National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for uranium activity result

  1. Results of Active Test of Uranium-Plutonium Co-denitration Facility at Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Numao, Teruhiko; Nakayashiki, Hiroshi; Arai, Nobuyuki; Miura, Susumu; Takahashi, Yoshiharu [Denitration Section, Plant Operation Dept., Reprocessing Plant, Reprocessing Business Division, Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited Rokkasho-mura, Kamikita-gun, Aomori-ken (Japan); Nakamura, Hironobu; Tanaka, Izumi [Technical Support Dept., Reprocessing Plant, Reprocessing Business Division, Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited Rokkasho-mura, Kamikita-gun, Aomori-ken (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    In the U-Pu co-denitration facility at Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP), Active Test which composes of 5 steps was performed by using uranium-plutonium nitrate solution that was extracted from spent fuels. During Active Test, two kinds of tests were performed in parallel. One was denitration performance test in denitration ovens, and expected results were successfully obtained. The other was validation and calibration of non-destructive assay (NDA) systems, and expected performances were obtained and their effectiveness as material accountancy and safeguards system was validated. (authors)

  2. Uranium Biomineralization By Natural Microbial Phosphatase Activities...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Uranium Biomineralization By Natural Microbial Phosphatase Activities in the Subsurface Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Uranium Biomineralization By...

  3. EPA Update: NESHAP Uranium Activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EPA Update: NESHAP Uranium Activities Reid J. Rosnick Environmental Protection Agency Radiation Mining (Clean Air Act) · 40 CFR 61.20, Subpart B regulations limiting radon emissions from underground air radon standard not to exceed 10 mrem/yr to any member of the public-compliance determined

  4. Uranium Biomineralization by Natural Microbial Phosphatase Activities in the Subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobecky, Patricia A.

    2015-04-06

    In this project, inter-disciplinary research activities were conducted in collaboration among investigators at The University of Alabama (UA), Georgia Institute of Technology (GT), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), and the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light source (SSRL) to: (i) confirm that phosphatase activities of subsurface bacteria in Area 2 and 3 from the Oak Ridge Field Research Center result in solid U-phosphate precipitation in aerobic and anaerobic conditions; (ii) investigate the eventual competition between uranium biomineralization via U-phosphate precipitation and uranium bioreduction; (iii) determine subsurface microbial community structure changes of Area 2 soils following organophosphate amendments; (iv) obtain the complete genome sequences of the Rahnella sp. Y9-602 and the type-strain Rahnella aquatilis ATCC 33071 isolated from these soils; (v) determine if polyphosphate accumulation and phytate hydrolysis can be used to promote U(VI) biomineralization in subsurface sediments; (vi) characterize the effect of uranium on phytate hydrolysis by a new microorganism isolated from uranium-contaminated sediments; (vii) utilize positron-emission tomography to label and track metabolically-active bacteria in soil columns, and (viii) study the stability of the uranium phosphate mineral product. Microarray analyses and mineral precipitation characterizations were conducted in collaboration with DOE SBR-funded investigators at LBNL. Thus, microbial phosphorus metabolism has been shown to have a contributing role to uranium immobilization in the subsurface.

  5. Charge-Separation in Uranium Diazomethane Complexes Leading to C-H Activation and Chemical Transformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Karsten

    Charge-Separation in Uranium Diazomethane Complexes Leading to C-H Activation and Chemical of diphenyldiazomethane with [((t-Bu ArO)3tacn)UIII ] (1) results in an 2 -bound diphenyldiazomethane uranium complex-shell ligand, [((t-Bu ArO)3tacn)UIV (2 -NNCPh2)] (2). Treating Ph2CN2 with a uranium complex that contains

  6. Active-Interrogation Measurements of Fast Neutrons from Induced Fission in Low-Enriched Uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Dolan; M. J. Marcath; M. Flaska; S. A. Pozzi; D. L. Chichester; A. Tomanin; P. Peerani

    2014-02-01

    A detection system was designed with MCNPX-PoliMi to measure induced-fission neutrons from U-235 and U-238 using active interrogation. Measurements were then performed with this system at the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Ispra, Italy on low-enriched uranium samples. Liquid scintillators measured induced fission neutron to characterize the samples in terms of their uranium mass and enrichment. Results are presented to investigate and support the use of organic liquid scintillators with active interrogation techniques to characterize uranium containing materials.

  7. Analysis of uranium urinalysis and in vivo measurement results from eleven participating uranium mills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spitz, H.B.; Simpson, J.C.; Aldridge, T.L.

    1984-05-01

    Uranium urinalysis and in vivo examination results obtained from workers at eleven uranium mills between 1978 and 1980 were evaluated. The main purpose was to determine the degree of the mills' compliance with bioassay monitoring recommendations given in the draft NRC Regulatory Guide 8.22 (USNRC 1978). The effect of anticipated changes in the draft regulatory guidance, as expressed to PNL in May 1982, was also studied. Statistical analyses of the data showed that the bioassay results did not reliably meet the limited performance criteria given in the draft regulatory guide. Furthermore, quality control measurements of uranium in urine indicated that detection limits at ..cap alpha.. = ..beta.. = 0.05 ranged from 13 ..mu..g/l to 29 ..mu..g/l, whereas the draft regulatory guidance suggests 5 ..mu..g/l as the detection limit. Recommendations for monitoring frequencies given in the draft guide were not followed consistently from mill to mill. The results of these statistical analyses indicate a need to include performance criteria for accuracy, precision, and confidence in revisions of the draft Regulatory Guide 8.22. Revised guidance should also emphasize the need for each mill to continually test the laboratory performing urinalyses by submitting quality control samples (i.e., blank and spiked urine samples as open and blind test) to insure that the performance criteria are being met. Recommendations for a bioassay audit program are also given. 25 references, 15 figures, 17 tables.

  8. Process for reducing beta activity in uranium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Briggs, G.G.; Kato, T.R.; Schonegg, E.

    1985-04-11

    This invention is a method for lowering the beta radiation hazards associated with the casting of uranium. The method reduces the beta radiation emitted from the as-cast surfaces of uranium ingots. The method also reduces the amount of beta radiation emitters retained on the interiors of the crucibles that have been used to melt the uranium charges and which undergone cleaning in a remote handling facility. The lowering of the radioactivity is done by scavenging the beta emitters from the molten uranium with a molten mixture containing the fluorides of magnesium and calcium. The method provides a means of collection and disposal of the beta emitters in a manner that reduces radiation exposure to operating personnel in the work area where the ingots are cast and processed. 5 tabs.

  9. Process for reducing beta activity in uranium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Briggs, Gifford G. (Cincinnatti, OH); Kato, Takeo R. (Cincinnatti, OH); Schonegg, Edward (Cleves, OH)

    1986-01-01

    This invention is a method for lowering the beta radiation hazards associated with the casting of uranium. The method reduces the beta radiation emitted from the as-cast surfaces of uranium ingots. The method also reduces the amount of beta radiation emitters retained on the interiors of the crucibles that have been used to melt the uranium charges and which have undergone cleaning in a remote handling facility. The lowering of the radioactivity is done by scavenging the beta emitters from the molten uranium with a molten mixture containing the fluorides of magnesium and calcium. The method provides a means of collection and disposal of the beta emitters in a manner that reduces radiation exposure to operating personnel in the work area where the ingots are cast and processed.

  10. Measurement of uranium enrichment by gamma spectroscopy: result of an experimental design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PAPER Measurement of uranium enrichment by gamma spectroscopy: result of an experimental design Gamma spectroscopy is commonly used in nuclear safeguards to measure uranium enrichment. An experimental design has been carried out for the measurement of uranium enrichment using this technique with different

  11. Uranium Adsorption on Granular Activated Carbon – Batch Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, Kent E.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2013-09-26

    The uranium adsorption performance of two activated carbon samples (Tusaar Lot B-64, Tusaar ER2-189A) was tested using unadjusted source water from well 299-W19-36. These batch tests support ongoing performance optimization efforts to use the best material for uranium treatment in the Hanford Site 200 West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system. A linear response of uranium loading as a function of the solution-to-solid ratio was observed for both materials. Kd values ranged from ~380,000 to >1,900,000 ml/g for the B-64 material and ~200,000 to >1,900,000 ml/g for the ER2-189A material. Uranium loading values ranged from 10.4 to 41.6 ?g/g for the two Tusaar materials.

  12. Method for monitoring stack gases for uranium activity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beverly, Claude R. (Paducah, KY); Ernstberger, Harold G. (Paducah, KY)

    1988-01-01

    A method for monitoring the stack gases of a purge cascade of a gaseous diffusion plant for uranium activity. A sample stream is taken from the stack gases and contacted with a volume of moisture-laden air for converting trace levels of uranium hexafluoride, if any, in the stack gases into particulate uranyl fluoride. A continuous strip of filter paper from a supply roll is passed through this sampling stream to intercept and gather any uranyl fluoride in the sampling stream. This filter paper is then passed by an alpha scintillation counting device where any radioactivity on the filter paper is sensed so as to provide a continuous monitoring of the gas stream for activity indicative of the uranium content in the stack gases.

  13. Method for monitoring stack gases for uranium activity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beverly, C.R.; Ernstberger, E.G.

    1985-07-03

    A method for monitoring the stack gases of a purge cascade of gaseous diffusion plant for uranium activity. A sample stream is taken from the stack gases and contacted with a volume of moisture-laden air for converting trace levels of uranium hexafluoride, if any, in the stack gases into particulate uranyl fluoride. A continuous strip of filter paper from a supply roll is passed through this sampling stream to intercept and gather any uranyl fluoride in the sampling stream. This filter paper is then passed by an alpha scintillation counting device where any radioactivity on the filter paper is sensed so as to provide a continuous monitoring of the gas stream for activity indicative of the uranium content in the stack gases. 1 fig.

  14. Unanticipated results in the uranium niobium alloy system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooley, J. C. (Jason C.); Hults, W. L. (William L.); Dauelsberg, L. B. (Lawrence B.); Thoma, D. J. (Dan J.); Peterson, E. J. (Eric J.); Teter, D. F. (David F.); Smith, J. L. (James L.); Kelly, A. M. (Anna Marie); Lashley, J. C. (Jason C.)

    2002-01-01

    The uranium niobium binary alloy system exhibits a rich collection of phenomena for study. The composition range from 0 wt.% Nb to 10 wt.% Nb exhibits multiple crystallographic phases with interesting properties such as superconductivity, charge density waves and shape memory effects. We have measured the resistivity and heat capacity as a function of temperature from 2 to 325K in the above composition range in an effort to map out the phase boundaries of interest. Surprisingly the temperature dependence of the resistivity transitions from metallic (decreasing with decreasing temperature) to nonmetallic (increasing with decreasing temperature). It is not clear if the nonmetallic resistivity is caused by strongly correlated electronic effects or is the result of some other effect such as disorder driven scattering.

  15. Uranium deposition study on aluminum: results of early tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, M.R.; Nolan, T.A.

    1984-06-19

    Laboratory experiments to quantify uranium compound deposition on Aluminum 3003 test coupons have been initiated. These experiments consist of exposing the coupons to normal assay UF/sub 6/ (0.7% /sup 235/U) in nickel reaction vessels under various conditions of UF/sub 6/ pressure, temperature, and time. To-date, runs from 5 minutes to 2000 hr have been completed at a UF/sub 6/ pressure of 100 torr and at a temperature of 60/sup 0/C. Longer exposure times are in progress. Initial results indicated that a surface film of uranium, primarily as uranyl fluoride (UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/), is deposited very soon after exposure to UF/sub 6/. In a five minute UF/sub 6/ exposure at a temperature of 60/sup 0/C, an average of 2.9 ..mu..g U/cm/sup 2/ was deposited; after 24 hr the deposit typically increased to 5.0 ..mu..g/cm/sup 2/ and then increased to 10.4 ..mu..g/cm/sup 2/ after 2000 hr. This amount of deposit (at 2000 hr exposure) would contribute roughly 10 to 20% to the total 186 keV gamma signal obtained from a GCEP product header pipe being operated at UF/sub 6/ pressures of 2 to 5 torr. The amount of isotopic exchange which would occur in the deposit in the event that HEU and LEU productions were alternated is considered. It is felt that isotopic exchange would not occur to any significant amount within the fixed deposit during relatively short HEU production periods since the HEU would be present primarily as adsorbed UF/sub 6/ molecules on the surface of the deposit. The adsorbed HEU molecules would be removed by evacuation and diluted by LEU production. Major increases in the deposit count would be observed if a leak occurred or moisture was introduced into the system while HEU was being produced.

  16. Uranium industry annual 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    This report provides statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing.

  17. Promoting Uranium Immobilization by the Activities of Microbial...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of uranium U(VI) phosphate precipitates. Specifically, we hypothesize that the precipitation of U(VI) phosphate minerals may be promoted through the microbial release andor...

  18. Survey of plutonium and uranium atom ratios and activity levels in Mortandad Canyon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallaher, B.M.; Benjamin, T.M.; Rokop, D.J.; Stoker, A.K.

    1997-09-22

    For more than three decades Mortandad Canyon has been the primary release area of treated liquid radioactive waste from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Laboratory). In this survey, six water samples and seven stream sediment samples collected in Mortandad Canyon were analyzed by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) to determine the plutonium and uranium activity levels and atom ratios. Be measuring the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios, the Laboratory plutonium component was evaluated relative to that from global fallout. Measurements of the relative abundance of {sup 235}U and {sup 236}U were also used to identify non-natural components. The survey results indicate the Laboratory plutonium and uranium concentrations in waters and sediments decrease relatively rapidly with distance downstream from the major industrial sources. Plutonium concentrations in shallow alluvial groundwater decrease by approximately 1000 fold along a 3000 ft distance. At the Laboratory downstream boundary, total plutonium and uranium concentrations were generally within regional background ranges previously reported. Laboratory derived plutonium is readily distinguished from global fallout in on-site waters and sediments. The isotopic ratio data indicates off-site migration of trace levels of Laboratory plutonium in stream sediments to distances approximately two miles downstream of the Laboratory boundary.

  19. Results of the remote sensing feasibility study for the uranium hexafluoride storage cylinder yard program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balick, L.K.; Bowman, D.R. [Bechtel Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Remote Sensing Lab.; Bounds, J.H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    The US DOE manages the safe storage of approximately 650,000 tons of depleted uranium hexafluoride remaining from the Cold War. This slightly radioactive, but chemically active, material is contained in more than 46,000 steel storage cylinders that are located at Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Paducah, Kentucky; and Portsmouth, Ohio. Some of the cylinders are more than 40 years old, and approximately 17,500 are considered problem cylinders because their physical integrity is questionable. These cylinders require an annual visual inspection. The remainder of the 46,000-plus cylinders must be visually inspected every four years. Currently, the cylinder inspection program is extremely labor intensive. Because these inspections are accomplished visually, they may not be effective in the early detection of leaking cylinders. The inspection program requires approximately 12--14 full-time-equivalent (FTE) employees. At the cost of approximately $125K per FTE, this translates to $1,500K per annum just for cylinder inspection. As part of the technology-development portion of the DOE Cylinder Management Program, the DOE Office of Facility Management requested the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) to evaluate remote sensing techniques that have potential to increase the effectiveness of the inspection program and, at the same time, reduce inspection costs and personnel radiation exposure. During two site visits (March and May 1996) to the K-25 Site at Oak Ridge, TN, RSL personnel tested and characterized seven different operating systems believed to detect leakage, surface contamination, thickness and corrosion of cylinder walls, and general area contamination resulting from breached cylinders. The following techniques were used and their performances are discussed: Laser-induced fluorescent imaging; Long-range alpha detection; Neutron activation analysis; Differential gamma-ray attenuation; Compton scatterometry; Active infrared inspection; and Passive thermal infrared imaging.

  20. The non-aqueous chemistry of uranium has been an active area of exploration in recent decades1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    The non-aqueous chemistry of uranium has been an active area of exploration in recent decades1 of the art of synthetic uranium chemistry should provide form to its future in catalysis, drawn from for uranium will be created in part by the quest of researchers to understand the properties and potential

  1. Uranium groundwater anomalies and active normal faulting W. Plastino G. F. Panza C. Doglioni M. L. Frezzotti A. Peccerillo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uranium groundwater anomalies and active normal faulting W. Plastino · G. F. Panza · C. Doglioni to crustal defor- mation. It is shown in this paper that uranium groundwater anomalies, which were observed of the area, these measurements indicate that uranium may be used as a possible strain meter in extensional

  2. Uranium industry annual 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  3. Recent International R&D Activities in the Extraction of Uranium from Seawater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, Linfeng

    2010-03-15

    A literature survey has been conducted to collect information on the International R&D activities in the extraction of uranium from seawater for the period from the 1960s till the year of 2010. The reported activities, on both the laboratory scale bench experiments and the large scale marine experiments, were summarized by country/region in this report. Among all countries where such activities have been reported, Japan has carried out the most advanced large scale marine experiments with the amidoxime-based system, and achieved the collection efficiency (1.5 g-U/kg-adsorbent for 30 days soaking in the ocean) that could justify the development of industrial scale marine systems to produce uranium from seawater at the price competitive with those from conventional uranium resources. R&D opportunities are discussed for improving the system performance (selectivity for uranium, loading capacity, chemical stability and mechanical durability in the sorption-elution cycle, and sorption kinetics) and making the collection of uranium from seawater more economically competitive.

  4. Application of copper vapour lasers for controlling activity of uranium isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barmina, E V; Sukhov, I A; Lepekhin, N M; Priseko, Yu S; Filippov, V G; Simakin, Aleksandr V; Shafeev, Georgii A

    2013-06-30

    Beryllium nanoparticles are generated upon ablation of a beryllium target in water by a copper vapour laser. The average size of single crystalline nanoparticles is 12 nm. Ablation of a beryllium target in aqueous solutions of uranyl chloride leads to a significant (up to 50 %) decrease in the gamma activity of radionuclides of the uranium-238 and uranium-235 series. Data on the recovery of the gamma activity of these nuclides to new steady-state values after laser irradiation are obtained. The possibility of application of copper vapour lasers for radioactive waste deactivation is discussed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  5. Determination of uranium and thorium in semiconductor memory materials by high fluence neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dyer, F.F.; Emery, J.F.; Northcutt, K.J.; Scott, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium and thorium were measured by absolute neutron activation analysis in high-purity materials used to manufacture semiconductor memories. The main thrust of the study concerned aluminum and aluminum alloys used as sources for thin film preparation, evaporated metal films, and samples from the Czochralski silicon crystal process. Average levels of U and Th were found for the source alloys to be approx. 65 and approx. 45 ppB, respectively. Levels of U and Th in silicon samples fell in the range of a few parts per trillion. Evaporated metal films contained about 1 ppB U and Th, but there is some question about these results due to the possibility of contamination.

  6. Key programmatic steps and activities for implementing the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project. [UMTRA Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-07-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA) was enacted based upon findings by Congress that uranium mill tailings located at active and inactive hazard to the public, and that protection of the public health, safety and welfare, and the regulations of interstate commerce, require that every reasonable effort be made to provide for the stabilization, disposal, and control in a safe and environmentally sound manner of such tailings in order to prevent or minimize radon diffusion into the environment and to prevent or minimize other environmental hazards from such tailings.'' A general understanding of the steps leading to elimination of the hazards associated with designated uranium mill tailings sites, and the parties involved in that effort, are presented in this document. A representative schedule is also presented in this document to show both program sequence and activity interdependence. Those activities that have the most potential to influence program duration, because of the significant amount of additional time that may be required, include identification and selection of a suitable site, field data collection delays due to weather, actual acquisition of the designated or alternate disposal site, construction delays due to weather, and site licensing. This document provides an understanding of the steps, the sequence, the parties involved, and a representative duration of activities leading to remedial action and cleanup at the designated inactive uranium mill tailings sites. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Uranium Industry Annual, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-28

    The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ``Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,`` is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2.

  8. Active-Interrogation Measurements of Induced-Fission Neutrons from Low-Enriched Uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Dolan; M. J. Marcath; M. Flaska; S. A. Pozzi; D. L. Chichester; A. Tomanin; P. Peerani; G. Nebbia

    2012-07-01

    Protection and control of nuclear fuels is paramount for nuclear security and safeguards; therefore, it is important to develop fast and robust controlling mechanisms to ensure the safety of nuclear fuels. Through both passive- and active-interrogation methods we can use fast-neutron detection to perform real-time measurements of fission neutrons for process monitoring. Active interrogation allows us to use different ranges of incident neutron energy to probe for different isotopes of uranium. With fast-neutron detectors, such as organic liquid scintillation detectors, we can detect the induced-fission neutrons and photons and work towards quantifying a sample’s mass and enrichment. Using MCNPX-PoliMi, a system was designed to measure induced-fission neutrons from U-235 and U-238. Measurements were then performed in the summer of 2010 at the Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy. Fissions were induced with an associated particle D-T generator and an isotopic Am-Li source. The fission neutrons, as well as neutrons from (n, 2n) and (n, 3n) reactions, were measured with five 5” by 5” EJ-309 organic liquid scintillators. The D-T neutron generator was available as part of a measurement campaign in place by Padova University. The measurement and data-acquisition systems were developed at the University of Michigan utilizing a CAEN V1720 digitizer and pulse-shape discrimination algorithms to differentiate neutron and photon detections. Low-enriched uranium samples of varying mass and enrichment were interrogated. Acquired time-of-flight curves and cross-correlation curves are currently analyzed to draw relationships between detected neutrons and sample mass and enrichment. In the full paper, the promise of active-interrogation measurements and fast-neutron detection will be assessed through the example of this proof-of-concept measurement campaign. Additionally, MCNPX-PoliMi simulation results will be compared to the measured data to validate the MCNPX-PoliMi code when used for active-interrogation simulations.

  9. Biomineralization of Uranium by PhoY Phosphatase Activity Aids Cell Survival in Caulobacter crescentus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yung, M C; Jiao, Y

    2014-07-22

    Caulobacter crescentus is known to tolerate high levels of uranium [U(VI)], but its detoxification mechanism is poorly understood. Here we show that C. crescentus is able to facilitate U(VI) biomineralization through the formation of U-Pi precipitates via its native alkaline phosphatase activity. The U-Pi precipitates, deposited on the cell surface in the form of meta-autunite structures, have a lower U/Pi ratio than do chemically produced precipitates. The enzyme that is responsible for the phosphatase activity and thus the biomineralization process is identified as PhoY, a periplasmic alkaline phosphatase with broad substrate specificity. Furthermore, PhoY is shown to confer a survival advantage on C. crescentus toward U(VI) under both growth and nongrowth conditions. Results obtained in this study thus highlight U(VI) biomineralization as a resistance mechanism in microbes, which not only improves our understanding of bacterium-mineral interactions but also aids in defining potential ecological niches for metal-resistant bacteria.

  10. Recent International R&D Activities in the Extraction of Uranium from Seawater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rao, Linfeng

    2011-01-01

    Uranium and Rare Earth Elements Using Biomass of Algae, Bioinorganic Chemistry andRecovery of uranium from sea water. Chemistry & Industry (of uranium from seawater. Turkish Journal of Chemistry, 17 (

  11. Recent International R&D Activities in the Extraction of Uranium from Seawater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rao, Linfeng

    2011-01-01

    Poletiko, S. Prabhakar, P. K. Tewari, Extraction of uranium1982) 145-150. 27. P. K. Tewari, Recovery of Uranium from

  12. Some Investigations of the Reaction of Activated Charcoal with Fluorine and Uranium Hexafluoride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Del Cul, G.D.; Fiedor, J.N.; Simmons, D.W.; Toth, L.M.; Trowbridge, L.D.; Williams

    1998-09-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been shut down since 1969, when the fuel salt was drained from the core into two Hastelloy N drain tanks at the reactor site. Over time, fluorine (F{sub 2}) and uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) moved from the salt through the gas piping to a charcoal bed, where they reacted with the activated charcoal. Some of the immediate concerns related to the migration of F{sub 2} and UF{sub 6} to the charcoal bed were the possibility of explosive reactions between the charcoal and F{sub 2}, the existence of conditions that could induce a criticality accident, and the removal and recovery of the fissile uranium from the charcoal. This report addresses the reactions and reactivity of species produced by the reaction of fluorine and activated charcoal and between charcoal and F{sub 2}-UF{sub 6} gas mixtures in order to support remediation of the MSRE auxiliary charcoal bed (ACB) and the recovery of the fissile uranium. The chemical identity, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, and potential for explosive decomposition of the primary reaction product, fluorinated charcoal, was determined.

  13. Control of structure and reactivity by ligand design : applications to small molecule activation by low-valent uranium complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lam, Oanh Phi

    2010-01-01

    Coordination Chemistry of Uranium………………………………….11 1.4researchers from uranium chemistry. Fortunately, despiteclassical coordination chemistry of uranium has flourished

  14. Parametric Evaluation of Active Neutron Interrogation for the Detection of Shielded Highly-Enriched Uranium in the Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. L. Chcihester; E. H. Seabury; S. J. Thompson; R. R. C. Clement

    2011-10-01

    Parametric studies using numerical simulations are being performed to assess the performance capabilities and limits of active neutron interrogation for detecting shielded highly enriched uranium (HEU). Varying the shield material, HEU mass, HEU depth inside the shield, and interrogating neutron source energy, the simulations account for both neutron and photon emission signatures from the HEU with resolution in both energy and time. The results are processed to represent different irradiation timing schemes and several different classes of radiation detectors, and evaluated using a statistical approach considering signal intensity over background. This paper describes the details of the modeling campaign and some preliminary results, weighing the strengths of alternative measurement approaches for the different irradiation scenarios.

  15. Control of structure and reactivity by ligand design : applications to small molecule activation by low-valent uranium complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lam, Oanh Phi

    2010-01-01

    of a Charge- Separated Uranium Benzophenone Ketyl Radical3. Charge-Separation in Uranium Diazomethane ComplexesRelated Small Molecules by Uranium Coordination Complexes”,

  16. Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Conversion Activities for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renfro, David G; Cook, David Howard; Freels, James D; Griffin, Frederick P; Ilas, Germina; Sease, John D; Chandler, David

    2012-03-01

    This report describes progress made during FY11 in ORNL activities to support converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum (UMo) alloy. With both radial and axial contouring of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in performance to users from the current levels achieved with HEU fuel. Studies are continuing to demonstrate that the fuel thermal safety margins can be preserved following conversion. Studies are also continuing to update other aspects of the reactor steady state operation and accident response for the effects of fuel conversion. Technical input has been provided to Oregon State University in support of their hydraulic testing program. The HFIR conversion schedule was revised and provided to the GTRI program. In addition to HFIR conversion activities, technical support was provided directly to the Fuel Fabrication Capability program manager.

  17. Uranium 238U/235U isotope ratios as indicators of reduction: Results from an in situ biostimulation experiment at Rifle, Colorado, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bopp IV, C.J.

    2010-01-01

    Series Geochemistry; In Uranium-Series Geochemistry; BernardIsotopic Fractionation of Uranium. Earth and Planetaryand precipitation of uranium and vanadium at low

  18. Recent International R&D Activities in the Extraction of Uranium from Seawater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rao, Linfeng

    2011-01-01

    41. H. G. Bals, Uranium extraction from seawater. INIS.Report (1976), (INIS-mf-3844), 149 pp.From: INIS Atomindex 1977, 8(20), Abstr. No. 334731. 42. K.

  19. Recent International R&D Activities in the Extraction of Uranium from Seawater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rao, Linfeng

    2011-01-01

    of uranium recovery from seawater. In 1975, the Metal Mininguranium from seawater with hydrous TiO 2 was operated by the Agency for Natural Resource and Energy (ANRE), MITI, and Metal Mining

  20. EA-1155: Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to comply with the Environmental Protection Agency's ground-water standards set forth in 40 CFR 192 at the Spook, Wyoming Uranium Mill...

  1. Uranium Ore Uranium is extracted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milling of Uranium Ore Uranium is extracted from ore with strong acids or bases. The uranium is concentrated in a solid substance called"yellowcake." Chemical Conversion Plants convert the uranium in yellowcake to uranium hexafluoride (UF6 ), a compound that can be made into nuclear fuel. Enrichment

  2. Fermentation and Hydrogen Metabolism Affect Uranium Reduction by Clostridia

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gao, Weimin; Francis, Arokiasamy J.

    2013-01-01

    Previously, it has been shown that not only is uranium reduction under fermentation condition common among clostridia species, but also the strains differed in the extent of their capability and the pH of the culture significantly affected uranium(VI) reduction. In this study, using HPLC and GC techniques, metabolic properties of those clostridial strains active in uranium reduction under fermentation conditions have been characterized and their effects on capability variance of uranium reduction discussed. Then, the relationship between hydrogen metabolism and uranium reduction has been further explored and the important role played by hydrogenase in uranium(VI) and iron(III) reduction bymore »clostridia demonstrated. When hydrogen was provided as the headspace gas, uranium(VI) reduction occurred in the presence of whole cells of clostridia. This is in contrast to that of nitrogen as the headspace gas. Without clostridia cells, hydrogen alone could not result in uranium(VI) reduction. In alignment with this observation, it was also found that either copper(II) addition or iron depletion in the medium could compromise uranium reduction by clostridia. In the end, a comprehensive model was proposed to explain uranium reduction by clostridia and its relationship to the overall metabolism especially hydrogen (H 2 ) production. « less

  3. Uranium 238U/235U isotope ratios as indicators of reduction: Results from an in situ biostimulation experiment at Rifle, Colorado, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bopp IV, C.J.

    2010-01-01

    to sandstone-type uranium deposits. Economic Geology;in 238U/235U in uranium ore deposits: Isotopic signatures of6) Dahlkamp, F.J. ; Uranium Ore Deposits; Springer-Verlag:

  4. Uranium enrichment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports that in 1990 the Department of Energy began a two-year project to illustrate the technical and economic feasibility of a new uranium enrichment technology-the atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) process. GAO believes that completing the AVLIS demonstration project will provide valuable information about the technical viability and cost of building an AVLIS plant and will keep future plant construction options open. However, Congress should be aware that DOE still needs to adequately demonstrate AVLIS with full-scale equipment and develop convincing cost projects. Program activities, such as the plant-licensing process, that must be completed before a plant is built, could take many years. Further, an updated and expanded uranium enrichment analysis will be needed before any decision is made about building an AVLIS plant. GAO, which has long supported legislation that would restructure DOE's uranium enrichment program as a government corporation, encourages DOE's goal of transferring AVLIS to the corporation. This could reduce the government's financial risk and help ensure that the decision to build an AVLIS plant is based on commercial concerns. DOE, however, has no alternative plans should the government corporation not be formed. Further, by curtailing a planned public access program, which would have given private firms an opportunity to learn about the technology during the demonstration project, DOE may limit its ability to transfer AVLIS to the private sector.

  5. Uranium isotopes in ground water as a prospecting technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowart, J.B.; Osmond, J.K.

    1980-02-01

    The isotopic concentrations of dissolved uranium were determined for 300 ground water samples near eight known uranium accumulations to see if new approaches to prospecting could be developed. It is concluded that a plot of /sup 234/U//sup 238/U activity ratio (A.R.) versus uranium concentration (C) can be used to identify redox fronts, to locate uranium accumulations, and to determine whether such accumulations are being augmented or depleted by contemporary aquifer/ground water conditions. In aquifers exhibiting flow-through hydrologic systems, up-dip ground water samples are characterized by high uranium concentration values (> 1 to 4 ppB) and down-dip samples by low uranium concentration values (less than 1 ppB). The boundary between these two regimes can usually be identified as a redox front on the basis of regional water chemistry and known uranium accumulations. Close proximity to uranium accumulations is usually indicated either by very high uranium concentrations in the ground water or by a combination of high concentration and high activity ratio values. Ground waters down-dip from such accumulations often exhibit low uranium concentration values but retain their high A.R. values. This serves as a regional indicator of possible uranium accumulations where conditions favor the continued augmentation of the deposit by precipitation from ground water. Where the accumulation is being dispersed and depleted by the ground water system, low A.R. values are observed. Results from the Gulf Coast District of Texas and the Wyoming districts are presented.

  6. Results of mobile gamma scanning activities in St. Louis, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, R E; Witt, D A; Cottrell, W D; Carrier, R F

    1991-06-01

    From 1942 through approximately 1966, the Mallinckrodt Chemical Works operated four plants in St. Louis, Missouri, for the Manhattan Engineer District and the Atomic Energy Commission. A variety of production processes using uranium- and radium-bearing ore materials were performed at the plants. It is the policy of the DOE to verify that radiological conditions at such sites or facilities comply with current DOE guidelines. Guidelines for release and use of such sites have become more stringent as research has provided more information since previous cleanups. The Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) was established as part of that effort to confirm the closeout status of facilities under contract to agencies preceding DOE during early nuclear energy development. Under the FUSRAP program, the Mallinckrodt properties have been previously investigated to determine the extent of on-site radiological contamination. At the request of DOE, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducted a survey in May 1990, of public roadways and suspected haul routes between the Mallinckrodt plant and storage sites in St. Louis to ensure that no residual radioactive materials were conveyed off-site. A mobile gamma scanning van with an on-board computer system was used to identify possible anomalies. Suspect areas are those displaying measurements deviating from gamma exposure rates identified as typical for radiologically unenhanced areas in the vicinity of the areas of interest. The instrumentation highlighted three anomaly locations each of which measured less than 1m{sup 2} in size. None of the slightly elevated radiation levels originated from material associated with former AEC-related processing operations in the area. The anomalies resulted from elevated concentrations of radionuclides present in phosphate fertilizers, increased thorium in road-base gravel, and emanations from the radioactive storage site near the Latty Avenue airport. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  7. India's Worsening Uranium Shortage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, Michael M.

    2007-01-15

    As a result of NSG restrictions, India cannot import the natural uranium required to fuel its Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs); consequently, it is forced to rely on the expediency of domestic uranium production. However, domestic production from mines and byproduct sources has not kept pace with demand from commercial reactors. This shortage has been officially confirmed by the Indian Planning Commission’s Mid-Term Appraisal of the country’s current Five Year Plan. The report stresses that as a result of the uranium shortage, Indian PHWR load factors have been continually decreasing. The Uranium Corporation of India Ltd (UCIL) operates a number of underground mines in the Singhbhum Shear Zone of Jharkhand, and it is all processed at a single mill in Jaduguda. UCIL is attempting to aggrandize operations by establishing new mines and mills in other states, but the requisite permit-gathering and development time will defer production until at least 2009. A significant portion of India’s uranium comes from byproduct sources, but a number of these are derived from accumulated stores that are nearing exhaustion. A current maximum estimate of indigenous uranium production is 430t/yr (230t from mines and 200t from byproduct sources); whereas, the current uranium requirement for Indian PHWRs is 455t/yr (depending on plant capacity factor). This deficit is exacerbated by the additional requirements of the Indian weapons program. Present power generation capacity of Indian nuclear plants is 4350 MWe. The power generation target set by the Indian Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) is 20,000 MWe by the year 2020. It is expected that around half of this total will be provided by PHWRs using indigenously supplied uranium with the bulk of the remainder provided by breeder reactors or pressurized water reactors using imported low-enriched uranium.

  8. Computation Results from a Parametric Study to Determine Bounding Critical Systems of Homogeneously Water-Moderated Mixed Plutonium--Uranium Oxides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shimizu, Y.

    2001-01-11

    This report provides computational results of an extensive study to examine the following: (1) infinite media neutron-multiplication factors; (2) material bucklings; (3) bounding infinite media critical concentrations; (4) bounding finite critical dimensions of water-reflected and homogeneously water-moderated one-dimensional systems (i.e., spheres, cylinders of infinite length, and slabs that are infinite in two dimensions) that were comprised of various proportions and densities of plutonium oxides and uranium oxides, each having various isotopic compositions; and (5) sensitivity coefficients of delta k-eff with respect to critical geometry delta dimensions were determined for each of the three geometries that were studied. The study was undertaken to support the development of a standard that is sponsored by the International Standards Organization (ISO) under Technical Committee 85, Nuclear Energy (TC 85)--Subcommittee 5, Nuclear Fuel Technology (SC 5)--Working Group 8, Standardization of Calculations, Procedures and Practices Related to Criticality Safety (WG 8). The designation and title of the ISO TC 85/SC 5/WG 8 standard working draft is WD 14941, ''Nuclear energy--Fissile materials--Nuclear criticality control and safety of plutonium-uranium oxide fuel mixtures outside of reactors.'' Various ISO member participants performed similar computational studies using their indigenous computational codes to provide comparative results for analysis in the development of the standard.

  9. Decommissioning of U.S. uranium production facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    From 1980 to 1993, the domestic production of uranium declined from almost 44 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} to about 3 million pounds. This retrenchment of the U.S. uranium industry resulted in the permanent closing of many uranium-producing facilities. Current low uranium prices, excess world supply, and low expectations for future uranium demand indicate that it is unlikely existing plants will be reopened. Because of this situation, these facilities eventually will have to be decommissioned. The Uranium Mill Tailings and Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA) vests the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) with overall responsibility for establishing environmental standards for decommissioning of uranium production facilities. UMTRCA also gave the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) the responsibility for licensing and regulating uranium production and related activities, including decommissioning. Because there are many issues associated with decommissioning-environmental, political, and financial-this report will concentrate on the answers to three questions: (1) What is required? (2) How is the process implemented? (3) What are the costs? Regulatory control is exercised principally through the NRC licensing process. Before receiving a license to construct and operate an uranium producing facility, the applicant is required to present a decommissioning plan to the NRC. Once the plan is approved, the licensee must post a surety to guarantee that funds will be available to execute the plan and reclaim the site. This report by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) represents the most comprehensive study on this topic by analyzing data on 33 (out of 43) uranium production facilities located in Colorado, Nebraska, New Mexico, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, and Washington.

  10. EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS ON DUAL-UEGO ACTIVE CATALYST CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grizzle, Jessy W.

    EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS ON DUAL-UEGO ACTIVE CATALYST CONTROL Giovanni Fiengo Jessy W. Grizzle hydrocarbons. Linear exhaust gas oxygen sensors are used to measure pre- and post-catalyst air-fuel ratio- and post-catalyst air-fuel ratio measurements to compensate for the bias corrupting the pre-catalyst air-fuel

  11. Physical activity across the curriculum: year one process evaluation results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibson, Cheryl A.; Smith, Bryan K.; DuBose, Katrina D.; Greene, Leon; Bailey, Bruce W.; Williams, Shannon L.; Ryan, Joseph J.; Schmelzle, Kristin H.; Washburn, Richard A.; Sullivan, Debra K.; Mayo, Matthew S.; Donnelly, Joseph E.

    2008-01-01

    ral International Journal of Behavioral ssBioMed CentNutrition and Physical Activity Open AcceResearch Physical activity across the curriculum: year one process evaluation results Cheryl A Gibson*1, Bryan K Smith2, Katrina D DuBose3, J Leon Greene... of Biostatistics, University of Kansas School of Medicine, 3901 Rainbow Blvd, Mail Stop 1026, Kansas City, KS, 66160, USA Email: Cheryl A Gibson* - cgibson@kumc.edu; Bryan K Smith - smithbr@ku.edu; Katrina D DuBose - dubose@ecu.edu; J Leon Greene - jlg...

  12. Quantification of Kinetic Rate Law Parameters of Uranium Release from Sodium Autunite as a Function of Aqueous Bicarbonate Concentrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gudavalli, Ravi; Katsenovich, Yelena; Wellman, Dawn M.; Lagos, Leonel; Tansel, Berrin

    2013-09-05

    ABSTRACT: Hydrogen carbonate is one of the most significant components within the uranium geochemical cycle. In aqueous solutions, hydrogen carbonate forms strong complexes with uranium. As such, aqueous bicarbonate may significantly increase the rate of uranium release from uranium minerals. Quantifying the relationship of aqueous hydrogen carbonate solutions to the rate of uranium release during dissolution is critical to understanding the long-term fate of uranium within the environment. Single-pass flow-through (SPTF) experiments were conducted to estimate the rate of uranium release from Na meta-autunite as a function of bicarbonate solutions (0.0005-0.003 M) under the pH range of 6-11 and temperatures of 5-60oC. Consistent with the results of previous investigation, the rate of uranium release from sodium autunite exhibited minimal dependency on temperature; but were strongly dependent on pH and increasing concentrations of bicarbonate solutions. Most notably at pH 7, the rate of uranium release exhibited 370 fold increases relative to the rate of uranium release in the absence of bicarbonate. However, the effect of increasing concentrations of bicarbonate solutions on the release of uranium was significantly less under higher pH conditions. It is postulated that at high pH values, surface sites are saturated with carbonate, thus the addition of more bicarbonate would have less effect on uranium release. Results indicate the activation energies were unaffected by temperature and bicarbonate concentration variations, but were strongly dependent on pH conditions. As pH increased from 6 to 11, activation energy values were observed to decrease from 29.94 kJ mol-1 to 13.07 kJ mol-1. The calculated activation energies suggest a surface controlled dissolution mechanism.

  13. Results from a "Proof-of-Concept" Demonstration of RF-Based Tracking of UF6 Cylinders during a Processing Operation at a Uranium Enrichment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pickett, Chris A; Kovacic, Donald N; Whitaker, J Michael; Younkin, James R; Hines, Jairus B; Laughter, Mark D; Morgan, Jim; Carrick, Bernie; Boyer, Brian; Whittle, K.

    2008-01-01

    Approved industry-standard cylinders are used globally for processing, storing, and transporting uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) at uranium enrichment plants. To ensure that cylinder movements at enrichment facilities occur as declared, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) must conduct time-consuming periodic physical inspections to validate facility records, cylinder identity, and containment. By using a robust system design that includes the capability for real-time unattended monitoring (of cylinder movements), site-specific rules-based event detection algorithms, and the capability to integrate with other types of monitoring technologies, one can build a system that will improve overall inspector effectiveness. This type of monitoring system can provide timely detection of safeguard events that could be used to ensure more timely and appropriate responses by the IAEA. It also could reduce reliance on facility records and have the additional benefit of enhancing domestic safeguards at the installed facilities. This paper will discuss the installation and evaluation of a radio-frequency- (RF-) based cylinder tracking system that was installed at a United States Enrichment Corporation Centrifuge Facility. This system was installed primarily to evaluate the feasibility of using RF technology at a site and the operational durability of the components under harsh processing conditions. The installation included a basic system that is designed to support layering with other safeguard system technologies and that applies fundamental rules-based event processing methodologies. This paper will discuss the fundamental elements of the system design, the results from this site installation, and future efforts needed to make this technology ready for IAEA consideration.

  14. Status of activities on the inactive uranium mill tailings sites remedial action program. Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    This report on the status of the Office of Environment's program for inactive uranium mill tailings sites is an analysis of the current status and a forecast of future activities of the Office of Environment. The termination date for receipt of information was September 30, 1980. Aerial radiological surveys and detailed ground radiological assessments of properties within the communities in the vicinity of the designated processing sites in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, Salt Lake City, Utah, and Boise, Idaho led to the designation of an initial group of vicinity properties for remedial action. The potential health effects of the residual radioactive materials on or near these properties were estimated, and the Assistant Secretary for Environment recommended priorities for performing remedial action to the Department's Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy. In designating these properties and establishing recommended priorities for performing remedial action, the Office of Environment consulted with the Environmental Protection Agency, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, representatives from the affected State and local governments, and individual property owners. After notifying the Governors of each of the affected States and the Navajo Nation of the Secretary of Energy's designation of processing sites within their areas of jurisdiction and establishment of remedial action priorities, a Sample Cooperative Agreement was developed by the Department in consultation with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and provided to the affected States and the Navajo Nation for comments. During September 1980, a Cooperative Agreement with the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania for the designated Canonsburg processing site was executed by the Department. It is anticipated that a Cooperative Agreement between the State of Utah and the Department to perform remedial actions at the designated Salt Lake City site will be executed in the near future.

  15. Novel Sensor for the In Situ Measurement of Uranium Fluxes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatfield, Kirk

    2015-02-10

    The goal of this project was to develop a sensor that incorporates the field-tested concepts of the passive flux meter to provide direct in situ measures of flux for uranium and groundwater in porous media. Measurable contaminant fluxes [J] are essentially the product of concentration [C] and groundwater flux or specific discharge [q ]. The sensor measures [J] and [q] by changes in contaminant and tracer amounts respectively on a sorbent. By using measurement rather than inference from static parameters, the sensor can directly advance conceptual and computational models for field scale simulations. The sensor was deployed in conjunction with DOE in obtaining field-scale quantification of subsurface processes affecting uranium transport (e.g., advection) and transformation (e.g., uranium attenuation) at the Rifle IFRC Site in Rifle, Colorado. Project results have expanded our current understanding of how field-scale spatial variations in fluxes of uranium, groundwater and salient electron donor/acceptors are coupled to spatial variations in measured microbial biomass/community composition, effective field-scale uranium mass balances, attenuation, and stability. The coupling between uranium, various nutrients and micro flora can be used to estimate field-scale rates of uranium attenuation and field-scale transitions in microbial communities. This research focuses on uranium (VI), but the sensor principles and design are applicable to field-scale fate and transport of other radionuclides. Laboratory studies focused on sorbent selection and calibration, along with sensor development and validation under controlled conditions. Field studies were conducted at the Rifle IFRC Site in Rifle, Colorado. These studies were closely coordinated with existing SBR (formerly ERSP) projects to complement data collection. Small field tests were conducted during the first two years that focused on evaluating field-scale deployment procedures and validating sensor performance under controlled field conditions. In the third and fourth year a suite of larger field studies were conducted. For these studies, the uranium flux sensor was used with uranium speciation measurements and molecular-biological tools to characterize microbial community and active biomass at synonymous wells distributed in a large grid. These field efforts quantified spatial changes in uranium flux and field-scale rates of uranium attenuation (ambient and stimulated), uranium stability, and quantitatively assessed how fluxes and effective reaction rates were coupled to spatial variations in microbial community and active biomass. Analyses of data from these field experiments were used to generate estimates of Monod kinetic parameters that are ‘effective’ in nature and optimal for modeling uranium fate and transport at the field-scale. This project provided the opportunity to develop the first sensor that provides direct measures of both uranium (VI) and groundwater flux. A multidisciplinary team was assembled to include two geochemists, a microbiologist, and two quantitative contaminant hydrologists. Now that the project is complete, the sensor can be deployed at DOE sites to evaluate field-scale uranium attenuation, source behavior, the efficacy of remediation, and off-site risk. Because the sensor requires no power, it can be deployed at remote sites for periods of days to months. The fundamental science derived from this project can be used to advance the development of predictive models for various transport and attenuation processes in aquifers. Proper development of these models is critical for long-term stewardship of contaminated sites in the context of predicting uranium source behavior, remediation performance, and off-site risk.

  16. Incorporation of oxidized uranium into Fe (hydr)oxides during Fe(II) catalyzed remineralization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nico, Peter S.

    2010-01-01

    Uranium isotopic evidence for the origin of the Bahariya iron deposits,U deposit, and the DOE Oak Ridge site (where uranium bearingdeposits, mining activities, and nuclear weapons production. Uranium

  17. Domestic utility attitudes toward foreign uranium supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-06-01

    The current embargo on the enrichment of foreign-origin uranium for use in domestic utilization facilities is scheduled to be removed in 1984. The pending removal of this embargo, complicated by a depressed worldwide market for uranium, has prompted consideration of a new or extended embargo within the US Government. As part of its on-going data collection activities, Nuclear Resources International (NRI) has surveyed 50 domestic utility/utility holding companies (representing 60 lead operator-utilities) on their foreign uranium purchase strategies and intentions. The most recent survey was conducted in early May 1981. A number of qualitative observations were made during the course of the survey. The major observations are: domestic utility views toward foreign uranium purchase are dynamic; all but three utilities had some considered foreign purchase strategy; some utilities have problems with buying foreign uranium from particular countries; an inducement is often required by some utilities to buy foreign uranium; opinions varied among utilities concerning the viability of the domestic uranium industry; and many utilities could have foreign uranium fed through their domestic uranium contracts (indirect purchases). The above observations are expanded in the final section of the report. However, it should be noted that two of the observations are particularly important and should be seriously considered in formulation of foreign uranium import restrictions. These important observations are the dynamic nature of the subject matter and the potentially large and imbalanced effect the indirect purchases could have on utility foreign uranium procurement.

  18. Process for alloying uranium and niobium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, Cressie E. (Farragut, TN); Northcutt, Jr., Walter G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Masters, David R. (Knoxville, TN); Chapman, Lloyd R. (Knoxville, TN)

    1991-01-01

    Alloys such as U-6Nb are prepared by forming a stacked sandwich array of uraniun sheets and niobium powder disposed in layers between the sheets, heating the array in a vacuum induction melting furnace to a temperature such as to melt the uranium, holding the resulting mixture at a temperature above the melting point of uranium until the niobium dissolves in the uranium, and casting the uranium-niobium solution. Compositional uniformity in the alloy product is enabled by use of the sandwich structure of uranium sheets and niobium powder.

  19. Uranium enrichment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    This book presents the GAO's views on the Department of Energy's (DOE) program to develop a new uranium enrichment technology, the atomic vapor laser isotope separation process (AVLIS). Views are drawn from GAO's ongoing review of AVLIS, in which the technical, program, and market issues that need to be addressed before an AVLIS plant is built are examined.

  20. Evaluation of Uranium Measurements in Water by Various Methods - 13571

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tucker, Brian J. [Shaw Environmental and Infrastructure Group, 150 Royall Street, Canton, MA (United States)] [Shaw Environmental and Infrastructure Group, 150 Royall Street, Canton, MA (United States); Workman, Stephen M. [ALS Laboratory Group, Environmental Division, 225 Commerce Drive, Fort Collins, CO 80524 (United States)] [ALS Laboratory Group, Environmental Division, 225 Commerce Drive, Fort Collins, CO 80524 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    In December 2000, EPA amended its drinking water regulations for radionuclides by adding a Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for uranium (so called MCL Rule)[1] of 30 micrograms per liter (?g/L). The MCL Rule also included MCL goals of zero for uranium and other radionuclides. Many radioactively contaminated sites must test uranium in wastewater and groundwater to comply with the MCL rule as well as local publicly owned treatment works discharge limitations. This paper addresses the relative sensitivity, accuracy, precision, cost and comparability of two EPA-approved methods for detection of total uranium: inductively plasma/mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and alpha spectrometry. Both methods are capable of measuring the individual uranium isotopes U-234, U- 235, and U-238 and both methods have been deemed acceptable by EPA. However, the U-238 is by far the primary contributor to the mass-based ICP-MS measurement, especially for naturally-occurring uranium, which contains 99.2745% U-238. An evaluation shall be performed relative to the regulatory requirement promulgated by EPA in December 2000. Data will be garnered from various client sample results measured by ALS Laboratory in Fort Collins, CO. Data shall include method detection limits (MDL), minimum detectable activities (MDA), means and trends in laboratory control sample results, performance evaluation data for all methods, and replicate results. In addition, a comparison will be made of sample analyses results obtained from both alpha spectrometry and the screening method Kinetic Phosphorescence Analysis (KPA) performed at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) FUSRAP Maywood Laboratory (UFML). Many uranium measurements occur in laboratories that only perform radiological analysis. This work is important because it shows that uranium can be measured in radiological as well as stable chemistry laboratories and it provides several criteria as a basis for comparison of two uranium test methods. This data will indicate which test method is the most accurate and most cost effective. This paper provides a benefit to Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) and other Department of Defense (DOD) programs that may be performing uranium measurements. (authors)

  1. Uranium roll front study in the upper Jackson group, Atascosa County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Michael Eugene

    1979-01-01

    Section and Outcrop Description Sampling Procedure Laboratory Methods Delayed Neutron Activation Analysis. Uranium Concentrations in Sediment Size Fractions. Fission Track Analysis X-ray Diffraction Analysis RESULTS Calliham Sandstone Fashing Clay... Page 4 5 8 9 9 11 14 15 16 16 16 21 22 25 29 32 32 34 35 35 39 40 42 48 48 50 TABLE OF CONTENTS - Continued Uranium D1str1bution (Megascopic) Size Fraction Analys1s. Fission Track Analysis (Microscopic) Organic...

  2. Uranium 2005 resources, production and demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

    2006-01-01

    Published every other year, Uranium Resources, Production, and Demand, or the "Red Book" as it is commonly known, is jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency. It is the recognised world reference on uranium and is based on official information received from 43 countries. This 21st edition presents the results of a thorough review of world uranium supplies and demand as of 1st January 2005 and provides a statistical profile of the world uranium industry in the areas of exploration, resource estimates, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantial new information from all major uranium production centres in Africa, Australia, Central Asia, Eastern Europe and North America. Projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements through 2025 are provided as well as a discussion of long-term uranium supply and demand issues. This edition focuses on recent price and production increases that could signal major c...

  3. Gamma/neutron time-correlation for special nuclear material characterization %3CU%2B2013%3E active stimulation of highly enriched uranium.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marleau, Peter; Nowack, Aaron B.; Clarke, Shaun D.; Monterial, Mateusz; Paff, Marc; Pozzi, Sara A.

    2013-09-01

    A series of simulations and experiments were undertaken to explore and evaluate the potential for a novel new technique for fissile material detection and characterization, the timecorrelated pulse-height (TCPH) method, to be used concurrent with active stimulation of potential nuclear materials. In previous work TCPH has been established as a highly sensitive method for the detection and characterization of configurations of fissile material containing Plutonium in passive measurements. By actively stimulating fission with the introduction of an external radiation source, we have shown that TCPH is also an effective method of detecting and characterizing configurations of fissile material containing Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU). The TCPH method is shown to be robust in the presence of the proper choice of external radiation source. An evaluation of potential interrogation sources is presented.

  4. Tc-99 Adsorption on Selected Activated Carbons - Batch Testing Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

    2010-12-01

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently developing a 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system as the remedial action selected under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Record of Decision for Operable Unit (OU) 200-ZP-1. This report documents the results of treatability tests Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers conducted to quantify the ability of selected activated carbon products (or carbons) to adsorb technetium-99 (Tc-99) from 200-West Area groundwater. The Tc-99 adsorption performance of seven activated carbons (J177601 Calgon Fitrasorb 400, J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, J177612 Norit GAC830, J177613 Norit GAC830, and J177617 Nucon LW1230) were evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36. Four of the best performing carbons (J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, and J177613 Norit GAC830) were selected for batch isotherm testing. The batch isotherm tests on four of the selected carbons indicated that under lower nitrate concentration conditions (382 mg/L), Kd values ranged from 6,000 to 20,000 mL/g. In comparison. Under higher nitrate (750 mg/L) conditions, there was a measureable decrease in Tc-99 adsorption with Kd values ranging from 3,000 to 7,000 mL/g. The adsorption data fit both the Langmuir and the Freundlich equations. Supplemental tests were conducted using the two carbons that demonstrated the highest adsorption capacity to resolve the issue of the best fit isotherm. These tests indicated that Langmuir isotherms provided the best fit for Tc-99 adsorption under low nitrate concentration conditions. At the design basis concentration of Tc 0.865 µg/L(14,700 pCi/L), the predicted Kd values from using Langmuir isotherm constants were 5,980 mL/g and 6,870 mL/g for for the two carbons. These Kd values did not meet the target Kd value of 9,000 mL/g. Tests conducted to ascertain the effects of changing pH showed that at pH values of 6.5 and 7.5, no significant differences existed in Tc-adsorption performance for three of the carbons, but the fourth carbon performed better at pH 7.5. When the pH was increased to 8.5, a slight decline in performance was observed for all carbons. Tests conducted to ascertain the temperature effect on Tc-99 adsorption indicated that at 21 ºC, 27 ºC, and 32 ºC there were no significant differences in Tc-99 adsorption for three of the carbons. The fourth carbon showed a noticeable decline in Tc-99 adsorption performance with increasing temperature. The presence of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the source water did not significantly affect Tc-99 adsorption on either of two carbons tested. Technetium-99 adsorption differed by less than 15% with or without VOCs present in the test water, indicating that Tc-99 adsorption would not be significantly affected if VOCs were removed from the water prior to contact with carbon.

  5. URANIUM IN ALKALINE ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, M.

    2011-01-01

    1962. "Diatremes and Uranium Deposits in the Hopi Buttes,H. , 1970. "Low-Grade Uranium Deposits in Agpaitic NephelineL. Torkild, 1974B. "The Uranium Deposit at Kvanefjeld, The

  6. URANIUM IN ALKALINE ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, M.

    2011-01-01

    1977. "Geology of Brazil's Uranium and Thorium Occurrences,"A tantalo-niobate of uranium, near pyrochlore. Isometric,niobate and tantalate of uranium, with ferrous iron and rare

  7. The End of Cheap Uranium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Dittmar

    2011-06-21

    Historic data from many countries demonstrate that on average no more than 50-70% of the uranium in a deposit could be mined. An analysis of more recent data from Canada and Australia leads to a mining model with an average deposit extraction lifetime of 10+- 2 years. This simple model provides an accurate description of the extractable amount of uranium for the recent mining operations. Using this model for all larger existing and planned uranium mines up to 2030, a global uranium mining peak of at most 58 +- 4 ktons around the year 2015 is obtained. Thereafter we predict that uranium mine production will decline to at most 54 +- 5 ktons by 2025 and, with the decline steepening, to at most 41 +- 5 ktons around 2030. This amount will not be sufficient to fuel the existing and planned nuclear power plants during the next 10-20 years. In fact, we find that it will be difficult to avoid supply shortages even under a slow 1%/year worldwide nuclear energy phase-out scenario up to 2025. We thus suggest that a worldwide nuclear energy phase-out is in order. If such a slow global phase-out is not voluntarily effected, the end of the present cheap uranium supply situation will be unavoidable. The result will be that some countries will simply be unable to afford sufficient uranium fuel at that point, which implies involuntary and perhaps chaotic nuclear phase-outs in those countries involving brownouts, blackouts, and worse.

  8. Uranium from Seawater Program Review; Fuel Resources Uranium from Seawater Program DOE Office of Nuclear Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-07-01

    For nuclear energy to remain sustainable in the United States, economically viable sources of uranium beyond terrestrial ores must be developed. The goal of this program is to develop advanced adsorbents that can extract uranium from seawater at twice the capacity of the best adsorbent developed by researchers at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1.5 mg U/g adsorbent. A multidisciplinary team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and the University of Texas at Austin was assembled to address this challenging problem. Polymeric adsorbents, based on the radiation grafting of acrylonitrile and methacrylic acid onto high surface-area polyethylene fibers followed by conversion of the nitriles to amidoximes, have been developed. These poly(acrylamidoxime-co-methacrylic acid) fibers showed uranium adsorption capacities for the extraction of uranium from seawater that exceed 3 mg U/g adsorbent in testing at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Marine Sciences Laboratory. The essence of this novel technology lies in the unique high surface-area trunk material that considerably increases the grafting yield of functional groups without compromising its mechanical properties. This technology received an R&D100 Award in 2012. In addition, high surface area nanomaterial adsorbents are under development with the goal of increasing uranium adsorption capacity by taking advantage of the high surface areas and tunable porosity of carbon-based nanomaterials. Simultaneously, de novo structure-based computational design methods are being used to design more selective and stable ligands and the most promising candidates are being synthesized, tested and evaluated for incorporation onto a support matrix. Fundamental thermodynamic and kinetic studies are being carried out to improve the adsorption efficiency, the selectivity of uranium over other metals, and the stability of the adsorbents. Understanding the rate-limiting step of uranium uptake from seawater is also essential in designing an effective uranium recovery system. Finally, economic analyses have been used to guide these studies and highlight what parameters, such as capacity, recyclability, and stability, have the largest impact on the cost of extraction of uranium from seawater. Initially, the cost estimates by the JAEA for extraction of uranium from seawater with braided polymeric fibers functionalized with amidoxime ligands were evaluated and updated. The economic analyses were subsequently updated to reflect the results of this project while providing insight for cost reductions in the adsorbent development through “cradle-to-grave” case studies for the extraction process. This report highlights the progress made over the last three years on the design, synthesis, and testing of new materials to extract uranium for seawater. This report is organized into sections that highlight the major research activities in this project: (1) Chelate Design and Modeling, (2) Thermodynamics, Kinetics and Structure, (3) Advanced Polymeric Adsorbents by Radiation Induced Grafting, (4) Advanced Nanomaterial Adsorbents, (5) Adsorbent Screening and Modeling, (6) Marine Testing, and (7) Cost and Energy Assessment. At the end of each section, future research directions are briefly discussed to highlight the challenges that still remain to reduce the cost of extractions of uranium for seawater. Finally, contributions from the Nuclear Energy University Programs (NEUP), which complement this research program, are included at the end of this report.

  9. Laser induced phosphorescence uranium analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bushaw, Bruce A. (Kennewick, WA)

    1986-01-01

    A method is described for measuring the uranium content of aqueous solutions wherein a uranyl phosphate complex is irradiated with a 5 nanosecond pulse of 425 nanometer laser light and resultant 520 nanometer emissions are observed for a period of 50 to 400 microseconds after the pulse. Plotting the natural logarithm of emission intensity as a function of time yields an intercept value which is proportional to uranium concentration.

  10. Laser induced phosphorescence uranium analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bushaw, B.A.

    1983-06-10

    A method is described for measuring the uranium content of aqueous solutions wherein a uranyl phosphate complex is irradiated with a 5 nanosecond pulse of 425 nanometer laser light and resultant 520 nanometer emissions are observed for a period of 50 to 400 microseconds after the pulse. Plotting the natural logarithm of emission intensity as a function of time yields an intercept value which is proportional to uranium concentration.

  11. Steady State Sputtering Yields and Surface Compositions of Depleted Uranium and Uranium Carbide bombarded by 30 keV Gallium or 16 keV Cesium Ions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siekhaus, W. J.; Teslich, N. E.; Weber, P. K.

    2014-10-23

    Depleted uranium that included carbide inclusions was sputtered with 30-keV gallium ions or 16-kev cesium ions to depths much greater than the ions’ range, i.e. using steady-state sputtering. The recession of both the uranium’s and uranium carbide’s surfaces and the ion corresponding fluences were used to determine the steady-state target sputtering yields of both uranium and uranium carbide, i.e. 6.3 atoms of uranium and 2.4 units of uranium carbide eroded per gallium ion, and 9.9 uranium atoms and 3.65 units of uranium carbide eroded by cesium ions. The steady state surface composition resulting from the simultaneous gallium or cesium implantation and sputter-erosion of uranium and uranium carbide were calculated to be U??Ga??, (UC)??Ga?? and U??Cs?, (UC)??Cs??, respectively.

  12. Uranium Elemental and Isotopic Constraints on Groundwater Flow Beneath the Nopal I Uranium Deposit, Pena Blanca, Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.J. Goldstein; M.T. Murrell; A.M. Simmons

    2005-07-11

    The Nopal I uranium deposit in Chihuahua, Mexico, is an excellent analogue for evaluating the fate of spent fuel, associated actinides, and fission products over long time scales for the proposed Yucca Mountain high-level nuclear waste repository. In 2003, three groundwater wells were drilled directly adjacent to (PB-1) and 50 m on either side of the uranium deposit (PB-2 and PB-3) in order to evaluate uranium-series transport in three dimensions. After drilling, uranium concentrations were elevated in all of the three wells (0.1-18 ppm) due to drilling activities and subsequently decreased to {approx}5-20% of initial values over the next several months. The {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios were similar for PB-1 and PB-2 (1.005 to 1.079) but distinct for PB-3 (1.36 to 1.83) over this time period, suggesting limited mixing between groundwater from these wells over these short time and length scales. Regional groundwater wells located up to several km from the deposit also have distinct uranium isotopic characteristics and constrain mixing over larger length and time scales. We model the decreasing uranium concentrations in the newly drilled wells with a simple one-dimensional advection-dispersion model, assuming uranium is introduced as a slug to each of the wells and transported as a conservative tracer. Using this model for our data, the relative uranium concentrations are dependent on both the longitudinal dispersion as well as the mean groundwater flow velocity. These parameters have been found to be correlated in both laboratory and field studies of groundwater velocity and dispersion (Klotz et al., 1980). Using typical relationships between velocity and dispersion for field and laboratory studies along with the relationship observed from our uranium data, both velocity (1-10 n/yr) and dispersion coefficient (1E-5 to 1E-2 cm{sup 2}/s) can be derived from the modeling. As discussed above, these relatively small flow velocities and dispersivities agree with mixing considerations derived from the {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U data. While these results and the limited productivity of these wells consistently suggest limited groundwater flow and mixing, we anticipate additional work with artificial tracers to better establish groundwater flow velocities and gradient at this site.

  13. Summary of FY15 results of benchmark modeling activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arguello, J. Guadalupe

    2015-08-01

    Sandia is participating in the third phase of an is a contributing partner to a U.S.-German "Joint Project" entitled "Comparison of current constitutive models and simulation procedures on the basis of model calculations of the thermo-mechanical behavior and healing of rock salt." The first goal of the project is to check the ability of numerical modeling tools to correctly describe the relevant deformation phenomena in rock salt under various influences. Achieving this goal will lead to increased confidence in the results of numerical simulations related to the secure storage of radioactive wastes in rock salt, thereby enhancing the acceptance of the results. These results may ultimately be used to make various assertions regarding both the stability analysis of an underground repository in salt, during the operating phase, and the long-term integrity of the geological barrier against the release of harmful substances into the biosphere, in the post-operating phase.

  14. Depleted uranium hexafluoride management program : data compilation for the Portsmouth site.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartmann, H. M.

    2001-06-05

    This report is a compilation of data and analyses for the Portsmouth site, near Portsmouth, Ohio. The data were collected and the analyses were done in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 1999 Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DOE/EIS-0269). The report describes the affected environment at the Portsmouth site and summarizes potential environmental impacts that could result from conducting the following depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) management activities at the site: continued cylinder storage, preparation of cylinders for shipment, conversion, and long-term storage. DOE's preferred alternative is to begin converting the depleted UF{sub 6} inventory as soon as possible to either uranium oxide, uranium metal, or a combination of both, while allowing for use of as much of this inventory as possible.

  15. Depleted uranium hexafluoride management program : data compilation for the Paducah site.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartmann, H.

    2001-06-07

    This report is a compilation of data and analyses for the Paducah site, near Paducah, Kentucky. The data were collected and the analyses were done in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 1999 Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DOE/EIS-0269). The report describes the affected environment at the Paducah site and summarizes potential environmental impacts that could result from conducting the following depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) activities at the site: continued cylinder storage, preparation of cylinders for shipment, conversion, and long-term storage. DOE's preferred alternative is to begin converting the depleted UF{sub 6} inventory as soon as possible to either uranium oxide, uranium metal, or a combination of both, while allowing for use of as much of this inventory as possible.

  16. Uranium Metal Analysis via Selective Dissolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Chenault, Jeffrey W.

    2008-09-10

    Uranium metal, which is present in sludge held in the Hanford Site K West Basin, can create hazardous hydrogen atmospheres during sludge handling, immobilization, or subsequent transport and storage operations by its oxidation/corrosion in water. A thorough knowledge of the uranium metal concentration in sludge therefore is essential to successful sludge management and waste process design. The goal of this work was to establish a rapid routine analytical method to determine uranium metal concentrations as low as 0.03 wt% in sludge even in the presence of up to 1000-fold higher total uranium concentrations (i.e., up to 30 wt% and more uranium) for samples to be taken during the upcoming sludge characterization campaign and in future analyses for sludge handling and processing. This report describes the experiments and results obtained in developing the selective dissolution technique to determine uranium metal concentration in K Basin sludge.

  17. RESOLUTION OF URANIUM ISOTOPES WITH KINETIC PHOSPHORESCENCE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miley, Sarah M.; Hylden, Anne T.; Friese, Judah I.

    2013-04-01

    This study was conducted to test the ability of the Chemchek™ Kinetic Phosphorescence Analyzer Model KPA-11 with an auto-sampler to resolve the difference in phosphorescent decay rates of several different uranium isotopes, and therefore identify the uranium isotope ratios present in a sample. Kinetic phosphorescence analysis (KPA) is a technique that provides rapid, accurate, and precise determination of uranium concentration in aqueous solutions. Utilizing a pulsed-laser source to excite an aqueous solution of uranium, this technique measures the phosphorescent emission intensity over time to determine the phosphorescence decay profile. The phosphorescence intensity at the onset of decay is proportional to the uranium concentration in the sample. Calibration with uranium standards results in the accurate determination of actual concentration of the sample. Different isotopes of uranium, however, have unique properties which should result in different phosphorescence decay rates seen via KPA. Results show that a KPA is capable of resolving uranium isotopes.

  18. The Sorption/Desorption Behavior of Uranium in Transport Studies Using Yucca Mountain Alluvium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. D. Scism

    2006-02-15

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada is the proposed site of a geologic repository for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in the United States. In the event repository engineered barriers fail, the saturated alluvium located south of Yucca Mountain is expected to serve as a natural barrier to the migration of radionuclides to the accessible environment. The purpose of this study is to improve the characterization of uranium retardation in the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain to support refinement of an assessment model. The distribution of uranium desorption rates from alluvium obtained from Nye County bore holes EWDP-19IM1, EWDP-10SA, EWDP-22SA were studied to address inconsistencies between results from batch sorption and column transport experiments. The alluvium and groundwater were characterized to better understand the underlying mechanisms of the observed behavior. Desorption rate constants were obtained using an activity based mass balance equation and column desorption experiments were analyzed using a mathematical model utilizing multiple sorption sites with different first-order forward and reverse reaction rates. The uranium desorption rate constants decreased over time, suggesting that the alluvium has multiple types of active sorption sites with different affinities for uranium. While a significant fraction of the initially sorbed uranium desorbed from the alluvium quite rapidly, a roughly equivalent amount remained sorbed after several months of testing. The information obtained through this research suggests that uranium may experience greater effective retardation in the alluvium than simple batch sorption experiments would suggest. Electron Probe Microanalysis shows that uranium is associated with both clay minerals and iron oxides after sorption to alluvial material. These results provide further evidence that the alluvium contains multiple sorption sites for uranium.

  19. Determination of the origin of elevated uranium at a Former Air Force Landfill using non-parametric statistics analysis and uranium isotope ratio analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weismann, J.; Young, C.; Masciulli, S.; Caputo, D.

    2007-07-01

    Lowry Air Force Base (Lowry) was closed in September 1994 as part of the Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) program and the base was transferred to the Lowry Redevelopment Authority in 1995. As part of the due diligence activities conducted by the Air Force, a series of remedial investigations were conducted across the base. A closed waste landfill, designated Operable Unit 2 (OU 2), was initially assessed in a 1990 Remedial Investigation (RI; [1]). A Supplemental Remedial Investigation was conducted in 1995 [2] and additional studies were conducted in a 1998 Focused Feasibility Study. [3] The three studies indicated that gross alpha, gross beta, and uranium concentrations were consistently above regulatory standards and that there were detections of low concentrations other radionuclides. Results from previous investigations at OU 2 have shown elevated gross alpha, gross beta, and uranium concentrations in groundwater, surface water, and sediments. The US Air Force has sought to understand the provenance of these radionuclides in order to determine if they could be due to leachates from buried radioactive materials within the landfill or whether they are naturally-occurring. The Air Force and regulators agreed to use a one-year monitoring and sampling program to seek to explain the origins of the radionuclides. Over the course of the one-year program, dissolved uranium levels greater than the 30 {mu}g/L Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) were consistently found in both up-gradient and down-gradient wells at OU 2. Elevated Gross Alpha and Gross Beta measurements that were observed during prior investigations and confirmed during the LTM were found to correlate with high dissolved uranium content in groundwater. If Gross Alpha values are corrected to exclude uranium and radon contributions in accordance with US EPA guidance, then the 15 pCi/L gross alpha level is not exceeded. The large dataset also allowed development of gross alpha to total uranium correlation factors so that gross alpha action levels can be applied to future long-term landfill monitoring to track radiological conditions at lower cost. Ratios of isotopic uranium results were calculated to test whether the elevated uranium displayed signatures indicative of military use. Results of all ratio testing strongly supports the conclusion that the uranium found in groundwater, surface water, and sediment at OU 2 is naturally-occurring and has not undergone anthropogenic enrichment or processing. U-234:U-238 ratios also show that a disequilibrium state, i.e., ratio greater than 1, exists throughout OU 2 which is indicative of long-term aqueous transport in aged aquifers. These results all support the conclusion that the elevated uranium observed at OU 2 is due to the high concentrations in the regional watershed. Based on the results of this monitoring program, we concluded that the elevated uranium concentrations measured in OU 2 groundwater, surface water, and sediment are due to the naturally-occurring uranium content of the regional watershed and are not the result of waste burials in the former landfill. Several lines of evidence indicate that natural uranium has been naturally concentrated beneath OU 2 in the geologic past and the higher of uranium concentrations in down-gradient wells is the result of geochemical processes and not the result of a uranium ore disposal. These results therefore provide the data necessary to support radiological closure of OU 2. (authors)

  20. Y-12 Uranium Exposure Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eckerman, K.F.; Kerr, G.D.

    1999-08-05

    Following the recent restart of operations at the Y-12 Plant, the Radiological Control Organization (RCO) observed that the enriched uranium exposures appeared to involve insoluble rather than soluble uranium that presumably characterized most earlier Y-12 operations. These observations necessitated changes in the bioassay program, particularly the need for routine fecal sampling. In addition, it was not reasonable to interpret the bioassay data using metabolic parameter values established during earlier Y-12 operations. Thus, the recent urinary and fecal bioassay data were interpreted using the default guidance in Publication 54 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP); that is, inhalation of Class Y uranium with an activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) of 1 {micro}m. Faced with apparently new workplace conditions, these actions were appropriate and ensured a cautionary approach to worker protection. As additional bioassay data were accumulated, it became apparent that the data were not consistent with Publication 54. Therefore, this study was undertaken to examine the situation.

  1. Continuous reduction of uranium tetrafluoride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeMint, A.L.; Maxey, A.W.

    1993-10-21

    Operation of a pilot-scale system for continuous metallothermic reduction of uranium tetrafluoride (UF{sub 4} or green salt) has been initiated. This activity is in support of the development of a cost- effective process to produce uranium-iron (U-Fe) alloy feed for the Uranium-Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) program. To date, five runs have been made to reduce green salt (UF{sub 4}) with magnesium. During this quarter, three runs were made to perfect the feeding system, examine feed rates, and determine the need for a crust breaker/stirrer. No material was drawn off in any of the runs; both product metal and by-product salt were allowed to accumulate in the reactor.

  2. An evaluation of health risk to the public as a consequence of in situ uranium mining in Wyoming, USA

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ruedig, Elizabeth; Johnson, Thomas E.

    2015-08-30

    In the United States there is considerable public concern regarding the health effects of in situ recovery uranium mining. These concerns focus principally on exposure to contaminants mobilized in groundwater by the mining process. However, the risk arising as a result of mining must be viewed in light of the presence of naturally occurring uranium ore and other constituents which comprise a latent hazard. The United States Environmental Protection Agency recently proposed new guidelines for successful restoration of an in situ uranium mine by limiting concentrations of thirteen groundwater constituents: arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, selenium, silver, nitrate (asmore »nitrogen), molybdenum, radium, total uranium, and gross ? activity. We investigated the changes occurring to these constituents at an ISR uranium mine in Wyoming, USA by comparing groundwater quality at baseline measurement to that at stability (post-restoration) testing. Of the groundwater constituents considered, only uranium and radium-226 showed significant (p –1. As a result, higher concentrations of uranium correspond to increased biomarkers of nephrotoxicity, however the clinical significance of this increase is unclear.« less

  3. Uranium isotopes fingerprint biotic reduction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Wang, Yuheng; Monga, Nikhil; Romaniello, Stephen J.; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2015-04-20

    Knowledge of paleo-redox conditions in the Earth’s history provides a window into events that shaped the evolution of life on our planet. The role of microbial activity in paleo-redox processes remains unexplored due to the inability to discriminate biotic from abiotic redox transformations in the rock record. The ability to deconvolute these two processes would provide a means to identify environmental niches in which microbial activity was prevalent at a specific time in paleo-history and to correlate specific biogeochemical events with the corresponding microbial metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that the isotopic signature associated with microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium (U),more »i.e., the accumulation of the heavy isotope in the U(IV) phase, is readily distinguishable from that generated by abiotic uranium reduction in laboratory experiments. Thus, isotope signatures preserved in the geologic record through the reductive precipitation of uranium may provide the sought-after tool to probe for biotic processes. Because uranium is a common element in the Earth’s crust and a wide variety of metabolic groups of microorganisms catalyze the biological reduction of U(VI), this tool is applicable to a multiplicity of geological epochs and terrestrial environments. The findings of this study indicate that biological activity contributed to the formation of many authigenic U deposits, including sandstone U deposits of various ages, as well as modern, Cretaceous, and Archean black shales. In addition, engineered bioremediation activities also exhibit a biotic signature, suggesting that, although multiple pathways may be involved in the reduction, direct enzymatic reduction contributes substantially to the immobilization of uranium.« less

  4. Final Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Final Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) Final Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) Uranium Leasing...

  5. Depleted Uranium Technical Brief

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Depleted Uranium Technical Brief United States Environmental Protection Agency Office of Air and Radiation Washington, DC 20460 EPA-402-R-06-011 December 2006 #12;#12;Depleted Uranium Technical Brief EPA of Radiation and Indoor Air Radiation Protection Division ii #12;iii #12;FOREWARD The Depleted Uranium

  6. Corrosion Evaluation of RERTR Uranium Molybdenum Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A K Wertsching

    2012-09-01

    As part of the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) mandate to replace the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel for low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, research into the development of LEU fuel for research reactors has been active since the late 1970’s. Originally referred to as the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) program the new effort named Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) is nearing the goal of replacing the standard aluminum clad dispersion highly enriched uranium aluminide fuel with a new LEU fuel. The five domestic high performance research reactors undergoing this conversion are High Flux Isotope reactor (HFIR), Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Reactor, Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor II (MITR-II). The design of these reactors requires a higher neutron flux than other international research reactors, which to this point has posed unique challenges in the design and development of the new mandated LEU fuel. The new design utilizes a monolithic fuel configuration in order to obtain sufficient 235U within the LEU stoichoimetry to maintain the fission reaction within the domestic test reactors. The change from uranium aluminide dispersion fuel type to uranium molybdenum (UMo) monolithic configuration requires examination of possible corrosion issues associated with the new fuel meat. A focused analysis of the UMo fuel under potential corrosion conditions, within the ATR and under aqueous storage indicates a slow and predictable corrosion rate. Additional corrosion testing is recommended for the highest burn-up fuels to confirm observed corrosion rate trends. This corrosion analysis will focus only on the UMo fuel and will address corrosion of ancillary components such as cladding only in terms of how it affects the fuel. The calculations and corrosion scenarios are weighted with a conservative bias to provide additional confidence with the results. The actual corrosion rates of UMo fuel is very likely to be lower than assumed within this report which can be confirmed with additional testing.

  7. Uranium and Neptunium Desorption from Yucca Mountain Alluvium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.D. Scism; P.W. Reimus; M. Ding; S.J. Chipera

    2006-03-16

    Uranium and neptunium were used as reactive tracers in long-term laboratory desorption studies using saturated alluvium collected from south of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The objective of these long-term experiments is to make detailed observations of the desorption behavior of uranium and neptunium to provide Yucca Mountain with technical bases for a more realistic and potentially less conservative approach to predicting the transport of adsorbing radionuclides in the saturated alluvium. This paper describes several long-term desorption experiments using a flow-through experimental method and groundwater and alluvium obtained from boreholes along a potential groundwater flow path from the proposed repository site. In the long term desorption experiments, the percentages of uranium and neptunium sorbed as a function of time after different durations of sorption was determined. In addition, the desorbed activity as a function of time was fit using a multi-site, multi-rate model to demonstrate that different desorption rate constants ranging over several orders of magnitude exist for the desorption of uranium from Yucca Mountain saturated alluvium. This information will be used to support the development of a conceptual model that ultimately results in effective K{sub d} values much larger than those currently in use for predicting radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain.

  8. Molten-Salt Depleted-Uranium Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Bao-Guo; Gu, Ji-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The supercritical, reactor core melting and nuclear fuel leaking accidents have troubled fission reactors for decades, and greatly limit their extensive applications. Now these troubles are still open. Here we first show a possible perfect reactor, Molten-Salt Depleted-Uranium Reactor which is no above accident trouble. We found this reactor could be realized in practical applications in terms of all of the scientific principle, principle of operation, technology, and engineering. Our results demonstrate how these reactors can possess and realize extraordinary excellent characteristics, no prompt critical, long-term safe and stable operation with negative feedback, closed uranium-plutonium cycle chain within the vessel, normal operation only with depleted-uranium, and depleted-uranium high burnup in reality, to realize with fission nuclear energy sufficiently satisfying humanity long-term energy resource needs, as well as thoroughly solve the challenges of nuclear criticality safety, uranium resource insuffic...

  9. Measurements of Low-Enriched Uranium Holdup.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belian, A. P. (Anthony P.); Reilly, T. D. (T. Douglas); Russo, P. A. (Phyllis A.); Tobin, S. J. (Stephen J.)

    2005-01-01

    A recent effort determined uranium holdup at a large fuel fabrication facility abroad where low enriched ({approx} 3%) uranium (LEU) oxide feeds the pellet manufacturing process. Measurements taken with both high- and low-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry systems include extensive data for the ventilation and vacuum systems. Equipment dimensions and the corresponding holdup deposit masses are large for LEU. Because deposits are infinitely thick to the 186 keV gamma ray in many locations in an LEU environment, measurements of both the 186 and 1001 keV gamma-rays were required, and self-attenuation was significant at 1001 keV in many cases. These wide-dynamic-range measruements used short count times, portable scintillator detectors, and portable MCAs. Because equipment is elevated above floor levels, most measurements were made with detectors mounted on extended telescoping poles. One of the main goals of this effort was to demonstrate and validate methods for measurement and quantitative analysis of LEU holdup using low-resolution detectors and the Generalized Geometry Holdup (GGH) techniques. The current GGH approach is applied elsewhere for holdup measurements of plutonium and high-enriched uranium. The recent experience is directly applicable to holdup measruements at LEU facilities such as the Paducah and Portmouth gaseous diffusion enrichment plants and elsewhere, including LEU sites where D and D is active. This report discusses the measurement methodology, calibration of the measurement equipment, measurement control, analysis of the data, and the global and local assay results including random and systematic uncertainties. It includes field-validation exercises (multiple calibrated systems that perform measruements on the same extended equipment) as well as quantitative validation results obtained on reference materials assembled to emulate the deposits in an extended vacuum line that was also measured by these techniques. The paper examines the differences in assay results between the low-resolution system using the GGH method and the high-resolution system utilizing the commercially available ISOCS analysis method.

  10. Plutonium recovery from spent reactor fuel by uranium displacement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackerman, J.P.

    1992-03-17

    A process is described for separating uranium values and transuranic values from fission products containing rare earth values when the values are contained together in a molten chloride salt electrolyte. A molten chloride salt electrolyte with a first ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride is contacted with both a solid cathode and an anode having values of uranium and fission products including plutonium. A voltage is applied across the anode and cathode electrolytically to transfer uranium and plutonium from the anode to the electrolyte while uranium values in the electrolyte electrolytically deposit as uranium metal on the solid cathode in an amount equal to the uranium and plutonium transferred from the anode causing the electrolyte to have a second ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride. Then the solid cathode with the uranium metal deposited thereon is removed and molten cadmium having uranium dissolved therein is brought into contact with the electrolyte resulting in chemical transfer of plutonium values from the electrolyte to the molten cadmium and transfer of uranium values from the molten cadmium to the electrolyte until the first ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride is reestablished.

  11. Plutonium recovery from spent reactor fuel by uranium displacement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackerman, John P. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1992-01-01

    A process for separating uranium values and transuranic values from fission products containing rare earth values when the values are contained together in a molten chloride salt electrolyte. A molten chloride salt electrolyte with a first ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride is contacted with both a solid cathode and an anode having values of uranium and fission products including plutonium. A voltage is applied across the anode and cathode electrolytically to transfer uranium and plutonium from the anode to the electrolyte while uranium values in the electrolyte electrolytically deposit as uranium metal on the solid cathode in an amount equal to the uranium and plutonium transferred from the anode causing the electrolyte to have a second ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride. Then the solid cathode with the uranium metal deposited thereon is removed and molten cadmium having uranium dissolved therein is brought into contact with the electrolyte resulting in chemical transfer of plutonium values from the electrolyte to the molten cadmium and transfer of uranium values from the molten cadmium to the electrolyte until the first ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride is reestablished.

  12. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project. 1995 Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 23 1. 1, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, the DOE prepares an annual report to document the activities of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring program. This monitoring must comply with appropriate laws, regulations, and standards, and it must identify apparent and meaningful trends in monitoring results. The results of all monitoring activities must be communicated to the public. The UMTRA Project has prepared annual environmental reports to the public since 1989.

  13. Adsorption study for uranium in Rocky Flats groundwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laul, J.C.; Rupert, M.C.; Harris, M.J.; Duran, A.

    1995-01-01

    Six adsorbents were studied to determine their effectiveness in removing uranium in Rocky Flats groundwater. The bench column and batch (Kd) tests showed that uranium can be removed (>99.9%) by four adsorbents. Bone Charcoal (R1O22); F-1 Alumina (granular activated alumina); BIOFIX (immobilized biological agent); SOPBPLUS (mixed metal oxide); Filtrasorb 300 (granular activated carbon); and Zeolite (clinoptilolite).

  14. Uranium mill ore dust characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knuth, R.H.; George, A.C.

    1980-11-01

    Cascade impactor and general air ore dust measurements were taken in a uranium processing mill in order to characterize the airborne activity, the degree of equilibrium, the particle size distribution and the respirable fraction for the /sup 238/U chain nuclides. The sampling locations were selected to limit the possibility of cross contamination by airborne dusts originating in different process areas of the mill. The reliability of the modified impactor and measurement techniques was ascertained by duplicate sampling. The results reveal no significant deviation from secular equilibrium in both airborne and bulk ore samples for the /sup 234/U and /sup 230/Th nuclides. In total airborne dust measurements, the /sup 226/Ra and /sup 210/Pb nuclides were found to be depleted by 20 and 25%, respectively. Bulk ore samples showed depletions of 10% for the /sup 226/Ra and /sup 210/Pb nuclides. Impactor samples show disequilibrium of /sup 226/Ra as high as +-50% for different size fractions. In these samples the /sup 226/Ra ratio was generally found to increase as particle size decreased. Activity median aerodynamic diameters of the airborne dusts ranged from 5 to 30 ..mu..m with a median diameter of 11 ..mu..m. The maximum respirable fraction for the ore dusts, based on the proposed International Commission on Radiological Protection's (ICRP) definition of pulmonary deposition, was < 15% of the total airborne concentration. Ore dust parameters calculated for impactor duplicate samples were found to be in excellent agreement.

  15. Method for converting uranium oxides to uranium metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duerksen, Walter K. (Norris, TN)

    1988-01-01

    A process is described for converting scrap and waste uranium oxide to uranium metal. The uranium oxide is sequentially reduced with a suitable reducing agent to a mixture of uranium metal and oxide products. The uranium metal is then converted to uranium hydride and the uranium hydride-containing mixture is then cooled to a temperature less than -100.degree. C. in an inert liquid which renders the uranium hydride ferromagnetic. The uranium hydride is then magnetically separated from the cooled mixture. The separated uranium hydride is readily converted to uranium metal by heating in an inert atmosphere. This process is environmentally acceptable and eliminates the use of hydrogen fluoride as well as the explosive conditions encountered in the previously employed bomb-reduction processes utilized for converting uranium oxides to uranium metal.

  16. Possibility of nuclear pumped laser experiment using low enriched uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obara, Toru; Takezawa, Hiroki [Center for Research into Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems Tokyo Institute of Technology 2-12-1-N1-19, Ookayama Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2012-06-06

    Possibility to perform experiments for nuclear pumped laser oscillation by using low enriched uranium is investigated. Kinetic analyses are performed for two types of reactor design, one is using highly enriched uranium and the other is using low enriched uranium. The reactor design is based on the experiment reactor in IPPE. The results show the oscillation of nuclear pumped laser in the case of low enriched uranium reactor is also possible. The use of low enriched uranium in the experiment will make experiment easier.

  17. Preliminary Results of Ancillary Safety Analyses Supporting TREAT LEU Conversion Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunett, A. J.; Fei, T.; Strons, P. S.; Papadias, D. D.; Hoffman, E. A.; Kontogeorgakos, D. C.; Connaway, H. M.; Wright, A. E.

    2015-10-01

    The Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT), located at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is a test facility designed to evaluate the performance of reactor fuels and materials under transient accident conditions. The facility, an air-cooled, graphite-moderated reactor designed to utilize fuel containing high-enriched uranium (HEU), has been in non-operational standby status since 1994. Currently, in support of the missions of the Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Material Management and Minimization (M3) Reactor Conversion Program, a new core design is being developed for TREAT that will utilize low-enriched uranium (LEU). The primary objective of this conversion effort is to design an LEU core that is capable of meeting the performance characteristics of the existing HEU core. Minimal, if any, changes are anticipated for the supporting systems (e.g. reactor trip system, filtration/cooling system, etc.); therefore, the LEU core must also be able to function with the existing supporting systems, and must also satisfy acceptable safety limits. In support of the LEU conversion effort, a range of ancillary safety analyses are required to evaluate the LEU core operation relative to that of the existing facility. These analyses cover neutronics, shielding, and thermal hydraulic topics that have been identified as having the potential to have reduced safety margins due to conversion to LEU fuel, or are required to support the required safety analyses documentation. The majority of these ancillary tasks have been identified in [1] and [2]. The purpose of this report is to document the ancillary safety analyses that have been performed at Argonne National Laboratory during the early stages of the LEU design effort, and to describe ongoing and anticipated analyses. For all analyses presented in this report, methodologies are utilized that are consistent with, or improved from, those used in analyses for the HEU Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) [3]. Depending on the availability of historical data derived from HEU TREAT operation, results calculated for the LEU core are compared to measurements obtained from HEU TREAT operation. While all analyses in this report are largely considered complete and have been reviewed for technical content, it is important to note that all topics will be revisited once the LEU design approaches its final stages of maturity. For most safety significant issues, it is expected that the analyses presented here will be bounding, but additional calculations will be performed as necessary to support safety analyses and safety documentation. It should also be noted that these analyses were completed as the LEU design evolved, and therefore utilized different LEU reference designs. Preliminary shielding, neutronic, and thermal hydraulic analyses have been completed and have generally demonstrated that the various LEU core designs will satisfy existing safety limits and standards also satisfied by the existing HEU core. These analyses include the assessment of the dose rate in the hodoscope room, near a loaded fuel transfer cask, above the fuel storage area, and near the HEPA filters. The potential change in the concentration of tramp uranium and change in neutron flux reaching instrumentation has also been assessed. Safety-significant thermal hydraulic items addressed in this report include thermally-induced mechanical distortion of the grid plate, and heating in the radial reflector.

  18. Highly Enriched Uranium Disposition | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NNSA seeks to recover the economic value of the material by using the resulting LEU as nuclear reactor fuel. U.S.-Russian Highly Enriched Uranium Purchase Agreement NNSA's HEU...

  19. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Naturita uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado: Revision 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    Title 1 of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law (PL) 95-604, authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to perform remedial action at the inactive Naturita, Colorado, uranium processing site to reduce the potential health effects from the radioactive materials at the site and at vicinity properties associated with the site. Title 2 of the UMTRCA authorized the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) or agreement state to regulate the operation and eventual reclamation of active uranium processing sites. The uranium mill tailings at the site were removed and reprocessed from 1977 to 1979. The contaminated areas include the former tailings area, the mill yard, the former ore storage area, and adjacent areas that were contaminated by uranium processing activities and wind and water erosion. The Naturita remedial action would result in the loss of 133 acres (ac) of contaminated soils at the processing site. If supplemental standards are approved by the NRC and the state of Colorado, approximately 112 ac of steeply sloped contaminated soils adjacent to the processing site would not be cleaned up. Cleanup of this contamination would have adverse environmental consequences and would be potentially hazardous to remedial action workers.

  20. Low dose cadmium poisoning results in sustained ERK phosphorylation and caspase activation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Patrick [Transcriptional Regulation and Differentiation, CNRS UMR 6548, Nice University, Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice cedex 2 (France)]. E-mail: pmartin@unice.fr; Poggi, Marie Christine [Transcriptional Regulation and Differentiation, CNRS UMR 6548, Nice University, Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice cedex 2 (France)]. E-mail: poggi@unice.fr; Chambard, Jean Claude [Institute of Signaling, Developmental Biology and Cancer Research, CNRS UMR 6543, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, 33 Ave. de Valombrose, 06189 Nice (France)]. E-mail: chambard@unice.fr; Boulukos, Kim E. [Transcriptional Regulation and Differentiation, CNRS UMR 6548, Nice University, Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice cedex 2 (France)]. E-mail: boulukos@unice.fr; Pognonec, Philippe [Transcriptional Regulation and Differentiation, CNRS UMR 6548, Nice University, Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice cedex 2 (France)]. E-mail: pognonec@unice.fr

    2006-11-24

    Cadmium poisoning has been known to result in a wide variety of cellular responses, including oxidative stress and kinase activation. It has been reported that ERK is activated following acute cadmium exposure, and this response is commonly seen as a classical ERK survival mechanism. Here, we analyzed different cell types for their responses to low concentrations of cadmium poisoning. We found that there is an association between cell susceptibility to cadmium toxicity and ERK activation. This activation is atypical, since it consists of a sustained ERK phosphorylation, that lasts up to 6 days post stimulation. This activation is associated with the appearance of cleaved caspases 8 and 3, processed PARP, and irreversible damage. Pharmacological inhibition of ERK phosphorylation results in the ability of cells to resist cadmium poisoning. Our data indicate that low cadmium concentrations result in an unconventional ERK sustained phosphorylation, which in turn leads to death signaling.

  1. Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hayden, H.W. Jr.; Horton, J.A.; Elliott, G.R.B.

    1995-06-06

    A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO{sub 3}), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl{sub 4}), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation. 4 figs.

  2. Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hayden, Jr., Howard W. (Oakridge, TN); Horton, James A. (Livermore, CA); Elliott, Guy R. B. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1995-01-01

    A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO.sub.3), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO.sub.2). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl.sub.4), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation.

  3. Preparation of uranium compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline L; Montreal, Marisa J; Thomson, Robert K; Cantat, Thibault; Travia, Nicholas E

    2013-02-19

    UI.sub.3(1,4-dioxane).sub.1.5 and UI.sub.4(1,4-dioxane).sub.2, were synthesized in high yield by reacting turnings of elemental uranium with iodine dissolved in 1,4-dioxane under mild conditions. These molecular compounds of uranium are thermally stable and excellent precursor materials for synthesizing other molecular compounds of uranium including alkoxide, amide, organometallic, and halide compounds.

  4. Uranium Purchases Report

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1996-01-01

    Final issue. This report details natural and enriched uranium purchases as reported by owners and operators of commercial nuclear power plants. 1996 represents the most recent publication year.

  5. U.S.Uranium Reserves

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Uranium Reserves Data for: 2003 Release Date: June 2004 Next Release: Not determined Uranium Reserves Estimates The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has reported the...

  6. Results of a research study on the impact of active daylighting on operating results of a retail business

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    In preliminary evaluations of So-Luminaire's (SI) product in 1985 and 1986, DOE concluded that it warranted further research and evaluation and was worthy of receiving governmental financial and structural support therefor. SI, along with Safeway, had known intuitively that the So-Luminaire systems which had been previously installed in several of their Phoenix-area stores had resulted in a marked reduction in electrical energy consumption. However, a definitive determination of energy savings had been utilized in previous installations. Further, SI and Safeway both hypothesized that the high quality of natural light provided by these systems displayed goods to greater advantage and contributed to an overall increase in store sales, all other factors being held constant. A study to attempt to objectively determine these two presumed benefits of active daylighting in a commercial application was begun.

  7. Results of a research study on the impact of active daylighting on operating results of a retail business. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    In preliminary evaluations of So-Luminaire`s (SI) product in 1985 and 1986, DOE concluded that it warranted further research and evaluation and was worthy of receiving governmental financial and structural support therefor. SI, along with Safeway, had known intuitively that the So-Luminaire systems which had been previously installed in several of their Phoenix-area stores had resulted in a marked reduction in electrical energy consumption. However, a definitive determination of energy savings had been utilized in previous installations. Further, SI and Safeway both hypothesized that the high quality of natural light provided by these systems displayed goods to greater advantage and contributed to an overall increase in store sales, all other factors being held constant. A study to attempt to objectively determine these two presumed benefits of active daylighting in a commercial application was begun.

  8. Uranium dioxide electrolysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Willit, James L. (Batavia, IL); Ackerman, John P. (Prescott, AZ); Williamson, Mark A. (Naperville, IL)

    2009-12-29

    This is a single stage process for treating spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors. The spent nuclear fuel, uranium oxide, UO.sub.2, is added to a solution of UCl.sub.4 dissolved in molten LiCl. A carbon anode and a metallic cathode is positioned in the molten salt bath. A power source is connected to the electrodes and a voltage greater than or equal to 1.3 volts is applied to the bath. At the anode, the carbon is oxidized to form carbon dioxide and uranium chloride. At the cathode, uranium is electroplated. The uranium chloride at the cathode reacts with more uranium oxide to continue the reaction. The process may also be used with other transuranic oxides and rare earth metal oxides.

  9. 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report May 2014 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U Administration | 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report ii Contacts This report was prepared by the staff of the Renewables and Uranium Statistics Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables, and Uranium Statistics. Questions

  10. The uranium cylinder assay system for enrichment plant safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Karen A; Swinhoe, Martyn T; Marlow, Johnna B; Menlove, Howard O; Rael, Carlos D; Iwamoto, Tomonori; Tamura, Takayuki; Aiuchi, Syun

    2010-01-01

    Safeguarding sensitive fuel cycle technology such as uranium enrichment is a critical component in preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. A useful tool for the nuclear materials accountancy of such a plant would be an instrument that measured the uranium content of UF{sub 6} cylinders. The Uranium Cylinder Assay System (UCAS) was designed for Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited (JNFL) for use in the Rokkasho Enrichment Plant in Japan for this purpose. It uses total neutron counting to determine uranium mass in UF{sub 6} cylinders given a known enrichment. This paper describes the design of UCAS, which includes features to allow for unattended operation. It can be used on 30B and 48Y cylinders to measure depleted, natural, and enriched uranium. It can also be used to assess the amount of uranium in decommissioned equipment and waste containers. Experimental measurements have been carried out in the laboratory and these are in good agreement with the Monte Carlo modeling results.

  11. Uranium accountancy in Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carver, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    The AVLIS program pioneers the large scale industrial application of lasers to produce low cost enriched uranium fuel for light water reactors. In the process developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, normal uranium is vaporized by an electron beam, and a precisely tuned laser beam selectively photo-ionizes the uranium-235 isotopes. These ions are moved in an electromagnetic field to be condensed on the product collector. All other uranium isotopes remain uncharged and pass through the collector section to condense as tails. Tracking the three types of uranium through the process presents special problems in accountancy. After demonstration runs, the uranium on the collector was analyzed for isotopic content by Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Their results were checked at LLNL by analysis of parallel samples. The differences in isotopic composition as reported by the two laboratories were not significant.

  12. Status of data, major results, and plans for geophysical activities, Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliver, H.W. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA); Hardin, E.L. [Science Applications International Corp., Las Vegas, NV (USA); Nelson, P.H. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA)] [eds.

    1990-07-01

    This report describes past and planned geophysical activities associated with the Yucca Mountain Project and is intended to serve as a starting point for integration of geophysical activities. This report relates past results to site characterization plans, as presented in the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Plan (SCP). This report discusses seismic exploration, potential field methods, geoelectrical methods, teleseismic data collection and velocity structural modeling, and remote sensing. This report discusses surface-based, airborne, borehole, surface-to-borehole, crosshole, and Exploratory Shaft Facility-related activities. The data described in this paper, and the publications discussed, have been selected based on several considerations; location with respect to Yucca Mountain, whether the success or failure of geophysical data is important to future activities, elucidation of features of interest, and judgment as to the likelihood that the method will produce information that is important for site characterization. 65 refs., 19 figs., 12 tabs.

  13. BEHAVIOR OF METALLIC INCLUSIONS IN URANIUM DIOXIDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Rosa L.

    2013-01-01

    Metallic Inclusions in Uranium Dioxide", LBL-11117 (1980).in Hypostoichiornetric Uranium Dioxide 11 , LBL-11095 (OF METALLIC INCLUSIONS IN URANIUM DIOXIDE Rosa L. Yang and

  14. 16th intersociety energy conversion engineering conference. CDIF - activation completion and initial MHD test results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staats, G.E.; DeJong, V.J.; Karvinen, R.J.; Carrington, R.A.; Bauman, L.E.

    1981-01-01

    The Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) is one of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) experimental test facilities. The scope of this paper is limited to a brief description of the facility activation and results from the initial MHD testing using an oil fired ash injected combustor (AIC) and a supersonic channel. 1 ref.

  15. Identification of bacteria synthesizing ribosomal RNA in response to uranium addition during biostimulation at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McGuinness, Lora R.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Kerkhof, Lee J.; Boyanov, Maxim I.

    2015-09-18

    Understanding which organisms are capable of reducing uranium at historically contaminated sites provides crucial information needed to evaluate treatment options and outcomes. One approach is determination of the bacteria which directly respond to uranium addition. In this research, uranium amendments were made to groundwater samples from a site of ongoing biostimulation with acetate. The active microbes in the planktonic phase were deduced by monitoring ribosomes production via RT-PCR. The results indicated several microorganisms were synthesizing ribosomes in proportion with uranium amendment up to 2 ?M. Concentrations of U (VI) >2 ?M were generally found to inhibit ribosome synthesis. Two activemore »bacteria responding to uranium addition in the field were close relatives of Desulfobacter postgateii and Geobacter bemidjiensis. Since RNA content often increases with growth rate, our findings suggest it is possible to rapidly elucidate active bacteria responding to the addition of uranium in field samples and provides a more targeted approach to stimulate specific populations to enhance radionuclide reduction in contaminated sites.« less

  16. Method for the recovery of uranium values from uranium tetrafluoride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kreuzmann, Alvin B. (Cincinnati, OH)

    1983-01-01

    The invention is a novel method for the recovery of uranium from dry, particulate uranium tetrafluoride. In one aspect, the invention comprises reacting particulate uranium tetrafluoride and calcium oxide in the presence of gaseous oxygen to effect formation of the corresponding alkaline earth metal uranate and alkaline earth metal fluoride. The product uranate is highly soluble in various acidic solutions wherein the product fluoride is virtually insoluble therein. The product mixture of uranate and alkaline earth metal fluoride is contacted with a suitable acid to provide a uranium-containing solution, from which the uranium is recovered. The invention can achieve quantitative recovery of uranium in highly pure form.

  17. Method for the recovery of uranium values from uranium tetrafluoride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kreuzmann, A.B.

    1982-10-27

    The invention is a novel method for the recovery of uranium from dry, particulate uranium tetrafluoride. In one aspect, the invention comprises reacting particulate uranium tetrafluoride and calcium oxide in the presence of gaseous oxygen to effect formation of the corresponding alkaline earth metal uranate and alkaline earth metal fluoride. The product uranate is highly soluble in various acidic solutions whereas the product fluoride is virtually insoluble therein. The product mixture of uranate and alkaline earth metal fluoride is contacted with a suitable acid to provide a uranium-containing solution, from which the uranium is recovered. The invention can achieve quantitative recovery of uranium in highly pure form.

  18. The US uranium industry: Regulatory and policy impediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drennen, T.E.; Glicken, J.

    1995-06-01

    The Energy Policy Act of 1992 required the DOE to develop recommendations and implement government programs to assist the domestic uranium industry in increasing export opportunities. In 1993, as part of that effort, the Office of Nuclear Energy identified several key factors that could (or have) significantly impact(ed) export opportunities for domestic uranium. This report addresses one of these factors: regulatory and policy impediments to the flow of uranium products between the US and other countries. It speaks primarily to the uranium market for civil nuclear power. Changes in the world political and economic order have changed US national security requirements, and the US uranium industry has found itself without the protected market it once enjoyed. An unlevel playing field for US uranium producers has resulted from a combination of geology, history, and a general US political philosophy of nonintervention that precludes the type of industrial policy practiced in other uranium-exporting countries. The US has also been hampered in its efforts to support the domestic uranium-producing industry by its own commitment to free and open global markets and by international agreements such as GATT and NAFTA. Several US policies, including the imposition of NRC fees and licensing costs and Harbor Maintenance fees, directly harm the competitiveness of the domestic uranium industry. Finally, requirements under US law, such as those in the 1979 Nuclear Nonproliferation Act, place very strict limits on the use of US-origin uranium, limitations not imposed by other uranium-producing countries. Export promotion and coordination are two areas in which the US can help the domestic uranium industry without violating existing trade agreements or other legal or policy constraints.

  19. CHAPTER 6. BIBLIOGRAPHY AAPG 2005--American Association of Petroleum Geologists. Recent Uranium Industry Developments,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Industry Developments, Exploration, Mining and Environmental Programs in the U.S. and Overseas. Uranium-Solution Mining. Uranium 1 (1978): 37-52. Burghardt 2003--Burghardt. J. Capitol Reef National Park (Utah): Rainy Day and Duchess Uranium Mines-Site Characterization (September 2002) Summary results presented at U

  20. file://\\\\fs-f1\\shared\\uranium\\uranium.html

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Glossary Home > Nuclear > U.S. Uranium Reserves Estimates U.S. Uranium Reserves Estimates Data for: 2008 Report Released: July 2010 Next Release Date: 2012 Summary The U.S. Energy...

  1. Process for electrolytically preparing uranium metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haas, Paul A. (Knoxville, TN)

    1989-01-01

    A process for making uranium metal from uranium oxide by first fluorinating uranium oxide to form uranium tetrafluoride and next electrolytically reducing the uranium tetrafluoride with a carbon anode to form uranium metal and CF.sub.4. The CF.sub.4 is reused in the fluorination reaction rather than being disposed of as a hazardous waste.

  2. Synthesis of Uranium Trichloride for the Pyrometallurgical Processing of Used Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.R. Westphal; J.C. Price; R.D. Mariani

    2011-11-01

    The pyroprocessing of used nuclear fuel via electrorefining requires the continued addition of uranium trichloride to sustain operations. Uranium trichloride is utilized as an oxidant in the system to allow separation of uranium metal from the minor actinides and fission products. The inventory of uranium trichloride had diminished to a point that production was necessary to continue electrorefiner operations. Following initial experimentation, cupric chloride was chosen as a reactant with uranium metal to synthesize uranium trichloride. Despite the variability in equipment and charge characteristics, uranium trichloride was produced in sufficient quantities to maintain operations in the electrorefiner. The results and conclusions from several experiments are presented along with a set of optimized operating conditions for the synthesis of uranium trichloride.

  3. Organic Separation Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2014-09-22

    Separable organics have been defined as “those organic compounds of very limited solubility in the bulk waste and that can form a separate liquid phase or layer” (Smalley and Nguyen 2013), and result from three main solvent extraction processes: U Plant Uranium Recovery Process, B Plant Waste Fractionation Process, and Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Process. The primary organic solvents associated with tank solids are TBP, D2EHPA, and NPH. There is concern that, while this organic material is bound to the sludge particles as it is stored in the tanks, waste feed delivery activities, specifically transfer pump and mixer pump operations, could cause the organics to form a separated layer in the tank farms feed tank. Therefore, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is experimentally evaluating the potential of organic solvents separating from the tank solids (sludge) during waste feed delivery activities, specifically the waste mixing and transfer processes. Given the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste acceptance criteria per the Waste Feed Acceptance Criteria document (24590-WTP-RPT-MGT-11-014) that there is to be “no visible layer” of separable organics in the waste feed, this would result in the batch being unacceptable to transfer to WTP. This study is of particular importance to WRPS because of these WTP requirements.

  4. An evaluation of health risk to the public as a consequence of in situ uranium mining in Wyoming, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruedig, Elizabeth; Johnson, Thomas E.

    2015-08-30

    In the United States there is considerable public concern regarding the health effects of in situ recovery uranium mining. These concerns focus principally on exposure to contaminants mobilized in groundwater by the mining process. However, the risk arising as a result of mining must be viewed in light of the presence of naturally occurring uranium ore and other constituents which comprise a latent hazard. The United States Environmental Protection Agency recently proposed new guidelines for successful restoration of an in situ uranium mine by limiting concentrations of thirteen groundwater constituents: arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, selenium, silver, nitrate (as nitrogen), molybdenum, radium, total uranium, and gross ? activity. We investigated the changes occurring to these constituents at an ISR uranium mine in Wyoming, USA by comparing groundwater quality at baseline measurement to that at stability (post-restoration) testing. Of the groundwater constituents considered, only uranium and radium-226 showed significant (p < 0.05) deviation from site-wide baseline conditions in matched-wells. Uranium concentrations increased by a factor of 5.6 (95% CI 3.6–8.9 times greater) while radium-226 decreased by a factor of about one half (95% CI 0.42–0.75 times less). Change in risk was calculated using the RESRAD (onsite) code for an individual exposed as a resident-farmer; total radiation dose to a resident farmer decreased from pre-to post-mining by about 5.2 mSv y–1. As a result, higher concentrations of uranium correspond to increased biomarkers of nephrotoxicity, however the clinical significance of this increase is unclear.

  5. Uranium-titanium-niobium alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ludtka, Gail M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ludtka, Gerard M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1990-01-01

    A uranium alloy having small additions of Ti and Nb shows improved strength and ductility in cross section of greater than one inch over prior uranium alloy having only Ti as an alloying element.

  6. Uranium hexafluoride handling. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    The United States Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Field Office, and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., are co-sponsoring this Second International Conference on Uranium Hexafluoride Handling. The conference is offered as a forum for the exchange of information and concepts regarding the technical and regulatory issues and the safety aspects which relate to the handling of uranium hexafluoride. Through the papers presented here, we attempt not only to share technological advances and lessons learned, but also to demonstrate that we are concerned about the health and safety of our workers and the public, and are good stewards of the environment in which we all work and live. These proceedings are a compilation of the work of many experts in that phase of world-wide industry which comprises the nuclear fuel cycle. Their experience spans the entire range over which uranium hexafluoride is involved in the fuel cycle, from the production of UF{sub 6} from the naturally-occurring oxide to its re-conversion to oxide for reactor fuels. The papers furnish insights into the chemical, physical, and nuclear properties of uranium hexafluoride as they influence its transport, storage, and the design and operation of plant-scale facilities for production, processing, and conversion to oxide. The papers demonstrate, in an industry often cited for its excellent safety record, continuing efforts to further improve safety in all areas of handling uranium hexafluoride. Selected papers were processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  7. Uranium and cesium diffusion in fuel cladding of electrogenerating channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasil’ev, I. V. Ivanov, A. S.; Churin, V. A.

    2014-12-15

    The results of reactor tests of a carbonitride fuel in a single-crystal cladding from a molybdenum-based alloy can be used in substantiating the operational reliability of fuels in developing a project of a megawatt space nuclear power plant. The results of experimental studies of uranium and cesium penetration into the single-crystal cladding of fuel elements with a carbonitride fuel are interpreted. Those fuel elements passed nuclear power tests in the Ya-82 pilot plant for 8300 h at a temperature of about 1500°C. It is shown that the diffusion coefficients for uranium diffusion into the cladding are virtually coincident with the diffusion coefficients measured earlier for uranium diffusion into polycrystalline molybdenum. It is found that the penetration of uranium into the cladding is likely to occur only in the case of a direct contact between the cladding and fuel. The experimentally observed nonmonotonic uranium-concentration profiles are explained in terms of predominant uranium diffusion along grain boundaries. It is shown that a substantially nonmonotonic behavior observed in our experiment for the uranium-concentration profile may be explained by the presence of a polycrystalline structure of the cladding in the surface region from its inner side. The diffusion coefficient is estimated for the grain-boundary diffusion of uranium. The diffusion coefficients for cesium are estimated on the basis of experimental data obtained in the present study.

  8. 1987 annual report to the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation and the Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer on the Department of Energy's cultural resource activities at Colorado UMTRA Project sites. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-04-01

    This report is a summary of the Department of Energy's (DOE) cultural resource investigations related to the DOE's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites in Colorado. This report is intended to fulfill the DOE's obligation for an annual report as stated in the Programmatic Memorandum of Agreement executed between the DOE, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and the Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer in December, 1984. A summary of the cultural resource surveys and identified resources is provided for project sites in the vicinities of Durango, Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock, Colorado. This report summarizes all DOE UKTRA Project cultural resource activities in Colorado for the 1987 calender year.

  9. Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project: A summary of drilling and engineering activities and scientific results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, H.P.; Forsgren, C.K. (eds.)

    1992-04-01

    The Salton Sea Scientific g Project (SSSDP) completed the first major well in the United States Continental Scientific Drilling Program. The well (State 2-14) was drilled to 10,W ft (3,220 m) in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field in California's Imperial Valley, to permit scientific study of a deep, high-temperature portion of an active geothermal system. The program was designed to investigate, through drilling and testing, the subsurface thermal, chemical, and mineralogical environments of this geothermal area. Extensive samples and data, including cores, cuttings, geothermal fluids and gases, and geophysical logs, were collected for future scientific analysis, interpretation, and publication. Short duration flow tests were conducted on reservoirs at a depth of approximately 6,120 ft (1,865 m) and at 10,136 ft (3,089 m). This report summarizes all major activities of the SSSDP, from project inception in the fall of 1984 through brine-pond cleanup and site restoration, ending in February 1989. This report presents a balanced summary of drilling, coring, logging, and flow-test operations, and a brief summary of technical and scientific results. Frequent reference is made to original records, data, and publication of results. The report also reviews the proposed versus the final well design, and operational summaries, such as the bit record, the casing and cementing program, and the coring program. Summaries are and the results of three flow tests. Several teamed during the project.

  10. Fission Enhanced diffusion of uranium in zirconia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bérerd, N; Moncoffre, N; Sainsot, P; Faust, H; Catalette, H

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with the comparison between thermal and Fission Enhanced Diffusion (FED) of uranium into zirconia, representative of the inner face of cladding tubes. The experiments under irradiation are performed at the Institut Laue Langevin (ILL) in Grenoble using the Lohengrin spectrometer. A thin $^{235}UO\\_2$ layer in direct contact with an oxidized zirconium foil is irradiated in the ILL high flux reactor. The fission product flux is about 10$^{11}$ ions cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ and the target temperature is measured by an IR pyrometer. A model is proposed to deduce an apparent uranium diffusion coefficient in zirconia from the energy distribution broadening of two selected fission products. It is found to be equal to 10$^{-15}$ cm$^2$ s$^{-1}$ at 480$\\circ$C and compared to uranium thermal diffusion data in ZrO$\\_2$ in the same pressure and temperature conditions. The FED results are analysed in comparison with literature data.

  11. Uranium-series constraints on radionuclide transport and groundwater flow at the Nopal I uranium deposit, Sierra Pena Blanca, Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldstein, S.J.; Abdel-Fattah, A.I.; Murrell, M.T.; Dobson, P.F.; Norman, D.E.; Amato, R.S.; Nunn, A. J.

    2009-10-01

    Uranium-series data for groundwater samples from the Nopal I uranium ore deposit were obtained to place constraints on radionuclide transport and hydrologic processes for a nuclear waste repository located in fractured, unsaturated volcanic tuff. Decreasing uranium concentrations for wells drilled in 2003 are consistent with a simple physical mixing model that indicates that groundwater velocities are low ({approx}10 m/y). Uranium isotopic constraints, well productivities, and radon systematics also suggest limited groundwater mixing and slow flow in the saturated zone. Uranium isotopic systematics for seepage water collected in the mine adit show a spatial dependence which is consistent with longer water-rock interaction times and higher uranium dissolution inputs at the front adit where the deposit is located. Uranium-series disequilibria measurements for mostly unsaturated zone samples indicate that {sup 230}Th/{sup 238}U activity ratios range from 0.005-0.48 and {sup 226}Ra/{sup 238}U activity ratios range from 0.006-113. {sup 239}Pu/{sup 238}U mass ratios for the saturated zone are <2 x 10{sup -14}, and Pu mobility in the saturated zone is >1000 times lower than the U mobility. Saturated zone mobility decreases in the order {sup 238}U{approx}{sup 226}Ra > {sup 230}Th{approx}{sup 239}Pu. Radium and thorium appear to have higher mobility in the unsaturated zone based on U-series data from fractures and seepage water near the deposit.

  12. Corrosion-resistant uranium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hovis, V.M. Jr.; Pullen, W.C.; Kollie, T.G.; Bell, R.T.

    1981-10-21

    The present invention is directed to the protecting of uranium and uranium alloy articles from corrosion by providing the surfaces of the articles with a layer of an ion-plated metal selected from aluminum and zinc to a thickness of at least 60 microinches and then converting at least the outer surface of the ion-plated layer of aluminum or zinc to aluminum chromate or zinc chromate. This conversion of the aluminum or zinc to the chromate form considerably enhances the corrosion resistance of the ion plating so as to effectively protect the coated article from corrosion.

  13. Uranium Transport Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bostick, William D.

    2008-01-15

    Uranium contamination is prevalent at many of the U.S. DOE facilities and at several civilian sites that have supported the nuclear fuel cycle. The potential off-site mobility of uranium depends on the partitioning of uranium between aqueous and solid (soil and sediment) phases. Hexavalent U (as uranyl, UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) is relatively mobile, forming strong complexes with ubiquitous carbonate ion which renders it appreciably soluble even under mild reducing conditions. In the presence of carbonate, partition of uranyl to ferri-hydrate and select other mineral phases is usually maximum in the near-neutral pH range {approx} 5-8. The surface complexation reaction of uranyl with iron-containing minerals has been used as one means to model subsurface migration, used in conjunction with information on the site water chemistry and hydrology. Partitioning of uranium is often studied by short-term batch 'equilibrium' or long-term soil column testing ; MCLinc has performed both of these methodologies, with selection of method depending upon the requirements of the client or regulatory authority. Speciation of uranium in soil may be determined directly by instrumental techniques (e.g., x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, XPS; x-ray diffraction, XRD; etc.) or by inference drawn from operational estimates. Often, the technique of choice for evaluating low-level radionuclide partitioning in soils and sediments is the sequential extraction approach. This methodology applies operationally-defined chemical treatments to selectively dissolve specific classes of macro-scale soil or sediment components. These methods recognize that total soil metal inventory is of limited use in understanding bioavailability or metal mobility, and that it is useful to estimate the amount of metal present in different solid-phase forms. Despite some drawbacks, the sequential extraction method can provide a valuable tool to distinguish among trace element fractions of different solubility related to mineral phases. Four case studies are presented: Water and Soil Characterization, Subsurface Stabilization of Uranium and other Toxic Metals, Reductive Precipitation (in situ bioremediation) of Uranium, and Physical Transport of Particle-bound Uranium by Erosion.

  14. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal Consumers inYear JanSalesa. Uranium3.9.3.3. Uranium

  15. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal Consumers inYear JanSalesa. Uranium3.9.3.3. Uranium5.

  16. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal Consumers inYear JanSalesa. Uranium3.9.3.3.b. Uranium

  17. Controlling intake of uranium in the workplace: Applications of biokinetic modeling and occupational monitoring data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leggett, Richard Wayne; Eckerman, Keith F; McGinn, Wilson; Meck, Dr. Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    This report provides methods for interpreting and applying occupational uranium monitoring data. The methods are based on current international radiation protection guidance, current information on the chemical toxicity of uranium, and best available biokinetic models for uranium. Emphasis is on air monitoring data and three types of bioassay data: the concentration of uranium in urine; the concentration of uranium in feces; and the externally measured content of uranium in the chest. Primary Reference guidance levels for prevention of chemical effects and limitation of radiation effects are selected based on a review of current scientific data and regulatory principles for setting standards. Generic investigation levels and immediate action levels are then defined in terms of these primary guidance levels. The generic investigation and immediate actions levels are stated in terms of radiation dose and concentration of uranium in the kidneys. These are not directly measurable quantities, but models can be used to relate the generic levels to the concentration of uranium in air, urine, or feces, or the total uranium activity in the chest. Default investigation and immediate action levels for uranium in air, urine, feces, and chest are recommended for situations in which there is little information on the form of uranium taken into the body. Methods are prescribed also for deriving case-specific investigation and immediate action levels for uranium in air, urine, feces, and chest when there is sufficient information on the form of uranium to narrow the range of predictions of accumulation of uranium in the main target organs for uranium: kidneys for chemical effects and lungs for radiological effects. In addition, methods for using the information herein for alternative guidance levels, different from the ones selected for this report, are described.

  18. OFF-GAS MERCURY CONTROL USING SULFUR-IMPREGNATED ACTIVATED CARBON – TEST RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nick Soelberg

    2007-05-01

    Several laboratory and pilot-scale tests since the year 2000 have included demonstrations of off-gas mercury control using fixed bed, sulfur-impregnated activated carbon. These demonstrations have included operation of carbon beds with gas streams containing a wide range of mercury and other gas species concentrations representing off-gas from several U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) mixed waste treatment processes including electrical resistance heated (joule-heated) glass melters, fluidized bed calciners, and fluidized bed steam reformers. Surrogates of various DOE mixed waste streams (or surrogates of offgas from DOE mixed waste streams) including INL “sodium bearing waste” (SBW), liquid “low activity waste” (LAW) from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and liquid waste from Savannah River National Laboratory (“Tank 48H waste”) have been tested. Test results demonstrate mercury control efficiencies up to 99.999%, high enough to comply with the Hazardous Waste (HWC) Combustor Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards even when the uncontrolled off-gas mercury concentrations exceed 400,000 ug/dscm (at 7% O2), and confirm carbon bed design parameters for such high efficiencies. Results of several different pilot-scale and engineering-scale test programs performed over several years are presented and compared.

  19. New Technique for Speciation of Uranium in Sediments Following Acetate-Stimulated Bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-06-22

    Acetate-stimulated bioremediation is a promising new technique for sequestering toxic uranium contamination from groundwater. The speciation of uranium in sediments after such bioremediation attempts remains unknown as a result of low uranium concentration, and is important to analyzing the stability of sequestered uranium. A new technique was developed for investigating the oxidation state and local molecular structure of uranium from field site sediments using X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS), and was implemented at the site of a former uranium mill in Rifle, CO. Glass columns filled with bioactive Rifle sediments were deployed in wells in the contaminated Rifle aquifer and amended with a hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) stock solution to increase uranium concentration while maintaining field conditions. This sediment was harvested and XAS was utilized to analyze the oxidation state and local molecular structure of the uranium in sediment samples. Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) data was collected and compared to known uranium spectra to determine the local molecular structure of the uranium in the sediment. Fitting was used to determine that the field site sediments did not contain uraninite (UO{sub 2}), indicating that models based on bioreduction using pure bacterial cultures are not accurate for bioremediation in the field. Stability tests on the monomeric tetravalent uranium (U(IV)) produced by bioremediation are needed in order to assess the efficacy of acetate-stimulation bioremediation.

  20. High loading uranium fuel plate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wiencek, Thomas C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Domagala, Robert F. (Indian Head Park, IL); Thresh, Henry R. (Palos Heights, IL)

    1990-01-01

    Two embodiments of a high uranium fuel plate are disclosed which contain a meat comprising structured uranium compound confined between a pair of diffusion bonded ductile metal cladding plates uniformly covering the meat, the meat having a uniform high fuel loading comprising a content of uranium compound greater than about 45 Vol. % at a porosity not greater than about 10 Vol. %. In a first embodiment, the meat is a plurality of parallel wires of uranium compound. In a second embodiment, the meat is a dispersion compact containing uranium compound. The fuel plates are fabricated by a hot isostatic pressing process.

  1. Innovative Elution Processes for Recovering Uranium from Seawater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wai, Chien; Tian, Guoxin; Janke, Christopher

    2014-05-29

    Utilizing amidoxime-based polymer sorbents for extraction of uranium from seawater has attracted considerable interest in recent years. Uranium collected in the sorbent is recovered typically by elution with an acid. One drawback of acid elution is deterioration of the sorbent which is a significant factor that limits the economic competitiveness of the amidoxime-based sorbent systems for sequestering uranium from seawater. Developing innovative elution processes to improve efficiency and to minimize loss of sorbent capacity become essential in order to make this technology economically feasible for large-scale industrial applications. This project has evaluated several elution processes including acid elution, carbonate elution, and supercritical fluid elution for recovering uranium from amidoxime-based polymer sorbents. The elution efficiency, durability and sorbent regeneration for repeated uranium adsorption- desorption cycles in simulated seawater have been studied. Spectroscopic techniques are used to evaluate chemical nature of the sorbent before and after elution. A sodium carbonate-hydrogen peroxide elution process for effective removal of uranium from amidoxime-based sorbent is developed. The cause of this sodium carbonate and hydrogen peroxide synergistic leaching of uranium from amidoxime-based sorbent is attributed to the formation of an extremely stable uranyl peroxo-carbonato complex. The efficiency of uranium elution by the carbonate-hydrogen peroxide method is comparable to that of the hydrochloric acid elution but damage to the sorbent material is much less for the former. The carbonate- hydrogen peroxide elution also does not need any elaborate step to regenerate the sorbent as those required for hydrochloric acid leaching. Several CO2-soluble ligands have been tested for extraction of uranium from the sorbent in supercritical fluid carbon dioxide. A mixture of hexafluoroacetylacetone and tri-n-butylphosphate shows the best result but uranium removal from the sorbent reaches only 80% after 10 hours of leaching. Some information regarding coordination of vanadium with amidoxime molecules and elution of vanadium from amidoxime- based sorbents is also given in the report.

  2. Selective Extraction of Uranium from Liquid or Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farawila, Anne F.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Wai, Chien M.; Taylor, Harry Z.; Liao, Yu-Jung

    2012-07-31

    Current liquid-liquid extraction processes used in recycling irradiated nuclear fuel rely on (1) strong nitric acid to dissolve uranium oxide fuel, and (2) the use of aliphatic hydrocarbons as a diluent in formulating the solvent used to extract uranium. The nitric acid dissolution process is not selective. It dissolves virtually the entire fuel meat which complicates the uranium extraction process. In addition, a solvent washing process is used to remove TBP degradation products, which adds complexity to the recycling plant and increases the overall plant footprint and cost. A liquid or supercritical carbon dioxide (l/sc -CO2) system was designed to mitigate these problems. Indeed, TBP nitric acid complexes are highly soluble in l/sc -CO2 and are capable of extracting uranium directly from UO2, UO3 and U3O8 powders. This eliminates the need for total acid dissolution of the irradiated fuel. Furthermore, since CO2 is easily recycled by evaporation at room temperature and pressure, it eliminates the complex solvent washing process. In this report, we demonstrate: (1) A reprocessing scheme starting with the selective extraction of uranium from solid uranium oxides into a TBP-HNO3 loaded Sc-CO2 phase, (2) Back extraction of uranium into an aqueous phase, and (3) Conversion of recovered purified uranium into uranium oxide. The purified uranium product from step 3 can be disposed of as low level waste, or mixed with enriched uranium for use in a reactor for another fuel cycle. After an introduction on the concept and properties of supercritical fluids, we first report the characterization of the different oxides used for this project. Our extraction system and our online monitoring capability using UV-Vis absorbance spectroscopy directly in sc-CO2 is then presented. Next, the uranium extraction efficiencies and kinetics is demonstrated for different oxides and under different physical and chemical conditions: l/sc -CO2 pressure and temperature, TBP/HNO3 complex used, reductant or complexant used for selectivity, and ionic liquids used as supportive media. To complete the extraction and recovery cycle, we then demonstrate uranium back extraction from the TBP loaded sc-CO2 phase into an aqueous phase and the characterization of the uranium complex formed at the end of this process. Another aspect of this project was to limit proliferation risks by either co-extracting uranium and plutonium, or by leaving plutonium behind by selectively extracting uranium. We report that the former is easily achieved, since plutonium is in the tetravalent or hexavalent oxidation state in the oxidizing environment created by the TBP-nitric acid complex, and is therefore co-extracted. The latter is more challenging, as a reductant or complexant to plutonium has to be used to selectively extract uranium. After undertaking experiments on different reducing or complexing systems (e.g., AcetoHydroxamic Acid (AHA), Fe(II), ascorbic acid), oxalic acid was chosen as it can complex tetravalent actinides (Pu, Np, Th) in the aqueous phase while allowing the extraction of hexavalent uranium in the sc-CO2 phase. Finally, we show results using an alternative media to commonly used aqueous phases: ionic liquids. We show the dissolution of uranium in ionic liquids and its extraction using sc-CO2 with and without the presence of AHA. The possible separation of trivalent actinides from uranium is also demonstrated in ionic liquids using neodymium as a surrogate and diglycolamides as the extractant.

  3. Controlling uranium reactivity March 18, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Karsten

    March 2008 Controlling uranium reactivity March 18, 2008 Uranium is an often misunderstood metal uranium research. In reality, uranium presents a wealth of possibilities for funda- mental chemistry. Many research groups have been involved in utilizing the large size and unique reactivity of the uranium atom

  4. Method of preparation of uranium nitride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline Loetsch; Thomson, Robert Kenneth James

    2013-07-09

    Method for producing terminal uranium nitride complexes comprising providing a suitable starting material comprising uranium; oxidizing the starting material with a suitable oxidant to produce one or more uranium(IV)-azide complexes; and, sufficiently irradiating the uranium(IV)-azide complexes to produce the terminal uranium nitride complexes.

  5. Integration of health physics, safety and operational processes for management and disposition of recycled uranium wastes at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barber, James; Buckley, James

    2003-02-23

    Fluor Fernald, Inc. (Fluor Fernald), the contractor for the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), recently submitted a new baseline plan for achieving site closure by the end of calendar year 2006. This plan was submitted at DOE's request, as the FEMP was selected as one of the sites for their accelerated closure initiative. In accordance with the accelerated baseline, the FEMP Waste Management Project (WMP) is actively evaluating innovative processes for the management and disposition of low-level uranium, fissile material, and thorium, all of which have been classified as waste. These activities are being conducted by the Low Level Waste (LLW) and Uranium Waste Disposition (UWD) projects. Alternatives associated with operational processing of individual waste streams, each of which poses potentially unique health physics, industrial hygiene and industrial hazards, are being evaluated for determination of the most cost effective and safe met hod for handling and disposition. Low-level Mixed Waste (LLMW) projects are not addressed in this paper. This paper summarizes historical uranium recycling programs and resultant trace quantity contamination of uranium waste streams with radionuclides, other than uranium. The presentation then describes how waste characterization data is reviewed for radiological and/or chemical hazards and exposure mitigation techniques, in conjunction with proposed operations for handling and disposition. The final part of the presentation consists of an overview of recent operations within LLW and UWD project dispositions, which have been safely completed, and a description of several current operations.

  6. Paleo-channel deposition of natural uranium at a US Air Force landfill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, Carl; Weismann, Joseph; Caputo, Daniel [Cabrera Services, Inc., East Hartford, Connecticut (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The US Air Force sought to identify the source of radionuclides that were detected in groundwater surrounding a closed solid waste landfill at the former Lowry Air Force Base in Denver, Colorado, USA. Gross alpha, gross beta, and uranium levels in groundwater were thought to exceed US drinking water standards and down-gradient concentrations exceeded up-gradient concentrations. Our study has concluded that the elevated radionuclide concentrations are due to naturally-occurring uranium in the regional watershed and that the uranium is being released from paleo-channel sediments beneath the site. Groundwater samples were collected from monitor wells, surface water and sediments over four consecutive quarters. A list of 23 radionuclides was developed for analysis based on historical landfill records. Concentrations of major ions and metals and standard geochemical parameters were analyzed. The only radionuclide found to be above regulatory standards was uranium. A search of regional records shows that uranium is abundant in the upstream drainage basin. Analysis of uranium isotopic ratios shows that the uranium has not been processed for enrichment nor is it depleted uranium. There is however slight enrichment in the U-234:U- 238 activity ratio, which is consistent with uranium that has undergone aqueous transport. Comparison of up-gradient versus down-gradient uranium concentrations in groundwater confirms that higher uranium concentrations are found in the down-gradient wells. The US drinking water standard of 30 {mu}g/L for uranium was exceeded in some of the up-gradient wells and in most of the down-gradient wells. Several lines of evidence indicate that natural uranium occurring in streams has been preferentially deposited in paleo-channel sediments beneath the site, and that the paleo-channel deposits are causing the increased uranium concentrations in down-gradient groundwater compared to up-gradient groundwater. (authors)

  7. Method for fabricating uranium foils and uranium alloy foils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hofman, Gerard L. (Downers Grove, IL); Meyer, Mitchell K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Knighton, Gaven C. (Moore, ID); Clark, Curtis R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2006-09-05

    A method of producing thin foils of uranium or an alloy. The uranium or alloy is cast as a plate or sheet having a thickness less than about 5 mm and thereafter cold rolled in one or more passes at substantially ambient temperatures until the uranium or alloy thereof is in the shape of a foil having a thickness less than about 1.0 mm. The uranium alloy includes one or more of Zr, Nb, Mo, Cr, Fe, Si, Ni, Cu or Al.

  8. OXYGEN DIFFUSION IN HYPOSTOICHIOMETRIC URANIUM DIOXIDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Kee Chul

    2010-01-01

    IN HYPOSTOICHIOMETRIC URANIUM DIOXIDE Kee Chul Kim Ph.D.727-366; Figure 1. Oxygen-uranium phase-equilibrium _ystem [18]. uranium dioxide powders and 18 0 enriched carbon

  9. Uranium in prehistoric Indian pottery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filberth, Ernest William

    1976-01-01

    URANIUM IN PREHISTORIC INDIAN POTTERY A Thesis by ERNEST WILLIAM FILBERTH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1976 Major Subject...: Chemistry URANIUM IN PREHISTORIC INDIAN POTTERY A Thesis by ERNEST WILLIAM FILBERTH Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Department) (Member) (Membe (Member) (Member) December 1976 ABSTRACT Uranium in Prehistoric...

  10. Gas-phase CO2 emission toward Cepheus A East: the result of shock activity?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Sonnentrucker; E. González-Alfonso; D. A. Neufeld; E. A. Bergin; G. J. Melnick; W. J. Forrest; J. L. Pipher; D. M. Watson

    2006-09-05

    We report the first detection of gas-phase CO2 emission in the star-forming region Cepheus A East, obtained by spectral line mapping of the v2 bending mode at 14.98 micron with the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) instrument onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. The gaseous CO2 emission covers a region about 35'' x 25'' in extent, and results from radiative pumping by 15 micron continuum photons emanating predominantly from the HW2 protostellar region. The gaseous CO2 exhibits a temperature distribution ranging from 50 K to 200 K. A correlation between the gas-phase CO2 distribution and that of H2 S(2), a tracer of shock activity, indicates that the CO2 molecules originate in a cool post-shock gas component associated with the outflow powered by HW2. The presence of CO2 ice absorption features at 15.20 micron toward this region and the lack of correlation between the IR continuum emission and the CO2 gas emission distribution further suggest that the gaseous CO2 molecules are mainly sputtered off grain mantles -- by the passage of slow non-dissociative shocks with velocities of 15-30 km/s -- rather than sublimated through grain heating.

  11. Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Appropriations Subcommittee, is shown some of the technology in the Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility by Warehousing and Transportation Operations Manager Byron...

  12. Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund's...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund's Fiscal Year 2008 and 2007 Financial Statement Audit, OAS-FS-10-05 Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and...

  13. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, Surface Project Management Plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) authorizes the US Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake remedial action at 24 designated inactive uranium processing sites and associated vicinity properties (VP) containing uranium mill tailings and related residual radioactive materials. The purpose of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project is to minimize or eliminate radiation health hazards to the public and the environment at the 24 sites and related VPs. This document describes the management organization, system, and methods used to manage the design, construction, and other activities required to clean up the designated sites and associated VPs, in accordance with the UMTRCA.

  14. Thorium and uranium redox-active ligand complexes; reversible intramolecular electron transfer in U(dpp-BIAN)2/ U(dpp-BIAN)2(THE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schelter, Eric John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wu, Ruilian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scott, Brian L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thompson, Joe D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batista, Enrique R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morris, David E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Actinide complexes of the redox-active ligand dpp-BIAN{sup 2-} (dpp-BIAN = bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)acenaphthylene), An(dpp-BIAN){sub 2}(THF){sub n} (An = Th, n = 1; An = U, n = 0, 1) have been prepared. Solid-state magnetic and single-crystal X-ray data for U(dpp-BIAN){sub 2}(THF){sub n} show when n = 0, the complex exists in an f{sup 2}-{pi}*{sup 4} configuration; whereas an intramolecular electron transfer occurs for n = 1, resulting in an f{sup 3}-{pi}*{sup 3} ground configuration. The magnetic data also indicate that interconversion between the two forms of the complex is possible, limited only by the ability of THF vapor to penetrate the solid on cooling of the sample. Spectroscopic data indicate the complex exists solely in the f{sup 2}-{pi}*{sup 4} form in solution, evidenced by the appearance of only small changes in the electronic absorption spectra of the U(dpp-BIAN){sub 2} complex on titration with THF and by measurement of the solution magnetic moment m d{sub 8}-tetrahydrofuran using Evans method. Electrochemistry of the complexes is reported, with small differences observed in wave potentials between metals and in the presence of THF. These data represent the first example of a well-defined, reversible intramolecular electron transfer in an f-element complex and the second example of oxidation state change through dative interaction with a metal ion.

  15. Reaction of uranium oxides with chlorine and carbon or carbon monoxide to prepare uranium chlorides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haas, P.A.; Lee, D.D.; Mailen, J.C.

    1991-11-01

    The preferred preparation concept of uranium metal for feed to an AVLIS uranium enrichment process requires preparation of uranium tetrachloride (UCI{sub 4}) by reacting uranium oxides (UO{sub 2}/UO{sub 3}) and chlorine (Cl{sub 2}) in a molten chloride salt medium. UO{sub 2} is a very stable metal oxide; thus, the chemical conversion requires both a chlorinating agent and a reducing agent that gives an oxide product which is much more stable than the corresponding chloride. Experimental studies in a quartz reactor of 4-cm ID have demonstrated the practically of some chemical flow sheets. Experimentation has illustrated a sequence of results concerning the chemical flow sheets. Tests with a graphite block at 850{degrees}C demonstrated rapid reactions of Cl{sub 2} and evolution of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) as a product. Use of carbon monoxide (CO) as the reducing agent also gave rapid reactions of Cl{sub 2} and formation of CO{sub 2} at lower temperatures, but the reduction reactions were slower than the chlorinations. Carbon powder in the molten salt melt gave higher rates of reduction and better steady state utilization of Cl{sub 2}. Addition of UO{sub 2} feed while chlorination was in progress greatly improved the operation by avoiding the plugging effects from high UO{sub 2} concentrations and the poor Cl{sub 2} utilizations from low UO{sub 2} concentrations. An UO{sub 3} feed gave undesirable effects while a feed of UO{sub 2}-C spheres was excellent. The UO{sub 2}-C spheres also gave good rates of reaction as a fixed bed without any molten chloride salt. Results with a larger reactor and a bottom condenser for volatilized uranium show collection of condensed uranium chlorides as a loose powder and chlorine utilizations of 95--98% at high feed rates. 14 refs., 7 figs., 14 tabs.

  16. Conversion of depleted uranium hexafluoride to a solid uranium compound

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rothman, Alan B. (Willowbrook, IL); Graczyk, Donald G. (Lemont, IL); Essling, Alice M. (Elmhurst, IL); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

    2001-01-01

    A process for converting UF.sub.6 to a solid uranium compound such as UO.sub.2 and CaF. The UF.sub.6 vapor form is contacted with an aqueous solution of NH.sub.4 OH at a pH greater than 7 to precipitate at least some solid uranium values as a solid leaving an aqueous solution containing NH.sub.4 OH and NH.sub.4 F and remaining uranium values. The solid uranium values are separated from the aqueous solution of NH.sub.4 OH and NH.sub.4 F and remaining uranium values which is then diluted with additional water precipitating more uranium values as a solid leaving trace quantities of uranium in a dilute aqueous solution. The dilute aqueous solution is contacted with an ion-exchange resin to remove substantially all the uranium values from the dilute aqueous solution. The dilute solution being contacted with Ca(OH).sub.2 to precipitate CaF.sub.2 leaving dilute NH.sub.4 OH.

  17. Na, K, Ca, Mg, and U-series in fossil bone and the proposal of a radial diffusioneadsorption model of uranium uptake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    of uranium uptake A.S. Cid a , R.M. Anjos a, * , C.B. Zamboni b , R. Cardoso a , M. Muniz a , A. Corona c , D-series dating Neutron activation analysis Uranium uptake Radial diffusioneadsorption model a b s t r a c- logical sites. However, since bone is an open system for uranium, it cannot be dated directly

  18. 4.0 RISK FROM URANIUM MINING WASTE IN BUILDING In general, building materials contain low levels of radioactivity. For example, the range of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    4.0 RISK FROM URANIUM MINING WASTE IN BUILDING MATERIALS In general, building materials contain low levels of radioactivity. For example, the range of natural uranium concentrations may average as low as about 0.5 ppm (0.34 pCi/g or 13 Bq/kg) total uranium activity in sandstone building materials to as high

  19. The IMCA: A field instrument for uranium enrichment measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, G.H.; Koskelo, M.; Moeslinger, M.; Mayer, R.L. II; McGinnis, B.R.; Wishard, B.

    1996-12-31

    The IMCA (Inspection Multi-Channel Analyzer) is a portable gamma-ray spectrometer designed to measure the enrichment of uranium either in a laboratory or in the field. The IMCA consists of a Canberra InSpector Multi-Channel Analyzer, sodium iodide or a planar germanium detector, and special application software. The system possesses a high degree of automation. The IMCA uses the uranium enrichment meter principle, and is designed to meet the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) requirements for the verification of enriched uranium materials. The IMCA is available with MGA plutonium isotopic analysis software or MGAU uranium analysis software as well. In this paper, the authors present a detailed description of the hardware and software of the IMCA system, as well as results from preliminary measurements testing compliance of IMCA with IAEA requirements using uranium standards and UF6 cylinders. Measurements performed on UF6 cylinders in the field under variable environmental conditions (temperatures ranging from 0 to 35 C) have shown that good results can be achieved. The enrichment of UF6 contained in the cylinder is determined by using calibration constants generated from an instrument calibration, using traceable uranium oxide standards, performed in the laboratory under controlled environmental conditions. The IMCA software is designed to make the necessary matrix and container corrections to ensure that accurate results are achieved in the field.

  20. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance data release for the Elk City NTMS Quadrangle, Idaho/Montana, including concentrations of forty-five additional elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broxton, D.E.; Beyth, M.

    1980-07-01

    Totals of 1580 water and 1720 sediment samples were collected from 1754 locations in the quadrangle. Elemental concentration, field measurement, weather, geologic, and geographic data for each sample location are listed for waters in Appendix I-A and for sediments in Appendix I-B. Uranium/thorium ratios for sediment samples are also included in Appendix I-B. All elemental analyses were performed at the LASL. Water samples were initially analyzed for uranium by fluorometry. All water samples containing more than 40 parts per billion (ppB) uranium were reanalyzed by delayed-neutron counting (DNC). A supplemental report containing the multielement analyses of water samples will be open filed in the near future. Sediments were analyzed for uranium and thorium as well as aluminum, antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, bismuth, cadmium, calcium, cerium, cesium, chlorine, chromium, cobalt, copper, dysprosium, europium, gold, hafnium, iron, lanthanum, lead, lithium, lutetium, magnesium, manganese, nickel, niobium, potassium, rubidium, samarium, selenium, scandium, silver, sodium, strontium, tantalum, terbium, tin, titanium, tungsten, vanadium, ytterbium, zinc, and zirconium. Basic statistics for 40 of these elements are presented. All sediments were analyzed for uranium by delayed-neutron counting. Other elemental concentrations in sediments were determined by neutron-activation analysis for 30 elements, by x-ray fluorescence for 12 elements, and by arc-source emission spectrography for 2 elements. Analytical results for sediments are reported as parts per million.

  1. Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  2. Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  3. Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  4. Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  5. Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  6. Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal Consumers inYear JanSalesa. Uranium purchasedb.4.

  7. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  8. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  9. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal Consumers inYear JanSalesa. Uranium

  10. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal Consumers inYear JanSalesa. Uranium3. Deliveries of

  11. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal Consumers inYear JanSalesa. Uranium3. Deliveries of4.

  12. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal Consumers inYear JanSalesa. Uranium3. Deliveries

  13. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  14. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  15. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  16. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  17. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal Consumers inYear JanSalesa. Uranium3.9. Foreign.

  18. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  19. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  20. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  1. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  2. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  3. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  4. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  5. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  6. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  7. Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalentLaboratory |Sector Full reportTown2008 Final May1. U.S. uranium

  8. Development of Integrated Online Monitoring Systems for Detection of Diversion at Natural Uranium Conversion Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dewji, Shaheen A; Lee, Denise L; Croft, Stephen; McElroy, Robert Dennis; Hertel, Nolan; Chapman, Jeffrey Allen; Cleveland, Steven L

    2013-01-01

    Recent work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has focused on some source term modeling of uranyl nitrate (UN) as part of a comprehensive validation effort employing gamma-ray detector instrumentation for the detection of diversion from declared conversion activities. Conversion, the process by which natural uranium ore (yellowcake) is purified and converted through a series of chemical processes into uranium hexafluoride gas (UF6), has historically been excluded from the nuclear safeguards requirements of the 235U-based nuclear fuel cycle. The undeclared diversion of this product material could potentially provide feedstock for a clandestine weapons program for state or non-state entities. Given the changing global political environment and the increased availability of dual-use nuclear technology, the International Atomic Energy Agency has evolved its policies to emphasize safeguarding this potential feedstock material in response to dynamic and evolving potential diversion pathways. To meet the demand for instrumentation testing at conversion facilities, ORNL developed the Uranyl Nitrate Calibration Loop Equipment (UNCLE) facility to simulate the full-scale operating conditions of a purified uranium-bearing aqueous stream exiting the solvent extraction process in a natural uranium conversion plant. This work investigates gamma-ray signatures of UN circulating in the UNCLE facility and evaluates detector instrumentation sensitivity to UN for safeguards applications. These detector validation activities include assessing detector responses to the UN gamma-ray signatures for spectrometers based on sodium iodide, lanthanum bromide, and germanium detectors. The results of measurements under static and dynamic operating conditions at concentrations ranging from 10-90g U/L of naturally enriched UN will be presented. A range of gamma-ray lines was examined and self-attenuation factors were calculated, in addition to attenuation for transmission measurement of density, concentration and enrichment. A detailed uncertainty analysis will be presented providing insights into instrumentation limitations to spoofing.

  9. Electrodic voltages accompanying stimulated bioremediation of a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, K.H.; N'Guessan, A.L.; Druhan, J.; Long, P.E.; Hubbard, S.S.; Lovley, D.R.; Banfield, J.F.

    2009-11-15

    The inability to track the products of subsurface microbial activity during stimulated bioremediation has limited its implementation. We used spatiotemporal changes in electrodic potentials (EP) to track the onset and persistence of stimulated sulfate-reducing bacteria in a uranium-contaminated aquifer undergoing acetate amendment. Following acetate injection, anomalous voltages approaching -900 mV were measured between copper electrodes within the aquifer sediments and a single reference electrode at the ground surface. Onset of EP anomalies correlated in time with both the accumulation of dissolved sulfide and the removal of uranium from groundwater. The anomalies persisted for 45 days after halting acetate injection. Current-voltage and current-power relationships between measurement and reference electrodes exhibited a galvanic response, with a maximum power density of 10 mW/m{sup 2} during sulfate reduction. We infer that the EP anomalies resulted from electrochemical differences between geochemically reduced regions and areas having higher oxidation potential. Following the period of sulfate reduction, EP values ranged from -500 to -600 mV and were associated with elevated concentrations of ferrous iron. Within 10 days of the voltage decrease, uranium concentrations rebounded from 0.2 to 0.8 {mu}M, a level still below the background value of 1.5 {mu}M. These findings demonstrate that EP measurements provide an inexpensive and minimally invasive means for monitoring the products of stimulated microbial activity within aquifer sediments and are capable of verifying maintenance of redox conditions favorable for the stability of bioreduced contaminants, such as uranium.

  10. From Nanowires to Biofilms: An Exploration of Novel Mechanisms of Uranium Transformation Mediated by Geobacter Bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    REGUERA, GEMMA [Michigan State University

    2014-01-16

    One promising strategy for the in situ bioremediation of radioactive groundwater contaminants that has been identified by the SBR Program is to stimulate the activity of dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganisms to reductively precipitate uranium and other soluble toxic metals. The reduction of U(VI) and other soluble contaminants by Geobacteraceae is directly dependent on the reduction of Fe(III) oxides, their natural electron acceptor, a process that requires the expression of Geobacter’s conductive pili (pilus nanowires). Expression of conductive pili by Geobacter cells leads to biofilm development on surfaces and to the formation of suspended biogranules, which may be physiological closer to biofilms than to planktonic cells. Biofilm development is often assumed in the subsurface, particularly at the matrix-well screen interface, but evidence of biofilms in the bulk aquifer matrix is scarce. Our preliminary results suggest, however, that biofilms develop in the subsurface and contribute to uranium transformations via sorption and reductive mechanisms. In this project we elucidated the mechanism(s) for uranium immobilization mediated by Geobacter biofilms and identified molecular markers to investigate if biofilm development is happening in the contaminated subsurface. The results provided novel insights needed in order to understand the metabolic potential and physiology of microorganisms with a known role in contaminant transformation in situ, thus having a significant positive impact in the SBR Program and providing novel concept to monitor, model, and predict biological behavior during in situ treatments.

  11. Radiological Modeling for Determination of Derived Concentration Levels of an Area with Uranium Residual Material - 13533

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez-Sanchez, Danyl [CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 40, 28040, Madrid (Spain)] [CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 40, 28040, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-07-01

    As a result of a pilot project developed at the old Spanish 'Junta de Energia Nuclear' to extract uranium from ores, tailings materials were generated. Most of these residual materials were sent back to different uranium mines, but a small amount of it was mixed with conventional building materials and deposited near the old plant until the surrounding ground was flattened. The affected land is included in an area under institutional control and used as recreational area. At the time of processing, uranium isotopes were separated but other radionuclides of the uranium decay series as Th-230, Ra-226 and daughters remain in the residue. Recently, the analyses of samples taken at different ground's depths confirmed their presence. This paper presents the methodology used to calculate the derived concentration level to ensure that the reference dose level of 0.1 mSv y-1 used as radiological criteria. In this study, a radiological impact assessment was performed modeling the area as recreational scenario. The modelization study was carried out with the code RESRAD considering as exposure pathways, external irradiation, inadvertent ingestion of soil, inhalation of resuspended particles, and inhalation of radon (Rn-222). As result was concluded that, if the concentration of Ra-226 in the first 15 cm of soil is lower than, 0.34 Bq g{sup -1}, the dose would not exceed the reference dose. Applying this value as a derived concentration level and comparing with the results of measurements on the ground, some areas with a concentration of activity slightly higher than latter were found. In these zones the remediation proposal has been to cover with a layer of 15 cm of clean material. This action represents a reduction of 85% of the dose and ensures compliance with the reference dose. (authors)

  12. Process for producing enriched uranium having a {sup 235}U content of at least 4 wt. % via combination of a gaseous diffusion process and an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process to eliminate uranium hexafluoride tails storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horton, J.A.; Hayden, H.W. Jr.

    1995-05-30

    An uranium enrichment process capable of producing an enriched uranium, having a {sup 235}U content greater than about 4 wt. %, is disclosed which will consume less energy and produce metallic uranium tails having a lower {sup 235}U content than the tails normally produced in a gaseous diffusion separation process and, therefore, eliminate UF{sub 6} tails storage and sharply reduce fluorine use. The uranium enrichment process comprises feeding metallic uranium into an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process to produce an enriched metallic uranium isotopic mixture having a {sup 235} U content of at least about 2 wt. % and a metallic uranium residue containing from about 0.1 wt. % to about 0.2 wt. % {sup 235} U; fluorinating this enriched metallic uranium isotopic mixture to form UF{sub 6}; processing the resultant isotopic mixture of UF{sub 6} in a gaseous diffusion process to produce a final enriched uranium product having a {sup 235}U content of at least 4 wt. %, and up to 93.5 wt. % or higher, of the total uranium content of the product, and a low {sup 235}U content UF{sub 6} having a {sup 235}U content of about 0.71 wt. % of the total uranium content of the low {sup 235}U content UF{sub 6}; and converting this low {sup 235}U content UF{sub 6} to metallic uranium for recycle to the atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. 4 figs.

  13. Process for producing enriched uranium having a .sup.235 U content of at least 4 wt. % via combination of a gaseous diffusion process and an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process to eliminate uranium hexafluoride tails storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horton, James A. (Livermore, CA); Hayden, Jr., Howard W. (Oakridge, TN)

    1995-01-01

    An uranium enrichment process capable of producing an enriched uranium, having a .sup.235 U content greater than about 4 wt. %, is disclosed which will consume less energy and produce metallic uranium tails having a lower .sup.235 U content than the tails normally produced in a gaseous diffusion separation process and, therefore, eliminate UF.sub.6 tails storage and sharply reduce fluorine use. The uranium enrichment process comprises feeding metallic uranium into an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process to produce an enriched metallic uranium isotopic mixture having a .sup.235 U content of at least about 2 wt. % and a metallic uranium residue containing from about 0.1 wt. % to about 0.2 wt. % .sup.235 U; fluorinating this enriched metallic uranium isotopic mixture to form UF.sub.6 ; processing the resultant isotopic mixture of UF.sub.6 in a gaseous diffusion process to produce a final enriched uranium product having a .sup.235 U content of at least 4 wt. %, and up to 93.5 wt. % or higher, of the total uranium content of the product, and a low .sup.235 U content UF.sub.6 having a .sup.235 U content of about 0.71 wt. % of the total uranium content of the low .sup.235 U content UF.sub.6 ; and converting this low .sup.235 U content UF.sub.6 to metallic uranium for recycle to the atomic vapor laser isotope separation process.

  14. Baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Gunnison, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    This report evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from groundwater contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site are being placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating groundwater contamination. This is the second risk assessment of groundwater contamination at this site. The first risk assessment was performed primarily to evaluate existing domestic wells to determine the potential for immediate human health and environmental impacts. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated groundwater that flows beneath the processing site towards the Gunnison River. The monitor wells that have consistently shown the highest concentration of most contaminants are used in this risk assessment. This risk assessment will be used in conjunction with additional activities and documents to assist in determining what remedial action is needed for contaminated groundwater at the site after the tailings are relocated. This risk assessment follows an approach outlined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The first step is to evaluate groundwater data collected from monitor wells at the site. Evaluation of these data showed that the main contaminants in the groundwater are cadmium, cobalt, iron, manganese, sulfate, uranium, and some of the products of radioactive decay of uranium.

  15. Separation of Zirconium from Uranium in U-Zr Alloys Using a Chlorination Process 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parkison, Adam J

    2013-06-04

    the ?-pathway results in a dramatically increased pulverization rate [13]. 2.1.2 Uranium Hydride Formation Uranium is also known to form a brittle hydride; a property which is commonly used in the creation of uranium metal powder through a hydride... processing techniques of the group-4 species take advantage of these two properties. The material of interest is halogenated to form a volatile halide which is separated from its feed material through volatilization. There have been numerous methods...

  16. APPENDIX J Partition Coefficients For Uranium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    APPENDIX J Partition Coefficients For Uranium #12;Appendix J Partition Coefficients For Uranium J.1.0 Background The review of uranium Kd values obtained for a number of soils, crushed rock and their effects on uranium adsorption on soils are discussed below. The solution pH was also used as the basis

  17. SHEEP MOUNTAIN URANIUM PROJECT CROOKS GAP, WYOMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SHEEP MOUNTAIN URANIUM PROJECT CROOKS GAP, WYOMING US EPA Project Meeting April 7 2011April 7, 2011/Titan Uranium, VP Development · Deborah LebowAal/EPA Region 8 Air Program Introduction to Titan Uranium USA;PROJECT OVERVIEW ·Site Location·Site Location ·Fremont , Wyoming ·Existing Uranium Mine Permit 381C

  18. statistical physics canonical ensemble Uranium Centrifuges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    statistical physics canonical ensemble Uranium Centrifuges The easiest type of nuclear weapon of the physics behind crude uranium enrichment methods. 2 The centrifuge concept is a very generic way of trying the uranium, we remove gas from the ends of the centrifuge, where the heavier uranium atoms are more

  19. Helium on Venus: Implications for uranium and thorium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prather, MJ; Mcelroy, MB

    1983-01-01

    Implications for Uranium and Thorium Abstract. Helium isa wide range of uranium and thorium abundances. simi· lar toof crustal uranium and thorium. Studies of helium in Earth's

  20. THE THEORY OF URANIUM ENRICHMENT BY THE GAS CENTRIFUGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olander, Donald R.

    2013-01-01

    Soubbaramayer, (1979) in "Uranium Enrichment", S. Villani,and Davies, E. (1973) "Uranium Enrichment by Gas Centrifuge"Nuclear Energy THE THEORY OF URANIUM ENRICHMENT BY THE GAS

  1. Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan The 2013 Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan describes a framework for the effective...

  2. THE HIGH TEMPERATURE BEHAVIOR OF METALLIC INCLUSIONS IN URANIUM DIOXIDE.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Rosa Lu.

    2010-01-01

    Products in Irradiated Uranium Dioxide," UKAEA Report AERE-OF METALLIC INCLUSIONS IN URANIUM DIOXIDE Rosa Lu Yang (Chemical State of Irradiated Uranium- Plutonium Oxide Fuel

  3. Research Reactor Preparations for the Air Shipment of Highly Enriched Uranium from Romania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. J. Allen; I. Bolshinsky; L. L. Biro; M. E. Budu; N. V. Zamfir; M. Dragusin; C. Paunoiu; M. Ciocanescu

    2010-03-01

    In June 2009 two air shipments transported both unirradiated (fresh) and irradiated (spent) Russian-origin highly enriched uranium (HEU) nuclear fuel from two research reactors in Romania to the Russian Federation for conversion to low enriched uranium. The Institute for Nuclear Research at Pitesti (SCN Pitesti) shipped 30.1 kg of HEU fresh fuel pellets to Dimitrovgrad, Russia and the Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH) shipped 23.7 kilograms of HEU spent fuel assemblies from the VVR S research reactor at Magurele, Romania, to Chelyabinsk, Russia. Both HEU shipments were coordinated by the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program (RRRFR) as part of the U.S. Department of Energy Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), were managed in Romania by the National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control (CNCAN), and were conducted in cooperation with the Russian Federation State Corporation Rosatom and the International Atomic Energy Agency. Both shipments were transported by truck to and from respective commercial airports in Romania and the Russian Federation and stored at secure nuclear facilities in Russia until the material is converted into low enriched uranium. These shipments resulted in Romania becoming the 3rd country under the RRRFR program and the 14th country under the GTRI program to remove all HEU. This paper describes the research reactor preparations and license approvals that were necessary to safely and securely complete these air shipments of nuclear fuel.

  4. Surface and subsurface characterization of uranium contamination at the Fernald environmental management site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schilk, A.J.; Perkins, R.W.; Abel, K.H.; Brodzinski, R.L.

    1993-04-01

    The past operations of uranium production and support facilities at several Department of Energy (DOE) sites have occasionally resulted in the local contamination of some surface and subsurface soils, and the three-dimensional distribution of the uranium at these sites must be thoroughly characterized before any effective remedial protocols can be established. To this end, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been tasked by the DOE`s Office of Technology Development with adapting, developing, and demonstrating technologies for the measurement of uranium in surface and subsurface soils at the Fernald Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration site. These studies are detailed in this report.

  5. Uranium hexafluoride bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnham, S.L.

    1988-01-01

    This bibliography is a compilation of reports written about the transportation, handling, safety, and processing of uranium hexafluoride. An on-line literature search was executed using the DOE Energy files and the Nuclear Science Abstracts file to identify pertinent reports. The DOE Energy files contain unclassified information that is processed at the Office of Scientific and Technical Information of the US Department of Energy. The reports selected from these files were published between 1974 and 1983. Nuclear Science Abstracts contains unclassified international nuclear science and technology literature published from 1948 to 1976. In addition, scientific and technical reports published by the US Atomic Energy Commission and the US Energy Research and Development Administration, as well as those published by other agencies, universities, and industrial and research organizations, are included in the Nuclear Science Abstracts file. An alphabetical listing of the acronyms used to denote the corporate sponsors follows the bibliography.

  6. Uranium Contamination in the 300 Area: Emergent Data and their Impact on the Source Term Conceptual Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Christopher F.; Um, Wooyong; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2008-09-30

    The primary objectives of this characterization activity were to: 1) determine the extent of uranium contamination in the sediments, 2) quantify the leachable (labile) concentration of uranium in the sediments, and 3) create a data set that could be used to correlate the present data to existing 300 Area data. In order to meet these objectives, sediments collected from wells 399-2-5 (C5708), 299-3-22 (C5706) and 299-4-14 (C5707) were analyzed for moisture content, 1:1 sediment:water extracts (which provide soil pH, electrical conductivity [EC], cation, and anion data), total carbon and inorganic carbon content, 8 M nitric acid extracts (which provide a measure of the total leachable sediment content of the contaminants), microwave-assisted digestion (which results in total digestion of the sediment), and carbonate leaches (which provide an assessment of the concentration of labile uranium present in the sediments). Additionally, pore waters present in select samples were extracted using ultracentrifugation. The mobility characteristics of uranium vary within the multiple subsurface zones that contain residual contaminant uranium. Principal subsurface zones include 1) the vadose zone, 2) a zone through which the water table rises and falls, 3) the aquifer, and 4) a zone where groundwater and river water interact beneath the river shoreline. Principal controls on mobilization include the form of the residual uranium (e.g., crystalline minerals, amorphous precipitates/coatings, sorbed onto sediment), the transporting medium (e.g., water infiltration from the land surface, groundwater), and the rate of exchange between the form and transporting medium. The bicarbonate content of aqueous media strongly influences the rate of exchange, with relatively higher content enhancing mobility. Groundwater has a higher bicarbonate content than river water or other freshwater sources, such as utility and potable water systems. The variety of processes affecting the mobility of uranium in the subsurface, along with the numerous potential compartments where residual contamination may be located, presents challenges for predicting uranium movement through environmental pathways. The processes responsible for the persistence of the plume may involve cycling of uranium between the aquifer and overlying zone through which the water table fluctuates. Contaminated groundwater is moved upward into the lower vadose zone, and when the water table subsequently falls, contaminated moisture is left behind. Some of the uranium in groundwater may become sorbed to sediment in that zone, to subsequently slowly release. Also, near the Columbia River in the zone of groundwater/river water interaction, where the bicarbonate content is lowered because of infiltrating river water, the tendency for uranium to adsorb onto sediment is enhanced, thus slowing dissipation via the groundwater pathway. Fluctuations in the Columbia River stage are the driving mechanism for the rise and fall of the water table beneath the 300 Area, and also for creating the dynamic hydraulic and geochemical environment found in the zone of interaction beneath the shoreline.

  7. Measurements of the spatial and energy distribution of thermal neutrons in uranium, heavy water lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Paul S. (Paul Sherman)

    1962-01-01

    Intracell activity distributions were measured in three natural uranium, heavy water lattices of 1. 010 inch diameter, aluminum clad rods on triangular spacings of 4. 5 inches, 5. 0 inches, and 5. 75 inches, respectively, ...

  8. Uranium reduction and microbial community development in response to stimulation with different electron donors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barlett, M.

    2014-01-01

    Water Res Komlos J, Mishra B, Lanzirotti A, Myneni SCB, Jaffe PR (2008a) Real-time speciation of uranium during active bioremediation andbioremediation of acid mine drainage using emulsified soybean oil mine. Water

  9. Colloids generation from metallic uranium fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metz, C.; Fortner, J.; Goldberg, M.; Shelton-Davis, C.

    2000-07-20

    The possibility of colloid generation from spent fuel in an unsaturated environment has significant implications for storage of these fuels in the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. Because colloids can act as a transport medium for sparingly soluble radionuclides, it might be possible for colloid-associated radionuclides to migrate large distances underground and present a human health concern. This study examines the nature of colloidal materials produced during corrosion of metallic uranium fuel in simulated groundwater at elevated temperature in an unsaturated environment. Colloidal analyses of the leachates from these corrosion tests were performed using dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Results from both techniques indicate a bimodal distribution of small discrete particles and aggregates of the small particles. The average diameters of the small, discrete colloids are {approximately}3--12 nm, and the large aggregates have average diameters of {approximately}100--200 nm. X-ray diffraction of the solids from these tests indicates a mineral composition of uranium oxide or uranium oxy-hydroxide.

  10. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    The Grand Junction site has been reevaluated in order to revise the October 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Grand Junction, Colorado. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 1.9 million tons of tailings at the Grand Junction site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. The eight alternative actions presented herein range from millsite and off-site decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option I), to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site (Options II through VIII). Cost estimates for the eight options range from about $10,200,000 for stabilization in-place to about $39,500,000 for disposal in the DeBeque area, at a distance of about 35 mi, using transportation by rail. If transportation to DeBeque were by truck, the cost estimated to be about $41,900,000. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Grand Junction tailings were examined: (a) heap leaching; (b) treatment at an existing mill; and (c) reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $200/lb by heap leach and $150/lb by conventional plant processes. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery appears not to be economically attractive.

  11. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price to fall toUranium Marketing Annual Report 2014 Uranium 201457 201425.

  12. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price to fall toUranium Marketing Annual Report 2014 Uranium 201457

  13. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price to fall toUranium Marketing Annual Report 2014 Uranium 201457Feed

  14. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price to fall toUranium Marketing Annual Report 2014 Uranium

  15. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price to fall toUranium Marketing Annual Report 2014 Uranium17. Purchases of

  16. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price to fall toUranium Marketing Annual Report 2014 Uranium17. Purchases

  17. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price to fall toUranium Marketing Annual Report 2014 Uranium17.

  18. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price to fall toUranium Marketing Annual Report 20144. Uranium sellers to

  19. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Survey

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price to fall toUranium Marketing Annual Report 20144. Uranium sellers to57.

  20. CHP REGIONAL APPLICATION CENTERS: A PRELIMINARY INVENTORY OF ACTIVITIES AND SELECTED RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schweitzer, Martin

    2009-10-01

    Eight Regional CHP Application Centers (RACs) are funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to facilitate the development and deployment of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) technologies in all 50 states. The RACs build end-user awareness by providing CHP-related information to targeted markets through education and outreach; they work with the states and regulators to encourage the creation and adoption of favorable public policies; and they provide CHP users and prospective users with technical assistance and support on specific projects. The RACs were started by DOE as a pilot program in 2001 to support the National CHP Roadmap developed by industry to accelerate deployment of energy efficient CHP technologies (U.S. Combined Heat and Power Association 2001). The intent was to foster a regional presence to build market awareness, address policy issues, and facilitate project development. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has supported DOE with the RAC program since its inception. In 2007, ORNL led a cooperative effort involving DOE and some CHP industry stakeholders to establish quantitative metrics for measuring the RACs accomplishments. This effort incorporated the use of logic models to define and describe key RAC activities, outputs, and outcomes. Based on this detailed examination of RAC operations, potential metrics were identified associated with the various key sectors addressed by the RACs: policy makers; regulatory agencies; investor owned utilities; municipal and cooperative utilities; financiers; developers; and end users. The final product was reviewed by a panel of representatives from DOE, ORNL, RACs, and the private sector. The metrics developed through this effort focus on major RAC activities as well as on CHP installations and related outcomes. All eight RACs were contacted in August 2008 and asked to provide data for every year of Center operations for those metrics on which they kept records. In addition, data on CHP installations and related outcomes were obtained from an existing DOE-supported data base. The information provided on the individual RACs was summed to yield totals for all the Centers combined for each relevant item.

  1. Computer-based procedure for field activities: Results from three evaluations at nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oxstrand, Johanna; bly, Aaron; LeBlanc, Katya

    2014-09-01

    Nearly all activities that involve human interaction with the systems of a nuclear power plant are guided by procedures. The paper-based procedures (PBPs) currently used by industry have a demonstrated history of ensuring safety; however, improving procedure use could yield tremendous savings in increased efficiency and safety. One potential way to improve procedure-based activities is through the use of computer-based procedures (CBPs). Computer-based procedures provide the opportunity to incorporate context driven job aids, such as drawings, photos, just-in-time training, etc into CBP system. One obvious advantage of this capability is reducing the time spent tracking down the applicable documentation. Additionally, human performance tools can be integrated in the CBP system in such way that helps the worker focus on the task rather than the tools. Some tools can be completely incorporated into the CBP system, such as pre-job briefs, placekeeping, correct component verification, and peer checks. Other tools can be partly integrated in a fashion that reduces the time and labor required, such as concurrent and independent verification. Another benefit of CBPs compared to PBPs is dynamic procedure presentation. PBPs are static documents which limits the degree to which the information presented can be tailored to the task and conditions when the procedure is executed. The CBP system could be configured to display only the relevant steps based on operating mode, plant status, and the task at hand. A dynamic presentation of the procedure (also known as context-sensitive procedures) will guide the user down the path of relevant steps based on the current conditions. This feature will reduce the user’s workload and inherently reduce the risk of incorrectly marking a step as not applicable and the risk of incorrectly performing a step that should be marked as not applicable. As part of the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Light Water Reactors Sustainability Program, researchers at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) along with partners from the nuclear industry have been investigating the design requirements for computer-based work instructions (including operations procedures, work orders, maintenance procedures, etc.) to increase efficiency, safety, and cost competitiveness of existing light water reactors.

  2. Beneficial Uses of Depleted Uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, C. [U.S. Department of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States); Croff, A.G.; Haire, M. J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Naturally occurring uranium contains 0.71 wt% {sup 235}U. In order for the uranium to be useful in most fission reactors, it must be enriched the concentration of the fissile isotope {sup 235}U must be increased. Depleted uranium (DU) is a co-product of the processing of natural uranium to produce enriched uranium, and DU has a {sup 235}U concentration of less than 0.71 wt%. In the United States, essentially all of the DU inventory is in the chemical form of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) and is stored in large cylinders above ground. If this co-product material were to be declared surplus, converted to a stable oxide form, and disposed, the costs are estimated to be several billion dollars. Only small amounts of DU have at this time been beneficially reused. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has begun the Beneficial Uses of DU Project to identify large-scale uses of DU and encourage its reuse for the primary purpose of potentially reducing the cost and expediting the disposition of the DU inventory. This paper discusses the inventory of DU and its rate of increase; DU disposition options; beneficial use options; a preliminary cost analysis; and major technical, institutional, and regulatory issues to be resolved.

  3. Influence of attrition scrubbing, ultrasonic treatment, and oxidant additions on uranium removal from contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timpson, M.E.; Elless, M.P.; Francis, C.W.

    1994-06-01

    As part of the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration Project being conducted by the US Department of Energy, bench-scale investigations of selective leaching of uranium from soils at the Fernald Environmental Management Project site in Ohio were conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Two soils (storage pad soil and incinerator soil), representing the major contaminant sources at the site, were extracted using carbonate- and citric acid-based lixiviants. Physical and chemical processes were used in combination with the two extractants to increase the rate of uranium release from these soils. Attrition scrubbing and ultrasonic dispersion were the two physical processes utilized. Potassium permanganate was used as an oxidizing agent to transform tetravalent uranium to the hexavalent state. Hexavalent uranium is easily complexed in solution by the carbonate radical. Attrition scrubbing increased the rate of uranium release from both soils when compared with rotary shaking. At equivalent extraction times and solids loadings, however, attrition scrubbing proved effective only on the incinerator soil. Ultrasonic treatments on the incinerator soil removed 71% of the uranium contamination in a single extraction. Multiple extractions of the same sample removed up to 90% of the uranium. Additions of potassium permanganate to the carbonate extractant resulted in significant changes in the extractability of uranium from the incinerator soil but had no effect on the storage pad soil.

  4. Standard Test Method for Determination of Uranium, Oxygen to Uranium (O/U), and Oxygen to Metal (O/M) in Sintered Uranium Dioxide and Gadolinia-Uranium Dioxide Pellets by Atmospheric Equilibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    Standard Test Method for Determination of Uranium, Oxygen to Uranium (O/U), and Oxygen to Metal (O/M) in Sintered Uranium Dioxide and Gadolinia-Uranium Dioxide Pellets by Atmospheric Equilibration

  5. Uranium Fate and Transport Modeling, Guterl Specialty Steel Site, New York - 13545

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frederick, Bill; Tandon, Vikas

    2013-07-01

    The Former Guterl Specialty Steel Corporation Site (Guterl Site) is located 32 kilometers (20 miles) northeast of Buffalo, New York, in Lockport, Niagara County, New York. Between 1948 and 1952, up to 15,875 metric tons (35 million pounds) of natural uranium metal (U) were processed at the former Guterl Specialty Steel Corporation site in Lockport, New York. The resulting dust, thermal scale, mill shavings and associated land disposal contaminated both the facility and on-site soils. Uranium subsequently impacted groundwater and a fully developed plume exists below the site. Uranium transport from the site involves legacy on-site pickling fluid handling, the leaching of uranium from soil to groundwater, and the groundwater transport of dissolved uranium to the Erie Canal. Groundwater fate and transport modeling was performed to assess the transfer of dissolved uranium from the contaminated soils and buildings to groundwater and subsequently to the nearby Erie Canal. The modeling provides a tool to determine if the uranium contamination could potentially affect human receptors in the vicinity of the site. Groundwater underlying the site and in the surrounding area generally flows southeasterly towards the Erie Canal; locally, groundwater is not used as a drinking water resource. The risk to human health was evaluated outside the Guterl Site boundary from the possibility of impacted groundwater discharging to and mixing with the Erie Canal waters. This condition was evaluated because canal water is infrequently used as an emergency water supply for the City of Lockport via an intake located approximately 122 meters (m) (400 feet [ft]) southeast of the Guterl Site. Modeling was performed to assess whether mixing of groundwater with surface water in the Erie Canal could result in levels of uranium exceeding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) established drinking water standard for total uranium; the Maximum Concentration Limit (MCL). Geotechnical test data indicate that the major portion of uranium in the soil will adsorb or remain bound to soil, yet leaching to groundwater appears as an on-site source. Soil leaching was modeled using low adsorption factors to replicate worst-case conditions where the uranium leaches to the groundwater. Results indicate that even after several decades, which is the period of time since uranium was processed at the Guterl Site, leaching from soil does not fully account for the currently observed levels of groundwater contamination. Modeling results suggest that there were historic releases of uranium from processing operations directly to the shallow fractured rock and possibly other geochemical conditions that have produced the current groundwater contamination. Groundwater data collected at the site between 1997 and 2011 do not indicate an increasing level of uranium in the main plume, thus the uranium adsorbed to the soil is in equilibrium with the groundwater geochemistry and transport conditions. Consequently, increases in the overall plume concentration or size are not expected. Groundwater flowing through fractures under the Guterl Site transports dissolved uranium from the site to the Erie Canal, where the groundwater has been observed to seep from the northern canal wall at some locations. The seeps discharge uranium at concentrations near or below the MCL to the Erie Canal. Conservative mixing calculations were performed using two worst-case assumptions: 1) the seeps were calculated as contiguous discharges from the Erie Canal wall and 2) the uranium concentration of the seepage is 274 micrograms per liter (?g/L) of uranium, which is the highest on-site uranium concentration in groundwater and nearly ten-fold the actual seep concentrations. The results indicate that uranium concentrations in the seep water would have to be more than 200 times greater than the highest observed on-site groundwater concentrations (or nearly 55,000 ?g/L) to potentially exceed the drinking water standard (the MCL) for total uranium in the Erie Canal. (authors)

  6. Use of the UNCLE Facility to Assess Integrated Online Monitoring Systems for Detection of Diversions at Uranium Conversion Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dewji, Shaheen A; Chapman, Jeffrey Allen; Lee, Denise L; Rauch, Eric; Hertel, Nolan

    2011-01-01

    Historically, the approach to safeguarding nuclear material in the front end of the fuel cycle was implemented only at the stage when UF6 was declared as feedstock for enrichment plants. Recent International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) circulars and policy papers have sought to implement safeguards when any purified aqueous uranium solution or uranium oxides suitable for isotopic enrichment or fuel fabrication exist. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed the Uranyl Nitrate Calibration Loop Equipment (UNCLE) facility to simulate the full-scale operating conditions for a purified uranium-bearing aqueous stream exiting the solvent extraction process conducted in a natural uranium conversion plant (NUCP) operating at 6000 MTU/year. Monitoring instruments, including the 3He passive neutron detector developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Endress+Hauser Promass 83F Coriolis meter, have been tested at UNCLE and field tested at Springfields. The field trials demonstrated the need to perform full-scale equipment testing under controlled conditions prior to field deployment of operations and safeguards monitoring at additional plants. Currently, UNCLE is testing neutron-based monitoring for detection of noncompliant activities; however, gamma-ray source term monitoring is currently being explored complementary to the neutron detector in order to detect undeclared activities in a more timely manner. The preliminary results of gamma-ray source term modeling and monitoring at UNCLE are being analyzed as part of a comprehensive source term and detector benchmarking effort. Based on neutron source term detection capabilities, alternative gamma-based detection and monitoring methods will be proposed to more effectively monitor NUCP operations in verifying or detecting deviations from declared conversion activities.

  7. Uranium- and thorium-bearing pegmatites of the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J.W.; Arengi, J.T.; Parrish, I.S.

    1980-04-01

    This report is part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program designed to identify criteria favorable for the occurrence of the world's significant uranium deposits. This project deals specifically with uranium- and thorium-bearing pegmatites in the United States and, in particular, their distribution and origin. From an extensive literature survey and field examination of 44 pegmatite localities in the United States and Canada, the authors have compiled an index to about 300 uranium- and thorium-bearing pegmatites in the United States, maps giving location of these deposits, and an annotated bibliography to some of the most pertinent literature on the geology of pegmatites. Pegmatites form from late-state magma differentiates rich in volatile constituents with an attendant aqueous vapor phase. It is the presence of an aqueous phase which results in the development of the variable grain size which characterizes pegmatites. All pegmatites occur in areas of tectonic mobility involving crustal material usually along plate margins. Those pegmatites containing radioactive mineral species show, essentially, a similar distribution to those without radioactive minerals. Criteria such as tectonic setting, magma composition, host rock, and elemental indicators among others, all serve to help delineate areas more favorable for uranium- and thorium-bearing pegmatites. The most useful guide remains the radioactivity exhibited by uranium- and thorium-bearing pegmatites. Although pegmatites are frequently noted as favorable hosts for radioactive minerals, the general paucity and sporadic distribution of these minerals and inherent mining and milling difficulties negate the resource potential of pegmatites for uranium and thorium.

  8. Isotopic Analysis of Uranium in NIST SRM Glass by Femtosecond Laser Ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffin, Andrew M.; Hart, Garret L.; Hanlen, Richard C.; Eiden, Gregory C.

    2013-05-19

    We employed femtosecond Laser Ablation Multicollector Inductively Coupled Mass Spectrometry for the 11 determination of uranium isotope ratios in a series of standard reference material glasses (NIST 610, 612, 614, and 12 616). This uranium concentration in this series of SRM glasses is a combination of isotopically natural uranium in 13 the materials used to make the glass matrix and isotopically depleted uranium added to increase the uranium 14 elemental concentration across the series. Results for NIST 610 are in excellent agreement with literature values. 15 However, other than atom percent 235U, little information is available for the remaining glasses. We present atom 16 percent and isotope ratios for 234U, 235U, 236U, and 238U for all four glasses. Our results show deviations from the 17 certificate values for the atom percent 235U, indicating the need for further examination of the uranium isotopes in 18 NIST 610-616. Our results are fully consistent with a two isotopic component mixing between the depleted 19 uranium spike and natural uranium in the bulk glass.

  9. Spain`s uranium industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferguson, M.P.

    1992-05-01

    Spain currently operates nine nuclear reactors totalling over 7,100 MWe of capacity, contributing about one-third of all electricity generated in Spain. Four reactors at advanced stages of construction remain mothballed as the result of a government-imposed moratorium, and a fire at Vandellos 1 in 1989 led to its premature closure and to a revival of anti-nuclear sentiment in the country. In the new national energy plan, which was sent to the Spanish Parliament on July 25, 1991, Spain opted to continue the nuclear moratorium that began in 1984 and rely upon conservation measures, additional natural gas imports, and electricity imports to meet expected demand. Under the new plan, nuclear power`s share of Spain`s total installed electrical generating capacity will fall from about 17 percent in 1990, to approximately 14 percent by the end of the century, as only the current nuclear facilities will continue to operate and no new nuclear plants will be built. Spain`s integration into the European Community also is affecting the country`s energy plans, prompting consolidation within the Spanish electricity sector in order to be more competitive in Europe. To supply the existing reactors, the government is supporting a major expansion of the country`s domestic uranium industry.

  10. Standard practice for removal of uranium or plutonium, or both, for impurity assay in uranium or plutonium materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    Standard practice for removal of uranium or plutonium, or both, for impurity assay in uranium or plutonium materials

  11. Uranium Tris-aryloxide Derivatives Supported by Triazacyclononane: Engendering a Reactive Uranium(III)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Karsten

    Uranium Tris-aryloxide Derivatives Supported by Triazacyclononane: Engendering a Reactive Uranium-mail: kmeyer@ucsd.edu Abstract: The synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of the mononuclear uranium complex [((ArO)3tacn)UIII (NCCH3)] is reported. The uranium(III) complex reacts with organic azides

  12. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Monument Valley uranium mill tailings site Cane Valley, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing at UMTRA Project sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to minimize further contamination of ground water. Surface cleanup at the Monument Valley UMTRA Project site near Cane Valley, Arizona, was completed in 1994. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination that resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. Human health may be at risk from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur by drinking water pumped out of a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated areas. Adverse ecological and agricultural effects may also result from exposure to contaminated ground water. For example, livestock should not be watered with contaminated ground water. A risk assessment describes a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the ecological environment may be exposed, and the health or ecological effects that could result from that exposure. This risk assessment is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and potential future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site investigations will be used to determine a compliance strategy to comply with the UMTRA ground water standards.

  13. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Sites near Rifle, Colorado. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further ground water contamination. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from the uranium ore processing activities. Two UMTRA Project sites are near Rifle, Colorado: the Old Rifle site and the New Rifle site. Surface cleanup at the two sites is under way and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. A risk assessment identifies a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the environment may be exposed, and the health or environmental effects that could result from that exposure. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. This evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine if action is needed to protect human health or the environment. Human health risk may result from exposure to ground water contaminated from uranium ore processing. Exposure could occur from drinking water obtained from a well placed in the areas of contamination. Furthermore, environmental risk may result from plant or animal exposure to surface water and sediment that have received contaminated ground water.

  14. Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krumhansl, James L; Brady, Patrick V

    2014-04-29

    An in situ recovery of uranium operation involves circulating reactive fluids through an underground uranium deposit. These fluids contain chemicals that dissolve the uranium ore. Uranium is recovered from the fluids after they are pumped back to the surface. Chemicals used to accomplish this include complexing agents that are organic, readily degradable, and/or have a predictable lifetime in an aquifer. Efficiency is increased through development of organic agents targeted to complexing tetravalent uranium rather than hexavalent uranium. The operation provides for in situ immobilization of some oxy-anion pollutants under oxidizing conditions as well as reducing conditions. The operation also artificially reestablishes reducing conditions on the aquifer after uranium recovery is completed. With the ability to have the impacted aquifer reliably remediated, the uranium recovery operation can be considered inherently safe.

  15. The End of Cheap Uranium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dittmar, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Historic data from many countries demonstrate that on average no more than 50-70% of the uranium in a deposit could be mined. An analysis of more recent data from Canada and Australia leads to a mining model with an average deposit extraction lifetime of 10+- 2 years. This simple model provides an accurate description of the extractable amount of uranium for the recent mining operations. Using this model for all larger existing and planned uranium mines up to 2030, a global uranium mining peak of at most 58 +- 4 ktons around the year 2015 is obtained. Thereafter we predict that uranium mine production will decline to at most 54 +- 5 ktons by 2025 and, with the decline steepening, to at most 41 +- 5 ktons around 2030. This amount will not be sufficient to fuel the existing and planned nuclear power plants during the next 10-20 years. In fact, we find that it will be difficult to avoid supply shortages even under a slow 1%/year worldwide nuclear energy phase-out scenario up to 2025. We thus suggest that a world...

  16. Evaluation of health effects in Sequoyah Fuels Corporation workers from accidental exposure to uranium hexafluoride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, D.R. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Swint, M.J.; Kathren, R.L. (Hanford Environmental Health Foundation, Richland, WA (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Urine bioassay measurements for uranium and medical laboratory results were studied to determine whether there were any health effects from uranium intake among a group of 31 workers exposed to uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) and hydrolysis products following the accidental rupture of a 14-ton shipping cylinder in early 1986 at the Sequoyah Fuels Corporation uranium conversion facility in Gore, Oklahoma. Physiological indicators studied to detect kidney tissue damage included tests for urinary protein, casts and cells, blood, specific gravity, and urine pH, blood urea nitrogen, and blood creatinine. We concluded after reviewing two years of follow-up medical data that none of the 31 workers sustained any observable health effects from exposure to uranium. The early excretion of uranium in urine showed more rapid systemic uptake of uranium from the lung than is assumed using the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 30 and Publication 54 models. The urinary excretion data from these workers were used to develop an improved systemic recycling model for inhaled soluble uranium. We estimated initial intakes, clearance rates, kidney burdens, and resulting radiation doses to lungs, kidneys, and bone surfaces. 38 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  17. Modeled atmospheric radon concentrations from uranium mines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Droppo, J.G.

    1985-04-01

    Uranium mining and milling operations result in the release of radon from numerous sources of various types and strengths. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the Clean Air Act, is assessing the health impact of air emissions of radon from underground uranium mines. In this case, the radon emissions may impact workers and residents in the mine vicinity. To aid in this assessment, the EPA needs to know how mine releases can affect the radon concentrations at populated locations. To obtain this type of information, Pacific Northwest Laboratory used the radon emissions, release characteristics and local meterological conditions for a number of mines to model incremental radon concentrations. Long-term, average, incremental radon concentrations were computed based on the best available information on release rates, plume rise parameters, number and locations of vents, and local dispersion climatology. Calculations are made for a model mine, individual mines, and multiple mines. Our approach was to start with a general case and then consider specific cases for comparison. A model underground uranium mine was used to provide definition of the order of magnitude of typical impacts. Then computations were made for specific mines using the best mine-specific information available for each mine. These case study results are expressed as predicted incremental radon concentration contours plotted on maps with local population data from a previous study. Finally, the effect of possible overlap of radon releases from nearby mines was studied by calculating cumulative radon concentrations for multiple mines in a region with many mines. The dispersion model, modeling assumptions, data sources, computational procedures, and results are documented in this report. 7 refs., 27 figs., 18 tabs.

  18. Decolonizing cartographies : sovereignty, territoriality, and maps of meaning in the uranium landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voyles, Traci Brynne

    2010-01-01

    227! Figure 19 Uranium depositsthe Geological Features and Uranium Deposits in the Shiprockresource sovereignty” to uranium deposits located on Native

  19. URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS PIÑON RIDGE PROJECT MONTROSE COUNTY, COLORADO (EFRC) proposes to license, construct, and operate a conventional acid leach uranium and vanadium mill storage pad, and access roads. The mill is designed to process ore containing uranium and vanadium

  20. High strength uranium-tungsten alloy process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, Paul S. (Santa Fe, NM); Sheinberg, Haskell (Los Alamos, NM); Hogan, Billy M. (Los Alamos, NM); Lewis, Homer D. (Bayfield, CO); Dickinson, James M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01

    Alloys of uranium and tungsten and a method for making the alloys. The amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 4 wt % to about 35 wt %. Tungsten particles are dispersed throughout the uranium and a small amount of tungsten is dissolved in the uranium.

  1. High strength uranium-tungsten alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, Paul S. (Santa Fe, NM); Sheinberg, Haskell (Los Alamos, NM); Hogan, Billy M. (Los Alamos, NM); Lewis, Homer D. (Bayfield, CO); Dickinson, James M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01

    Alloys of uranium and tungsten and a method for making the alloys. The amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 4 wt % to about 35 wt %. Tungsten particles are dispersed throughout the uranium and a small amount of tungsten is dissolved in the uranium.

  2. Small cell experiments for electrolytic reduction of uranium oxides to uranium metal using fluoride salts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haas, P.A.; Adcock, P.W.; Coroneos, A.C.; Hendrix, D.E. )

    1994-08-01

    Electrolytic reduction of uranium oxide was proposed for the preparation of uranium metal feed for the atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) process. A laboratory cell of 25-cm ID was operated to obtain additional information in areas important to design and operation of a pilot plant cell. Reproducible test results and useful operating and control procedures were demonstrated. About 20 kg of uranium metal of acceptable purity were prepared. A good supply of dissolved UO[sub 2] feed at the anode is the most important controlling requirement for efficient cell operation. A large fraction of the cell current is nonproductive in that it does not produce a metal product nor consume carbon anodes. All useful test conditions gave some reduction of UF[sub 4] to produce CF[sub 4] in addition to the reduction of UO[sub 2], but the fraction of metal from the reduction of UF[sub 4] can be decreased by increasing the concentration of dissolved UO[sub 2]. Operation of large continuous cells would probably be limited to current efficiencies of less than 60 pct, and more than 20 pct of the metal would result from the reduction of UF[sub 4].

  3. Uranium Adsorption on Ion-Exchange Resins - Batch Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

    2010-12-01

    The uranium adsorption performance of five resins (Dowex 1, Dowex 21K 16-30 [fresh], Dowex 21K 16-30 [regenerated], Purofine PFA600/4740, and ResinTech SIR-1200) were tested using unspiked, nitrate-spiked, and nitrate-spiked/pH adjusted source water from well 299-W19-36. These batch tests were conducted in support of a resin selection process in which the best resin to use for uranium treatment in the 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system will be identified. The results from these tests are as follows: • The data from the high-nitrate (1331 mg/L) tests indicated that Dowex 1, Dowex 21K 16-30 (fresh), Purofine PFA600/4740, and ResinTech SIR-1200 all adsorbed uranium similarly well with Kd values ranging from ~15,000 to 95,000 ml/g. All four resins would be considered suitable for use in the treatment system based on uranium adsorption characteristics. • Lowering the pH of the high nitrate test conditions from 8.2 to 7.5 did not significantly change the uranium adsorption isotherms for the four tested resins. The Kd values for these four resins under high nitrate (1338 mg/L), lower pH (7.5) ranged from ~15,000 to 80,000 ml/g. • Higher nitrate concentrations greatly reduced the uranium adsorption on all four resins. Tests conducted with unspiked (no amendments; nitrate at 337 mg/L and pH at 8.2) source water yielded Kd values for Dowex 1, Dowex 21K 16-30 (fresh), Purofine PFA600/4740, and ResinTech SIR-1200 resins ranging from ~800,000 to >3,000,000 ml/g. These values are about two orders of magnitude higher than the Kd values noted from tests conducted using amended source water. • Compared to the fresh resin, the regenerated Dowex 21K 16-30 resin exhibited significantly lower uranium-adsorption performance under all test conditions. The calculated Kd values for the regenerated resin were typically an order of magnitude lower than the values calculated for the fresh resin. • Additional testing using laboratory columns is recommended to better resolve differences between the adsorption abilities of the resins and to develop estimates of uranium loading on the resins. By determining the quantity of uranium that each resin can adsorb and the time required to reach various levels of loading, resin lifetime in the treatment system can be estimated.

  4. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings sites near Rifle, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase 1) and the Ground Water Project (Phase 2). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, radioactive contaminated soil, equipment, and materials associated with the former uranium ore processing sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further ground water contamination. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from the uranium ore processing activities. Two UMTRA Project sites are near Rifle, Colorado: the Old Rifle site and the New Rifle site. Surface cleanup at the two sites is under way and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The Ground Water Project is in its beginning stages. A risk assessment identifies a source of contamination, how that contamination reaches people and the environment, the amount of contamination to which people or the environment may be exposed, and the health or environmental effects that could result from that exposure. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. This evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine if action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

  5. Method for providing uranium with a protective copper coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waldrop, Forrest B. (Powell, TN); Jones, Edward (Knoxville, TN)

    1981-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method for providing uranium metal with a protective coating of copper. Uranium metal is subjected to a conventional cleaning operation wherein oxides and other surface contaminants are removed, followed by etching and pickling operations. The copper coating is provided by first electrodepositing a thin and relatively porous flash layer of copper on the uranium in a copper cyanide bath. The resulting copper-layered article is then heated in an air or inert atmosphere to volatilize and drive off the volatile material underlying the copper flash layer. After the heating step an adherent and essentially non-porous layer of copper is electro-deposited on the flash layer of copper to provide an adherent, multi-layer copper coating which is essentially impervious to corrosion by most gases.

  6. Uranium soils integrated demonstration: Soil characterization project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunnane, J.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Gill, V.R. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States); Lee, S.Y. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Morris, D.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Nickelson, M.D. [HAZWRAP, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Perry, D.L. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Tidwell, V.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-08-01

    An Integrated Demonstration Program, hosted by the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), has been established for investigating technologies applicable to the characterization and remediation of soils contaminated with uranium. Critical to the design of relevant treatment technologies is detailed information on the chemical and physical characteristics of the uranium waste-form. To address this need a soil sampling and characterization program was initiated which makes use of a variety of standard analytical techniques coupled with state-of-the-art microscopy and spectroscopy techniques. Sample representativeness is evaluated through the development of conceptual models in an effort to identify and understand those geochemical processes governing the behavior of uranium in FEMP soils. Many of the initial results have significant implications for the design of soil treatment technologies for application at the FEMP.

  7. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price to fall toUranium Marketing Annual Report 2014 Uranium 201457 201425.+1

  8. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price to fall toUranium Marketing Annual Report 2014 Uranium17. Purchases6a.

  9. Preserving Ultra-Pure Uranium-233

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krichinsky, Alan M [ORNL; Goldberg, Dr. Steven A. [DOE SC - Chicago Office; Hutcheon, Dr. Ian D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

    2011-10-01

    Uranium-233 ({sup 233}U) is a synthetic isotope of uranium formed under reactor conditions during neutron capture by natural thorium ({sup 232}Th). At high purities, this synthetic isotope serves as a crucial reference material for accurately quantifying and characterizing uranium-bearing materials assays and isotopic distributions for domestic and international nuclear safeguards. Separated, high purity {sup 233}U is stored in vaults at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These materials represent a broad spectrum of {sup 233}U from the standpoint of isotopic purity - the purest being crucial for precise analyses in safeguarding uranium. All {sup 233}U at ORNL is currently scheduled to be disposed of by down-blending with depleted uranium beginning in 2015. This will reduce safety concerns and security costs associated with storage. Down-blending this material will permanently destroy its potential value as a certified reference material for use in uranium analyses. Furthermore, no credible options exist for replacing {sup 233}U due to the lack of operating production capability and the high cost of restarting currently shut down capabilities. A study was commissioned to determine the need for preserving high-purity {sup 233}U. This study looked at the current supply and the historical and continuing domestic need for this crucial isotope. It examined the gap in supplies and uses to meet domestic needs and extrapolated them in the context of international safeguards and security activities - superimposed on the recognition that existing supplies are being depleted while candidate replacement material is being prepared for disposal. This study found that the total worldwide need by this projection is at least 850 g of certified {sup 233}U reference material over the next 50 years. This amount also includes a strategic reserve. To meet this need, 18 individual items totaling 959 g of {sup 233}U were identified as candidates for establishing a lasting supply of certified reference materials (CRM), all having an isotopic purity of at least 99.4% {sup 233}U and including materials up to 99.996% purity. Current plans include rescuing the purest {sup 233}U materials during a 3-year project beginning in FY 2012 in three phases involving preparations, handling preserved materials, and cleanup. The first year will involve preparations for handling the rescued material for sampling, analysis, distribution, and storage. Such preparations involve modifying or developing work control documents and physical preparations in the laboratory, which include preparing space for new material-handling equipment and procuring and (in some cases) refurbishing equipment needed for handling {sup 233}U or qualifying candidate CRM. Once preparations are complete, an evaluation of readiness will be conducted by independent reviewers to verify that the equipment, work controls, and personnel are ready for operations involving handling radioactive materials with nuclear criticality safety as well as radiological control requirements. The material-handling phase will begin in FY 2013 and be completed early in FY 2014, as currently scheduled. Material handling involves retrieving candidate CRM items from the ORNL storage facility and shipping them to another laboratory at ORNL; receiving and handling rescued items at the laboratory (including any needed initial processing, acquisition and analysis of samples from each item, and preparation for shipment); and shipping bulk material to destination labs or to a yet-to-be-designated storage location. There are seven groups of {sup 233}U identified for handling based on isotopic purity that require the utmost care to prevent cross-contamination. The last phase, cleanup, also will be completed in 2014. It involves cleaning and removing the equipment and material-handling boxes and characterizing, documenting, and disposing of waste. As part of initial planning, the cost of rescuing candidate {sup 233}U items was estimated roughly. The annualized costs were found to be $1,228K in FY 2012, $1,375K in FY 2013,

  10. Recovery of Uranium from Wet Phosphoric Acid by Solvent Extraction Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beltrami, Denis; Cote, Gérard; Mokhtari, Hamid; Courtaud, Bruno; Moyer, Bruce A; Chagnes, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Between 1951 and 1991, about 17 processes were developed to recover uranium from wet phosphoric acid (WPA), but the viability of these processes was subject to the variation of the uranium price market. Nowadays, uranium from WPA appears to be attractive due to the increase of the global uranium demand resulting from the emergence of developing countries. The increasing demand provides impetus for a new look at the applicable technology with a view to improvements as well as altogether new approaches. This paper gives an overview on extraction processes developed in the past to recover uranium from wet phosphoric acid (WPA) as well as the physicochemistry involved in these processes. Recent advances concerning the development of new extraction systems are also reported and discussed.

  11. X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic study of uranium nitrides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poineau, Frederic [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Yeamans, Charles B. [University of California, Berkeley; Cerefice, Gary S. [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Sattelberger, Alfred P [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Czerwinski, Ken R. [University of Nevada, Las Vegas

    2012-01-01

    Uranium mononitride (UN), sesquinitride (U2N3) and dinitride (UN2) were characterized by extended X-Ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Analysis on UN indicate the presence of three uranium shells at distances of 3.46(3), 4.89(5) and 6.01(6) A and a nitrogen shell at a distance of 2.46(2) A . For U2N3, two absorbing uranium atoms at different crystallographic positions are present in the structure. One of the uranium atoms is surrounded by nitrogen atoms at 2.28(2) A and by uranium atoms at 3.66(4) and 3.95(4) A . The second type of uranium atom is surrounded by nitrogen atoms at 2.33(2) and 2.64(3) A and by uranium atoms at 3.66(4), 3.95(4) and 5.31(5) A . Results on UN2 indicate two uranium shells at 3.71(4) and 5.32(5) A and two nitrogen shells at 2.28(2).

  12. Characterization of past and present solid waste streams from the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pottmeyer, J.A.; Weyns, M.I.; Lorenzo, D.S.; Vejvoda, E.J. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc., NM (US); Duncan, D.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (US)

    1993-04-01

    During the next two decades the transuranic wastes, now stored in the burial trenches and storage facilities at the Hanford Site, are to be retrieved, processed at the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility, and shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad, New Mexico for final disposal. Over 7% of the transuranic waste to be retrieved for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant has been generated at the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant. The purpose of this report is to characterize the radioactive solid wastes generated by PUREX using process knowledge, existing records, and oral history interviews. The PUREX Plant is currently operated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy and is now in standby status while being prepared for permanent shutdown. The PUREX Plant is a collection of facilities that has been used primarily to separate plutonium for nuclear weapons from spent fuel that had been irradiated in the Hanford Site`s defense reactors. Originally designed to reprocess aluminum-clad uranium fuel, the plant was modified to reprocess zirconium alloy clad fuel elements from the Hanford Site`s N Reactor. PUREX has provided plutonium for research reactor development, safety programs, and defense. In addition, the PUREX was used to recover slightly enriched uranium for recycling into fuel for use in reactors that generate electricity and plutonium. Section 2.0 provides further details of the PUREX`s physical plant and its operations. The PUREX Plant functions that generate solid waste are as follows: processing operations, laboratory analyses and supporting activities. The types and estimated quantities of waste resulting from these activities are discussed in detail.

  13. GEOCHEMISTRY AND ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY OF GROUNDWATERS IN THE STRIPA GRANITE RESULTS AND PRELIMINARY INTERPRETATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, P.

    2011-01-01

    the Ca++ and Ba++ chemistry, and uranium solution is redoxchemistry samples collect dissolved gas samples collect uraniumand Uranium-238 Helium-4 and other noble gases. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 3.1 Groundwater Chemistry

  14. The socioeconomic effects of uranium development in south Texas: a human ecological approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, Pamela Chris

    1982-01-01

    in which the resident population per- ceives the impacts. In general, this study shows that a multiplicity of factors determine the way in which a rural community is impacted by and adjusts to industrial develop- ment. It may be concluded from... of uranium ore may thus occur in Texas in the coming years. Presently, this activity is concentrated primarily in a seventeen thousand square mile region in the Southern Coastal Plains of Texas. This South Texas Uranium District is composed of Atascosa...

  15. Design Study for a Low-Enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual report for FY 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, David; Freels, James D; Ilas, Germina; Miller, James Henry; Primm, Trent; Sease, John D; Guida, Tracey; Jolly, Brian C

    2010-02-01

    This report documents progress made during FY 2009 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. With axial and radial grading of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in reactor performance from the current level. Results of selected benchmark studies imply that calculations of LEU performance are accurate. Studies are reported of the application of a silicon coating to surrogates for spheres of uranium-molybdenum alloy. A discussion of difficulties with preparing a fuel specification for the uranium-molybdenum alloy is provided. A description of the progress in developing a finite element thermal hydraulics model of the LEU core is provided.

  16. Summary report on reprocessing evaluation of selected inactive uranium mill tailings sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has been assisting the Department of Energy in the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Actions Program (UMTRAP) the purpose of which is to implement the provisions of Title I of Public Law 95-604, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978.'' As part of this program, there was a need to evaluate the mineral concentration of the residual radioactive materials at some of the designated processing sites to determine whether mineral recovery would be practicable. Accordingly, Sandia contracted Mountain States Research and Development (MSRD), a division of Mountain States Mineral Enterprises, to drill, sample, and test tailings at 12 sites to evaluate the cost of and the revenue that could be derived from mineral recovery. UMTRAP related environmental and engineering sampling and support activities were performed in conjunction with the MSRD operations. This summary report presents a brief description of the various activities in the program and of the data and information obtained and summarizes the results. 8 refs., 9 tabs.

  17. Annual status report on the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    This fourteenth annual status report for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office summarizes activities of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Surface (UMTRA-Surface) and Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Groundwater (UMTRA-Groundwater) Projects undertaken during fiscal year (FY) 1992 by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and other agencies. Project goals for FY 1993 are also presented. An annual report of this type was a statutory requirement through January 1, 1986, pursuant to the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law (PL) 95-604. The DOE will continue to submit annual reports to DOE-Headquarters, the states, tribes, and local representatives through Project completion in order to inform the public of the yearly Project status. The purpose of the remedial action is to stabilize and control the tailings and other residual radioactive material (RRM) located on the inactive uranium processing sites in a safe and environmentally sound manner, and to minimize or eliminate potential health hazards. Commercial and residential properties near designated processing sites that are contaminated with material from the sites, herein referred to as ``vicinity properties (VP),`` are also eligible for remedial action. Included in the UMTRA Project are 24 inactive uranium processing sites and associated VPs located in 10 states, and the VPs associated with the Edgemont, South Dakota, uranium mill currently owned by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) (Figure A.1, Appendix A).

  18. Ultraslow Wave Nuclear Burning of Uranium-Plutonium Fissile Medium on Epithermal Neutrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. D. Rusov; V. A. Tarasov; M. V. Eingorn; S. A. Chernezhenko; A. A. Kakaev; V. M. Vashchenko; M. E. Beglaryan

    2014-09-29

    For a fissile medium, originally consisting of uranium-238, the investigation of fulfillment of the wave burning criterion in a wide range of neutron energies is conducted for the first time, and a possibility of wave nuclear burning not only in the region of fast neutrons, but also for cold, epithermal and resonance ones is discovered for the first time. For the first time the results of the investigation of the Feoktistov criterion fulfillment for a fissile medium, originally consisting of uranium-238 dioxide with enrichments 4.38%, 2.00%, 1.00%, 0.71% and 0.50% with respect to uranium-235, in the region of neutron energies 0.015-10.0eV are presented. These results indicate a possibility of ultraslow wave neutron-nuclear burning mode realization in the uranium-plutonium media, originally (before the wave initiation by external neutron source) having enrichments with respect to uranium-235, corresponding to the subcritical state, in the regions of cold, thermal, epithermal and resonance neutrons. In order to validate the conclusions, based on the slow wave neutron-nuclear burning criterion fulfillment depending on the neutron energy, the numerical modeling of ultraslow wave neutron-nuclear burning of a natural uranium in the epithermal region of neutron energies (0.1-7.0eV) was conducted for the first time. The presented simulated results indicate the realization of the ultraslow wave neutron-nuclear burning of the natural uranium for the epithermal neutrons.

  19. Uranium and its relationship to host rock mineralogy in an unoxidized roll front in the Jackson group, South Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasse, Eric Martin

    1978-01-01

    Martin Prasse, B. A. , R1ce University Chairman of Advisory Comm1ttee: Dr. Hen Huang Results of fission track study of thin sect1ons of uran1um ore show that the distr1but1on of uranium on the microscopic scale in the ore is inhomogeneous, with high... of an unoxidized roll front in the Deweesville Sandstone of the Jackson Group in Karnes County, Texas. Overall, 114 ore samples and 90 overburden samples were collected and analyzed for uran1um by delayed neutron activation. Uran1um concentration varies between...

  20. Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krumhansl, James Lee; Beauheim, Richard Louis; Brady, Patrick Vane; Arnold, Bill Walter; Kanney, Joseph F.; McKenna, Sean Andrew

    2009-05-01

    Expansion of uranium mining in the United States is a concern to some environmental groups and sovereign Native American Nations. An approach which may alleviate some problems is to develop inherently safe in situ uranium recovery ('ISR') technologies. Current ISR technology relies on chemical extraction of trace levels of uranium from aquifers that, once mined, can still contain dissolved uranium and other trace metals that are a health concern. Existing ISR operations are few in number; however, high uranium prices are driving the industry to consider expanding operations nation-wide. Environmental concerns and enforcement of the new 30 ppb uranium drinking water standard may make opening new mining operations more difficult and costly. Here we propose a technological fix: the development of inherently safe in situ recovery (ISISR) methods. The four central features of an ISISR approach are: (1) New 'green' leachants that break down predictably in the subsurface, leaving uranium, and associated trace metals, in an immobile form; (2) Post-leachant uranium/metals-immobilizing washes that provide a backup decontamination process; (3) An optimized well-field design that increases uranium recovery efficiency and minimizes excursions of contaminated water; and (4) A combined hydrologic/geochemical protocol for designing low-cost post-extraction long-term monitoring. ISISR would bring larger amounts of uranium to the surface, leave fewer toxic metals in the aquifer, and cost less to monitor safely - thus providing a 'win-win-win' solution to all stakeholders.

  1. Uranium in Hanford Site 300 Area: Extraction Data on Borehole Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Guohui; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Lindberg, Michael J.; Um, Wooyong; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Williams, Benjamin D.; Kutynakov, I. V.; Wang, Zheming; Qafoku, Nikolla

    2012-11-26

    In this study, sediments collected from boreholes drilled in 2010 and 2011 as part of a remedial investigation/feasibility study were characterized. The wells, located within or around two process ponds and one process trench waste site, were characterized in terms of total uranium concentration, mobile fraction of uranium, particle size, and moisture content along the borehole depth. In general, the gravel-dominated sediments of the vadose zone Hanford formation in all investigated boreholes had low moisture contents. Based on total uranium content, a total of 48 vadose zone and periodically rewetted zone sediment samples were selected for more detailed characterization, including measuring the concentration of uranium extracted with 8 M nitric acid, and leached using bicarbonate mixed solutions to determine the liable uranium (U(VI)) contents. In addition, water extraction was conducted on 17 selected sediments. Results from the sediment acid and bicarbonate extractions indicated the total concentrations of anthropogenic labile uranium in the sediments varied among the investigated boreholes. The peak uranium concentration (114.84 µg/g, acid extract) in <2-mm size fractions was found in borehole 399 1-55, which was drilled directly in the southwest corner of the North Process Pond. Lower uranium concentrations (~0.3–2.5 µg/g, acid extract) in <2-mm size fractions were found in boreholes 399-1-57, 399-1-58, and 399-1-59, which were drilled either near the Columbia River or inland and upgradient of any waste process ponds or trenches. A general trend of “total” uranium concentrations was observed that increased as the particle size decreased when relating the sediment particle size and acid extractable uranium concentrations in two selected sediment samples. The labile uranium bicarbonate leaching kinetic experiments on three selected sediments indicated a two-step leaching rate: an initial rapid release, followed by a slow continual release of uranium from the sediment. Based on the uranium leaching kinetic results, quasi equilibrium can be assumed after 1000-h batch reaction time in this study.

  2. Global terrestrial uranium supply and its policy implications : a probabilistic projection of future uranium costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthews, Isaac A

    2010-01-01

    An accurate outlook on long-term uranium resources is critical in forecasting uranium costresource relationships, and for energy policy planning as regards the development and deployment of nuclear fuel cycle alternatives. ...

  3. Radio-Ecological Conditions of Groundwater in the Area of Uranium Mining and Milling Facility - 13525

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Titov, A.V.; Semenova, M.P.; Seregin, V.A.; Isaev, D.V.; Metlyaev, E.G. [FSBU SRC A.I.Burnasyan Federal Medical Biophysical Center of FMBA of Russia, Zhivopisnaya Street, 46, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [FSBU SRC A.I.Burnasyan Federal Medical Biophysical Center of FMBA of Russia, Zhivopisnaya Street, 46, Moscow (Russian Federation); Glagolev, A.V.; Klimova, T.I.; Sevtinova, E.B. [FSESP 'Hydrospecgeologiya' (Russian Federation)] [FSESP 'Hydrospecgeologiya' (Russian Federation); Zolotukhina, S.B.; Zhuravleva, L.A. [FSHE 'Centre of Hygiene and Epidemiology no. 107' under FMBA of Russia (Russian Federation)] [FSHE 'Centre of Hygiene and Epidemiology no. 107' under FMBA of Russia (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01

    Manmade chemical and radioactive contamination of groundwater is one of damaging effects of the uranium mining and milling facilities. Groundwater contamination is of special importance for the area of Priargun Production Mining and Chemical Association, JSC 'PPMCA', because groundwater is the only source of drinking water. The paper describes natural conditions of the site, provides information on changes of near-surface area since the beginning of the company, illustrates the main trends of contaminators migration and assesses manmade impact on the quality and mode of near-surface and ground waters. The paper also provides the results of chemical and radioactive measurements in groundwater at various distances from the sources of manmade contamination to the drinking water supply areas. We show that development of deposits, mine water discharge, leakages from tailing dams and cinder storage facility changed general hydro-chemical balance of the area, contributed to new (overlaid) aureoles and flows of scattering paragenetic uranium elements, which are much smaller in comparison with natural ones. However, increasing flow of groundwater stream at the mouth of Sukhoi Urulyungui due to technological water infiltration, mixing of natural water with filtration streams from industrial reservoirs and sites, containing elevated (relative to natural background) levels of sulfate-, hydro-carbonate and carbonate- ions, led to the development and moving of the uranium contamination aureole from the undeveloped field 'Polevoye' to the water inlet area. The aureole front crossed the southern border of water inlet of drinking purpose. The qualitative composition of groundwater, especially in the southern part of water inlet, steadily changes for the worse. The current Russian intervention levels of gross alpha activity and of some natural radionuclides including {sup 222}Rn are in excess in drinking water; regulations for fluorine and manganese concentrations are also in excess. Possible ways to improve the situation are considered. (authors)

  4. Minor actinide transmutation in thorium and uranium matrices in heavy water moderated reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhatti, Zaki; Hyland, B.; Edwards, G.W.R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, 1 Plant Road, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    The irradiation of Th{sup 232} breeds fewer of the problematic minor actinides (Np, Am, Cm) than the irradiation of U{sup 238}. This characteristic makes thorium an attractive potential matrix for the transmutation of these minor actinides, as these species can be transmuted without the creation of new actinides as is the case with a uranium fuel matrix. Minor actinides are the main contributors to long term decay heat and radiotoxicity of spent fuel, so reducing their concentration can greatly increase the capacity of a long term deep geological repository. Mixing minor actinides with thorium, three times more common in the Earth's crust than natural uranium, has the additional advantage of improving the sustainability of the fuel cycle. In this work, lattice cell calculations have been performed to determine the results of transmuting minor actinides from light water reactor spent fuel in a thorium matrix. 15-year-cooled group-extracted transuranic elements (Np, Pu, Am, Cm) from light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel were used as the fissile component in a thorium-based fuel in a heavy water moderated reactor (HWR). The minor actinide (MA) transmutation rates, spent fuel activity, decay heat and radiotoxicity, are compared with those obtained when the MA were mixed instead with natural uranium and taken to the same burnup. Each bundle contained a central pin containing a burnable neutron absorber whose initial concentration was adjusted to have the same reactivity response (in units of the delayed neutron fraction ?) for coolant voiding as standard NU fuel. (authors)

  5. Uranium hexafluoride packaging tiedown systems overview at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, D.L.; Green, D.J.; Lindquist, M.R.

    1993-07-01

    The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) in Piketon, Ohio, is operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., through the US Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO) for the US Department of Energy-Headquarters, Office of Nuclear Energy. The PORTS conducts those operations that are necessary for the production, packaging, and shipment of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}). Uranium hexafluoride enriched uranium than 1.0 wt percent {sup 235}U shall be packaged in accordance with the US Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations of Title 49 CFR Parts 173 (Reference 1) and 178 (Reference 2), or in US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) or US Department of Energy (DOE) certified package designs. Concerns have been expressed regarding the various tiedown methods and condition of the trailers being used by some shippers/carriers for international transport of the UF{sub 6} cylinders/overpacks. Because of the concerns about international shipments, the US Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Office of Nuclear Energy, through DOE-HQ Transportation Management Division, requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) to review UF{sub 6} packaging tiedown and shipping practices used by PORTS, and where possible and appropriate, provide recommendations for enhancing these practices. Consequently, a team of two individuals from Westinghouse Hanford visited PORTS on March 5 and 6, 1990, for the purpose of conducting this review. The paper provides a brief discussion of the review activities and a summary of the resulting findings and recommendations. A detailed reporting of the is documented in Reference 4.

  6. Position paper Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant storage of uranium in plastics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duerksen, W.K.

    1995-07-01

    As a result of the end of the Cold War, the United States nuclear weapon stockpile is being reduced from approximately 20,000 warheads to fewer than 10,000 by the end of the century. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant is the Department of Energy (DOE) site charged with the responsibility of providing safe, secure storage for the uranium recovered from these weapons. In addition to weapons material, Y-12 has traditionally processed and stored uranium from nonweapon programs and presumably will continue to do so. The purpose of this document is to evaluate the suitability of plastics for use in the containment of uranium.

  7. Dupoly process for treatment of depleted uranium and production of beneficial end products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kalb, Paul D. (Wading River, NY); Adams, Jay W. (Stony Brook, NY); Lageraaen, Paul R. (Seaford, NY); Cooley, Carl R. (Gaithersburg, MD)

    2000-02-29

    The present invention provides a process of encapsulating depleted uranium by forming a homogenous mixture of depleted uranium and molten virgin or recycled thermoplastic polymer into desired shapes. Separate streams of depleted uranium and virgin or recycled thermoplastic polymer are simultaneously subjected to heating and mixing conditions. The heating and mixing conditions are provided by a thermokinetic mixer, continuous mixer or an extruder and preferably by a thermokinetic mixer or continuous mixer followed by an extruder. The resulting DUPoly shapes can be molded into radiation shielding material or can be used as counter weights for use in airplanes, helicopters, ships, missiles, armor or projectiles.

  8. Uranium 2009 resources, production and demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

    2010-01-01

    With several countries currently building nuclear power plants and planning the construction of more to meet long-term increases in electricity demand, uranium resources, production and demand remain topics of notable interest. In response to the projected growth in demand for uranium and declining inventories, the uranium industry – the first critical link in the fuel supply chain for nuclear reactors – is boosting production and developing plans for further increases in the near future. Strong market conditions will, however, be necessary to trigger the investments required to meet projected demand. The "Red Book", jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, is a recognised world reference on uranium. It is based on information compiled in 40 countries, including those that are major producers and consumers of uranium. This 23rd edition provides a comprehensive review of world uranium supply and demand as of 1 January 2009, as well as data on global ur...

  9. Depleted uranium disposal options evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.; Otis, M.D. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Waste Management Technology Div.

    1994-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, has chartered a study to evaluate alternative management strategies for depleted uranium (DU) currently stored throughout the DOE complex. Historically, DU has been maintained as a strategic resource because of uses for DU metal and potential uses for further enrichment or for uranium oxide as breeder reactor blanket fuel. This study has focused on evaluating the disposal options for DU if it were considered a waste. This report is in no way declaring these DU reserves a ``waste,`` but is intended to provide baseline data for comparison with other management options for use of DU. To PICS considered in this report include: Retrievable disposal; permanent disposal; health hazards; radiation toxicity and chemical toxicity.

  10. 2014 Uranium Marketing Annual Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price to fall toUranium Marketing Annual Report 2014

  11. Non destructive multi elemental analysis using prompt gamma neutron activation analysis techniques: Preliminary results for concrete sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahing, Lahasen Normanshah [School of Applied Physics, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia and Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuklear Malaysia), Bangi 43000, Kajang (Malaysia); Yahya, Redzuan [School of Applied Physics, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Yahya, Roslan; Hassan, Hearie [Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuklear Malaysia), Bangi 43000, Kajang (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    In this study, principle of prompt gamma neutron activation analysis has been used as a technique to determine the elements in the sample. The system consists of collimated isotopic neutron source, Cf-252 with HPGe detector and Multichannel Analysis (MCA). Concrete with size of 10×10×10 cm{sup 3} and 15×15×15 cm{sup 3} were analysed as sample. When neutrons enter and interact with elements in the concrete, the neutron capture reaction will occur and produce characteristic prompt gamma ray of the elements. The preliminary result of this study demonstrate the major element in the concrete was determined such as Si, Mg, Ca, Al, Fe and H as well as others element, such as Cl by analysis the gamma ray lines respectively. The results obtained were compared with NAA and XRF techniques as a part of reference and validation. The potential and the capability of neutron induced prompt gamma as tool for multi elemental analysis qualitatively to identify the elements present in the concrete sample discussed.

  12. Dry process fluorination of uranium dioxide using ammonium bifluoride

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeamans, Charles Burnett, 1978-

    2003-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to determine the practicality of various unit operations for fluorination of uranium dioxide. The objective was to prepare ammonium uranium fluoride double salts from uranium dioxide and ...

  13. THE THEORY OF URANIUM ENRICHMENT BY THE GAS CENTRIFUGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olander, Donald R.

    2013-01-01

    E. (1973) "Uranium Enrichment by Gas Centrifuge" Mills andTHEORY OF URANIUM ENRICHMENT BY THE GAS CENTRIFUGE Donald R.THEORY OF URANIUM ENRICHMENT BY THE GAS CENTRIFUGE by Donald

  14. Measurement and Analysis of Fission Rates in a Spherical Mockup of Uranium and Polyethylene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tong-Hua, Zhu; Xin-Xin, Lu; Rong, Liu; Zi-Jie, Han; Li, Jiang; Mei, Wang

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of the reaction rate distribution were carried out using two kinds of Plate Micro Fission Chamber(PMFC). The first is a depleted uranium chamber and the second an enriched uranium chamber. The material in the depleted uranium chamber is strictly the same as the material in the uranium assembly. With the equation solution to conduct the isotope contribution correction, the fission rate of 238U and 235U were obtained from the fission rate of depleted uranium and enriched uranium. And then, the fission count of 238U and 235U in an individual uranium shell was obtained. In this work, MCNP5 and continuous energy cross sections ENDF/BV.0 were used for the analysis of fission rate distribution and fission count. The calculated results were compared with the experimental ones. The calculation of fission rate of DU and EU were found to agree with the measured ones within 10% except at the positions in polyethylene region and the two positions near the outer surface. Beacause the fission chamber was not co...

  15. Uptake of uranium from seawater by amidoxime-based polymeric adsorbent marine testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsouris, C.; Kim, J.; Oyola, Y.; Mayes, R.; Hexel, C.; Sostre Gonzalez, F.; Janke, C.; Dai, S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TE 37831-618 (United States); Gill, G.; Kuo, L.J.; Wood, J.; Choe, K.Y. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (United States); Pourmand, A.; D'Alessandro, E. [Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami (United States); Buesseler, K.; Pike, S. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Amidoxime-based polymer adsorbents in the form of functionalized fibers were prepared at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and screened in laboratory experiments, in terms of uranium uptake capacity, using spiked uranium solution and seawater samples. Batch laboratory experiments conducted with 5-gallon seawater tanks provided equilibrium information. Based on results from 5-gallon experiments, the best adsorbent was selected for field-testing of uranium adsorption from seawater. Flow-through column tests have been performed at different marine sites to investigate the uranium uptake rate and equilibrium capacity under diverse biogeochemistry. The maximum amount of uranium uptake from seawater tests at Sequim, WA, was 3.3 mg U/g adsorbent after eight weeks of contact of the adsorbent with seawater. This amount was three times higher than the maximum adsorption capacity achieved in this study by a leading adsorbent developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), which was 1.1 mg U/g adsorbent at equilibrium. The initial uranium uptake rate of the ORNL adsorbent was 2.6 times higher than that of the JAEA adsorbent under similar conditions. A mathematical model derived from the mass balance of uranium was employed to describe the data. (authors)

  16. Radiochronological Age of a Uranium Metal Sample from an Abandoned Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyers, L A; Williams, R W; Glover, S E; LaMont, S P; Stalcup, A M; Spitz, H B

    2012-03-16

    A piece of scrap uranium metal bar buried in the dirt floor of an old, abandoned metal rolling mill was analyzed using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (MC-ICP-MS). The mill rolled uranium rods in the 1940s and 1950s. Samples of the contaminated dirt in which the bar was buried were also analyzed. The isotopic composition of uranium in the bar and dirt samples were both the same as natural uranium, though a few samples of dirt also contained recycled uranium; likely a result of contamination with other material rolled at the mill. The time elapsed since the uranium metal bar was last purified can be determined by the in-growth of the isotope {sup 230}Th from the decay of {sup 234}U, assuming that only uranium isotopes were present in the bar after purification. The age of the metal bar was determined to be 61 years at the time of this analysis and corresponds to a purification date of July 1950 {+-} 1.5 years.

  17. Updated Conceptual Model for the 300 Area Uranium Groundwater Plume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachara, John M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Last, George V.; Peterson, Robert E.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.

    2012-11-01

    The 300 Area uranium groundwater plume in the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit is residual from past discharge of nuclear fuel fabrication wastes to a number of liquid (and solid) disposal sites. The source zones in the disposal sites were remediated by excavation and backfilled to grade, but sorbed uranium remains in deeper, unexcavated vadose zone sediments. In spite of source term removal, the groundwater plume has shown remarkable persistence, with concentrations exceeding the drinking water standard over an area of approximately 1 km2. The plume resides within a coupled vadose zone, groundwater, river zone system of immense complexity and scale. Interactions between geologic structure, the hydrologic system driven by the Columbia River, groundwater-river exchange points, and the geochemistry of uranium contribute to persistence of the plume. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently completed a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) to document characterization of the 300 Area uranium plume and plan for beginning to implement proposed remedial actions. As part of the RI/FS document, a conceptual model was developed that integrates knowledge of the hydrogeologic and geochemical properties of the 300 Area and controlling processes to yield an understanding of how the system behaves and the variables that control it. Recent results from the Hanford Integrated Field Research Challenge site and the Subsurface Biogeochemistry Scientific Focus Area Project funded by the DOE Office of Science were used to update the conceptual model and provide an assessment of key factors controlling plume persistence.

  18. Criticality safety concerns of uranium deposits in cascade equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plaster, M.J. [Lockheed Martin Utility Services, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants enrich uranium in the {sup 235}U isotope by diffusing gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) through a porous barrier. The UF{sub 6} gaseous diffusion cascade utilized several thousand {open_quotes}stages{close_quotes} of barrier to produce highly enriched uranium (HEU). Historically, Portsmouth has enriched the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant`s product (typically 1.8 wt% {sup 235}U) as well as natural enrichment feed stock up to 97 wt%. Due to the chemical reactivity of UF{sub 6}, particularly with water, the formation of solid uranium deposits occur at a gaseous diffusion plant. Much of the equipment operates below atmospheric pressure, and deposits are formed when atmospheric air enters the cascade. Deposits may also be formed from UF{sub 6} reactions with oil, UF{sub 6} reactions with the metallic surfaces of equipment, and desublimation of UF{sub 6}. The major deposits form as a result of moist air in leakage due to failure of compressor casing flanges, blow-off plates, seals, expansion joint convolutions, and instrument lines. This report describes criticality concerns and deposit disposition.

  19. Colorimetric detection of uranium in water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeVol, Timothy A. (Clemson, SC); Hixon, Amy E. (Piedmont, SC); DiPrete, David P. (Evans, GA)

    2012-03-13

    Disclosed are methods, materials and systems that can be used to determine qualitatively or quantitatively the level of uranium contamination in water samples. Beneficially, disclosed systems are relatively simple and cost-effective. For example, disclosed systems can be utilized by consumers having little or no training in chemical analysis techniques. Methods generally include a concentration step and a complexation step. Uranium concentration can be carried out according to an extraction chromatographic process and complexation can chemically bind uranium with a detectable substance such that the formed substance is visually detectable. Methods can detect uranium contamination down to levels even below the MCL as established by the EPA.

  20. Final Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tribe 11 12 Title: Final Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement 13 (DOEEIS-0472) 14 15 For additional information on this Programmatic...

  1. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Sites near Rifle, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    The ground water project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from the uranium ore processing activities. This report is a site specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. Currently, no one is using the ground water and therefore, no one is at risk. However, the land will probably be developed in the future and so the possibility of people using the ground water does exist. This report examines the future possibility of health hazards resulting from the ingestion of contaminated drinking water, skin contact, fish ingestion, or contact with surface waters and sediments.

  2. High strength and density tungsten-uranium alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheinberg, Haskell (Los Alamos, NM)

    1993-01-01

    Alloys of tungsten and uranium and a method for making the alloys. The amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 55 vol % to about 85 vol %. A porous preform is made by sintering consolidated tungsten powder. The preform is impregnated with molten uranium such that (1) uranium fills the pores of the preform to form uranium in a tungsten matrix or (2) uranium dissolves portions of the preform to form a continuous uranium phase containing tungsten particles.

  3. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Portsmouth Uranium Enrichment Complex, Piketon, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-08-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Uranium Enrichment Complex (PUEC), conducted August 4 through August 15, 1986. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Team specialists are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations performed at PUEC, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by Argonne National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the PUEC Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the PUEC Survey. 55 refs., 22 figs., 21 tabs.

  4. Magnetism and superconductivity of uranium and intermetallic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooley, J. C. (Jason C.); Gay, E. C. (Eddie C.); Hanrahan, R. J. (Robert J.); Hults, W. L. (William L.); Lashley, J. C. (Jason C.); Manley, M. E. (Michael E.); McPheeters, C. C. (Charles C.); Schmiedeshoff, G. M. (George M.); Thoma, D. J. (Dan J.); Touton, S. (Sharon); Smith, J. L. (James L.)

    2001-01-01

    Heat capacity, resistivity, and phonon density of states have been measured on uranium and reported already. Many of the results are on single crystals of purity that has been unavailable before. Some intermetallic compounds have been measured that are in the class of so-called heavy-fermion materials. We present here the latest results along with a discussion of the occurrence of superconductivity or magnetism in these materials.

  5. Using complex resistivity imaging to infer biogeochemical processes associated with bioremediation of a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flores-Orozco, Adrian; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Kemna, Andreas

    2011-07-07

    Experiments at the Department of Energy’s Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site near Rifle, Colorado (USA) have demonstrated the ability to remove uranium from groundwater by stimulating the growth and activity of Geobacter species through acetate amendment. Prolonging the activity of these strains in order to optimize uranium bioremediation has prompted the development of minimally-invasive and spatially-extensive monitoring methods diagnostic of their in situ activity and the end products of their metabolism. Here we demonstrate the use of complex resistivity imaging for monitoring biogeochemical changes accompanying stimulation of indigenous aquifer microorganisms during and after a prolonged period (100+ days) of acetate injection. A thorough raw-data statistical analysis of discrepancies between normal and reciprocal measurements and incorporation of a new power-law phase-error model in the inversion were used to significantly improve the quality of the resistivity phase images over those obtained during previous monitoring experiments at the Rifle IRFC site. The imaging results reveal spatiotemporal changes in the phase response of aquifer sediments, which correlate with increases in Fe(II) and precipitation of metal sulfides (e.g., FeS) following the iterative stimulation of iron and sulfate reducing microorganism. Only modest changes in resistivity magnitude were observed over the monitoring period. The largest phase anomalies (>40 mrad) were observed hundreds of days after halting acetate injection, in conjunction with accumulation of Fe(II) in the presence of residual FeS minerals, reflecting preservation of geochemically reduced conditions in the aquifer – a prerequisite for ensuring the long-term stability of immobilized, redox-sensitive contaminants, such as uranium.

  6. Using complex resistivity imaging to infer biogeochemical processes associated with bioremediation of a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orozco, A. Flores; Williams, K.H.; Long, P.E.; Hubbard, S.S.; Kemna, A.

    2011-04-01

    Experiments at the Department of Energy's Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site near Rifle, Colorado (USA) have demonstrated the ability to remove uranium from groundwater by stimulating the growth and activity of Geobacter species through acetate amendment. Prolonging the activity of these strains in order to optimize uranium bioremediation has prompted the development of minimally-invasive and spatially-extensive monitoring methods diagnostic of their in situ activity and the end products of their metabolism. Here we demonstrate the use of complex resistivity imaging for monitoring biogeochemical changes accompanying stimulation of indigenous aquifer microorganisms during and after a prolonged period (100+ days) of acetate injection. A thorough raw-data statistical analysis of discrepancies between normal and reciprocal measurements and incorporation of a new power-law phase-error model in the inversion were used to significantly improve the quality of the resistivity phase images over those obtained during previous monitoring experiments at the Rifle IRFC site. The imaging results reveal spatiotemporal changes in the phase response of aquifer sediments, which correlate with increases in Fe(II) and precipitation of metal sulfides (e.g., FeS) following the iterative stimulation of iron and sulfate reducing microorganism. Only modest changes in resistivity magnitude were observed over the monitoring period. The largest phase anomalies (>40 mrad) were observed hundreds of days after halting acetate injection, in conjunction with accumulation of Fe(II) in the presence of residual FeS minerals, reflecting preservation of geochemically reduced conditions in the aquifer - a prerequisite for ensuring the long-term stability of immobilized, redox-sensitive contaminants, such as uranium.

  7. Sequestering Uranium from Seawater: Binding Strength and Modes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sequestering Uranium from Seawater: Binding Strength and Modes of Uranyl Complexes with Glutarimidedioxime Sequestering Uranium from Seawater: Binding Strength and Modes of Uranyl...

  8. Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility, Major Design Changes...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility, Major Design Changes Late...Lessons Learned Report, NNSA, Dec 2010 Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility, Major Design Changes...

  9. Department of Energy to Continue Managing Uranium Leasing Program...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy to Continue Managing Uranium Leasing Program in Western Colorado Department of Energy to Continue Managing Uranium Leasing Program in Western Colorado May 12,...

  10. DOE Extends Public Comment Period for the Draft Uranium Leasing...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Extends Public Comment Period for the Draft Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement DOE Extends Public Comment Period for the Draft Uranium Leasing...

  11. Decommissioning of U.S. Uranium Production Facilities

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1995-01-01

    This report analyzes the uranium production facility decommissioning process and its potential impact on uranium supply and prices. 1995 represents the most recent publication year.

  12. Secretarial Determination of No Adverse Material Impact for Uranium...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Secretarial Determination of No Adverse Material Impact for Uranium Transfers Secretarial Determination of No Adverse Material Impact for Uranium Transfers The determination covers...

  13. Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facility...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facility Compliance Agreement Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facility Compliance Agreement Toxic...

  14. DOE Extends Public Comment Period for Uranium Program Environmental...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Uranium Program Environmental Impact Statement DOE Extends Public Comment Period for Uranium Program Environmental Impact Statement April 18, 2013 - 1:08pm Addthis Contractor, Bob...

  15. DOE Seeks Contractor for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE Seeks Contractor for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Operations at Ohio and Kentucky Facilities DOE Seeks Contractor for Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Operations at...

  16. Record of Decision for the Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Record of Decision for the Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision for the Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact...

  17. Uranium Speciation As a Function of Depth in Contaminated Hanford...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    PLUMES; PONDS; SEDIMENTS; SILICATE MINERALS; SODIUM; SPECTRA; SPECTROSCOPY; SURFACE COATING; URANIUM; URANIUM MINERALS; WASTES; WATER TABLES Word Cloud More Like This Full Text...

  18. Trace element patterns in lichens following uranium mine closures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fahselt, D.; Wu, T.W.; Mott, B. [Univ. of Western Ontario, London (Canada)

    1995-09-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis was used to determine trace elements in Cladina mitis (Sandst). Hale & Culb. along transects extending from uranium mines at Elliot Lake and Agnew Lake in central Ontario, Canada. Levels of 11 elements were reported and the presence of uranium (U) was confirmed, although U concentrations were much less than in Cladina rangiferina 10 years earlier. Among the elements identified in lichen thalli was Th, which occurred in higher concentrations than U. All trace elements, including the two radionuclides, were found in deteriorating thallus parts as well as living podetia, and five of these seem to have originated as airborne particulates from minesites. In spite of mine closures, levels of Th and U remained higher near sources of ore dust and there was little relationship between radionuclide concentrations in thallus and substrate. 24 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project 1993 Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    This annual report documents the Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring and protection program. The UMTRA Project routinely monitors radiation, radioactive residual materials, and hazardous constituents at associated former uranium tailings processing sites and disposal sites. At the end of 1993, surface remedial action was complete at 10 of the 24 designated UMTRA Project processing sites. In 1993 the UMTRA Project office revised the UMTRA Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan, as required by the US DOE. Because the UMTRA Project sites are in different stages of remedial action, the breadth of the UMTRA environmental protection program differs from site to site. In general, sites actively undergoing surface remedial action have the most comprehensive environmental programs for sampling media. At sites where surface remedial action is complete and at sites where remedial action has not yet begun, the environmental program consists primarily of surface water and ground water monitoring to support site characterization, baseline risk assessments, or disposal site performance assessments.

  20. Annual report to the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation and the Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer on the US Department of Energy's cultural resource activities at Colorado UMTRA Project sites, January--December 1991. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This report is a summary of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) cultural resource investigations for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites in Colorado. This report is intended to fulfill the DOE's obligation for an annual report as stated in the Programmatic Memorandum of Agreement executed between the DOE, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and the Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer in December 1984. Summaries of the cultural resource surveys and identified resources are provided for the UMTRA Project sites in the vicinities of Durango, Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock. This report covers all UMTRA Project cultural resource activities in Colorado from January through December 1991.

  1. Oxidation behavior and segregation of uranium in the intermetallic compound UFe/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erbudak, M.; Stucki, F.

    1985-08-15

    Ion scattering and Auger-electron spectroscopies show that there is a large segregation of uranium at the surface of UFe/sub 2/. Adsorbed oxygen reacts only with this uranium and forms a stable oxide layer at the surface, which prevents further oxygen diffusing into the solid. As a result of this process, the iron remains in metallic form even after prolonged oxygen exposures.

  2. The Effect of U-234 Content on the Neutronic Behavior of Uranium Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busch, Robert D.; Bledsoe, Keith C

    2011-01-01

    When analyzing uranium systems, the usual rule of thumb is to ignore the U-234 by assuming that it behaves neutronically like U-238. Thus for uranium systems, the uranium is evaluated as U-235 with everything else being U-238. The absorption cross section of U-234 is indeed qualitatively very similar to that of U-238. However, thermal absorption cross section of U-234 is about 100 times that of U-238. At low U-235 enrichments, the amount of U-234 is quite small so the impact of assuming it is U-238 is minimal. However, at high enrichments, the relative ratio of U-234 to U-238 is quite large (maybe as much as 1 to 5). Thus, one would expect that some effect of using the rule of thumb might be seen in higher enriched systems. Analyses were performed on three uranium systems from the set of Benchmarks [1]. Although the benchmarks are adequately characterized as to the U-234 content, often, materials used in processing are not as well characterized. This issue may become more important with the advent of laser enrichment processes, which have little or no effect on the U-234 content. Analytical results based on the relationship of U-234 activity to that of U-235 have shown good predictive capability but with large variability in the uncertainties [2]. Rucker and Johnson noted that the actual isotopics vary with enrichment, design of the enrichment cascade, composition of the feed material, and on blending of enrichments so there is considerable uncertainty in the use of models to determine isotopics. Thus, it is important for criticality personnel to understand the effects of variation of U-234 content in fissile systems and the impact of different modeling assumptions in handling the U-234. Analyses were done on LEU, IEU and HEU benchmarks from the International Handbook. These indicate that the effect of ignoring U-234 in HEU metal systems is non-conservative while it seems to be conservative for HEU solution systems. The magnitude of change in k-effective was as high as 0.4%, which has implications on selection of administrative margins and the determination of the upper subcriticality limit.

  3. Annual status report on the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-12-01

    This eleventh annual status report summarizes activities of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project undertaken during Fiscal Year (FY) 1989 by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and other agencies. Project goals for FY 1990 are also presented. An annual report of this type was a statutory requirement through January 1, 1986, pursuant to the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law (PL) 95--604. The DOE will continue to submit an annual report through project completion in order to inform the public of yearly project status. Title I of the UMTRCA authorizes the DOE, in cooperation with affected states and Indian tribes within whose boundaries designated uranium processing sites are located, to provide a program of assessment and remedial action at such sites. The purpose of the remedial action is to stabilize and control the tailings and other residual radioactive materials located on the inactive uranium processing sites in a safe and environmentally sound manner and to minimize or eliminate potential radiation health hazards. Commercial and residential properties in the vicinity of designated processing sites that are contaminated with material from the sites, herein referred to as vicinity properties,'' are also eligible for remedial action. Included in the UMTRA Project are 24 inactive uranium processing sites and associated vicinity properties located in 10 states, and the vicinity properties associated with Edgemont, South Dakota, an inactive uranium mill currently owned by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA).

  4. Advective Desorption of Uranium (VI) from Contaminated Hanford Vadose Zone Sediments under Saturated and Unsaturated Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Zachara, John M.; Liu, Chongxuan; Qafoku, Nikolla; Smith, Steven C.; Forrester, Steven W.

    2008-11-03

    Sedimentary, hydrologic, and geochemical variations in the Hanford subsurface environment, as well as compositional differences in contaminating waste streams, have created vast differences in the migration and mobility of uranium within the subsurface environment. A series of hydraulically-saturated and -unsaturated column experiments were performed to i.) assess the effect of water content on the advective desorption and migration of uranium from contaminated sediments, and ii.) evaluate the uranium concentration that can develop in porewater and/or groundwater as a result of desorption/dissolution reactions. Flow rate and moisture content were varied to evaluate the influence of contact time, pore water velocity, and macropore desaturation on aqueous uranium concentrations. Sediments were collected from the T-TX-TY tank farm complex and the 300 Area Process Ponds located on the Hanford Site, southeastern Washington State. The sediments vary in depth, mineralogy, and in contamination events. Experiments were conducted under mildly alkaline/calcareous conditions representative of conditions commonly encountered at repository sites across the arid western United States and, in particular, the Hanford site. Results illustrate the release of uranium from these sediments is kinetically controlled and low water contents encountered within the Hanford vadose zone result in the formation of mobile-immobile water regimes, which isolate a fraction of the reactive sites within the sediments, effectively reducing the concentration of uranium released into migrating porewaters.

  5. Uranium Management - Preservation of a National Asset

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, J. D.; Stroud, J. C.

    2002-02-27

    The Uranium Management Group (UMG) was established at the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Operations in 1999 as a mechanism to expedite the de-inventory of surplus uranium from the Fernald Environmental Management Project site. This successful initial venture has broadened into providing uranium material de-inventory and consolidation support to the Hanford site as well as retrieving uranium materials that the Department had previously provided to universities under the loan/lease program. As of December 31, 2001, {approx} 4,300 metric tons of uranium (MTU) have been consolidated into a more cost effective interim storage location at the Portsmouth site near Piketon, OH. The UMG continues to uphold its corporate support mission by promoting the Nuclear Materials Stewardship Initiative (NMSI) and the twenty-five (25) action items of the Integrated Nuclear Materials Management Plan (1). Before additional consolidation efforts may commence to remove excess inventory from Environmental Management closure sites and universities, a Programmatic Environmental Assessment (PEA) must be completed. Two (2) noteworthy efforts currently being pursued involve the investigation of re-use opportunities for surplus uranium materials and the recovery of usable uranium from the shutdown Portsmouth cascade. In summary, the UMG is available as a DOE complex-wide technical resource to promote the responsible management of surplus uranium.

  6. Clean Air Act Requirements: Uranium Mill Tailings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EPA'S Clean Air Act Requirements: Uranium Mill Tailings Radon Emissions Rulemaking Reid J. Rosnick Requirements for Uranium Operations (Clean Air Act) Subpart W Requirements (continued) · Radon emission standard of 20 pCi/m2/sec -- annual reporting requirements, notification in advance of testing · The radon

  7. URANIUM AND PLUTONIUM LOADING ONTO MONOSODIUM TITANATE MST IN TANK 50H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobbs, D

    2006-08-31

    A possible disposition pathway for the residue from the abandoned In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) sends the material from Tank 48H in increments to Saltstone via aggregation in Tank 50H. After entering Tank 50H, the amount of fissile material sorbed on MST may increase as a result of contacting waste solutions with dissolved uranium and plutonium. SRNL recommends that nuclear criticality safety evaluations use uranium and plutonium loadings onto MST of 14.0 {+-} 1.04 weight percent (wt %) for uranium and 2.79 {+-} 0.197 wt % for plutonium given the assumed streams defined in this report. These values derive from recently measured for conditions relevant to the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and serve as conservative upper bounds for uranium and plutonium loadings during the proposed transfers of MST from Tank 48H into Tank 50H.

  8. Method for fabricating laminated uranium composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chapman, L.R.

    1983-08-03

    The present invention is directed to a process for fabricating laminated composites of uranium or uranium alloys and at least one other metal or alloy. The laminated composites are fabricated by forming a casting of the molten uranium with the other metal or alloy which is selectively positioned in the casting and then hot-rolling the casting into a laminated plate in or around which the casting components are metallurgically bonded to one another to form the composite. The process of the present invention provides strong metallurgical bonds between the laminate components primarily since the bond disrupting surface oxides on the uranium or uranium alloy float to the surface of the casting to effectively remove the oxides from the bonding surfaces of the components.

  9. Scrap uranium recycling via electron beam melting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKoon, R.

    1993-11-01

    A program is underway at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to recycle scrap uranium metal. Currently, much of the material from forging and machining processes is considered radioactive waste and is disposed of by oxidation and encapsulation at significant cost. In the recycling process, uranium and uranium alloys in various forms will be processed by electron beam melting and continuously cast into ingots meeting applicable specifications for virgin material. Existing vacuum processing facilities at LLNL are in compliance with all current federal and state environmental, safety and health regulations for the electron beam melting and vaporization of uranium metal. One of these facilities has been retrofitted with an auxiliary electron beam gun system, water-cooled hearth, crucible and ingot puller to create an electron beam melt furnace. In this furnace, basic process R&D on uranium recycling will be performed with the goal of eventual transfer of this technology to a production facility.

  10. Thermodynamic data for uranium fluorides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leitnaker, J.M.

    1983-03-01

    Self-consistent thermodynamic data have been tabulated for uranium fluorides between UF/sub 4/ and UF/sub 6/, including UF/sub 4/ (solid and gas), U/sub 4/F/sub 17/ (solid), U/sub 2/F/sub 9/ (solid), UF/sub 5/ (solid and gas), U/sub 2/F/sub 10/ (gas), and UF/sub 6/ (solid, liquid, and gas). Included are thermal function - the heat capacity, enthalpy, and free energy function, heats of formation, and vaporization behavior.

  11. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: AlternativeMonthly","10/2015"Monthly","10/2015" ,"Release7 Relative Standard Errors for Relative StandardCensusp2. U.S. uranium

  12. Programmatic Environmental Report for remedial actions at UMTRA (Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action) Project vicinity properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-03-01

    This Environmental Report (ER) examines the environmental consequences of implementing a remedial action that would remove radioactive uranium mill tailings and associated contaminated materials from 394 vicinity properties near 14 inactive uranium processing sites included in the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project pursuant to Public Law 95--604, the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978. Vicinity properties are those properties in the vicinity of the UMTRA Project inactive mill sites, either public or private, that are believed to be contaminated by residual radioactive material originating from one of the 14 inactive uranium processing sites, and which have been designated under Section 102(a)(1) of UMTRCA. The principal hazard associated with the contaminated properties results from the production of radon, a radioactive decay product of the radium contained in the tailings. Radon, a radioactive gas, can diffuse through the contaminated material and be released into the atmosphere where it and its radioactive decay products may be inhaled by humans. A second radiation exposure pathway results from the emission of gamma radiation from uranium decay products contained in the tailings. Gamma radiation emitted from contaminated material delivers an external exposure to the whole body. If the concentration of radon and its decay products is high enough and the exposure time long enough, or if the exposure to direct gamma radiation is long enough, cancers (i.e., excess health effects) may develop in persons living and working at the vicinity properties. 3 refs., 7 tabs.

  13. CHARACTERIZATION OF H CANYON CONDUCTIVITY METER INDICATIONS WITH ELEVATED URANIUM IN NITRIC ACID

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nash, C

    2007-10-31

    Solution conductivity data from the 1CU conductivity meter in H-Canyon shows that uranium concentration in the 0 to 30 gram per liter (g/L) range has no statistically significant effect on the calibration of free nitric acid measurement. Based on these results, no additional actions are needed on the 1CU Conductivity Meter prior to or during the processing of uranium solutions in the 0 to 30 g/L range. A model based only on free nitric acid concentration is shown to be appropriate for explaining the data. Data uncertainties for the free acid measurement of uranium-bearing solutions are 8.5% or less at 95% confidence. The analytical uncertainty for calibrating solutions is an order of magnitude smaller only when uranium is not present, allowing use of a more accurate analytical procedure. Literature work shows that at a free nitric acid level of 0.33 M, uranium concentration of 30 g/L and 25 C, solution conductivity is 96.4% of that of a uranium-free solution. The level of uncertainties in the literature data and its fitting equation do not justify calibration changes based on this small depression in solution conductivity. This work supports preparation of H-Canyon processing of Super Kukla fuel; however, the results will be applicable to the processing of any similar concentration uranium and nitric acid solution. Super Kukla fuel processing will increase the uranium concentration above the nominal zero to 10 g/L level, though not above 30 g/L. This work examined free nitric acid levels ranging from 0.18 to 0.52 molar. Temperature ranged from 27.9 to 28.3 C during conductivity testing. The data indicates that sequential order of measurement is not a significant factor. The conductivity meter was thus flushed effectively between measurements as desired.

  14. Final Environmental assessment for the Uranium Lease Management Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared a programmatic environmental assessment (EA) of the proposed action to continue leasing withdrawn lands and DOE-owned patented claims for the exploration and production of uranium and vanadium ores. The Domestic Uranium Program regulation, codified at Title 10, Part 760.1, of the US Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), gives DOE the flexibility to continue leasing these lands under the Uranium Lease Management Program (ULMP) if the agency determines that it is in its best interest to do so. A key element in determining what is in DOE`s ``best interest`` is the assessment of the environmental impacts that may be attributable to lease tract operations and associated activities. On the basis of the information and analyses presented in the EA for the ULMP, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, as defined in the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (42 United States Code 4321 et seq.), as amended.Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required for the ULMP,and DOE is issuing this Finding, of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  15. Uranium Cluster Chemistry DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906605

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uranium Cluster Chemistry DOI: 10.1002/anie.200906605 Tetranuclear Uranium Clusters by Reductive in the coordination chemistry and small-molecule reactivity of uranium. Among the intriguing reactivity patterns of tetravalent uranium with 3,5-dimethylpyrazolate (Me2PzÀ ) led to forma- tion of an unprecedented homoleptic

  16. Hydrologic transport of depleted uranium associated with open air dynamic range testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico, and Eglin Air Force Base, Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, N.M.; Vanta, E.B.

    1995-05-01

    Hydrologic investigations on depleted uranium fate and transport associated with dynamic testing activities were instituted in the 1980`s at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Eglin Air Force Base. At Los Alamos, extensive field watershed investigations of soil, sediment, and especially runoff water were conducted. Eglin conducted field investigations and runoff studies similar to those at Los Alamos at former and active test ranges. Laboratory experiments complemented the field investigations at both installations. Mass balance calculations were performed to quantify the mass of expended uranium which had transported away from firing sites. At Los Alamos, it is estimated that more than 90 percent of the uranium still remains in close proximity to firing sites, which has been corroborated by independent calculations. At Eglin, we estimate that 90 to 95 percent of the uranium remains at test ranges. These data demonstrate that uranium moves slowly via surface water, in both semi-arid (Los Alamos) and humid (Eglin) environments.

  17. Geochemical Evaluation of Uranium Fate and Transport Guterl Specialty Steel Site, New York - 12077

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frederick, Bill; Tandon, Vikas

    2012-07-01

    Between 1948 and 1952, up to 15,875 metric tons (35 million pounds) of natural uranium metal (U) were processed at the former Guterl Specialty Steel Corporation site in Lockport, New York. The resulting dust, thermal scale, mill shavings and associated land disposal contaminated both the facility and on-site soils. Uranium subsequently impacted groundwater and a fully developed plume exists below the site. Site soils are composed of anthropogenic fill and re-worked, glacially-derived native soil. This overburden is underlain by the weathered and fractured Lockport Dolostone bedrock. Shallow groundwater levels fluctuate seasonally and allow groundwater to contact U contaminated soil, which promotes transport. This condition is exemplified through coincident increases in specific conductivity and groundwater levels, which flush soluble constituents in the fill/soil to groundwater during recharge events. In addition, water-level fluctuations affect reduction-oxidation (redox) conditions at the site. The U in soils is subject to wetting and drying cycles that promote oxidation more than stable redox conditions (e.g., dry soil or fully saturated conditions). This oxidizing mechanism increases uranium solubility and mobility. Site groundwater also receives uranium via leaching from near-surface contaminated fill. The strong correlation between nitrate and uranium in groundwater indicates that uranium is mobile where oxidizing conditions occur. Analytical models of contaminant leaching determined that multiple pathways and transport mechanisms govern site risk. Uranium transport to groundwater involves three mechanisms: 1) direct contact of contaminated soil with groundwater, 2) the oxidation-state or chemical valence of uranium, and 3) the leaching of near-surface contamination to groundwater. These mechanisms require an integrated remedial solution that is sustainable and cost effective. (authors)

  18. Technical Basis for Assessing Uranium Bioremediation Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PE Long; SB Yabusaki; PD Meyer; CJ Murray; AL N’Guessan

    2008-04-01

    In situ bioremediation of uranium holds significant promise for effective stabilization of U(VI) from groundwater at reduced cost compared to conventional pump and treat. This promise is unlikely to be realized unless researchers and practitioners successfully predict and demonstrate the long-term effectiveness of uranium bioremediation protocols. Field research to date has focused on both proof of principle and a mechanistic level of understanding. Current practice typically involves an engineering approach using proprietary amendments that focuses mainly on monitoring U(VI) concentration for a limited time period. Given the complexity of uranium biogeochemistry and uranium secondary minerals, and the lack of documented case studies, a systematic monitoring approach using multiple performance indicators is needed. This document provides an overview of uranium bioremediation, summarizes design considerations, and identifies and prioritizes field performance indicators for the application of uranium bioremediation. The performance indicators provided as part of this document are based on current biogeochemical understanding of uranium and will enable practitioners to monitor the performance of their system and make a strong case to clients, regulators, and the public that the future performance of the system can be assured and changes in performance addressed as needed. The performance indicators established by this document and the information gained by using these indicators do add to the cost of uranium bioremediation. However, they are vital to the long-term success of the application of uranium bioremediation and provide a significant assurance that regulatory goals will be met. The document also emphasizes the need for systematic development of key information from bench scale tests and pilot scales tests prior to full-scale implementation.

  19. Stratigraphy of the PB-1 well, Nopal I uranium deposit, Sierra Pena Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, P.

    2009-01-01

    of the Nopal I uranium deposit, Mexico: Proceedings, 2006of the Nopal I uranium deposit (Sierra Peña Blanca, Mexico),Chihuahua, Mexico, in Uranium Deposits in Volcanic Rocks,

  20. Electrochemistry, Spectroscopy, and Reactivity of Uranium Complexes Supported by Ferrocene Diamide Ligands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duhovic, Selma

    2012-01-01

    J. L. , Pentavalent Uranium Chemistry-Synthetic Pursuit of aand High-Valent Uranium Chemistry. Organometallics 2011,for Trivalent Uranium Chemistry. Inorg. Chem. 1989, 28, (

  1. Behavior of Uranium(VI) during HEDPA Leaching for Aluminum Dissolution in Tank Waste Sludges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Brian A.; Rao, Linfeng; Nash, Kenneth L.; Martin, Leigh

    2006-01-01

    Behavior of Uranium(VI) during HEDPA Leaching for Aluminuman increase in the aqueous phase uranium concentration.The concentration of uranium continually increased over 59

  2. In-well sediment incubators to evaluate microbial community stability and dynamics following bioimmobilization of uranium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, B.R.

    2010-01-01

    D. R. (1992). Enzymatic uranium precipitation. Environmentalof technetium and uranium in a nitrate-contaminated aquifer.in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater.

  3. Sequestering Uranium from Seawater: Binding Strength and Modes of Uranyl Complexes with Glutarimidedioxime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Guoxin

    2013-01-01

    data_request/cif. OECD, Uranium 2009: Resources, Productionthermodynamics of uranium”, (H. Wanner and I. Forest,of California. Sequestering uranium from seawater: binding

  4. Sulfur isotopes as indicators of amended bacterial sulfate reduction processes influencing field scale uranium bioremediation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Druhan, J.L.

    2009-01-01

    in situ bioremediation of uranium in a highly contaminatedwith bioremediation of uranium to submicromolar levels.Reoxidation of bioreduced uranium under reducing conditions.

  5. Stability of uranium incorporated into Fe(hydr)oxides under fluctuating redox conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, B.D.

    2009-01-01

    for Bioremediation of uranium-contaminated aquifers withReoxidation of bioreduced uranium under reducing conditions.Komlos, J. ; Jaffe, P. R. Uranium reoxidation in previously

  6. Decolonizing cartographies : sovereignty, territoriality, and maps of meaning in the uranium landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voyles, Traci Brynne

    2010-01-01

    Figure 8 Colorado Plateau uranium district, Life magazine in146! Figure 12 Navajo Nation and uranium industry162! Figure 14 An undated poster protesting uranium

  7. Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery (Patent) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery An in situ recovery of uranium operation involves...

  8. Incorporation of oxidized uranium into Fe (hydr)oxides during Fe(II) catalyzed remineralization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nico, Peter S.

    2010-01-01

    B. M. ; Geesey, G. G. Uranium complexes formed at hematiteheterogeneity in an in situ uranium bioremediation fieldL. R. In-situ evidence for uranium immobilization and

  9. Novel Transformations using Uranium and Group 5 Metal Complexes Supported by 1,1'-diamidoferrocene Ligands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez, Michael Joseph

    2013-01-01

    in the past decade. 1 Uranium is the most studiedactinide, due the stability of uranium-238and uranium involvement in nuclear power. Despite interest

  10. Uranium-series comminution ages of continental sediments: Case study of a Pleistocene alluvial fan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Victoria E.

    2010-01-01

    and river transport. Uranium-Series Geochemistry 52, 533-using high- precision uranium isotopic measurements.B. , Turner, S.P. , 2008. Uranium-series isotopes in river

  11. Magnetic Exchange Coupling and Single-Molecule Magnetism in Uranium Complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rinehart, Jeffrey Dennis

    2010-01-01

    method for interpreting uranium magnetism and will becontaining lower-valent uranium centers can be seen to1995. Chapter 4: Tetranuclear Uranium Clusters via Reductive

  12. Decolonizing cartographies : sovereignty, territoriality, and maps of meaning in the uranium landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voyles, Traci Brynne

    2010-01-01

    uranium mining .. 176!Doug, “The History of Uranium Mining and the Navajo People,”The Navajo People and Uranium Mining, University of New

  13. Electrolytic process for preparing uranium metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haas, Paul A. (Knoxville, TN)

    1990-01-01

    An electrolytic process for making uranium from uranium oxide using Cl.sub.2 anode product from an electrolytic cell to react with UO.sub.2 to form uranium chlorides. The chlorides are used in low concentrations in a melt comprising fluorides and chlorides of potassium, sodium and barium in the electrolytic cell. The electrolysis produces Cl.sub.2 at the anode that reacts with UO.sub.2 in the feed reactor to form soluble UCl.sub.4, available for a continuous process in the electrolytic cell, rather than having insoluble UO.sub.2 fouling the cell.

  14. uranium

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 FederalRivers andMEDA Station3/%2A ¡BLM Public

  15. Uranium isotopic composition and uranium concentration in special reference material SRM A (uranium in KCl/LiCl salt matrix)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graczyk, D.G.; Essling, A.M.; Sabau, C.S.; Smith, F.P.; Bowers, D.L.; Ackerman, J.P.

    1997-07-01

    To help assure that analysis data of known quality will be produced in support of demonstration programs at the Fuel Conditioning Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West (Idaho Falls, ID), a special reference material has been prepared and characterized. Designated SRM A, the material consists of individual units of LiCl/KCl eutectic salt containing a nominal concentration of 2.5 wt. % enriched uranium. Analyses were performed at Argonne National Laboratory-East (Argonne, IL) to determine the uniformity of the material and to establish reference values for the uranium concentration and uranium isotopic composition. Ten units from a batch of approximately 190 units were analyzed by the mass spectrometric isotope dilution technique to determine their uranium concentration. These measurements provided a mean value of 2.5058 {+-} 0.0052 wt. % U, where the uncertainty includes estimated limits to both random and systematic errors that might have affected the measurements. Evidence was found of a small, apparently random, non-uniformity in uranium content of the individual SRM A units, which exhibits a standard deviation of 0.078% of the mean uranium concentration. Isotopic analysis of the uranium from three units, by means of thermal ionization mass spectrometry with a special, internal-standard procedure, indicated that the uranium isotopy is uniform among the pellets with a composition corresponding to 0.1115 {+-} 0.0006 wt. % {sup 234}U, 19.8336 {+-} 0.0059 wt. % {sup 235}U, 0.1337 {+-} 0.0006 wt. % {sup 236}U, and 79.9171 {+-} 0.0057 wt. % {sup 238}U.

  16. Thermodynamic properties of uranium dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fink, J.K.; Chasanov, M.G.; Leibowitz, L.

    1981-04-01

    In order to provide reliable and consistent data on the thermophysical properties of reactor materials for reactor safety studies, this revision is prepared for the thermodynamic properties of the uranium dioxide portion of the fuel property section of the report Properties for LMFBR Safety Analysis. Since the original report was issued in 1976, there has been international agreement on a vapor pressure equation for the total pressure over UO/sub 2/, new methods have been suggested for the calculation of enthalpy and heat capacity, and a phase change at 2670 K has been proposed. In this report, an electronic term is used in place of the Frenkel defect term in the enthalpy and heat capacity equation and the phase transition is accepted.

  17. Uranium associations and migration behaviour at the Needle’s Eye natural analogue site in SW Scotland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Xiaolu

    2015-06-30

    This thesis investigated uranium (U) migration behaviour at the Needle?s Eye natural analogue site, located close to Southwick Water, South West Scotland. The results of this study are important for the prediction of U ...

  18. Interdiffusion and Reaction between Uranium and Iron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Huang; Y. Park; A. Ewh; B. H. Sencer; J. R. Kennedy; K. R. Coffey; Y. H. Sohn

    2012-05-01

    Metallic uranium alloy fuels cladded in stainless steel are being examined for fast reactors that operate at high temperature. In this work, solid-to-solid diffusion couples were assembled between pure U and Fe, and annealed at 853K, 888K and 923K where U exists as orthorhombic {alpha}, and at 953K and 973K where U exists as tetragonal {beta}. The microstructures and concentration profiles developed during annealing were examined by scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis, respectively. U{sub 6}Fe and UFe{sub 2} intermetallics developed in all diffusion couples, and U{sub 6}Fe was observed to grow faster than UFe{sub 2}. The interdiffusion fluxes of U and Fe were calculated to determine the integrated interdiffusion coefficients in U{sub 6}Fe and UFe{sub 2}. The extrinsic (K{sub I}) and intrinsic growth constants (K{sub II}) of U{sub 6}Fe and UFe{sub 2} were also calculated according to Wagner's formalism. The difference between K{sub I} and K{sub II} of UFe{sub 2} indicate that its growth was impeded by the fast-growing U{sub 6}Fe phase. However, the thin UFe{sub 2} played only a small role on the growth of U{sub 6}Fe as its K{sub I} and K{sub II} values were determined to be similar. The allotropic transformation of uranium (orthorhombic {alpha} to tetragonal {beta} phase) was observed to influence the growth of U{sub 6}Fe directly, because the growth rate of U{sub 6}Fe changed based on variation of activation energy. The change in chemical potential and crystal structure of U due to the allotropic transformation affected the interdiffusion between U and U{sub 6}Fe. Faster growth of U{sub 6}Fe is also examined with respect to various factors including crystal structure, phase diagram, and diffusion.

  19. BIOSORPTION OF URANIUM ON SARGASSUM BIOMASS JINBAI YANG and BOHUMIL VOLESKY*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volesky, Bohumil

    Biosorption of dangerous elements from nuclear waste liquids has attracted a signi®cant focus in recent years into the environment through the activities associated with the nuclear industry (Benedict et al., 1981). Uranium in binding heavy metal ions of gold, cadmium, copper and zinc etc. (Volesky and Holan, 1995). The high sorp

  20. U.S. Uranium Reserves Estimates

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1. U.S. Forward-Cost Uranium Reserves by State, Year-End 2008 State 50lb 100lb Ore (million tons) Gradea (%) U3O8 (million lbs) Ore (million tons) Gradea (%) U3O8 (million lbs)...

  1. U.S. Uranium Reserves Estimates

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Methodology The U.S. uranium ore reserves reported by EIA for specific MFC categories represent the sums of quantities estimated to occur in known deposits on properties where data...

  2. U.S. Uranium Reserves Estimates

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2. U.S. Forward-Cost Uranium Reserves by Mining Method, Year-End 2008 Mining Method 50 per pound 100 per pound Ore (million tons) Gradea (percent U3O8) U3O8 (million pounds) Ore...

  3. Innovative design of uranium startup fast reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fei, Tingzhou

    2012-01-01

    Sodium Fast Reactors are one of the three candidates of GEN-IV fast reactors. Fast reactors play an important role in saving uranium resources and reducing nuclear wastes. Conventional fast reactors rely on transuranic ...

  4. Summary of the engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1981-07-01

    The Grand Junction site has been reevaluated in order to revise the october 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Grand Junction, Colorado. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 1.9 million tons of tailings at the Grand Junction site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. The eight alternative actions presented herein range from millsite and off-site decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option I), to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site (Option II through VIII). Cost estimates for the eight options range from about $10,200,000 for stabilization in-place to about $39,500,000 for disposal in the DeBeque area, at a distance of about 35 mi, using transportation by rail. If transportation to DeBeque were by truck, the cost is estimated to be about $41,900,000. Three prinicpal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Grand Junction tailings were examined: (a) heap leaching; (b) treatment at an existing mill; and (c) reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $200/lb by heap leach and $150/lb by conventional plant processes. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery appears not to be economically attractive.

  5. Decommissioning of uranium mines in Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zgola, M.B. [Atomic Energy Control Board, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    The Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) regulates the nuclear fuel cycle in Canada. This paper overviews the nature and function of the AECB; discusses its {open_quotes}site-specific{close_quotes} approach to regulating the decommissioning of uranium mining facilities; catalogues the location and status of inactive uranium tailings impoundments in Canada; and, summarizes the decommissioning work at the licensed Elliot Lake tailings impoundments.

  6. The ultimate disposition of depleted uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemons, T.R. [Uranium Enrichment Organization, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Depleted uranium (DU) is produced as a by-product of the uranium enrichment process. Over 340,000 MTU of DU in the form of UF{sub 6} have been accumulated at the US government gaseous diffusion plants and the stockpile continues to grow. An overview of issues and objectives associated with the inventory management and the ultimate disposition of this material is presented.

  7. Depleted uranium: A DOE management guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a management challenge and financial liability in the form of 50,000 cylinders containing 555,000 metric tons of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) that are stored at the gaseous diffusion plants. The annual storage and maintenance cost is approximately $10 million. This report summarizes several studies undertaken by the DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD) to evaluate options for long-term depleted uranium management. Based on studies conducted to date, the most likely use of the depleted uranium is for shielding of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) or vitrified high-level waste (HLW) containers. The alternative to finding a use for the depleted uranium is disposal as a radioactive waste. Estimated disposal costs, utilizing existing technologies, range between $3.8 and $11.3 billion, depending on factors such as applicability of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the location of the disposal site. The cost of recycling the depleted uranium in a concrete based shielding in SNF/HLW containers, although substantial, is comparable to or less than the cost of disposal. Consequently, the case can be made that if DOE invests in developing depleted uranium shielded containers instead of disposal, a long-term solution to the UF{sub 6} problem is attained at comparable or lower cost than disposal as a waste. Two concepts for depleted uranium storage casks were considered in these studies. The first is based on standard fabrication concepts previously developed for depleted uranium metal. The second converts the UF{sub 6} to an oxide aggregate that is used in concrete to make dry storage casks.

  8. Electrochemical method of producing eutectic uranium alloy and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horton, James A. (Livermore, CA); Hayden, H. Wayne (Oakridge, TN)

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus and method for continuous production of liquid uranium alloys through the electrolytic reduction of uranium chlorides. The apparatus includes an electrochemical cell formed from an anode shaped to form an electrolyte reservoir, a cathode comprising a metal, such as iron, capable of forming a eutectic uranium alloy having a melting point less than the melting point of pure uranium, and molten electrolyte in the reservoir comprising a chlorine or fluorine containing salt and uranium chloride. The method of the invention produces an eutectic uranium alloy by creating an electrolyte reservoir defined by a container comprising an anode, placing an electrolyte in the reservoir, the electrolyte comprising a chlorine or fluorine containing salt and uranium chloride in molten form, positioning a cathode in the reservoir where the cathode comprises a metal capable of forming an uranium alloy having a melting point less than the melting point of pure uranium, and applying a current between the cathode and the anode.

  9. Conversion and Blending Facility Highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as uranium hexafluoride. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-05

    This report describes the Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) which will have two missions: (1) convert surplus HEU materials to pure HEU UF{sub 6} and a (2) blend the pure HEU UF{sub 6} with diluent UF{sub 6} to produce LWR grade LEU-UF{sub 6}. The primary emphasis of this blending be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. The chemical and isotopic concentrations of the blended LEU product will be held within the specifications required for LWR fuel. The blended LEU product will be offered to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) to be sold as feed material to the commercial nuclear industry.

  10. Uranium diphosphonates templated by interlayer organic amines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Anna-Gay D.; Alekseev, Evgeny V.; Institut fuer Kristallographie, RWTH Aachen University, D-52066 Aachen ; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.; Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Notre Dame, IN 46556 ; Ewing, Rodney C.

    2013-02-15

    The hydrothermal treatment of uranium trioxide and methylenediphosphonic acid with a variety of amines (2,2-dipyridyl, triethylenediamine, ethylenediamine, and 1,10-phenanthroline) at 200 Degree-Sign C results in the crystallization of a series of layered uranium diphosphonate compounds, [C{sub 10}H{sub 9}N{sub 2}]{l_brace}UO{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)[CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3})(PO{sub 3}H)]{r_brace} (Ubip2), [C{sub 6}H{sub 14}N{sub 2}]{l_brace}(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}[CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3})(PO{sub 3}H)]{sub 2}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O{r_brace} (UDAB), [C{sub 2}H{sub 10}N{sub 2}]{sub 2}{l_brace}(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}[CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2}{center_dot}0.5H{sub 2}O{r_brace} (Uethyl), and [C{sub 12}H{sub 9}N{sub 2}]{l_brace}UO{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)[CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3})(PO{sub 3}H)]{r_brace} (Uphen). The crystal structures of the compounds are based on UO{sub 7} units linked by methylenediphosphonate molecules to form two-dimensional anionic sheets in Ubip2 and UDAB, and one-dimensional anionic chains in Uethyl and Uphen, which are charge balanced by protonated amine molecules. Interaction of the amine molecules with phosphonate oxygens and water molecules results in extensive hydrogen bonding in the interlayer. These amine molecules serve both as structure-directing agents and charge-balancing cations for the anionic uranium phosphonate sheets and chains in the formation of the different coordination geometries and topologies of each structure. Reported herein are the syntheses, structural and spectroscopic characterization of the synthesized compounds. - Graphical abstract: The Raman spectra of the synthesized compounds and an illustration of the stacking of the layers with the diprotonated triethylenediamine molecules in [C{sub 6}H{sub 14}N{sub 2}]{l_brace}(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}[CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3})(PO{sub 3}H)]{sub 2}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O{r_brace} UDAB. Solvent water molecules are removed for clarity. The corresponding Raman spectra for the complexes synthesized is also shown. The structure is constructed from UO{sub 7} pentagonal bipyramids (yellow), oxygen=red, phosphorus=magenta, carbon=black, and nitrogen=blue. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Organic amines act both as charge-balancing and as structure-directing agents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extensive hydrogen bonding interactions with solvent water molecules and amines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Altering the organic amine (size or flexibility) affects structure formation.

  11. Effects of solution pH and complexing reagents on uranium and thorium desorption under saturated equilibrium conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yug-Yea; Yu, C.

    1992-01-01

    Three contaminated bulk surface soils were used for investigating the effect of solution pH and complexing reagents on uranium and thorium desorption. At a low solution pH, the major chemical species of uranium and thorium, uranyl UO{sub 2}{sup +2}, thorium dihydroxide Th(OH){sub 2}{sup +2}, and thorium hydroxide Th(OH){sup +3}, tend to form complexes with acetates in the solution phase, which increases the fractions of uranium and thorium desorbed into this phase. At a high solution pH, important uranium and thorium species such as uranyl tricarbonate complex UO{sub 2}(CO){sub 3}{sub 3}{sup {minus}4} and thorium tetrahydroxide complex Th(OH){sub 4} tend to resist complexation with acetates. The presence of complexing reagents in solution can release radionuclides such as uranium and/or thorium from the soil to the solution by forming soluble complexes. Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO{sub 3}) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) are strong complex formers that released 38% to 62% of total uranium activity and 78% to 86% of total thorium activity, respectively, from the soil samples investigated. Solutions of 0.1 molar sodium nitrate (NaNO{sub 3}) and 0.1 molar sodium sulfate (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) were not effective complex formers with uranium and thorium under the experimental conditions. Fractions of uranium and thorium desorbed by 0.15g/200ml humic acid ranged from 4.62% to 6.17% and 1.59% to 7.09%, respectively. This work demonstrates the importance of a knowledge of solution chemistry in investigating the desorption of radionuclides.

  12. Effects of solution pH and complexing reagents on uranium and thorium desorption under saturated equilibrium conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yug-Yea; Yu, C.

    1992-08-01

    Three contaminated bulk surface soils were used for investigating the effect of solution pH and complexing reagents on uranium and thorium desorption. At a low solution pH, the major chemical species of uranium and thorium, uranyl UO{sub 2}{sup +2}, thorium dihydroxide Th(OH){sub 2}{sup +2}, and thorium hydroxide Th(OH){sup +3}, tend to form complexes with acetates in the solution phase, which increases the fractions of uranium and thorium desorbed into this phase. At a high solution pH, important uranium and thorium species such as uranyl tricarbonate complex UO{sub 2}(CO){sub 3}{sub 3}{sup {minus}4} and thorium tetrahydroxide complex Th(OH){sub 4} tend to resist complexation with acetates. The presence of complexing reagents in solution can release radionuclides such as uranium and/or thorium from the soil to the solution by forming soluble complexes. Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO{sub 3}) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) are strong complex formers that released 38% to 62% of total uranium activity and 78% to 86% of total thorium activity, respectively, from the soil samples investigated. Solutions of 0.1 molar sodium nitrate (NaNO{sub 3}) and 0.1 molar sodium sulfate (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) were not effective complex formers with uranium and thorium under the experimental conditions. Fractions of uranium and thorium desorbed by 0.15g/200ml humic acid ranged from 4.62% to 6.17% and 1.59% to 7.09%, respectively. This work demonstrates the importance of a knowledge of solution chemistry in investigating the desorption of radionuclides.

  13. Characterization of cores from an in-situ recovery mined uranium deposit in Wyoming: Implications for post-mining restoration

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    WoldeGabriel, G.; Boukhalfa, H.; Ware, S. D.; Cheshire, M.; Reimus, P.; Heikoop, J.; Conradson, S. D.; Batuk, O.; Havrilla, G.; House, B.; et al

    2014-10-08

    In-situ recovery (ISR) of uranium (U) from sandstone-type roll-front deposits is a technology that involves the injection of solutions that consist of ground water fortified with oxygen and carbonate to promote the oxidative dissolution of U, which is pumped to recovery facilities located at the surface that capture the dissolved U and recycle the treated water. The ISR process alters the geochemical conditions in the subsurface creating conditions that are more favorable to the migration of uranium and other metals associated with the uranium deposit. There is a lack of clear understanding of the impact of ISR mining on themore »aquifer and host rocks of the post-mined site and the fate of residual U and other metals within the mined ore zone. We performed detailed petrographic, mineralogical, and geochemical analyses of several samples taken from about 7 m of core of the formerly the ISR-mined Smith Ranch–Highland uranium deposit in Wyoming. We show that previously mined cores contain significant residual uranium (U) present as coatings on pyrite and carbonaceous fragments. Coffinite was identified in three samples. Core samples with higher organic (> 1 wt.%) and clay (> 6–17 wt.%) contents yielded higher 234U/238U activity ratios (1.0–1.48) than those with lower organic and clay fractions. The ISR mining was inefficient in mobilizing U from the carbonaceous materials, which retained considerable U concentrations (374–11,534 ppm). This is in contrast with the deeper part of the ore zone, which was highly depleted in U and had very low 234U/238U activity ratios. This probably is due to greater contact with the lixiviant (leaching solution) during ISR mining. EXAFS analyses performed on grains with the highest U and Fe concentrations reveal that Fe is present in a reduced form as pyrite and U occurs mostly as U(IV) complexed by organic matter or as U(IV) phases of carbonate complexes. Moreover, U–O distances of ~ 2.05 Å were noted, indicating the potential formation of other poorly defined U(IV/VI) species. We also noted a small contribution from Udouble bond; length as m-dashO at 1.79 Å, which indicates that U is partially oxidized. There is no apparent U–S or U–Fe interaction in any of the U spectra analyzed. However, SEM analysis of thin sections prepared from the same core material reveals surficial U associated with pyrite which is probably a minor fraction of the total U present as thin coatings on the surface of pyrite. Our data show the presence of different structurally variable uranium forms associated with the mined cores. U associated with carbonaceous materials is probably from the original U mobilization that accumulated in the organic matter-rich areas under reducing conditions during shallow burial diagenesis. U associated with pyrite represents a small fraction of the total U and was likely deposited as a result of chemical reduction by pyrite. Our data suggest that areas rich in carbonaceous materials had limited exposure to the lixiviant solution, continue to be reducing, and still hold significant U resources. Because of their limited access to fluid flow, these areas might not contribute significantly to post-mining U release or attenuation. Areas with pyrite that are accessible to fluids seem to be more reactive and could act as reductants and facilitate U reduction and accumulation, limiting its migration.« less

  14. Final programmatic environmental impact statement for the uranium mill tailings remedial action ground water project. Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1996-10-01

    This programmatic environmental impact statement (PElS) was prepared for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). This PElS provides an analysis of the potential impacts of the alternatives and ground water compliance strategies as well as potential cumulative impacts. On November 8, 1978, Congress enacted the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law, codified at 42 USC §7901 et seq. Congress found that uranium mill tailings " ... may pose a potential and significant radiation health hazard to the public, and that every reasonable effort should be made to provide for stabilization, disposal, and control in a safe, and environmentally sound manner of such tailings in order to prevent or minimize other environmental hazards from such tailings." Congress authorized the Secretary of Energy to designate inactive uranium processing sites for remedial action by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Congress also directed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to set the standards to be followed by the DOE for this process of stabilization, disposal, and control. On January 5, 1983, EPA published standards (40 CFR Part 192) for the disposal and cleanup of residual radioactive materials. On September 3, 1985, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit set aside and remanded to EPA the ground water provisions of the standards. The EPA proposed new standards to replace remanded sections and changed other sections of 40 CFR Part 192. These proposed standards were published in the Federal Register on September 24, 1987 (52 FR 36000). Section 108 of the UMTRCA requires that DOE comply with EPA's proposed standards in the absence of final standards. The Ground Water Project was planned under the proposed standards. On January 11, 1995, EPA published the final rule, with which the DOE must now comply. The PElS and the Ground Water Project are in accordance with the final standards. The EPA reserves the right to modify the ground water standards, if necessary, based on changes in EPA drinking water standards. Appendix A contains a copy of the 1983 EPA ground water compliance standards, the 1987 proposed changes to the standards, and the 1995 final rule. Under UMTRA, DOE is responsible for bringing the designated processing sites into compliance with the EPA ground water standards and complying with all other applicable standards and requirements. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) must concur with DOE's actions. States are full participants in the process. The DOE also must consult with any affected Indian tribes and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Uranium processing activities at most of the inactive mill sites resulted in the contamination of ground water beneath and, in some cases, downgradient of the sites. This contaminated ground water often has elevated levels of constituents such as but not limited to uranium and nitrates. The purpose of the UMTRA Ground Water Project is to eliminate or reduce to acceptable levels the potential health and environmental consequences of milling activities by meeting the EPA ground water standards.

  15. Stability of uranium incorporated into Fe(hydr)oxides under fluctuating redox conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, B.D.

    2009-01-01

    at the Koongarra uranium deposit, Northern Australia -Uranium isotopic evidence for the origin of the Bahariya iron deposits,

  16. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Computer-based procedure for field activities: results from three evaluations at nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oxstrand, Johanna; Bly, Aaron; LeBlanc, Katya

    2014-09-01

    Nearly all activities that involve human interaction with the systems of a nuclear power plant are guided by procedures. The paper-based procedures (PBPs) currently used by industry have a demonstrated history of ensuring safety; however, improving procedure use could yield tremendous savings in increased efficiency and safety. One potential way to improve procedure-based activities is through the use of computer-based procedures (CBPs). Computer-based procedures provide the opportunity to incorporate context driven job aids, such as drawings, photos, just-in-time training, etc into CBP system. One obvious advantage of this capability is reducing the time spent tracking down the applicable documentation. Additionally, human performance tools can be integrated in the CBP system in such way that helps the worker focus on the task rather than the tools. Some tools can be completely incorporated into the CBP system, such as pre-job briefs, placekeeping, correct component verification, and peer checks. Other tools can be partly integrated in a fashion that reduces the time and labor required, such as concurrent and independent verification. Another benefit of CBPs compared to PBPs is dynamic procedure presentation. PBPs are static documents which limits the degree to which the information presented can be tailored to the task and conditions when the procedure is executed. The CBP system could be configured to display only the relevant steps based on operating mode, plant status, and the task at hand. A dynamic presentation of the procedure (also known as context-sensitive procedures) will guide the user down the path of relevant steps based on the current conditions. This feature will reduce the user’s workload and inherently reduce the risk of incorrectly marking a step as not applicable and the risk of incorrectly performing a step that should be marked as not applicable. As part of the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Light Water Reactors Sustainability Program, researchers at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) along with partners from the nuclear industry have been investigating the design requirements for computer-based work instructions (including operations procedures, work orders, maintenance procedures, etc.) to increase efficiency, safety, and cost competitiveness of existing light water reactors.

  17. Radioactive and other environmental threats to the United States and the Arctic resulting from past Soviet activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-12-31

    Earlier this year the Senate Intelligence Committee began to receive reports from environmental and nuclear scientists in Russia detailing the reckless nuclear waste disposal practices, nuclear accidents and the use of nuclear detonations. We found that information disturbing to say the least. Also troubling is the fact that 15 Chernobyl style RBMK nuclear power reactors continue to operate in the former Soviet Union today. These reactors lack a containment structure and they`re designed in such a way that nuclear reaction can actually increase when the reactor overheats. As scientists here at the University of Alaska have documented, polar air masses and prevailing weather patterns provide a pathway for radioactive contaminants from Eastern Europe and Western Russia, where many of these reactors are located. The threats presented by those potential radioactive risks are just a part of a larger Arctic pollution problem. Every day, industrial activities of the former Soviet Union continue to create pollutants. I think we should face up to the reality that in a country struggling for economic survival, environment protection isn`t necessarily the high priority. And that could be very troubling news for the Arctic in the future.

  18. Uranium and other heavy metals in soil and vegetation from the Hanford environs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, K.R.; Kinnison, R.R.

    1982-11-01

    Strong winds that could transport contaminated dust and other materials offsite from the Hanford 300 Area typically blow from the west or southwest. Samples were collected from an offsite study area located across the Columbia River and downwind from the 300 Area to estimate the concentrations of uranium and other heavy metals in soils and vegetation. Results were compared to similar measurements collected at control sites located both on and off the Hanford Site. These comparisons were used to test hypotheses that uranium and other heavy metals had been transported offsite by wind-blown dust or other materials. The conclusion from this study was that operations at the 300 Area have not resulted in a detectable impact on the offsite environs across the river. The concentration of uranium in soil samples from the study area was statistically greater than comparable samples from control sites, but there was no evidence that the uranium in the study-area samples was other than naturally occurring. There was no statistical difference in the concentration of lead, silver, zinc or copper in soil samples from the study area as compared to the control sites. No statistically significant differences in uranium or other heavy metals were noted among vegetation samples from the various sampling sites.

  19. Ultraslow Wave Nuclear Burning of Uranium-Plutonium Fissile Medium on Epithermal Neutrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rusov, V D; Eingorn, M V; Chernezhenko, S A; Kakaev, A A

    2014-01-01

    For a fissile medium, originally consisting of uranium-238, the investigation of fulfillment of the wave burning criterion in a wide range of neutron energies is conducted for the first time, and a possibility of wave nuclear burning not only in the region of fast neutrons, but also for cold, epithermal and resonance ones is discovered for the first time. For the first time the results of the investigation of the Feoktistov criterion fulfillment for a fissile medium, originally consisting of uranium-238 dioxide with enrichments 4.38%, 2.00%, 1.00%, 0.71% and 0.50% with respect to uranium-235, in the region of neutron energies 0.015-10.0eV are presented. These results indicate a possibility of ultraslow wave neutron-nuclear burning mode realization in the uranium-plutonium media, originally (before the wave initiation by external neutron source) having enrichments with respect to uranium-235, corresponding to the subcritical state, in the regions of cold, thermal, epithermal and resonance neutrons. In order to...

  20. 2013 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-11-01

    This report, in fulfillment of a license requirement, presents the results of long-term surveillance and maintenance activities conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management in 2013 at six uranium mill tailings disposal sites reclaimed under Title II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978. These activities verified that the UMTRCA Title II disposal sites remain in compliance with license requirements. DOE manages six UMTRCA Title II disposal sites under a general license granted by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established at Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 40.28. Reclamation and site transition activities continue at other sites, and DOE ultimately expects to manage approximately 27 Title II disposal sites. Long-term surveillance and maintenance activities and services for these disposal sites include inspecting and maintaining the sites; monitoring environmental media and institutional controls; conducting any necessary corrective action; and performing administrative, records, stakeholder services, and other regulatory functions. Annual site inspections and monitoring are conducted in accordance with site-specific long-term surveillance plans (LTSPs) and procedures established by DOE to comply with license requirements. Each site inspection is performed to verify the integrity of visible features at the site; to identify changes or new conditions that may affect the long-term performance of the site; and to determine the need, if any, for maintenance, follow-up inspections, or corrective action. LTSPs and site compliance reports are available online at http://www.lm.doe.gov

  1. Can Ionic Liquids Be Used As Templating Agents For Controlled Design of Uranium-Containing Nanomaterials?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Visser, A.; Bridges, N.; Tosten, M.

    2013-04-09

    Nanostructured uranium oxides have been prepared in ionic liquids as templating agents. Using the ionic liquids as reaction media for inorganic nanomaterials takes advantage of the pre-organized structure of the ionic liquids which in turn controls the morphology of the inorganic nanomaterials. Variation of ionic liquid cation structure was investigated to determine the impact on the uranium oxide morphologies. For two ionic liquid cations, increasing the alkyl chain length increases the aspect ratio of the resulting nanostructured oxides. Understanding the resulting metal oxide morphologies could enhance fuel stability and design.

  2. Recovery of Depleted Uranium Fragments from Soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farr, C.P.; Alecksen, T.J.; Heronimus, R.S.; Simonds, M.H.; Farrar, D.R.; Baker, K.R. [Environmental Restoration Group, Inc., Washington St. NE, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Miller, M.L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2008-07-01

    A cost-effective method was demonstrated for recovering depleted uranium (DU) fragments from soil. A compacted clean soil pad was prepared adjacent to a pile of soil containing DU fragments. Soil from the contaminated pile was placed on the pad in three-inch lifts using conventional construction equipment. Each lift was scanned with an automatic scanning system consisting of an array of radiation detectors coupled to a detector positioning system. The data were downloaded into ArcGIS for data presentation. Areas of the pad exhibiting scaler counts above the decision level were identified as likely locations of DU fragments. The coordinates of these locations were downloaded into a PDA that was wirelessly connected to the positioning system. The PDA guided technicians to the locations where hand-held trowels and shovels were used to remove the fragments. After DU removal, the affected areas were re-scanned and the new data patched into the data base to replace the original data. This new data set along with soil sample results served as final status survey data. (authors)

  3. Fire testing of bare uranium hexafluoride cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pryor, W.A. [PAI Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31

    In 1965, the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), now the K-25 Site, conducted a series of tests in which bare cylinders of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) were exposed to engulfing oil fires for the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), now the US Department of Energy (DOE). The tests are described and the results, conclusions, and observations are presented. Two each of the following types of cylinders were tested: 3.5-in.-diam {times} 7.5-in.-long cylinders of Monel (Harshaw), 5.0-in.-diam {times} x 30-in.-long cylinders of Monel, and 8-in.-diam {times} 48-in.-long cylinders of nickel. The cylinders were filled approximately to the standard UF{sub 6} fill limits of 5, 55, and 250 lb, respectively, with a U-235 content of 0.22%. The 5-in.- and 8-in.-diam cylinders were tested individually with and without their metal valve covers. For the 3.5-in.-diam Harshaw cylinders and the 5.0-in.-diam cylinder without a valve cover, the valves failed and UF{sub 6} was released. The remaining 6 cylinders ruptured explosively in time intervals ranging from about 8.5 to 11 min.

  4. Fire testing of bare uranium hexafluoride cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pryor, W.A. [PAI Corp., Oak Rige, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31

    In 1965, the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), now the K-25 Site, conducted a series of tests in which bare cylinders of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) were exposed to engulfing oil fires for the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), now the US Department of Energy (DOE). The tests are described and the results, conclusions, and observations are presented. Two each of the following types of cylinders were tested: 3.5-in.-diam {times} 7.5-in.-long cylinders of Monel (Harshaw), 5.0-in.-diam {times} 30-in.-long cylinders of Monel, and 8-in.-diam {times} 48-in.-long cylinders of nickel. The cylinders were filled approximately to the standard UF{sub 6} fill limits of 5, 55, and 250 lb, respectively, with a U-235 content of 0.22%. The 5-in.- and 8-in.-diam cylinders were tested individually with and without their metal valve covers. For the 3.5-in.-diam Harshaw cylinders and the 5.0-in.-diam cylinder without a valve cover the valves failed and UF{sub 6} was released. The remaining cylinders ruptured explosively in time intervals ranging from about 8.5 to 11 min.

  5. United States transuranium and uranium registries - 25 years of growth, research, and service. Annual report, April 1992--September 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathren, R.L.; Harwick, L.A.; Toohey, R.E.; Russell, J.J.; Filipy, R.E.; Dietert, S.E.; Hunacek, M.M.; Hall, C.A.

    1994-10-01

    The Registries originated in 1968 as the National Plutonium Registry with the name changed to the United States Transuranium Registry the following year to reflect a broader concern with the heavier actinides as well. Initially, the scientific effort of the USTR was directed towards study of the distribution and dose of plutonium and americium in occupationally exposed persons, and to assessment of the effects of exposure to the transuranium elements on health. This latter role was reassessed during the 1970`s when it was recognized that the biased cohort of the USTR was inappropriate for epidemiologic analysis. In 1978, the administratively separate but parallel United States Uranium Registry was created to carry out similar work among persons exposed to uranium and its decay products. A seven member scientific advisory committee provided guidance and scientific oversight. In 1992, the two Registries were administratively combined and transferred from the purview of a Department of Energy contractor to Washington State University under the provisions of a grant. Scientific results for the first twenty-five years of the Registries are summarized, including the 1985 publication of the analysis of the first whole body donor. Current scientific work in progress is summarized along with administrative activities for the period.

  6. Impacts of uranium-utilization improvements on light water reactor radionuclide releases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaberg, R.L.

    1981-08-01

    This report discusses potential changes to radionuclide releases as a result of uranium-saving plant modifications and altered operating practices. Only releases to the environment from routine operation are considered; releases resulting from abnormal conditions outside the technical specifications covering plant operation are not considered.

  7. Annual report on the U.S. Department of Energy`s Cultural Resource Activities at Colorado UMTRA Project Sites for October 1993 through September 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    This report summarizes the results of cultural resource activities conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites in Colorado for the period of October 1, 1993, through September 30, 1994. The UMTRA Project is a cooperative (state and federal) program mandated by the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act, Public Law 95-604 (42 USC {section}7901 et seq.). This law requires the timely cleanup of 24 inactive uranium mill tailings sites throughout the United States. Nine of these inactive uranium mill tailings sites are in Colorado at Durango, Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock. On December 6, 1984, the DOE, Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO) entered into a programmatic memorandum of agreement (PMOA) (DOE, 1984). This PMOA specifies requirements for the DOE`s fulfillment of its obligations under various state and federal regulations for the protection and preservation of cultural resources. This report fulfills the requirement for the DOE to provide the state of Colorado with an annual report on the cultural resource activities performed for all of the UMTRA Project sites in Colorado. This report is organized by UMTRA Project site. For each site, the general remedial action activities and cultural resource activities performed during the period of record are summarized. When known, the DOE`s plans for future cultural resource activities at the site are summarized.

  8. Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Fully Operational at the...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Jack Zimmerman, DUF6 at the PortsmouthPaducah Project Office. DUF6 is depleted uranium hexafluoride, a byproduct of uranium enrichment that has taken place at U.S. gaseous...

  9. EA-1290: Disposition of Russian Federation Titled Natural Uranium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to transport up to an average of 9,000 metric tons per year of natural uranium as uranium hexafluoride (UF6) from the United...

  10. ORNL/TM-2009/110 Profile of World Uranium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    ORNL/TM-2009/110 Profile of World Uranium Enrichment Programs--2009 April 2009 Prepared by M. D PROFILE OF WORLD URANIUM ENRICHMENT PROGRAMS--2009 M. D. Laughter Date Published: April 2009 This work

  11. Prospects for the recovery of uranium from seawater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Best, F. R.

    1980-01-01

    A computer program entitled URPE (Uranium Recovery Performance and Economics) has been developed to simulate the engineering performance and provide an economic analysis O of a plant recovering uranium from seawater. The ...

  12. Assessments of long-term uranium supply availability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaterman, Daniel R

    2009-01-01

    The future viability of nuclear power will depend on the long-term availability of uranium. A two-form uranium supply model was used to estimate the date at which peak production will occur. The model assumes a constant ...

  13. Uranium hexafluoride packaging tiedown systems overview at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, D.L.; Lindquist, M.R.

    1993-03-01

    The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) in Piketon, Ohio operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., through the US Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO) for the US Department of Energy Headquarters, Office of Nuclear Energy. The PORTS conducts those operations that are necessary for the production, packaging, and shipment of enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF[sub 6]). Uranium hexafluoride enriched greater than 1.0 wt percent [sup 235]U shall be packaged in accordance with the US Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations of Title 49 CFR Parts 173 (Reference 1) and 178 (Reference 2), or in US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) or US Department of Energy (DOE) certified package designs. Concerns have been expressed regarding the various tiedown methods and condition of the trailers being used by some shippers/carriers for international transport of the UF[sub 6] cylinders/overpacks (Reference 3). Because of the concerns about international shipments, the US Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Office of Nuclear Energy, through DOE-HQ Transportation Management Division, requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) to review UF[sub 6] packaging tiedown and shipping practices used by PORTS, and where possible and appropriate, provide recommendations for enhancing these practices. Consequently, a tram of two individuals from Westinghouse Hanford visited PORTS on March 5 and 6, 1990, for the purpose of conducting this review. The paper provides a brief discussion of the review activities and a summary of the resulting findings and recommendations. A detailed reporting of the review is documented in Reference 4.

  14. Uranium hexafluoride packaging tiedown systems overview at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, D.L.; Lindquist, M.R.

    1993-03-01

    The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) in Piketon, Ohio operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., through the US Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO) for the US Department of Energy Headquarters, Office of Nuclear Energy. The PORTS conducts those operations that are necessary for the production, packaging, and shipment of enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}). Uranium hexafluoride enriched greater than 1.0 wt percent {sup 235}U shall be packaged in accordance with the US Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations of Title 49 CFR Parts 173 (Reference 1) and 178 (Reference 2), or in US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) or US Department of Energy (DOE) certified package designs. Concerns have been expressed regarding the various tiedown methods and condition of the trailers being used by some shippers/carriers for international transport of the UF{sub 6} cylinders/overpacks (Reference 3). Because of the concerns about international shipments, the US Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Office of Nuclear Energy, through DOE-HQ Transportation Management Division, requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) to review UF{sub 6} packaging tiedown and shipping practices used by PORTS, and where possible and appropriate, provide recommendations for enhancing these practices. Consequently, a tram of two individuals from Westinghouse Hanford visited PORTS on March 5 and 6, 1990, for the purpose of conducting this review. The paper provides a brief discussion of the review activities and a summary of the resulting findings and recommendations. A detailed reporting of the review is documented in Reference 4.

  15. Preconceptual design studies and cost data of depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, E

    1999-07-26

    One of the more important legacies left with the Department of Energy (DOE) after the privatization of the United States Enrichment Corporation is the large inventory of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6). The DOE Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology (NE) is responsible for the long-term management of some 700,000 metric tons of DUF6 stored at the sites of the two gaseous diffusion plants located at Paducah, Kentucky and Portsmouth, Ohio, and at the East Tennessee Technology Park in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The DUF6 management program resides in NE's Office of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management. The current DUF6 program has largely focused on the ongoing maintenance of the cylinders containing DUF6. However, the long-term management and eventual disposition of DUF6 is the subject of a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) and Public Law 105-204. The first step for future use or disposition is to convert the material, which requires construction and long-term operation of one or more conversion plants. To help inform the DUF6 program's planning activities, it was necessary to perform design and cost studies of likely DUF6 conversion plants at the preconceptual level, beyond the PEIS considerations but not as detailed as required for conceptual designs of actual plants. This report contains the final results from such a preconceptual design study project. In this fast track, three month effort, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Bechtel National Incorporated developed and evaluated seven different preconceptual design cases for a single plant. The preconceptual design, schedules, costs, and issues associated with specific DUF6 conversion approaches, operating periods, and ownership options were evaluated based on criteria established by DOE. The single-plant conversion options studied were similar to the dry-conversion process alternatives from the PEIS. For each of the seven cases considered, this report contains information on the conversion process, preconceptual plant description, rough capital and operating costs, and preliminary project schedule.

  16. April market review. [Spot market prices for uranium (1993)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The spot market price for uranium outside the USA weakened further during April, and at month end, the NUEXCO Exchange Value had fallen $0.35, to $7.10 per pound U3O8. This is the lowest Exchange Value observed in nearly twenty years, comparable to Values recorded during the low price levels of the early 1970s. The Restricted American Market Penalty (RAMP) for concentrates increased $0.40, to $2.95 per pound U3O8. Transactions for significant quantities of uranium concentrates that are both deliverable in and intended for consumption in the USA could have been concluded on April 30 at $10.05 per pound U3O8, up $0.05 from the sum of corresponding March Values. Four near-term concentrates transactions were reported, totalling nearly 1.5 million pounds equivalent U3O8. One long-term sale was reported. The UF6 Value also declined, as increased competition among sellers led to a $0.50 decrease, to $24.50 per kgU as UF6. However, the RAMP for UF6 increased $0.65, to $5.90 per kgU as UF6, reflecting an effective US market level of $30.40 per kgU. Two near term transactions were reported totalling approximately 1.1 million pounds equivalent U3O8. In total, eight uranium transactions totalling 28 million pounds equivalent U3O8 were reported, which is about average for April market activity.

  17. Electron Microbeam Investigation of Uranium-Contaminated Soils from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Chen

    . Uranium(VI), which typically occurs in the uranyl (UO2 2+) ion or in uranyl complexes, dominates under

  18. Monitoring Uranium Transformations Determined by the Evolution of Biogeochemical Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsh, Terence L.

    2013-07-30

    Our contribution to the larger project (ANL) was the phylogenetic analysis of evolved communities capable of reducing metals including uranium.

  19. The Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) Finite Element Meshing Discussion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) Finite Element Meshing Discussion Loring Wyllie Arne Halterman Degenkolb Engineers, San Francisco

  20. Modeling Uranium-Proton Ion Exchange in Biosorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volesky, Bohumil

    Modeling Uranium-Proton Ion Exchange in Biosorption J I N B A I Y A N G A N D B O H U M I L V O L E, Quebec, Canada H3A 2B2 Biosorption of uranium metal ions by a nonliving protonated Sargassum fluitans seaweed biomass was used to remove the heavy metal uranium from the aqueous solution. Uranium biosorption

  1. Retrieval of buried depleted uranium from the T-1 trench

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burmeister, M.; Castaneda, N.; Greengard, T. |; Hull, C.; Barbour, D.; Quapp, W.J.

    1998-07-01

    The Trench 1 remediation project will be conducted this year to retrieve depleted uranium and other associated materials from a trench at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site. The excavated materials will be segregated and stabilized for shipment. The depleted uranium will be treated at an offsite facility which utilizes a novel approach for waste minimization and disposal through utilization of a combination of uranium recycling and volume efficient uranium stabilization.

  2. The radioactive Substances (Uranium and Thorium) Exemption Order 1962 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, Keith

    1962-01-01

    STATUTORY INSTRUMENTS 1962 No.2710 ATOMIC ENERGY AND RADIOACTIVE SUBSTANCES The Radioactive Substances (Uranium and Thorium) Exemption Order 1962

  3. Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Water with Uranium Metal in K Basins Sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2010-01-29

    Means to decrease the rate of hydrogen gas generation from the chemical reaction of uranium metal with water were identified by surveying the technical literature. The underlying chemistry and potential side reactions were explored by conducting 61 principal experiments. Several methods achieved significant hydrogen gas generation rate mitigation. Gas-generating side reactions from interactions of organics or sludge constituents with mitigating agents were observed. Further testing is recommended to develop deeper knowledge of the underlying chemistry and to advance the technology aturation level. Uranium metal reacts with water in K Basin sludge to form uranium hydride (UH3), uranium dioxide or uraninite (UO2), and diatomic hydrogen (H2). Mechanistic studies show that hydrogen radicals (H·) and UH3 serve as intermediates in the reaction of uranium metal with water to produce H2 and UO2. Because H2 is flammable, its release into the gas phase above K Basin sludge during sludge storage, processing, immobilization, shipment, and disposal is a concern to the safety of those operations. Findings from the technical literature and from experimental investigations with simple chemical systems (including uranium metal in water), in the presence of individual sludge simulant components, with complete sludge simulants, and with actual K Basin sludge are presented in this report. Based on the literature review and intermediate lab test results, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, Nochar Acid Bond N960, disodium hydrogen phosphate, and hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] were tested for their effects in decreasing the rate of hydrogen generation from the reaction of uranium metal with water. Nitrate and nitrite each were effective, decreasing hydrogen generation rates in actual sludge by factors of about 100 to 1000 when used at 0.5 molar (M) concentrations. Higher attenuation factors were achieved in tests with aqueous solutions alone. Nochar N960, a water sorbent, decreased hydrogen generation by no more than a factor of three while disodium phosphate increased the corrosion and hydrogen generation rates slightly. U(VI) showed some promise in attenuating hydrogen but only initial testing was completed. Uranium metal corrosion rates also were measured. Under many conditions showing high hydrogen gas attenuation, uranium metal continued to corrode at rates approaching those observed without additives. This combination of high hydrogen attenuation with relatively unabated uranium metal corrosion is significant as it provides a means to eliminate uranium metal by its corrosion in water without the accompanying hazards otherwise presented by hydrogen generation.

  4. Spatial distribution of an uranium-respiring betaproteobacterium at the rifle, CO field research site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Koribanics, Nicole M. [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Tuorto, Steven J. [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Lopez-Chiaffarelli, Nora [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); McGuinness, Lora R. [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Häggblom, Max M. [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Williams, Kenneth H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Long, Philip E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kerkhof, Lee J. [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Morais, Paula V [Univ. of Coimbra (Portugal)

    2015-04-13

    The Department of Energy’s Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site (IFRC) at Rifle, Colorado was created to address the gaps in knowledge on the mechanisms and rates of U(VI) bioreduction in alluvial sediments. Previous studies at the Rifle IFRC have linked microbial processes to uranium immobilization during acetate amendment. Several key bacteria believed to be involved in radionuclide containment have been described; however, most of the evidence implicating uranium reduction with specific microbiota has been indirect. Here, we report on the cultivation of a microorganism from the Rifle IFRC that reduces uranium and appears to utilize it as a terminal electron acceptor for respiration with acetate as electron donor. Furthermore, this bacterium constitutes a significant proportion of the subsurface sediment community prior to biostimulation based on TRFLP profiling of 16S rRNA genes. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicates that the microorganism is a betaproteobacterium with a high similarity to Burkholderia fungorum. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of a betaproteobacterium capable of uranium respiration. Our results indicate that this microorganism occurs commonly in alluvial sediments located between 3-6 m below ground surface at Rifle and may play a role in the initial reduction of uranium at the site.

  5. Thermal Conductivity Measurement of Xe-Implanted Uranium Dioxide Thick Films using Multilayer Laser Flash Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Andrew T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-30

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program's Advanced Fuels campaign is currently pursuing use of ion beam assisted deposition to produce uranium dioxide thick films containing xenon in various morphologies. To date, this technique has provided materials of interest for validation of predictive fuel performance codes and to provide insight into the behavior of xenon and other fission gasses under extreme conditions. In addition to the structural data provided by such thick films, it may be possible to couple these materials with multilayer laser flash analysis in order to measure the impact of xenon on thermal transport in uranium dioxide. A number of substrate materials (single crystal silicon carbide, molybdenum, and quartz) containing uranium dioxide films ranging from one to eight microns in thickness were evaluated using multilayer laser flash analysis in order to provide recommendations on the most promising substrates and geometries for further investigation. In general, the uranium dioxide films grown to date using ion beam assisted deposition were all found too thin for accurate measurement. Of the substrates tested, molybdenum performed the best and looks to be the best candidate for further development. Results obtained within this study suggest that the technique does possess the necessary resolution for measurement of uranium dioxide thick films, provided the films are grown in excess of fifty microns. This requirement is congruent with the material needs when viewed from a fundamental standpoint, as this length scale of material is required to adequately sample grain boundaries and possible second phases present in ceramic nuclear fuel.

  6. Spatial distribution of an uranium-respiring betaproteobacterium at the Rifle, CO field research site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Koribanics, Nicole M.; Tuorto, Steven J.; Lopez-Chiaffarelli, Nora; McGuinness, Lora R.; Häggblom, Max M.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Kerkhof, Lee J.; Morais, Paula V

    2015-04-13

    The Department of Energy’s Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site (IFRC) at Rifle, Colorado was created to address the gaps in knowledge on the mechanisms and rates of U(VI) bioreduction in alluvial sediments. Previous studies at the Rifle IFRC have linked microbial processes to uranium immobilization during acetate amendment. Several key bacteria believed to be involved in radionuclide containment have been described; however, most of the evidence implicating uranium reduction with specific microbiota has been indirect. Here, we report on the cultivation of a microorganism from the Rifle IFRC that reduces uranium and appears to utilize it as a terminalmore »electron acceptor for respiration with acetate as electron donor. Furthermore, this bacterium constitutes a significant proportion of the subsurface sediment community prior to biostimulation based on TRFLP profiling of 16S rRNA genes. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicates that the microorganism is a betaproteobacterium with a high similarity to Burkholderia fungorum. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of a betaproteobacterium capable of uranium respiration. Our results indicate that this microorganism occurs commonly in alluvial sediments located between 3-6 m below ground surface at Rifle and may play a role in the initial reduction of uranium at the site.« less

  7. HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM BLEND DOWN PROGRAM AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE PRESENT AND FUTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magoulas, V; Charles Goergen, C; Ronald Oprea, R

    2008-06-05

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) entered into an Interagency Agreement to transfer approximately 40 metric tons of highly enriched uranium (HEU) to TVA for conversion to fuel for the Browns Ferry Nuclear Power Plant. Savannah River Site (SRS) inventories included a significant amount of this material, which resulted from processing spent fuel and surplus materials. The HEU is blended with natural uranium (NU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) with a 4.95% 235U isotopic content and shipped as solution to the TVA vendor. The HEU Blend Down Project provided the upgrades needed to achieve the product throughput and purity required and provided loading facilities. The first blending to low enriched uranium (LEU) took place in March 2003 with the initial shipment to the TVA vendor in July 2003. The SRS Shipments have continued on a regular schedule without any major issues for the past 5 years and are due to complete in September 2008. The HEU Blend program is now looking to continue its success by dispositioning an additional approximately 21 MTU of HEU material as part of the SRS Enriched Uranium Disposition Project.

  8. The U.S. regulatory framework for long-term management of uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smythe, C.; Bierley, D.; Bradshaw, M.

    1995-03-01

    The US established the regulatory structure for the management, disposal, and long-term care of uranium mill tailings in 1978 with the passage of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) (Pub. L. 95-604). This legislation has governed the cleanup and disposal of uranium tailings at both inactive and active sites. The passage of the UMTRCA established a federal regulatory program for the cleanup and disposal of uranium mill tailings in the US. This program involves the DOE, the NRC, the EPA, various states and tribal governments, private licensees, and the general public. The DOE has completed surface remediation at 14 sites, with the remaining sites either under construction or in planning. The DOE`s UMTRA Project has been very successful in dealing with public and agency demands, particularly regarding disposal site selection and transportation issues. The active sites are also being cleaned up, but at a slower pace than the inactive sites, with the first site tentatively scheduled for completion in 1996.

  9. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project surface project management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This Project Management Plan describes the planning, systems, and organization that shall be used to manage the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRA). US DOE is authorized to stabilize and control surface tailings and ground water contamination at 24 inactive uranium processing sites and associated vicinity properties containing uranium mill tailings and related residual radioactive materials.

  10. Soil to plant transfer of 238 Th on a uranium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Qinhong "Max"

    Soil to plant transfer of 238 U, 226 Ra and 232 Th on a uranium mining-impacted soil from species grown in soils from southeastern China contaminated with uranium mine tailings were analyzed. Keywords: Uranium; Thorium; Radium; Tailings-contaminated soil; Soileplant transfer 1. Introduction

  11. Uranium Reduction in Sediments under Diffusion-Limited Transport of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry

    Uranium Reduction in Sediments under Diffusion-Limited Transport of Organic Carbon T E T S U K, Chicago, Illinois 60637 Costly disposal of uranium (U) contaminated sediments is motivating research. Introduction Uranium (U) is an important subsurface contaminant at sites associated with its mining

  12. Estimating terrestrial uranium and thorium by antineutrino flux measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mcdonough, William F.

    Estimating terrestrial uranium and thorium by antineutrino flux measurements Stephen T. Dye, and approved November 16, 2007 (received for review July 11, 2007) Uranium and thorium within the Earth produce of uranium and thorium concentrations in geological reservoirs relies largely on geochemi- cal model

  13. EPA Uranium Program Update Loren W. Setlow and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EPA Uranium Program Update Loren W. Setlow and Reid J. Rosnick Environmental Protection Agency Office of Radiation and Indoor Air (6608J) Washington, DC 20460 NMA/NRC Uranium Recovery Workshop April 30, 2008 #12;2 Overview EPA Radiation protection program Uranium reports and abandoned mine lands

  14. Standard Review Plan for In Situ Leach Uranium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NUREG-1569 Standard Review Plan for In Situ Leach Uranium Extraction License Applications Final Washington, DC 20555-0001 #12;NUREG-1569 Standard Review Plan for In Situ Leach Uranium Extraction License OF A STANDARD REVIEW PLAN (NUREG­1569) FOR STAFF REVIEWS FOR IN SITU LEACH URANIUM EXTRACTION LICENSE

  15. Appendix IV. Risks Associated with Conventional Uranium Milling Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as in situ leaching (ISL) mining operations, to provide a more complete picture of uranium production. While this report focuses on the impacts associated with conventional surface and underground uranium mines Radioactive Materials from Uranium Mining. Volume 1: Mining and Reclamation Background" by U.S. EPA (2006

  16. Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar Model Utilizing Boron-10 Lined Tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, Jeremy L.; Ely, James H.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2012-09-18

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security (NA-241) is supporting the project Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the development of a 3He proportional counter alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is to design, build and demonstrate a system based upon 10B-lined proportional tubes in a configuration typical for 3He-based coincidence counter applications. This report, providing results for model development of Alternative Boron-Based Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar (ABUNCL) designs, is a deliverable under Task 2 of the project.

  17. Structural Behaviour of Uranium Sulfide under High Pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shareef, F.; Singh, S.; Gour, A.; Bhardwaj, P.; Sarwan, M.; Dubey, R. [High Pressure Research Lab, Department of Physics, Barkatullah University, Bhopal-462026 (India); Singh, R. K. [ITM University, Gurgaon, Haryana-122017 (India)

    2011-07-15

    The study of pressure induced structural phase transition of uranium sulphide, which crystallizes in rock salt (B1) structure, has been performed using the well described three body interaction model (TBIPM). Our present TBIP model consists of long range coulombic interaction, three body interactions, Hafemeister and Flygare type short-range overlap repulsion extended upto the second neighbor ions and the van der Waals interaction. The present results are in good agreement with the available experimental data on the phase transition pressure (Pt = 80.2 GPa). So it can be considered as an adequate and suitable model to perform high pressure studies.

  18. Radiochemistry of uranium, neptunium and plutonium: an updating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, R.A.; Choppin, G.R.; Wild, J.F.

    1986-02-01

    This report presents some procedures used in the radiochemical isolation, purification and/or analysis of uranium, neptunium, and plutonium. In this update of the procedures, we have not attempted to discuss the developments in the chemistry of U, Np, and Pu but have restricted the report to the newer procedures, most of which have resulted from the increased emphasis in environmental concern which requires analysis of extremely small amounts of the actinide element in quite complex matrices. The final section of this report describes several schemes for isolation of actinides by oxidation state.

  19. Uranium hexafluoride: Safe handling, processing, and transporting: Conference proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strunk, W.D.; Thornton, S.G. (eds.)

    1988-01-01

    This conference seeks to provide a forum for the exchange of information and ideas of the safety aspects and technical issue related to the handling of uranium hexafluoride. By allowing operators, engineers, scientists, managers, educators, and others to meet and share experiences of mutual concern, the conference is also intended to provide the participants with a more complete knowledge of technical and operational issues. The topics for the papers in the proceedings are widely varied and include the results of chemical, metallurgical, mechanical, thermal, and analytical investigations, as well as the developed philosophies of operational, managerial, and regulatory guidelines. Papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  20. SANS Measurement of Hydrides in Uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spooner, S; Ludtka, G.M.; Bullock, J.S.; Bridges, R.L.; Powell, G.L.

    2001-09-04

    SANS scattering is shown to be an effective method for detecting the presence of hydrogen precipitates in uranium. High purity polycrystalline samples of depleted uranium were given several hydriding treatments which included extended exposures to hydrogen gas at two different pressures at 630 C as well as a furnace anneal at 850 C followed by slow cooling in the near absence hydrogen gas. All samples exhibited neutron scattering that was in proportion to the expected levels of hydrogen content. While the scattering signal was strong, the shape of the scattering curve indicated that the scattering objects were large sized objects. Only by use of a very high angular resolution SANS technique was it possible to make estimates of the major diameter of the scattering objects. This analysis permits an estimate of the volume fraction and means size of the hydride precipitates in uranium.

  1. Method for fluorination of uranium oxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Petit, George S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1987-01-01

    Highly pure uranium hexafluoride is made from uranium oxide and fluorine. The uranium oxide, which includes UO.sub.3, UO.sub.2, U.sub.3 O.sub.8 and mixtures thereof, is introduced together with a small amount of a fluorine-reactive substance, selected from alkali chlorides, silicon dioxide, silicic acid, ferric oxide, and bromine, into a constant volume reaction zone. Sufficient fluorine is charged into the zone at a temperature below approximately 0.degree. C. to provide an initial pressure of at least approximately 600 lbs/sq. in. at the ambient atmospheric temperature. The temperature is then allowed to rise in the reaction zone until reaction occurs.

  2. Design Study for a Low-Enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Primm, Trent [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL

    2009-03-01

    This report documents progress made during FY 2008 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. With axial and radial grading of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in reactor performance from the current level. Results of selected benchmark studies imply that calculations of LEU performance are accurate. Scoping experiments with various manufacturing methods for forming the LEU alloy profile are presented.

  3. Fuel Grading Study on a Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Design for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

    2009-11-01

    An engineering design study that would enable the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium to low-enriched uranium fuel is ongoing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The computational models used to search for a low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel design that would meet the requirements for the conversion study, and the recent results obtained with these models during FY 2009, are documented and discussed in this report. Estimates of relevant reactor performance parameters for the LEU fuel core are presented and compared with the corresponding data for the currently operating high-enriched uranium fuel core. These studies indicate that the LEU fuel design would maintain the current performance of the HFIR with respect to the neutron flux to the central target region, reflector, and beam tube locations.

  4. Ab initio density functional theory study of uranium solubility in Gd2Zr2O7 pyrochlore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qing-yun; Meng, Chuan-min; Liao, Chang-zhong; Wang, Lie-lin; Xie, Hua; Lv, Hui-yi; Wu, Tao; Ji, Shi-yin; Huang, Yu-zhu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an ab initio calculation is performed to investigate the uranium solubility in different sites of Gd2Zr2O7 pyrochlore. The Gd2Zr2O7 maintains its pyrochlore structure at low uranium dopant levels, and the lattice constants of Gd2(Zr2-yUy)O7 and (Gd2-yUy)Zr2O7 are generally expressed as being linearly related to the uranium content y. Uranium is found to be a preferable substitute for the B-site gadolinium atoms in cation-disordered Gd2Zr2O7 (where gadolinium and zirconium atoms are swapped) over the A-site gadolinium atoms in ordered Gd2Zr2O7 due to the lower total energy of (Gd2-yZry)(Zr2-yUy)O7. The theoretical findings present a reasonable explanation of recent experiment results.

  5. U. S. forms uranium enrichment corporation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seltzer, R.

    1993-07-12

    After almost 40 years of operation, the federal government is withdrawing from the uranium enrichment business. On July 1, the Department of Energy turned over to a new government-owned entity--the US Enrichment Corp. (USEC)--both the DOE enrichment plants at Paducah, Ky., and Portsmouth, Ohio, and domestic and international marketing of enriched uranium from them. Pushed by the inability of DOE's enrichment operations to meet foreign competition, Congress established USEC under the National Energy Policy Act of 1992, envisioning the new corporation as the first step to full privatization. With gross revenues of $1.5 billion in fiscal 1992, USEC would rank 275th on the Fortune 500 list of top US companies. USEC will lease from DOE the Paducah and Portsmouth facilities, built in the early 1950s, which use the gaseous diffusion process for uranium enrichment. USEC's stock is held by the US Treasury, to which it will pay annual dividends. Martin Marietta Energy Systems, which has operated Paducah since 1984 and Portsmouth since 1986 for DOE, will continue to operate both plants for USEC. Closing one of the two facilities will be studied, especially in light of a 40% world surplus of capacity over demand. USEC also will consider other nuclear-fuel-related ventures. USEC will produce only low-enriched uranium, not weapons-grade material. Indeed, USEC will implement a contract now being completed under which the US will purchase weapons-grade uranium from dismantled Russian nuclear weapons and convert it into low-enriched uranium for power reactor fuel.

  6. Expansion capacity of an SX unit in uranium process pilot tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Courtaud, B.; Auger, F.; Morel, P.

    2008-07-01

    The rising price of uranium has led uranium producers to increase their plant capacity. The new project proposed to increase capacity is based on processing low-grade uranium by heap leaching. It is necessary to modify the plant, particularly the solvent extraction unit, to handle the increased flow. The goal of our study is to determine the minimal changes necessary to process the whole flow. Several stages have been carried out (i) thermodynamic modelling of the solvent extraction process to determine the capacities of the SX plant and the impact of the modification and (ii) pilot tests at the plant of the different configurations proposed by modelling. This paper presents results of the pilot tests performed at the plant. (authors)

  7. Aseismic design criteria for uranium enrichment plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beavers, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    In this paper technological, economical, and safety issues of aseismic design of uranium enrichment plants are presented. The role of management in the decision making process surrounding these issues is also discussed. The resolution of the issues and the decisions made by management are controlling factors in developing aseismic design criteria for any facility. Based on past experience in developing aseismic design criteria for the GCEP various recommendations are made for future enrichment facilities, and since uranium enrichment plants are members of the nuclear fuel cycle the discussion and recommendations presented herein are applicable to other nonreactor nuclear facilities.

  8. Lessons Learned: Tribal Community Engagement, Remediation and Restoration of a Uranium Mine Tailings Site, Navajo Nation - 12484

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wadsworth, Donald K. [New World Environmental Inc., Livermore California 94550 (United States); Hicks, Allison H. [New World Environmental Inc., Irvine California 92614 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    In May, 2011 New World Environmental Inc. was awarded a contract by the Navajo Nation Environmental Protection Agency to remediate an illegal radioactive waste disposal site located in the Navajo Nation. The initial scope included the excavation and shipment of an estimated 3,000 cubic yards of Uranium mine tailings and associated industrial waste. In this instance Stakeholders were supportive of the project, remediation and restoration, yet the movement of residual radioactive materials through tribal communities was a controversial issue. Other Stakeholder issues included site security, water sources for remediation activities, local residents' temporary re-location and care of livestock, right of way permissions and local workforce development. This presentation recaps the technical and non-technical issues encountered in the remediation and restoration the seven acre site and the outreach to surrounding communities. Cultural and equity issues resulting from historical problems associated with this and other sites in the immediate area and education and training. (authors)

  9. Simplifying strong electronic correlations in uranium: Localized uranium heavy-fermion UM2Zn20 (M=Co,Rh) compounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Jon

    Simplifying strong electronic correlations in uranium: Localized uranium heavy-fermion UM2Zn20 (M Atómica, 8400 Bariloche, Argentina 6 Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Delaware-field effects corroborate an ionic-like uranium electronic configura- tion in UM2Zn20. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevB.78

  10. Development of a Kelp-type Structure Module in a Coastal Ocean Model to Assess the Hydrodynamic Impact of Seawater Uranium Extraction Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Taiping; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Long, Wen; Gill, Gary A.

    2014-02-07

    In recent years, with the rapid growth of global energy demand, the interest in extracting uranium from seawater for nuclear energy has been renewed. While extracting seawater uranium is not yet commercially viable, it serves as a “backstop” to the conventional uranium resources and provides an essentially unlimited supply of uranium resource. With recent advances in seawater uranium extraction technology, extracting uranium from seawater could be economically feasible when the extraction devices are deployed at a large scale (e.g., several hundred km2). There is concern however that the large scale deployment of adsorbent farms could result in potential impacts to the hydrodynamic flow field in an oceanic setting. In this study, a kelp-type structure module was incorporated into a coastal ocean model to simulate the blockage effect of uranium extraction devices on the flow field. The module was quantitatively validated against laboratory flume experiments for both velocity and turbulence profiles. The model-data comparison showed an overall good agreement and validated the approach of applying the model to assess the potential hydrodynamic impact of uranium extraction devices or other underwater structures in coastal oceans.

  11. Enhancing uranium uptake by amidoxime adsorbent in seawater: An investigation for optimum alkaline conditioning parameters

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Das, Sadananda; Tsouris, Costas; Zhang, Chenxi; Brown, Suree; Janke, Christopher James; Mayes, Richard T.; Kuo, Li -Jung; Gill, Gary; Dai, Sheng; Kim, J.; et al

    2015-09-07

    A high-surface-area polyethylene-fiber adsorbent (AF160-2) has been developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory by radiation-induced graft polymerization of acrylonitrile and itaconic acid. The grafted nitriles were converted to amidoxime groups by treating with hydroxylamine. The amidoximated adsorbents were then conditioned with potassium hydroxide (KOH) by varying different reaction parameters such as KOH concentration (0.2, 0.44, and 0.6 M), duration (1, 2, and 3 h), and temperature (60, 70, and 80 °C). Adsorbent screening was then performed with simulated seawater solutions containing sodium chloride and sodium bicarbonate, at concentrations found in seawater, and uranium nitrate at a uranium concentration ofmore »~7–8 ppm and pH 8. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and solid-state NMR analyses indicated that a fraction of amidoxime groups was hydrolyzed to carboxylate during KOH conditioning. The uranium adsorption capacity in the simulated seawater screening solution gradually increased with conditioning time and temperature for all KOH concentrations. It was also observed that the adsorption capacity increased with an increase in concentration of KOH for all the conditioning times and temperatures. AF160-2 adsorbent samples were also tested with natural seawater using flow-through experiments to determine uranium adsorption capacity with varying KOH conditioning time and temperature. Based on uranium loading capacity values of several AF160-2 samples, it was observed that changing KOH conditioning time from 3 to 1 h at 60, 70, and 80 °C resulted in an increase of the uranium loading capacity in seawater, which did not follow the trend found in laboratory screening with stimulated solutions. Longer KOH conditioning times lead to significantly higher uptake of divalent metal ions, such as calcium and magnesium, which is a result of amidoxime conversion into less selective carboxylate. The scanning electron microscopy showed that long conditioning times may also lead to adsorbent degradation.« less

  12. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project 1994 environmental report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This annual report documents the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring and protection program. The UMTRA Project routinely monitors radiation, radioactive residual materials, and hazardous constituents at associated former uranium tailings processing sites and disposal sites. At the end of 1994, surface remedial action was complete at 14 of the 24 designated UMTRA Project processing sites: Canonsburg, Pennsylvania; Durango, Colorado; Grand Junction, Colorado; Green River Utah, Lakeview, Oregon; Lowman, Idaho; Mexican Hat, Utah; Riverton, Wyoming; Salt Lake City, Utah; Falls City, Texas; Shiprock, New Mexico; Spook, Wyoming, Tuba City, Arizona; and Monument Valley, Arizona. Surface remedial action was ongoing at 5 sites: Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico; Naturita, Colorado; Gunnison, Colorado; and Rifle, Colorado (2 sites). Remedial action has not begun at the 5 remaining UMTRA Project sites that are in the planning stage. Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota; Maybell, Colorado; and Slick Rock, Colorado (2 sites). The ground water compliance phase of the UMTRA Project started in 1991. Because the UMTRA Project sites are.` different stages of remedial action, the breadth of the UMTRA environmental protection program differs from site to site. In general, sites actively undergoing surface remedial action have the most comprehensive environmental programs for sampling media. At sites where surface remedial action is complete and at sites where remedial action has not yet begun, the environmental program consists primarily of surface water and ground water monitoring to support site characterization, baseline risk assessments, or disposal site performance assessments.

  13. US uranium mining industry: background information on economics and emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruno, G.A.; Dirks, J.A.; Jackson, P.O.; Young, J.K.

    1984-03-01

    A review of the US uranium mining industry has revealed a generally depressed industry situation. The 1982 U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ production from both open-pit and underground mines declined to 3800 and 6300 tons respectively with the underground portion representing 46% of total production. US exploration and development has continued downward in 1982. Employment in the mining and milling sectors has dropped 31% and 17% respectively in 1982. Representative forecasts were developed for reactor fuel demand and U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ production for the years 1983 and 1990. Reactor fuel demand is estimated to increase from 15,900 tons to 21,300 tons U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ respectively. U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ production, however, is estimated to decrease from 10,600 tons to 9600 tons respectively. A field examination was conducted of 29 selected underground uranium mines that represent 84% of the 1982 underground production. Data was gathered regarding population, land ownership and private property valuation. An analysis of the increased cost to production resulting from the installation of 20-meter high exhaust borehole vent stacks was conducted. An assessment was made of the current and future /sup 222/Rn emission levels for a group of 27 uranium mines. It is shown that /sup 222/Rn emission rates are increasing from 10 individual operating mines through 1990 by 1.2 to 3.8 times. But for the group of 27 mines as a whole, a reduction of total /sup 222/Rn emissions is predicted due to 17 of the mines being shutdown and sealed. The estimated total /sup 222/Rn emission rate for this group of mines will be 105 Ci/yr by year end 1983 or 70% of the 1978-79 measured rate and 124 Ci/yr by year end 1990 or 83% of the 1978-79 measured rate.

  14. The Uranium Institute 24th Annual Symposium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    -239 for use in subsequent reactors. A fast neutron reactor is capable of producing more plutonium fuel than the uranium fuel it burns, leading to a breeder reactor. In addition, if the reactor is a fast with half lives of 30 years or less. The fast neutron reactor of preference was to be cooled with liquid

  15. The Quest for the Heaviest Uranium Isotope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Schramm; D. Gridnev; D. V. Tarasov; V. N. Tarasov; W. Greiner

    2012-01-17

    We study Uranium isotopes and surrounding elements at very large neutron number excess. Relativistic mean field and Skyrme-type approaches with different parametrizations are used in the study. Most models show clear indications for isotopes that are stable with respect to neutron emission far beyond N=184 up to the range of around N=258.

  16. Standard test method for determination of uranium or gadolinium (or both) in gadolinium oxide-uranium oxide pellets or by X-ray fluorescence (XRF)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    Standard test method for determination of uranium or gadolinium (or both) in gadolinium oxide-uranium oxide pellets or by X-ray fluorescence (XRF)

  17. Recovery of uranium from phosphoric acid medium by polymeric composite beads encapsulating organophosphorus extractants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, D.K.; Yadav, K.K.; Varshney, L.; Singh, H. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2013-07-01

    The present study deals with the preparation and evaluation of the poly-ethersulfone (PES) based composite beads encapsulating synergistic mixture of D2EHPA and Cyanex 923 (at 4:1 mole ratio) for the separation of uranium from phosphoric acid medium. SEM was used for the characterization of the composite materials. Addition of 1% PVA (polyvinyl alcohol) improved the internal morphology and porosity of the beads. Additionally, microscopic examination of the composite bead confirmed central coconut type cavity surrounded by porous polymer layer of the beads through which exchange of metal ions take place. Effect of various experimental variables including aqueous acidity, metal ion concentration in aqueous feed, concentration of organic extractant inside the beads, extractant to polymer ratio, liquid to solid (L/S) ratio and temperature on the extraction of uranium was studied. Increase in acidity (1-6 M), L/S ratio (1- 10), metal ion concentration (0.2-3 g/L U{sub 3}O{sub 8}) and polymer to extractant ratio (1:4 -1:10) led to decrease in extraction of uranium. At 5.5 M (comparable to wet process phosphoric acid concentration) the extraction of uranium was about 85% at L/S ratio 5. Increase in extractant concentration inside the bead resulted in enhanced extraction of metal ion. Increase in temperature in the range of 30 to 50 Celsius degrees increased the extraction, whereas further increase to 70 C degrees led to the decrease in extraction of uranium. Amongst various reagents tested, stripping of uranium was quantitative by 12% Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solution. Polymeric beads were found to be stable and reusable up-to 10 cycles of extraction/stripping. (authors)

  18. Including environmental concerns in management strategies for depleted uranium hexafluoride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, M. [Argonne National Laboratory, Washington, DC (United States); Avci, H.I. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Bradley, C.E. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-12-31

    One of the major programs within the Office of Nuclear Energy, Science, and Technology of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) management program. The program is intended to find a long-term management strategy for the DUF{sub 6} that is currently stored in approximately 46,400 cylinders at Paducah, KY; Portsmouth, OH; and Oak Ridge, TN, USA. The program has four major components: technology assessment, engineering analysis, cost analysis, and the environmental impact statement (EIS). From the beginning of the program, the DOE has incorporated the environmental considerations into the process of strategy selection. Currently, the DOE has no preferred alternative. The results of the environmental impacts assessment from the EIS, as well as the results from the other components of the program, will be factored into the strategy selection process. In addition to the DOE`s current management plan, other alternatives continued storage, reuse, or disposal of depleted uranium, will be considered in the EIS. The EIS is expected to be completed and issued in its final form in the fall of 1997.

  19. Criticality Benchmark Analysis of Water-Reflected Uranium Oxyfluoride Slabs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margaret A. Marshall; John D. Bess

    2009-11-01

    A series of twelve experiments were conducted in the mid 1950's at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Critical Experiments Facility to determine the critical conditions of a semi-infinite water-reflected slab of aqueous uranium oxyfluoride (UO2F2). A different slab thickness was used for each experiment. Results from the twelve experiment recorded in the laboratory notebook were published in Reference 1. Seven of the twelve experiments were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments for the inclusion in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments. This evaluation will not only be available to handbook users for the validation of computer codes and integral cross-section data, but also for the reevaluation of experimental data used in the ANSI/ANS-8.1 standard. This evaluation is important as part of the technical basis of the subcritical slab limits in ANSI/ANS-8.1. The original publication of the experimental results was used for the determination of bias and bias uncertainties for subcritical slab limits, as documented by Hugh Clark's paper 'Subcritical Limits for Uranium-235 Systems'.

  20. Quantifying Uranium Isotope Ratios Using Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry: The Influence of Laser Parameters on Relative Ionization Probability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isselhardt, Brett Hallen

    2011-01-01

    4.5 Uranium Isotope Ratio Measurements . . . . . .4.32 Uranium sputtered from three U-rich materials of varying uranium isotopic

  1. Reuse of activated alumina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobensack, J.E. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Activated alumina is used as a trapping media to remove trace quantities of UF{sub 6} from process vent streams. The current uranium recovery method employs concentrated nitric acid which destroys the alumina pellets and forms a sludge which is a storage and disposal problem. A recently developed technique using a distilled water rinse followed by three dilute acid rinses removes on average 97% of the uranium, and leaves the pellets intact with crush strength and surface area values comparable with new material. Trapping tests confirm the effectiveness of the recycled alumina as UF{sub 6} trapping media.

  2. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium processing site at Naturita, Colorado. Attachment 3, Groundwater hydrology report, Attachment 4, Water resources protection strategy: Preliminary final

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established health and environmental protection regulations to correct and prevent groundwater contamination resulting from processing activities at inactive uranium milling sites (40 CFR 192). The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978 designated responsibility to the US Department of Energy (DOE) for assessing the inactive uranium milling sites. The DOE has determined that each assessment shall include information on site characterization, a description of the proposed action, and a summary of the water resources protection strategy that describes how the proposed action will comply with the EPA groundwater protection standards. To achieve compliance with the proposed US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) groundwater protection standards, the US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes that supplemental standards be applied at the Dry Flats disposal site because of Class III (limited use) groundwater in the uppermost aquifer (the basal sandstone of the Cretaceous Burro Canyon Formation) based on low yield. The proposed remedial action will ensure protection of human health and the environment.

  3. 2013 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-03-01

    This report, in fulfillment of a license requirement, presents the results of long-term surveillance and maintenance activities conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) in 2013 at 19 uranium mill tailings disposal sites established under Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978.1 These activities verified that the UMTRCA Title I disposal sites remain in compliance with license requirements. DOE operates 18 UMTRCA Title I sites under a general license granted by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in accordance with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 40.27 (10 CFR 40.27). As required under the general license, a long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for each site was prepared by DOE and accepted by NRC. The Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site, one of the 19 Title I sites, will not be included under the general license until the open, operating portion of the cell is closed. The open portion will be closed either when it is filled or in 2023. This site is inspected in accordance with an interim LTSP. Long-term surveillance and maintenance services for these disposal sites include inspecting and maintaining the sites; monitoring environmental media and institutional controls; conducting any necessary corrective actions; and performing administrative, records, stakeholder relations, and other regulatory stewardship functions. Annual site inspections and monitoring are conducted in accordance with site-specific LTSPs and procedures established by DOE to comply with license requirements. Each site inspection is performed to verify the integrity of visible features at the site; to identify changes or new conditions that may affect the long-term performance of the site; and to determine the need, if any, for maintenance, follow-up or contingency inspections, or corrective action in accordance with the LTSP. LTSPs and site compliance reports are available on the Internet at http://www.lm.doe.gov/.

  4. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Usage Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 7 of 7 results. Download Learning and Conserving (10 activities) These activities explore energy use...

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Usage Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 6 of 6 results. Download Learning and Conserving (10 activities) These activities explore energy use...

  6. Search results | Department of Energy

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    Energy Usage Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 9 of 9 results. Download Learning and Conserving (10 activities) These activities explore energy use...

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    Consumption Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 6 of 6 results. Download Learning and Conserving (10 activities) These activities explore energy use and...

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    Consumption Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 5 of 5 results. Download Learning and Conserving (10 activities) These activities explore energy use and...

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    Economy Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 2 of 2 results. Download Energy from The Wind (9 activities) Hands-on activities that provide a...

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    Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 4 of 4 results. Download Energy from The Wind (9 activities) Hands-on activities that provide a comprehensive...

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 6 of 6 results. Download Exploring Wind Energy (12 activities) Hands-on activities that provide a comprehensive understanding...

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 7 of 7 results. Download Exploring Wind Energy (12 activities) Hands-on activities that provide a comprehensive understanding...

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    results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 5 of 5 results. Download Exploring Wind Energy (12 activities) Hands-on activities that provide a comprehensive understanding...

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    Renewables Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 2 of 2 results. Download Energy from The Wind (9 activities) Hands-on activities that provide a...

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    Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 121 - 130 of 124 results. Download Intermediate Energy Infobook and Intermediate Infobook Activities (29 Activities) The...

  17. Comments on proposed legislation to restructure DOE's uranium enrichment program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    This book focuses on H.R.145, H.R.788, and S.210. Each of the proposed bills would restructure DOE's enrichment program as a government corporation with private financing and would encourage the eventual sale of the corporation to the private sector. In doing so, the bills would, among other things, allow the corporation to set prices to maximize long-term returns; establish a fund to meet the costs of decontamination, decommissioning, and other environmental cleanup costs associated with uranium enrichment activities; transfer interest in DOE's new atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) process to the new corporation; and, except for H.R. 145, require the government to pay its share of the costs to clean up mill tailings (mining wastes) generated under government contracts.

  18. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Naturita Uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The proposed remedial action for the Naturita processing site is relocation of the contaminated materials and debris to the Dry Flats disposal sits, 6 road miles (mi) [10 kilometers (km)) to the southeast. At the disposal site, the contaminated materials would be stabilized and covered with layers of earth and rock. The proposed disposal site is on land administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and used primarily for livestock grazing. The final disposal sits would cover approximately 57 ac (23 ha), which would be permanently transferred from the BLM to the DOE and restricted from future uses. The remedial action activities would be conducted by the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The proposed remedial action would result in the loss of approximately 162 ac (66 ha) of soils at the processing and disposal sites; however, 133 ac (55 ha) of these soils at and adjacent to the processing site are contaminated and cannot be used for other purposes. If supplemental standards are approved by the NRC and state of Colorado, approximately 112 ac (45 ha) of contaminated soils adjacent to the processing site would not be cleaned up. This area is steeply sloped. The cleanup of this contamination would have adverse environmental consequences and would be potentially hazardous to remedial action workers. Another 220 ac (89 ha) of soils would be temporarily disturbed during the remedial action. The final disposal site would result in approximately 57 ac (23 ha) being removed from livestock grazing and wildlife use.

  19. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Naturita uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The proposed remedial action for the Naturita processing site is relocation of the contaminated materials and debris to the Dry Flats disposal site, 6 road miles (mi) [10 kilometers (km)] to the southeast. At the disposal site, the contaminated materials would be stabilized and covered with layers of earth and rock. The proposed disposal site is on land administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and used primarily for livestock grazing. The final disposal site would cover approximately 57 ac (23 ha), which would be permanently transferred from the BLM to the DOE and restricted from future uses. The remedial action activities would be conducted by the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The proposed remedial action would result in the loss of approximately 162 ac (66 ha) of soils at the processing and disposal sites; however, 133 ac (55 ha) of these soils at and adjacent to the processing site are contaminated and cannot be used for other purposes. If supplemental standards are approved by the NRC and state of Colorado, approximately 112 ac (45 ha) of contaminated soils adjacent to the processing site would not be cleaned up. This area is steeply sloped. The cleanup of this contamination would have adverse environmental consequences and would be potentially hazardous to remedial action workers. Another 220 ac (89 ha) of soils would be temporarily disturbed during the remedial action. The final disposal site would result in approximately 57 ac (23 ha) being removed from livestock grazing and wildlife use.

  20. Nuclear Criticality Control and Safety of Plutonium-Uranium Fuel Mixtures Outside Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, D; Mennerdahl, D

    2008-06-23

    The ANSI/ANS 8.12 standard was first approved in July 1978. At that time, this edition was applicable to operations with plutonium-uranium oxide (MOX) fuel mixtures outside reactors and was limited to subcritical limits for homogeneous systems. The next major revision, ANSI/ANS-8.12-1987, included the addition of subcritical limits for heterogeneous systems. The standard was subsequently reaffirmed in February 1993. During late 1990s, substantial work was done by the ANS 8.12 Standard Working Group to re-examine the technical data presented in the standard using the latest codes and cross section sets. Calculations performed showed good agreement with the values published in the standard. This effort resulted in the reaffirmation of the standard in March 2002. The standard is currently in a maintenance mode. After 2002, activities included discussions to determine the future direction of the standard and to follow the MOX standard development by the International Standard Organization (ISO). In 2007, the Working Group decided to revise the standard to extend the areas of applicability by providing a wider range of subcritical data. The intent is to cover a wider domain of MOX fuel fabrication and operations. It was also decided to follow the ISO MOX standard specifications (related to MOX density and isotopics) and develop a new set of subcritical limits for homogeneous systems. This has resulted in the submittal (and subsequent approval) of the project initiation notification system form (PINS) in 2007.

  1. Assessing the environmental availability of uranium in soils and sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amonette, J.E.; Holdren, G.R. Jr.; Krupa, K.M.; Lindenmeier, C.W. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-06-01

    Soils and sediments contaminated with uranium pose certain environmental and ecological risks. At low to moderate levels of contamination, the magnitude of these risks depends not only on the absolute concentrations of uranium in the material but also on the availability of the uranium to drinking water supplies, plants, or higher organisms. Rational approaches for regulating the clean-up of sites contaminated with uranium, therefore, should consider the value of assessing the environmental availability of uranium at the site before making decisions regarding remediation. The purpose of this work is to review existing approaches and procedures to determine their potential applicability for assessing the environmental availability of uranium in bulk soils or sediments. In addition to making the recommendations regarding methodology, the authors have tabulated data from the literature on the aqueous complexes of uranium and major uranium minerals, examined the possibility of predicting environmental availability of uranium based on thermodynamic solubility data, and compiled a representative list of analytical laboratories capable of performing environmental analyses of uranium in soils and sediments.

  2. United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries. Annual report February 1, 2000--January 31, 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehrhart, Susan M.; Filipy, Ronald E.

    2001-07-01

    The United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) comprise a human tissue research program studying the deposition, biokinetics and dosimetry of the actinide elements in humans with the primary goals of providing data fundamental to the verification, refinement, or future development of radiation protection standards for these and other radionuclides, and of determining possible bioeffects on both a macro and subcellular level attributable to exposure to the actinides. This report covers USTUR activities during the year from February 2000 through January 2001.

  3. United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries. Annual report October 1, 1994 - September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathren, R.L.; Harwick, L.A.; Markel, M.J.

    1996-07-01

    The United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) comprise a human tissue research program studying the deposition, biokinetics and dosimetry of the actinide elements in humans with the primary goals of providing data fundamental to the verification, refinement, or future development of radiation protection standards for these and other radionuclides, and of determining possible bioeffects on both a macro and subcellular level attributable to exposure to the actinides. This report covers USTUR activities during the year from October 1994 through September 1995.

  4. Single well field injection test of humate to enhance attenuation of uranium and other radionuclides in an acidic plume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denham, M.

    2014-09-30

    This report documents the impact of the injected humate on targeted contaminants over a period of 4 months and suggests it is a viable attenuation-based remedy for uranium, potentially for I-129, but not for Sr-90. Future activities will focus on issues pertinent to scaling the technology to full deployment.

  5. Analytical and experimental investigations of the behavior of thermal neutrons in lattices of uranium metal rods in heavy water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simms, Richard

    1963-01-01

    Measurements of the intracellular distribution of the activation of foils by neutrons were made in lattices of 1/4-inch diameter, 1.03% U-235, uranium rods moderated by heavy water, with bare and cadmium-covered foils of ...

  6. Validation of reference materials for uranium radiochronometry in the frame of nuclear forensic investigations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Varga, Z.; Mayer, K.; Bonamici, C. E.; Hubert, A.; Hutcheon, I.; Kinman, W.; Kristo, M.; Pointurier, F.; Spencer, K.; Stanley, F.; et al

    2015-05-11

    The results of a joint effort by expert nuclear forensic laboratories in the area of age dating of uranium, i.e. the elapsed time since the last chemical purification of the material are presented and discussed. Completely separated uranium materials of known production date were distributed among the laboratories, and the samples were dated according to routine laboratory procedures by the measurement of the ²²?Th/²³?U ratio. The measurement results were in good agreement with the known production date showing that the concept for preparing uranium age dating reference material based on complete separation is valid. Detailed knowledge of the laboratory proceduresmore »used for uranium age dating allows the identification of possible improvements in the current protocols and the development of improved practice in the future. The availability of age dating reference materials as well as the evolvement of the age dating best-practice protocol will increase the relevance and applicability of age dating as part of the tool-kit available for nuclear forensic investigations.« less

  7. Liner evaluation for uranium mill tailings. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buelt, J.L. (comp.)

    1983-09-01

    The Liner Evaluation for Uranium Mill Tailings Program was conducted to evaluate the need for and performance of prospective lining materials for the long-term management of inactive uranium mill tailings piles. On the basis of program results, two materials have been identified: natural foundation soil amended with 10% sodium bentonite; catalytic airblown asphalt membrane. The study showed that, for most situations, calcareous soils typical of Western US sites adequately buffer tailings leachates and prevent groundwater contamination without additional liner materials or amendments. Although mathematical modeling of disposal sites is recommended on a site-specific basis, there appears to be no reason to expect significant infiltration through the cover for most Western sites. The major water source through the tailings would be groundwater movement at sites with shallow groundwater tables. Even so column leaching studies showed that contaminant source terms were reduced to near maximum contaminant levels (MCL's) for drinking water within one or two pore volumes; thus, a limited source term for groundwater contamination exists. At sites where significant groundwater movement or infiltration is expected and the tailings leachates are alkaline, however, the sodium bentonite or asphalt membrane may be necessary.

  8. Estimated population near uranium tailings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloomster, C.H.; Brown, D.R.; Bruno, G.A.; Craig, S.N.; Dirks, J.A.; Griffin, E.A.; Reis, J.W.; Young, J.K.

    1984-01-01

    Population studies, which took place during the months of April, May, and June 1983, were performed for 27 active and 25 inactive mill sites. For each mill site, a table showing population by radius (1/2, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 km) in 16 compass directions was generated. 22 references, 6 tables.

  9. Challenges using a {sup 252}Cf shuffler instrument in a plant environment to measure mixtures of uranium and plutonium transuranic waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurd, J.R.

    1999-08-29

    An active-passive {sup 252}Cf shuffler instrument, installed and certified several years ago at Los Alamos National Laboratory's plutonium facility, has now been calibrated for different matrices to measure Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)-destined transuranic (TRU) waste. Little or no data currently exist for these types of measurements in plant environments where sudden large changes in the neutron background radiation can significantly distort the results. Measurements and analyses of twenty-two 55-gallon drums, consisting of mixtures of varying quantities of uranium and plutonium in mostly noncombustible matrices, have been recently completed at the plutonium facility. The calibration and measurement techniques, including the method used to separate out the plutonium component, will be presented and discussed. Calculations used to adjust for differences in uranium enrichment from that of the calibration standards will be shown. Methods used to determine various sources of both random and systematic error will be indicated. Particular attention will be directed to those problems identified as arising from the plant environment. The results of studies to quantify the aforementioned distortion effects in the data will be presented. Various solution scenarios will be outlined, along with those adopted here.

  10. Remedial action plan for the inactive Uranium Processing Site at Naturita, Colorado. Remedial action plan: Attachment 2, Geology report, Attachment 3, Ground water hydrology report: Working draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado, is one of 24 inactive uranium mill sites designated to be cleaned up by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), 42 USC {section}7901 et seq. Part of the UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE`s remedial action plan (RAP) and certify that the remedial action conducted at the site complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This RAP serves two purposes. First, it describes the activities that are proposed by the DOE to accomplish remediation and long-term stabilization and control of the radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado. Second, this RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the state of Colorado, and the NRC, become Appendix B of the cooperative agreement between the DOE and the state of Colorado.

  11. Extraction of uranium(VI) by N,N-di-(2-ethylhexyl)isobutyramide (DEHIBA): from the batch experimental data to the countercurrent process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miguirditchian, M.; Sorel, C.; Cames, B.; Bisel, I.; Baron, P.

    2008-07-01

    The selective separation of uranium(VI) in the first cycle of the GANEX process is operated by a hydrometallurgical process using a monoamide extractant DEHiBA (N,N-di-(2-ethylhexyl)isobutyramide). Distribution ratios of uranium(VI) and nitric acid in 1 M DEHiBA/HTP were determined with macro-concentrations of uranium, and the experimental data were modelled by taking into account the activity coefficients of the constituents in aqueous phases. A flowsheet was designed and tested in a countercurrent process in laboratory-scale mixer-settlers on a surrogate U(VI)/HNO 3 feed. More than 99.999% of the uranium was recovered. (authors)

  12. Uranium-Loaded Water Treatment Resins: 'Equivalent Feed' at NRC and Agreement State-Licensed Uranium Recovery Facilities - 12094

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camper, Larry W.; Michalak, Paul; Cohen, Stephen; Carter, Ted [Nuclear Regulatory Commission (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Community Water Systems (CWSs) are required to remove uranium from drinking water to meet EPA standards. Similarly, mining operations are required to remove uranium from their dewatering discharges to meet permitted surface water discharge limits. Ion exchange (IX) is the primary treatment strategy used by these operations, which loads uranium onto resin beads. Presently, uranium-loaded resin from CWSs and mining operations can be disposed as a waste product or processed by NRC- or Agreement State-licensed uranium recovery facilities if that licensed facility has applied for and received permission to process 'alternate feed'. The disposal of uranium-loaded resin is costly and the cost to amend a uranium recovery license to accept alternate feed can be a strong disincentive to commercial uranium recovery facilities. In response to this issue, the NRC issued a Regulatory Issue Summary (RIS) to clarify the agency's policy that uranium-loaded resin from CWSs and mining operations can be processed by NRC- or Agreement State-licensed uranium recovery facilities without the need for an alternate feed license amendment when these resins are essentially the same, chemically and physically, to resins that licensed uranium recovery facilities currently use (i.e., equivalent feed). NRC staff is clarifying its current alternate feed policy to declare IX resins as equivalent feed. This clarification is necessary to alleviate a regulatory and financial burden on facilities that filter uranium using IX resin, such as CWSs and mine dewatering operations. Disposing of those resins in a licensed facility could be 40 to 50 percent of the total operations and maintenance (O and M) cost for a CWS. Allowing uranium recovery facilities to treat these resins without requiring a license amendment lowers O and M costs and captures a valuable natural resource. (authors)

  13. In-line assay monitor for uranium hexafluoride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wallace, S.A.

    1980-03-21

    An in-line assay monitor for determining the content of uranium-235 in a uranium hexafluoride gas isotopic separation system is provided which removes the necessity of complete access to the operating parameters of the system for determining the uranium-235 content. The method and monitor for carrying out the method involve cooling of a radiation pervious chamber connected in fluid communication with the selected point in the system to withdraw a specimen and solidify the specimen in the chamber. The specimen is irradiated by means of an ionizing radiation source of energy different from that of the 185 keV gamma emissions from uranium-235. The uranium-235 content of the specimen is determined from comparison of the accumulated 185 keV energy counts and reference energy counts. The latter is used to measure the total uranium isotopic content of the specimen.

  14. Uranium enrichment management review: summary of analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    In May 1980, the Assistant Secretary for Resource Applications within the Department of Energy requested that a group of experienced business executives be assembled to review the operation, financing, and management of the uranium enrichment enterprise as a basis for advising the Secretary of Energy. After extensive investigation, analysis, and discussion, the review group presented its findings and recommendations in a report on December 2, 1980. The following pages contain background material on which that final report was based. This report is arranged in chapters that parallel those of the uranium enrichment management review final report - chapters that contain summaries of the review group's discussion and analyses in six areas: management of operations and construction; long-range planning; marketing of enrichment services; financial management; research and development; and general management. Further information, in-depth analysis, and discussion of suggested alternative management practices are provided in five appendices.

  15. Assessment of Preferred Depleted Uranium Disposal Forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Croff, A.G.; Hightower, J.R.; Lee, D.W.; Michaels, G.E.; Ranek, N.L.; Trabalka, J.R.

    2000-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of converting about 700,000 metric tons (MT) of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) containing 475,000 MT of depleted uranium (DU) to a stable form more suitable for long-term storage or disposal. Potential conversion forms include the tetrafluoride (DUF4), oxide (DUO2 or DU3O8), or metal. If worthwhile beneficial uses cannot be found for the DU product form, it will be sent to an appropriate site for disposal. The DU products are considered to be low-level waste (LLW) under both DOE orders and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. The objective of this study was to assess the acceptability of the potential DU conversion products at potential LLW disposal sites to provide a basis for DOE decisions on the preferred DU product form and a path forward that will ensure reliable and efficient disposal.

  16. Uranium Oxide Aerosol Transport in Porous Graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchard, Jeremy; Gerlach, David C.; Scheele, Randall D.; Stewart, Mark L.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Brown, Charles C.; Iovin, Cristian; Delegard, Calvin H.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Buck, Edgar C.; Riley, Brian J.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2012-01-23

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the transport of uranium oxide particles that may be present in carbon dioxide (CO2) gas coolant, into the graphite blocks of gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. The transport of uranium oxide in the coolant system, and subsequent deposition of this material in the graphite, of such reactors is of interest because it has the potential to influence the application of the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM). The GIRM is a technology that has been developed to validate the declared operation of graphite moderated reactors. GIRM exploits isotopic ratio changes that occur in the impurity elements present in the graphite to infer cumulative exposure and hence the reactor’s lifetime cumulative plutonium production. Reference Gesh, et. al., for a more complete discussion on the GIRM technology.

  17. Fayans functional for deformed nuclei. Uranium region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. V. Tolokonnikov; I. N. Borzov; M. Kortelainen; Yu. S. Lutostansky; E. E. Saperstein

    2015-08-03

    Fayans energy density functional (EDF) FaNDF^0 has been applied to the nuclei around uranium region. Ground state characteristics of the Th, U and Pu isotopic chains, up to the two-neutron drip line, are found and compared with predictions from several Skyrme EDFs. The two-neutron drip line is found for FaNDF^0, SLy4 and SkM^* EDFs for a set of elements with even proton number, from Pb up to Fm.

  18. Fayans functional for deformed nuclei. Uranium region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolokonnikov, S V; Kortelainen, M; Lutostansky, Yu S; Saperstein, E E

    2015-01-01

    Fayans energy density functional (EDF) FaNDF^0 has been applied to the nuclei around uranium region. Ground state characteristics of the Th, U and Pu isotopic chains, up to the two-neutron drip line, are found and compared with predictions from several Skyrme EDFs. The two-neutron drip line is found for FaNDF^0, SLy4 and SkM^* EDFs for a set of elements with even proton number, from Pb up to Fm.

  19. Magnetic Exchange Coupling and Single-Molecule Magnetism in Uranium Complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rinehart, Jeffrey Dennis

    2010-01-01

    in molecular uranium cluster chemistry. 13 Compound 2 ischemistry and small-molecule reactivity of uranium. AmongUranium Complexes by Jeffrey Dennis Rinehart Doctor of Philosophy in Chemistry

  20. CRYSTAL AND MOLECULAR STRUCTURE OF HYDRIDOTIS (BIS(TRIMETHYLSILYL)AMIDO]URANIUM(IV)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andersen, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    BIS(TRIMETHYLSILYL)AMIDO]URANIUM(IV) Richard A. Andersen,BIS(TRIMETHYLSILYL)AMIDO]URANIUM(IV) Richard A. Andersen,of thorium (IV) and uranium (IV), HM[N(SiMe ) 2] 3 , have

  1. Examination of Uranium(VI) Leaching During Ligand Promoted Dissolution of Waste Tank Sludge Surrogates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Brian A.

    2008-01-01

    Effects of phosphate on uranium(VI) adsorption to goethite-and ionic strength upon uranium(VI) sorption onto alumina asD. R. , Leslie, B. W. , Uranium sorption on a-alumina:

  2. Investigation of the electronic structure of mono(1,1?- diamidoferrocene) uranium(IV) complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duhovi?, S; Oria, JV; Odoh, SO; Schreckenbach, G; Batista, ER; Diaconescu, PL

    2013-01-01

    1,1’- Diamidoferrocene) Uranium(IV) Complexes Selma Duhovi?,mono(1,1’- diamidoferrocene) uranium complexes (NN R )UX 2 (as actinides. 17-19 For uranium, we have observed a wide

  3. Uranium Recovery from Seawater: Development of Fiber Adsorbents Prepared via Atom-Transfer Radical Polymerization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saito, Tomonori; Brown, Suree; Chatterjee, Sabornie; Kim, Jungseung; Tsouris, Constantinos; Mayes, Richard; Kuo, Li-Jung; Gill, Gary A.; Oyola, Yatsandra; Janke, C.; Dai, Sheng

    2014-07-09

    Uranium exists uniformly at a concentration of ~3.3 ppb in seawater. The extraction of uranium from seawater presents a very attractive alternative source of uranium for nuclear fuel needs.

  4. Equation of State of Uranium and Plutonium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barroso, Dalton Ellery Girão

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work is to define the parameters of the three-term equation of state for uranium and plutonium, appropriate for conditions in which these materials are subjected to strong shock compressions, as in cylindrical and spherical implosions. The three-term equation of state takes into account the three components of the pressure that resist to compression in the solid: the elastic or "cold" pressure (coulombian repulsion between atoms), the thermal pressure due to vibratory motion of atoms in the lattice of the solid and the thermal pressure of electrons thermally excited. The equation of state defined here permits also to take into account the variation of the specific heat with the transition of the solid to the liquid or gaseous state due to continued growth of temperature in strong shock compressions. In the definition of uranium equation of state, experimental data on the uranium compression, available in the open scientific literature, are used. In the plutonium case, this element was co...

  5. Equation of State of Uranium and Plutonium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalton Ellery Girão Barroso

    2015-07-13

    The objective of this work is to define the parameters of the three-term equation of state for uranium and plutonium, appropriate for conditions in which these materials are subjected to strong shock compressions, as in cylindrical and spherical implosions. The three-term equation of state takes into account the three components of the pressure that resist to compression in the solid: the elastic or "cold" pressure (coulombian repulsion between atoms), the thermal pressure due to vibratory motion of atoms in the lattice of the solid and the thermal pressure of electrons thermally excited. The equation of state defined here permits also to take into account the variation of the specific heat with the transition of the solid to the liquid or gaseous state due to continued growth of temperature in strong shock compressions. In the definition of uranium equation of state, experimental data on the uranium compression, available in the open scientific literature, are used. In the plutonium case, this element was considered initially in the alpha-phase or stabilized in the delta-phase. In the last case, an abrupt and instantaneous transition to the alpha-phase was considered when the delta-phase plutonium is submitted to strong compressions.

  6. Supply of enriched uranium for research reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, H. [NUKEM GmbH, Alzenau (Germany)

    1997-08-01

    Since the RERTR-meeting In Newport/USA in 1990 the author delivered a series of papers in connection with the fuel cycle for research reactors dealing with its front-end. In these papers the author underlined the need for unified specifications for enriched uranium metal suitable for the production of fuel elements and made proposals with regard to the re-use of in Europe reprocessed highly enriched uranium. With regard to the fuel cycle of research reactors the research reactor community was since 1989 more concentrating on the problems of its back-end since the USA stopped the acceptance of spent research reactor fuel on December 31, 1988. Now, since it is apparent that these back-end problem have been solved by AEA`s ability to reprocess and the preparedness of the USA to again accept physically spent research reactor fuel the author is focusing with this paper again on the front-end of the fuel cycle on the question whether there is at all a safe supply of low and high enriched uranium for research reactors in the future.

  7. Chapter 3. Volume and Characteristics of Uranium Mine Wastes Uranium has been found and mined in a wide variety of rocks, including sandstone, carbonates1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    3-1 Chapter 3. Volume and Characteristics of Uranium Mine Wastes Uranium has been found and mined conventional mining, solution extraction, and milling of uranium, a principal focus of this report is TENORM, or which may need future reclamation. When uranium mining first started, most of the ores were recovered

  8. Characterization of cores from an in-situ recovery mined uranium deposit in Wyoming: Implications for post-mining restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WoldeGabriel, G.; Boukhalfa, H.; Ware, S. D.; Cheshire, M.; Reimus, P.; Heikoop, J.; Conradson, S. D.; Batuk, O.; Havrilla, G.; House, B.; Simmons, A.; Clay, J.; Basu, A.; Christensen, J. N.; Brown, S. T.; DePaolo, D. J.

    2014-10-08

    In-situ recovery (ISR) of uranium (U) from sandstone-type roll-front deposits is a technology that involves the injection of solutions that consist of ground water fortified with oxygen and carbonate to promote the oxidative dissolution of U, which is pumped to recovery facilities located at the surface that capture the dissolved U and recycle the treated water. The ISR process alters the geochemical conditions in the subsurface creating conditions that are more favorable to the migration of uranium and other metals associated with the uranium deposit. There is a lack of clear understanding of the impact of ISR mining on the aquifer and host rocks of the post-mined site and the fate of residual U and other metals within the mined ore zone. We performed detailed petrographic, mineralogical, and geochemical analyses of several samples taken from about 7 m of core of the formerly the ISR-mined Smith Ranch–Highland uranium deposit in Wyoming. We show that previously mined cores contain significant residual uranium (U) present as coatings on pyrite and carbonaceous fragments. Coffinite was identified in three samples. Core samples with higher organic (> 1 wt.%) and clay (> 6–17 wt.%) contents yielded higher 234U/238U activity ratios (1.0–1.48) than those with lower organic and clay fractions. The ISR mining was inefficient in mobilizing U from the carbonaceous materials, which retained considerable U concentrations (374–11,534 ppm). This is in contrast with the deeper part of the ore zone, which was highly depleted in U and had very low 234U/238U activity ratios. This probably is due to greater contact with the lixiviant (leaching solution) during ISR mining. EXAFS analyses performed on grains with the highest U and Fe concentrations reveal that Fe is present in a reduced form as pyrite and U occurs mostly as U(IV) complexed by organic matter or as U(IV) phases of carbonate complexes. Moreover, U–O distances of ~ 2.05 Å were noted, indicating the potential formation of other poorly defined U(IV/VI) species. We also noted a small contribution from Udouble bond; length as m-dashO at 1.79 Å, which indicates that U is partially oxidized. There is no apparent U–S or U–Fe interaction in any of the U spectra analyzed. However, SEM analysis of thin sections prepared from the same core material reveals surficial U associated with pyrite which is probably a minor fraction of the total U present as thin coatings on the surface of pyrite. Our data show the presence of different structurally variable uranium forms associated with the mined cores. U associated with carbonaceous materials is probably from the original U mobilization that accumulated in the organic matter-rich areas under reducing conditions during shallow burial diagenesis. U associated with pyrite represents a small fraction of the total U and was likely deposited as a result of chemical reduction by pyrite. Our data suggest that areas rich in carbonaceous materials had limited exposure to the lixiviant solution, continue to be reducing, and still hold significant U resources. Because of their limited access to fluid flow, these areas might not contribute significantly to post-mining U release or attenuation. Areas with pyrite that are accessible to fluids seem to be more reactive and could act as reductants and facilitate U reduction and accumulation, limiting its migration.

  9. TRANSITION STATE FOR THE GAS-PHASE REACTION OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE WITH WATER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, S; James Becnel, J

    2008-03-18

    Density Functional Theory and small-core, relativistic pseudopotentials were used to look for symmetric and asymmetric transitions states of the gas-phase hydrolysis reaction of uranium hexafluoride, UF{sub 6}, with water. At the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p)/SDD level, an asymmetric transition state leading to the formation of a uranium hydroxyl fluoride, U(OH)F{sub 5}, and hydrogen fluoride was found with an energy barrier of +77.3 kJ/mol and an enthalpy of reaction of +63.0 kJ/mol (both including zero-point energy corrections). Addition of diffuse functions to all atoms except uranium led to only minor changes in the structure and relative energies of the reacting complex and transition state. However, a significant change in the product complex structure was found, significantly reducing the enthalpy of reaction to +31.9 kJ/mol. Similar structures and values were found for PBE0 and MP2 calculations with this larger basis set, supporting the B3LYP results. No symmetric transition state leading to the direct formation of uranium oxide tetrafluoride, UOF{sub 4}, was found, indicating that the reaction under ambient conditions likely includes several more steps than the mechanisms commonly mentioned. The transition state presented here appears to be the first published transition state for the important gas-phase reaction of UF{sub 6} with water.

  10. Depleted uranium hexafluoride management program : data compilation for the K-25 site.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartmann, H. M.

    2001-06-05

    This report is a compilation of data and analyses for the K-25 site on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The data were collected and the analyses were done in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 1999 Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DOE/EIS-0269). The report describes the affected environment at the K-25 site and summarizes the potential environmental impacts that could result from continued cylinder storage and preparation of cylinders for shipment at the site. It is probable that the cylinders at the K-25 site will be shipped to another site for conversion. Because conversion and long-term storage of the entire inventory at the K-25 site are highly unlikely, these data are not presented in this report. DOE's preferred alternative is to begin converting the depleted uranium hexafluoride inventory as soon as possible to either uranium oxide, uranium metal, or a combination of both, while allowing for use of as much of this inventory as possible.

  11. Reactions of plutonium and uranium with water: Kinetics and potential hazards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haschke, J.M.

    1995-12-01

    The chemistry and kinetics of reactions between water and the metals and hydrides of plutonium and uranium are described in an effort to consolidate information for assessing potential hazards associated with handling and storage. New experimental results and data from literature sources are presented. Kinetic dependencies on pH, salt concentration, temperature and other parameters are reviewed. Corrosion reactions of the metals in near-neutral solutions produce a fine hydridic powder plus hydrogen. The corrosion rate for plutonium in sea water is a thousand-fold faster than for the metal in distilled water and more than a thousand-fold faster than for uranium in sea water. Reaction rates for immersed hydrides of plutonium and uranium are comparable and slower than the corrosion rates for the respective metals. However, uranium trihydride is reported to react violently if a quantity greater than twenty-five grams is rapidly immersed in water. The possibility of a similar autothermic reaction for large quantities of plutonium hydride cannot be excluded. In addition to producing hydrogen, corrosion reactions convert the massive metals into material forms that are readily suspended in water and that are aerosolizable and potentially pyrophoric when dry. Potential hazards associated with criticality, environmental dispersal, spontaneous ignition and explosive gas mixtures are outlined.

  12. An analysis of uranium dispersal and health effects using a Gulf War case study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, Albert Christian

    2005-07-01

    The study described in this report used mathematical modeling to estimate health risks from exposure to depleted uranium (DU) during the 1991 Gulf War for both U.S. troops and nearby Iraqi civilians. The analysis found that the risks of DU-induced leukemia or birth defects are far too small to result in an observable increase in these health effects among exposed veterans or Iraqi civilians. Only a few veterans in vehicles accidentally struck by U.S. DU munitions are predicted to have inhaled sufficient quantities of DU particulate to incur any significant health risk (i.e., the possibility of temporary kidney damage from the chemical toxicity of uranium and about a 1% chance of fatal lung cancer). The health risk to all downwind civilians is predicted to be extremely small. Recommendations for monitoring are made for certain exposed groups. Although the study found fairly large calculational uncertainties, the models developed and used are generally valid. The analysis was also used to assess potential uranium health hazards for workers in the weapons complex. No illnesses are projected for uranium workers following standard guidelines; nonetheless, some research suggests that more conservative guidelines should be considered.

  13. The radioactive Substances (Prepared Uranium Thorium Compounds) Exemption Order 1962 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, Keith

    1962-01-01

    STATUTORY INSTRUMENTS 1962 No. 2711 ATOMIC ENERGY AND RADIOACI1VE SUBSTANCES The Radioactive Substances (prepared Uranium and Thorium Compounds) Exemption Order 1962

  14. High grade uranium resources in the United States : an overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graves, Richard E.

    1974-01-01

    A time analysis of uranium exploration, production and known reserves in the United States is employed to reveal industry trends. The

  15. The Hydrogen Corrosion of Uranium: Identification of Underlying...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Hydrogen Corrosion of Uranium: Identification of Underlying Causes and Proposed Mitigation Strategies Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Hydrogen Corrosion of...

  16. Degradation problems with the solvent extraction organic at Roessing uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munyungano, Brodrick; Feather, Angus; Virnig, Michael

    2008-07-01

    Roessing Uranium Ltd recovers uranium from a low-grade ore in Namibia. Uranium is recovered and purified from an ion-exchange eluate in a solvent-extraction plant. The solvent-extraction plant uses Alamine 336 as the extractant for uranium, with isodecanol used as a phase modifier in Sasol SSX 210, an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent. Since the plant started in the mid 1970's, there have been a few episodes where the tertiary amine has been quickly and severely degraded when the plant was operated outside certain operating parameters. The Rossing experience is discussed in more detail in this paper. (authors)

  17. Basic characterization of highly enriched uranium by gamma spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cong Tam Nguyen; Jozsef Zsigrai

    2005-08-25

    Gamma-spectrometric methods suitable for the characterization of highly enriched uranium samples encountered in illicit trafficking of nuclear materials are presented. In particular, procedures for determining the 234U, 235U, 238U, 232U and 236U contents and the age of highly enriched uranium are described. Consequently, the total uranium content and isotopic composition can be calculated. For determining the 238U and 232U contents a low background chamber was used. In addition, age dating of uranium was also performed using low-background spectrometry.

  18. Basic characterization of highly enriched uranium by gamma spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, C T

    2006-01-01

    Gamma-spectrometric methods suitable for the characterization of highly enriched uranium samples encountered in illicit trafficking of nuclear materials are presented. In particular, procedures for determining the 234U, 235U, 238U, 232U and 236U contents and the age of highly enriched uranium are described. Consequently, the total uranium content and isotopic composition can be calculated. For determining the 238U and 232U contents a low background chamber was used. In addition, age dating of uranium was also performed using low-background spectrometry.

  19. EIS-0359: Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and decontamination and decommissioning of the proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) conversion facility at three locations within the Paducah site; transportation of...

  20. EIS-0360: Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product at the Portsmouth...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and decontamination and decommissioning of the proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) conversion facility at three alternative locations within the Portsmouth site;...

  1. DOE Evaluates Environmental Impacts of Uranium Mining on Government...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    JUNCTION, Colo. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that the Final Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) is available to...

  2. Uranium and Strontium Batch Sorption and Diffusion Kinetics into...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Uranium and Strontium Batch Sorption and Diffusion Kinetics into Mesoporous Silica Friday, February 27, 2015 Figure 1 Figure 1. Transmission electron microscopy images of (A)...

  3. Abandoned Uranium Mine Technical Services and Cleanup Industry...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Abandoned Uranium Mine Technical Services and Cleanup Industry Day In January 2015, the United States (U.S.) and the Anadarko Litigation Trust ("Litigation Trust") entered into a...

  4. Electrochemical method of producing eutectic uranium alloy and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horton, J.A.; Hayden, H.W.

    1995-01-10

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for continuous production of liquid uranium alloys through the electrolytic reduction of uranium chlorides. The apparatus includes an electrochemical cell formed from an anode shaped to form an electrolyte reservoir, a cathode comprising a metal, such as iron, capable of forming a eutectic uranium alloy having a melting point less than the melting point of pure uranium, and molten electrolyte in the reservoir comprising a chlorine or fluorine containing salt and uranium chloride. The method of the invention produces an eutectic uranium alloy by creating an electrolyte reservoir defined by a container comprising an anode, placing an electrolyte in the reservoir, the electrolyte comprising a chlorine or fluorine containing salt and uranium chloride in molten form, positioning a cathode in the reservoir where the cathode comprises a metal capable of forming an uranium alloy having a melting point less than the melting point of pure uranium, and applying a current between the cathode and the anode. 2 figures.

  5. Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facilities...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Toxic Substance Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement (TSCA-UE- FFCA), February 20, 1992 State Kentucky Agreement Type Compliance Agreement Legal...

  6. The Uranium Processing Facility Finite Element Meshing Discussion

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) Finite Element Meshing Discussion ...Need picture of Building... October 25, 2011 Department of Energy - Natural Phenomenon Hazard Workshop 1...

  7. Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility, Major Design Changes...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    440 Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility (HEUMF) Major Design Changes Late Lessons Learned Report Apr 2010.pdf More Documents & Publications EIS-0387: Draft Site-Wide...

  8. Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facilities...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Toxic Substance Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement (TSCA-UE- FFCA), February 20, 1992 State Ohio Agreement Type Compliance Agreement Legal...

  9. Method of fabricating a uranium-bearing foil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gooch, Jackie G. (Seymour, TN); DeMint, Amy L. (Kingston, TN)

    2012-04-24

    Methods of fabricating a uranium-bearing foil are described. The foil may be substantially pure uranium, or may be a uranium alloy such as a uranium-molybdenum alloy. The method typically includes a series of hot rolling operations on a cast plate material to form a thin sheet. These hot rolling operations are typically performed using a process where each pass reduces the thickness of the plate by a substantially constant percentage. The sheet is typically then annealed and then cooled. The process typically concludes with a series of cold rolling passes where each pass reduces the thickness of the plate by a substantially constant thickness amount to form the foil.

  10. President Truman Increases Production of Uranium and Plutonium...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Increases Production of Uranium and Plutonium | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

  11. Selective leaching of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils: Progress report 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francis, C.W.; Mattus, A.J.; Farr, L.L.; Elless, M.P.; Lee, S.Y.

    1993-02-01

    Three soils and a sediment contaminated with uranium were used to determine the effectiveness of sodium carbonate and citric acid leaching to decontaminated or remove uranium to acceptable regulatory levels. Two of the soils were surface soils from the DOE facility formerly called the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) at Fernald, Ohio. This facility is presently called the Femald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). Carbonate extractions generally removed from 70 to 90% of the uranium from the Fernald storage pad soil. Uranium was slightly more difficult to extract from the Fernald incinerator and the Y-12 landfarm soils. Very small amounts of uranium could be extracted from the storm sewer sediment. Extraction with carbonate at high solution-to-soil ratios were as effective as extractions at low solution-to-soil ratios, indicating attrition by the paddle mixer was not significantly different than that provided in a rotary extractor. Also, pretreatments such as milling or pulverizing the soil sample did not appear to increase extraction efficiency when carbonate extractions were carried out at elevated temperatures (60[degree]C) or long extraction times (23 h). Adding KMnO[sub 4] in the carbonate extraction appeared to increase extraction efficiency from the Fernald incinerator soil but not the Fernald storage pad soil. The most effective leaching rates (> 90 % from both Fernald soils) were obtained using a citrate/dithionite extraction procedure designed to remove amorphous (noncrystalline) iron/aluminum sesquioxides from surfaces of clay minerals. Citric acid also proved to be a very good extractant for uranium.

  12. Selective leaching of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils: Progress report 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francis, C.W.; Mattus, A.J.; Farr, L.L.; Elless, M.P.; Lee, S.Y.

    1993-02-01

    Three soils and a sediment contaminated with uranium were used to determine the effectiveness of sodium carbonate and citric acid leaching to decontaminated or remove uranium to acceptable regulatory levels. Two of the soils were surface soils from the DOE facility formerly called the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) at Fernald, Ohio. This facility is presently called the Femald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). Carbonate extractions generally removed from 70 to 90% of the uranium from the Fernald storage pad soil. Uranium was slightly more difficult to extract from the Fernald incinerator and the Y-12 landfarm soils. Very small amounts of uranium could be extracted from the storm sewer sediment. Extraction with carbonate at high solution-to-soil ratios were as effective as extractions at low solution-to-soil ratios, indicating attrition by the paddle mixer was not significantly different than that provided in a rotary extractor. Also, pretreatments such as milling or pulverizing the soil sample did not appear to increase extraction efficiency when carbonate extractions were carried out at elevated temperatures (60{degree}C) or long extraction times (23 h). Adding KMnO{sub 4} in the carbonate extraction appeared to increase extraction efficiency from the Fernald incinerator soil but not the Fernald storage pad soil. The most effective leaching rates (> 90 % from both Fernald soils) were obtained using a citrate/dithionite extraction procedure designed to remove amorphous (noncrystalline) iron/aluminum sesquioxides from surfaces of clay minerals. Citric acid also proved to be a very good extractant for uranium.

  13. Rapid separation and purification of uranium and plutonium from dilute-matrix samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, Christopher R.; Ticknor, Brian W.; Hall, Gregory; Cadieux, James R.

    2014-03-11

    This work presents a streamlined separation and purification approach for trace uranium and plutonium from dilute (carrier-free) matrices. The method, effective for nanogram quantities of U and femtogram to picogram quantities of Pu, is ideally suited for environmental swipe samples that contain a small amount of collected bulk material. As such, it may be applicable for processing swipe samples such as those collected in IAEA inspection activities as well as swipes that are loaded with unknown analytes, such as those implemented in interlaboratory round-robin or proficiency tests. Additionally, the simplified actinide separation could find use in internal laboratory monitoring of clean room conditions prior to or following more extensive chemical processing. We describe key modifications to conventional techniques that result in a relatively rapid, cost-effective, and efficient U and Pu separation process. We demonstrate the efficacy of implementing anion exchange chromatography in a single column approach. We also show that hydrobromic acid is an effective substitute in lieu of hydroiodoic acid for eluting Pu. Lastly, we show that nitric acid is an effective digestion agent in lieu of perchloric acid and/or hydrofluoric acid. A step by step procedure of this process is detailed.

  14. Rapid separation and purification of uranium and plutonium from dilute-matrix samples

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Armstrong, Christopher R.; Ticknor, Brian W.; Hall, Gregory; Cadieux, James R.

    2014-03-11

    This work presents a streamlined separation and purification approach for trace uranium and plutonium from dilute (carrier-free) matrices. The method, effective for nanogram quantities of U and femtogram to picogram quantities of Pu, is ideally suited for environmental swipe samples that contain a small amount of collected bulk material. As such, it may be applicable for processing swipe samples such as those collected in IAEA inspection activities as well as swipes that are loaded with unknown analytes, such as those implemented in interlaboratory round-robin or proficiency tests. Additionally, the simplified actinide separation could find use in internal laboratory monitoring ofmore »clean room conditions prior to or following more extensive chemical processing. We describe key modifications to conventional techniques that result in a relatively rapid, cost-effective, and efficient U and Pu separation process. We demonstrate the efficacy of implementing anion exchange chromatography in a single column approach. We also show that hydrobromic acid is an effective substitute in lieu of hydroiodoic acid for eluting Pu. Lastly, we show that nitric acid is an effective digestion agent in lieu of perchloric acid and/or hydrofluoric acid. A step by step procedure of this process is detailed.« less

  15. Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning a Reference Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elder, H. K.

    1981-10-01

    Safety and cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of a commercial uranium hexafluoride conversion (UF{sub 6}) plant. Two basic decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between cost and safety impacts: DECON, and passive SAFSTOR. A third alternative, DECON of the plant and equipment with stabilization and long-term care of lagoon wastes. is also examined. DECON includes the immediate removal (following plant shutdown) of all radioactivity in excess of unrestricted release levels, with subsequent release of the site for public use. Passive SAFSTOR requires decontamination, preparation, maintenance, and surveillance for a period of time after shutdown, followed by deferred decontamination and unrestricted release. DECON with stabilization and long-term care of lagoon wastes (process wastes generated at the reference plant and stored onsite during plant operation} is also considered as a decommissioning method, although its acceptability has not yet been determined by the NRC. The decommissioning methods assumed for use in each decommissioning alternative are based on state-of-the-art technology. The elapsed time following plant shutdown required to perform the decommissioning work in each alternative is estimated to be: for DECON, 8 months; for passive SAFSTOR, 3 months to prepare the plant for safe storage and 8 months to accomplish deferred decontamination. Planning and preparation for decommissioning prior to plant shutdown is estimated to require about 6 months for either DECON or passive SAFSTOR. Planning and preparation prior to starting deferred decontamination is estimated to require an additional 6 months. OECON with lagoon waste stabilization is estimated to take 6 months for planning and about 8 months to perform the decommissioning work. Decommissioning cost, in 1981 dollars, is estimated to be $5.91 million for OECON. For passive SAFSTOR, preparing the facility for safe storage is estimated to cost $0.88 million, the annual maintenance and surveillance cost is estimated to be about $0.095 million, and deferred decontamination is estimated to cost about $6.50 million. Therefore, passive SAFSTOR for 10 years is estimated to cost $8.33 million in nondiscounted 1981 dollars. DECON with lagoon waste stabilization is estimated to cost about $4.59 million, with an annual cost of $0.011 million for long-term care. All of these estimates include a 25% contingency. Waste management costs for DECON, including the net cost of disposal of the solvent extraction lagoon wastes by shipping those wastes to a uranium mill for recovery of residual uranium, comprise about 38% of the total decommissioning cost. Disposal of lagoon waste at a commercial low-level waste burial ground is estimated to add $10.01 million to decommissioning costs. Safety analyses indicate that radiological and nonradiological safety impacts from decommissioning activities should be small. The 50-year committed dose equivalent to members of the public from airborne releases during normal decommissioning activities is estimated to 'Je about 4.0 man-rem. Radiation doses to the public from accidents are found to be very low for all phases of decommissioning. Occupational radiation doses from normal decommissioning operations (excluding transport operations) are estimated to be about 79 man-rem for DECON and about 80 man-rem for passive SAFSTOR with 10 years of safe storage. Doses from DECON with lagoon waste stabilization are about the same as for DECON except there is less dose resulting from transportation of radioactive waste. The number of fatalities and serious lost-time injuries not related to radiation is found to be very small for all decommissioning alternatives. Comparison of the cost estimates shows that DECON with lagoon waste stabilization is the least expensive method. However, this alternative does not allow unrestricted release of the site. The cumulative cost of maintenance and surveillance and the higher cost of deferred decontamination makes passive SAFSTOR more expensive than DECON. Seve

  16. Determination of the Relative Amount of Fluorine in Uranium Oxyfluoride Particles using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry and Optical Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kips, R; Kristo, M J; Hutcheon, I D; Amonette, J; Wang, Z; Johnson, T; Gerlach, D; Olsen, K B

    2009-05-29

    Both nuclear forensics and environmental sampling depend upon laboratory analysis of nuclear material that has often been exposed to the environment after it has been produced. It is therefore important to understand how those environmental conditions might have changed the chemical composition of the material over time, particularly for chemically sensitive compounds. In the specific case of uranium enrichment facilities, uranium-bearing particles stem from small releases of uranium hexafluoride, a highly reactive gas that hydrolyzes upon contact with moisture from the air to form uranium oxyfluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) particles. The uranium isotopic composition of those particles is used by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to verify whether a facility is compliant with its declarations. The present study, however, aims to demonstrate how knowledge of time-dependent changes in chemical composition, particle morphology and molecular structure can contribute to an even more reliable interpretation of the analytical results. We prepared a set of uranium oxyfluoride particles at the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM, European Commission, Belgium) and followed changes in their composition, morphology and structure with time to see if we could use these properties to place boundaries on the particle exposure time in the environment. Because the rate of change is affected by exposure to UV-light, humidity levels and elevated temperatures, the samples were subjected to varying conditions of those three parameters. The NanoSIMS at LLNL was found to be the optimal tool to measure the relative amount of fluorine in individual uranium oxyfluoride particles. At PNNL, cryogenic laser-induced time-resolved U(VI) fluorescence microspectroscopy (CLIFS) was used to monitor changes in the molecular structure.

  17. Boron-10 ABUNCL Active Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2013-07-09

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security (NA-241) is supporting the project Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the development of a 3He proportional counter alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is to design, build and demonstrate a system based upon 10B-lined proportional tubes in a configuration typical for 3He-based coincidence counter applications. This report provides results from testing of the active mode of the General Electric Reuter-Stokes Alternative Boron-Based Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar (ABUNCL) at Los Alamos National Laboratory using sources and fuel pins.

  18. Stratigraphy of the PB-1 well, Nopal I uranium deposit, Sierra Pena Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, P.

    2009-01-01

    and geochronology of the Nopal I uranium deposit, Mexico:with hydrothermally altered Nopal Formation rhyolitic tuff.uranium mineralization at the Nopal deposit include Calas (

  19. CRYSTAL AND MOLECULAR STRUCTURE OF HYDRIDOTIS (BIS(TRIMETHYLSILYL)AMIDO]URANIUM(IV)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andersen, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Chemistry University of California Berkeley, California 94720 New hydride derivatives of thorium (IV) and uranium (Chemistry CRYSTAL AND MOLECULAR STRUCTURE OF HYDRIDOTRIS[BIS(TRIMETHYLSILYL)AMIDO]URANIUM(

  20. Novel Transformations using Uranium and Group 5 Metal Complexes Supported by 1,1'-diamidoferrocene Ligands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez, Michael Joseph

    2013-01-01

    chemistry has grown significantly in the past decade. 1 UraniumChemistry by Michael Joseph Lopez ABSTRACT OF THE THESIS Novel Transformations using Uranium