uranium enrichment process. In the United States, uranium is enriched through the gaseous diffusion process in which the compound uranium hexafluoride (UF6) is heated and converted from a solid to a gas. The gas is then forced through a series of compressors and converters that contain porous barriers. Because uranium-235 has a slightly lighter isotopic mass than uranium-238, UF6 molecules made with uranium-235 diffuse through the barriers at a slightly higher rate than the molecules containing uranium-238. At the end of the process, there are two UF6 streams, with one stream having a higher concentration of uranium-235 than the other. The stream having the greater uranium-235 concentration is referred to as enriched UF6, while the stream that is reduced in its concentration of uranium-235 is referred to as depleted UF6. The depleted UF6 can be converted to other chemical forms, such as depleted uranium oxide or depleted uranium metal.

129

FLUORIDE VOLATILITY PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY OF URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The separation and recovery of uraniunn from contaminants introduced by neutron irradiation by a halogenation and volatilization method are described. The irradiated uranium is dissolved in bromine trifluoride in the liquid phase. The uranium is converted to the BrF/sub 3/ soluble urmium hexafluoride compound whereas the fluorides of certain contaminating elements are insoluble in liquid BrF/sub 3/, and the reaction rate of the BrF/sub 3/ with certain other solid uranium contamirnnts is sufficiently slower than the reaction rate with uranium that substantial portions of these contaminating elements will remain as solids. These solids are then separated from the solution by a distillation, filtration, or centrifugation step. The uranium hexafluoride is then separated from the balance of the impurities and solvent by one or more distillations.

Katz, J.J.; Hyman, H.H.; Sheft, I.

1958-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

PLATINUM HEXAFLUORIDE AND METHOD OF FLUORINATING PLUTONIUM CONTAINING MIXTURES THERE-WITH  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The preparation of platinum hexafluoride and its use as a fluorinating agent in a process for separating plutonium from fission products is presented. According to the invention, platinum is reacted with fluorine gas at from 900 to 1100 deg C to form platinum hexafluoride. The platinum hexafluoride is then contacted with the plutonium containing mixture at room temperature to form plutonium hexafluoride which is more volatile than the fission products fluorides and therefore can be isolated by distillation.

Malm, J.G.; Weinstock, B.; Claassen, H.H.

1959-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Apparatus for storing hydrogen isotopes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An improved method and apparatus for storing isotopes of hydrogen (especially tritium) are provided. The hydrogen gas(es) is (are) stored as hydrides of material (for example uranium) within boreholes in a block of copper. The mass of the block is critically important to the operation, as is the selection of copper, because no cooling pipes are used. Because no cooling pipes are used, there can be no failure due to cooling pipes. And because copper is used instead of stainless steel, a significantly higher temperature can be reached before the eutectic formation of uranium with copper occurs, (the eutectic of uranium with the iron in stainless steel forming at a significantly lower temperature).

McMullen, John W. (Los Alamos, NM); Wheeler, Michael G. (Los Alamos, NM); Cullingford, Hatice S. (Houston, TX); Sherman, Robert H. (Los Alamos, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Uranium Enrichment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enrichment Depleted Uranium line line Uranium Enrichment Depleted Uranium Health Effects Uranium Enrichment A description of the uranium enrichment process, including gaseous...

133

Storing Hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Researchers have been studying mesoporous materials for almost two decades with a view to using them as hosts for small molecules and scaffolds for molding organic compounds into new hybrid materials and nanoparticles. Their use as potential storage systems for large quantities of hydrogen has also been mooted. Such systems that might hold large quantities of hydrogen safely and in a very compact volume would have enormous potential for powering fuel cell vehicles, for instance. A sponge-like form of silicon dioxide, the stuff of sand particles and computer chips, can soak up and store other compounds including hydrogen. Studies carried out at the XOR/BESSRC 11-ID-B beamline at the APS have revealed that the nanoscopic properties of the hydrogenrich compound ammonia borane help it store hydrogen more efficiently than usual. The material may have potential for addressing the storage issues associated with a future hydrogen economy. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

Kim, Hyun Jeong; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Autrey, Thomas; Chupas, Peter; Proffen, Thomas E.

2010-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

134

A LABORATORY INVESTIGATION OF THE FLUORINATION OF CRUDE URANIUM TETRAFLUORIDE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ore concentrates were converted directly to crude uranium tetrafluoride by hydrogen reduction aad hydrofluorination in fluidized-bed reactors. Small- scale laboratory experiments demonstrated that this process can be extended to the production of crude uranium hexafluoride through fluorination of the uranium tetrafluoride in a fluidized bed. The satisfactory temperature range for the reaction lies between 300 and 600 deg C. At 450 deg C the fluorine utilization is between 50 and 80%. With excess fluorine, over 99% of the uranium is volatilized from the solid material. The fluidization characteristics of certain materials are improved by the addition of an inert solid diluent to the bed. (auth) .

Sandus, O.; Steunenberg, R.K.

1957-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

CONTINUOUS PROCESS FOR PREPARING URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE FROM URANIUM TETRAFLUORIDE AND OXYGEN  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for preparing UF/sub 6/ by reacting UF/sub 4/ and oxygen is described. The UF/sub 4/ and oxygen are continuously introduced into a fluidized bed of UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/ at a temperature of 600 to 900 deg C. The concentration of UF/sub 4/ in the bed is maintained below 25 weight per cent in order to avoid sintering and intermediate compound formation. By-product U0/sub 2/F/sub 2/ is continuously removed from the top of the bed recycled. In an alternative embodiment heat is supplied to the reaction bed by burning carbon monoxide in the bed. The product UF/sub 6/ is filtered to remove entrained particles and is recovered in cold traps and chemical traps. (AEC)

Adams, J.B.; Bresee, J.C.; Ferris, L.M.

1961-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

136

FAQ 3-What are the common forms of uranium?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are the common forms of uranium? are the common forms of uranium? What are the common forms of uranium? Uranium can take many chemical forms. In nature, uranium is generally found as an oxide, such as in the olive-green-colored mineral pitchblende. Uranium oxide is also the chemical form most often used for nuclear fuel. Uranium-fluorine compounds are also common in uranium processing, with uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and uranium tetrafluoride (UF4) being the two most common. In its pure form, uranium is a silver-colored metal. The most common forms of uranium oxide are U3O8 and UO2. Both oxide forms have low solubility in water and are relatively stable over a wide range of environmental conditions. Triuranium octaoxide (U3O8) is the most stable form of uranium and is the form most commonly found in nature. Uranium dioxide (UO2) is the form in which uranium is most commonly used as a nuclear reactor fuel. At ambient temperatures, UO2 will gradually convert to U3O8. Because of their stability, uranium oxides are generally considered the preferred chemical form for storage or disposal.

137

Study of Chemical Changes in Uranium Oxyfluoride Particles Progress Report March - October 2009  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear forensics relies on the analysis of certain sample characteristics to determine the origin and history of a nuclear material. In the specific case of uranium enrichment facilities, it is the release of trace amounts of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) gas - used for the enrichment of uranium - that leaves a process-characteristic fingerprint. When UF{sub 6} gas interacts with atmospheric moisture, uranium oxyfluoride particles or particle agglomerates are formed with sizes ranging from several microns down to a few tens of nanometers. These particles are routinely collected by safeguards organizations, such as the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), allowing them to verify whether a facility is compliant with its declarations. Spectrometric analysis of uranium particles from UF{sub 6} hydrolysis has revealed the presence of both particles that contain fluorine, and particles that do not. It is therefore assumed that uranium oxyfluoride is unstable, and decomposes to form uranium oxide. Understanding the rate of fluorine loss in uranium oxyfluoride particles, and the parameters that control it, may therefore contribute to placing boundaries on the particle's exposure time in the environment. Expressly for the purpose of this study, we prepared a set of uranium oxyfluoride particles at the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (EU-JRC-IRMM) from a static release of UF{sub 6} in a humid atmosphere. The majority of the samples was stored in controlled temperature, humidity and lighting conditions. Single particles were characterized by a suite of micro-analytical techniques, including NanoSIMS, micro-Raman spectrometry (MRS), scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX) and focused ion beam (FIB). The small particle size was found to be the main analytical challenge. The relative amount of fluorine, as well as the particle chemical composition and morphology were determined at different stages in the ageing process, and immediately after preparation. This report summarizes our most recent findings for each of the analytical techniques listed above, and provides an outlook on what remains to be resolved. Additional spectroscopic and mass spectrometric measurements were carried out at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, but are not included in this summary.

Kips, R; Kristo, M; Hutcheon, I

2009-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

138

EA-1290: Disposition of Russian Federation Titled Natural Uranium |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

290: Disposition of Russian Federation Titled Natural Uranium 290: Disposition of Russian Federation Titled Natural Uranium EA-1290: Disposition of Russian Federation Titled Natural Uranium SUMMARY This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to transport up to an average of 9,000 metric tons per year of natural uranium as uranium hexafluoride (UF6) from the United States to the Russian Federation. This amount of uranium is equivalent to 13,3000 metric tons of UF6. The EA also examines the impacts of this action on the global commons. Transfer of natural UF6 to the Russian Federation is part of a joint U.S./Russian program to dispose of highly enriched uranium (HEU) from dismantled Russian nuclear weapons. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD

139

Nitrous oxide as a substitute for sulfur hexafluoride in the ANSI/ASHRAE 110 Method of hood performance evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ANSI/ASHRAE 110 Method is the standard test for laboratory hood containment performance. Sulfur hexafluoride is specified as the gas most suitable for this test and is most commonly used. Sulfur hexafluoride use has ...

Guffey, Eric J. (Eric Jemison)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

EA-1172: Sale of Surplus Natural and Low Enriched Uranium, Piketon, Ohio  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to sell uranium for subsequent enrichment and fabrication into commercial nuclear power reactor fuel. The uranium is currently stored...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium hexafluoride stored" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

DOE/EA-1607: Final Environmental Assessment for Disposition of DOE Excess Depleted Uranium, Natural Uranium, and Low-Enriched Uranium (June 2009)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

μCi/cc microcuries per cubic centimeter μCi/cc microcuries per cubic centimeter MAP mitigation action plan MEI maximally exposed individual mg/kg milligrams per kilogram mrem millirem mSv millisievert MT metric ton MTCA Model Toxics Control Act MTU metric tons of uranium N/A not applicable Final Environmental Assessment: Disposition of DOE Excess Depleted Uranium, Natural Uranium, and Low-Enriched Uranium vi NAAQS National Ambient Air Quality Standards NEF National Enrichment Facility NEPA National Environmental Policy Act NRC U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission NU natural uranium NUF 6 natural uranium hexafluoride pCi/g picocuries per gram PEIS programmatic environmental impact statement PM 2.5 particulate matter with a diameter of 2.5 microns or less PM 10 particulate matter with a diameter of 10 microns or less

142

Depleted Uranium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Depleted Uranium Depleted Uranium Depleted Uranium line line Uranium Enrichment Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium Depleted uranium is uranium that has had some of its U-235 content removed. Over the last four decades, large quantities of uranium were processed by gaseous diffusion to produce uranium having a higher concentration of uranium-235 than the 0.72% that occurs naturally (called "enriched" uranium) for use in U.S. national defense and civilian applications. "Depleted" uranium is also a product of the enrichment process. However, depleted uranium has been stripped of some of its natural uranium-235 content. Most of the Department of Energy's (DOE) depleted uranium inventory contains between 0.2 to 0.4 weight-percent uranium-235, well

143

Method for fluorination of uranium oxide  

SciTech Connect

Highly pure uranium hexafluoride is made from uranium oxide and fluorine. The uranium oxide, which includes UO.sub.3, UO.sub.2, U.sub.3 O.sub.8 and mixtures thereof, is introduced together with a small amount of a fluorine-reactive substance, selected from alkali chlorides, silicon dioxide, silicic acid, ferric oxide, and bromine, into a constant volume reaction zone. Sufficient fluorine is charged into the zone at a temperature below approximately 0.degree. C. to provide an initial pressure of at least approximately 600 lbs/sq. in. at the ambient atmospheric temperature. The temperature is then allowed to rise in the reaction zone until reaction occurs.

Petit, George S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Nuclear & Uranium  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel ... nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy. Comprehensive data summaries, comparisons, analysis, and projections ...

145

Video Stores: Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Journal, and a former video manager of Kim's Mediapolis inMEDIA FELDS J O U R N A L Video Stores Introduction Jeffa specific media space: the video rental store. We were

Scheible, Jeff; Neves, Joshua

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Nitrous oxide as a substitute for sulfur hexafluoride in the ANSI/ASHRAE 110 Method of hood performance evaluation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The ANSI/ASHRAE 110 Method is the standard test for laboratory hood containment performance. Sulfur hexafluoride is specified as the gas most suitable for this test (more)

Guffey, Eric J. (Eric Jemison)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Barriers and Issues Related to Achieving Final Disposition of Depleted Uranium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Approximately 750,000 metric tons (MT) of surplus depleted uranium (DU) in various chemical forms are stored at several Department of Energy (DOE) sites throughout the United States. Most of the DU is in the form of DU hexafluoride (DUF6) that resulted from uranium enrichment operations over the last several decades. DOE plans to convert the DUF6 to ''a more stable form'' that could be any one or combination of DU tetrafluoride (DUF4 or green salt), DU oxide (DUO3, DUO2, or DU3O8), or metal depending on the final disposition chosen for any given quantity. Barriers to final disposition of this material have existed historically and some continue today. Currently, the barriers are more related to finding uses for this material versus disposing as waste. Even though actions are beginning to convert the DUF6, ''final'' disposition of the converted material has yet to be decided. Unless beneficial uses can be implemented, DOE plans to dispose of this material as waste. This expresses the main barrier to DU disposition; DOE's strategy is to dispose unless uses can be found while the strategy should be only dispose as a last resort and make every effort to find uses. To date, only minimal research programs are underway to attempt to develop non-fuel uses for this material. Other issues requiring resolution before these inventories can reach final disposition (uses or disposal) include characterization, disposal of large quantities, storage (current and future), and treatment options. Until final disposition is accomplished, these inventories must be managed in a safe and environmentally sound manner; however, this is becoming more difficult as materials and facilities age. The most noteworthy final disposition technical issues include the development of reuse and treatment options.

Gillas, D. L.; Chambers, B. K.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

148

Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

123 123 Federal Register / Vol. 66, No. 181 / Tuesday, September 18, 2001 / Notices Section 615-Procedural Safeguards Topic Addressed: Due Process Hearings * Letter dated April 19, 2001 to Virginia Department of Education Director Judith A. Douglas, regarding whether a State educational agency is required to convene a due process hearing initiated by someone other than the parent of a child with a disability or a public agency. Topic Addressed: Surrogate Parents * Letter dated April 16, 2001 to Pinal County, Arizona Deputy County Attorney Linda L. Harant, regarding the appointment of surrogate parents for children who are wards of a tribal court. Topic Addressed: Student Discipline * Letter dated April 16, 2001 to Professor Perry A. Zirkel, regarding the calculation of disciplinary removals of

149

THE CHEMISTRY OF THE REACTION OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE WITH ACTIVATED CARBON  

SciTech Connect

The effects of temperature, time and other variables on the rate and extent of reaction between UF/sub 6/ and various types, grades and particle sizes of commercial activated carbon have been studied experimentally. It is shown that both hydrolysis and reduction of the UF/sub 6/ occur, the latter more slowly than the former. Reduction leads to the formation of a mixture of fluorocarbons ranging from CF/sub 4/ to a wax-like maternial volatile only above 250 deg C. There is also evidence for the adsorption of UF/sub 6/ on an undetermined substrate. (auth)

Wilson, T.P.; Schuman, S.C.; Simons, E.L.

1946-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

150

FAQ 21-What happens if a cylinder of uranium hexafluoride leaks...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(breach) occurs and the depleted UF6 is exposed to water vapor in the air, uranyl fluoride (UO2F2) and hydrogen fluoride (HF) are formed. The uranyl fluoride is a solid that...

151

Assessment of Preferred Depleted Uranium Disposal Forms  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of converting about 700,000 metric tons (MT) of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) containing 475,000 MT of depleted uranium (DU) to a stable form more suitable for long-term storage or disposal. Potential conversion forms include the tetrafluoride (DUF4), oxide (DUO2 or DU3O8), or metal. If worthwhile beneficial uses cannot be found for the DU product form, it will be sent to an appropriate site for disposal. The DU products are considered to be low-level waste (LLW) under both DOE orders and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. The objective of this study was to assess the acceptability of the potential DU conversion products at potential LLW disposal sites to provide a basis for DOE decisions on the preferred DU product form and a path forward that will ensure reliable and efficient disposal.

Croff, A.G.; Hightower, J.R.; Lee, D.W.; Michaels, G.E.; Ranek, N.L.; Trabalka, J.R.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

NUCLEAR BOMBS FROM LOW- ENRICHED URANIUM OR SPENT FUEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conventional wisdom says that low-enriched uranium is not suitable for making nuclear weapons. However, an article in USA Today claims that rogue states and terrorists have discovered that this is untrue. Not only that, but terrorists could separate plutonium from irradiated fuel (often called spent fuel) more easily than previously thought. (584.5495) WISE Amsterdam Lowenriched uranium (LEU) is uranium containing up to 20 % uranium-235. Uranium with higher enrichment levels is classified as high-enriched, and is subject to international safeguards because it can be used to make nuclear weapons. However, a USA Today article claims that rogue countries and terrorists have discovered that it is possible to make nuclear weapons with uranium of lower enrichment, according to classified nuclear threat reports (1). The information is not entirely new. Back in 1996, a standard book on nuclear weapons material stated, a self-sustaining chain reaction in a nuclear weapon cannot occur in depleted or natural or low-enriched uranium and is only theoretically IN THIS ISSUE: possible in LEU of roughly 10 percent or greater (2). Fuel for nuclear power reactors would not be suitable this is typically enriched to 3-5 % uranium-235. However, for a rogue state wanting to make high-enriched uranium, it would take less work to start with nuclear fuel than with natural uranium. It could be done in a small and easy to hide uranium enrichment plant perhaps similar to the plant which has recently been discovered in Iran (3). Nevertheless, it would still require a substantial operation, since the fuel would need to be converted to uranium hexafluoride, enriched and then reconverted to uranium metal. More significantly, many research reactors use uranium of just under

unknown authors

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

India's Worsening Uranium Shortage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a result of NSG restrictions, India cannot import the natural uranium required to fuel its Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs); consequently, it is forced to rely on the expediency of domestic uranium production. However, domestic production from mines and byproduct sources has not kept pace with demand from commercial reactors. This shortage has been officially confirmed by the Indian Planning Commissions Mid-Term Appraisal of the countrys current Five Year Plan. The report stresses that as a result of the uranium shortage, Indian PHWR load factors have been continually decreasing. The Uranium Corporation of India Ltd (UCIL) operates a number of underground mines in the Singhbhum Shear Zone of Jharkhand, and it is all processed at a single mill in Jaduguda. UCIL is attempting to aggrandize operations by establishing new mines and mills in other states, but the requisite permit-gathering and development time will defer production until at least 2009. A significant portion of Indias uranium comes from byproduct sources, but a number of these are derived from accumulated stores that are nearing exhaustion. A current maximum estimate of indigenous uranium production is 430t/yr (230t from mines and 200t from byproduct sources); whereas, the current uranium requirement for Indian PHWRs is 455t/yr (depending on plant capacity factor). This deficit is exacerbated by the additional requirements of the Indian weapons program. Present power generation capacity of Indian nuclear plants is 4350 MWe. The power generation target set by the Indian Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) is 20,000 MWe by the year 2020. It is expected that around half of this total will be provided by PHWRs using indigenously supplied uranium with the bulk of the remainder provided by breeder reactors or pressurized water reactors using imported low-enriched uranium.

Curtis, Michael M.

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

Where DUF6 is Stored  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DUF6 is Stored Depleted UF6 Storage line line How DUF6 is Stored Where DUF6 is Stored DUF6 Storage Safety Cylinder Leakage Where Depleted UF6 is Stored in the United States The UF6...

155

Uranium and Its Compounds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Its Compounds Uranium and Its Compounds line line What is Uranium? Chemical Forms of Uranium Properties of Uranium Compounds Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium Health Effects...

156

SULFUR HEXAFLUORIDE TREATMENT OF USED NUCLEAR FUEL TO ENHANCE SEPARATIONS  

SciTech Connect

Reactive Gas Recycling (RGR) technology development has been initiated at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), with a stretch-goal to develop a fully dry recycling technology for Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF). This approach is attractive due to the potential of targeted gas-phase treatment steps to reduce footprint and secondary waste volumes associated with separations relying primarily on traditional technologies, so long as the fluorinators employed in the reaction are recycled for use in the reactors or are optimized for conversion of fluorinator reactant. The developed fluorination via SF{sub 6}, similar to the case for other fluorinators such as NF{sub 3}, can be used to address multiple fuel forms and downstream cycles including continued processing for LWR via fluorination or incorporation into a aqueous process (e.g. modified FLUOREX) or for subsequent pyro treatment to be used in advanced gas reactor designs such metal- or gas-cooled reactors. This report details the most recent experimental results on the reaction of SF{sub 6} with various fission product surrogate materials in the form of oxides and metals, including uranium oxides using a high-temperature DTA apparatus capable of temperatures in excess of 1000{deg}C . The experimental results indicate that the majority of the fission products form stable solid fluorides and sulfides, while a subset of the fission products form volatile fluorides such as molybdenum fluoride and niobium fluoride, as predicted thermodynamically. Additional kinetic analysis has been performed on additional fission products. A key result is the verification that SF{sub 6} requires high temperatures for direct fluorination and subsequent volatilization of uranium oxides to UF{sub 6}, and thus is well positioned as a head-end treatment for other separations technologies, such as the volatilization of uranium oxide by NF{sub 3} as reported by colleagues at PNNL, advanced pyrochemical separations or traditional full recycle approaches. Based on current results of the research at SRNL on SF{sub 6} fluoride volatility for UNF separations, SF{sub 6} treatment renders all anticipated volatile fluorides studied to be volatile, and all non-volatile fluorides studied to be non-volatile, with the notable exception of uranium oxides. This offers an excellent opportunity to use this as a head-end separations treatment process because: 1. SF{sub 6} can be used to remove volatile fluorides from a UNF matrix while leaving behind uranium oxides. Therefore an agent such as NF{sub 3} should be able to very cleanly separate a pure UF{sub 6} stream, leaving compounds in the bottoms such as PuF{sub 4}, SrF{sub 2} and CsF after the UNF matrix has been pre-treated with SF{sub 6}. 2. Due to the fact that the uranium oxide is not separated in the volatilization step upon direct contact with SF{sub 6} at moderately high temperatures (? 1000{deg}C), this fluoride approach may be wellsuited for head-end processing for Gen IV reactor designs where the LWR is treated as a fuel stock, and it is not desired to separate the uranium from plutonium, but it is desired to separate many of the volatile fission products. 3. It is likely that removal of the volatile fission products from the uranium oxide should simplify both traditional and next generation pyroprocessing techniques. 4. SF{sub 6} treatment to remove volatile fission products, with or without treatment with additional fluorinators, could be used to simplify the separations of traditional aqueous processes in similar fashion to the FLUOREX process. Further research should be conducted to determine the separations efficiency of a combined SF{sub 6}/NF{sub 3} separations approach which could be used as a stand-alone separations technology or a head-end process.

Gray, J.; Torres, R.; Korinko, P.; Martinez-Rodriguez, M.; Becnel, J.; Garcia-Diaz, B.; Adams, T.

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

157

Provenance Store Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Requirements for the provenance store and access API are developed. Existing RDF stores and APIs are evaluated against the requirements and performance benchmarks. The teams conclusion is to use MySQL as a database backend, with a possible move to Oracle in the near-term future. Both Jena and Sesames APIs will be supported, but new code will use the Jena API

Paulson, Patrick R.; Gibson, Tara D.; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Stephan, Eric G.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Method for monitoring stack gases for uranium activity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for monitoring the stack gases of a purge cascade of a gaseous diffusion plant for uranium activity. A sample stream is taken from the stack gases and contacted with a volume of moisture-laden air for converting trace levels of uranium hexafluoride, if any, in the stack gases into particulate uranyl fluoride. A continuous strip of filter paper from a supply roll is passed through this sampling stream to intercept and gather any uranyl fluoride in the sampling stream. This filter paper is then passed by an alpha scintillation counting device where any radioactivity on the filter paper is sensed so as to provide a continuous monitoring of the gas stream for activity indicative of the uranium content in the stack gases.

Beverly, Claude R. (Paducah, KY); Ernstberger, Harold G. (Paducah, KY)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Method for monitoring stack gases for uranium activity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for monitoring the stack gases of a purge cascade of gaseous diffusion plant for uranium activity. A sample stream is taken from the stack gases and contacted with a volume of moisture-laden air for converting trace levels of uranium hexafluoride, if any, in the stack gases into particulate uranyl fluoride. A continuous strip of filter paper from a supply roll is passed through this sampling stream to intercept and gather any uranyl fluoride in the sampling stream. This filter paper is then passed by an alpha scintillation counting device where any radioactivity on the filter paper is sensed so as to provide a continuous monitoring of the gas stream for activity indicative of the uranium content in the stack gases. 1 fig.

Beverly, C.R.; Ernstberger, E.G.

1985-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

160

Evaluation of a RF-Based Approach for Tracking UF6 Cylinders at a Uranium Enrichment Plant  

SciTech Connect

Approved industry-standard cylinders are used globally to handle and store uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) feed, product, tails, and samples at uranium enrichment plants. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) relies on time-consuming physical inspections to verify operator declarations and detect possible diversion of UF{sub 6}. Development of a reliable, automated, and tamper-resistant system for near real-time tracking and monitoring UF{sub 6} cylinders (as they move within an enrichment facility) would greatly improve the inspector function. This type of system can reduce the risk of false or misreported cylinder tare weights, diversion of nuclear material, concealment of excess production, utilization of undeclared cylinders, and misrepresentation of the cylinders contents. This paper will describe a proof-of-concept approach that was designed to evaluate the feasibility of using radio frequency (RF)-based technologies to track individual UF{sub 6} cylinders throughout a portion of their life cycle, and thus demonstrate the potential for improved domestic accountability of materials, and a more effective and efficient method for application of site-level IAEA safeguards. The evaluation system incorporates RF-based identification devices (RFID) which provide a foundation for establishing a reliable, automated, and near real-time tracking system that can be set up to utilize site-specific, rules-based detection algorithms. This paper will report results from a proof-of-concept demonstration at a real enrichment facility that is specifically designed to evaluate both the feasibility of using RF to track cylinders and the durability of the RF equipment to survive the rigors of operational processing and handling. The paper also discusses methods for securely attaching RF devices and describes how the technology can effectively be layered with other safeguard systems and approaches to build a robust system for detecting cylinder diversion. Additionally, concepts for off-site tracking of cylinders are described.

Pickett, Chris A [ORNL; Younkin, James R [ORNL; Kovacic, Donald N [ORNL; Laughter, Mark D [ORNL; Hines, Jairus B [ORNL; Boyer, Brian [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Martinez, B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium hexafluoride stored" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Milestones Keep DUF6 Plants Moving Ahead | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Milestones Keep DUF6 Plants Moving Ahead Milestones Keep DUF6 Plants Moving Ahead Milestones Keep DUF6 Plants Moving Ahead May 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Cylinders containing depleted uranium hexafluoride. Cylinders containing depleted uranium hexafluoride. The depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion plant in Paducah. The depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion plant in Paducah. Workers inspect cylinders containing depleted uranium hexafluoride. Workers inspect cylinders containing depleted uranium hexafluoride. The operating room at a depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion plant. The operating room at a depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion plant. Cylinders containing depleted uranium hexafluoride. The depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion plant in Paducah. Workers inspect cylinders containing depleted uranium hexafluoride.

162

Depleted uranium storage and disposal trade study: Summary report  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this study were to: identify the most desirable forms for conversion of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) for extended storage, identify the most desirable forms for conversion of DUF6 for disposal, evaluate the comparative costs for extended storage or disposal of the various forms, review benefits of the proposed plasma conversion process, estimate simplified life-cycle costs (LCCs) for five scenarios that entail either disposal or beneficial reuse, and determine whether an overall optimal form for conversion of DUF6 can be selected given current uncertainty about the endpoints (specific disposal site/technology or reuse options).

Hightower, J.R.; Trabalka, J.R.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

URANIUM ALLOYS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A uranium alloy is reported containing from 0.1 to 5 per cent by weight of molybdenum and from 0.1 to 5 per cent by weight of silicon, the balance being uranium.

Colbeck, E.W.

1959-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

164

Pyrolitic Uranium Compound (PYRUC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pyrolitic Uranium Compound Pyrolitic Uranium Compound (PYRUC) PYRolitic Uranium Compound (PYRUC) is a shielding material consisting of depleted uranium UO2 or UC in either pellet...

165

SF6 (Sulfur Hexafluoride) Computer-Based Training Module 4.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The SF6 (Sulfur Hexafluoride): Computer-Based Training Modules consist of four sub-modules that each provide approximately one hour of instruction to users on SF6 topics. A browser interface helps the user navigate through the interactive training. As the user moves through the module, it provides instruction and assessment. At the end of the module, the user receives a final scored assessment and a pass/fail result. Four SF6 sub-modules are included in the ...

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

166

Occupational Hygiene Aspects of Sulfur Hexafluoride Decomposition By-Products: Workshop Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) is an inert gas that is present in many different types of electrical utility equipment. While the environmental concerns about this gas have been widely addressed, worker exposure aspects of SF6 decomposition by-products have not been fully explored. To address this knowledge gap, EPRI conducted a workshop on March 12, 2013, in Charlotte, North Carolina. This workshop was designed to 1) address the perspectives of occupational hygiene and engineering ...

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

167

New Prototype Safeguards Technology Offers Improved Confidence and Automation for Uranium Enrichment Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An important requirement for the international safeguards community is the ability to determine the enrichment level of uranium in gas centrifuge enrichment plants and nuclear fuel fabrication facilities. This is essential to ensure that countries with nuclear nonproliferation commitments, such as States Party to the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, are adhering to their obligations. However, current technologies to verify the uranium enrichment level in gas centrifuge enrichment plants or nuclear fuel fabrication facilities are technically challenging and resource-intensive. NNSAs Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NIS) supports the development, testing, and evaluation of future systems that will strengthen and sustain U.S. safeguards and security capabilitiesin this case, by automating the monitoring of uranium enrichment in the entire inventory of a fuel fabrication facility. One such system is HEVAhybrid enrichment verification array. This prototype was developed to provide an automated, nondestructive assay verification technology for uranium hexafluoride (UF6) cylinders at enrichment plants.

Brim, Cornelia P.

2013-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

168

Supply Stores | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supply Stores Supply Stores Supply Stores DOE Self Service Supply Stores at Headquarters Operated by: Paperclips, Etc. and the Winston-Salem Industries for the Blind DOE Self-Service Supply Stores Hours of Operation: 9:00 a.m. through 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday DOE Supply Stores Locations Location Phone Fax Forrestal Room GA-171 (202) 554-1451 (202) 554-1452 (202) 554-7074 Germantown Room R-008 (301) 515-9109 (301) 515-9206 (301) 515-8751 The stores provide an Office Supply Product inventory that is tailored to meet the DOE customer's requirements. Office Supply items that are not carried in the store inventory can be special ordered, see the Catalog Order Form section below. The stores are operated for the Department of Energy, Office of Administration, Office of Logistics and Facility Operations, for the Supply

169

Results from a "Proof-of-Concept" Demonstration of RF-Based Tracking of UF6 Cylinders during a Processing Operation at a Uranium Enrichment Plant  

SciTech Connect

Approved industry-standard cylinders are used globally for processing, storing, and transporting uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) at uranium enrichment plants. To ensure that cylinder movements at enrichment facilities occur as declared, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) must conduct time-consuming periodic physical inspections to validate facility records, cylinder identity, and containment. By using a robust system design that includes the capability for real-time unattended monitoring (of cylinder movements), site-specific rules-based event detection algorithms, and the capability to integrate with other types of monitoring technologies, one can build a system that will improve overall inspector effectiveness. This type of monitoring system can provide timely detection of safeguard events that could be used to ensure more timely and appropriate responses by the IAEA. It also could reduce reliance on facility records and have the additional benefit of enhancing domestic safeguards at the installed facilities. This paper will discuss the installation and evaluation of a radio-frequency- (RF-) based cylinder tracking system that was installed at a United States Enrichment Corporation Centrifuge Facility. This system was installed primarily to evaluate the feasibility of using RF technology at a site and the operational durability of the components under harsh processing conditions. The installation included a basic system that is designed to support layering with other safeguard system technologies and that applies fundamental rules-based event processing methodologies. This paper will discuss the fundamental elements of the system design, the results from this site installation, and future efforts needed to make this technology ready for IAEA consideration.

Pickett, Chris A [ORNL; Kovacic, Donald N [ORNL; Whitaker, J Michael [ORNL; Younkin, James R [ORNL; Hines, Jairus B [ORNL; Laughter, Mark D [ORNL; Morgan, Jim [Innovative Solutions; Carrick, Bernie [USEC; Boyer, Brian [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Whittle, K. [USEC

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

US Department of Energy Uranium Enrichment Activity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

KPMG Peat Marwick (KPMG), Certified Public Accountants, has completed its audit of the Department of Energy's Uranium Enrichment Activity (UEA) financial.statements as of September 30, 1991. The purpose of the audit was to determine whether (1) the financial statements were presented fairly in accordance with applicable accounting principles, (2) the auditee complied with all applicable laws and regulations that may have materially affected the financial statements, and (3) the internal accounting controls, taken as a whole, were adequate. The US Government, through the Department of Energy (DOE) and the management and operating contractor, operates the UEA to enrich uranium hexafluoride in the isotope U-235 for commercial power reactor operators, as further discussed in note 1 of the financial statements. The enrichment of uranium for Government program users, which had been a function of UEA, was transferred outside the UEA affective September 30, 1991, as described in note 3 of the financial statements. UEA is a part of DOE and does not exist as a separate legal entity. For financial reporting purposes, the entity is defined as those activities which provide enriching services to its customers. The financial statements are prepared by extracting and adjusting UEA related data from the financial records of DOE and its contractors.

Not Available

1992-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

171

The Iowa Stored Energy Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Robert Haug Executive Director Iowa Association of Municipal Utilities for Iowa Stored Energy Plant Agency THE IOWA STORED ENERGY PLANT What is ISEP? ISEP is a DOE-supported effort...

172

URANIUM COMPOSITIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to high purity uranium alloys characterized by improved stability to thermal cycling and low thermal neutron absorption. The high purity uranium alloy contains less than 0.1 per cent by weight in total amount of any ore or more of the elements such as aluminum, silicon, phosphorous, tin, lead, bismuth, niobium, and zinc.

Allen, N.P.; Grogan, J.D.

1959-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

173

Depleted Uranium and Uranium Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Naturally occurring uranium makes up 0.0004% of the crust of the Earth; it is 40 times more plentiful than silver, and 800 times more plentiful than gold. Natural uranium contains approximately 0.7% fissionable U 235 and 99.3%

174

Rescuing a Treasure Uranium-233  

SciTech Connect

Uranium-233 (233U) is a synthetic isotope of uranium formed under reactor conditions during neutron capture by natural thorium (232Th). At high purities, this synthetic isotope serves as a crucial reference for accurately quantifying and characterizing natural uranium isotopes for domestic and international safeguards. Separated 233U is stored in vaults at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These materials represent a broad spectrum of 233U from the standpoint isotopic purity the purest being crucial for precise analyses in safeguarding uranium. All 233U at ORNL currently is scheduled to be down blended with depleted uranium beginning in 2015. Such down blending will permanently destroy the potential value of pure 233U samples as certified reference material for use in uranium analyses. Furthermore, no replacement 233U stocks are expected to be produced in the future due to a lack of operating production capability and the high cost of returning to operation this currently shut down capability. This paper will describe the efforts to rescue the purest of the 233U materials arguably national treasures from their destruction by down blending.

Krichinsky, Alan M [ORNL; Goldberg, Dr. Steven A. [DOE SC - Chicago Office; Hutcheon, Dr. Ian D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

SF6 (Sulfur Hexafluoride) Computer-Based Training (CBT) Module Version 3.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The SF6 (Sulfur Hexafluoride): Computer-Based Training Modules consist of four sub-modules that each provide approximately one hour of instruction to users on SF6 topics. A browser interface helps the user navigate through the interactive training. As the user moves through the module, it provides instruction and assessment. At the end of the module, the user receives a final scored assessment and a pass/fail result.The four SF6 sub-modules are included in the ...

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

176

Uranium industry annual 1997  

SciTech Connect

This report provides statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Uranium Marketing Annual Report - Release Date: May 31, 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. Uranium purchased by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by origin and material type, 2012 deliveries 4. Uranium purchased by owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by origin and material type, 2012 deliveries thousand pounds U3O8 equivalent; dollars per pound U3O8 equivalent Deliveries Uranium Concentrate Natural UF6 Enriched UF6 Natural UF6 and Enriched UF6 Total U.S.-Origin Uranium Purchases W W W W 9,807 Weighted-Average Price W W W W 59.44 Foreign-Origin Uranium Purchases W W W W 47,713 Weighted-Average Price W W W W 54.07 Total Purchases 28,642 W W 28,878 57,520 Weighted-Average Price 54.20 W W 55.80 54.99 W = Data withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Weighted-average prices are not adjusted for inflation. Natural UF6 is uranium hexafluoride. The natural UF6 and enriched UF6 quantity represents only the U3O8 equivalent uranium-component quantity specified in the contract for each delivery of natural UF6 and enriched UF6. The natural UF6 and enriched UF6 weighted-average price represent only the U3O8 equivalent uranium-component price specified in the contract for each delivery of natural UF6 and enriched UF6, and does not include the conversion service and enrichment service components.

178

Nuclear & Uranium  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 21. Foreign sales of uranium from U.S. suppliers and owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors by origin and delivery year, 2008-2012

179

What is Depleted Uranium?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What is Uranium? What is Uranium? Uranium and Its Compounds line line What is Uranium? Chemical Forms of Uranium Properties of Uranium Compounds Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium Health Effects What is Uranium? Physical and chemical properties, origin, and uses of uranium. Properties of Uranium Uranium is a radioactive element that occurs naturally in varying but small amounts in soil, rocks, water, plants, animals and all human beings. It is the heaviest naturally occurring element, with an atomic number of 92. In its pure form, uranium is a silver-colored heavy metal that is nearly twice as dense as lead. In nature, uranium atoms exist as several isotopes, which are identified by the total number of protons and neutrons in the nucleus: uranium-238, uranium-235, and uranium-234. (Isotopes of an element have the

180

URANIUM IN ALKALINE ROCKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

combine to indicate uranium enrichment of an alkaline magma.uranium, the Ilfmaussaq intrusion contains an unusually high enrichment

Murphy, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium hexafluoride stored" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

CCPExecutiveSummary Storing Wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CCPExecutiveSummary July 2011 Storing Wind for a Rainy Day W: www.uea.ac.uk/ccp T: +44 (0)1603 593715 A: UEA, Norwich, NR4 7TJ Storing Wind for a Rainy Day: What kind of electricity does Denmark export? BACKGROUND The last decade has seen a remarkable increase in the number of wind installations

Feigon, Brooke

182

Uranium Mining and Enrichment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview Presentation » Uranium Mining and Enrichment Overview Presentation » Uranium Mining and Enrichment Uranium Mining and Enrichment Uranium is a radioactive element that occurs naturally in the earth's surface. Uranium is used as a fuel for nuclear reactors. Uranium-bearing ores are mined, and the uranium is processed to make reactor fuel. In nature, uranium atoms exist in several forms called isotopes - primarily uranium-238, or U-238, and uranium-235, or U-235. In a typical sample of natural uranium, most of the mass (99.3%) would consist of atoms of U-238, and a very small portion of the total mass (0.7%) would consist of atoms of U-235. Uranium Isotopes Isotopes of Uranium Using uranium as a fuel in the types of nuclear reactors common in the United States requires that the uranium be enriched so that the percentage of U-235 is increased, typically to 3 to 5%.

183

Depleted uranium plasma reduction system study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system life-cycle cost study was conducted of a preliminary design concept for a plasma reduction process for converting depleted uranium to uranium metal and anhydrous HF. The plasma-based process is expected to offer significant economic and environmental advantages over present technology. Depleted Uranium is currently stored in the form of solid UF{sub 6}, of which approximately 575,000 metric tons is stored at three locations in the U.S. The proposed system is preconceptual in nature, but includes all necessary processing equipment and facilities to perform the process. The study has identified total processing cost of approximately $3.00/kg of UF{sub 6} processed. Based on the results of this study, the development of a laboratory-scale system (1 kg/h throughput of UF6) is warranted. Further scaling of the process to pilot scale will be determined after laboratory testing is complete.

Rekemeyer, P.; Feizollahi, F.; Quapp, W.J.; Brown, B.W.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Uranium (U)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 63   Properties of unstable uranium isotopes with α-particle emission...Table 63 Properties of unstable uranium isotopes with α-particle emission Isotope Abundance, % Half-life ( t 1/2 ), years Energy, MeV 234 U 0.0055 2.47 ? 10 5 4.77, 4.72, 4.58, 4.47, 235 U 0.720 7.1 ? 10 6 4.40, 4.2 238 U 99.274 4.51 ? 10 9 4.18...

185

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at Portsmouth, Ohio, Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth DUF Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX A: TEXT OF PUBLIC LAW 107-206 PERTINENT TO THE MANAGEMENT OF DUF 6 Public Law 107-206 A-2 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Public Law 107-206 A-3 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX A: TEXT OF PUBLIC LAW 107-206 PERTINENT TO THE MANAGEMENT OF DUF 6 Section 502 of Public Law 107-206, "2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States" (signed by the President 08/02/2002) SEC. 502. Section 1 of Public Law 105-204 (112 Stat. 681) is amended - (1) in subsection (b), by striking "until the date" and all that follows and inserting "until the date that is 30 days after the date on which the Secretary of Energy awards a contract under

186

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at Portsmouth, Ohio, Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth DUF Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-1 Regional Map of the Portsmouth, Ohio, Site Vicinity Summary S-18 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-3 Three Alternative Conversion Facility Locations within the Portsmouth Site, with Location A Being the Preferred Alternative (A representative conversion facility footprint is shown within each location.) Summary S-20 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-4 Conceptual Overall Material Flow Diagram for the Portsmouth Conversion Facility Summary S-21 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-5 Conceptual Conversion Facility Site Layout for Portsmouth Summary S-25 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-6 Potential Locations for Construction of a New Cylinder Storage Yard at Portsmouth

187

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-1 Regional Map of the Paducah, Kentucky, Site Vicinity Summary S-18 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-3 Three Alternative Conversion Facility Locations within the Paducah Site, with Location A Being the Preferred Alternative (A representative conversion facility footprint is shown within each location.) Summary S-20 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-4 Conceptual Overall Material Flow Diagram for the Paducah Conversion Facility Summary S-21 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-5 Conceptual Conversion Facility Site Layout for Paducah Summary S-28 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS FIGURE S-6 Areas of Potential Impact Evaluated for Each Alternative Alternatives 2-7 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS

188

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX A: TEXT OF PUBLIC LAW 107-206 PERTINENT TO THE MANAGEMENT OF DUF 6 Public Law 107-206 A-2 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Public Law 107-206 A-3 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX A: TEXT OF PUBLIC LAW 107-206 PERTINENT TO THE MANAGEMENT OF DUF 6 Section 502 of Public Law 107-206, "2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States" (signed by the President 08/02/2002) SEC. 502. Section 1 of Public Law 105-204 (112 Stat. 681) is amended - (1) in subsection (b), by striking "until the date" and all that follows and inserting "until the date that is 30 days after the date on which the Secretary of Energy awards a contract under

189

EM Plan Accelerates Uranium-233 Disposal, Saves Taxpayers Half Billion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM Plan Accelerates Uranium-233 Disposal, Saves Taxpayers Half EM Plan Accelerates Uranium-233 Disposal, Saves Taxpayers Half Billion Dollars EM Plan Accelerates Uranium-233 Disposal, Saves Taxpayers Half Billion Dollars August 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis For more than 50 years, the uranium-233 (U-233) supply has been stored at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL) Building 3019. The facility, located near the center of the ORNL campus, is owned by EM and one of the nation’s few repositories for U-233 and other special nuclear materials dating back to the Manhattan Project. For more than 50 years, the uranium-233 (U-233) supply has been stored at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) Building 3019. The facility, located near the center of the ORNL campus, is owned by EM and one of the nation's few repositories for U-233 and other special nuclear materials

190

EM Plan Accelerates Uranium-233 Disposal, Saves Taxpayers Half Billion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM Plan Accelerates Uranium-233 Disposal, Saves Taxpayers Half EM Plan Accelerates Uranium-233 Disposal, Saves Taxpayers Half Billion Dollars EM Plan Accelerates Uranium-233 Disposal, Saves Taxpayers Half Billion Dollars August 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis For more than 50 years, the uranium-233 (U-233) supply has been stored at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL) Building 3019. The facility, located near the center of the ORNL campus, is owned by EM and one of the nation’s few repositories for U-233 and other special nuclear materials dating back to the Manhattan Project. For more than 50 years, the uranium-233 (U-233) supply has been stored at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) Building 3019. The facility, located near the center of the ORNL campus, is owned by EM and one of the nation's few repositories for U-233 and other special nuclear materials

191

List of common materials available for ESTAR continued  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Cadmium Tungstate Calcium Carbonate Calcium Fluoride Calcium Oxide ... Triethyl Phosphate Tungsten Hexafluoride Uranium Dicarbide Uranium ...

192

46 | NewScientist | 14 July 2007 www.newscientist.com Earlier this year an Iranian  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

scientist at the uranium conversion facility at Isfahan died from poisoning with uranium hexafluoride gas

Valero-Cuevas, Francisco

193

Uranium-234  

SciTech Connect

Translation of Uran-234 by J. Sehmorak. The following subjects are discussed: /sup 234/U and other natural radioactive isotopes, fractionation of heavy radioactive elements in nature, fractionation of radioactive isotopes, /sup 234/U in nuclear geochemistry, /sup 234/U in uranium minerals, /sup 234/U in continental waters and in quaternary deposits, and /sup 234/U in the ocean. (LK)

Cherdyntsev, V.V.

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Depleted Uranium Health Effects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium line line Uranium Enrichment Depleted Uranium Health Effects Depleted Uranium Health Effects Discussion of health effects of external exposure, ingestion, and inhalation of depleted uranium. Depleted uranium is not a significant health hazard unless it is taken into the body. External exposure to radiation from depleted uranium is generally not a major concern because the alpha particles emitted by its isotopes travel only a few centimeters in air or can be stopped by a sheet of paper. Also, the uranium-235 that remains in depleted uranium emits only a small amount of low-energy gamma radiation. However, if allowed to enter the body, depleted uranium, like natural uranium, has the potential for both chemical and radiological toxicity with the two important target organs

195

Uranium industry annual 1996  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Depleted uranium disposal options evaluation  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, has chartered a study to evaluate alternative management strategies for depleted uranium (DU) currently stored throughout the DOE complex. Historically, DU has been maintained as a strategic resource because of uses for DU metal and potential uses for further enrichment or for uranium oxide as breeder reactor blanket fuel. This study has focused on evaluating the disposal options for DU if it were considered a waste. This report is in no way declaring these DU reserves a ``waste,`` but is intended to provide baseline data for comparison with other management options for use of DU. To PICS considered in this report include: Retrievable disposal; permanent disposal; health hazards; radiation toxicity and chemical toxicity.

Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.; Otis, M.D. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Waste Management Technology Div.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

PREPARATION OF URANIUM MONOSULFIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is given for preparing uranium monosulfide from uranium tetrafluoride dissolved in molten alkali metal chloride. A hydrogen-hydrogen sulfide gas mixture passed through the solution precipitates uranium monosulfide. (AEC)

Yoshioka, K.

1964-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

198

Properties of Uranium Compounds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Triuranium Octaoxide (U3O8) Uranium Dioxide (UO2) Uranium Tetrafluoride (U4) Uranyl Fluoride (UO2F2) The physical properties of the pertinent chemical forms of uranium are...

199

Uranium Quick Facts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Uranium Quick Facts Uranium Quick Facts A collection of facts about uranium, DUF6, and DOEs DUF6 inventory. Over the years, the Department of Energy has received numerous...

200

URANIUM IN ALKALINE ROCKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1977. "Geology of Brazil's Uranium and Thorium Occurrences,"A tantalo-niobate of uranium, near pyrochlore. Isometric,niobate and tantalate of uranium, with ferrous iron and rare

Murphy, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium hexafluoride stored" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The Long Tail of the Video Store  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005). The Long Tail of the Video Store Frederick Wasser isThe Long Tail of the Video Store Frederick Wasser Init is remarkable that video rental stores still survive. Of

Wasser, Frederick

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

The Iowa Stored Energy Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Systems Systems Annual Peer Review November 2-3, 2006 Progress Report Presented by Robert Haug Executive Director Iowa Association of Municipal Utilities for Iowa Stored Energy Plant Agency THE IOWA STORED ENERGY PLANT What is ISEP? ISEP is a DOE-supported effort of municipal utilities in Iowa, Minnesota, and the Dakotas for development of 200 (now 268) MW of compressed air energy storage (CAES) and 75 MW of wind capacity. THE IOWA STORED ENERGY PLANT What is the ISEP Agency? The ISEP Agency is an intergovernmental entity formed under Iowa law in 2005 and governed by a board of directors composed of representatives of participating local governments. Board of Directors: * Dennis Fannin, Osage * John Bilsten, Algona * Sheila Boeckman, Waverly * Scott Tonderum, Graettinger * Niel Ruddy, Carlisle

203

COPPER COATED URANIUM ARTICLE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Various techniques and methods for obtaining coppercoated uranium are given. Specifically disclosed are a group of complex uranium coatings having successive layers of nickel, copper, lead, and tin.

Gray, A.G.

1958-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Nuclear > Domestic Uranium Production Report Domestic Uranium Production Report Data for: 2005 Release Date: May 15, 2006 Next Release: May 15, 2007

205

Uranium Oxide Semiconductors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of semiconductors, it would consume the annual production rate of depleted uranium from uranium enrichment facilities. For more information: PDF Semiconductive Properties of...

206

Manhattan Project: Uranium cubes  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Cubes of uranium metal, Los Alamos, 1945 Events > Difficult Choices, 1942 > More Uranium Research, 1942 Events > Bringing It All Together, 1942-1945 > Basic Research at Los Alamos,...

207

ENERGY STAR Score for Retail Stores  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

100 percentile ranking of performance, relative to the national population. Property Types. The ENERGY STAR score for retail stores applies to retail stores and wholesale...

208

Notice of Availability of a Draft Supplement Analysis for Disposal of Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Produce Generated from DOE's Inventory of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

69 Federal Register 69 Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 63 / Tuesday, April 3, 2007 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION The Historically Black Colleges and Universities Capital Financing Advisory Board AGENCY: The Historically Black Colleges and Universities Capital Financing Board, Department of Education. ACTION: Notice of an open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice sets forth the schedule and proposed agenda of an upcoming open meeting of the Historically Black Colleges and Universities Capital Financing Advisory Board. The notice also describes the functions of the Board. Notice of this meeting is required by Section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act and is intended to notify the public of their opportunity to attend. DATES: Friday, April 20, 2007. Time: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

209

Uranium Industry Annual, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ``Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,`` is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2.

Not Available

1993-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

210

Design of the Uranium Storage Facility at the Y-12 National Security...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

In 1998, the Department of Energy determined that a new facility to store highly enriched uranium materials at the Y-12 National Security Complex was needed. The new facility...

211

Sorption of Np and Tc in Underground Waters by Uranium Oxides  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

worldwide. As a rule DUF 6 is stored in steel cylinders near power stations 1,2 in Russia, and at uranium en- richment plants in the U.S. It is desirable to convert the UF 6 to...

212

PRODUCTION OF URANIUM MONOCARBIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of making essentially stoichiometric uranium monocarbide by pelletizing a mixture of uranium tetrafluoride, silicon, and carbon and reacting the mixture at a temperature of approximately 1500 to 1700 deg C until the reaction goes to completion, forming uranium monocarbide powder and volatile silicon tetrafluoride, is described. The powder is then melted to produce uranium monocarbide in massive form. (AEC)

Powers, R.M.

1962-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

213

DECONTAMINATION OF URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent deals with the separation of rare earth and other fission products from neutron bombarded uranium. This is accomplished by melting the uranium in contact with either thorium oxide, maguesium oxide, alumnum oxide, beryllium oxide, or uranium dioxide. The melting is preferably carried out at from 1150 deg to 1400 deg C in an inert atmosphere, such as argon or helium. During this treatment a scale of uranium dioxide forms on the uranium whtch contains most of the fission products.

Feder, H.M.; Chellew, N.R.

1958-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Documents: Program Planning and Decision Making  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

documents Program Planning and Decision Making PDF Icon Final Plan for the Conversion of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride 345 KB details PDF Icon Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride...

215

FAQ 38-What are the potential environmental impacts from continued...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

continued storage of depleted uranium hexafluoride? What are the potential environmental impacts from continued storage of depleted uranium hexafluoride? In addition to human...

216

Uranium industry annual 1998  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Industry Annual 1998 (UIA 1998) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. It contains data for the period 1989 through 2008 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data provides a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1989 through 1998, including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment, are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2008, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, and uranium inventories, are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1998 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. The Form EIA-858 ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is shown in Appendix D. For the readers convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix E along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

NONE

1999-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

217

Uranium industry annual 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Industry Annual 1994 (UIA 1994) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing during that survey year. The UIA 1994 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the 10-year period 1985 through 1994 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` (UIAS) provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1994, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. A feature article, ``Comparison of Uranium Mill Tailings Reclamation in the United States and Canada,`` is included in the UIA 1994. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, and uranium inventories, enrichment feed deliveries (actual and projected), and unfilled market requirements are shown in Chapter 2.

NONE

1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

218

Process for electroslag refining of uranium and uranium alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for electroslag refining of uranium and uranium alloys wherein molten uranium and uranium alloys are melted in a molten layer of a fluoride slag containing up to about 8 weight percent calcium metal. The calcium metal reduces oxides in the uranium and uranium alloys to provide them with an oxygen content of less than 100 parts per million. (auth)

Lewis, P.S. Jr.; Agee, W.A.; Bullock, J.S. IV; Condon, J.B.

1975-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

219

PRODUCTION OF PURIFIED URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pyrometallurgical method for processing nuclear reactor fuel elements containing uranium and fission products and for reducing uranium compound; to metallic uranium is reported. If the material proccssed is essentially metallic uranium, it is dissolved in zinc, the sulution is cooled to crystallize UZn/sub 9/ , and the UZn/sub 9/ is distilled to obtain uranium free of fission products. If the material processed is a uranium compound, the sollvent is an alloy of zinc and magnesium and the remaining steps are the same.

Burris, L. Jr.; Knighton, J.B.; Feder, H.M.

1960-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

220

URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for recovering uranium values from uranium bearing phosphate solutions such as are encountered in the manufacture of phosphate fertilizers. The solution is first treated with a reducing agent to obtain all the uranium in the tetravalent state. Following this reduction, the solution is treated to co-precipitate the rcduced uranium as a fluoride, together with other insoluble fluorides, thereby accomplishing a substantially complete recovery of even trace amounts of uranium from the phosphate solution. This precipitate usually takes the form of a complex fluoride precipitate, and after appropriate pre-treatment, the uranium fluorides are leached from this precipitate and rccovered from the leach solution.

Bailes, R.H.; Long, R.S.; Olson, R.S.; Kerlinger, H.O.

1959-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium hexafluoride stored" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

SOLDERING OF URANIUM  

SciTech Connect

One of Its Monograph Series, The Industrial Atom.'' The joining of uranium to uranium has been done successfully using a number of commercial soft solders and fusible alloys. Soldering by using an ultrasonic soldering iron has proved the best method for making sound soldered joints of uranium to uranium and of uranium to other metals, such as stainless steel. Other method of soldering have shown some promise but did not give reliable joints all the time. The soldering characteristics of uranium may best be compared to those of aluminum. (auth)

Hanks, G.S.; Doll, D.T.; Taub, J.M.; Brundige, E.L.

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

EPA Update: NESHAP Uranium Activities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

measurements have been performed on high-enriched uranium (HEU) oxide fuel pins and depleted uranium metal

223

Atomic Data for Uranium (U )  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Uranium (U) Homepage - Introduction Finding list Select element by name. Select element by atomic number. ... Atomic Data for Uranium (U). ...

224

Survey of Energy Use in Grocery Stores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of an energy use survey assembled for 93 grocery stores in south Texas. All stores were of the same chain. Several conclusions were drawn. Total electricity consumption per square foot is roughly 9 W/ft^2 for all stores, and varies by 2 W/ft^2. This seemed to be due to a set amount of refrigeration capacity in the stores. In this survey, stores built after 1979 had roughly 9% less energy consumption per ft^2 than those built before 1979. Heat reclamation from the refrigeration systems provided an adequate means of space heating most winter-time conditions. In many cases, stores used natural gas primarily for cooking. Grocery store energy use is divisible into components, some of which are dependent on store size and some of which are not, a more detailed analysis is required in order to determine key predictors of energy use.

Cox, R. L.; Haberl, J. S.; Claridge, D. E.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

METHOD FOR PURIFYING URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is given for purifying a uranium-base nuclear material. The nuclear material is dissolved in zinc or a zinc-magnesium alloy and the concentration of magnesium is increased until uranium precipitates.

Knighton, J.B.; Feder, H.M.

1960-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

226

Uranium Health Effects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For inhalation or ingestion of soluble or moderately soluble compounds such as uranyl fluoride (UO2F2) or uranium tetrafluoride (UF4), the uranium enters the bloodstream and...

227

Uranium from phosphate ores  

SciTech Connect

The following topics are described briefly: the way phosphate fertilizers are made; how uranium is recovered in the phosphate industry; and how to detect covert uranium recovery operations in a phsophate plant.

Hurst, F.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Cathodoluminescence of uranium oxides  

SciTech Connect

The cathodoluminescence of uranium oxide surfaces prepared in-situ from clean uranium exposed to dry oxygen was studied. The broad asymmetric peak observed at 470 nm is attributed to F-center excitation.

Winer, K.; Colmenares, C.; Wooten, F.

1984-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

229

Uranium Quick Facts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Uranium Quick Facts A collection of facts about uranium, DUF6, and DOEs DUF6 inventory. Over the years, the Department of Energy has received numerous inquiries from the...

230

U.S. Energy Information Administration / 2012 Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 9 2012 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 16, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 Deliveries Uranium Concentrate Natural UF 6 Enriched UF 6 Natural UF 6 and Enriched UF 6 Total Purchases W W W W 9,807 Weighted-Average Price W W W W 59.44 Purchases W W W W 47,713 Weighted-Average Price W W W W 54.07 Purchases 28,642 W W 28,878 57,520 Weighted-Average Price 54.20 W W 55.80 54.99 Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Weighted-average prices are not adjusted for inflation. Natural UF 6 is uranium hexafluoride. The natural UF 6 and enriched UF 6 quantity represents only the U 3 O 8 equivalent uranium-component quantity specified in the contract for each delivery of natural UF 6 and enriched UF 6 . The natural UF 6 and enriched UF 6 weighted-average price represent only the U

231

Uranium industry annual 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Industry Annual 1995 (UIA 1995) provides current statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1995 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the period 1986 through 2005 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey``. Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1995, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1986 through 1995 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2005, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1995 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. For the reader`s convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix D along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 14 figs., 56 tabs.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Bicarbonate leaching of uranium  

SciTech Connect

The alkaline leach process for extracting uranium from uranium ores is reviewed. This process is dependent on the chemistry of uranium and so is independent on the type of mining system (conventional, heap or in-situ) used. Particular reference is made to the geochemical conditions at Crownpoint. Some supporting data from studies using alkaline leach for remediation of uranium-contaminated sites is presented.

Mason, C.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

233

Overview: A Legacy of Uranium Enrichment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Legacy of Uranium Enrichment Depleted Uranium is a Legacy of Uranium Enrichment Cylinders Photo Next Screen Management Responsibilities...

234

Challenges dealing with depleted uranium in Germany - Reuse or disposal  

SciTech Connect

During enrichment large amounts of depleted Uranium are produced. In Germany every year 2.800 tons of depleted uranium are generated. In Germany depleted uranium is not classified as radioactive waste but a resource for further enrichment. Therefore since 1996 depleted Uranium is sent to ROSATOM in Russia. However it still has to be dealt with the second generation of depleted Uranium. To evaluate the alternative actions in case a solution has to be found in Germany, several studies have been initiated by the Federal Ministry of the Environment. The work that has been carried out evaluated various possibilities to deal with depleted uranium. The international studies on this field and the situation in Germany have been analyzed. In case no further enrichment is planned the depleted uranium has to be stored. In the enrichment process UF{sub 6} is generated. It is an international consensus that for storage it should be converted to U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. The necessary technique is well established. If the depleted Uranium would have to be characterized as radioactive waste, a final disposal would become necessary. For the planned Konrad repository - a repository for non heat generating radioactive waste - the amount of Uranium is limited by the licensing authority. The existing license would not allow the final disposal of large amounts of depleted Uranium in the Konrad repository. The potential effect on the safety case has not been roughly analyzed. As a result it may be necessary to think about alternatives. Several possibilities for the use of depleted uranium in the industry have been identified. Studies indicate that the properties of Uranium would make it useful in some industrial fields. Nevertheless many practical and legal questions are open. One further option may be the use as shielding e.g. in casks for transport or disposal. Possible techniques for using depleted Uranium as shielding are the use of the metallic Uranium as well as the inclusion in concrete. Another possibility could be the use of depleted uranium for the blending of High enriched Uranium (HEU) or with Plutonium to MOX-elements. (authors)

Moeller, Kai D. [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz - BFS, Postfach 10 01 49, D-38201 Salzgitter (Germany)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the prior art processing of uranium ores, the ore is flrst digested with nitric acid and filtered, and the uranium values are then extracted tom the filtrate by contacting with an organic solvent. The insoluble residue has been processed separately in order to recover any uranium which it might contain. The improvement consists in contacting a slurry, composed of both solution and residue, with the organic solvent prior to filtration. Tbe result is that uranium values contained in the residue are extracted along with the uranium values contained th the solution in one step.

Yeager, J.H.

1958-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

236

URANIUM SEPARATION PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The separation of uranium from a mixture of uranium and thorium by organic solvent extraction from an aqueous solution is described. The uranium is separrted from an aqueous mixture of uranium and thorium nitrates 3 N in nitric acid and containing salting out agents such as ammonium nitrate, so as to bring ihe total nitrate ion concentration to a maximum of about 8 N by contacting the mixture with an immiscible aliphatic oxygen containing organic solvent such as diethyl carbinol, hexone, n-amyl acetate and the like. The uranium values may be recovered from the organic phase by back extraction with water.

Hyde, E.K.; Katzin, L.I.; Wolf, M.J.

1959-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

237

PRODUCTION OF URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The production of uranium metal by the reduction of uranium tetrafluoride is described. Massive uranium metal of high purily is produced by reacting uranium tetrafluoride with 2 to 20% stoichiometric excess of magnesium at a temperature sufficient to promote the reaction and then mantaining the reaction mass in a sealed vessel at temperature in the range of 1150 to 2000 d C, under a superatomospheric pressure of magnesium for a period of time sufficient 10 allow separation of liquid uranium and liquid magnesium fluoride into separate layers.

Spedding, F.H.; Wilhelm, H.A.; Keller, W.H.

1958-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

Method for converting uranium oxides to uranium metal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for converting scrap and waste uranium oxide to uranium metal. The uranium oxide is sequentially reduced with a suitable reducing agent to a mixture of uranium metal and oxide products. The uranium metal is then converted to uranium hydride and the uranium hydride-containing mixtures is then cooled to a temperature less than -100/sup 0/C in an inert liquid which renders the uranium hydride ferromagnetic. The uranium hydride is then magnetically separated from the cooled mixture. The separated uranium hydride is readily converted to uranium metal by heating in an inert atmosphere. This process is environmentally acceptable and eliminates the use of hydrogen fluoride as well as the explosive conditions encountered in the previously employed bomb-reduction processes utilized for converting uranium oxides to uranium metal.

Duerksen, W.K.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Method for converting uranium oxides to uranium metal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A process is described for converting scrap and waste uranium oxide to uranium metal. The uranium oxide is sequentially reduced with a suitable reducing agent to a mixture of uranium metal and oxide products. The uranium metal is then converted to uranium hydride and the uranium hydride-containing mixture is then cooled to a temperature less than -100.degree. C. in an inert liquid which renders the uranium hydride ferromagnetic. The uranium hydride is then magnetically separated from the cooled mixture. The separated uranium hydride is readily converted to uranium metal by heating in an inert atmosphere. This process is environmentally acceptable and eliminates the use of hydrogen fluoride as well as the explosive conditions encountered in the previously employed bomb-reduction processes utilized for converting uranium oxides to uranium metal.

Duerksen, Walter K. (Norris, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

FAQ 1-What is uranium?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What is uranium? What is uranium? What is uranium? Uranium is a radioactive element that occurs naturally in low concentrations (a few parts per million) in soil, rock, and surface and groundwater. It is the heaviest naturally occurring element, with an atomic number of 92. Uranium in its pure form is a silver-colored heavy metal that is nearly twice as dense as lead. In nature, uranium atoms exist as several isotopes: primarily uranium-238, uranium-235, and a very small amount of uranium-234. (Isotopes are different forms of an element that have the same number of protons in the nucleus, but a different number of neutrons.) In a typical sample of natural uranium, most of the mass (99.27%) consists of atoms of uranium-238. About 0.72% of the mass consists of atoms of uranium-235, and a very small amount (0.0055% by mass) is uranium-234.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium hexafluoride stored" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Use of Savannah River Site facilities for blend down of highly enriched uranium  

SciTech Connect

Westinghouse Savannah River Company was asked to assess the use of existing Savannah River Site (SRS) facilities for the conversion of highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). The purpose was to eliminate the weapons potential for such material. Blending HEU with existing supplies of depleted uranium (DU) would produce material with less than 5% U-235 content for use in commercial nuclear reactors. The request indicated that as much as 500 to 1,000 MT of HEU would be available for conversion over a 20-year period. Existing facilities at the SRS are capable of producing LEU in the form of uranium trioxide (UO{sub 3}) powder, uranyl nitrate [UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}] solution, or metal. Additional processing, and additional facilities, would be required to convert the LEU to uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) or uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 3}), the normal inputs for commercial fuel fabrication. This study`s scope does not include the cost for new conversion facilities. However, the low estimated cost per kilogram of blending HEU to LEU in SRS facilities indicates that even with fees for any additional conversion to UO{sub 2} or UF{sub 6}, blend-down would still provide a product significantly below the spot market price for LEU from traditional enrichment services. The body of the report develops a number of possible facility/process combinations for SRS. The primary conclusion of this study is that SRS has facilities available that are capable of satisfying the goals of a national program to blend HEU to below 5% U-235. This preliminary assessment concludes that several facility/process options appear cost-effective. Finally, SRS is a secure DOE site with all requisite security and safeguard programs, personnel skills, nuclear criticality safety controls, accountability programs, and supporting infrastructure to handle large quantities of special nuclear materials (SNM).

Bickford, W.E.; McKibben, J.M.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Storing and transporting energy - Energy Innovation Portal  

Among other things, hydrogen is released from water at a first location using energy from a first energy source; the released hydrogen is stored in a ...

243

Fuel Cell Store Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name Fuel Cell Store, Inc Place San Diego, California Zip 92154 Sector Hydro, Hydrogen Product San Diego-based firm selling fuel cell stacks, components, and hydrogen...

244

Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. Uranium sellers to owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, 2010-2012 2010 2011 2012 4. Uranium sellers to owners and operators of U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors, 2010-2012 2010 2011 2012 American Fuel Resources, LLC Advance Uranium Asset Management Ltd. (was Uranium Asset Management) Advance Uranium Asset Management Ltd. (was Uranium Asset Management) AREVA NC, Inc. (was COGEMA, Inc.) American Fuel Resources, LLC American Fuel Resources, LLC BHP Billiton Olympic Dam Corporation Pty Ltd AREVA NC, Inc. AREVA NC, Inc. CAMECO BHP Billiton Olympic Dam Corporation Pty Ltd BHP Billiton Olympic Dam Corporation Pty Ltd ConverDyn CAMECO CAMECO Denison Mines Corp. ConverDyn ConverDyn Energy Resources of Australia Ltd. Denison Mines Corp. Energy Fuels Resources Energy USA, Inc. Effective Energy N.V. Energy Resources of Australia Ltd.

245

Preparation of uranium compounds  

SciTech Connect

UI.sub.3(1,4-dioxane).sub.1.5 and UI.sub.4(1,4-dioxane).sub.2, were synthesized in high yield by reacting turnings of elemental uranium with iodine dissolved in 1,4-dioxane under mild conditions. These molecular compounds of uranium are thermally stable and excellent precursor materials for synthesizing other molecular compounds of uranium including alkoxide, amide, organometallic, and halide compounds.

Kiplinger, Jaqueline L; Montreal, Marisa J; Thomson, Robert K; Cantat, Thibault; Travia, Nicholas E

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

246

Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO{sub 3}), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl{sub 4}), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation. 4 figs.

Hayden, H.W. Jr.; Horton, J.A.; Elliott, G.R.B.

1995-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

247

Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO.sub.3), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO.sub.2). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl.sub.4), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation.

Hayden, Jr., Howard W. (Oakridge, TN); Horton, James A. (Livermore, CA); Elliott, Guy R. B. (Los Alamos, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

First Principles Calculations of Uranium and Uranium-Zirconium Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, First Principles Calculations of Uranium and Uranium- Zirconium Alloys. Author(s), Benjamin Good, Benjamin Beeler, Chaitanya Deo, Sergey...

249

Controlling statistical properties of stored light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Statistical properties of outgoing light pulses are studies after they have been stored in a medium of atoms in the tripod configuration. A generalized Hong-Ou-Mandel interference, storing of squeezed states and homodyne signal analysis are discussed in the context of their dependence on the parameters of the control fields used for light storage and release.

A. Raczynski; K. Slowik; J. Zaremba; S. Zielinska-Kaniasty

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

250

Walnut: a unified cloud object store  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Walnut is an object-store being developed at Yahoo! with the goal of serving as a common low-level storage layer for a variety of cloud data management systems including Hadoop (a MapReduce system), MObStor (a multimedia serving system), and PNUTS (an ... Keywords: cloud storage, hybrid object store, paxos-based replication

Jianjun Chen; Chris Douglas; Michi Mutsuzaki; Patrick Quaid; Raghu Ramakrishnan; Sriram Rao; Russell Sears

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

EIS-0360: Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, Site

252

EIS-0359: Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site

253

EIS-0360: Record of Decision  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, Site

254

EIS-0359: Record of Decision  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site

255

Uranium Purchases Report  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final issue. This report details natural and enriched uranium purchases as reported by owners and operators of commercial nuclear power plants. 1996 represents the most recent publication year.

Douglas Bonnar

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

PRODUCTION OF URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process is described for the magnesium reduction of UF/sub 4/ to produce uranium metal. In the past, there have been undesirable premature reactions between the Mg and the bomb liner or the UF/sub 4/ before the actual ignition of the bomb reaction. Since these premature reactions impair the yield of uranium metal, they have been inhibited by forming a protective film upon the particles of Mg by reacting it with hydrated uranium tetrafluoride, sodium bifluoride, uranyl fluoride, or uranium trioxide. This may be accomplished by adding about 0.5 to 2% of the additive to the bomb charge.

Ruehle, A.E.; Stevenson, J.W.

1957-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

257

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. U.S. uranium drilling activities, 2003-2012 Exploration Drilling Development Drilling Exploration and Development Drilling Year Number of Holes Feet (thousand) Number of Holes...

258

Uranium 'pearls' before slime  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

harm to themselves, scientists have wondered how on Earth these microbes do it. For Shewanella oneidensis, a microbe that modifies uranium chemistry, the pieces are coming...

259

Uranium Purchases Report 1995  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA0570(95) Distribution Category UC950 Uranium Purchases Report 1995 June 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, ...

260

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Totals may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-851A, "Domestic Uranium Production Report"...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium hexafluoride stored" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Paperclips Supply Store Forms | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paperclips Supply Store Forms Paperclips Supply Store Forms Paperclips Supply Store Forms Catalog Order Form for Non-Stocked or Specialty Items For any non-stocked or special item that needs to be ordered, the Catalog Order Form (pdf) needs to be filled in. All supplies ordered MUST be used for Official Government Business. All catalog orders are subject to full payment or a restocking fee if items ordered are returned to the supplier due to the customer not picking up the item(s) within five days of receipt by the store personnel or the customer deciding to return the item(s). This form is fillable and also saveable with the Acrobat Reader or through your web browser. Request Supply Store Purchasing Authority for a Non-Federal Employee In order for non-federal headquarters personnel to gain access to make

262

US Department of Energy Uranium Enrichment Activity. Financial statements, September 30, 1991 and 1990  

SciTech Connect

KPMG Peat Marwick (KPMG), Certified Public Accountants, has completed its audit of the Department of Energy`s Uranium Enrichment Activity (UEA) financial.statements as of September 30, 1991. The purpose of the audit was to determine whether (1) the financial statements were presented fairly in accordance with applicable accounting principles, (2) the auditee complied with all applicable laws and regulations that may have materially affected the financial statements, and (3) the internal accounting controls, taken as a whole, were adequate. The US Government, through the Department of Energy (DOE) and the management and operating contractor, operates the UEA to enrich uranium hexafluoride in the isotope U-235 for commercial power reactor operators, as further discussed in note 1 of the financial statements. The enrichment of uranium for Government program users, which had been a function of UEA, was transferred outside the UEA affective September 30, 1991, as described in note 3 of the financial statements. UEA is a part of DOE and does not exist as a separate legal entity. For financial reporting purposes, the entity is defined as those activities which provide enriching services to its customers. The financial statements are prepared by extracting and adjusting UEA related data from the financial records of DOE and its contractors.

Not Available

1992-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

263

URANIUM LEACHING AND RECOVERY PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for recovering uranium from carbonate leach solutions by precipitating uranium as a mixed oxidation state compound. Uranium is recovered by adding a quadrivalent uranium carbon;te solution to the carbonate solution, adjusting the pH to 13 or greater, and precipitating the uranium as a filterable mixed oxidation state compound. In the event vanadium occurs with the uranium, the vanadium is unaffected by the uranium precipitation step and remains in the carbonate solution. The uranium-free solution is electrolyzed in the cathode compartment of a mercury cathode diaphragm cell to reduce and precipitate the vanadium.

McClaine, L.A.

1959-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

264

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

udrilling 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Next Release Date: May 2014 Table 1. U.S. uranium drilling activities, 2003-2012 Year Exploration Drilling

265

Uranium industry annual 1993  

SciTech Connect

Uranium production in the United States has declined dramatically from a peak of 43.7 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (16.8 thousand metric tons uranium (U)) in 1980 to 3.1 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (1.2 thousand metric tons U) in 1993. This decline is attributed to the world uranium market experiencing oversupply and intense competition. Large inventories of uranium accumulated when optimistic forecasts for growth in nuclear power generation were not realized. The other factor which is affecting U.S. uranium production is that some other countries, notably Australia and Canada, possess higher quality uranium reserves that can be mined at lower costs than those of the United States. Realizing its competitive advantage, Canada was the world`s largest producer in 1993 with an output of 23.9 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (9.2 thousand metric tons U). The U.S. uranium industry, responding to over a decade of declining market prices, has downsized and adopted less costly and more efficient production methods. The main result has been a suspension of production from conventional mines and mills. Since mid-1992, only nonconventional production facilities, chiefly in situ leach (ISL) mining and byproduct recovery, have operated in the United States. In contrast, nonconventional sources provided only 13 percent of the uranium produced in 1980. ISL mining has developed into the most cost efficient and environmentally acceptable method for producing uranium in the United States. The process, also known as solution mining, differs from conventional mining in that solutions are used to recover uranium from the ground without excavating the ore and generating associated solid waste. This article describes the current ISL Yang technology and its regulatory approval process, and provides an analysis of the factors favoring ISL mining over conventional methods in a declining uranium market.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Determination of the Relative Amount of Fluorine in Uranium Oxyfluoride Particles using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry and Optical Spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Both nuclear forensics and environmental sampling depend upon laboratory analysis of nuclear material that has often been exposed to the environment after it has been produced. It is therefore important to understand how those environmental conditions might have changed the chemical composition of the material over time, particularly for chemically sensitive compounds. In the specific case of uranium enrichment facilities, uranium-bearing particles stem from small releases of uranium hexafluoride, a highly reactive gas that hydrolyzes upon contact with moisture from the air to form uranium oxyfluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) particles. The uranium isotopic composition of those particles is used by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to verify whether a facility is compliant with its declarations. The present study, however, aims to demonstrate how knowledge of time-dependent changes in chemical composition, particle morphology and molecular structure can contribute to an even more reliable interpretation of the analytical results. We prepared a set of uranium oxyfluoride particles at the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM, European Commission, Belgium) and followed changes in their composition, morphology and structure with time to see if we could use these properties to place boundaries on the particle exposure time in the environment. Because the rate of change is affected by exposure to UV-light, humidity levels and elevated temperatures, the samples were subjected to varying conditions of those three parameters. The NanoSIMS at LLNL was found to be the optimal tool to measure the relative amount of fluorine in individual uranium oxyfluoride particles. At PNNL, cryogenic laser-induced time-resolved U(VI) fluorescence microspectroscopy (CLIFS) was used to monitor changes in the molecular structure.

Kips, R; Kristo, M J; Hutcheon, I D; Amonette, J; Wang, Z; Johnson, T; Gerlach, D; Olsen, K B

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

267

Nuclear Isotopic Dilution of Highly-Enriched Uranium-235 and Uranium-233 by Dry Blending via the RM-2 Mill Technology  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy has initiated numerous activities to identify strategies to disposition various excess fissile materials. Two such materials are the off-specification highly enriched uranium-235 oxide powder and the uranium-233 contained in unirradiated nuclear fuel both currently stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This report describes the development of a technology that could dilute these materials to levels categorized as low-enriched uranium, or further dilute the materials to a level categorized as waste. This dilution technology opens additional pathways for the disposition of these excess fissile materials as existing processing infrastructure continues to be retired.

N. A. Chipman; R. N. Henry; R. K. Rajamani; S. Latchireddi; V. Devrani; H. Sethi; J. L. Malhotra

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Uranium from phosphate ores  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phosphate rock, the major raw material for phosphate fertilizers, contains uranium that can be recovered when the rock is processed. This makes it possible to produce uranium in a country that has no uranium ore deposits. The author briefly describes the way that phosphate fertilizers are made, how uranium is recovered in the phosphate industry, and how to detect uranium recovery operations in a phosphate plant. Uranium recovery from the wet-process phosphoric acid involves three unit operations: (1) pretreatment to prepare the acid; (2) solvent extraction to concentrate the uranium; (3) post treatment to insure that the acid returning to the acid plant will not be harmful downstream. There are 3 extractants that are capable of extracting uranium from phosphoric acid. The pyro or OPPA process uses a pyrophosphoric acid that is prepared on site by reacting an organic alcohol (usually capryl alcohol) with phosphorous pentoxide. The DEPA-TOPO process uses a mixture of di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (DEPA) and trioctyl phosphine oxide (TOPO). The components can be bought separately or as a mixture. The OPAP process uses octylphenyl acid phosphate, a commercially available mixture of mono- and dioctylphenyl phosphoric acids. All three extractants are dissolved in kerosene-type diluents for process use.

Hurst, F.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

DECONTAMINATION OF URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is given for separating fission products from uranium by extracting the former into molten aluminum. Phase isolation can be accomplished by selectively hydriding the uranium at between 200 and 300 deg C and separating the hydride powder from coarse particles of fissionproduct-containing aluminum. (AEC)

Spedding, F.H.; Butler, T.A.

1962-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

URANIUM SEPARATION PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The separation of uranium from an aqueous solution containing a water soluble uranyl salt is described. The process involves adding an alkali thiocyanate to the aqueous solution, contacting the resulting solution with methyl isobutyl ketons and separating the resulting aqueous and organic phase. The uranium is extracted in the organic phase as UO/sub 2/(SCN)/sub/.

McVey, W.H.; Reas, W.H.

1959-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

271

Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Uranium Marketing Uranium Marketing Annual Report May 2011 www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. U.S. Energy Information Administration | 2010 Uranium Marketing Annual Report ii Contacts This report was prepared by the staff of the Renewables and Uranium Statistics Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables, and Uranium Statistics. Questions about the preparation and content of this report may be directed to Michele Simmons, Team Leader,

272

recycled_uranium.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Recycled Uranium and Transuranics: Recycled Uranium and Transuranics: Their Relationship to Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project Introduction Historical Perspective On August 8, 1999, Energy Secretary Bill Richardson announced a comprehensive set of actions to address issues raised at the Paducah, Kentucky, Gaseous Diffusion Plant that may have had the potential to affect the health of the workers. One of the issues addressed the need to determine the extent and significance of radioactive fission products and transuranic elements in the uranium feed and waste products throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national complex. Subsequently, a DOE agency-wide Recycled Uranium Mass Balance Project (RUMBP) was initiated. For the Weldon Spring Uranium Feed Materials Plant (WSUFMP or later referred to as Weldon Spring),

273

URANIUM PRECIPITATION PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the recovery of uranium from sulfuric acid solutions is described. In the present process, sulfuric acid is added to the uranium bearing solution to bring the pH to between 1 and 1.8, preferably to about 1.4, and aluminum metal is then used as a reducing agent to convert hexavalent uranium to the tetravalent state. As the reaction proceeds, the pH rises amd a selective precipitation of uranium occurs resulting in a high grade precipitate. This process is an improvement over the process using metallic iron, in that metallic aluminum reacts less readily than metallic iron with sulfuric acid, thus avoiding consumption of the reducing agent and a raising of the pH without accomplishing the desired reduction of the hexavalent uranium in the solution. Another disadvantage to the use of iron is that positive ferric ions will precipitate with negative phosphate and arsenate ions at the pH range employed.

Thunaes, A.; Brown, E.A.; Smith, H.W.; Simard, R.

1957-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Energy Savings Store | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Savings Store Savings Store Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Energy Savings Store Name Energy Savings Store Address 15209 W. 99th Street Place Lenexa, Kansas Zip 66219 Sector Solar Product Solar and wind systems Phone number 913-495-9434 Website http://www.ewindandsolar.com/ Coordinates 38.9491298°, -94.7623183° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.9491298,"lon":-94.7623183,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

275

Retrieval Of Final Stored Radioactive Waste Resumes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

IDAHO FALLS, ID - Operations to retrieve the estimated 6,900 cubic meters of stored transuranic waste remaining at the Idaho site began this week at the U.S. Department of Energys Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project.

276

RECOVERY OF URANIUM VALUES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid-liquid extraction method is presented for recovering uranium values from an aqueous acidic solution by means of certain high molecular weight amine in the amine classes of primary, secondary, heterocyclic secondary, tertiary, or heterocyclic tertiary. The uranium bearing aqueous acidic solution is contacted with the selected amine dissolved in a nonpolar water-immiscible organic solvent such as kerosene. The uranium which is substantially completely exiracted by the organic phase may be stripped therefrom by waters and recovered from the aqueous phase by treatment into ammonia to precipitate ammonium diuranate.

Brown, K.B.; Crouse, D.J. Jr.; Moore, J.G.

1959-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

277

BEHAVIOR OF METALLIC INCLUSIONS IN URANIUM DIOXIDE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metallic Inclusions in Uranium Dioxide", LBL-11117 (1980).in Hypostoichiornetric Uranium Dioxide 11 , LBL-11095 (OF METALLIC INCLUSIONS IN URANIUM DIOXIDE Rosa L. Yang and

Yang, Rosa L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Microsoft Word - duf6 Report.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Follow-up of Depleted Uranium Follow-up of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion DOE/IG-0751 December 2006 a-, 2 @I 5 - , & % %TEE.@ Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 December 26, 2006 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Inspector General SUBJECT : INFORMATION: "Follow-up Audit Report of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion" BACKGROUND -- - -- - - - - - In 1998, legislation was enacted requiring the Department of Energy (Department) to convert the 794,000 metric tons of depleted uranium hexafluoride stored at its gaseous diffusion plants to a more stable form. In August 2002, the Department awarded a contract to IJranium Disposition Services, LLC for the design, construction, and operation of conirersion facilities in Paducah, Kentucky and Portsmouth, Ohio. The

279

Notice of Change in National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Compliance Approach for the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Conversion Facilities Project (4/28/03)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

68 68 Federal Register / Vol. 68, No. 81 / Monday, April 28, 2003 / Notices ''Browse Pending Collections'' link and by clicking on link number 2270. When you access the information collection, click on ''Download Attachments'' to view. Written requests for information should be addressed to Vivian Reese, Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW., Room 4050, Regional Office Building 3, Washington, DC 20202-4651 or to the e-mail address vivan.reese@ed.gov. Requests may also be electronically mailed to the internet address OCIO_RIMG@ed.gov or faxed to 202-708-9346. Please specify the complete title of the information collection when making your request. Comments regarding burden and/or the collection activity requirements should be directed to Joseph Schubart at

280

Record of Decision for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, Site (DOE/EIS-0360) (07/20/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

49 49 Federal Register / Vol. 69, No. 143 / Tuesday, July 27, 2004 / Notices halseypj@oro.doe.gov or check the Web site at www.oakridge.doe.gov/em/ssab. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Purpose of the Board: The purpose of the Board is to make recommendations to DOE in the areas of environmental restoration, waste management, and related activities. Tentative Agenda 8 a.m.-Introductions, overview of meeting agenda and logistics (Dave Mosby) 8:15 a.m.-Past year evaluation-Board and stakeholder survey results, what worked, what can be improved (Facilitator) 9:50 a.m.-Break 10:05 a.m.-Past year evaluation continued 10:45 a.m.-Summaries and Q&A on the most important issues to DOE, TN Department of Environment & Conservation, and EPA (Facilitator) 11:30 a.m.-Lunch

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium hexafluoride stored" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities (DOE/EIS-0329) (9/18/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

23 23 Federal Register / Vol. 66, No. 181 / Tuesday, September 18, 2001 / Notices Section 615-Procedural Safeguards Topic Addressed: Due Process Hearings * Letter dated April 19, 2001 to Virginia Department of Education Director Judith A. Douglas, regarding whether a State educational agency is required to convene a due process hearing initiated by someone other than the parent of a child with a disability or a public agency. Topic Addressed: Surrogate Parents * Letter dated April 16, 2001 to Pinal County, Arizona Deputy County Attorney Linda L. Harant, regarding the appointment of surrogate parents for children who are wards of a tribal court. Topic Addressed: Student Discipline * Letter dated April 16, 2001 to Professor Perry A. Zirkel, regarding the calculation of disciplinary removals of

282

Advance Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facilities (DOE/EIS-0329) (5/7/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

010 010 Federal Register / Vol. 66, No. 88 / Monday, May 7, 2001 / Notices centers. The commenter believes that by working independently of schools, the centers can better assist families who do not feel connected with the schools and provide families with the tools needed to create change in the schools. Discussion: The Secretary is not requiring non-profit organizations to apply in consortium with one or more LEAs. However, the Secretary believes that strengthening school-community- family partnerships will help children in low-performing schools succeed in school. Under the priority, the parent centers still will have considerable autonomy in designing proposals that best meet local needs and in coordinating with low-performing schools in implementing comprehensive strategies to assist children in these

283

Notice of Change in National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Approach for the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Conversion Facilities Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

68 68 Federal Register / Vol. 68, No. 81 / Monday, April 28, 2003 / Notices ''Browse Pending Collections'' link and by clicking on link number 2270. When you access the information collection, click on ''Download Attachments'' to view. Written requests for information should be addressed to Vivian Reese, Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW., Room 4050, Regional Office Building 3, Washington, DC 20202-4651 or to the e-mail address vivan.reese@ed.gov. Requests may also be electronically mailed to the internet address OCIO_RIMG@ed.gov or faxed to 202-708-9346. Please specify the complete title of the information collection when making your request. Comments regarding burden and/or the collection activity requirements should be directed to Joseph Schubart at

284

Position paper Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant storage of uranium in plastics  

SciTech Connect

As a result of the end of the Cold War, the United States nuclear weapon stockpile is being reduced from approximately 20,000 warheads to fewer than 10,000 by the end of the century. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant is the Department of Energy (DOE) site charged with the responsibility of providing safe, secure storage for the uranium recovered from these weapons. In addition to weapons material, Y-12 has traditionally processed and stored uranium from nonweapon programs and presumably will continue to do so. The purpose of this document is to evaluate the suitability of plastics for use in the containment of uranium.

Duerksen, W.K.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Iowa Stored Energy Park | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stored Energy Park Stored Energy Park Jump to: navigation, search Name Iowa Stored Energy Park Place Ankeny, Iowa Zip 50021 Sector Wind energy Product Iowa Stored Energy Park is planning a 268MW wind project that would store its power as compressed air in deep underground geological formations, which could later be heated and used to drive turbines to generate electricity. Coordinates 41.73184°, -93.605264° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.73184,"lon":-93.605264,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

286

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. U.S. uranium mills by owner, location, capacity, and operating status at end of the year, 2008-2012 4. U.S. uranium mills by owner, location, capacity, and operating status at end of the year, 2008-2012 Mill Owner Mill Name County, State (existing and planned locations) Milling Capacity (short tons of ore per day) Operating Status at End of the Year 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Cotter Corporation Canon City Mill Fremont, Colorado 0 Standby Standby Standby Reclamation Demolished Denison White Mesa LLC White Mesa Mill San Juan, Utah 2,000 Operating Operating Operating Operating Operating Energy Fuels Resources Corporation Piñon Ridge Mill Montrose, Colorado 500 Developing Developing Developing Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Kennecott Uranium Company/Wyoming Coal Resource Company Sweetwater Uranium Project Sweetwater, Wyoming 3,000 Standby Standby Standby Standby Standby

287

Uranium Management and Policy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Office of Uranium Management and Policy (NE-54), as part of the Office of Fuel Cycle Technologies (NE-5), supports the Department of Energy (DOE) by assuring domestic supplies of fuel for...

288

Chemical Forms of Uranium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

such as water vapor in the air, the UF6 and water react, forming corrosive hydrogen fluoride (HF) and a uranium-fluoride compound called uranyl fluoride (UO2F2). For this reason,...

289

300 AREA URANIUM CONTAMINATION  

SciTech Connect

{sm_bullet} Uranium fuel production {sm_bullet} Test reactor and separations experiments {sm_bullet} Animal and radiobiology experiments conducted at the. 331 Laboratory Complex {sm_bullet} .Deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning,. and demolition of 300 Area facilities

BORGHESE JV

2009-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

290

Uranium-Based Catalysts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Uranium-Based Catalysts S. H. Overbury, Cyrus Riahi-Nezhad, Zongtao Zhang, Sheng Dai, and Jonathan Haire Oak Ridge National Laboratory* P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge, Tennessee...

291

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

6. Employment in the U.S. uranium production industry by category, 2003-2012 person-years Year Exploration Mining Milling Processing Reclamation Total 2003 W W W W 117 321 2004 18...

292

E-stores design: the influence of e-store design and product type on consumers' emotions and attitudes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the effect of e-store design dimensions (usability and aesthetics) on consumers' emotions and attitudes towards the store, in three different store domains. The study is based on a model of Web-store environment that describes how ... Keywords: aesthetics, design, emotions, usability, web-store atmosphere

Talya Porat; Rinat Liss; Noam Tractinsky

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Uranium tailings bibliography  

SciTech Connect

A bibliography containing 1,212 references is presented with its focus on the general problem of reducing human exposure to the radionuclides contained in the tailings from the milling of uranium ore. The references are divided into seven broad categories: uranium tailings pile (problems and perspectives), standards and philosophy, etiology of radiation effects, internal dosimetry and metabolism, environmental transport, background sources of tailings radionuclides, and large-area decontamination. (JSR)

Holoway, C.F.; Goldsmith, W.A.; Eldridge, V.M.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

URANIUM EXTRACTION PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for recovering uranium values from acidic aqueous solutions containing hexavalent uranium by contacting the solution with an organic solution comprised of a substantially water-immiscible organlc diluent and an organic phosphate to extract the uranlum values into the organic phase. Carbon tetrachloride and a petroleum hydrocarbon fraction, such as kerosene, are sultable diluents to be used in combination with organlc phosphates such as dibutyl butylphosphonate, trlbutyl phosphine oxide, and tributyl phosphate.

Baldwin, W.H.; Higgins, C.E.

1958-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

295

Depleted uranium valuation  

SciTech Connect

The following uses for depleted uranium were examined to determine its value: a substitute for lead in shielding applications, feed material in gaseous diffusion enrichment facilities, feed material for an advanced enrichment concept, Mixed Oxide (MOx) diluent and blanket material in LMFBRs, and fertile material in LMFBR systems. A range of depleted uranium values was calculated for each of these applications. The sensitivity of these values to analysis assumptions is discussed. 9 tables.

Lewallen, M.A.; White, M.K.; Jenquin, U.P.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Uranium purchases report 1994  

SciTech Connect

US utilities are required to report to the Secretary of Energy annually the country of origin and the seller of any uranium or enriched uranium purchased or imported into the US, as well as the country of origin and seller of any enrichment services purchased by the utility. This report compiles these data and also contains a glossary of terms and additional purchase information covering average price and contract duration. 3 tabs.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

URANIUM SEPARATION PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of separating uranium oxides from PuO/sub 2/, ThO/sub 2/, and other actinide oxides is described. The oxide mixture is suspended in a fused salt melt and a chlorinating agent such as chlorine gas or phosgene is sparged through the suspension. Uranium oxides are selectively chlorinated and dissolve in the melt, which may then be filtered to remove the unchlorinated oxides of the other actinides. (AEC)

Lyon, W.L.

1962-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

298

Method for the recovery of uranium values from uranium tetrafluoride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a novel method for the recovery of uranium from dry, particulate uranium tetrafluoride. In one aspect, the invention comprises reacting particulate uranium tetrafluoride and calcium oxide in the presence of gaseous oxygen to effect formation of the corresponding alkaline earth metal uranate and alkaline earth metal fluoride. The product uranate is highly soluble in various acidic solutions whereas the product fluoride is virtually insoluble therein. The product mixture of uranate and alkaline earth metal fluoride is contacted with a suitable acid to provide a uranium-containing solution, from which the uranium is recovered. The invention can achieve quantitative recovery of uranium in highly pure form.

Kreuzmann, A.B.

1982-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

299

Method for the recovery of uranium values from uranium tetrafluoride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a novel method for the recovery of uranium from dry, particulate uranium tetrafluoride. In one aspect, the invention comprises reacting particulate uranium tetrafluoride and calcium oxide in the presence of gaseous oxygen to effect formation of the corresponding alkaline earth metal uranate and alkaline earth metal fluoride. The product uranate is highly soluble in various acidic solutions wherein the product fluoride is virtually insoluble therein. The product mixture of uranate and alkaline earth metal fluoride is contacted with a suitable acid to provide a uranium-containing solution, from which the uranium is recovered. The invention can achieve quantitative recovery of uranium in highly pure form.

Kreuzmann, Alvin B. (Cincinnati, OH)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Retrieval Of Final Stored Radioactive Waste Resumes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

18, 2012 18, 2012 Media Contact: Danielle Miller, DOE-Idaho Operations, 208-526-5709, millerdc@id.doe.gov Rick Dale, Idaho Treatment Group, 208-557-6552, rick.dale@amwtp.inl.gov Retrieval Of Final Stored Radioactive Waste Resumes IDAHO FALLS, ID- Operations to retrieve the estimated 6,900 cubic meters of stored transuranic waste remaining at the Idaho site began this week at the U.S. Department of Energy�s Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project. Waste retrieval resumes at the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project. The resumption of work comes after a nearly two-year stoppage of retrieval operations �A significant investment has been made in terms of time and dollars that will allow employees to safely retrieve the final radioactive waste that has been stored aboveground at the Idaho site for more than four

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium hexafluoride stored" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Storing data encoded DNA in living organisms  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Current technologies allow the generation of artificial DNA molecules and/or the ability to alter the DNA sequences of existing DNA molecules. With a careful coding scheme and arrangement, it is possible to encode important information as an artificial DNA strand and store it in a living host safely and permanently. This inventive technology can be used to identify origins and protect R&D investments. It can also be used in environmental research to track generations of organisms and observe the ecological impact of pollutants. Today, there are microorganisms that can survive under extreme conditions. As well, it is advantageous to consider multicellular organisms as hosts for stored information. These living organisms can provide as memory housing and protection for stored data or information. The present invention provides well for data storage in a living organism wherein at least one DNA sequence is encoded to represent data and incorporated into a living organism.

Wong; Pak C. (Richland, WA), Wong; Kwong K. (Sugar Land, TX), Foote; Harlan P. (Richland, WA)

2006-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

302

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10. Uranium reserve estimates at the end of 2012 10. Uranium reserve estimates at the end of 2012 million pounds U3O8 Forward Cost2 Uranium Reserve Estimates1 by Mine and Property Status, Mining Method, and State(s) $0 to $30 per pound $0 to $50 per pound $0 to $100 per pound Properties with Exploration Completed, Exploration Continuing, and Only Assessment Work W W 102.0 Properties Under Development for Production W W W Mines in Production W 21.4 W Mines Closed Temporarily and Closed Permanently W W 133.1 In-Situ Leach Mining W W 128.6 Underground and Open Pit Mining W W 175.4 Arizona, New Mexico and Utah 0 W 164.7 Colorado, Nebraska and Texas W W 40.8 Wyoming W W 98.5 Total 51.8 W 304.0 1 Sixteen respondents reported reserve estimates on 71 mines and properties. These uranium reserve estimates cannot be compared with the much larger historical data set of uranium reserves that were published in the July 2010 report U.S. Uranium Reserves Estimates at http://www.eia.gov/cneaf/nuclear/page/reserves/ures.html. Reserves, as reported here, do not necessarily imply compliance with U.S. or Canadian government definitions for purposes of investment disclosure.

303

FAQ 5-Is uranium radioactive?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Is uranium radioactive? Is uranium radioactive? Is uranium radioactive? All isotopes of uranium are radioactive, with most having extremely long half-lives. Half-life is a measure of the time it takes for one half of the atoms of a particular radionuclide to disintegrate (or decay) into another nuclear form. Each radionuclide has a characteristic half-life. Half-lives vary from millionths of a second to billions of years. Because radioactivity is a measure of the rate at which a radionuclide decays (for example, decays per second), the longer the half-life of a radionuclide, the less radioactive it is for a given mass. The half-life of uranium-238 is about 4.5 billion years, uranium-235 about 700 million years, and uranium-234 about 25 thousand years. Uranium atoms decay into other atoms, or radionuclides, that are also radioactive and commonly called "decay products." Uranium and its decay products primarily emit alpha radiation, however, lower levels of both beta and gamma radiation are also emitted. The total activity level of uranium depends on the isotopic composition and processing history. A sample of natural uranium (as mined) is composed of 99.3% uranium-238, 0.7% uranium-235, and a negligible amount of uranium-234 (by weight), as well as a number of radioactive decay products.

304

economic means to permanently store CO  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

economic means to permanently store CO economic means to permanently store CO 2 in unmineable coal seams. Prior to the injection, horizontal coalbed methane (CBM) wells were drilled approximately 1,200 to 1,800 feet underground in a five-spot pattern over a 200-acre area in the unmineable Upper Freeport coal seam. As part of this $13 million field trial, which is being conducted under the collaboration of the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), West Virginia University, and CONSOL Energy, Inc., CO 2 will be injected at a pressure of up to 700 pounds per square inch (psi)

305

System for handling and storing radioactive waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for handling and storing spent reactor fuel and other solid radioactive waste, including canisters to contain the elements of solid waste, storage racks to hold a plurality of such canisters, storage bays to store these racks in isolation by means of shielded doors in the bays. This system also includes means for remotely positioning the racks in the bays and an access tunnel within which the remotely operated means is located to position a rack in a selected bay. The modular type of these bays will facilitate the construction of additional bays and access tunnel extension.

Anderson, John K. (San Diego, CA); Lindemann, Paul E. (Escondido, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

System for handling and storing radioactive waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method are claimed for handling and storing spent reactor fuel and other solid radioactive waste, including canisters to contain the elements of solid waste, storage racks to hold a plurality of such canisters, storage bays to store these racks in isolation by means of shielded doors in the bays. This system also includes means for remotely positioning the racks in the bays and an access tunnel within which the remotely operated means is located to position a rack in a selected bay. The modular type of these bays will facilitate the construction of additional bays and access tunnel extension.

Anderson, J.K.; Lindemann, P.E.

1982-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

307

Development of Integrated Online Monitoring Systems for Detection of Diversion at Natural Uranium Conversion Facilities  

SciTech Connect

Recent work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has focused on some source term modeling of uranyl nitrate (UN) as part of a comprehensive validation effort employing gamma-ray detector instrumentation for the detection of diversion from declared conversion activities. Conversion, the process by which natural uranium ore (yellowcake) is purified and converted through a series of chemical processes into uranium hexafluoride gas (UF6), has historically been excluded from the nuclear safeguards requirements of the 235U-based nuclear fuel cycle. The undeclared diversion of this product material could potentially provide feedstock for a clandestine weapons program for state or non-state entities. Given the changing global political environment and the increased availability of dual-use nuclear technology, the International Atomic Energy Agency has evolved its policies to emphasize safeguarding this potential feedstock material in response to dynamic and evolving potential diversion pathways. To meet the demand for instrumentation testing at conversion facilities, ORNL developed the Uranyl Nitrate Calibration Loop Equipment (UNCLE) facility to simulate the full-scale operating conditions of a purified uranium-bearing aqueous stream exiting the solvent extraction process in a natural uranium conversion plant. This work investigates gamma-ray signatures of UN circulating in the UNCLE facility and evaluates detector instrumentation sensitivity to UN for safeguards applications. These detector validation activities include assessing detector responses to the UN gamma-ray signatures for spectrometers based on sodium iodide, lanthanum bromide, and germanium detectors. The results of measurements under static and dynamic operating conditions at concentrations ranging from 10-90g U/L of naturally enriched UN will be presented. A range of gamma-ray lines was examined and self-attenuation factors were calculated, in addition to attenuation for transmission measurement of density, concentration and enrichment. A detailed uncertainty analysis will be presented providing insights into instrumentation limitations to spoofing.

Dewji, Shaheen A [ORNL; Lee, Denise L [ORNL; Croft, Stephen [ORNL; McElroy, Robert Dennis [ORNL; Hertel, Nolan [Georgia Institute of Technology; Chapman, Jeffrey Allen [ORNL; Cleveland, Steven L [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Costs of Storing and Transporting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Costs of Storing and Transporting Hydrogen Project Summary Full Title: Costs of Storing and Transporting Hydrogen Project ID: 114 Principal Investigator: Wade Amos Purpose An...

309

November 18, 2010: Antimatter Trapped and Stored | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Stored November 18, 2010 The Department's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) announces that atoms of antimatter have been trapped and stored for the first time in...

310

Pages that link to "Energy Savings Store" | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Energy Savings Store" Energy Savings Store Jump to: navigation, search What links here...

311

Changes related to "Energy Savings Store" | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Data Special page Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Energy Savings Store" Energy Savings Store Jump to: navigation, search This is a list...

312

FAQ 6-What is depleted uranium?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

depleted uranium? What is depleted uranium? Depleted uranium is created during the processing that is done to make natural uranium suitable for use as fuel in nuclear power plants...

313

Tag: uranium | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

uranium Tag: uranium Displaying 1 - 10 of 23... Category: News The Nation's Expert in All Things Uranium Y-12 serves the nation and the world as a center of excellence for uranium...

314

The Nature of Vibrational Softening in ? - Uranium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Nature of Vibrational Softening in ? - Uranium. The standard textbook ... B / atom. All experiments used uranium powder. High ...

315

Education: Digital Resource Center - WEB: Uranium Information ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 24, 2007 ... Uranium, Electricity and the Greenhouse Effect ... Educational Resource Papers," Australian Uranium Association Ltd. Site updated weekly.

316

Energy Levels of Neutral Uranium ( U I )  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Data, Uranium (U) Homepage - Introduction Finding list Select element by name. ... Version Energy Levels of Neutral Uranium ( U I ). ...

317

Domestic Uranium Production Report 2004 -2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy. Comprehensive data summaries, comparisons, analysis, and projections ...

318

Domestic Uranium Production Report - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, ... with currently proven mining and processing technology and under current law and regulations.

319

Walmart Experimental Store Performance Stories: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Walmart opened two experimental stores--one in Colorado and one in Texas--in 2005 to serve as test beds for several advanced building systems. Each embodied more than 50 experiments covering materials, water systems, energy systems, and renewable energy production. Walmart worked for three years with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for the Colorado Store and Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the Texas store to monitor, analyze, and report on their performance. HVAC experiments included waste oil boilers, a microturbine/absorption chiller combined heat and power system, evaporative cooling, and a transpired solar collector. The refrigeration systems integrated a medium-temperature secondary loop, evaporatively cooled condenser, doors on medium-temperature cases, and light-emitting diodes on cases. Experiments in the lighting systems included a redesigned roof for clerestory daylighting and T-5 fluorescent lamps. Three photovoltaic systems for a total of 135 kW and a 50-kW wind turbine are also included. The energy system performance was compared to the measured performance of a prototypical Walmart store and to other benchmarks.

Deru, M.; Kozubal, E.; Norton, P.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Canister arrangement for storing radioactive waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The subject invention relates to a canister arrangement for jointly storing high level radioactive chemical waste and metallic waste resulting from the reprocessing of nuclear reactor fuel elements. A cylindrical steel canister is provided with an elongated centrally disposed billet of the metallic waste and the chemical waste in vitreous form is disposed in the annulus surrounding the billet.

Lorenzo, D.K.; Van Cleve, J.E. Jr.

1980-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium hexafluoride stored" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Canister arrangement for storing radioactive waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The subject invention relates to a canister arrangement for jointly storing high level radioactive chemical waste and metallic waste resulting from the reprocessing of nuclear reactor fuel elements. A cylindrical steel canister is provided with an elongated centrally disposed billet of the metallic waste and the chemical waste in vitreous form is disposed in the annulus surrounding the billet.

Lorenzo, Donald K. (Knoxville, TN); Van Cleve, Jr., John E. (Kingston, TN)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Schemes of storing XML query cache  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

XML query caching for XML database-backed Web applications began to be investigated recently. However, the issue of how the cached query results are stored has not been addressed despite its practical significance. In this paper, we deal with ... Keywords: DOM, PDOM, XML query cache, XML update, incremental cache refresh

Hyunchul Kang; Seungchul Han; Younghyun Kim

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Process for electrolytically preparing uranium metal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for making uranium metal from uranium oxide by first fluorinating uranium oxide to form uranium tetrafluoride and next electrolytically reducing the uranium tetrafluoride with a carbon anode to form uranium metal and CF.sub.4. The CF.sub.4 is reused in the fluorination reaction rather than being disposed of as a hazardous waste.

Haas, Paul A. (Knoxville, TN)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Uranium-titanium-niobium alloy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A uranium alloy having small additions of Ti and Nb shows improved strength and ductility in cross section of greater than one inch over prior uranium alloy having only Ti as an alloying element.

Ludtka, Gail M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ludtka, Gerard M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

METHOD OF SINTERING URANIUM DIOXIDE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This patent relates to a method of sintering uranium dioxide. Uranium dioxide bodies are heated to above 1200 nif- C in hydrogen, sintered in steam, and then cooled in hydrogen. (AEC)

Henderson, C.M.; Stavrolakis, J.A.

1963-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

326

It's Elemental - The Element Uranium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

into uranium-233, also through beta decay. If completely fissioned, one pound (0.45 kilograms) of uranium-233 will provide the same amount of energy as burning 1,500 tons...

327

Uranium resources: Issues and facts  

SciTech Connect

Although there are several secondary issues, the most important uranium resource issue is, ``will there be enough uranium available at a cost which will allow nuclear power to be competitive in the future?`` This paper will attempt to answer this question by discussing uranium supply, demand, and economics from the perspective of the United States. The paper will discuss: how much uranium is available; the sensitivity of nuclear power costs to uranium price; the potential future demand for uranium in the Unites States, some of the options available to reduce this demand, the potential role of the Advanced Liquid Metal Cooled Reactor (ALMR) in reducing uranium demand; and potential alternative uranium sources and technologies.

Delene, J.G.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

METHOD OF RECOVERING URANIUM COMPOUNDS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

S>The recovery of uranium compounds which have been adsorbed on anion exchange resins is discussed. The uranium and thorium-containing residues from monazite processed by alkali hydroxide are separated from solution, and leached with an alkali metal carbonate solution, whereby the uranium and thorium hydrorides are dissolved. The carbonate solution is then passed over an anion exchange resin causing the uranium to be adsorbed while the thorium remains in solution. The uranium may be recovered by contacting the uranium-holding resin with an aqueous ammonium carbonate solution whereby the uranium values are eluted from the resin and then heating the eluate whereby carbon dioxide and ammonia are given off, the pH value of the solution is lowered, and the uranium is precipitated.

Poirier, R.H.

1957-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

329

Environmental assessment for the purchase of Russian low enriched uranium derived from the dismantlement of nuclear weapons in the countries of the former Soviet Union  

SciTech Connect

The United States is proposing to purchase from the Russian Federation low enriched uranium (LEU) derived from highly enriched uranium (HEU) resulting from the dismantlement of nuclear weapons in the countries of the former Soviet Union. The purchase would be accomplished through a proposed contract requiring the United States to purchase 15,250 metric tons (tonnes) of LEU (or 22,550 tonnes of UF{sub 6}) derived from blending 500 metric tones uranium (MTU) of HEU from nuclear warheads. The LEU would be in the form of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) and would be converted from HEU in Russia. The United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) is the entity proposing to undertake the contract for purchase, sale, and delivery of the LEU from the Russian Federation. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is negotiating the procedure for gaining confidence that the LEU is derived from HEU that is derived from dismantled nuclear weapons (referred to as ``transparency),`` and would administer the transparency measures for the contract. There are six environments that could potentially be affected by the proposed action; marine (ocean); US ports of entry; truck or rail transportation corridors; the Portsmouth GDP; the electric power industry; and the nuclear fuel cycle industry. These environmental impacts are discussed.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

EXTRACTION OF URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process is presented for recovering uranium from a carnotite ore. In the improved process U/sub 2/O/sub 5/ is added to the comminuted ore along with the usual amount of NaCl prior to roasting. The amount of U/sub 2/O/ sub 5/ is dependent on the amount of free calcium oxide and the uranium in the ore. Specifically, the desirable amount of U/sub 2/O/sub 5/ is 3.2% for each 1% of CaO, and 5 to 6% for each 1% of uranium. The mixture is roasted at about 1560 deg C for about 30 min and then leached with a 3 to 9% aqueous solution of sodium carbonate.

Kesler, R.D.; Rabb, D.D.

1959-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

331

Uranium immobilization and nuclear waste  

SciTech Connect

Considerable information useful in nuclear waste storage can be gained by studying the conditions of uranium ore deposit formation. Further information can be gained by comparing the chemistry of uranium to nuclear fission products and other radionuclides of concern to nuclear waste disposal. Redox state appears to be the most important variable in controlling uranium solubility, especially at near neutral pH, which is characteristic of most ground water. This is probably also true of neptunium, plutonium, and technetium. Further, redox conditions that immobilize uranium should immobilize these elements. The mechanisms that have produced uranium ore bodies in the Earth's crust are somewhat less clear. At the temperatures of hydrothermal uranium deposits, equilibrium models are probably adequate, aqueous uranium (VI) being reduced and precipitated by interaction with ferrous-iron-bearing oxides and silicates. In lower temperature roll-type uranium deposits, overall equilibrium may not have been achieved. The involvement of sulfate-reducing bacteria in ore-body formation has been postulated, but is uncertain. Reduced sulfur species do, however, appear to be involved in much of the low temperature uranium precipitation. Assessment of the possibility of uranium transport in natural ground water is complicated because the system is generally not in overall equilibrium. For this reason, Eh measurements are of limited value. If a ground water is to be capable of reducing uranium, it must contain ions capable of reducing uranium both thermodynamically and kinetically. At present, the best candidates are reduced sulfur species.

Duffy, C.J.; Ogard, A.E.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

PROCESS OF PREPARING URANIUM CARBIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of preparing uranium monocarbide is de scribed. Uranium metal is dissolved in cadmium, zinc, cadmium-- zinc, or magnesium-- zinc alloy and a small quantity of alkali metal is added. Addition of stoichiometric amounts of carbon at 500 to 820 deg C then precipitates uranium monocarbide. (AEC)

Miller, W.E.; Stethers, H.L.; Johnson, T.R.

1964-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

333

TREATMENT OF URANIUM SURFACES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process is presented for prcparation of uranium surfaces prior to electroplating. The surfacc of the uranium to be electroplated is anodized in a bath comprising a solution of approximately 20 to 602 by weight of phosphoric acid which contains about 20 cc per liter of concentrated hydrochloric acid. Anodization is carried out for approximately 20 minutes at a current density of about 0.5 amperes per square inch at a temperature of about 35 to 45 C. The oxidic film produced by anodization is removed by dipping in strong nitric acid, followed by rinsing with water just prior to electroplating.

Slunder, C.J.

1959-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

PROCESS OF RECOVERING URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved precipitation method is described for the recovery of uranium from aqueous solutions. After removal of all but small amounts of Ni or Cu, and after complexing any iron present, the uranium is separated as the peroxide by adding H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. The improvement lies in the fact that the addition of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and consequent precipitation are carried out at a temperature below the freezing; point of the solution, so that minute crystals of solvent are present as seed crystals for the precipitation.

Price, T.D.; Jeung, N.M.

1958-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

335

Rack for storing spent nuclear fuel elements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A rack for storing spent nuclear fuel elements in which a plurality of aligned rows of upright enclosures of generally square cross-sectional areas contain vertically disposed fuel elements. The enclosures are fixed at the lower ends thereof to a base. Pockets are formed between confronting walls of adjacent enclosures for receiving high absorption neutron absorbers, such as Boral, cadmium, borated stainless steel and the like for the closer spacing of spent fuel elements.

Rubinstein, Herbert J. (Los Gatos, CA); Clark, Philip M. (San Jose, CA); Gilcrest, James D. (San Jose, CA)

1978-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

336

Multiple stage multiple filter hydrate store  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved hydrate store for a metal halogen battery system is disclosed which employs a multiple stage, multiple filter means for separating the halogen hydrate from the liquid used in forming the hydrate. The filter means is constructed in the form of three separate sections which combine to substantially cover the interior surface of the store container. Exit conduit means is provided in association with the filter means for transmitting liquid passing through the filter means to a hydrate former subsystem. The hydrate former subsystem combines the halogen gas generated during the charging of the battery system with the liquid to form the hydrate in association with the store. Relief valve means is interposed in the exit conduit means for controlling the operation of the separate sections of the filter means, such that the liquid flow through the exit conduit means from each of the separate sections is controlled in a predetermined sequence. The three separate sections of the filter means operate in three discrete stages to provide a substantially uniform liquid flow to the hydrate former subsystem during the charging of the battery system. The separation of the liquid from the hydrate causes an increase in the density of the hydrate by concentrating the hydrate along the filter means. 7 figs.

Bjorkman, H.K. Jr.

1983-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

337

Using Metal Hydride to Store Hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen is the lightest element. At ambient conditions on a volume basis it stores the least amount of energy compared to other fuel carriers such as natural gas and gasoline. For hydrogen to become a practical fuel carrier, a way must be found to increase its volumetric energy density to a practical level. Present techniques being developed include compressed gas, cryogenic liquid and absorbed solid. Each of these techniques has its advantages and disadvantages. And none of them appears to be satisfactory for use in a hydrogen economy. In the interim all of them are used for demonstration purposes. Metal hydrides store hydrogen in a solid form under moderate temperature and pressure that gives them a safety advantage. They require the least amount of energy to operate. Their stored hydrogen density is nearing that of liquid hydrogen. But they are heavy and the weight is their main disadvantage. Current usable metal hydrides can hold no more than about 1.8 percent hydrogen by weight. However much effort is underway to find lighter materials. These include other solid materials other than the traditional metal hydrides. Their operation is expected to be similar to that of metal hydride and can use the technology developed for metal hydrides.

Heung, L.K.

2003-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

338

Production and Handling Slide 21: Melting Points of Uranium and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Points of Uranium and Uranium Compounds Skip Presentation Navigation First Slide Previous Slide Next Slide Last Presentation Table of Contents Melting Points of Uranium and Uranium...

339

FAQ 26-Are there any uses for depleted uranium?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

uses for depleted uranium? Are there any uses for depleted uranium? Several current and potential uses exist for depleted uranium. Depleted uranium could be mixed with highly...

340

High loading uranium fuel plate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Two embodiments of a high uranium fuel plate are disclosed which contain a meat comprising structured uranium compound confined between a pair of diffusion bonded ductile metal cladding plates uniformly covering the meat, the meat having a uniform high fuel loading comprising a content of uranium compound greater than about 45 Vol. % at a porosity not greater than about 10 Vol. %. In a first embodiment, the meat is a plurality of parallel wires of uranium compound. In a second embodiment, the meat is a dispersion compact containing uranium compound. The fuel plates are fabricated by a hot isostatic pressing process.

Wiencek, Thomas C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Domagala, Robert F. (Indian Head Park, IL); Thresh, Henry R. (Palos Heights, IL)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium hexafluoride stored" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

STRIPPING OF URANIUM FROM ORGANIC EXTRACTANTS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid-liquid extraction method is given for recovering uranium values from uranium-containing solutions. Uranium is removed from a uranium-containing organic solution by contacting said organic solution with an aqueous ammonium carbonate solution substantially saturated in uranium values. A uranium- containing precipitate is thereby formed which is separated from the organic and aqueous phases. Uranium values are recovered from this separated precipitate. (AE C)

Crouse, D.J. Jr.

1962-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Depleted Uranium Technical Brief  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This Technical Brief specifically addresses DU in an environmental contamination setting and specifically does.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other govern ment sources. DU occurs in a number of different compounds airborne releases of uranium at one DOE facility amounted to 310,000 kg between 1951 and 1988, which

343

URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The recovery of uranium from the acidic aqueous metal waste solutions resulting from the bismuth phosphate carrier precipitation of plutonium from solutions of neutron irradiated uranium is described. The waste solutions consist of phosphoric acid, sulfuric acid, and uranium as a uranyl salt, together with salts of the fission products normally associated with neutron irradiated uranium. Generally, the process of the invention involves the partial neutralization of the waste solution with sodium hydroxide, followed by conversion of the solution to a pH 11 by mixing therewith sufficient sodium carbonate. The resultant carbonate-complexed waste is contacted with a titanated silica gel and the adsorbent separated from the aqueous medium. The aqueous solution is then mixed with sufficient acetic acid to bring the pH of the aqueous medium to between 4 and 5, whereby sodium uranyl acetate is precipitated. The precipitate is dissolved in nitric acid and the resulting solution preferably provided with salting out agents. Uranyl nitrate is recovered from the solution by extraction with an ether such as diethyl ether.

Hyman, H.H.; Dreher, J.L.

1959-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Criteria for the safe storage of enriched uranium at the Y-12 Plant  

SciTech Connect

Uranium storage practices at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities have evolved over a period spanning five decades of programmatic work in support of the nuclear deterrent mission. During this period, the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee has served as the principal enriched uranium facility for fabrication, chemical processing, metallurgical processing and storage. Recent curtailment of new nuclear weapons production and stockpile reduction has created significant amounts of enriched uranium available as a strategic resource which must be properly and safely stored. This standard specifies criteria associated with the safe storage of enriched uranium at the Y-12 Plant. Because programmatic needs, compliance regulations and desirable materials of construction change with time, it is recommended that these standards be reviewed and amended periodically to ensure that they continue to serve their intended purpose.

Cox, S.O.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

A PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY OF URANIUM FROM NUCLEAR FUEL ELEMENTS USING FLUID-BED DRYING AND VOLATILITY TECHNIQUES  

SciTech Connect

A process scheme for the recovery of uranium from fuel elements has been developed. The scheme combines continuous fluid-bed drying and fluoride volatility techniques after initial dissolution of the fuel element in the appropriate aqueous system, hence the designation ADF, Aqueous Dry Fluorination Process. The application of this process to the recovery of uranium from highly enriched, low uranium-zirconium alloy plate-type fuels is described. ln the process, the feed solution is sprayed horizontally through a two-fluid nozzle and is atomized directly in the heated fluidized bed. The spray droplets are dried on the fluidized particles and form a dense coating. Excessive particle growth was limited by the use of air attrition-jets inserted directly in the bed. Aqueous hydrofluoric acid solutions containing l.2 to 3.6 M zirconiuni, 0.007 to 0.03 M uranium, and free acid concentrations from 1 to about l0 M were successfully processed in a 6-in.-diameter Inconel fluid-bed spray dryer. Rates equivalent to about 3.l kg/hr of zirconium were achieved, 160 ml/min with the most concentrated feed solution. Experiments were successfully carried out from 240 to 450 deg C. A new design for a two-fluid nozzle was developed. Extensive work was done to identify the various zirconium fluoride compounds formed. The granular dryer product was subsequently fluorinated at temperatures to 600 deg C in fluid beds and to 700 deg C in static beds to remove the uranium as the volatile hexafluoride. About 90 to 95% uranium removal was consistently achieved near 600 deg C. The relatively low uranium recovery under these conditions is a disadvantage for the application to zirconium-base fuels. It was found necessary to resort to static beds and higher temperatures to achieve greater removal. Since the fluorine attack on nickel, the material of construction, is prohibitive at temperatures above 600 deg C, a disposable fluorinator concept for use with static beds is described. Results of corrosion studies are reported. A preliminary chemical flowsheet with a design capacity of 1l00 kg of uranium (93% enriched) annually is presented. (auth)

Levitz, N.; Barghusen, J.; Carls, E.; Jonke, A.A.

1961-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Nuclear Fuel Facts: Uranium | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Uranium Management and Uranium Management and Policy » Nuclear Fuel Facts: Uranium Nuclear Fuel Facts: Uranium Nuclear Fuel Facts: Uranium Uranium is a silvery-white metallic chemical element in the periodic table, with atomic number 92. It is assigned the chemical symbol U. A uranium atom has 92 protons and 92 electrons, of which 6 are valence electrons. Uranium has the highest atomic weight (19 kg m) of all naturally occurring elements. Uranium occurs naturally in low concentrations in soil, rock and water, and is commercially extracted from uranium-bearing minerals such as uraninite. Uranium ore can be mined from open pits or underground excavations. The ore can then be crushed and treated at a mill to separate the valuable uranium from the ore. Uranium may also be dissolved directly from the ore deposits

347

Many-core key-value store  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scaling data centers to handle task-parallel work-loads requires balancing the cost of hardware, operations, and power. Low-power, low-core-count servers reduce costs in one of these dimensions, but may require additional nodes to provide the required ... Keywords: 64-core Tilera TILEPro64, many-core key-value store, data centers, task-parallel workloads, low-core-count servers, low-power servers, under-utilizing memory, power consumption, high-core-count processor, clock rate, 4-core Intel Xeon L5520, 8-core AMD Opteron 6128 HE

M. Berezecki; E. Frachtenberg; M. Paleczny; K. Steele

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

PRODUCTION OF URANIUM METAL BY CARBON REDUCTION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The preparation of uranium metal by the carbon reduction of an oxide of uranium is described. In a preferred embodiment of the invention a charge composed of carbon and uranium oxide is heated to a solid mass after which it is further heated under vacuum to a temperature of about 2000 deg C to produce a fused uranium metal. Slowly ccoling the fused mass produces a dendritic structure of uranium carbide in uranium metal. Reacting the solidified charge with deionized water hydrolyzes the uranium carbide to finely divide uranium dioxide which can be separated from the coarser uranium metal by ordinary filtration methods.

Holden, R.B.; Powers, R.M.; Blaber, O.J.

1959-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

349

Remediation and Recovery of Uranium from Contaminated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

uranium containing the mixture of isotopes occurring in nature; uranium depleted in the isotope 235; Depleted uranium 1000 kilograms; and Thorium 1000 kilograms. #12;INFCIRC/254/Rev.9/Part.1 November 2007 Annex B, section 4.); 2.5. Plants for the separation of isotopes of natural uranium, depleted uranium

Lovley, Derek

350

Method of preparation of uranium nitride  

SciTech Connect

Method for producing terminal uranium nitride complexes comprising providing a suitable starting material comprising uranium; oxidizing the starting material with a suitable oxidant to produce one or more uranium(IV)-azide complexes; and, sufficiently irradiating the uranium(IV)-azide complexes to produce the terminal uranium nitride complexes.

Kiplinger, Jaqueline Loetsch; Thomson, Robert Kenneth James

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

351

Method of preparing uranium nitride or uranium carbonitride bodies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Sintered uranium nitride or uranium carbonitride bodies having a controlled final carbon-to-uranium ratio are prepared, in an essentially continuous process, from U.sub.3 O.sub.8 and carbon by varying the weight ratio of carbon to U.sub.3 O.sub.8 in the feed mixture, which is compressed into a green body and sintered in a continuous heating process under various controlled atmospheric conditions to prepare the sintered bodies.

Wilhelm, Harley A. (Ames, IA); McClusky, James K. (Valparaiso, IN)

1976-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

352

Carbon Pollution Being Captured, Stored and Used to Produce More...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Pollution Being Captured, Stored and Used to Produce More Domestic Oil Carbon Pollution Being Captured, Stored and Used to Produce More Domestic Oil May 10, 2013 - 11:38am...

353

Using the Vidisector and the Store Picture Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The stored picture facility (FAKETV) allows LISP users, and to some extent machine language users, to access a library of stored images rather than live vidisector scenes. The vidisector functions in LISP have been slightly ...

Lerman, Jerome B.

354

ENERGY STAR Score for Supermarkets/Grocery Stores  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SupermarketsGrocery Stores in the United States Page 1 ENERGY STAR Score for SupermarketsGrocery Stores in the United States Technical Reference OVERVIEW The ENERGY STAR Score...

355

Method for fabricating uranium foils and uranium alloy foils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of producing thin foils of uranium or an alloy. The uranium or alloy is cast as a plate or sheet having a thickness less than about 5 mm and thereafter cold rolled in one or more passes at substantially ambient temperatures until the uranium or alloy thereof is in the shape of a foil having a thickness less than about 1.0 mm. The uranium alloy includes one or more of Zr, Nb, Mo, Cr, Fe, Si, Ni, Cu or Al.

Hofman, Gerard L. (Downers Grove, IL); Meyer, Mitchell K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Knighton, Gaven C. (Moore, ID); Clark, Curtis R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2006-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

356

METHOD OF PRODUCING URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A modified process is described for the production of uranium metal by means of a bomb reduction of UF/sub 4/. Difficulty is sometimes experienced in obtaining complete separation of the uranium from the slag when the process is carried out on a snnall scale, i.e., for the production of 10 grams of U or less. Complete separation may be obtained by incorporating in the reaction mixture a quantity of MnCl/sub 2/, so that this compound is reduced along with the UF/sub 4/ . As a result a U--Mn alloy is formed which has a melting point lower than that of pure U, and consequently the metal remains molten for a longer period allowing more complete separation from the slag.

Foster, L.S.; Magel, T.T.

1958-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

357

Intelligent Building Series, Volume 2: Grocery and Convenience Stores  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today's grocery and convenience stores are facing intense competition from nontraditional food retailers such as wholesale retailers, mass merchandisers, and pharmacy and dollar stores. This competition is forcing grocery and convenience stores to seek ways to attract new customers, reduce operating costs, and retain their employees. This report examines the grocery and convenience store segment in terms of market trends, energy use, and the potential for demand response implementation. Electric loads th...

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

358

Innovative Methods for Corn Stover Collecting, Handling, Storing and Transporting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Investigation of innovative methods for collecting, handling, storing, and transporting corn stover for potential use for production of cellulosic ethanol.

Atchison, J. E.; Hettenhaus, J. R.

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Simulation of transportation of low enriched uranium solutions  

SciTech Connect

A simulation of the transportation by truck of low enriched uranium solutions has been completed for NEPA purposes at the Savannah River Site. The analysis involves three distinct source terms, and establishes the radiological risks of shipment to three possible destinations. Additionally, loading accidents were analyzed to determine the radiological consequences of mishaps during handling and delivery. Source terms were developed from laboratory measurements of chemical samples from low enriched uranium feed materials being stored at SRS facilities, and from manufacturer data on transport containers. The transportation simulations were accomplished over the INTERNET using the DOE TRANSNET system at Sandia National Laboratory. The HIGHWAY 3.3 code was used to analyze routing scenarios, and the RADTRAN 4 code was used to analyze incident free and accident risks of transporting radiological materials. Loading accidents were assessed using the Savannah River Site AXAIR89Q and RELEASE 2 codes.

Hope, E.P.; Ades, M.J.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

ELECTROLYSIS OF THORIUM AND URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrolytic method is given for obtaining pure thorium, uranium, and thorium-uranium alloys. The electrolytic cell comprises a cathode composed of a metal selected from the class consisting of zinc, cadmium, tin, lead, antimony, and bismuth, an anode composed of at least one of the metals selected from the group consisting of thorium and uranium in an impure state, and an electrolyte composed of a fused salt containing at least one of the salts of the metals selected from the class consisting of thorium, uranium. zinc, cadmium, tin, lead, antimony, and bismuth. Electrolysis of the fused salt while the cathode is maintained in the molten condition deposits thorium, uranium, or thorium-uranium alloys in pure form in the molten cathode which thereafter may be separated from the molten cathode product by distillation.

Hansen, W.N.

1960-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium hexafluoride stored" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9. Summary production statistics of the U.S. uranium industry, 1993-2012 9. Summary production statistics of the U.S. uranium industry, 1993-2012 Item 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 E2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Exploration and Development Surface Drilling (million feet) 1.1 0.7 1.3 3.0 4.9 4.6 2.5 1.0 0.7 W W 1.2 1.7 2.7 5.1 5.1 3.7 4.9 6.3 7.2 Drilling Expenditures (million dollars)1 5.7 1.1 2.6 7.2 20.0 18.1 7.9 5.6 2.7 W W 10.6 18.1 40.1 67.5 81.9 35.4 44.6 53.6 66.6 Mine Production of Uranium (million pounds U3O8) 2.1 2.5 3.5 4.7 4.7 4.8 4.5 3.1 2.6 2.4 2.2 2.5 3.0 4.7 4.5 3.9 4.1 4.2 4.1 4.3 Uranium Concentrate Production (million pounds U3O8) 3.1 3.4 6.0 6.3 5.6 4.7 4.6 4.0 2.6 2.3 2.0 2.3 2.7 4.1 4.5 3.9 3.7 4.2 4.0 4.1

362

WELDED JACKETED URANIUM BODY  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel element is presented for a neutronic reactor and is comprised of a uranium body, a non-fissionable jacket surrounding sald body, thu jacket including a portion sealed by a weld, and an inclusion in said sealed jacket at said weld of a fiux having a low neutron capture cross-section. The flux is provided by combining chlorine gas and hydrogen in the intense heat of-the arc, in a "Heliarc" welding muthod, to form dry hydrochloric acid gas.

Gurinsky, D.H.

1958-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

363

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8. U.S. uranium expenditures, 2003-2012 8. U.S. uranium expenditures, 2003-2012 million dollars Year Drilling Production Land and Other Total Expenditures Total Land and Other Land Exploration Reclamation 2003 W W 31.3 NA NA NA W 2004 10.6 27.8 48.4 NA NA NA 86.9 2005 18.1 58.2 59.7 NA NA NA 136.0 2006 40.1 65.9 115.2 41.0 23.3 50.9 221.2 2007 67.5 90.4 178.2 77.7 50.3 50.2 336.2 2008 81.9 221.2 164.4 65.2 50.2 49.1 467.6 2009 35.4 141.0 104.0 17.3 24.2 62.4 280.5 2010 44.6 133.3 99.5 20.2 34.5 44.7 277.3 2011 53.6 168.8 96.8 19.6 43.5 33.7 319.2 2012 66.6 186.9 99.4 16.8 33.3 49.3 352.9 Drilling: All expenditures directly associated with exploration and development drilling. Production: All expenditures for mining, milling, processing of uranium, and facility expense.

364

METHOD OF JACKETING URANIUM BODIES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process is presented for providing uranium slugs with thin walled aluminum jackets. Since aluminum has a slightiy higher coefficient of thermal expansion than does uraaium, both uranium slugs and aluminum cans are heated to an elevated temperature of about 180 C, and the slug are inserted in the cans at that temperature. During the subsequent cooling of the assembly, the aluminum contracts more than does the uranium and a tight shrink fit is thus assured.

Maloney, J.O.; Haines, E.B.; Tepe, J.B.

1958-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

365

PROCESS FOR PREPARING URANIUM METAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is presented for producing oxygen-free uranium metal comprising contacting iodine vapor with crude uranium in a reaction zone maintained at 400 to 800 C to produce a vaporous mixture of UI/sub 4/ and iodine. Also disposed within the maction zone is a tungsten filament which is heated to about 1600 C. The UI/sub 4/, upon contacting the hot filament, is decomposed to molten uranium substantially free of oxygen.

Prescott, C.H. Jr.; Reynolds, F.L.

1959-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

366

FAQ 2-Where does uranium come from?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

come from? Where does uranium come from? Small amounts of uranium are found almost everywhere in soil, rock, and water. However, concentrated deposits of uranium ores are found in...

367

OXYGEN DIFFUSION IN HYPOSTOICHIOMETRIC URANIUM DIOXIDE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IN HYPOSTOICHIOMETRIC URANIUM DIOXIDE Kee Chul Kim Ph.D.727-366; Figure 1. Oxygen-uranium phase-equilibrium _ystem [18]. uranium dioxide powders and 18 0 enriched carbon

Kim, Kee Chul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Reoxidation of Bioreduced Uranium Under Reducing Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microbial reduction of uranium. Nature 350, 413-416 (1991).C. Enzymatic iron and uranium reduction by sulfate-reducingS. Reduction of hexavalent uranium from organic complexes by

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

PROCESS FOR REMOVING NOBLE METALS FROM URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pyrometallurgical method is given for purifying uranium containing ruthenium and palladium. The uranium is disintegrated and oxidized by exposure to air and then the ruthenium and palladium are extracted from the uranium with molten zinc.

Knighton, J.B.

1961-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

370

IMPROVED PROCESSES FOR RECOVERING AND PURIFYING URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for reclaiming metallic uranium enriched with uranium-235 from the collector of a calutron upon which the enriched metallic uranium is Editor please delete 22166.

Price, T.D.; Henrickson, A.V.

1959-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

371

Y-12 and uranium history  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

German chemists, Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassman, successfully described a new term, nuclear fission, for their experiment that resulted in the first splitting of the uranium atom....

372

Highly Enriched Uranium Transparency Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Climate Research Center for Geospatial Analysis Program Highlights Index Highly Enriched Uranium Transparency Program EVS staff members helped to implement transparency and...

373

THERMAL DECOMPOSITION OF URANIUM COMPOUNDS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is presented of preparing uranium metal of high purity consisting contacting impure U metal with halogen vapor at between 450 and 550 C to form uranium halide vapor, contacting the uranium halide vapor in the presence of H/sub 2/ with a refractory surface at about 1400 C to thermally decompose the uranium halides and deposit molten U on the refractory surface and collecting the molten U dripping from the surface. The entire operation is carried on at a sub-atmospheric pressure of below 1 mm mercury.

Magel, T.T.; Brewer, L.

1959-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

374

SEPARATION OF THORIUM FROM URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A description is given for the separation of thorium from uranium by forming an aqueous acidic solution containing ionic species of thorium, uranyl uranium, and hydroxylamine, flowing the solution through a column containing the phenol-formaldehyde type cation exchange resin to selectively adsorb substantially all the thorium values and a portion of the uranium values, flowing a dilute solution of hydrochloric acid through the column to desorb the uranium values, and then flowing a dilute aqueous acidic solution containing an ion, such as bisulfate, which has a complexing effect upon thortum through the column to desorb substantially all of the thorium.

Bane, R.W.

1959-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

METHOD FOR RECOVERING URANIUM FROM OILS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is presented for recovering uranium from hydrocarbon oils, wherein the uranium is principally present as UF/sub 4/. According to the invention, substantially complete removal of the uranium from the hydrocarbon oil may be effected by intimately mixing one part of acetone to about 2 to 12 parts of the hydrocarbon oil containing uranium and separating the resulting cake of uranium from the resulting mixture. The uranium in the cake may be readily recovered by burning to the oxide.

Gooch, L.H.

1959-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

376

PREPARATION OF URANIUM(IV) NITRATE SOLUTIONS  

SciTech Connect

A procedure was developed for the preparation of uranium(IV) nitrate solutions in dilute nitric acid. Zinc metal was used as a reducing agent for uranium(VI) in dilute sulfuric acid. The uranium(IV) was precipitated as the hydrated oxide and dissolved in nitric acid. Uranium(IV) nitrate solutions were prepared at a maximum concentration of 100 g/l. The uranium(VI) content was less than 2% of the uranium(IV). (auth)

Ondrejcin, R.S.

1961-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Walmart Experimental Store Performance Stories: Preprint  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8295 8295 August 2010 Walmart Experimental Store Performance Stories Preprint Michael Deru, Eric Kozubal, and Paul Norton Presented at ACEEE Summer Study Pacific Grove, California August 15-20, 2010 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and Alliance retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any

378

PROCESS OF PRODUCING REFRACTORY URANIUM OXIDE ARTICLES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is presented for fabricating uranium oxide into a shaped refractory article by introducing a uranium halide fluxing reagent into the uranium oxide, and then mixing and compressing the materials into a shaped composite mass. The shaped mass of uranium oxide and uranium halide is then fired at an elevated temperature so as to form a refractory sintered article. It was found in the present invention that the introduction of a uraninm halide fluxing agent afforded a fluxing action with the uranium oxide particles and that excellent cohesion between these oxide particles was obtained. Approximately 90% of uranium dioxide and 10% of uranium tetrafluoride represent a preferred composition.

Hamilton, N.E.

1957-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Uranium Leasing Program | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Uranium Leasing Program Uranium Leasing Program Abandoned Mine Reclamation, Uravan Mineral Belt, Colorado Abandoned Mine Reclamation, Uravan Mineral Belt, Colorado LM currently...

380

Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Project | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Project Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Project CEUSP Inventory11-6-13Finalprint-ready.pdf CEUSPtimelinefinalprint-ready...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium hexafluoride stored" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund's...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund's Fiscal Year 2008 and 2007 Financial Statement Audit, OAS-FS-10-05 Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and...

382

Understanding How Uranium Changes in Subsurface Environments...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

whether it is immobilized or moves out of a contaminated area, potentially into water supplies. The Impact New research on the transformation of uranium (VI) to uranium...

383

Uranium Compounds and Other Natural Radioactivities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-ray Science Division XSD Groups Industry Argonne Home Advanced Photon Source Uranium Compounds and Other Natural Radioactivities Uranium containing compounds and other...

384

Uranium Downblending and Disposition Project Technology Readiness...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Centers Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Uranium Downblending and Disposition Project Technology Readiness Assessment Uranium...

385

Uranium Mining Tax (Nebraska) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Savings Uranium Mining Tax (Nebraska) Uranium Mining Tax (Nebraska) Eligibility Agricultural...

386

Microsoft Word - UraniumBioreductionV3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Highlight - March 2013 Biotic-Abiotic Pathways: A New Paradigm for Uranium Reduction in Sediments Uranium, one of the most common radioactive elements on Earth, makes its...

387

Domestic Uranium Production Report - Quarterly - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total anticipated uranium market requirements at U.S. civilian nuclear power reactors are 50 million pounds for 2013. 2. 1 2012 Uranium Marketing ...

388

FLAME DENITRATION AND REDUCTION OF URANIUM NITRATE TO URANIUM DIOXIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is given for converting uranyl nitrate solution to uranium dioxide. The process comprises spraying fine droplets of aqueous uranyl nitrate solution into a hightemperature hydrocarbon flame, said flame being deficient in oxygen approximately 30%, retaining the feed in the flame for a sufficient length of time to reduce the nitrate to the dioxide, and recovering uranium dioxide. (AEC)

Hedley, W.H.; Roehrs, R.J.; Henderson, C.M.

1962-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

389

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #333: August 16, 2004 Convenience Stores  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3: August 16, 3: August 16, 2004 Convenience Stores Selling Gasoline to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #333: August 16, 2004 Convenience Stores Selling Gasoline on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #333: August 16, 2004 Convenience Stores Selling Gasoline on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #333: August 16, 2004 Convenience Stores Selling Gasoline on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #333: August 16, 2004 Convenience Stores Selling Gasoline on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #333: August 16, 2004 Convenience Stores Selling Gasoline on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #333: August 16, 2004 Convenience Stores Selling Gasoline on AddThis.com...

390

Lighting Up Georgia Convenience Stores | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lighting Up Georgia Convenience Stores Lighting Up Georgia Convenience Stores Lighting Up Georgia Convenience Stores March 28, 2012 - 5:01pm Addthis One of several Georgia convenience stores that improved lighting while saving energy and money. | Courtesy of Outlaw Consulting, Inc. One of several Georgia convenience stores that improved lighting while saving energy and money. | Courtesy of Outlaw Consulting, Inc. Kristin Swineford Communication Specialist, Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs "Programs such as this are a real benefit to the small business owners who operate the majority of convenience stores in the state, bringing them expertise and savings that would not normally be available to them." Jim Tudor, president of GACS Convenience stores across Georgia are saving energy thanks to energy

391

MOBILE SYSTEMS FOR DILUTION OF HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM AND URANIUM CONTAINING COMPONENTS  

SciTech Connect

A mobile melt-dilute (MMD) module for the treatment of aluminum research reactor spent fuel is being developed. The process utilizes a closed system approach to retain fission products/gases inside a sealed canister after treatment. The MMD process melts and dilutes spent fuel with depleted uranium to obtain a fissile fraction of less than 0.2. The final ingot is solidified inside the sealed canister and can be stored safely either wet or dry until final disposition or reprocessing. The MMD module can be staged at or near the research reactor fuel storage sites to facilitate the melt-dilute treatment of the spent fuel into a stable non-proliferable form.

Adams, T

2007-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

392

Assay of Drums with Unknown Content Stored in 247-41F  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Analytical Development Section of Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) was requested by the Facilities Decontamination and Decommissioning Program (FDD) to determine the radionuclide content in two drums that were stored in an inactive warehouse of the Naval Fuels facility. The drums were labeled as containing fissile material and were placed in a critically safe arrangement, but it was not known whether they still contained the fissile material. Our g-PHA assay results indicate that the unknown highly enriched uranium (HEU) content of the two drums is one and 0.5 grams of surface contamination. Our neutron measurements confirmed that there are no significant lumps of 235U present in these drums and that only surface contamination is present. The results confirmed that the facility was in compliance with administrative controls for fissile materials and that it is safe to open the drums for visual inspection.

Dewberry, R.

2002-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

393

Vessel-Spanning Bubble Formation in K-Basin Sludge Stored in Large-Diameter Containers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The K Basin sludge to be retrieved and stored in the large diameter containers (LDCs) contains some fraction of uranium metal that generates hydrogen gas, which introduces potential upset conditions. One postulated upset condition is a rising plug of sludge supported by a hydrogen bubble that is driven into the vent filters at the top of the container. In laboratory testing with actual K Basin sludge, vessel-spanning bubbles that lifted plugs of sludge were observed in 3-inch-diameter graduated cylinders. This report presents a series of analytical assessments performed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to address the potential for the generation of a vessel spanning bubble in the LDCs. The assessments included the development and evaluation of static and dynamic bubble formation models over the projected range of K Basin sludge physical properties. Additionally, the theory of circular plates was extrapolated to examine conditions under which a plug of sludge would collapse and release a spanning bubble.

Terrones, Guillermo; Gauglitz, Phillip A.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Solubility measurement of uranium in uranium-contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect

A short-term equilibration study involving two uranium-contaminated soils at the Fernald site was conducted as part of the In Situ Remediation Integrated Program. The goal of this study is to predict the behavior of uranium during on-site remediation of these soils. Geochemical modeling was performed on the aqueous species dissolved from these soils following the equilibration study to predict the on-site uranium leaching and transport processes. The soluble levels of total uranium, calcium, magnesium, and carbonate increased continually for the first four weeks. After the first four weeks, these components either reached a steady-state equilibrium or continued linearity throughout the study. Aluminum, potassium, and iron, reached a steady-state concentration within three days. Silica levels approximated the predicted solubility of quartz throughout the study. A much higher level of dissolved uranium was observed in the soil contaminated from spillage of uranium-laden solvents and process effluents than in the soil contaminated from settling of airborne uranium particles ejected from the nearby incinerator. The high levels observed for soluble calcium, magnesium, and bicarbonate are probably the result of magnesium and/or calcium carbonate minerals dissolving in these soils. Geochemical modeling confirms that the uranyl-carbonate complexes are the most stable and dominant in these solutions. The use of carbonate minerals on these soils for erosion control and road construction activities contributes to the leaching of uranium from contaminated soil particles. Dissolved carbonates promote uranium solubility, forming highly mobile anionic species. Mobile uranium species are contaminating the groundwater underlying these soils. The development of a site-specific remediation technology is urgently needed for the FEMP site.

Lee, S.Y.; Elless, M.; Hoffman, F.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Aluminosilicate Precipitation Impact on Uranium  

SciTech Connect

Experiments have been conducted to examine the fate of uranium during the formation of sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) when wastes containing high aluminate concentrations are mixed with wastes of high silicate concentration. Testing was conducted at varying degrees of uranium saturation. Testing examined typical tank conditions, e.g., stagnant, slightly elevated temperature (50 C). The results showed that under sub-saturated conditions uranium is not removed from solution to any large extent in both simulant testing and actual tank waste testing. This aspect was not thoroughly understood prior to this work and was necessary to avoid criticality issues when actual tank wastes were aggregated. There are data supporting a small removal due to sorption of uranium on sites in the NAS. Above the solubility limit the data are clear that a reduction in uranium concentration occurs concomitant with the formation of aluminosilicate. This uranium precipitation is fairly rapid and ceases when uranium reaches its solubility limit. At the solubility limit, it appears that uranium is not affected, but further testing might be warranted.

WILMARTH, WILLIAM

2006-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

396

METHOD OF SEPARATING URANIUM SUSPENSIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is presented for separating colloidally dissed uranium oxides from the heavy water medium in upwhich they are contained. The method consists in treating such dispersions with hydrogen peroxide, thereby converting the uranium to non-colloidal UO/sub 4/, and separating the UO/sub 4/ sfter its rapid settling.

Wigner, E.P.; McAdams, W.A.

1958-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

397

Preserving Ultra-Pure Uranium-233  

SciTech Connect

Uranium-233 ({sup 233}U) is a synthetic isotope of uranium formed under reactor conditions during neutron capture by natural thorium ({sup 232}Th). At high purities, this synthetic isotope serves as a crucial reference material for accurately quantifying and characterizing uranium-bearing materials assays and isotopic distributions for domestic and international nuclear safeguards. Separated, high purity {sup 233}U is stored in vaults at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These materials represent a broad spectrum of {sup 233}U from the standpoint of isotopic purity - the purest being crucial for precise analyses in safeguarding uranium. All {sup 233}U at ORNL is currently scheduled to be disposed of by down-blending with depleted uranium beginning in 2015. This will reduce safety concerns and security costs associated with storage. Down-blending this material will permanently destroy its potential value as a certified reference material for use in uranium analyses. Furthermore, no credible options exist for replacing {sup 233}U due to the lack of operating production capability and the high cost of restarting currently shut down capabilities. A study was commissioned to determine the need for preserving high-purity {sup 233}U. This study looked at the current supply and the historical and continuing domestic need for this crucial isotope. It examined the gap in supplies and uses to meet domestic needs and extrapolated them in the context of international safeguards and security activities - superimposed on the recognition that existing supplies are being depleted while candidate replacement material is being prepared for disposal. This study found that the total worldwide need by this projection is at least 850 g of certified {sup 233}U reference material over the next 50 years. This amount also includes a strategic reserve. To meet this need, 18 individual items totaling 959 g of {sup 233}U were identified as candidates for establishing a lasting supply of certified reference materials (CRM), all having an isotopic purity of at least 99.4% {sup 233}U and including materials up to 99.996% purity. Current plans include rescuing the purest {sup 233}U materials during a 3-year project beginning in FY 2012 in three phases involving preparations, handling preserved materials, and cleanup. The first year will involve preparations for handling the rescued material for sampling, analysis, distribution, and storage. Such preparations involve modifying or developing work control documents and physical preparations in the laboratory, which include preparing space for new material-handling equipment and procuring and (in some cases) refurbishing equipment needed for handling {sup 233}U or qualifying candidate CRM. Once preparations are complete, an evaluation of readiness will be conducted by independent reviewers to verify that the equipment, work controls, and personnel are ready for operations involving handling radioactive materials with nuclear criticality safety as well as radiological control requirements. The material-handling phase will begin in FY 2013 and be completed early in FY 2014, as currently scheduled. Material handling involves retrieving candidate CRM items from the ORNL storage facility and shipping them to another laboratory at ORNL; receiving and handling rescued items at the laboratory (including any needed initial processing, acquisition and analysis of samples from each item, and preparation for shipment); and shipping bulk material to destination labs or to a yet-to-be-designated storage location. There are seven groups of {sup 233}U identified for handling based on isotopic purity that require the utmost care to prevent cross-contamination. The last phase, cleanup, also will be completed in 2014. It involves cleaning and removing the equipment and material-handling boxes and characterizing, documenting, and disposing of waste. As part of initial planning, the cost of rescuing candidate {sup 233}U items was estimated roughly. The annualized costs were found to be $1,228K in FY 2012, $1,375K in FY 2013,

Krichinsky, Alan M [ORNL; Goldberg, Dr. Steven A. [DOE SC - Chicago Office; Hutcheon, Dr. Ian D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 Milling Capacity (short tons of ore per day) 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Cotter Corporation Canon City Mill Fremont, Colorado 0 Standby Standby Standby Reclamation Demolished EFR White Mesa LLC White Mesa Mill San Juan, Utah 2,000 Operating Operating Operating Operating Operating Energy Fuels Resources Corporation Piñon Ridge Mill Montrose, Colorado 500 Developing Developing Developing Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Kennecott Uranium Company/Wyoming Coal Resource Company Sweetwater Uranium Project Sweetwater, Wyoming 3,000 Standby Standby Standby Standby Standby Uranium One Americas, Inc. Shootaring Canyon Uranium Mill Garfield, Utah 750 Changing License To Operational Standby

399

METHOD OF ELECTROPLATING ON URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to a preparation of metallic uranium surfaces for receiving coatings, particularly in order to secure adherent electroplated coatings upon uranium metal. In accordance with the invention the uranium surface is pretreated by degreasing in trichloroethylene, followed by immersion in 25 to 50% nitric acid for several minutes, and then rinsed with running water, prior to pickling in trichloroacetic acid. The last treatment is best accomplished by making the uranium the anode in an aqueous solution of 50 per cent by weight trichloroacetic acid until work-distorted crystals or oxide present on the metal surface have been removed and the basic crystalline structure of the base metal has been exposed. Following these initial steps the metallic uranium is rinsed in dilute nitric acid and then electroplated with nickel. Adnerent firmly-bonded coatings of nickel are obtained.

Rebol, E.W.; Wehrmann, R.F.

1959-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

400

Carbon stored in human settlements: the conterminous  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Urban areas are home to more than half of the worlds people, responsible for 470 % of anthropogenic release of carbon dioxide and 76 % of wood used for industrial purposes. By 2050 the proportion of the urban population is expected to increase to 70 % worldwide. Despite fast rates of change and potential value for mitigation of carbon dioxide emissions, the organic carbon storage in human settlements has not been well quantified. Here, we show that human settlements can store as much carbon per unit area (2342 kg C m 2 urban areas and 716 kg C m 2 exurban areas) as tropical forests, which have the highest carbon density of natural ecosystems (425 kg C m 2). By the year 2000 carbon storage attributed to human settlements of the conterminous United States was 18 Pg of carbon or 10 % of its total land carbon storage. Sixty-four percent of this carbon was attributed to soil, 20 % to vegetation, 11 % to landfills, and 5 % to buildings. To offset rising urban emissions of carbon, regional and national governments should consider how to protect or even to increase carbon storage of human-dominated landscapes. Rigorous studies addressing carbon budgets of human settlements and vulnerability of their carbon storage are needed.

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium hexafluoride stored" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Standing by Ohio: Cleaning Up our Environmental Legacy | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the start-up of operations at the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plant, or DUF6, as we commonly call it. Depleted uranium hexafluoride has been generated in the United...

402

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. U.S. uranium mine production and number of mines and sources, 2003-2012 2. U.S. uranium mine production and number of mines and sources, 2003-2012 Production / Mining Method 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Underground (estimated contained thousand pounds U3O8) W W W W W W W W W W Open Pit (estimated contained thousand pounds U3O8) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 In-Situ Leaching (thousand pounds U3O8) W W 2,681 4,259 W W W W W W Other1 (thousand pounds U3O8) W W W W W W W W W W Total Mine Production (thousand pounds U3O8) E2,200 2,452 3,045 4,692 4,541 3,879 4,145 4,237 4,114 4,335 Number of Operating Mines Underground 1 2 4 5 6 10 14 4 5 6 Open Pit 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 In-Situ Leaching 2 3 4 5 5 6 4 4 5 5 Other Sources1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1

403

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5. U.S. uranium in-situ-leach plants by owner, location, capacity, and operating status at end of the year, 2008-2012 5. U.S. uranium in-situ-leach plants by owner, location, capacity, and operating status at end of the year, 2008-2012 In-Situ-Leach Plant Owner In-Situ-Leach Plant Name County, State (existing and planned locations) Production Capacity (pounds U3O8 per year) Operating Status at End of the Year 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Cameco Crow Butte Operation Dawes, Nebraska 1,000,000 Operating Operating Operating Operating Operating Hydro Resources, Inc. Crownpoint McKinley, New Mexico 1,000,000 Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Hydro Resources,Inc. Church Rock McKinley, New Mexico 1,000,000 Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed

404

Process for removing carbon from uranium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Carbon contamination is removed from uranium and uranium alloys by heating in inert atmosphere to 700.degree.-1900.degree.C in effective contact with yttrium to cause carbon in the uranium to react with the yttrium. The yttrium is either in direct contact with the contaminated uranium or in indirect contact by means of an intermediate transport medium.

Powell, George L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

APPENDIX J Partition Coefficients For Uranium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

APPENDIX J Partition Coefficients For Uranium #12;Appendix J Partition Coefficients For Uranium J.1.0 Background The review of uranium Kd values obtained for a number of soils, crushed rock and their effects on uranium adsorption on soils are discussed below. The solution pH was also used as the basis

406

The End of Cheap Uranium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historic data from many countries demonstrate that on average no more than 50-70% of the uranium in a deposit could be mined. An analysis of more recent data from Canada and Australia leads to a mining model with an average deposit extraction lifetime of 10+- 2 years. This simple model provides an accurate description of the extractable amount of uranium for the recent mining operations. Using this model for all larger existing and planned uranium mines up to 2030, a global uranium mining peak of at most 58 +- 4 ktons around the year 2015 is obtained. Thereafter we predict that uranium mine production will decline to at most 54 +- 5 ktons by 2025 and, with the decline steepening, to at most 41 +- 5 ktons around 2030. This amount will not be sufficient to fuel the existing and planned nuclear power plants during the next 10-20 years. In fact, we find that it will be difficult to avoid supply shortages even under a slow 1%/year worldwide nuclear energy phase-out scenario up to 2025. We thus suggest that a worldwide nuclear energy phase-out is in order. If such a slow global phase-out is not voluntarily effected, the end of the present cheap uranium supply situation will be unavoidable. The result will be that some countries will simply be unable to afford sufficient uranium fuel at that point, which implies involuntary and perhaps chaotic nuclear phase-outs in those countries involving brownouts, blackouts, and worse.

Michael Dittmar

2011-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

407

Uranium Pyrophoricity Phenomena and Prediction (FAI/00-39)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a topical reference on the phenomena and prediction of uranium pyrophoricity for the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project with specific applications to SNF Project processes and situations. Spent metallic uranium nuclear fuel is currently stored underwater at the K basins in the Hanford 100 area, and planned processing steps include: (1) At the basins, cleaning and placing fuel elements and scrap into stainless steel multi-canister overpacks (MCOs) holding about 6 MT of fuel apiece; (2) At nearby cold vacuum drying (CVD) stations, draining, vacuum drying, and mechanically sealing the MCOs; (3) Shipping the MCOs to the Canister Storage Building (CSB) on the 200 Area plateau; and (4) Welding shut and placing the MCOs for interim (40 year) dry storage in closed CSB storage tubes cooled by natural air circulation through the surrounding vault. Damaged fuel elements have exposed and corroded fuel surfaces, which can exothermically react with water vapor and oxygen during normal process steps and in off-normal situations, A key process safety concern is the rate of reaction of damaged fuel and the potential for self-sustaining or runaway reactions, also known as uranium fires or fuel ignition. Uranium metal and one of its corrosion products, uranium hydride, are potentially pyrophoric materials. Dangers of pyrophoricity of uranium and its hydride have long been known in the U.S. Department of Energy (Atomic Energy Commission/DOE) complex and will be discussed more below; it is sufficient here to note that there are numerous documented instances of uranium fires during normal operations. The motivation for this work is to place the safety of the present process in proper perspective given past operational experience. Steps in development of such a perspective are: (1) Description of underlying physical causes for runaway reactions, (2) Modeling physical processes to explain runaway reactions, (3) Validation of the method against experimental data, (4) Application of the method to plausibly explain operational experience, and (5) Application of the method to present process steps to demonstrate process safety and margin. Essentially, the logic above is used to demonstrate that runaway reactions cannot occur during normal SNF Project process steps, and to illustrate the depth of the technical basis for such a conclusion. Some off-normal conditions are identified here that could potentially lead to runaway reactions. However, this document is not intended to provide an exhaustive analysis of such cases. In summary, this report provides a ''toolkit'' of models and approaches for analysis of pyrophoricity safety issues at Hanford, and the technical basis for the recommended approaches. A summary of recommended methods appears in Section 9.0.

PLYS, M.G.

2000-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

408

Audit Report: IG-0642 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Audit Report: IG-0642 March 18, 2004 Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion For over 30 years, the Department of Energy (Department) operated geous diffusion plans in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Portsmouth, Ohio; and Paducah, Kentucky, to meet its enriched uranium needs. As a byproduct of the enrichment process, about 704,000 metric tons of depleted uranium hexafluoride were generated and stored in approximately 58,00 cylinders at the enrichment plants. While the cylinders are currently stored with little risk to workers, the public, and the environment, they are gradually deteriorating. Prolonged storage has the potential to increase the Department's safety and health risks from handling operations, natural disasters, or malicious acts. Audit Report: IG-0642

409

ENERGY STAR Score for Supermarkets/Grocery Stores  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supermarkets/Grocery Stores in the United States Page 1 Supermarkets/Grocery Stores in the United States Page 1 ENERGY STAR Score for Supermarkets/Grocery Stores in the United States Technical Reference OVERVIEW The ENERGY STAR Score for Supermarkets/Grocery Stores applies to properties used for the retail sale of primarily food and beverage products. The objective of the ENERGY STAR score is to provide a fair assessment of the energy performance of a property relative to its peers, taking into account the climate, weather, and business activities at the property. To identify the aspects of building activity that are significant drivers of energy use and then normalize for

410

The Evolution of the Stored Energy during the Batch Annealing ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results show that the stored energy distribution through the thickness of the ... Microstructures of Hot Rolled 3rd Generation Advanced High Strength Steels.

411

NETL: News Release - Storing Liquefied Natural Gas in Underground...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

July 22, 2003 Storing Liquefied Natural Gas in Underground Salt Caverns Could Boost Global LNG Trade Novel Process May be Half the Cost of Conventional Liquid Tank Terminals...

412

Grocery Store 50% Energy Savings Technical Support Document 2009...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Grocery Store 50% Energy Savings Technical Support Document 2009 Jump to: navigation, search Publication...

413

ENERGY STAR Building Upgrade Manual Chapter 13: Retail Stores...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

care resources Small business resources State and local government resources ENERGY STAR Building Upgrade Manual Chapter 13: Retail Stores The Building Upgrade Manual is a...

414

Independent Oversight Assessment, Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office- May 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Assessment of the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office Conduct of Operations Oversight of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plants

415

ELECTRODEPOSITION OF NICKEL ON URANIUM  

SciTech Connect

Electrodeposited nickel coatings on uranium for protection from destructive corrosion in boiling water wns investigated. Correlation between the pretreatment of the uranium and subsequent protection by thin nickel coatings was established. Thin electrodeposited nickel coatings provide better protection when applied to a matte surface produced by blasting with an aqueous suspension of silica (100 mesh) followed by a cathodic treatment in 35 wt% sulfuric acid than when applied to the rough surfaces produced on uranium by anodic pretreatments and acid pickling. Blistering of nickel electrodeposits arising from hydrogen was encountered and eliminated. (auth)

Beard, A.P.; Crooks, D.D.

1954-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

416

SEPARATION OF URANIUM FROM THORIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is presented for separating uranium from thorium wherein the ratio of thorium to uranium is between 100 to 10,000. According to the invention the thoriumuranium mixture is dissolved in nitric acid, and the solution is prepared so as to obtain the desired concentration within a critical range of from 4 to 8 N with regard to the total nitrate due to thorium nitrate, with or without nitric acid or any nitrate salting out agent. The solution is then contacted with an ether, such as diethyl ether, whereby uranium is extracted into ihe organic phase while thorium remains in the aqueous phase.

Hellman, N.N.

1959-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

FLUX COMPOSITION AND METHOD FOR TREATING URANIUM-CONTAINING METAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A flux composition is preseated for use with molten uranium and uranium alloys. It consists of about 60% calcium fluoride, 30% calcium chloride and 10% uranium tetrafluoride.

Foote, F.

1958-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

418

Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility | Y-12 National Security...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highly Enriched Uranium ... Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility HEUMF The Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility is our nation's central repository for highly enriched...

419

Summary Production Statistics of the U.S. Uranium Industry ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Domestic Uranium Production Report presents information Operating Status of U.S. Uranium Expenditures, 2003-2005. ... Mine Production of Uranium

420

Uranium Lease Tracts Location Map | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Centers Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Uranium Lease Tracts Location Map Uranium Lease Tracts Location Map Uranium Lease Tracts...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium hexafluoride stored" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

THE THEORY OF URANIUM ENRICHMENT BY THE GAS CENTRIFUGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soubbaramayer, (1979) in "Uranium Enrichment", S. Villani,and Davies, E. (1973) "Uranium Enrichment by Gas Centrifuge"THE THEORY OF URANIUM ENRICHMENT BY THE GAS CENTRIFUGE

Olander, Donald R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

THE THEORY OF URANIUM ENRICHMENT BY THE GAS CENTRIFUGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soubbaramayer, (1979) in "Uranium Enrichment", S. Villani,and Davies, E. (1973) "Uranium Enrichment by Gas Centrifuge"Nuclear Energy THE THEORY OF URANIUM ENRICHMENT BY THE GAS

Olander, Donald R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Proteogenomic monitoring of Geobacter physiology during stimulated uranium bioremediation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phillips. 1992. Bioremediationof uraniumcontaminationwith enzymaticuraniumreduction. Environ. Sci. Microbial reduction of uranium. Nature350:413?416.

Wilkins, M.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

CALIFORNIUM ISOTOPES FROM BOMBARDMENT OF URANIUM WITH CARBON IONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Isotopes from Bombardment of Uranium with Carbon Ions A.ISOTOPES FROM BOMBARDMENT OF URANIUM WITH CARBON IONS A.the irradiations, the uranium was dissolved in dilute

Ghiorso, A.; Thompson, S.G.; Street, K. Jr.; Seaborg, G.T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

THE HIGH TEMPERATURE BEHAVIOR OF METALLIC INCLUSIONS IN URANIUM DIOXIDE.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Products in Irradiated Uranium Dioxide," UKAEA Report AERE-OF METALLIC INCLUSIONS IN URANIUM DIOXIDE Rosa Lu Yang (Chemical State of Irradiated Uranium- Plutonium Oxide Fuel

Yang, Rosa Lu.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

THE HIGH TEMPERATURE BEHAVIOR OF METALLIC INCLUSIONS IN URANIUM DIOXIDE.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

State of Irradiated Uranium- Plutonium Oxide Fuel Pins,"Ingots Formed in Uranium-Plutonium Oxide Irradiated in EBR-Roake, "Fission Products and Plutonium Migration in Uranium-

Yang, Rosa Lu.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Estimated Maximum Gas Retention from Uniformly Dispersed Bubbles in K Basin Sludge Stored in Large-Diameter Containers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This letter report addresses the KE Basin sludge that will be retrieved and stored in large-diameter containers (LDCs.) A fraction of the hydrogen gas bubbles generated from the corrosion of uranium metal and oxides may be retained within the sludge matrix. Those entrapped bubbles will expand the sludge bed volume and, therefore, will affect how much sludge can be loaded into a container. The entrapped gas bubbles will also impact the overall thermal conductivity and heat capacity of the sludge bed. The evaluation summarized here was performed to estimate the maximum gas holdup (volume fraction gas) that could occur sludge stored in large-diameter containers, assuming uniform gas generation (i.e., uniform distribution of metallic uranium particles). This report represents an evaluation of the retention of uniformly distributed bubbles and an estimate of the maximum gas fraction that might be retained in K Basin LDCs based on existing literature data on bubble retention and Basin sludge characterization data. Existing data show that the maximum gas fraction varies, depending on physical properties and the configuration of the material or waste.

Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Terrones, Guillermo

2002-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

428

Analysis of the Reuse of Uranium Recovered from the Reprocessing of Commercial LWR Spent Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an analysis of the factors involved in the reuse of uranium recovered from commercial light-water-reactor (LWR) spent fuels (1) by reenrichment and recycling as fuel to LWRs and/or (2) by recycling directly as fuel to heavy-water-reactors (HWRs), such as the CANDU (registered trade name for the Canadian Deuterium Uranium Reactor). Reuse is an attractive alternative to the current Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) baseline plan, which stores the reprocessed uranium (RU) for an uncertain future or attempts to dispose of it as 'greater-than-Class C' waste. Considering that the open fuel cycle currently deployed in the United States already creates a huge excess quantity of depleted uranium, the closed fuel cycle should enable the recycle of the major components of spent fuel, such as the uranium and the hazardous, long-lived transuranic (TRU) actinides, as well as the managed disposal of fission product wastes. Compared with the GNEP baseline scenario, the reuse of RU in the uranium fuel cycle has a number of potential advantages: (1) avoidance of purchase costs of 11-20% of the natural uranium feed; (2) avoidance of disposal costs for a large majority of the volume of spent fuel that is reprocessed; (3) avoidance of disposal costs for a portion of the depleted uranium from the enrichment step; (4) depending on the {sup 235}U assay of the RU, possible avoidance of separative work costs; and (5) a significant increase in the production of {sup 238}Pu due to the presence of {sup 236}U, which benefits somewhat the transmutation value of the plutonium and also provides some proliferation resistance.

DelCul, Guillermo D [ORNL; Trowbridge, Lee D [ORNL; Renier, John-Paul [ORNL; Ellis, Ronald James [ORNL; Williams, Kent Alan [ORNL; Spencer, Barry B [ORNL; Collins, Emory D [ORNL

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

L.C.C. laser isotope separation project progress report  

SciTech Connect

Progress is described in the following areas: matrix isolation of uranium hexafluoride in carbon monoxide host and obtainment of stable narrow bands in the 623cm{sup -1} region of uranium hexafluoride; and reactions of nitrogen oxide with uranium hexafluoride.

Catalano, E.

1974-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

430

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. U.S. uranium concentrate production, shipments, and sales, 2003-2012" "Activity at U.S. Mills and In-Situ-Leach Plants",2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012...

431

Depleted Uranium (DU) Dioxide Fill  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fill Depleted Uranium (DU) Dioxide Fill DU dioxide in the form of sand may be used to fill the void spaces in the waste package after the package is loaded with SNF. This...

432

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Domestic Uranium Production Report June 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. U.S. Energy Information Administration | 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report ii Contacts This report was prepared by the staff of the Renewables and Uranium Statistics Team, Office of Electricity,

433

2012 Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Uranium Marketing Annual Uranium Marketing Annual Report May 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 May 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | 2012 Uranium Marketing Annual Report i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. May 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | 2012 Uranium Marketing Annual Report ii

434

Beneficial Uses of Depleted Uranium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Table 2 (ref. 1). The content of 235 U in DU is dependent on economics. If the cost of natural uranium feed is high relative to the cost of enrichment services, then a low 235 U...

435

Robust data sharing with key-value stores  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A key-value store (KVS) offers functions for storing and retrieving values associated with unique keys. KVSs have become widely used as shared storage solutions for Internet-scale distributed applications. We present a fault-tolerant wait-free efficient ... Keywords: cloud storage, distributed storage

Cristina Basescu; Christian Cachin; Ittay Eyal; Robert Haas; Marko Vukolic

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Robust data sharing with key-value stores  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A key-value store (KVS) offers functions for storing and retrieving values associated with unique keys. KVSs have become the most popular way to access Internet-scale cloud storage systems. We present an efficient wait-free algorithm that ...

Cristina Basescu; Christian Cachin; Ittay Eyal; Robert Haas; Alessandro Sorniotti; Marko Vukolic; Ido Zachevsky

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Sanitizing Stored Water Supplies R. Craig Runyan1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Publication date: September 2009. This publication is produced by the Southern Regional Water Program, scrubbing the interior tank walls with mild detergent can produce excellent results. Even when water stored quantities. Treatment of stored water using standard household bleach will usually produce good

438

Characteristics and Energy Use of the Convenience Store Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy efficiency measures could reduce a convenience store's energy costs by 25 percent and improve a typical return on investment by about 10 percent. This report assesses opportunities for improving convenience store energy efficiency by installing energy-efficient lighting systems, refrigeration controls, and display case antisweat heater controls.

1994-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

439

DUF6 Management Cost Analysis Report (CAR): Part 2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

. . . Cost Analysis Report for the Long-Term Management of May 1997 Figure 4.5 Total Costs of Manufacture of Metal Options 900 800 700 Ctj 300 3 200 100 0 Metal Shielding Oxide Shielding Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride and Oxide Shielding s Decontamination & Decommissioning QI Operations & Maintenance s Regulatory Compliance u Balance of Plant u Manufacturing Facilities s Manufacturing Equipment u Engineering Development 57 ..- . Cost Analysis Report for the Long-Term Management of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride May 1997 4.4 Long-term Storage Storage of depleted uranium is predicated on its use at some later date. In the engineering analysis, storage options are defined by the type of storage facility, and suboptions are defined by the chemical form in which the depleted uranium is stored. The types of storage facilities analyzed are (1) buildings, (2) below ground vaults,

440

SURFACE TREATMENT OF METALLIC URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The treatment of metallic uranium to provide a surface to which adherent electroplates can be applied is described. Metallic uranium is subjected to an etchant treatment in aqueous concentrated hydrochloric acid, and the etched metal is then treated to dissolve the resulting black oxide and/or chloride film without destroying the etched metal surface. The oxide or chloride removal is effected by means of moderately concentrated nitric acid in 3 to 20 seconds.

Gray, A.G.; Schweikher, E.W.

1958-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium hexafluoride stored" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Laser induced phosphorescence uranium analysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for measuring the uranium content of aqueous solutions wherein a uranyl phosphate complex is irradiated with a 5 nanosecond pulse of 425 nanometer laser light and resultant 520 nanometer emissions are observed for a period of 50 to 400 microseconds after the pulse. Plotting the natural logarithm of emission intensity as a function of time yields an intercept value which is proportional to uranium concentration.

Bushaw, B.A.

1983-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

442

LIQUID METAL COMPOSITIONS CONTAINING URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Liquid metal compositions containing a solid uranium compound dispersed therein is described. Uranium combines with tin to form the intermetallic compound USn/sub 3/. It has been found that this compound may be incorporated into a liquid bath containing bismuth and lead-bismuth components, if a relatively small percentage of tin is also included in the bath. The composition has a low thermal neutron cross section which makes it suitable for use in a liquid metal fueled nuclear reactor.

Teitel, R.J.

1959-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

443

ENERGY STAR Success Story: Kohls Department Stores  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kohl's Department Stores Kohl's Department Stores Kohl's is a value-oriented specialty department store with more than1,000 locations in 49 states. As demonstrated by its many corporate sustainability initiatives, Kohl's is committed to environmental stewardship and the reduction of its carbon footprint. As a key component in Kohl's energy management efforts since 1998, ENERGY STAR tools and resources have been utilized by the company to develop new energy management strategies and solutions for everyday business practices. Kohl's has earned an unprecedented number of ENERGY STAR certifications for its high-performing stores. More than 50 percent of the company's store portfolio has earned a 75 or higher on the one to 100 ENERGY STAR performance scale, indicating these buildings (more than 600 in all) perform in the top 25 percent of their

444

Storing the Power of the Sun | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storing the Power of the Sun Storing the Power of the Sun Storing the Power of the Sun December 22, 2010 - 11:47am Addthis Storing the Power of the Sun John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Yesterday, Secretary Chu announced that a $1.45 billion loan guarantee has been finalized for Abengoa Solar Inc.'s Solana project, the first large-scale solar plant in the United States capable of storing energy it generates. This storage capacity allows Solana to bank energy that would normally go unused for times of peak demand, making Solar a more dependable source of energy. Located near Gila Bend, Arizona, the 250-megawatt (MW) project will be the world's largest parabolic trough concentrating solar plant, producing enough energy to serve 70,000 households and eliminate the emissions of

445

Uranium Resources Inc URI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Uranium Resources Inc URI Uranium Resources Inc URI Jump to: navigation, search Name Uranium Resources, Inc. (URI) Place Lewisville, Texas Zip 75067 Product Uranium Resources, Inc. (URI) is primarily engaged in the business of acquiring, exploring, developing and mining uranium properties using the in situ recovery (ISR) or solution mining process. References Uranium Resources, Inc. (URI)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Uranium Resources, Inc. (URI) is a company located in Lewisville, Texas . References ↑ "Uranium Resources, Inc. (URI)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Uranium_Resources_Inc_URI&oldid=352580" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

446

SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS FOR URANIUM RECOVERY  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for extracting uranium from uranium ore, wherein the uranium is substantially free from molybdenum contamination. In a solvent extraction process for recovering uranium, uranium and molybdenum ions are extracted from the ore with ether under high acidity conditions. The ether phase is then stripped with water at a lower controiled acidity, resaturated with salting materials such as sodium nitrate, and reextracted with the separation of the molybdenum from the uranium without interference from other metals that have been previously extracted.

Clark, H.M.; Duffey, D.

1958-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

447

Process for alloying uranium and niobium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Alloys such as U-6Nb are prepared by forming a stacked sandwich array of uranium sheets and niobium powder disposed in layers between the sheets, heating the array in a vacuum induction melting furnace to a temperature such as to melt the uranium, holding the resulting mixture at a temperature above the melting point of uranium until the niobium dissolves in the uranium, and casting the uranium-niobium solution. Compositional uniformity in the alloy product is enabled by use of the sandwich structure of uranium sheets and niobium powder.

Holcombe, C.E.; Northcutt, W.G.; Masters, D.R.; Chapman, L.R.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

448

Available Technologies: Cost-effective Recovery of Uranium ...  

Uranium contamination of groundwater is an environmental problem at many DOE facilities and at uranium mining/processing sites.

449

U.S. Uranium Expenditures, 2003-2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Domestic Uranium Production Report presents information Operating Status of U.S. Uranium Expenditures, 2003-2005

450

U.S. mine production of uranium, 1993-2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. ... Privacy/Security Copyright & Reuse Accessibility. Related Sites ...

451

Polyethylene Encapsulated Depleted Uranium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Poly DU Poly DU Polyethylene Encapsulated Depleted Uranium Technology Description: Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has completed preliminary work to investigate the feasibility of encapsulating DU in low density polyethylene to form a stable, dense product. DU loadings as high as 90 wt% were achieved. A maximum product density of 4.2 g/cm3 was achieved using UO3, but increased product density using UO2 is estimated at 6.1 g/cm3. Additional product density improvements up to about 7.2 g/cm3 were projected using DU aggregate in a hybrid technique known as micro/macroencapsulation.[1] A U.S. patent for this process has been received.[2] Figure 1 Figure 1: DU Encapsulated in polyethylene samples produced at BNL containing 80 wt % depleted UO3 A recent DU market study by Kapline Enterprises, Inc. for DOE thoroughly identified and rated potential applications and markets for DU metal and oxide materials.[3] Because of its workability and high DU loading capability, the polyethylene encapsulated DU could readily be fabricated as counterweights/ballast (for use in airplanes, helicopters, ships and missiles), flywheels, armor, and projectiles. Also, polyethylene encapsulated DU is an effective shielding material for both gamma and neutron radiation, with potential application for shielding high activity waste (e.g., ion exchange resins, glass gems), spent fuel dry storage casks, and high energy experimental facilities (e.g., accelerator targets) to reduce radiation exposures to workers and the public.

452

Polarizing a stored proton beam by spin flip?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss polarizing a proton beam in a storage ring, either by selective removal or by spin flip of the stored ions. Prompted by recent, conflicting calculations, we have carried out a measurement of the spin flip cross section in low-energy electron-proton scattering. The experiment uses the cooling electron beam at COSY as an electron target. The measured cross sections are too small for making spin flip a viable tool in polarizing a stored beam. This invalidates a recent proposal to use co-moving polarized positrons to polarize a stored antiproton beam.

D. Oellers; L. Barion; S. Barsov; U. Bechstedt; P. Benati; S. Bertelli; D. Chiladze; G. Ciullo; M. Contalbrigo; P. F. Dalpiaz; J. Dietrich; N. Dolfus; S. Dymov; R. Engels; W. Erven; A. Garishvili; R. Gebel; P. Goslawski; K. Grigoryev; H. Hadamek; A. Kacharava; A. Khoukaz; A. Kulikov; G. Langenberg; A. Lehrach; P. Lenisa; N. Lomidze; B. Lorentz; G. Macharashvili; R. Maier; S. Martin; S. Merzliakov; I. N. Meshkov; H. O. Meyer; M. Mielke; M. Mikirtychiants; S. Mikirtychiants; A. Nass; M. Nekipelov; N. N. Nikolaev; M. Nioradze; G. d'Orsaneo; M. Papenbrock; D. Prasuhn; F. Rathmann; J. Sarkadi; R. Schleichert; A. Smirnov; H. Seyfarth; J. Sowinski; D. Spoelgen; G. Stancari; M. Stancari; M. Statera; E. Steffens; H. J. Stein; H. Stockhorst; H. Straatmann; H. Stroeher; M. Tabidze; G. Tagliente; P. Thoerngren Engblom; S. Trusov; A. Vasilyev; Chr. Weidemann; D. Welsch; P. Wieder; P. Wuestner; P. Zupranski

2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

453

Uranium Tris-aryloxide Derivatives Supported by Triazacyclononane: Engendering a Reactive Uranium(III)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Uranium Tris-aryloxide Derivatives Supported by Triazacyclononane: Engendering a Reactive Uranium-mail: kmeyer@ucsd.edu Abstract: The synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of the mononuclear uranium complex [((ArO)3tacn)UIII (NCCH3)] is reported. The uranium(III) complex reacts with organic azides

Meyer, Karsten

454

Evidence of uranium biomineralization in sandstone-hosted roll-front uranium deposits, northwestern China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evidence of uranium biomineralization in sandstone-hosted roll-front uranium deposits, northwestern Available online 25 January 2005 Abstract We show evidence that the primary uranium minerals, uraninite-front uranium deposits, Xinjiang, northwestern China were biogenically precipitated and psuedomorphically

Fayek, Mostafa

455

The End of Cheap Uranium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historic data from many countries demonstrate that on average no more than 50-70% of the uranium in a deposit could be mined. An analysis of more recent data from Canada and Australia leads to a mining model with an average deposit extraction lifetime of 10+- 2 years. This simple model provides an accurate description of the extractable amount of uranium for the recent mining operations. Using this model for all larger existing and planned uranium mines up to 2030, a global uranium mining peak of at most 58 +- 4 ktons around the year 2015 is obtained. Thereafter we predict that uranium mine production will decline to at most 54 +- 5 ktons by 2025 and, with the decline steepening, to at most 41 +- 5 ktons around 2030. This amount will not be sufficient to fuel the existing and planned nuclear power plants during the next 10-20 years. In fact, we find that it will be difficult to avoid supply shortages even under a slow 1%/year worldwide nuclear energy phase-out scenario up to 2025. We thus suggest that a world...

Dittmar, Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Production Report Domestic Uranium Production Report 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 State(s) 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Wyoming 134 139 181 195 245 301 308 348 424 512 Colorado and Texas 48 140 269 263 557 696 340 292 331 248 Nebraska and New Mexico 92 102 123 160 149 160 159 134 127 W Arizona, Utah, and Washington 47 40 75 120 245 360 273 281 W W Alaska, Michigan, Nevada, and South Dakota 0 0 0 16 25 30 W W W W California, Montana, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, and Virginia 0 0 0 0 9 17 W W W W Total 321 420 648 755 1,231 1,563 1,096 1,073 1,191 1,196 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-851A, "Domestic Uranium Production Report" (2003-2012). Table 7. Employment in the U.S. uranium production industry by state, 2003-2012 person-years

457

Uranium Metal: Potential for Discovering Commercial Uses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Uranium Metal Uranium Metal Potential for Discovering Commercial Uses Steven M. Baker, Ph.D. Knoxville Tn 5 August 1998 Summary Uranium Metal is a Valuable Resource 3 Large Inventory of "Depleted Uranium" 3 Need Commercial Uses for Inventory  Avoid Disposal Cost  Real Added Value to Society 3 Uranium Metal Has Valuable Properties  Density  Strength 3 Market will Come if Story is Told Background The Nature of Uranium Background 3 Natural Uranium: 99.3% U238; 0.7% U 235 3 U235 Fissile  Nuclear Weapons  Nuclear Reactors 3 U238 Fertile  Neutron Irradiation of U238 Produces Pu239  Neutrons Come From U235 Fission  Pu239 is Fissile (Weapons, Reactors, etc.) Post World War II Legacy Background 3 "Enriched" Uranium Product  Weapons Program 

458

Domestic Uranium Production Report - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Production Report - Annual Domestic Uranium Production Report - Annual With Data for 2012 | Release Date: June 06, 2013 | Next Release Date: May 2014 |full report Previous domestic uranium production reports Year: 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 Go Drilling Figure 1. U.S. Uranium drilling by number of holes, 2004-2012 U.S. uranium exploration drilling was 5,112 holes covering 3.4 million feet in 2012. Development drilling was 5,970 holes and 3.7 million feet. Combined, total uranium drilling was 11,082 holes covering 7.2 million feet, 5 percent more holes than in 2011. Expenditures for uranium drilling in the United States were $67 million in 2012, an increase of 24 percent compared with 2011. Mining, production, shipments, and sales U.S. uranium mines produced 4.3 million pounds U3O8 in 2012, 5 percent more

459

Uranium Management and Policy | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Uranium Management and Policy Uranium Management and Policy The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant is located 3 miles south of the Ohio River and is 12 miles west of Paducah,...

460

COLORIMETRIC DETERMINATION OF URANIUM(IV)  

SciTech Connect

A colorimetric method was developed for the determination of uranium(IV) in the presence of uranium(VI), nitric acid, hydroxylamine sulfate, and hydrazine. A coefficient of variation of 2.4% (n = 25) was obtained. (auth)

Dorsett, R.S.

1961-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "uranium hexafluoride stored" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Draft Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

five times the uranium concentration; this ratio was selected on the basis of the mining production rate of vanadium versus that of uranium. The RfCs used in the calculation were...

462

Stored CO2 and Methane Leakage Risk Assessment and Monitoring...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stored Co 2 and Methane Leakage riSk aSSeSSMent and Monitoring tooL deveLopMent: Co 2 Capture projeCt phaSe 2 Background Unmineable coal seams at depths beyond conventional...

463

NETL: News Release -Midwest Has Potential to Store Hundreds of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

16, 2011 Midwest Has Potential to Store Hundreds of Years of CO2 Emissions Regional Partnership's Phase II Field Tests Validate Earlier Research Results Washington, D.C. - Geologic...

464

Storing and Retrieving Data using HPSS at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

http:help.nersc.gov consult@nersc.gov 1-800-66-NERSC, option 3 or 510-486-8611 Home For Users Data & File Systems HPSS Data Archive Storing and Retrieving...

465

Method for storing spent nuclear fuel in repositories  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for storing radioactive spent fuel in repositories containing sulfur as the storage medium is disclosed. Sulfur is non-corrosive and not subject to radiation damage. Thus, storage periods of up to 100 years are possible.

Schweitzer, Donald G. (Bayport, NY); Sastre, Cesar (Shoreham, NY); Winsche, Warren (Bellport, NY)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Co2 Deep Store Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AB11 7LH Sector Carbon Product UK based organization focused on the commercialization of carbon capture and storage. References Co2 Deep Store Ltd1 LinkedIn Connections...

467

SPP sales flyer for supermarkets and grocery stores | ENERGY...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

stores Need a hand preparing for an upcoming sales call? This fact sheet provides energy use facts for supermarkets, tips on how to talk to this audience, opportunities for...

468

Grocery Store 50% Energy Savings Technical Support Document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents technical analysis for grocery stores aimed at providing design guidance that achieves whole-building energy savings of at least 50% over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004.

Leach, M.; Hale, E.; Hirsch, A.; Torcellini, P.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

INHERENTLY SAFE IN SITU URANIUM RE OVERY  

Nuclear power and waste opportunities contact us at Mining operations Increased safety of uranium removal Environmentally friendly process

470

PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY OF URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to a process for the recovery of uranium from impure uranium tetrafluoride. The process consists essentially of the steps of dissolving the impure uranium tetrafluoride in excess dilute sulfuric acid in the presence of excess hydrogen peroxide, precipitating ammonium uranate from the solution so formed by adding an excess of aqueous ammonia, dissolving the precipitate in sulfuric acid and adding hydrogen peroxide to precipitate uranium peroxdde.

Morris, G.O.

1955-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

471

Molecular Mechanisms of Uranium Reduction by Clostridia  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research is to elucidate systematically the molecular mechanisms involved in the reduction of uranium by Clostridia.

Francis, A.J.; Matin, A.C.; Gao, W.; Chidambaram, D.; Barak, Y.; Dodge, C.J.

2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

472

Uranium Weapons Components Successfully Dismantled | National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Uranium Weapons Components Successfully Dismantled | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

473

Domestic Uranium Production Report - Quarterly - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy. ... Privacy/Security Copyright & Reuse Accessibility. Related Sites U.S. ...

474

Highly Enriched Uranium Transparency Program | National Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highly Enriched Uranium Transparency Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

475

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Frequently asked questions (FAQs) about uranium, uranium hexafluoride (UF6), UF6 storage and depleted UF6 management. Below is a list of...

476

Production and Handling Slide 18: Conversion of Yellow Cake to...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

last step of the conversion process involves the chemical conversion of uranium tetrafluoride UF4 to uranium hexafluoride UF6 using fluorine F2. Slide 1...

477

Depleted UF6 Management Information Network - A resource for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is an online repository of information about the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) inventory of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6), a product of the uranium enrichment...

478

High-current pulses from inductive energy stores  

SciTech Connect

Superconducting inductive energy stores can be used for high power pulse supplies if a suitable current multiplication scheme is used. The concept of an inductive Marx generator is superior to a transformer. A third scheme, a variable flux linkage device, is suggested; in multiplying current it also compresses energy. Its function is in many ways analogous to that of a horsewhip. Superconductor limits indicate that peak power levels of TW can be reached for stored energies above 1 MJ.

Wipf, S.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

10. Uranium reserve estimates at the end of 2012" 10. Uranium reserve estimates at the end of 2012" "million pounds U3O8" "Uranium Reserve Estimates1 by Mine and Property Status, Mining Method, and State(s)","Forward Cost 2" ,"$0 to $30 per pound","$0 to $50 per pound","$0 to $100 per pound" "Properties with Exploration Completed, Exploration Continuing, and Only Assessment Work","W","W",101.956759 "Properties Under Development for Production","W","W","W" "Mines in Production","W",21.40601,"W" "Mines Closed Temporarily and Closed Permanently","W","W",133.139239 "In-Situ Leach Mining","W","W",128.576534