Sample records for ur3 ur4 payload

  1. Modular Countermine Payload for Small Robots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman Herman; Doug Few; Roelof Versteeg; Jean-Sebastien Valois; Jeff McMahill; Michael Licitra; Edward Henciak

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Payloads for small robotic platforms have historically been designed and implemented as platform and task specific solutions. A consequence of this approach is that payloads cannot be deployed on different robotic platforms without substantial re-engineering efforts. To address this issue, we developed a modular countermine payload that is designed from the ground-up to be platform agnostic. The payload consists of the multi-mission payload controller unit (PCU) coupled with the configurable mission specific threat detection, navigation and marking payloads. The multi-mission PCU has all the common electronics to control and interface to all the payloads. It also contains the embedded processor that can be used to run the navigational and control software. The PCU has a very flexible robot interface which can be configured to interface to various robot platforms. The threat detection payload consists of a two axis sweeping arm and the detector. The navigation payload consists of several perception sensors that are used for terrain mapping, obstacle detection and navigation. Finally, the marking payload consists of a dual-color paint marking system. Through the multi-mission PCU, all these payloads are packaged in a platform agnostic way to allow deployment on multiple robotic platforms, including Talon and Packbot.

  2. Optical Payload for the STARE Mission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simms, L; Riot, V; De Vries, W; Olivier, S S; Pertica, A; Bauman, B J; Phillion, D; Nikolaev, S

    2011-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Space-based Telescopes for Actionable Refinement of Ephemeris (STARE) is a nano-sat based mission designed to better determine the trajectory of satellites and space debris in orbit around earth. In this paper, we give a brief overview of the mission and its place in the larger context of Space Situational Awareness (SSA). We then describe the details of the central optical payload, touching on the optical design and characterization of the on-board image sensor used in our Cubesat based prototype. Finally, we discuss the on-board star and satellite track detection algorithm central to the success of the mission.

  3. Expanding the Allowable TRUPACT-II Payload

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    St. Michel, W. (INEEL); Lott, S. (LANL-Carlsbad Operations)

    2002-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The partnership between the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and the TRU and Mixed Waste Focus Area (TMFA) was rewarded when several long-term projects came to fruition. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) removed some of the conservatism in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) with their approval of Revision 19. The SARP strictly limits the payload constituents to ensure that hydrogen gas and other flammable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) don't build up to flammable/explosive levels while the transuranic (TRU) waste is sealed in the container during shipment. The CBFO/TMFA development program was based on laboratory experiments with surrogate waste materials, real waste experiments, and theoretical modeling that were used to justify payload expansion. Future work to expand the shipping envelope of the TRUPACT-II focuses on increasing the throughput through the waste certification process and reducing the waste operations costs by removing the need for a repack aging and/or treatment capability or reducing the size of the needed repackaging/treatment capability.

  4. Expanding the Allowable TRUPACT-II Payload

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    St Michel, Whitney Dorothea; Lott, Sheila

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The partnership between the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and the TRU and Mixed Waste Focus Area (TMFA) was rewarded when several long-term projects came to fruition. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) removed some of the conservatism in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) with their approval of Revision 19. The SARP strictly limits the payload constituents to ensure that hydrogen gas and other flammable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) don't build up to flammable/explosive levels while the transuranic (TRU) waste is sealed in the container during shipment. The CBFO/TMFA development program was based on laboratory experiments with surrogate waste materials, real waste experiments, and theoretical modeling that were used to justify payload expansion. Future work to expand the shipping envelope of the TRUPACT-II focuses on increasing the throughput through the waste certification process and reducing the waste operations costs by removing the need for a repackaging and/or treatment capability or reducing the size of the needed repackaging/treatment capability.

  5. High payload six-axis load sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jansen, John F. (Knoxville, TN); Lind, Randall F. (Knoxville, TN)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A repairable high-payload six-axis load sensor includes a table, a base, and at least three shear-pin load transducers removably mounted between the table and the base. Removable mounting permits easy replacement of damaged shear pins. Preferably, the shear-pin load transducers are responsive to shear forces imparted along the two axes perpendicular to an axis of minimum sensitivity characteristic of the transducer. Responsive to an applied shear force, each shear-pin load transducer can produce an electrical signal proportional to the reaction force. The load sensor can further include a structure for receiving the proportional electrical signals and computing the applied load corresponding to the proportional electrical signals. The computed load can be expressed in terms of a three-dimensional XYZ Cartesian coordinate system.

  6. Overview of the New Horizons Science Payload

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. A. Weaver; W. C. Gibson; M. B. Tapley; L. A. Young; S. A. Stern

    2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The New Horizons mission was launched on 2006 January 19, and the spacecraft is heading for a flyby encounter with the Pluto system in the summer of 2015. The challenges associated with sending a spacecraft to Pluto in less than 10 years and performing an ambitious suite of scientific investigations at such large heliocentric distances (> 32 AU) are formidable and required the development of lightweight, low power, and highly sensitive instruments. This paper provides an overview of the New Horizons science payload, which is comprised of seven instruments. Alice provides spatially resolved ultraviolet spectroscopy. The Ralph instrument has two components: the Multicolor Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC), which performs panchromatic and color imaging, and the Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array (LEISA), which provides near-infrared spectroscopic mapping capabilities. The Radio Experiment (REX) is a component of the New Horizons telecommunications system that provides both occultation and radiometry capabilities. The Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) provides high sensitivity, high spatial resolution optical imaging capabilities. The Solar Wind at Pluto (SWAP) instrument measures the density and speed of solar wind particles. The Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation (PEPSSI) measures energetic protons and CNO ions. The Venetia Burney Student Dust Counter (VB-SDC) is used to record dust particle impacts during the cruise phases of the mission.

  7. Expert System for Building TRU Waste Payloads - 13554

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruemmer, Heather; Slater, Bryant [Information Systems Laboratories, 2235 East 25th Street, Suite 100, Idaho Falls, ID 83404 (United States)] [Information Systems Laboratories, 2235 East 25th Street, Suite 100, Idaho Falls, ID 83404 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The process for grouping TRU waste drums into payloads for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal is a very complex process. Transportation and regulatory requirements must be met, along with striving for the goals of shipment efficiency: maximize the number of waste drums in a shipment and minimize the use of empty drums which take up precious underground storage space. The restrictions on payloads range from weight restrictions, to limitations on flammable gas in the headspace, to minimum TRU alpha activity concentration requirements. The Overpack and Payload Assistant Tool (OPAT) has been developed as a mixed-initiative intelligent system within the WIPP Waste Data System (WDS) to guide the construction of multiple acceptable payloads. OPAT saves the user time while at the same time maximizes the efficiency of shipments for the given drum population. The tool provides the user with the flexibility to tune critical factors that guide OPAT's operation based on real-time feedback concerning the results of the execution. This feedback complements the user's external knowledge of the drum population (such as location of drums, known challenges, internal shipment goals). This work demonstrates how software can be utilized to complement the unique domain knowledge of the users. The mixed-initiative approach combines the insight and intuition of the human expert with the proficiency of automated computational algorithms. The result is the ability to thoroughly and efficiently explore the search space of possible solutions and derive the best waste management decision. (authors)

  8. TRU waste certification and TRUPACT-2 payload verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter, E.K. (USDOE Albuquerque Operations Office, Carlsbad, NM (USA). Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Project Office); Johnson, J.E. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (USA). Waste Isolation Div.)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) established a policy that requires each waste shipper to verify that all waste shipments meet the requirements of the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) prior to being shipped. This verification provides assurance that transuranic (TRU) wastes meet the criteria while still retained in a facility where discrepancies can be immediately corrected. Each Department of Energy (DOE) TRU waste facility planning to ship waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is required to develop and implement a specific program including Quality Assurance (QA) provisions to verify that waste is in full compliance with WIPP's WAC. This program is audited by a composite DOE and contractor audit team prior to granting the facility permission to certify waste. During interaction with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on payload verification for shipping in TRUPACT-II, a similar system was established by DOE. The TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report (SAR) contains the technical requirements and physical and chemical limits that payloads must meet (like the WAC). All shippers must plan and implement a payload control program including independent QA provisions. A similar composite audit team will conduct preshipment audits, frequent subsequent audits, and operations inspections to verify that all TRU waste shipments in TRUPACT-II meet the requirements of the Certificate of Compliance issued by the NRC which invokes the SAR requirements. 1 fig.

  9. ARM-UAV TWP-ICE Payload Instrumentation Details

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  10. Design of a Surface Albedo Modification Payload for Near Earth Asteroid (NEA) Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ge, Shen

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    of time and if it uses the close approach of an asteroid near Earth to magnify the perturbation. The payload dispenses colored powder called albedo changing particles (ACPs) onto the surface changing its albedo and indirectly the surface temperature which...

  11. Nonlinear Decelerator for Payloads in Aerial Delivery Systems. I: Design and Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Lyons; M. Ginther; P. Mascarenas; E. Rickard; J. Robinson; J. Braeger; H. Liu; A. Ludu

    2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the dynamics and the optimization of the shock deceleration supported by a payload when its airborne carrier impacts the ground. We build a nonlinear elastic model for a container prototype and an elastic suspension system for the payload. We model the dynamics of this system and extract information on maximum deceleration, energy transfer between the container and payload, and energy resonant damping. We designed the system and perform lab experiments for various terminal velocities and types of grounds (cement, grass, sand water, etc.). The results are compared with the theoretical model and results are commented, including predictions for deceleration at different types of ground impact. The results can be used for aerial delivery systems, splash-down of capsules, recoveries, weather balloons, coastal surveying systems, or the new introduced goal-line technology in sport competitions.

  12. Impact of Liquefied Natural Gas usage and payload size on Hybrid Wing Body aircraft fuel efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mody, Pritesh (Pritesh Chetan)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work assessed Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft in the context of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) fuel usage and payload/range scalability at three scales: H1 (B737), H2 (B787) and H3 (B777). The aircraft were optimized for ...

  13. Saving Energy with Buoyancy and Balance Control for Underwater Robots with Dynamic Payloads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    . The robot will have to adapt to the change. One possibility is to use increased thruster power to compensate the robot picks up or drops off a payload. Our approach combines balance control and buoy- ancy control) a balance control mechanism. The buoyancy con- trol mechanism provides a power-efficient means

  14. www.sea.co.uk a Cohort plc company Lunar Lander Science payload

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anand, Mahesh

    www.sea.co.uk a Cohort plc company Lunar Lander ­ Science payload Capability · Instrument design-European #12;www.sea.co.uk a Cohort plc company Lunar Lander ­ IMU Capability · MEMS IMU Heritage · MEMS gyro

  15. High efficiency photon counting detectors for the FAUST Spacelab far ultraviolet astronomy payload

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siegmund, O.H.W.; Lampton, M.; Bixler, J.; Vallerga, J.; Bowyer, S.

    1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors compare the performance of sealed tube microchannel-plate position sensitive detectors having transmission CsI photocathodes or opaque CsI photocathodes. These devices were developed for the FAUST Spacelab payload to accomplish imaging surveys in the band between 1300A and 1800A. The authors demonstrate that photocathode quantum efficiencies in excess of 40% at 1216A have been achieved with the transmission and the opaque CSI photocathodes. The effect of the photoelectron trajectory on the spatial resolution is assessed. Spatial resolution <70..mu..m FWHM has been obtained and is maintained up to event rates of 5x10/sup 4/ sec/sup -1/. Background rates of 0.55 events cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/ have been achieved and low distortion (<1%) imaging has been demonstrated.

  16. Second Annual Maintenance, Inspection, and Test Report for PAS-1 Cask Certification for Shipping Payload B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KELLY, D.J.

    2000-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Packaging, Inc. (NuPac), PAS-1 cask is required to undergo annual maintenance and inspections to retain certification in accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Certificate of Compliance USA/9184B(U) (Appendix A). The packaging configuration being tested and maintained is the NuPac PAS-1 cask for Payload B. The intent of the maintenance and inspections is to ensure the packaging remains in unimpaired physical condition. Two casks, serial numbers 2162-026 and 2162-027, were maintained, inspected, and tested at the 306E Development, Fabrication, and Test Laboratory, located at the Hanford Site's 300 Area. Waste Management Federal Services, Inc. (WMFS), a subsidiary of GTS Duratek, was in charge of the maintenance and testing. Cogema Engineering Corporation (Cogema) directed the operations in the test facility. The maintenance, testing, and inspections were conducted successfully with both PAS-1 casks. The work conducted on the overpacks included weighing, gasket replacement, and plastic pipe plug and foam inspections. The work conducted on the secondary containment vessel (SCV) consisted of visual inspection of the vessel and threaded parts (i.e., fasteners), visual inspection of sealing surfaces, replacement of O-ring seals, and a helium leak test. The work conducted on the primary containment vessel (PCV) consisted of visual inspection of the vessel and threaded parts (i.e., fasteners), visual inspection of sealing surfaces, replacement of O-ring seals, dimensional inspection of the vessel bottom, a helium leak test, and dye penetrant inspection of the welds. The vermiculite material used in the cask rack assembly was replaced.

  17. Compatibility issues of potential payloads for the USA/9904/B(U)F-85 RTG transportation system (RTGTS) for the 'Pluto Express' mission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Roger G.; Barklay, Chadwick D.; Howell, Edwin I.; Frazier, Timothy A. [EG and G Mound Applied Technologies P.O. Box 3000 Miamisburg, Ohio 45343-3000 (United States); U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 66 Miamisburg, Ohio 45343-0066 (United States)

    1997-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The specific electric power system for the 'Pluto Express' mission has yet to be specified. However, electric power will be provided by either radioisotopic thermoelectric generators (RTG), radioisotope thermophotovoltaic systems (RTPV), alkali metal thermal to electrical conversion (AMTEC) systems, radioisotope Stirling systems, or a combination of these. The selected radioisotopic power system will also be transported using the USA/9904/B(U)F-85, Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Transportation System (RTGTS). As a result, all of the potential payloads present uniquely different environmental and physical configuration requirements. This paper presents the major compatibility issues of the potential payloads for the USA/9904/B(U)F-85 RTG Transportation System for the 'Pluto Express' mission.

  18. G-1 Payload

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof EnergyFunding OpportunityF G F ! ( ! ( ! ( ! ( ! ( ! (

  19. Compatibility issues of potential payloads for the USA/9904/B(U)F-85 RTG transportation system (RTGTS) for the {open_quotes}Pluto Express{close_quotes} mission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, R.G.; Barklay, C.D.; Howell, E.I. [EGG Mound Applied Technologies P.O. Box 3000 Miamisburg, Ohio45343-3000 (United States); Frazier, T.A. [U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 66 Miamisburg, Ohio45343-0066 (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The specific electric power system for the {open_quotes}Pluto Express{close_quotes} mission has yet to be specified. However, electric power will be provided by either radioisotopic thermoelectric generators (RTG), radioisotope thermophotovoltaic systems (RTPV), alkali metal thermal to electrical conversion (AMTEC) systems, radioisotope Stirling systems, or a combination of these. The selected radioisotopic power system will also be transported using the USA/9904/B(U)F-85, Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Transportation System (RTGTS). As a result, all of the potential payloads present uniquely different environmental and physical configuration requirements. This paper presents the major compatibility issues of the potential payloads for the USA/9904/B(U)F-85 RTG Transportation System for the {open_quotes}Pluto Express{close_quotes} mission. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. COOPERATIVE AND SUPERVISORY CONTROL FOR PAYLOAD MANIPULATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmstrom, Kristen

    2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    of these tasks include habitat or facility construction. They can also act as an assistant to an astronaut that is collecting samples out in the field. To produce these robots, the first step is to make prototypes in a laboratory environment that can... E. Hurtado Department of Aerospace Engineering There are many tasks done by humans today that could be done by robots. One environment where robots are especially useful is space. Because of the limitations of astronauts, robots could...

  1. IMiniature Integrated Payload Suites 2010 Phase II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abstract The PowerCube is a 1U CubeSat module that provides integrated propulsion, power, and precision with magnetic torque coils, enables sun-tracking of the solar panel, vectoring of the thruster, and precision/s of delta-V per 90 minute orbit for a 3U CubeSat. Compared to other CubeSat propulsion technologies

  2. Steven P. Landau Technical Plans and Payload Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Tube Conversion, and Low Cost Test Missile Kit (LCTMK) development. Mr. Landau oversaw risk reduction studies and initial contract development to acquire new telemetry, tracking and destruct systems for D5 flight tests

  3. How to lighten trucks to haul bigger payloads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smiely, C.H.

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper discusses how lighter truck components can be used wisely for the highway transportation of coal, with maintenance and costs in mind, to increase the hauling capacity of trucks.

  4. PAYLOAD POINTING AND ACTIVE VIBRATION ISOLATION USING HEXAPOD PLATFORMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Box Algorithm, and the Adaptive Disturbance Canceller have been implemented on either or both, the Time Domain Clear Box Adaptive Basis Algorithm, the Frequency Domain Clear Box Algorithm, and Adaptive Disturbance Canceller algorithm achieved under various situations the performance as good as nearly two

  5. Update on the Micro-X Sounding Rocket payload

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectal

    The Micro-X High Resolution Microcalorimeter X-ray Imaging Rocket is a sounding rocket experiment that will combine a transition-edge-sensor X-ray-microcalorimeter array with a conical imaging mirror to obtain high- ...

  6. Shielded Payload Containers Will Enhance the Safety and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) · External dimensions = 55-gal drum, internal capacity for a standard 30-gallon drum · Transport in 3-pack within ICV · 6.5 inch crush of bottom end axial dunnage and aluminum honeycomb spacer equates

  7. On the Limits of Payload-Oblivious Network Attack Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiter, Michael

    alarms in order to detect them consistently. Keywords: network intrusion detection, ROC curve, evaluation. 1 Introduction We address the problem of evaluating network intrusion detection systems to the form of log data, encryption or simply a high connection failure rate--methods for detecting

  8. Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesvilleAbout » Contact Us Contact Us U.S. Department of EnergyAbout

  9. GPUs versus FPGAs for Onboard Payload Compression of Remotely Sensed Hyperspectral Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plaza, Antonio J.

    la Universidad s/n, E-10003 Cáceres, Spain Email: {aplaza, sersanmar, apazgal, jplaza York, five days after the terrorist attacks that collapsed the two main towers in the WTC complex. Our

  10. Suitability of Shape Memory Alloys for vibration isolation with application to launch vehicle payloads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayes, John Jeramy

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is similar to a buckling elastomer. In this work, a simplified material model for the prediction of the non-linear, hysteretic nature of the pseudoelastic force-displacement relationship is developed. This material model is coupled with the numerical...

  11. A lean safety review process for payloads on the International Space Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luis, Javier de

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Space Station has the potential to serve as a unique test platform to enable technologies for a wide array of manned and unmanned NASA missions. In order to live up to its promise, the resources required ...

  12. Test report for PAS-1 cask certification for shipping payload B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MERCADO, J.E.

    1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This test report documents the successful inspection and testing to certify two NuPac PAS-1 casks in accordance with US Department of Energy Certificate of Compliance (CoC) USA/9184/B(U). The primary and secondary containment vessels of each cask met the acceptance criteria defined in the CoC and the test plan.

  13. Suitability of Shape Memory Alloys for vibration isolation with application to launch vehicle payloads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayes, John Jeramy

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work details an investigation into the suitability of Shape Memory Alloys for the task of vibration isolation based on the similarities between the Shape Memory Alloy pseudoelastic behavior and the softening response of isolators whose response...

  14. Using a co-located GNSS radio occultation payload for microwave radiometer calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dav, Pratik K. (Pratik Kamlesh)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents a new method of calibrating an orbital cross-track scanning microwave radiometer using a co-located radio occultation (RO) instrument with Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). The radiometer and ...

  15. Globally Stable Neural Robot Control Capable of Payload Adaptation M. Jansen and R. Eckmiller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behnke, Sven

    for all positions and loads following the training phase, as well as the application of the networks

  16. Lunar Outpost Development and the Role of Mechanical Systems for Payload Handling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alabama in Huntsville, University of

    .2.2 Apollo and Advanced Apollo Infrastructure.................................................7 2.3 The Post Apollo, Pre SEI Era (1972-1988) .......................................................10 2.3.1 Lunar

  17. EXPERIMENT DEFINITION AND INTERGRATION STUDY FOR THE ACCOMMODATION OF MAGNETIC SPECTROMETER PAYLOAD ON SPACELAB/SHUTTLE MISSIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buffington, Dr. Andrew

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reliability W3S achieved by (1) an electronic design philosophy which stressed redundancy, (2) by a thorough testing of electronics

  18. RADIOISOTOPE-DRIVEN DUAL-MODE PROPULSION SYSTEM FOR CUBESAT-SCALE PAYLOADS TO THE OUTER PLANETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. D. Jerred; T. M. Howe; S. D. Howe; A. Rajguru

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is apparent the cost of planetary exploration is rising as mission budgets declining. Currently small scientific beds geared to performing limited tasks are being developed and launched into low earth orbit (LEO) in the form of small-scale satellite units, i.e., CubeSats. These micro- and nano-satellites are gaining popularity among the university and science communities due to their relatively low cost and design flexibility. To date these small units have been limited to performing tasks in LEO utilizing solar-based power. If a reasonable propulsion system could be developed, these CubeSat platforms could perform exploration of various extra-terrestrial bodies within the solar system engaging a broader range of researchers. Additionally, being mindful of mass, smaller cheaper launch vehicles (approximately 1,000 kgs to LEO) can be targeted. Thus, in effect, allows for beneficial exploration to be conducted within limited budgets. Researchers at the Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) are proposing a low mass, radioisotope-based, dual-mode propulsion system capable of extending the exploration realm of these CubeSats out of LEO.

  19. Synchronized Position Hold Engage & Reorient Experimental Satellites Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Space Systems Laboratory partnered with Payload Systems, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    multi-aperture telescope or interferometer Space based fuel depot Multi-vehicle Mars mission architectures Routine and autonomous formation flight is essential to the operation of these missions Long ranges Tethered Formation Flight Synchronized Wireless Autonomous Reconfigurable Modules (SWARM

  20. Appears in Proc. International Workshop on Planning and Scheduling for Space, Moffett Field, CA, March 2013. Onboard Mission Planning on the Intelligent Payload

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaffer, Steven

    solar panels for electrical power generation and is anticipated to have 1-1.5W powe IPEX is a 1 unit (1U) cubesat (Figure 1) [Chien et al. 2012] intended to flight validate technologies

  1. Central Characterization Program (CCP) Transuranic Authorized...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Authorized Methods for Payload Control Central Characterization Program (CCP) Transuranic Authorized Methods for Payload Control This document was used to determine facts and...

  2. CH Packaging Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction - This procedure provides instructions forassembling the following CH packaging payload: Drum payload assembly Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP)

  3. CH Packaging Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2006-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction - This procedure provides instructions forassembling the following CH packaging payload: Drum payload assembly Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP)

  4. CH Packaging Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2007-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This procedure provides instructions forassembling the following CH packaging payload: Drum payload assembly Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP)

  5. CH Packaging Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2007-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This procedure provides instructions forassembling the following CH packaging payload: Drum payload assembly Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP)

  6. EFFECTS OF RADIO WAVE PROPAGATION IN URBANIZED AREAS ON UAV-GCS COMMAND AND CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jenn, David C.

    ). However, future concept of operations (CONOPS) would involve UAV or payload control from soldiers in units

  7. Commercial Space Activities at Goddard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    Facilities Commercial Payload Partnerships/Rideshares Technology Infusion to Industry Technology

  8. Artus Mustermann Co Au Tor A New Method For

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chemnitz, Technische Universität

    . Preprint SPC 95 20, TU Chemnitz-Zwickau, Juni 1995. [8] D. Lohse. Ein Standard-File f¨ur 3D SFB393/04-44 Preprintreihe des Chemnitzer SFB 393 ISSN 1619-7178 (Print) ISSN 1619-7186 (Internet) SFB perturbed problem on anisotropic finite element meshes. January 2001. 01-02 G. Kunert. A note on the energy

  9. Mixed convection and heat management in the Mars gravity biosatellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsh, Jesse B. (Jesse Benjamin)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mars Gravity Biosatellite will house fifteen mice in a low Earth orbit satellite spinning about its longitudinal axis. The satellite's payload thermal control system will reject heat through the base of the payload ...

  10. A stereo vision system for support of planetary surface exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollefeys, Marc

    and for controlling the motion of the rover, using Light Emitting Diodes on the payload cab of the rover

  11. A stereo vision system for support of planetary surface exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollefeys, Marc

    and for controlling the motion of the rover, using light emitting diodes on the payload cab of the rover

  12. Calibration, Terrain Reconstruction and Path Planning for a Planetary Exploration System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollefeys, Marc

    and localization of the rover. The lat- ter makes use of four Light Emitting Diodes on the rover payload cab

  13. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system safety analysis report for packaging. Volumes 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, P.C.

    1996-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This SARP describes the RTG Transportation System Package, a Type B(U) packaging system that is used to transport an RTG or similar payload. The payload, which is included in this SARP, is a generic, enveloping payload that specifically encompasses the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) RTG payload. The package consists of two independent containment systems mounted on a shock isolation transport skid and transported within an exclusive-use trailer.

  14. Artus Mustermann Co Au Tor A New Method For

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chemnitz, Technische Universität

    . Preprint SPC 95 20, TU Chemnitz­Zwickau, Juni 1995. [8] D. Lohse. Ein Standard­File f?ur 3D Preprint SFB393/04­44 Preprintreihe des Chemnitzer SFB 393 ISSN 1619­7178 (Print) ISSN 1619­7186 (Internet on the energy norm for a singularly perturbed model problem. January 2001. 01­03 U.­J. G?orke, A. Bucher, R

  15. Recommendations and Justifications To Remove Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birney, Cathleen; Krauss, Mark J

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is part of an effort to reevaluate 37 FFACO and Administrative URs against the current Soils Risk-Based Corrective Action Evaluation Process. After reviewing 37 existing FFACO and Administrative URs, 3 URs addressed in this document have sufficient information to determine that these current URs may be removed, based on the RBCA criteria. This document presents recommendations on modifications to existing URs that will be consistent with the RBCA criteria.

  16. Autonomous Realtime Threat-Hunting Robot (ARTHR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    INL

    2008-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Idaho National Laboratory researchers developed an intelligent plug-and-play robot payload that transforms commercial robots into effective first responders for deadly chemical, radiological and explosive threats.

  17. Correspondence: Email: korpela@ssl.berkeley.edu; Telephone: (510) 643-6538; URL: http://setiathome.ssl.berkeley.edu/~korpela

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korpela, Eric J.

    ___________________ Correspondence: Email: korpela@ssl.berkeley.edu; Telephone: (510) 643-6538; URL: http://setiathome.ssl.berkeley.edu/~korpela The SPEAR Science Payload Eric J. Korpelaa , Jerry

  18. Microsoft Word - Inspection of TRUPACT-III Changes.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    variety of modifications in Room 108, such as removing a concrete pad, installing a hood ventilation system, bolting robot, bolt and coverlid rack, pallet dispenser, payload...

  19. Assessing the Impacts of Fractionation on Pointing-Intensive Spacecraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    ,500 - PoIM 1.5 % Payload Resolution 0.5 m Variable CONOPS Separation Distance 20, 1000, 5000 m Orbit

  20. air force bombers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engagement Effectiveness 12;Aircrew at Risk The Value of Range, Payload, Precision, and Stealth Bomb Droppers Air Escort Air Defense Suppression Tankers Total Aircrew At Risk...

  1. Autonomous Realtime Threat-Hunting Robot (ARTHR

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    INL

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Idaho National Laboratory researchers developed an intelligent plug-and-play robot payload that transforms commercial robots into effective first responders for deadly chemical, radiological and explosive threats.

  2. Submitted for publication in The International Journal of Robotics Research Experiments in Control of a Flexible-Link

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of a exible- link robot arm to handle payloads with unknown internal dynamics. The approach is based control of a very exible single-link robot arm with un- known dynamic payloads are presented. 1. The only sensors used for con- 1 #12;trol will be part of the main robotic arm1. It is assumed

  3. Attack Generation for NIDS Testing Using Natural Deduction Shai Rubin, Somesh Jha and Barton P. Miller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Barton P.

    Attack Generation for NIDS Testing Using Natural Deduction Shai Rubin, Somesh Jha and Barton P. Miller January 23, 2004 Abstract A common way to elude a signature-based NIDS is to transform an attack matching between the attack payload and the NIDS signature, attackers split the payload into several TCP

  4. Attack Generation for NIDS Testing Using Natural Deduction Shai Rubin, Somesh Jha and Barton P. Miller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    Attack Generation for NIDS Testing Using Natural Deduction Shai Rubin, Somesh Jha and Barton P. Miller January 23, 2004 Abstract A common way to elude a signature­based NIDS is to transform an attack matching between the attack payload and the NIDS signature, attackers split the payload into several TCP

  5. Water-soluble carbon nanotube compositions for drug delivery and medicinal applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tour, James M.; Lucente-Schultz, Rebecca; Leonard, Ashley; Kosynkin, Dmitry V.; Price, Brandi Katherine; Hudson, Jared L.; Conyers, Jr., Jodie L.; Moore, Valerie C.; Casscells, S. Ward; Myers, Jeffrey N.; Milas, Zvonimir L.; Mason, Kathy A.; Milas, Luka

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions comprising a plurality of functionalized carbon nanotubes and at least one type of payload molecule are provided herein. The compositions are soluble in water and PBS in some embodiments. In certain embodiments, the payload molecules are insoluble in water. Methods are described for making the compositions and administering the compositions. An extended release formulation for paclitaxel utilizing functionalized carbon nanotubes is also described.

  6. al pb zn: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    payload. The planar shield was designed to veto background countsproduced by local gamma-ray production in passive material and neutron interactions in the detector. The CdZnTe...

  7. The 2010 balloon campaign of the Nuclear Compton Eric C. Bellma, Jeng-Lun Chiub, Steven E. Boggsa, Hsiang-Kuang Changb,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    observations of the Galactic Center Region. Unfortunately, a launch accident caused major damage to the payload by Monique Arnaud, Stephen S. Murray, Tadayuki Takahashi, Proc. of SPIE Vol. 7732, 773224 2010 SPIE CCC

  8. Reducing Actuator Switchings for Motion Control of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Ryan N.

    Reducing Actuator Switchings for Motion Control of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles Monique Chyba, such as time, energy, payload or some combination of these. Indeed, the major issue is that due to the vehicles

  9. Ground calibrations of Nuclear Compton Telescope Jeng-Lun Chiu*a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    occurred to result in major payload damage with no balloon flight, where a subsequent one with the same Telescopes and Instrumentation 2010: Ultraviolet to Gamma Ray, edited by Monique Arnaud, Stephen S. Murray

  10. Review Article Huygens HASI servo accelerometer: A review and lessons learned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withers, Paul

    Review Article Huygens HASI servo accelerometer: A review and lessons learned B. Hathi a,?, A. Techniques used for data analysis and lessons learned that may be useful for accelerometry payloads on future . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1323 2.4. Lessons learned

  11. The Phoenix Mars Lander is the first project in NASA's openly competed program of Mars Scout

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , rather than making an airbag-cushioned landing like those of the Mars Pathfinder and the Mars Exploration of payload weight to total weight than airbags do. The Phoenix team has extensively examined the landing

  12. A Probabilistic Sonar Sensor Model for Robust Localization of a Small-size Blimp in Indoor Environments using a Particle Filter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teschner, Matthias

    -- In recent years, autonomous miniature airships have gained increased interest in the robotics community of miniature airships come from their limited payload which introduces substantial constraints monitoring, surveillance, and search and rescue. Many applications, however, require that the airships

  13. MKV Carrier Vehicle Sensor Calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotnik, Aaron M.

    The Multiple Kill Vehicle (MKV) system, which is being developed by the US Missile Defense Agency (MDA), is a midcourse payload that includes a carrier vehicle and a number of small kill vehicles. During the mission, the ...

  14. NASA ADVISORY COUNCIL COMMERCIAL SPACE COMMITTEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    , operations, and sustaining Payload and flight science experiment processing, integration and testing Development, test and demonstration of advanced flight systems and transformational technologies Developing IRIS Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph TDRS K Tracking and Data Relay System 2013 LDCM

  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Insurance companies may not impose surcharges on EVs based on factors such as new technology, passenger payload, weight-to-horsepower ratio, and the types of material used to...

  16. Autonomous Realtime Threat-Hunting Robot (ARTHR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Idaho National Laboratory - David Bruemmer, Curtis Nielsen

    2008-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Idaho National Laboratory researchers developed an intelligent plug-and-play robot payload that transforms commercial robots into effective first responders for deadly chemical, radiological and explosive threats. To learn more, visit

  17. Methods of and system for swing damping movement of suspended objects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, J.F.; Petterson, B.J.; Strip, D.R.

    1991-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A payload suspended from a gantry is swing damped in accordance with a control algorithm based on the periodic motion of the suspended mass or by servoing on the forces induced by the suspended mass. 13 figures.

  18. The design of a control architecture for a heavy-lift precision manipulator for use in contact with the environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, William T. (William Theodore Leroy)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Robotic manipulators can be used to enhance the strength and dexterity of a human user. This thesis considers the design of a controller for a heavy-lift manipulator for lifting and inserting payloads onto aircraft on the ...

  19. GPS radio occultation with CHAMP Jens Wickert, Georg Beyerle, Torsten Schmidt, Christian Marquardt, Rolf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GPS radio occultation with CHAMP Jens Wickert, Georg Beyerle, Torsten Schmidt, Christian Marquardt Positioning System) radio occultation experiment onboard the German CHAMP (CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload sensing of Earth's atmosphere, GPS radio occulta- tion 1 Introduction The CHAMP GPS radio occultation

  20. A UAV MISSION HIERARCHY C. E. NEHME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummings, Mary "Missy"

    Surveillance Payload Delivery Electronic warfare Target Designation Static Target Dynamic Target Dynamic Target* UAV Missions Intelligence/ Reconnaissance SurveillanceInsertion Electronic Attack Electronic) and can include, for example, the rendering of facilities inoperable (electronic jamming

  1. HEV Fleet Testing - Summary Fact Sheet for 2010 Ford Fusion

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Ford Fusion VIN 3FADP0L32AR194699 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 2.5 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 60 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 850 lbs Features:...

  2. Evaluation of the Suitability of Polarimetric Scattering and Emissivity Models with Scene Generation Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gartley, Michael G.

    Evaluation of the Suitability of Polarimetric Scattering and Emissivity Models with Scene models and hardware based infrared scene projectors commonly utilize analytical forms of polarized bi, polarimetric imaging sensors and payloads can benefit greatly from polarization capable synthetic image

  3. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE ELECTRONICS, VOL. GE-8, NO. 1, JANUARY 1970 Balloon-Borne Radio Altimeter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levanon, Nadav

    payload. The peak power of the altimeter was one watt. INTRODUCTION rl HE radiosonde, an instrument package elevated to high altitudes in the atmosphere by a buoy- ant balloon, is the most widespread means

  4. Virus constructed iron phosphate lithium ion batteries in unmanned aircraft systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolesnikov-Lindsey, Rachel

    FePO? lithium ion batteries that have cathodes constructed by viruses are scaled up in size to examine potential for use as an auxiliary battery in the Raven to power the payload equipment. These batteries are assembled ...

  5. Design and development of a high-altitude, in-flight-deployable micro-UAV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tao, Tony S

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A micro-UAV ([mu] UAV) system was developed to provide maximum endurance for a small atmospheric sensing payload. The system, composed of a ([mu] UAV) and protective case, folds and fits into a MJU-10/B flare cartridge ...

  6. Autonomous Realtime Threat-Hunting Robot (ARTHR)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Idaho National Laboratory - David Bruemmer, Curtis Nielsen

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Idaho National Laboratory researchers developed an intelligent plug-and-play robot payload that transforms commercial robots into effective first responders for deadly chemical, radiological and explosive threats. To learn more, visit

  7. Reconfiguration methods for on-orbit servicing, assembly, and operations with application to space telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan, Swati

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reconfiguration is an important characteristic in furthering on-orbit servicing, assembly, and operations. Previous work has focused on large assemblers manipulating small payloads, where the dynamics of the assembler is ...

  8. Estimation of the reliability of space nuclear power systems by probabilistic risk assessment techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutner, Sophie Isabelle

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A successful space mission depends on the reliable operation of the spacecraft's electrical power system. For payloads requiring high power levels, various designs of space nuclear power systems (SNPS) are available. Designers have conducted limited...

  9. George F. Chapline EGG-M-88285 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    payloads to the nearest star. Alpha Centauri, in about a hundred years or very rapid solar system transport. The parameters reported in this paper are based on a very...

  10. SHIELDED CONTAINER COMPLETENESS COMMENTS July 13, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the possible dose rate changes at the surface of the package for the intended payloads to be shipped. The same concerns as outlined above apply here. Reference WTS 2008. Shielded Container Type A Evaluation Report, ECO

  11. Design of an adaptive 3-dimensional display enabled by a swarm of autonomous micro air vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mueller, Erich, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is motivated by the concept of a system consisting of a swarm of small, automatically controlled air vehicles, each carrying a colour-controlled light source (payload), capable of executing coordinated maneouvres ...

  12. Bioresponsive Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles for Triggered Drug Release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Neetu

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNPs) have garnered a great deal of attention as potential carriers for therapeutic payloads. However, achieving triggered drug release from MSNPs in vivo has been challenging. Here, we ...

  13. Element and system design for active and passive vibration isolation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuo, Lei, 1974-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focusses on broadband vibration isolation, with an emphasis on control of absolute payload motion for ultra-precision instruments such as the MIT/Caltech Laser-Interferometric Gravitational Wave Observatory ...

  14. The Construction of AMS-02 AMS is scheduled to be installed on the Space Station in March 2004 for a period of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roma "La Sapienza", Universit di

    well. Because this is the only high energy physics experiment on the Space Station, NASA is following=PreliminaryDesignReview PIA=PayloadIntegrationAgreement PSR=PreShipReview PVP=PayloadVerificationPlan STS=SpaceShuttle TIM ISS Flight (note OZ refers to a NASA department) 171 #12;ActivityName -59-58-57-56-55-54-53-52-51-50

  15. A consumer panel test of Texas fortified red grapefruit juice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Carter

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    '. ?ET iCTEi TIAL FCF T"XAS FOFTIFIN R&X 38 67 CiiAPTER X B IHL IOGRAP HY AH '-'IX GiiAFEFRUIT JUICE CO', ~LUCIO". '. S. 74 80 Figure ', ''o. Page l. 2 ~ 3. Relationship between Index of Fading, Visual Color, and Lycopene and Carotene pie... of 1'58. Two taste . !-n. lo . !ere us?i' ? an oxf crt fin& non-evi srt taste 2! nel. The iix?ort fan?!1 ?nnioted ci' cix i?ricul+ur 3 an' ' ech!inicfll ollege of TeXaa SmplOyc . ;!!lc !lad OX?O"S" VO t&. at(~?" eX; erf enCe O"8 were Cap ?le Of' c...

  16. A bimodal spacecraft bus based on a cermet fueled heat pipe reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polansky, G.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rochow, R.F. [Novatech, Lynchburg, VA (United States); Gunther, N.G. [Gunther Associates, San Jose, CA (United States); Bixler, C.H. [Consultant, Mannford, OK (United States)

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bimodal space reactor systems provide both thermal propulsion for the spacecraft orbital transfer and electrical power to the spacecraft bus once it is on station. These systems have the potential to increase both the available payload in high energy orbits and the available power to that payload. These increased mass and power capabilities can be used to either reduce mission cost by permitting the use of smaller launch vehicles or to provide increased mission performance from the current launch vehicle. A major barrier to the deployment of these bimodal systems has been the cost associated with their development. This paper describes a bimodal spacecraft bus with performance potential to permit more than 70% of the instrumented payload of the Titan IV/Centaur to be launched from the Atlas IIAS. The development cost is minimized by basing the design on existing component technologies.

  17. A bimodal power and propulsion system based on cermet fuel and heat pipe energy transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polansky, G.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gunther, N.A. [Gunther (Norman A.), San Jose, CA (United States); Rochow, R.F. [Novatech, Lynchburg, VA (United States); Bixler, C.H. [Bixler (Charles H.), Mannford, OK (United States)

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bimodal space reactor systems provide both thermal propulsion for the spacecraft orbital transfer and electrical power to the spacecraft bus once it is on station. These systems have the potential to increase both the available payload in high energy orbits and the available power to that payload. These increased mass and power capabilities can be used to either reduce mission cost by permitting the use of smaller launch vehicles or to provide increased mission performance from the current launch vehicle. A major barrier to the deployment of these bimodal systems has been the cost associated with their development. This paper describes a bimodal reactor system with performance potential to permit more than 70% of the instrumented payload of the Titan IV/Centaur to be launched from the Atlas IIAS. The development cost is minimized by basing the design on existing component technologies.

  18. Procurement of a fully licensed radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adkins, H.E.; Bearden, T.E. (Westinghouse Hanford Company, P.O. Box 1970, N1-42, Richland, Washington 99352 (US))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fully licensed transportation system for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators and Light-Weight Radioisotope Heater Units is currently being designed and built. The system will comply with all applicable U.S. Department of Transportation regulations without the use of a DOE Alternative.'' The U.S. Department of Transportation has special double containment'' requirements for plutonium. The system packaging uses a doubly contained bell jar'' concept. A refrigerated trailer is used for cooling the high-heat payloads. The same packaging is used for both high- and low-heat payloads. The system is scheduled to be available for use by mid-1992.

  19. Procurement of a fully licensed radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adkins, H.E.; Bearden, T.E.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fully licensed transportation system for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators and Light-Weight Radioisotope Heater Units is currently being designed and built. The system will comply with all applicable US Department of Transportation regulations without the use of a DOE Alternative.'' The US Department of Transportation has special double containment'' requirements for plutonium. The system packaging uses a doubly contained bell jar'' concept. A refrigerated trailer is used for cooling the high-heat payloads. The same packaging is used for both high- and low-heat payloads. The system is scheduled to be available for use by mid-1992. 4 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Radiation environment along the INTEGRAL orbit measured with the IREM monitor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Hajdas; P. Bhler; C. Eggel; P. Favre; A. Mchedlishvili; A. Zehnder

    2003-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The INTEGRAL Radiation Environment Monitor (IREM) is a payload supporting instrument on board the INTEGRAL satellite. The monitor continually measures electron and proton fluxes along the orbit and provides this information to the spacecraft on board data handler. The mission alert system broadcasts it to the payload instruments enabling them to react accordingly to the current radiation level. Additionally, the IREM conducts its autonomous research mapping the Earth radiation environment for the space weather program. Its scientific data are available for further analysis almost without delay.

  1. A study of cooling time reduction of interferometric cryogenic gravitational wave detectors using a high-emissivity coating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakakibara, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Chen, D.; Tokoku, C.; Uchiyama, T.; Ohashi, M.; Kuroda, K. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research (ICRR), University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Kimura, N.; Suzuki, T.; Koike, S. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In interferometric cryogenic gravitational wave detectors, there are plans to cool mirrors and their suspension systems (payloads) in order to reduce thermal noise, that is, one of the fundamental noise sources. Because of the large payload masses (several hundred kg in total) and their thermal isolation, a cooling time of several months is required. Our calculation shows that a high-emissivity coating (e.g. a diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating) can reduce the cooling time effectively by enhancing radiation heat transfer. Here, we have experimentally verified the effect of the DLC coating on the reduction of the cooling time.

  2. A Study of Cooling Time Reduction of Interferometric Cryogenic Gravitational Wave Detectors Using a High-Emissivity Coating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sakakibara, Y; Suzuki, T; Yamamoto, K; Chen, D; Koike, S; Tokoku, C; Uchiyama, T; Ohashi, M; Kuroda, K

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In interferometric cryogenic gravitational wave detectors, there are plans to cool mirrors and their suspension systems (payloads) in order to reduce thermal noise, that is, one of the fundamental noise sources. Because of the large payload masses (several hundred kg in total) and their thermal isolation, a cooling time of several months is required. Our calculation shows that a high-emissivity coating (e.g. a diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating) can reduce the cooling time effectively by enhancing radiation heat transfer. Here, we have experimentally verified the effect of the DLC coating on the reduction of the cooling time.

  3. A Study of Cooling Time Reduction of Interferometric Cryogenic Gravitational Wave Detectors Using a High-Emissivity Coating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Sakakibara; N. Kimura; T. Suzuki; K. Yamamoto; D. Chen; S. Koike; C. Tokoku; T. Uchiyama; M. Ohashi; K. Kuroda

    2013-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In interferometric cryogenic gravitational wave detectors, there are plans to cool mirrors and their suspension systems (payloads) in order to reduce thermal noise, that is, one of the fundamental noise sources. Because of the large payload masses (several hundred kg in total) and their thermal isolation, a cooling time of several months is required. Our calculation shows that a high-emissivity coating (e.g. a diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating) can reduce the cooling time effectively by enhancing radiation heat transfer. Here, we have experimentally verified the effect of the DLC coating on the reduction of the cooling time.

  4. Automated Worm Fingerprinting Sumeet Singh, Cristian Estan, George Varghese and Stefan Savage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savage, Stefan

    and the Internet's un- restricted communication model creates an ideal climate for infectious pathogens. Worse-relays and denial-of-service at- tacks to their payloads. Unfortunately, our current ability to defend against. In fact, the basic approach of detection, characterization, and containment has not changed significantly

  5. System and method to improve the power output and longevity of a radioisotope thermoelectric generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mowery, A.L. Jr.

    1993-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    By using the helium generated by the alpha emissions of a thermoelectric generator during space travel for cooling, the thermal degradation of the thermoelectric generator can be slowed. Slowing degradation allows missions to be longer with little additional expense or payload. 1 figures.

  6. System and method to improve the power output and longetivity of a radioisotope thermoelectric generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mowery, A.L. Jr.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    By using the helium generated by the alpha emissions of a thermoelectric generator during space travel for cooling the thermal degradation of the thermoelectric generator can be slowed. Slowing degradation allows missions to be longer with little additional expense or payload.

  7. Michael J. Mosley1 Graduate Student

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mavroidis, Constantinos

    of SMA artificial muscles in large robotic systems has been very limited. The main reasons are the small) actuator that possesses impressive payload lifting capabilities are presented. This actuator consists of 48 SMA wires mechanically bundled in parallel forming one powerful muscle. It was designed to lift up

  8. Copyright 2000 by ASME1 Proceedings of DETC'00

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mavroidis, Constantinos

    , the design and control of a novel shape memory alloy (SMA) actuator that possesses impressive payload lifting in parallel forming one powerful artificial muscle. This new linear actuator can apply up to 100 lbf (445 N the research discussed in this paper is to develop a new generation of large-scale robotic systems

  9. The Hitchhiker's Guide to DNS Cache Poisoning Sooel Son and Vitaly Shmatikov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shmatikov, Vitaly

    The Hitchhiker's Guide to DNS Cache Poisoning Sooel Son and Vitaly Shmatikov The University of Texas at Austin Abstract. DNS cache poisoning is a serious threat to today's Internet. We de velop it to systematically investigate different types of cache poisoning and to generate templates for attack payloads. We

  10. The Hitchhiker's Guide to DNS Cache Poisoning Sooel Son and Vitaly Shmatikov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shmatikov, Vitaly

    The Hitchhiker's Guide to DNS Cache Poisoning Sooel Son and Vitaly Shmatikov The University of Texas at Austin Abstract. DNS cache poisoning is a serious threat to today's Internet. We de- velop it to systematically investigate different types of cache poisoning and to generate templates for attack payloads. We

  11. Irregular structures observed below 71 km in the night-time polar D-region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    . The payload contained two instru- ments. PIP (positive ion probe) measured positive ion current and CPP (cold plasma probes) measured electron current as well as electron temperature. The latter parameter archipelago. The rst instrumented rocket was launched on 20 November, 1997, at 1730 UT during geomagnetically

  12. Sway control method and system for rotary cranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinett, Rush D. (Tijeras, NM); Parker, Gordon G. (Houghton, MI); Feddema, John T. (Albuquerque, NM); Dohrmann, Clark R. (Albuquerque, NM); Petterson, Ben J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatuses for reducing the oscillatory motion of rotary crane payloads during operator-commanded or computer-controlled maneuvers. An Input-shaping filter receives input signals from multiple operator input devices and converts them into output signals readable by the crane controller to dampen the payload tangential and radial sway associated with rotation of the jib. The input signals are characterized by a hub rotation trajectory .gamma.(t), which includes a jib angular acceleration .gamma., a trolley acceleration x, and a load-line length velocity L. The system state variables are characterized by a tangential rotation angle .theta.(t) and a radial rotation angle .phi.(t) of the load-line. The coupled equations of motion governing the filter are non-linear and configuration-dependent. In one embodiment, a filter is provided between the operator and the crane for filtering undesired frequencies from the angular .gamma. and trolley x velocities to suppress payload oscillation. In another embodiment, crane commands are computer generated and controlled to suppress vibration of the payload using a postulated asymmetrical shape for the acceleration profiles of the jib, which profiles are uniquely determined by a set of parameters (including the acceleration pulse amplitude and the duration and coast time between pulses), or a dynamic programming approach.

  13. Poster Abstract: Message Position Modulation for Power Saving and Increased Bandwidth in Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poster Abstract: Message Position Modulation for Power Saving and Increased Bandwidth in Sensor@tik.ee.ethz.ch Abstract We use a form of pulse-position modulation, i.e. message- position modulation (MPM), to reduce the payload of a mes- sage by encoding parts of the message through its transmis- sion time. MPM allows

  14. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Shuttle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in diameter and 60 feet long; large enough to fit a school bus or 50,000 pounds of payload. The shuttle major safety improvement to the space shuttle fleet includes the expanded use of enhanced imaging of the orbiter, the camera is similar to a standard 35mm model and snaps a series of photos as the tank separates

  15. Analysis Framework for Cooperating Mobile Cable Robots Xiaobo Zhou, Chin Pei Tang and Venkat Krovi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260 USA xzhou9 energy consumption, ease of assembly/disassembly and reconfiguration. Cooperative payload manipulation design and analysis of cooperative mobile cable robots, building upon knowledge base of multi

  16. SUPERBOTS ON THE LUNAR SURFACE: A HABITAT OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE SYSTEM (HOMS). S. J. Lawrence1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Wei-Min

    Center, Mountain View, CA; 4 Metrica, Houston, TX; 5 DigitalSpace, Santa Cruz, CA; 6 Lockheed Martin and payload mass while enhancing mission performance, reliability, and safety through the SuperBot system's ability to change shape and function as needed. SuperBots can work independently or in concert to perform

  17. The field of medicine is taking its first steps towards patient-specific care: personalized medicine. Our research is aimed at tailoring treatments to address each person's individualized needs and unique disease presentation. Specifically, we are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandoghdar, Vahid

    their payload in disease sites. The evolution of these nanoparticles into programmed nano robots, unique to specific organs. Avi Schroeder is an Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering at the Technion Israel to Programmed Nano-robots Professor Avi Schroeder ETH Hnggerberg, HCI G 3, 02/04/14, 17.00 h Faculty

  18. Mars Science Laboratory Launch Contingency Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the payload being launched into space carries nuclear material. The primary goals of radiological contingency information, and prompt external communication with the media and general public. The Radiological Control Center (RADCC) at Ken- nedy Space Center (KSC) is the primary facility used to coordinate all

  19. Seminar 10! Project Management & System Design!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stengel, Robert F.

    (e.g., sample return)" # Power and Propulsion" #Solar cells" # Kick motor/ payload assist module" # Structure" #Skin, frames, ribs, stringers, bulkheads" #Propellant tanks" #Heat/solar/ micrometeoroid Satellite Mass Breakdown" # Satellite without on-orbit/de-orbit propulsion" # Kick motor/ PAM can add

  20. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics BIFOCAL RELAY MIRROR EXPERIMENTS ON THE NPS THREE AXIS SPACECRAFT SIMULATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics BIFOCAL RELAY MIRROR EXPERIMENTS ON THE NPS. The Bifocal Relay Mirror spacecraft system is composed of two optically coupled telescopes used to redirect was integrated onto the TASS as an auxiliary payload. The objective of this research was to develop and test

  1. Pg: 1 February 11, 2009 Surface Water and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    -mesoscale and kinetic energy containing scales -- What is the small- scale (10-100 km) variability of ocean surface/C requirements: ·Payload power, mass: ~1.1KW, ~300Kg ·Stringent Pointing knowledge requirements ·High Data Rate · Use conventional Jason- class altimeter for nadir coverage and radiometer for wet-tropospheric delay

  2. 30 CHAPTER 2. ABSTRACTS by tracking individual magnetic elements. The analysis reveals a strong spin down near the pole, which

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Chung-Sang

    . SWAP will image the solar corona in a 17.5nm bandpass at a 1 min cadence. SWAP is dedicated to track30 CHAPTER 2. ABSTRACTS by tracking individual magnetic elements. The analysis reveals a strong PROBA2 is an ESA microsatellite scheduled for launch in May 2008. Its scientific payload includes solar

  3. Shippingport Spent Fuel Canister (SSFC) Design Report Project W-518

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHNSON, D.M.

    2000-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The SSFC Design Report Describes A spent fuel canister for Shippingport Core 2 blanket fuel assemblies. The design of the SSFC is a minor modification of the MCO. The modification is limited to the Shield Plug which remains unchanged with regard to interfaces with the canister shell. The performance characteristics remain those for the MCO, which bounds the payload of the SSFC.

  4. of Southampton Professor Andy Keane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sbester, Andrs

    and careful choice of the precise quantities being controlled by the optimizer. Simplified 3d Model of Truss models of the structures constructed with commercial FE codes. Optimized 3d Model of Truss The initial Structures' (ACCESS) consisted of a tower like device which was built out from the payload bay of the shuttle

  5. An Intelligent Simulator for Telerobotics Training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kabanza, Froduald

    the mission. In such cases, ground operators may have to generate 3D animations for the new maneuvers and upload them to the operator on the station. So far, the generation of these 3D animations are done, and repair of the station, and also for moving payloads from visiting shuttles. Operators manipulating

  6. Low Altitude Wind Simulation Over Mount Saint Helens Using NASA SRTM Digital Terrain Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alberta, University of

    . Using a new radar sweep- ing technique most of the Earth's surfaces was digitized in 3D in approximately Medellin, Colombia Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6J 2E8 Abstract On February 11, 2000, the Shuttle Radar Topography Mis- sion (SRTM) was launched into space as part of one of the payload of the Shuttle Endeavor

  7. Abstract--In this work, we develop a new parallel implementation of the k-means unsupervised clustering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plaza, Antonio J.

    in the context of remote sensing image processing applications. For instance, while the price of a next as a processing module onboard the remote sensing instruments, with critical issues that can negatively affect the mission payload (weight, power consumption, heating, maintenance, etc.). In turn, GPUs offer a much more

  8. Kring/Space Sciences 2006 Lunar Exploration Initiative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Exploration Initiative Lunokhod 2 Powered by batteries that were recharged by a solar panel on lid of payload occasionally to recharge battery with solar panel ­ Hibernated during lunar night, remaining warm bay & a Polonium-210 radiogenic heat source Carried 3 TV cameras, one of which was high on rover

  9. Robotics and Autonomous Systems 62 (2014) 15811596 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Huosheng

    Moving Horizon Estimation with application to localization of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles Sen Wang of Essex, UK h i g h l i g h t s · A novel localization method for Autonomous Underwater Vehicle t Localizing small Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) that have limited payload and perception ca- pability

  10. Energy storage for long endurance AUVs G Griffiths, BA, MSc, CEng, MIEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffiths, Gwyn

    in the design of power management systems for spacecraft, now being applied to unmanned underwater vehicles autonomous underwater vehicles. Mission duration, speed through the water and sensor and payload capabilities is a key issue for long endurance autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs). Mission duration, speed through

  11. Engineering alumni and their UC Santa Cruz degrees UC Santa Cruz has produced many successful alumni in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renau, Jose

    an interdis- ciplinary approach to applications such as environmental analysis, risk assessment, and quality. the winning design was a solar-powered robot that can climb up a vertical ribbon while carrying a payload, an application that would form part of a "space elevator." Senior electrical engineering students bill Hogan

  12. REVIEW ARTICLE Guowei CAI, Ben M. CHEN, Tong H. LEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benmei, Chen

    a brief review on the historical development of the rotorcraft unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs integration, aerodynamic modeling and automatic flight control system involved in constructing the unmanned with a payload of a few tens of kilograms. Characterized by unique features such as relatively low cost, small

  13. System and method to improve the power output and longetivity of a radioisotope thermoelectric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mowery, Jr., Alfred L. (Potomac, MD)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By using the helium generated by the alpha emissions of a thermoelectric generator during space travel for cooling, the thermal degradation of the thermoelectric generator can be slowed. Slowing degradation allows missions to be longer with little additional expense or payload.

  14. CONCURRENT PROCESSES WITHIN PRELIMINARY SPACECRAFT DESIGN: > AN AUTONOMOUS DECISIONAL SUPPORT BASED ON GENETIC ALGORITHMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coello, Carlos A. Coello

    capacity, solar cell efficiency, material tiffness, etc.) and desired payload data return. As all the on with a user defined cost functions vectors to a final spacecraft configuration; the tool runs in real to an increase in costs, mass and power of the whole spacecraft: the problem rises from the constraints

  15. Sway control method and system for rotary cranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinett, R.D.; Parker, G.G.; Feddema, J.T.; Dohrmann, C.R.; Petterson, B.J.

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatuses are disclosed for reducing the oscillatory motion of rotary crane payloads during operator-commanded or computer-controlled maneuvers. An Input-shaping filter receives input signals from multiple operator input devices and converts them into output signals readable by the crane controller to dampen the payload tangential and radial sway associated with rotation of the jib. The input signals are characterized by a hub rotation trajectory [gamma](t), which includes a jib angular acceleration [gamma], a trolley acceleration x, and a load-line length velocity L. The system state variables are characterized by a tangential rotation angle [theta](t) and a radial rotation angle [phi](t) of the load-line. The coupled equations of motion governing the filter are non-linear and configuration-dependent. In one embodiment, a filter is provided between the operator and the crane for filtering undesired frequencies from the angular [gamma] and trolley x velocities to suppress payload oscillation. In another embodiment, crane commands are computer generated and controlled to suppress vibration of the payload using a postulated asymmetrical shape for the acceleration profiles of the jib, which profiles are uniquely determined by a set of parameters (including the acceleration pulse amplitude and the duration and coast time between pulses), or a dynamic programming approach. 25 figs.

  16. 400-FORM-0001 11/25/08 DIRECTIVES REQUIREMENTS LIST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    GDMS GPR-1420.1 Forms Management GDMS GPR-1440.8 Records Management GDMS GPR-1710.1 Corrective and Project Management Req'ts. GDMS NPR 8705.4 Risk Classification for NASA Payloads GDMS NPD 8720.1 NASA-1400.1 Waiver Processing GDMS GPR-1410.1 Directives Management GDMS GPR-1410.2 Configuration Management

  17. Structural design and analysis of a lightweight composite sandwich space radiator panel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukundan, Sudharsan

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this study is to design and analyze a sandwich composite panel with lightweight graphite foam core and carbon epoxy face sheets that can function as a radiator for the given payload in a satellite. This arrangement provides a lightweight...

  18. OPEN OCEAN OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE WITH THE AUTOSUB-1 AUTONOMOUS UNDERWATER VEHICLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffiths, Gwyn

    secondary (lead-acid) and primary (manganese alkaline) batteries have been used to power the vehicle. Using sealed lead-acid batteries the maximum mission endurance is 10 hours, whereas with the primary battery.8 m long and 0.9 m in diameter with a battery payload capacity of 300 kg and a sensor capacity of 1000

  19. Sharif-Abadi and Joseph 1 Soft ground reaction to cyclic loading by large mobile mining equipment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, Tim Grain

    opt for large mobile mining equipment. In the oil sand, loading and hauling of material results, truck and shovels operating on soft-ground will become less stable. Trucks in summer are frequently payloads the cycled ground after only a few passing trucks is unable to support the weight of the truck

  20. P3s Public-Private Partnerships? Or Peripatetic Pain in the Pants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Vegas to Phoenix ! I-69 Texas to Indiana Rebuild with tolls + added capacity: ! Key long-haul truck"/shift in short-haul setting. ! Greater payloads in long-haul setting. ! Keys to trucking industry support Investment Need Is Improved Goods Movement ! Two types of toll truckway project: ! Short-haul port

  1. 4, 76317665, 2004 Stratospheric Limb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    A novel light-weight, elevation scanning and absolutely calibrated UV/vis spectrome- ter and its., by an electrochemical cell (ECC) ozone sonde also deployed aboard the gondola) or (b) trace gas profiles from inferred UV/vis/near IR solar occultation measurements per- formed on the same payload. The novel technique

  2. National Aeronautics and Space Administration International Space Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monitoring on the External Payload Facility of Columbus - SOLar Auto-Calibrating EUV/UV Spectrophotometers doctors and scientists to quantify molecules and cells in blood. Born: Portland, Ind., considers spaceflight. Increased activity of osteoclasts, a bone cell that is responsible for resorption or breakdown

  3. Applications of Robust, Radiation Hard AlGaN Optoelectronic Devices in Space Exploration and High Energy Density Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, K.

    2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This slide show presents: space exploration applications; high energy density physics applications; UV LED and photodiode radiation hardness; UV LED and photodiode space qualification; UV LED AC charge management; and UV LED satellite payload instruments. A UV LED satellite will be launched 2nd half 2012.

  4. AlGaN UV LED and Photodiodes Radiation Hardness and Space Qualifications and Their Applications in Space Science and High Energy Density Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, K. X.

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation provides an overview of robust, radiation hard AlGaN optoelectronic devices and their applications in space exploration & high energy density physics. Particularly, deep UV LED and deep UV photodiodes are discussed with regard to their applications, radiation hardness and space qualification. AC charge management of UV LED satellite payload instruments, which were to be launched in late 2012, is covered.

  5. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ROBUST AND NONLINEAR CONTROL Int. J. Robust Nonlinear Control 2002; 12:207242 (DOI: 10.1002/rnc.683)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    How, Jonathan P.

    challenges. This paper presents fuel/time-optimal control algorithms for a co-ordination and control-line to analyse various aspects of the mission design and in real time as part of an onboard autonomous formation, and monitoring of the distributed vehicles in the cluster will be required to achieve the stringent payload

  6. Experimental Cooperative Control of Fixed-Wing Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fainekos, Georgios E.

    Experimental Cooperative Control of Fixed-Wing Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Selcuk Bayraktar, Georgios architecture (Cloud cap technologies) Hybrid Modeling (of the Piccolo autopilot) Experiments Autonomous Flight - 20min #12;UAVs @ Penn Servos controlling the payload LaptopPC Dell X200 3.5HP fuel engine Deployable

  7. RISK PREDICTION OF A BEHAVIOR-BASED ADHESION CONTROL NETWORK FOR ONLINE SAFETY ANALYSIS OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berns, Karsten

    by default. But for wheeled driving on concrete walls via negative pressure adhesion a prediction of risks- ited payload. Also the impact of features like surface roughness, sheathing defects, porous areas is de- signed to be used for inspections of large concrete buildings as depicted in figure 1

  8. Vol. 20, No. 13, April 3, 2009 Welcome Home

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummings, Mary "Missy"

    States-based conventional prompt global strike weapon, according to Lt. Col. Randall White, the effort-ATTACK PLANE REQUIREMENT The Air Force has kicked off a study to determine whether it will buy a light buys of current protected communications payloads might face additional contract competition, according

  9. Light-induced transformation of vesicles to micelles and vesicle-gels to sols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raghavan, Srinivasa

    molar ratios due to ionic interactions between the cationic and anionic headgroups. When irradiated of vesicles connected by polymer chains. Upon UV irradiation, the network is disrupted because and nutrients in foods, fragrances and dyes in cosmetics and textiles, etc.3­9 Payloads encapsulated in the core

  10. Analysis of a New Signaling Method at the Physical Layer for Optical Packet Switched Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kouroupetroglou, Georgios

    on the combination of the optical frequency shift keying (OFSK) modulated label with the onoff keying (OOK concept, the All Optical Label Swapping (AOLS) technique is proposed, where the packet routing) modulated payload on the same optical carrier. This orthogonal modulation scheme, for the label encoding

  11. Safety Analysis for Packaging Steel Banded Wooden Shipping Containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FERRELL, P.C.

    2000-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This safety analysis report for packaging describes the steel banded wooden shipping containers, which are certified as Type AF packagings. The authorized payload for these containers is unirradiated, slightly enriched, uranium ingots, billets, extrusions, and scrap materials. The amount of uranium in the containers will not exceed the LSA-II material requirements as defined in 49 CFR 173.403.

  12. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  13. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  14. CH-TRU Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  15. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  16. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  17. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  18. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2006-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  19. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  20. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codesand corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  1. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2008-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  2. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  3. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  4. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  5. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  6. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  7. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  8. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  9. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2007-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  10. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  11. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  12. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  13. Graphene Sails with Phased Array Optical Drive - Towards More Practical Interstellar Probes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheffer, Louis K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A spacecraft pushed by radiation has the major advantage that the power source is not included in the accelerated mass, making it the preferred technique for reaching relativistic speeds. There are two main technical challenges. First, to get significant acceleration, the sail must be both extremely light weight and capable of operating at high intensities of the incident beam and the resulting high temperatures. Second, the transmitter must emit high power beams through huge apertures, many kilometers in diameter, in order to focus radiation on the sail across the long distances needed to achieve high final speeds. Existing proposals for the sail use carbon or aluminum films, but aluminum is limited by a low melting point, and both have low mechanical strength requiring either a distributed payload or complex rigging. We propose here a graphene sail, which offers high absorption per unit weight, high temperature operation, and the mechanical strength to support simple rigging to a lumped mass payload. For th...

  14. Network topology analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalb, Jeffrey L.; Lee, David S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Emerging high-bandwidth, low-latency network technology has made network-based architectures both feasible and potentially desirable for use in satellite payload architectures. The selection of network topology is a critical component when developing these multi-node or multi-point architectures. This study examines network topologies and their effect on overall network performance. Numerous topologies were reviewed against a number of performance, reliability, and cost metrics. This document identifies a handful of good network topologies for satellite applications and the metrics used to justify them as such. Since often multiple topologies will meet the requirements of the satellite payload architecture under development, the choice of network topology is not easy, and in the end the choice of topology is influenced by both the design characteristics and requirements of the overall system and the experience of the developer.

  15. Environmental effects of the US Antarctic Program`s use of balloons in Antarctica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCold, L.N.; Eddlemon, G.K.; Blasing, T.J.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The USAP uses balloons in Antarctica to conduct scientific research, to facilitate safe air transport, and to provide data for global weather predictions. However, there is the possibility that balloons or their payloads may adversely affect Antarctic fauna or flora. The purpose of this study is to provide background information upon which the USAP may draw when complying with its responsibilities under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, the Antarctic Treaty, and the Madrid Protocol.

  16. Improving haul truck productivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiscor, S.

    2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper reviews developments in payload management and cycle times. These were discussed at a roundtable held at the Haulage and Loading 2007 conference held in May in Phoenix, AZ, USA. Several original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) explaind what their companies were doing to improve cycle times for trucks, shovels and excavators used in surface coal mining. Quotations are given from Dion Domaschenz of Liebherr and Steve Plott of Cat Global Mining. 4 figs.

  17. Rocket borne solar eclipse experiment to measure the temperature structure of the solar corona via lyman-. cap alpha. line profile observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Argo, H.V.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A rocket borne experiment to measure the temperature structure of the inner solar corona via the doppler broadening of the resonance hydrogen Lyman-..cap alpha.. (lambda1216A) radiation scattered by ambient neutral hydrogen atoms was attempted during the 16 Feb 1980 solar eclipse. Two Nike-Black Brant V sounding rockets carrying instrumented payloads were launched into the path of the advancing eclipse umbra from the San Marco satellite launch platform 3 miles off the east coast of Kenya.

  18. Experimental verification of active control in a microgravity environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cordera, Joseph Frank

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the proposed Space Station. Although this location eliminates accelerations induced by rotation of the Space Station, the experiment must be isolated from structural vibrations that may be caused by rotating machinery and crew push off. In order to isolate... response of the payload to various initial conditions. Results from these tests indicate a favorable comparison between the experiment and the analytical model for all controllers and free vibration. Of the three controllers, combinational control...

  19. Integration of Radioisotope Heat Source with Stirling Engine and Cooler for Venus Internal-Structure Mission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schock, Alfred

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary mission goal is to perform long-term seismic measurements on Venus, to study its largely unknown internal structure. The principal problem is that most payload components cannot long survive Venus's harsh environment, 90 bars at 500 degrees C. To meet the mission life goal, such components must be protected by a refrigerated payload bay. JPL Investigators have proposed a mission concept employing a lander with a spherical payload bay cooled to 25 degrees C by a Stirling cooler powered by a radioisotope-heated Sitrling engine. To support JPL's mission study, NASA/Lewis and MTI have proposed a conceptual design for a hydraulically coupled Stirling engine and cooler, and Fairchild Space - with support of the Department of Energy - has proposed a design and integration scheme for a suitable radioisotope heat source. The key integration problem is to devise a simple, light-weight, and reliable scheme for forcing the radioisotope decay heat to flow through the Stirling engine during operation on Venus, but to reject that heat to the external environment when the Stirling engine and cooler are not operating (e.g., during the cruise phase, when the landers are surrounded by heat shields needed for protection during subsequent entry into the Venusian atmosphere.) A design and integration scheme for achieving these goals, together with results of detailed thermal analyses, are described in this paper. There are 7 copies in the file.

  20. Prospect for UV observations from the Moon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Safonova, Margarita; Mohan, Rekhesh; Sreejith, A G; Murthy, Jayant; Brosch, Noah; Kappelmann, Norbert; Sharma, Arpit; Narayan, Rahul

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Space astronomy in the last 40 years has largely been done from spacecraft in low Earth orbit (LEO) for which the technology is proven and delivery mechanisms are readily available. However, new opportunities are arising with the surge in commercial aerospace missions. We describe here one such possibility: deploying a small instrument on the Moon. This can be accomplished by flying onboard the Indian entry to the Google Lunar X PRIZE competition, Team Indus mission, which is expected to deliver a nearly 30 kgs of payloads to the Moon, with a rover as its primary payload. We propose to mount a wide-field far-UV (130--180 nm) imaging telescope as a payload on the Team Indus lander. Our baseline operation is a fixed zenith pointing but with the option of a mechanism to allow observations of different attitudes. Pointing towards intermediate ecliptic latitude (50 deg or above) ensures that the Sun is at least 40 deg off the line of sight at all times. In this position, the telescope can cover higher galactic lat...

  1. Superpressure stratospheric vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chocol, C.; Robinson, W.; Epley, L.

    1990-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Our need for wide-band global communications, earth imaging and sensing, atmospheric measurements and military reconnaissance is extensive, but growing dependence on space-based systems raises concerns about vulnerability. Military commanders require space assets that are more accessible and under local control. As a result, a robust and low cost access to space-like capability has become a national priority. Free floating buoyant vehicles in the middle stratosphere can provide the kind of cost effective access to space-like capability needed for a variety of missions. These vehicles are inexpensive, invisible, and easily launched. Developments in payload electronics, atmospheric modeling, and materials combined with improving communications and navigation infrastructure are making balloon-borne concepts more attractive. The important milestone accomplished by this project was the planned test flight over the continental United States. This document is specifically intended to review the technology development and preparations leading up to the test flight. Although the test flight experienced a payload failure just before entering its assent altitude, significant data were gathered. The results of the test flight are presented here. Important factors included in this report include quality assurance testing of the balloon, payload definition and characteristics, systems integration, preflight testing procedures, range operations, data collection, and post-flight analysis. 41 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Development of a new class of satellites: a composite lightweight affordable spacecraft structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, T.C.; Parietti, L.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in partnership with Composite Optics Incorporated (COI) has successfully designed and tested a Composite Lightweight Affordable Structure (CLASS). The use of advanced composites in space applications is well developed, but the application of an all-composite satellite structure has not been achieved until now. The development of this low-cost, lightweight, composite technology for use in small satellite structures, in this case, for the Fast On-Orbit Recording of Transient Events (FORT{acute E}) satellite mission will make a considerable contribution to the advanced spacecraft community. A common practice for constructing small spacecraft structures is to use an all-aluminum spacecraft bus. Compared to a composite structure, this reduces the payload capacity significantly; however, the cost of the aluminum structure has historically been lower than one of that uses lightweight components. LANL mission requirements dictate the need for a long term solution that substantially increased the ratio of payload to structural mass while maintaining a low-risk low-cost approach. LANL intends to use the concept developed for FORT{acute E} on future missions requiring similar enhanced payload capacities. 1 fig.

  3. A Cheap Levitating Gas/Load Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Design of new cheap aerial pipelines, a large flexible tube deployed at high altitude, for delivery of natural (fuel) gas, water and other payload over a long distance is delineated. The main component of the natural gas is methane which has a specific weight less than air. A lift force of one cubic meter of methane equals approximately 0.5 kg (1 pound). The lightweight film flexible pipeline can be located in air at high altitude and, as such, does not damage the environment. Using the lift force of this pipeline and wing devices payloads of oil, water, or other fluids, or even solids such as coal, cargo, passengers can be delivered cheaply at long distance. This aerial pipeline dramatically decreases the cost and the time of construction relative to conventional pipelines of steel which saves energy and greatly lowers the capital cost of construction. The article contains a computed project for delivery 24 billion cubic meters of gas and tens of million tons of oil, water or other payload per year.

  4. Coilgun Launcher for Nanosatellites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turman, B.N.

    1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanosatellite space launches could significantly benefit from an electrically powered launch complex, based on an electromagnetic coil launcher. This paper presents results of studies to estimate the required launcher parameters and some fixed facility issues. This study is based on electromagnetic launch, or electromagnetic gun technology, which is constrained to a coaxial geometry to take advantage of the efficiency of closely-coupled coils. A baseline configuration for analysis considers a payload mass of 10 kg, launch velocity of 6 km/s, a second stage solid booster for orbital insertion, and a payload fraction of about 0.1. The launch facility is envisioned as an inclined track, 1-2 km in length, mounted on a hillside at 25 degrees aimed in the orbital inclination of interest. The launcher energy and power requirements fall in the range of 2000 MJ and 2 MW electric. This energy would be supplied by 400 modules of energy storage and magnetic coils. With a prime power generator of 2 MW, a launch rate of some 200 satellites per day is possible. The launch requires high acceleration, so the satellite package must be hardened to launch acceleration on the order of 1000 gee. Parametric evaluations compare performance parameters for a launcher length of 1-2 km, exit velocity of 4-8 km/s, and payloads of 1-100 kg. The EM launch complex could greatly reduce the amount of fuels handling, reduce the turn-around time between launches, allow more concurrence in launch preparation, reduce the manpower requirements for launch vehicle preparation and increase the reliability of launch by using more standardized vehicle preparations. Most importantly, such a facility could reduce the cost per launch and could give true launch-on-demand capability for nanosatellites.

  5. Work plan for the fabrication of the radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system package mounting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Satoh, J.A.

    1994-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) has available a dedicated system for the transportation of RTG payloads. The RTG Transportation System (System 100) is comprised of four systems; the Package (System 120), the Semi-trailer (System 140), the Gas Management (System 160), and the Facility Transport (System 180). This document provides guidelines on the fabrication, technical requirements, and quality assurance of the Package Mounting (Subsystem 145), part of System 140. The description follows the Development Control Requirements of WHC-CM-6-1, EP 2.4, Rev. 3.

  6. SpaceWire model development technology for satellite architecture.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eldridge, John M.; Leemaster, Jacob Edward; Van Leeuwen, Brian P.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Packet switched data communications networks that use distributed processing architectures have the potential to simplify the design and development of new, increasingly more sophisticated satellite payloads. In addition, the use of reconfigurable logic may reduce the amount of redundant hardware required in space-based applications without sacrificing reliability. These concepts were studied using software modeling and simulation, and the results are presented in this report. Models of the commercially available, packet switched data interconnect SpaceWire protocol were developed and used to create network simulations of data networks containing reconfigurable logic with traffic flows for timing system distribution.

  7. Trajectory simulation for design of ram-air inflated parachutes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tallant, Sibille Ursula

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the assistance of many persons in this research effort. Financial assistance was provided by Manley Butler, Calvin Kata and Hugh McCoy at the Naval Weapons Center in China Lake, CA, for which I am eternally grateful. I would also like to thank Joe Gamble... a great deal of computer time. 25 Complete System The system principal moments of inertia are obtained by individually transferring the parachute and payload principal moments of inertia to the system center of gravity and adding them together...

  8. Pure Nuclear Fusion Bomb Propulsion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winterberg, F

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent progress towards the non-fission ignition of thermonuclear micro-explosions raises the prospect for a revival of the nuclear bomb propulsion idea, both for the fast transport of large payloads within the solar system and the launch into earth orbit without the release of fission products into the atmosphere. To reach this goal three areas of research are of importance: 1)Compact thermonuclear ignition drivers. 2)Fast ignition and deuterium burn. 3)Space-craft architecture involving magnetic insulation and GeV electrostatic potentials

  9. Jerusalem Post, 2004.09.28: "Jerusalem envelope security fence may be

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Daniel

    BSD This payload avoids bytes 00, 09, 23. Effect: Removes file named x. Bytes Explanation eb 47 ip += 71 59 cx = *sp++ 89 ca dx = cx 83 c2 18 dx += 24 89 11 *(int*)cx = dx 31 c0 ax ^= ax 89 41 04 *(int*)(cx+4) = ax 83 c2 13 dx += 19 89 51 08 *(int*)(cx+8) = dx 83 c2 08 dx += 8 89 51 0c *(int*)(cx+12) = dx #12;83 c2

  10. Page 1 of 3 Radiogram No. 3758u Form 24 for 08/04/2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :00-08:05 FE-6 D2XS Battery Recharge 08:05-08:10 FE-5 ASEPTIC Box Sterilization Activation 08:10-08:35 Daily Exercise (ARED) 11:45-12:05 FE-5 RPCM OBT 11:50-11:55 FE-6 D2XS Battery Recharge 11:50-11:55 FE-4:35-11:35 FE-2 Physical Exercise (CEVIS) 11:05-11:40 FE-3 Photo/Video Chronicle of ISS Payloads 11:05-11:40 FE

  11. De-wrinkling of pre-tensioned membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonin, A. S.; Seffen, K. A.

    2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    -length. In Cunliffe (2003), trimming simulations are performed for a right-angled, isosceles membrane behaving as a biaxially-loaded quarter panel in a solar sail and, by trial and error, it is found that compressive stresses mostly disappear when all edges... % of the total area (Stamper et al.,1. Introduction Gossamer structures are thin-wa favoured in the design, construction spacecraft, such as solar-propelled sa telescopes and, more recently, de- inside restricted payload volumes, th ratios of any deployable...

  12. Remote-Handled Transuranic Content Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions

    2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document representsthe development of a uniform content code system for RH-TRU waste to be transported in the 72-Bcask. It will be used to convert existing waste form numbers, content codes, and site-specificidentification codes into a system that is uniform across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites.The existing waste codes at the sites can be grouped under uniform content codes without any lossof waste characterization information. The RH-TRUCON document provides an all-encompassing|description for each content code and compiles this information for all DOE sites. Compliance withwaste generation, processing, and certification procedures at the sites (outlined in this document foreach content code) ensures that prohibited waste forms are not present in the waste. The contentcode gives an overall description of the RH-TRU waste material in terms of processes and|packaging, as well as the generation location. This helps to provide cradle-to-grave traceability ofthe waste material so that the various actions required to assess its qualification as payload for the72-B cask can be performed. The content codes also impose restrictions and requirements on themanner in which a payload can be assembled.The RH-TRU Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC), Appendix 1.3.7of the 72-B Cask Safety Analysis Report (SAR), describes the current governing procedures|applicable for the qualification of waste as payload for the 72-B cask. The logic for this|classification is presented in the 72-B Cask SAR. Together, these documents (RH-TRUCON,|RH-TRAMPAC, and relevant sections of the 72-B Cask SAR) present the foundation and|justification for classifying RH-TRU waste into content codes. Only content codes described in thisdocument can be considered for transport in the 72-B cask. Revisions to this document will be madeas additional waste qualifies for transport. |Each content code uniquely identifies the generated waste and provides a system for tracking theprocess and packaging history. Each content code begins with a two-letter site abbreviation thatindicates the shipper of the RH-TRU waste. The site-specific letter designations for each of the|DOE sites are provided in Table 1. Not all of the sites listed in Table 1 have generated/stored RH-|TRU waste.

  13. An Extendible Reconfigurable Robot Based on Hot Melt Adhesives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brodbeck, Luzius; Iida, Fumiya

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    do not require fast motion of the robot arm, but some tasks might re- quire dynamic motions. The focus of this analysis is on the RBE processes, for which the dynamic limits of the base are not critical. The static torques on the robot base... - cific experimental platform as the robot base. The hard- ware used for the robot base is a five degrees of free- dom robotic arm (ST Robotics, R-12 Firefly, Fig. 3a) with a range of 500mm and a maximum payload of An Extendible Reconfigurable Robot Based...

  14. Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Instrumentation for Rapid Aerial Photo System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adiprawita, Widyawardana; Semibiring, Jaka

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research will proposed a new kind of relatively low cost autonomous UAV that will enable farmers to make just in time mosaics of aerial photo of their crop. These mosaics of aerial photo should be able to be produced with relatively low cost and within the 24 hours of acquisition constraint. The autonomous UAV will be equipped with payload management system specifically developed for rapid aerial mapping. As mentioned before turn around time is the key factor, so accuracy is not the main focus (not orthorectified aerial mapping). This system will also be equipped with special software to post process the aerial photos to produce the mosaic aerial photo map

  15. Final Report for the Scaled Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) Encryption Laboratory Directed Research and Development Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierson, L.G.; Witzke, E.L.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This effort studied the integration of innovative methods of key management crypto synchronization, and key agility while scaling encryption speed. Viability of these methods for encryption of ATM cell payloads at the SONET OC- 192 data rate (10 Gb/s), and for operation at OC-48 rates (2.5 Gb/s) was shown. An SNL-Developed pipelined DES design was adapted for the encryption of ATM cells. A proof-of-principle prototype circuit board containing 11 Electronically Programmable Logic Devices (each holding the equivalent of 100,000 gates) was designed, built, and used to prototype a high speed encryptor.

  16. A Measurement of the Flux of Cosmic Ray Iron at 5 x 10^13 eV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Clem; W. Droege; P. A. Evenson; H. Fischer; G. Green; D. Huber; H. Kunow; D. Seckel

    2001-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from the initial flight of our Balloon Air CHerenkov (BACH) payload. BACH detects air Cherenkov radiation from cosmic ray nuclei as coincident flashes in two optical modules. The flight (dubbed PDQ BACH) took place on April 22, 1998 from Ft. Sumner, New Mexico. During an exposure of 2.75 hours, with a typical threshold energy for iron nuclei of 2.2$\\times10^{13}$ eV, we observed several events cleanly identifiable as iron group nuclei. Analysis of the data yields a new flux measurement that is fully consistent with that reported by other investigations.

  17. Proposal for development of a resource and commodity highway system. Research report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deacon, J.A.; Allen, D.L.; Crabtree, J.D.; Agent, K.R.; Pigman, J.G.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1986, the Kentucky General Assembly established the Extended Weight Coal and Coal By-Products Haul Road System. The system includes approximately 3,200 miles of the most significant coal-haul roads in the state and permits coal trucks to carry much larger payloads than trucks with other commodities. In many ways, the extended-weight system has been very successful. Coal-transportation productivity has been substantially increased, and Kentucky coal continues to remain competitive in the marketplace. The study, conducted by the Kentucky Transportation Center, concluded that development of a statewide trucking network, herein named the Resource and Commodity Highway System, was both feasibile and desirable.

  18. Nuclear propulsion systems for orbit transfer based on the particle bed reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, J.R.; Ludewig, H.; Horn, F.L.; Araj, K.; Benenati, R.; Lazareth, O.; Slovik, G.; Solon, M.; Tappe, W.; Belisle, J.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technology of nuclear direct propulsion orbit transfer systems based on the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) is described. A 200 megawatt illustrative design is presented for LEO to GEO and other high ..delta..V missions. The PBR-NOTV can be used in a one-way mode with the shuttle or an expendable launch vehicle, e.g., the Titan 34D7, or as a two-way reusable space tug. In the one-way mode, payload capacity is almost three times greater than that of chemical OTV's. PBR technology status is described and development needs outlined.

  19. On-orbit calibration of soft X-ray detector on Chang'E-2 satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong Xiao; Wenxi Penga; Huanyu Wang; Xingzhu Cui; Dongya Guo

    2015-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray spectrometer is one of the satellite payloads on Chang'E-2 satellite. The soft X-ray detector is one of the device on X-ray spectrometer which is designed to detect the major rock-forming elements within 0.5-10keV range on lunar surface. In this paper, energy linearity and energy resolution calibration is done using a weak Fe55 source, while temperature and time effect is considered not take big error. The total uncertainty is estimated to be within 5% after correction.

  20. On-orbit calibration of soft X-ray detector on Chang'E-2 satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Hong; Wang, Huanyu; Cui, Xingzhu; Guo, Dongya

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray spectrometer is one of the satellite payloads on Chang'E-2 satellite. The soft X-ray detector is one of the device on X-ray spectrometer which is designed to detect the major rock-forming elements within 0.5-10keV range on lunar surface. In this paper, energy linearity and energy resolution calibration is done using a weak Fe55 source, while temperature and time effect is considered not take big error. The total uncertainty is estimated to be within 5% after correction.

  1. Space-QUEST: Experiments with quantum entanglement in space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rupert Ursin; Thomas Jennewein; Johannes Kofler; Josep M. Perdigues; Luigi Cacciapuoti; Clovis J. de Matos; Markus Aspelmeyer; Alejandra Valencia; Thomas Scheidl; Alessandro Fedrizzi; Antonio Acin; Cesare Barbieri; Giuseppe Bianco; Caslav Brukner; Jose Capmany; Sergio Cova; Dirk Giggenbach; Walter Leeb; Robert H. Hadfield; Raymond Laflamme; Norbert Lutkenhaus; Gerard Milburn; Momtchil Peev; Timothy Ralph; John Rarity; Renato Renner; Etienne Samain; Nikolaos Solomos; Wolfgang Tittel; Juan P. Torres; Morio Toyoshima; Arturo Ortigosa-Blanch; Valerio Pruneri; Paolo Villoresi; Ian Walmsley; Gregor Weihs; Harald Weinfurter; Marek Zukowski; Anton Zeilinger

    2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The European Space Agency (ESA) has supported a range of studies in the field of quantum physics and quantum information science in space for several years, and consequently we have submitted the mission proposal Space-QUEST (Quantum Entanglement for Space Experiments) to the European Life and Physical Sciences in Space Program. We propose to perform space-to-ground quantum communication tests from the International Space Station (ISS). We present the proposed experiments in space as well as the design of a space based quantum communication payload.

  2. Safety analysis report for the TRUPACT-II shipping package (condensed version). Volume 1, Rev. 14

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The condensed version of the TRUPACT-II Contact Handled Transuranic Waste Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) contains essential material required by TRUPACT-II users, plus additional contents (payload) information previously submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. All or part of the following sections, which are not required by users of the TRUPACT-II, are deleted from the condensed version: (i) structural analysis, (ii) thermal analysis, (iii) containment analysis, (iv) criticality analysis, (v) shielding analysis, and (vi) hypothetical accident test results.

  3. Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) for cesium chloride capsules with type W overpacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, J.C.

    1997-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This Safety Evaluation for Packaging (SEP) documents the evaluation of a new basket design and overpacked cesium chloride capsule payload for the Beneficial Uses Shipping System (BUSS) Cask in accordance with the onsite transportation requirements of the Hazardous Material Packaging and Shipping manual, WHC-CM-2-14. This design supports the one-time onsite shipment of 16 cesium chloride capsules with Type W overpacks from the 324 Building to the 224T Building at the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF). The SEP is valid for a one-time onsite shipment or until August 1, 1998, whichever occurs first.

  4. Central Characterization Program (CCP) Transuranic Authorized Methods for

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesville EnergyDepartment ofSystemsCertification and WasteControl |Payload

  5. ARM-WPac-MSEbin-poster

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP UpdateRefresh Model DataStreamsTotalARM-00-001PayloadMixing,

  6. State observers and Kalman filtering for high performance vibration isolation systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beker, M. G., E-mail: M.Beker@Nikhef.nl; Bertolini, A.; Hennes, E.; Rabeling, D. S. [National Institute for Subatomic Physics Nikhef, Science Park 105, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [National Institute for Subatomic Physics Nikhef, Science Park 105, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Brand, J. F. J. van den; Bulten, H. J. [National Institute for Subatomic Physics Nikhef, Science Park 105, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands) [National Institute for Subatomic Physics Nikhef, Science Park 105, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Amsterdam, de Boelelaan 1081, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a strong scientific case for the study of gravitational waves at or below the lower end of current detection bands. To take advantage of this scientific benefit, future generations of ground based gravitational wave detectors will need to expand the limit of their detection bands towards lower frequencies. Seismic motion presents a major challenge at these frequencies and vibration isolation systems will play a crucial role in achieving the desired low-frequency sensitivity. A compact vibration isolation system designed to isolate in-vacuum optical benches for Advanced Virgo will be introduced and measurements on this system are used to present its performance. All high performance isolation systems employ an active feedback control system to reduce the residual motion of their suspended payloads. The development of novel control schemes is needed to improve the performance beyond what is currently feasible. Here, we present a multi-channel feedback approach that is novel to the field. It utilizes a linear quadratic regulator in combination with a Kalman state observer and is shown to provide effective suppression of residual motion of the suspended payload. The application of state observer based feedback control for vibration isolation will be demonstrated with measurement results from the Advanced Virgo optical bench suspension system.

  7. Improving ISR Radar Utilization (How I quit blaming the user and made the radar easier to use).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In modern multi - sensor multi - mode Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance ( ISR ) platforms, the plethora of options available to a sensor/payload operator are quite large, leading to an over - worked operator often down - selecting to favorite sensors an d modes. For example, Full Motion Video (FMV) is justifiably a favorite sensor at the expense of radar modes, even if radar modes can offer unique and advantageous information. The challenge is then to increase the utilization of the radar modes in a man ner attractive to the sensor/payload operator. We propose that this is best accomplished by combining sensor modes and displays into 'super - modes'. - 4 - Acknowledgements This report is the result of a n unfunded research and development activity . Sandia Natio nal Laboratories is a multi - program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE - AC04 - 94AL850 00.

  8. Monolithic ballasted penetrator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hickerson, Jr., James P. (Cedar Crest, NM); Zanner, Frank J. (Sandia Park, NM); Baldwin, Michael D. (Albuquerque, NM); Maguire, Michael C. (Worcester, MA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a monolithic ballasted penetrator capable of delivering a working payload to a hardened target, such as reinforced concrete. The invention includes a ballast made from a dense heavy material insert and a monolithic case extending along an axis and consisting of a high-strength steel alloy. The case includes a nose end containing a hollow portion in which the ballast is nearly completely surrounded so that no movement of the ballast relative to the case is possible during impact with a hard target. The case is cast around the ballast, joining the two parts together. The ballast may contain concentric grooves or protrusions that improve joint strength between the case and ballast. The case further includes a second hollow portion; between the ballast and base, which has a payload fastened within this portion. The penetrator can be used to carry instrumentation to measure the geologic character of the earth, or properties of arctic ice, as they pass through it.

  9. Optical Manipulation of Vesicles for Optofluidic Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Scott, E. A.; O'Neil, C. P.; Psaltis, D.; Hubbell, J. A.

    2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, we review our recent results in the optical micromanipulation of vesicles. Traditionally, vesicle manipulation has been possible by employing photon momentum and optical trapping, giving rise to unique observations of vesicle shape changes and soft matter mechanics. Contrary to these attempts, we employ photon energy rather than momentum, by sensitizing vesicles with an oxidizing moiety. The later converts incident photons to reactive oxygen species, which in turn attack and compromise the stability of the vesicle membrane. Both coherent and incoherent radiation was employed. Polymersome re-organization into smaller diameter vesicles was possible by focusing the excitation beam in the vicinity of the polymersomes. Extended vesicle illumination with a collimated beam lead to their complete destabilization and micelle formation. Single particle analysis revealed that payload release takes place within seconds of illumination in an explosive burst. We will discuss the destabilization and payload release kinetics, as revealed by high resolution microscopy at the single particle level, as well as potential applications in single cell biomodulation.

  10. A Low-Cost Natural Gas/Freshwater Aerial Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin; Richard Cathcart

    2007-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Offered is a new type of low-cost aerial pipeline for delivery of natural gas, an important industrial and residential fuel, and freshwater as well as other payloads over long distances. The offered pipeline dramatically decreases the construction and operation costs and the time necessary for pipeline construction. A dual-use type of freight pipeline can improve an arid rural environment landscape and provide a reliable energy supply for cities. Our aerial pipeline is a large, self-lofting flexible tube disposed at high altitude. Presently, the term "natural gas" lacks a precise technical definition, but the main components of natural gas are methane, which has a specific weight less than air. A lift force of one cubic meter of methane equals approximately 0.5 kg. The lightweight film flexible pipeline can be located in the Earth-atmosphere at high altitude and poses no threat to airplanes or the local environment. The authors also suggest using lift force of this pipeline in tandem with wing devices for cheap shipment of a various payloads (oil, coal and water) over long distances. The article contains a computed macroproject in northwest China for delivery of 24 billion cubic meter of gas and 23 millions tonnes of water annually.

  11. Mission analysis for hybrid thermionic nuclear reactor LEO-to-GEO transfer applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widman, F.W. Jr.; North, D.M. (Rockwell International/Rocketdyne Division, 6633 Canoga Avenue, Canoga Park, California 91303 (United States)); Choong, P.T.; Teofilo, V.L. (Lockheed Missiles and Space Company, Inc., 1111 Lockheed Way, Synnyvale, California 94088 (United States))

    1993-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper details the results of mission analyses concerning a hybrid STAR-C based system, which is based on a safe solid fuel form for high-temperature reactor core operation and a rugged planar thermionic energy converter for long-life steady-state electric power production. Hybrid power/propulsion system concepts are shown to offer superior performance capabilities for Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) to Geosynchronous-Earth-Orbit (GEO) orbital transfer applications over chemical propulsion systems. A key feature of the hybrid power/propulsion system is that the propulsion system uses the on-board payload power system. Mission results for hybrid concepts using Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP), Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP), and combination of NTP and NEP are discussed.

  12. TRUPACT-II 157 Examination Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barry H. O'Brien; Jeffrey M. Lacy; Kip E. Archibald

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of examination and recovery activities performed on the TRUPACT-II 157 shipping container. The container was part of a contact-handled transuranic waste shipment being transported on a truck to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico when an accident occurred. Although the transport vehicle sustained only minor damage, airborne transuranic contamination was detected in air samples extracted from inside TRUPACT-II 157 at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Consequently, the shipping container was rejected, resealed, and returned to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory where the payload was disassembled, examined, and recovered for subsequent reshipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. This report documents the results of those activities.

  13. Research of advanced techniques for x-ray detectors and telescopes with applications to rockets and the LAMAR facility. Semiannual Report, 1 Jul. 1984 - 30 Jun. 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorenstein, P.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A program for the development of high throughput instrumentation for x-ray astronomy based upon focusing optics is being carried out by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. The instrumentation is applicable to investigations requiring large area focusing optics for direct imaging or dispersive spectroscopy. The long range goals of this program are the development of telescopes and gratings for future major X-ray astronomy facilities, including additions to the LAMAR OSS-2/SHEAL experiment after the initial flights. Tests of the devices and their more immediate utilization in scientific investigations can be carried out with SPARTAN payloads deployed and retrieved by the Space Shuttle. However, the present backlog of approved SPARTAN missions is longer than the three-year duration of the program described in this program. Laboratory studies and breadboarding of instrumentation are discussed.

  14. Completion processing for data communications instructions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blocksome, Michael A; Kumar, Sameer; Parker, Jeffrey J

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Completion processing of data communications instructions in a distributed computing environment, including receiving, in an active messaging interface (`AMI`) data communications instructions, at least one instruction specifying a callback function; injecting into an injection FIFO buffer of a data communication adapter, an injection descriptor, each slot in the injection FIFO buffer having a corresponding slot in a pending callback list; listing in the pending callback list any callback function specified by an instruction, incrementing a pending callback counter for each listed callback function; transferring payload data as per each injection descriptor, incrementing a transfer counter upon completion of each transfer; determining from counter values whether the pending callback list presently includes callback functions whose data transfers have been completed; calling by the AMI any such callback functions from the pending callback list, decrementing the pending callback counter for each callback function called.

  15. Solar sail propulsion: enabling new capabilities for heliophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, L; Alhorn, D; Heaton, A; Vansant, T; Campbell, B; Pappa, R; Keats, W; Liewer, P C; Alexander, D; Ayon, J; Wawrzyniak, G; Burton, R; Carroll, D; Matloff, G; Kezerashvili, R Ya

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar sails can play a critical role in enabling solar and heliophysics missions. Solar sail technology within NASA is currently at 80% of TRL-6, suitable for an in-flight technology demonstration. It is conceivable that an initial demonstration could carry scientific payloads that, depending on the type of mission, are commensurate with the goals of the three study panels of the 2010 Heliophysics Survey. Follow-on solar sail missions, leveraging advances in solar sail technology to support Heliophysics Survey goals, would then be feasible. This white paper reports on a sampling of missions enabled by solar sails, the current state of the technology, and what funding is required to advance the current state of technology such that solar sails can enable these missions.

  16. DAMPE silicon tracker on-board data compression algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Yifan; Qiao, Rui; Peng, Wenxi; Fan, Ruirui; Gong, Ke; Wu, Di; Wang, Huanyu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Dark Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is an upcoming scientific satellite mission for high energy gamma-ray, electron and cosmic rays detection. The silicon tracker (STK) is a sub detector of the DAMPE payload with an excellent position resolution (readout pitch of 242um), which measures the incident direction of particles, as well as charge. The STK consists 12 layers of Silicon Micro-strip Detector (SMD), equivalent to a total silicon area of 6.5m$^2$. The total readout channels of the STK are 73728, which leads to a huge amount of raw data to be dealt. In this paper, we focus on the on-board data compression algorithm and procedure in the STK, which was initially verified by cosmic-ray measurements.

  17. RH Packaging Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2003-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This procedure provides operating instructions for the RH-TRU 72-B Road Cask, Waste Shipping Package. In this document, ''Packaging'' refers to the assembly of components necessary to ensure compliance with the packaging requirements (not loaded with a payload). ''Package'' refers to a Type B packaging that, with its radioactive contents, is designed to retain the integrity of its containment and shielding when subject to the normal conditions of transport and hypothetical accident test conditions set forth in 10 CFR Part 71. Loading of the RH 72-B cask can be done two ways, on the RH cask trailer in the vertical position or by removing the cask from the trailer and loading it in a facility designed for remote-handling (RH). Before loading the 72-B cask, loading procedures and changes to the loading procedures for the 72-B cask must be sent to CBFO at sitedocuments@wipp.ws for approval.

  18. gLExec Integration with the ATLAS PanDA Workload Management System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karavakis, Edward; The ATLAS collaboration; Campana, Simone; De, Kaushik; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Litmaath, Maarten; Maeno, Tadashi; Medrano Llamas, Ramon; Nilsson, Paul; Wenaus, Torre

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ATLAS user jobs are executed on Worker Nodes (WNs) by pilots sent to sites by pilot factories. This paradigm serves to allow a high job reliability and although it has clear advantages, such as making the working environment homogeneous, the approach presents security and traceability challenges. To address these challenges, gLExec can be used to let the payloads for each user be executed under a different UNIX user id that uniquely identifies the ATLAS user. This paper describes the recent improvements and evolution of the security model within the ATLAS PanDA system, including improvements in the PanDA pilot, in the PanDA server and their integration with MyProxy, a credential caching system that entitles a person or a service to act in the name of the issuer of the credential. Finally, it presents results from ATLAS user jobs running with gLExec and describes the deployment campaign within ATLAS.

  19. Application of advanced composites for efficient on-board storage of fuel in natural gas vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sirosh, S.N. [EDO Canada Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following outlines the performance requirements for high pressure containers for on-board storage of fuel in Natural Gas Vehicles. The construction of state-of-the-art carbon-fiber reinforced all-composite cylinders is described and the validation testing and key advantages are discussed. Carbon-fiber reinforced advanced composite technology offers a number of key advantages to the NGV industry, by providing: improved range, including up to 30% more fuel storage for a given storage envelope and up to 300% more fuel storage for a given weight allowance; life-cycle cost advantages, including savings in non-recurring costs (installation), savings in recurring costs (fuel and maintenance), and increased revenues from more passengers/payload; and uncompromising safety, namely, superior resistance to degradation from fatigue or stress rupture and inherent resistance to corrosion; proven toughness/impact resistance.

  20. Main chain acid-degradable polymers for the delivery of bioactive materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frechet, Jean M. J. (Oakland, CA); Standley, Stephany M. (Evanston, IL); Jain, Rachna (Milpitas, CA); Lee, Cameron C. (Cambridge, MA)

    2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel main chain acid degradable polymer backbones and drug delivery systems comprised of materials capable of delivering bioactive materials to cells for use as vaccines or other therapeutic agents are described. The polymers are synthesized using monomers that contain acid-degradable linkages cleavable under mild acidic conditions. The main chain of the resulting polymers readily degrade into many small molecules at low pH, but remain relatively stable and intact at physiological pH. The new materials have the common characteristic of being able to degrade by acid hydrolysis under conditions commonly found within the endosomal or lysosomal compartments of cells thereby releasing their payload within the cell. The materials can also be used for the delivery of therapeutics to the acidic regions of tumors and other sites of inflammation.

  1. An automated miniature robotic vehicle inspection system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobie, Gordon; Summan, Rahul; MacLeod, Charles; Pierce, Gareth; Galbraith, Walter [Centre for Ultrasonic Engineering, University of Strathclyde, 204 George Street, Glasgow, G1 1XW (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel, autonomous reconfigurable robotic inspection system for quantitative NDE mapping is presented. The system consists of a fleet of wireless (802.11g) miniature robotic vehicles, each approximately 175 125 85 mm with magnetic wheels that enable them to inspect industrial structures such as storage tanks, chimneys and large diameter pipe work. The robots carry one of a number of payloads including a two channel MFL sensor, a 5 MHz dry coupled UT thickness wheel probe and a machine vision camera that images the surface. The system creates an NDE map of the structure overlaying results onto a 3D model in real time. The authors provide an overview of the robot design, data fusion algorithms (positioning and NDE) and visualization software.

  2. SAFETY ANALYSIS REPORT FOR PACKAGING, MODEL 9977, ADDENDUM 3, JUSTIFICATION FOR SMALL GRAM QUANTITY CONTENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abramczyk, G.

    2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Addendum establishes a new family of content envelopes consisting of small quantities of radioactive materials. These content envelopes and specific packing configurations are shown to be subcritical. However, the dose rates of some payloads must be measured and shown to comply with applicable radiation limits. Authorization for shipment of the content envelop requires acceptance of this Addendum by the DOE-HQ certifying official as a supplement to the 9977 SARP Revision 2 and DOE-HQ?s subsequent revision of the CoC Revision 10 (which is based on SARP Addendum 2 and SARP Addendum 4) to authorize the additional content envelope. The Small Gram Quantity Content Envelopes and packing configurations will be incorporated in the next revision of the 9977 SARP.

  3. Field Operations Program, Toyota PRIUS Hybrid Electric Vehicle Performance Characterization Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francfort, James Edward; Nguyen, N.; Phung, J.; Smith, J.; Wehrey, M.

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energys Field Operations Program evaluates advanced technology vehicles in real-world applications and environments. Advanced technology vehicles include pure electric, hybrid electric, hydrogen, and other vehicles that use emerging technologies such as fuel cells. Information generated by the Program is targeted to fleet managers and others considering the deployment of advanced technology vehicles. As part of the above activities, the Field Operations Program has initiated the testing of the Toyota Prius hybrid electric vehicle (HEV), a technology increasingly being considered for use in fleet applications. This report describes the Pomona Loop testing of the Prius, providing not only initial operational and performance information, but also a better understanding of HEV testing issues. The Pomona Loop testing includes both Urban and Freeway drive cycles, each conducted at four operating scenarios that mix minimum and maximum payloads with different auxiliary (e.g., lights, air conditioning) load levels.

  4. Capacitance probe for detection of anomalies in non-metallic plastic pipe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mathur, Mahendra P. (Pittsburgh, PA); Spenik, James L. (Morgantown, WV); Condon, Christopher M. (Morgantown, WV); Anderson, Rodney (Grafton, WV); Driscoll, Daniel J. (Morgantown, WV); Fincham, Jr., William L. (Fairmont, WV); Monazam, Esmail R. (Morgantown, WV)

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure relates to analysis of materials using a capacitive sensor to detect anomalies through comparison of measured capacitances. The capacitive sensor is used in conjunction with a capacitance measurement device, a location device, and a processor in order to generate a capacitance versus location output which may be inspected for the detection and localization of anomalies within the material under test. The components may be carried as payload on an inspection vehicle which may traverse through a pipe interior, allowing evaluation of nonmetallic or plastic pipes when the piping exterior is not accessible. In an embodiment, supporting components are solid-state devices powered by a low voltage on-board power supply, providing for use in environments where voltage levels may be restricted.

  5. PAMELA's Measurements of Magnetospheric Effects on High Energy Solar Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adriani, O; Bazilevskaya, G A; Bellotti, R; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bongi, M; Bonvicini, V; Bottai, S; Bravar, U; Bruno, A; Cafagna, F; Campana, D; Carbone, R; Carlson, P; Casolino, M; Castellini, G; Christian, E C; De Donato, C; de Nolfo, G A; De Santis, C; De Simone, N; Di Felice, V; Formato, V; Galper, A M; Karelin, A V; Koldashov, S V; Koldobskiy, S; Krutkov, S Y; Kvashnin, A N; Lee, M; Leonov, A; Malakhov, V; Marcelli, L; Martucci, M; Mayorov, A G; Menn, W; Merg, M; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Monaco, A; Mori, N; Munini, R; Osteria, G; Palma, F; Panico, B; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Ricci, M; Ricciarini, S B; Ryan, J M; Sarkar, R; Scotti, V; Simon, M; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Stochaj, S; Stozhkov, Y I; Thakur, N; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Voronov, S A; Yurkin, Y T; Zampa, G; Zampa, N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of particle acceleration at the Sun, whether through flare reconnection processes or through shocks driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), is still under scrutiny despite decades of research. The measured properties of solar energetic particles (SEPs) have long been modeled in different particle-acceleration scenarios. The challenge has been to disentangle to the effects of transport from those of acceleration. The Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA) instrument, enables unique observations of SEPs including composition and the angular distribution of the particles about the magnetic field, i.e. pitch angle distribution, over a broad energy range (>80 MeV) -- bridging a critical gap between space-based measurements and ground-based. We present high-energy SEP data from PAMELA acquired during the 2012 May 17 SEP event. These data exhibit differential anisotropies and thus transport features over the instrument rigidity range. SEP protons exhibit two dist...

  6. A New Paradigm in Space Based Experiments Using Rubber Balloons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarti, Sandip K; Palit, Sourav; Chakraborty, Subhankar; Mondal, Sushanta; Bhattacharyya, Arnab; Middya, Susanta; Chakrabarti, Sonali

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Indian Centre for Space Physics is engaged in long duration balloon borne experiments with typical payloads less than ~ 3kg. Low cost rubber balloons are used. In a double balloon system, the booster balloon lifts the orbiter balloon to its cruising altitude where data is taken for a long time. Here we present results of muon detections and recent solar activities, including the light curves and flare spectra in the 20-100keV range. We not only show that we have successfully obtained several flares and there spectra at different altitudes, we also found that the high energy X-ray flux of strong flares at altitudes of 10-13 km (the flight altitude of commercial planes) could be more than the contribution due to cosmic rays.

  7. PAT-1 safety analysis report addendum author responses to request for additional information.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiner, Ruth F.; Schmale, David T.; Kalan, Robert J.; Akin, Lili A.; Miller, David Russell; Knorovsky, Gerald Albert; Yoshimura, Richard Hiroyuki; Lopez, Carlos; Harding, David Cameron; Jones, Perry L.; Morrow, Charles W.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Plutonium Air Transportable Package, Model PAT-1, is certified under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations Part 71 by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) per Certificate of Compliance (CoC) USA/0361B(U)F-96 (currently Revision 9). The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) submitted SAND Report SAND2009-5822 to NRC that documented the incorporation of plutonium (Pu) metal as a new payload for the PAT-1 package. NRC responded with a Request for Additional Information (RAI), identifying information needed in connection with its review of the application. The purpose of this SAND report is to provide the authors responses to each RAI. SAND Report SAND2010-6106 containing the proposed changes to the Addendum is provided separately.

  8. Non-nuclear power sources for deep space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennel, E.B.; Tang, C.; Santarius, J.F.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric propulsion and non-nuclear power can be used in tandem as a replacement for the current chemical booster and radioisotope thermoelectric generators now in use for deep space applications (i.e., to the asteroid belt and beyond). In current generation systems, electric propulsion is usually considered to be impractical because of the lack of high power for deep space, and non-nuclear power is thought to be impractical partly due to its high mass. However, when taken in combination, a solar powered electric upper stage can provide ample power and propulsion capability for use in deep space. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) systems have generally been selected for missions only when other systems are absolutely unavailable. The disadvantages of radioisotopes include the need for nuclear safety as another dimension of concern in payload integration; the lack of assured availability of plutonium in the post-cold-war world; the enormous cost of plutonium-238; and the system complexity introduced by the need to continuously cool the system during the pre-launch phase. A conservative estimate for the total power for the solar array at beginning of life (BOL) may be in the range of 25 kW in order to provide 500 W continuous power at Jupiter. The availability of {approximately} 25 kW(e) in earth orbit raises the interesting possibility of coupling electric propulsion units to this free electric power. If electric propulsion is used to raise the probe from low-earth-orbit to an earth-escape trajectory, the system could actually save on low-earth orbit mass. Electric propulsion could be used by itself in a spiral trajectory orbit raising maneuver to earth escape velocity, or it could be used in conjunction with a chemical upper stage (either solid rocket or liquid), which would boost the payload to an elliptical orbit. The concept is to begin the Earth-Jupiter trip with a swing-by near the Sun close to the orbit of Venus and perhaps even closer if thermal loads can be tolerated. During the solar swing-by, much more power will be produced by the solar panels, allowing the spacecraft's velocity to be increased significantly. The outbound leg of the journey can, therefore, be made much more quickly than with the classical trajectory. For the purposes of a Jupiter mission, it is assumed that 20 km/sec total delta-v would be required. For a payload envelope of 17,304 kg, a 1,900 sec Isp capability means that 11,386 kg of propellant would have to be consumed, leaving 5,917 kg for the mass of the probe plus dry mass of the upper stage. The thruster subsystem would require 765 kg of thruster subsystem mass, and probably less. Assuming tanks, regulators and valves amount to 10% of the propellant mass (very likely a pessimistic assumption), it is possible to assign a mass of 1,150 kg for the tankage subsystem. This results in a mass allowance of at least 4,000 kg for the probe. This compares favorably with the dry mass of 1,637 kg for Galileo, for example, and suggests that more than adequate margin exists. If the payload margin is used for battery storage, flyby missions to the outer planets may be possible.

  9. CMMAD Usability Case Study in Support of Countermine and Hazard Sensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Victor G. Walker; David I. Gertman

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During field trials, operator usability data were collected in support of lane clearing missions and hazard sensing for two robot platforms with Robot Intelligence Kernel (RIK) software and sensor scanning payloads onboard. The tests featured autonomous and shared robot autonomy levels where tasking of the robot used a graphical interface featuring mine location and sensor readings. The goal of this work was to provide insights that could be used to further technology development. The efficacy of countermine systems in terms of mobility, search, path planning, detection, and localization were assessed. Findings from objective and subjective operator interaction measures are reviewed along with commentary from soldiers having taken part in the study who strongly endorse the system.

  10. Survivable pulse power space radiator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mims, J.; Buden, D.; Williams, K.

    1988-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal radiator system is described for use on an outer space vehicle, which must survive a long period of nonuse and then radiate large amounts of heat for a limited period of time. The radiator includes groups of radiator panels that are pivotally connected in tandem, so that they can be moved to deployed configuration wherein the panels lie largely coplanar, and to a stowed configuration wherein the panels lie in a stack to resist micrometerorite damage. The panels are mounted on a boom which separates a hot power source from a payload. While the panels are stowed, warm fluid passes through their arteries to keep them warm enough to maintain the coolant in a liquid state and avoid embrittlement of material. The panels can be stored in a largely cylindrical shell, with panels progressively further from the boom being of progressively shorter length. 5 figs.

  11. Status of Magnetic Nozzle and Plasma Detachment Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chavers, D. Gregory; Dobson, Chris; Jones, Jonathan; Lee, Michael; Martin, Adam; Gregory, Judith; Cecil, Jim [Propulsion Research Center, MSFC NASA, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Bengtson, Roger D.; Breizman, Boris; Arefiev, Alexey [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Institute of Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Chang-Diaz, Franklin; Squire, Jared; Glover, Tim; McCaskill, Greg [Ad Astra Rocket Company, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, TX 77058 (United States); Cassibry, Jason; Li Zhongmin [University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    High power plasma propulsion can move large payloads for orbit transfer, lunar missions, and beyond with large savings in fuel consumption owing to the high specific impulse. At high power, lifetime of the thruster becomes an issue. Electrodeless devices with magnetically guided plasma offer the advantage of long life since magnetic fields confine the plasma radially and keep it from impacting the material surfaces. For decades, concerns have been raised about the plasma remaining attached to the magnetic field and returning to the vehicle along the closed magnetic field lines. Recent analysis suggests that this may not be an issue if the magnetic field is properly shaped in the nozzle region and the plasma has sufficient energy density to stretch the magnetic field downstream. An experiment is being performed to test the theory regarding the MHD detachment scenario. The status of that experiment will be discussed in this paper.

  12. The PACSAT Communications Experiment (PCE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    While VITA (Volunteers in Technical Assistance) is the recognized world leader in low earth orbiting (LEO) satellite technology (below 1 GHz), its involvement in communications technologies is to facilitate renewable energy technology transfer to developing countries. A communications payload was incorporated into the UoSat 2 satellite (Surrey Univ., UK), launched in 1984; a prototype satellite (PCE) was also launched Jan 1990. US DOE awarded a second grant to VITA to design and test the prototype ground stations (command and field), install field ground stations in several developing country sites, pursue the operational licensing process, and transfer the evaluation results to the design of an operating system. This report covers the principal tasks of this grant.

  13. The PACSAT Communications Experiment (PCE). Final report, August 13, 1990--February 12, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    While VITA (Volunteers in Technical Assistance) is the recognized world leader in low earth orbiting (LEO) satellite technology (below 1 GHz), its involvement in communications technologies is to facilitate renewable energy technology transfer to developing countries. A communications payload was incorporated into the UoSat 2 satellite (Surrey Univ., UK), launched in 1984; a prototype satellite (PCE) was also launched Jan 1990. US DOE awarded a second grant to VITA to design and test the prototype ground stations (command and field), install field ground stations in several developing country sites, pursue the operational licensing process, and transfer the evaluation results to the design of an operating system. This report covers the principal tasks of this grant.

  14. Safety Evaluation for Packaging for onsite Transfer of plutonium recycle test reactor ion exchange columns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R.J.

    1995-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Safety Evaluation for Packaging (SEP) is to authorize the use of three U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) 7A, Type A metal boxes (Capital Industries Part No. S 0600-0600-1080- 0104) to package 12 Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) ion exchange columns as low-level waste (LLW). The packages will be transferred from the 309 Building in the 300 Area to low level waste burial in the 200 West Area. Revision 1 of WHC-SD-TP-SEP-035 (per ECN No. 621467) documents that the boxes containing ion exchange columns and grout will maintain the payload under normal conditions of transport if transferred without the box lids

  15. Final report on evaluation of cyclocraft support of oil and gas operations in wetland areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eggington, W.J.; Stevens, P.M.; John, C.J.; Harder, B.J.; Lindstedt, D.M.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cyclocraft is a proven hybrid aircraft, capable of VTOL, lifting heavy and bulky loads, highly controllable, having high safety characteristics and low operating costs. Mission Research Corporation (MRC), under Department of Energy sponsorship, is evaluating the potential use of cyclocraft in the transport of drill rigs, mud, pipes and other materials and equipment, in a cost effective and environmentally safe manner, to support oil and gas drilling, production, and transportation operations in wetland areas. Based upon the results of an earlier parametric study, a cyclocraft design, having a payload capacity of 45 tons and designated H.1 Cyclocraft, was selected for further study, including the preparation of a preliminary design and a development plan, and the determination of operating costs. This report contains all of the results derived from the program to evaluate the use of cyclocraft in the support of oil and gas drilling and production operations in wetland areas.

  16. Low-Z Shell Pellet Experiments on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollmann, E. M.; Yu, J. H. [University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 92093-0417 (United States); James, A. N.; Parks, P. B.; Evans, T. E.; Humphreys, D. A.; Jackson, G. L.; La Haye, R. J.; Strait, E. J.; West, W. P.; Wu, W. [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Jernigan, T. C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2009-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Small (o.d. = 1.8 mm, t = 0.37 mm) polystyrene shells filled with either pressurized argon gas or boron powder have been fired into DIII-D plasmas for disruption mitigation experiments. The pellet shells were observed to burn up at rhoapprox =0.5, roughly consistent with ablation rate calculations. Pellet slowing from 350 m/s down to 100 m/s was observed, which is not well-understood at present. Negligible plasma current contraction or MHD onset were seen as a result of the shell burn-up in the plasma edge, consistent with calculations. The pellet payloads were observed to ionize rapidly in the pellet vicinity (<1 cm radius) and rapid (<15 ms) mixing through the plasma core was observed.

  17. Shipment and Disposal of Solidified Organic Waste (Waste Type IV) to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Amico, E. L [Washington TRU Solutions (United States); Edmiston, D. R. [John Hart and Associates (United States); O'Leary, G. A. [CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC (United States); Rivera, M. A. [Aspen Resources Ltd., Inc. (United States); Steward, D. M. [Boulder Research Enterprises, LLC (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In April of 2005, the last shipment of transuranic (TRU) waste from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site to the WIPP was completed. With the completion of this shipment, all transuranic waste generated and stored at Rocky Flats was successfully removed from the site and shipped to and disposed of at the WIPP. Some of the last waste to be shipped and disposed of at the WIPP was waste consisting of solidified organic liquids that is identified as Waste Type IV in the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC) document. Waste Type IV waste typically has a composition, and associated characteristics, that make it significantly more difficult to ship and dispose of than other Waste Types, especially with respect to gas generation. This paper provides an overview of the experience gained at Rocky Flats for management, transportation and disposal of Type IV waste at WIPP, particularly with respect to gas generation testing. (authors)

  18. Implementation of Revision 19 of the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Amico, E.; O'Leary, J.; Bell, S.; Djordjevic, S.; Givens, C,; Shokes, T.; Thompson, S.; Stahl, S.

    2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission on July 27, 2001 approved Revision 19 of the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report (SAR) and the associated TRUPACT-II Authorized Methods for Payload Control (TRAMPAC). Key initiatives in Revision 19 included matrix depletion, unlimited mixing of shipping categories, a flammability assessment methodology, and an alternative methodology for the determination of flammable gas generation rates. All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites shipping transuranic (TRU) waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) were required to implement Revision 19 methodology into their characterization and waste transportation programs by May 20, 2002. An implementation process was demonstrated by the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) in Golden, Colorado. The three-part process used by RFETS included revision of the site-specific TRAMPAC, an evaluation of the contact-handled TRU waste inventory against the regulations in Revision 19, and design and development of software to facilitate future inventory analyses.

  19. Ground-based verification and data processing of Yutu rover Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Dongya; Peng, Wenxi; Cui, Xingzhu; Zhang, Chengmo; Liu, Yaqing; Liang, Xiaohua; Dong, Yifan; Wang, Jinzhou; Gao, Min; Yang, Jiawei; Zhang, Jiayu; Li, Chunlai; Zou, Yongliao; Zhang, Guangliang; Zhang, Liyan; Fu, Xiaohui

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) is one of the payloads on board the Yutu rover of Chang'E-3 mission. In order to assess the instrumental performance of APXS, a ground verification test was done for two unknown samples (basaltic rock, mixed powder sample). In this paper, the details of the experiment configurations and data analysis method are presented. The results show that the elemental abundance of major elements can be well determined by the APXS with relative deviations < 15 wt. % (detection distance = 30 mm, acquisition time = 30 min). The derived detection limit of each major element is inversely proportional to acquisition time and directly proportional to detection distance, suggesting that the appropriate distance should be < 50mm.

  20. FORTE spacecraft vibration mitigation. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maly, J.R.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents work that was performed by CSA Engineering, Inc., for Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), to reduce vibrations of the FORTE spacecraft by retrofitting damped structural components into the spacecraft structure. The technical objective of the work was reduction of response at the location of payload components when the structure is subjected to the dynamic loading associated with launch and proto-qualification testing. FORTE is a small satellite that will be placed in orbit in 1996. The structure weighs approximately 425 lb, and is roughly 80 inches high and 40 inches in diameter. It was developed and built by LANL in conjunction with Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque for the United States Department of Energy. The FORTE primary structure was fabricated primarily with graphite epoxy, using aluminum honeycomb core material for equipment decks and solar panel substrates. Equipment decks were bonded and bolted through aluminum mounting blocks to adjoining structure.

  1. Technical Review Report for the Application for Contents Amendment for Shipping Isentropic Compression Experiment (ICE) Apparatus in 9977 Packaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, M

    2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the review of Application for Contents Amendment for Shipping Isentropic Compression Experiment (ICE) Apparatus in 9977 Packaging, prepared by Savannah River Packaging Technology (SRPT) of Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) of Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, -- the Submittal -- at the request of the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Agency's (NNSA) Albuquerque Facility Operations Division, for the shipment of the ICE apparatus from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), to Sandia National Laboratory (SNL). The ICE apparatus consists of a stainless steel assembly containing about 8 grams of {sup 239}Pu or its dose equivalent as noted in Table 1, Comparison of 9977 Content C.1 and the ICE Radioactive Contents, of the Submittal. The ICE target is mounted on the transport container assembly base. A Viton{sup R} O-ring seals the transport container base to the transport container body. Another Viton{sup R} O-ring seals the transport container handle to the transport container body. The ICE apparatus weighs less than 30 pounds and has less than 0.6 watts decay heat rate. For the Model 9977 Package, the maximum payload weight is 100 pounds and the maximum decay heat rate is 19 watts. Thus, the maximum payload weight and the maximum decay heat rate for the Model 9977 Package easily bound those for the ICE apparatus. This Addendum supplements the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), Revision 2, for the Model 9977 Package and Addendum 1, Revision 2, to Revision 2 of the Model 9977 Package SARP. The ICE apparatus is considered as part of Content Envelope C.6, Samples and Sources, under the submittal for the Model 9978 Package SARP currently under review. The Staff at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) recommends that the Submittal be approved by the DOE-Headquarters Certifying Official (EM-60), and incorporated into a subsequent revision to the current Certificate of Compliance (CoC), to the Model 9977-96 Packaging.

  2. Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Dynamic-Tracking Directional Wireless Antennas for Low Powered Applications that Require Reliable Extended Range Operations in Time Critical Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott G. Bauer; Matthew O. Anderson; James R. Hanneman

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proven value of DOD Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) will ultimately transition to National and Homeland Security missions that require real-time aerial surveillance, situation awareness, force protection, and sensor placement. Public services first responders who routinely risk personal safety to assess and report a situation for emergency actions will likely be the first to benefit from these new unmanned technologies. Packable or Portable small class UAVs will be particularly useful to the first responder. They require the least amount of training, no fixed infrastructure, and are capable of being launched and recovered from the point of emergency. All UAVs require wireless communication technologies for real- time applications. Typically on a small UAV, a low bandwidth telemetry link is required for command and control (C2), and systems health monitoring. If the UAV is equipped with a real-time Electro-Optical or Infrared (EO/Ir) video camera payload, a dedicated high bandwidth analog/digital link is usually required for reliable high-resolution imagery. In most cases, both the wireless telemetry and real-time video links will be integrated into the UAV with unity gain omni-directional antennas. With limited on-board power and payload capacity, a small UAV will be limited with the amount of radio-frequency (RF) energy it transmits to the users. Therefore, packable and portable UAVs will have limited useful operational ranges for first responders. This paper will discuss the limitations of small UAV wireless communications. The discussion will present an approach of utilizing a dynamic ground based real-time tracking high gain directional antenna to provide extend range stand-off operation, potential RF channel reuse, and assured telemetry and data communications from low-powered UAV deployed wireless assets.

  3. TRUPACT-II Operating and Maintenance Instructions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Waste Isolation Division

    1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to provide the technical requirements for preparation for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of a Transuranic Package Transporter Model II (TRUPACT-II) Shipping Package and directly related components. This document complies with the minimum requirements as specified in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificate of Compliance (C of C) 9218. In the event there is a conflict between this document and the TRUPACT-II SARP, the TRUPACT-II SARP shall govern. TRUPACT-II C of C number 9218 states, ''... each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application.'' It further states, ''... each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the application.'' Chapter 9 of the TRUPACT-II SARP charges the Westinghouse Electric Corporation Waste Isolation Division (WID) with assuring that the TRUPACT-II is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. To meet this requirement and verify consistency of operations when loading and unloading the TRUPACT-II on the trailer, placing a payload in the packaging, unloading the payload from the packaging, or performing maintenance, the U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Area Office (U.S. DOE/CAO) finds it necessary to implement the changes that follow. This TRUPACT-II maintenance document represents a change to previous philosophy regarding site specific procedures for the use of the TRUPACT-II. This document details the instructions to be followed to consistently operate and maintain the TRUPACT-II. The intent of these instructions is to ensure that all users of the TRUPACT-II follow the same or equivalent instructions. Users may achieve this intent by any of the following methods: (1) Utilizing these instructions as is, or (2) Attaching a site-specific cover page/letter to this document stating that these are the instructions to be used at their location, or (3) Sites may prepare their own document using the steps in this document word-for-word, in-sequence, including Notes and Cautions. Site specific information may be included as deemed necessary. Submit the document to WID National TRU Programs for approval. Any revision made subsequent to WID TRU Program's approval shall be reviewed and approved by WID TRU Programs. A copy of the approval letter from WID National TRU Programs should be available for audit purposes. Users shall develop site-specific procedures addressing leak testing, preoperational activities, quality assurance, hoisting and rigging, and radiation health physics to be used in conjunction with the instructions contained in this document. Users desiring to recommend changes to this document may submit their recommendations to the WID National TRU Programs for evaluation. If approved, the change(s) will be incorporated into this document for use by all TRUPACT-II users. User sites will be audited to this document to ensure compliance within one year from the effective date of this revision. This document discusses operating instructions, required inspections and maintenance for the following: TRUPACT-II packaging, and Miscellaneous packaging, special tools, and equipment. Packaging and payload handling equipment and transport trailers have been specifically designed for use with the TRUPACT-II Packaging. This document discusses the required instructions for use of the following equipment in conjunction with the TRUPACT-II Packaging: TRUPACT-II Mobile Loading Unit (MLU), Adjustable Center-of-Gravity Lift Fixture (ACGLF), and TRUPACT-II Transport Trailer. Attachment E contains the various TRUPACT-II packaging interface control drawings, leak-test and vent-port tool drawings, ACGLF drawings, and tie-down drawings that identify the various system components.

  4. DUAL-MODE PROPULSION SYSTEM ENABLING CUBESAT EXPLORATION OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) Phase I Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nathan Jerred; Troy Howe; Adarsh Rajguru; Dr. Steven Howe

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is apparent the cost of planetary exploration is rising as mission budgets declining. Currently small scientific beds geared to performing limited tasks are being developed and launched into low earth orbit (LEO) in the form of small-scale satellite units, i.e., CubeSats. These micro- and nano-satellites are gaining popularity among the university and science communities due to their relatively low cost and design flexibility. To date these small units have been limited to performing tasks in LEO utilizing solar-based power. If a reasonable propulsion system could be developed, these CubeSat platforms could perform exploration of various extra-terrestrial bodies within the solar system engaging a broader range of researchers. Additionally, being mindful of mass, smaller cheaper launch vehicles (~1,000 kgs to LEO) can be targeted. This, in effect, allows for beneficial explora-tion to be conducted within limited budgets. Researchers at the Center for Space Nuclear Re-search (CSNR) are proposing a low mass, radioisotope-based, dual-mode propulsion system capable of extending the exploration realm of these CubeSats out of LEO. The proposed radioisotope-based system would leverage the high specific energies [J/kg] associated with radioisotope materials and enhance their inherent low specific powers [W/g]. This is accomplished by accumulating thermal energy from nuclear decay within a central core over time. This allows for significant amounts of power to be transferred to a flowing gas over short periods of time. In the proposed configuration the stored energy can be utilized in two ways: (1) with direct propellant injection to the core, the energy can be converted into thrust through the use of a converging-diverging nozzle and (2) by flowing a working fluid through the core and subsequent Brayton engine, energy within the core can be converted to electrical energy. The first scenario achieves moderate ranges of thrust, but at a higher Isp than traditional chemical-based systems. The second scenario allows for the production of electrical power, which is then available for electric-based propulsion. Additionally, once at location the production of electrical power can be dedicated to the payloads communication system for data transfer. Ultimately, the proposed dual-mode propulsion platform capitalizes on the benefits of two types of propulsion methods the thrust of thermal propulsion ideal for quick orbital maneuvers and the specific impulse of electric propulsion ideal for efficient inter-planetary travel. Previous versions of this RTR-based concept have been studied for various applications [NETS 1-3]. The current version of this concept is being matured through a NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) Phase I grant, awarded for FY 2014. In this study the RTR concept is being developed to deliver a 6U CubeSat payload to the orbit of the Saturnian moon - Enceladus. Additionally, this study will develop an entire mission architecture for Enceladus targeting a total allowable launch mass of 1,000 kg.

  5. Deep PDF parsing to extract features for detecting embedded malware.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munson, Miles Arthur; Cross, Jesse S. (Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO)

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The number of PDF files with embedded malicious code has risen significantly in the past few years. This is due to the portability of the file format, the ways Adobe Reader recovers from corrupt PDF files, the addition of many multimedia and scripting extensions to the file format, and many format properties the malware author may use to disguise the presence of malware. Current research focuses on executable, MS Office, and HTML formats. In this paper, several features and properties of PDF Files are identified. Features are extracted using an instrumented open source PDF viewer. The feature descriptions of benign and malicious PDFs can be used to construct a machine learning model for detecting possible malware in future PDF files. The detection rate of PDF malware by current antivirus software is very low. A PDF file is easy to edit and manipulate because it is a text format, providing a low barrier to malware authors. Analyzing PDF files for malware is nonetheless difficult because of (a) the complexity of the formatting language, (b) the parsing idiosyncrasies in Adobe Reader, and (c) undocumented correction techniques employed in Adobe Reader. In May 2011, Esparza demonstrated that PDF malware could be hidden from 42 of 43 antivirus packages by combining multiple obfuscation techniques [4]. One reason current antivirus software fails is the ease of varying byte sequences in PDF malware, thereby rendering conventional signature-based virus detection useless. The compression and encryption functions produce sequences of bytes that are each functions of multiple input bytes. As a result, padding the malware payload with some whitespace before compression/encryption can change many of the bytes in the final payload. In this study we analyzed a corpus of 2591 benign and 87 malicious PDF files. While this corpus is admittedly small, it allowed us to test a system for collecting indicators of embedded PDF malware. We will call these indicators features throughout the rest of this report. The features are extracted using an instrumented PDF viewer, and are the inputs to a prediction model that scores the likelihood of a PDF file containing malware. The prediction model is constructed from a sample of labeled data by a machine learning algorithm (specifically, decision tree ensemble learning). Preliminary experiments show that the model is able to detect half of the PDF malware in the corpus with zero false alarms. We conclude the report with suggestions for extending this work to detect a greater variety of PDF malware.

  6. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IRWIN, J.J.

    2000-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) is to achieve the earliest possible removal of free water from Multi-Canister Overpacks (MCOs). The MCOs contain metallic uranium SNF that have been removed from the 100K Area fuel storage water basins (i.e., the K East and K West Basins) at the US. Department of Energy Hanford Site in Southeastern Washington state. Removal of free water is necessary to halt water-induced corrosion of exposed uranium surfaces and to allow the MCOs and their SNF payloads to be safely transported to the Hanford Site 200 East Area and stored within the SNF Project Canister Storage Building (CSB). The CVDF is located within a few hundred yards of the basins, southwest of the 165KW Power Control Building and the 105KW Reactor Building. The site area required for the facility and vehicle circulation is approximately 2 acres. Access and egress is provided by the main entrance to the 100K inner area using existing roadways. The CVDF will remove free. water from the MCOs to reduce the potential for continued fuel-water corrosion reactions. The cold vacuum drying process involves the draining of bulk water from the MCO and subsequent vacuum drying. The MCO will be evacuated to a pressure of 8 torr or less and backfilled with an inert gas (helium). The MCO will be sealed, leak tested, and then transported to the CSB within a sealed shipping cask. (The MCO remains within the same shipping Cask from the time it enters the basin to receive its SNF payload until it is removed from the Cask by the CSB MCO handling machine.) The CVDF subproject acquired the required process systems, supporting equipment, and facilities. The cold vacuum drying operations result in an MCO containing dried fuel that is prepared for shipment to the CSB by the Cask transportation system. The CVDF subproject also provides equipment to dispose of solid wastes generated by the cold vacuum drying process and transfer process water removed from the MCO back to the K Basins.

  7. Feasibility Study for an Autonomous UAV -Magnetometer System -- Final Report on SERDP SEED 1509:2206

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roelof Versteeg; Mark McKay; Matt Anderson; Ross Johnson; Bob Selfridge; Jay Bennett

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large areas across the United States are potentially contaminated with UXO, with some ranges encompassing tens to hundreds of thousands of acres. Technologies are needed which will allow for cost effective wide area scanning with 1) near 100 % coverage and 2) near 100 % detection of subsurface ordnance or features indicative of subsurface ordnance. The current approach to wide area scanning is a multi-level one, in which medium altitude fixed wing optical imaging is used for an initial site assessment. This assessment is followed with low altitude manned helicopter based magnetometry followed by surface investigations using either towed geophysical sensor arrays or man portable sensors. In order to be effective for small UXO detection, the sensing altitude for magnetic site investigations needs to be on the order of 1 3 meters. These altitude requirements means that manned helicopter surveys will generally only be feasible in large, open and relatively flat terrains. While such surveys are effective in mapping large areas relatively fast there are substantial mobilization/demobilization, staffing and equipment costs associated with these surveys (resulting in costs of approximately $100-$150/acre). Surface towed arrays provide high resolution maps but have other limitations, e.g. in their ability to navigate rough terrain effectively. Thus, other systems are needed allowing for effective data collection. An UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) magnetometer platform is an obvious alternative. The motivation behind such a system is that it would be safer for the operators, cheaper in initial and O&M costs, and more effective in terms of site characterization. However, while UAV data acquisition from fixed wing platforms for large (> 200 feet) stand off distances is relatively straight forward, a host of challenges exist for low stand-off distance (~ 6 feet) UAV geophysical data acquisition. The objective of SERDP SEED 1509:2006 was to identify the primary challenges associated with a low stand off distance autonomous UAV magnetometer platform and to investigate whether these challenges can be resolved successfully such that a successful UAV magnetometer platform can be constructed. The primary challenges which were identified and investigated include: 1. The feasibility of assembling a payload package which integrates magnetometers, accurate positioning systems (DGPS, height above ground measurement), obstacle avoidance systems, power infrastructure, communications and data storage as well as auxiliary flight controls 2. The availability of commercial UAV platforms with autonomous flight capability which can accommodate this payload package 3. The feasibility of integrating obstacle avoidance controls in UAV platform control 4. The feasibility of collecting high quality magnetic data in the vicinity of an UAV.

  8. The scalability of OTR (out-of-core thermionic reactor) space nuclear power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallup, D.R.

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this document, masses of the STAR-C power system and an optimized out-of-core thermionic reactor (OTR) power system versus power level are investigated. The impacts of key system parameters on system performance are also addressed. The STAR-C is mass competitive below about 15 kWe, but at higher power levels the scalability is relatively poor. An optimized OR is the least massive space nuclear power system below 25 kWe, and scales well to 50 kWe. The system parameters that have a significant impact on the scalability of the STAR-C are core thermal flux, thermionic converter efficiency, and core length to diameter ratio. The emissivity of the core surface is shown to be a relatively unimportant parameter. For an optimized OR power system, the most significant system parameter is the maximum allowable fuel temperature. It is also shown that if advanced radiation-hardened electronics are used in the satellite payload, a very large mass savings is realized. 10 refs., 23 figs., 7 tabs.

  9. An Unprecedented Constraint on Water Content in the Sunlit Lunar Exosphere Seen by Lunar-Based Ultraviolet Telescope of Chang'e-3 Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J; Qiu, Y L; Meng, X M; Cai, H B; Cao, L; Deng, J S; Han, X H; Wei, J Y

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The content of $\\mathrm{OH/H_2O}$ molecules in the tenuous exosphere of the Moon is still an open issue at present. We here report an unprecedented upper limit of the content of the OH radicals, which is obtained from the in-situ measurements carried out \\rm by the Lunar-based Ultraviolet Telescope, a payload of Chinese Chang'e-3 mission. By analyzing the diffuse background in the images taken by the telescope, the column density and surface concentration of the OH radicals are inferred to be $<10^{11}\\ \\mathrm{cm^{-2}}$ and $<10^{4}\\ \\mathrm{cm^{-3}}$ (by assuming a hydrostatic equilibrium with a scale height of 100km), respectively, by assuming that the recorded background is fully contributed by their resonance fluorescence emission. The resulted concentration is lower than the previously reported value by about two orders of magnitude, and is close to the prediction of the sputtering model. In addition, the same measurements and method allow us to derive a surface concentration of $<10^{2}\\ \\math...

  10. Extragalactic Inverse Compton Light from Dark Matter annihilation and the Pamela positron excess

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Profumo, Stefano [Department of Physics, University of California, 1156 High St, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Jeltema, Tesla E., E-mail: profumo@scipp.ucsc.edu, E-mail: tesla@ucolick.org [UCO/Lick Observatories, 1156 High St, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the extragalactic diffuse emission originating from the up-scattering of cosmic microwave photons by energetic electrons and positrons produced in particle dark matter annihilation events at all redshifts and in all halos. We outline the observational constraints on this emission and we study its dependence on both the particle dark matter model (including the particle mass and its dominant annihilation final state) and on assumptions on structure formation and on the density profile of halos. We find that for low-mass dark matter models, data in the X-ray band provide the most stringent constraints, while the gamma-ray energy range probes models featuring large masses and pair-annihilation rates, and a hard spectrum for the injected electrons and positrons. Specifically, we point out that the all-redshift, all-halo inverse Compton emission from many dark matter models that might provide an explanation to the anomalous positron fraction measured by the Pamela payload severely overproduces the observed extragalactic gamma-ray background.

  11. Evaluation of using cyclocranes to support drilling and production of oil and gas in wetland areas. Fourth quarterly technical progress report, Second quarter, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eggington, W.J.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The planned program falls under wetlands area research related to drilling, production, and transportation of oil and gas resources. Specifically the planned program addresses an evaluation of using cyclocraft to transport drill rigs, mud, pipes and other materials and equipment in a cost effective and environmentally safe manner to support oil and gas drilling and production operations in wetland areas. The cyclocraft is a proven hybrid aircraft that utilizes aerostatic and aerodynamic lift. This type of aircraft has considerable payload capacity, VTOL capability, high controllability, low operating cost, low downwash and high safety. The benefits of using a cyclocraft to transport drill rigs and materials over environmentally-sensitive surfaces would be significant. The cyclocraft has considerable cost and operational advantages over the helicopter. The major activity during the second quarter of 1993 was focussed on completion of Task 4, Preliminary Design. The selected design has been designated H.1 Cyclocraft by MRC. Also during the report period, Task 6, Ground Support, was completed and a report containing the results was submitted to DOE. This task addressed the complete H.1 Cyclocraft system, i.e. it included the need personnel, facilities and equipment to support cyclocraft operations in wetland areas.

  12. Evaluation of using cyclocranes to support drilling and production of oil and gas in wetland areas. Fifth quarterly technical progress report, Third quarter, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eggington, W.J.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The planned program falls under wetlands area research related to drilling, production, and transportation of oil and gas resources. Specifically the planned program addresses an evaluation of using cyclocraft to transport drill rigs, mud, pipes and other materials and equipment in a cost effective and environmentally safe manner to support oil and gas drilling and production operations in wetland areas. The cyclocraft is a proven hybrid aircraft that utilizes aerostatic and aerodynamic lift. This type of aircraft has considerable payload capacity, VTOL capability, high controllability, low operating cost, low downwash and high safety. The benefits of using a cyclocraft to transport drill rigs and materials over environmentally-sensitive surfaces would be significant. The cyclocraft has considerable cost and operational advantages over the helicopter. In 1992, Task 1, Environmental Considerations, and Task 2, Transport Requirements, were completed. In the first two quarters of 1993, Task 3, Parametric Analysis, Task 4, Preliminary Design, and Task 6, Ground Support, were completed. Individual reports containing results obtained from each of these tasks were submitted to DOE. In addition, through June 30, 1993, a Subscale Test Plan was prepared under Task 5, Subscale Tests, and work was initiated on Task 7, Environmental Impacts, Task 8, Development Plan, Task 9, Operating Costs, and Task 10, Technology Transfer.

  13. Vehicle potential measurements during electron emission in the ionosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, N.B.

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CHARGE-2 was a sounding rocket experiment to study the interaction of an electron beam with the environment. Additionally, experiments on the interaction of a vehicle at high potential (up to 1 kV) with the ionosphere were performed. The payload consisted of two parts that were separated during the flight. A 1 -kV electron gun was flown on the mother vehicle along with numerous diagnostic Instruments. The daughter vehicle was deployed on a conducting, insulated tether to a distance of up to 426 m perpendicular to the geomagnetic field. The high potential was obtained by electron emission from the mother vehicle, and by voltage biasing of the daughter vehicle. Measurements of transient vehicle potential were obtained with a sample interval of 100 ns. Measurements of the steady-state vehicle potential were typically limited to about half of the lkV accelerating potential of the electron gun. The daughter vehicle collected current consistent with magnetically limited models of current collection.

  14. Gamma-ray Albedo of the Moon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; Porter, Troy A.

    2007-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the GEANT4 Monte Carlo framework to calculate the gamma-ray albedo of the Moon due to interactions of cosmic ray (CR) nuclei with moon rock. Our calculation of the albedo spectrum agrees with the EGRET data. We show that the spectrum of gamma-rays from the Moon is very steep with an effective cutoff around 3 GeV (600 MeV for the inner part of the Moon disc). Since it is the only (almost) black spot in the gamma-ray sky, it provides a unique opportunity for calibration of gamma-ray telescopes, such as the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). The albedo flux depends on the incident CR spectrum which changes over the solar cycle. Therefore, it is possible to monitor the CR spectrum using the albedo gamma-ray flux. Simultaneous measurements of CR proton and helium spectra by the Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA), and observations of the albedo -rays by the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT), can be used to test the model predictions and will enable the GLAST LAT to monitor the CR spectrum near the Earth beyond the lifetime of PAMELA.

  15. The Gamma-ray Albedo of the Moon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; /Stanford U., HEPL; Porter, Troy A.; /UC, Santa Cruz

    2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the GEANT4 Monte Carlo framework to calculate the {gamma}-ray albedo of the Moon due to interactions of cosmic ray (CR) nuclei with moon rock. Our calculation of the albedo spectrum agrees with the EGRET data. We show that the spectrum of {gamma}-rays from the Moon is very steep with an effective cutoff around 3-4 GeV (600 MeV for the inner part of the Moon disk) and exhibits a narrow pion-decay line at 67.5 MeV, perhaps unique in astrophysics. Apart from other astrophysical sources, the albedo spectrum of the Moon is well understood, including its absolute normalization; this makes it a useful 'standard candle' for {gamma}-ray telescopes. The steep albedo spectrum also provides a unique opportunity for energy calibration of {gamma}-ray telescopes, such as the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). Since the albedo flux depends on the incident CR spectrum which changes over the solar cycle, it is possible to monitor the CR spectrum using the albedo {gamma}-ray flux. Simultaneous measurements of CR proton and helium spectra by the Payload for Antimatter-Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA), and observations of the albedo {gamma}-rays by the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT), can be used to test the model predictions and will enable the LAT to monitor the CR spectrum near the Earth beyond the lifetime of the PAMELA.

  16. SOFT X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY OF THE CYGNUS LOOP SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oakley, Phil [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., 37-582F, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)] [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., 37-582F, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); McEntaffer, Randall [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Van Allen Hall, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Van Allen Hall, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Cash, Webster, E-mail: Oakley@mit.edu [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)] [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of a suborbital rocket flight whose scientific target was the Cygnus Loop Supernova Remnant. The payload consists of wire grid collimators, off-plane grating arrays, and gaseous electron multiplier (GEM) detectors. The system is designed for spectral measurements in the 17-107 A bandpass with a resolution up to {approx}60 ({lambda}/{Delta}{lambda}). The Extended X-ray Off-plane Spectrometer (EXOS) was launched on a Terrier-Black Brant rocket on 2009 November 13 from White Sands Missile Range and obtained 340 s of useable scientific data. The X-ray emission is dominated by O VII and O VIII, including the He-like O VII triplet at {approx}22 A. Another emission feature at {approx}45 A is composed primarily of Si XI and Si XII. The best-fit model to this spectrum is an equilibrium plasma model at a temperature of log(T) = 6.4 (0.23 keV).

  17. Windscale pile reactors - Decommissioning progress on a fifty year legacy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sexton, Richard J. [CH2M HILL International Nuclear Services, United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority - UKAEA (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The decommissioning of the Windscale Pile 1 reactor, fifty years after the 1957 fire, is one of the most technically challenging decommissioning projects in the UK, if not the world. This paper presents a summary of the 1957 Windscale Pile 1 accident, its unique challenges and a new technical approach developed to safely and efficiently decommission the two Windscale Pile Reactors. The reactors will be decommissioned using a top down approach that employs an array of light weight, carbon fiber, high payload robotic arms to remove the damaged fuel, the graphite core, activated metals and concrete. This relatively conventional decommissioning approach has been made possible by a recently completed technical assessment of reactor core fire and criticality risk which concluded that these types of events are not credible if relatively simple controls are applied. This paper presents an overview of the design, manufacture and testing of equipment to remove the estimated 15 tons of fire damaged fuel and isotopes from the Pile 1 reactor. The paper also discusses recently conducted characterization activities which have allowed for a refined waste estimate and conditioning strategy. These data and an innovative approach have resulted in a significant reduction in the estimated project cost and schedule. (authors)

  18. PAT-1 safety analysis report addendum.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiner, Ruth F.; Schmale, David T.; Kalan, Robert J.; Akin, Lili A.; Miller, David Russell; Knorovsky, Gerald Albert; Yoshimura, Richard Hiroyuki; Lopez, Carlos; Harding, David Cameron; Jones, Perry L.; Morrow, Charles W.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Plutonium Air Transportable Package, Model PAT-1, is certified under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations Part 71 by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) per Certificate of Compliance (CoC) USA/0361B(U)F-96 (currently Revision 9). The purpose of this SAR Addendum is to incorporate plutonium (Pu) metal as a new payload for the PAT-1 package. The Pu metal is packed in an inner container (designated the T-Ampoule) that replaces the PC-1 inner container. The documentation and results from analysis contained in this addendum demonstrate that the replacement of the PC-1 and associated packaging material with the T-Ampoule and associated packaging with the addition of the plutonium metal content are not significant with respect to the design, operating characteristics, or safe performance of the containment system and prevention of criticality when the package is subjected to the tests specified in 10 CFR 71.71, 71.73 and 71.74.

  19. Extension of the quantum-kinetic model to lunar and Mars return physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liechty, D. S. [Aerothermodynamics Branch, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia 23681 (United States)] [Aerothermodynamics Branch, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia 23681 (United States); Lewis, M. J. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)] [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to compute rarefied, ionized hypersonic flows is becoming more important as missions such as Earth reentry, landing high-mass payloads on Mars, and the exploration of the outer planets and their satellites are being considered. A recently introduced molecular-level chemistry model, the quantum-kinetic, or Q-K, model that predicts reaction rates for gases in thermal equilibrium and non-equilibrium using only kinetic theory and fundamental molecular properties, is extended in the current work to include electronic energy level transitions and reactions involving charged particles. Like the Q-K procedures for neutral species chemical reactions, these new models are phenomenological procedures that aim to reproduce the reaction/transition rates but do not necessarily capture the exact physics. These engineering models are necessarily efficient due to the requirement to compute billions of simulated collisions in direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) simulations. The new models are shown to generally agree within the spread of reported transition and reaction rates from the literature for near equilibrium conditions.

  20. THERMAL EVALUATION OF ALTERNATE SHIPPING CASK FOR GTRI EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donna Post Guillen

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) has many experiments yet to be irradiated in support of the High Performance Research Reactor fuels development program. Most of the experiments will be irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), then later shipped to the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) located at the Materials and Fuels Complex for post irradiation examination. To date, the General Electric (GE)-2000 cask has been used to transport GTRI experiments between these facilities. However, the availability of the GE-2000 cask to support future GTRI experiments is at risk. In addition, the internal cavity of the GE-2000 cask is too short to accommodate shipping the larger GTRI experiments. Therefore, an alternate shipping capability is being pursued. The Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, Research Reactor (BRR) cask has been determined to be the best alternative to the GE-2000 cask. An evaluation of the thermal performance of the BRR cask is necessary before proceeding with fabrication of the newly designed cask hardware and the development of handling, shipping, and transport procedures. This paper presents the results of the thermal evaluation of the BRR cask loaded with a representative set of fueled and non-fueled experiments. When analyzed with identical payloads, experiment temperatures were found to be lower with the BRR cask than with the GE-2000 cask. From a thermal standpoint, the BRR cask was found to be a suitable alternate to the GE-2000 cask.

  1. The Large Observatory For x-ray Timing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feroci, M; Bozzo, E; Barret, D; Brandt, S; Hernanz, M; van der Klis, M; Pohl, M; Santangelo, A; Stella, L; Watts, A; Wilms, J; Zane, S; Ahangarianabhari, M; Albertus, C; Alford, M; Alpar, A; Altamirano, D; Alvarez, L; Amati, L; Amoros, C; Andersson, N; Antonelli, A; Argan, A; Artigue, R; Artigues, B; Atteia, J -L; Azzarello, P; Bakala, P; Baldazzi, G; Balman, S; Barbera, M; van Baren, C; Bhattacharyya, S; Baykal, A; Belloni, T; Bernardini, F; Bertuccio, G; Bianchi, S; Bianchini, A; Binko, P; Blay, P; Bocchino, F; Bodin, P; Bombaci, I; Bidaud, J -M Bonnet; Boutloukos, S; Bradley, L; Braga, J; Brown, E; Bucciantini, N; Burderi, L; Burgay, M; Bursa, M; Budtz-Jrgensen, C; Cackett, E; Cadoux, F R; Cais, P; Caliandro, G A; Campana, R; Campana, S; Capitanio, F; Casares, J; Casella, P; Castro-Tirado, A J; Cavazzuti, E; Cerda-Duran, P; Chakrabarty, D; Chteau, F; Chenevez, J; Coker, J; Cole, R; Collura, A; Cornelisse, R; Courvoisier, T; Cros, A; Cumming, A; Cusumano, G; D'A, A; D'Elia, V; Del Monte, E; De Luca, A; De Martino, D; Dercksen, J P C; De Pasquale, M; De Rosa, A; Del Santo, M; Di Cosimo, S; Diebold, S; Di Salvo, T; 1), I Donnarumma; (32), A Drago; (33), M Durant; (107), D Emmanoulopoulos; (135), M H Erkut; (85), P Esposito; (1, Y Evangelista; 1b),; (24), A Fabian; (34), M Falanga; (25), Y Favre; (35), C Feldman; (128), V Ferrari; (3), C Ferrigno; (133), M Finger; (36), M H Finger; (35, G W Fraser; +),; (2), M Frericks; (7), F Fuschino; (125), M Gabler; (37), D K Galloway; (6), J L Galvez Sanchez; (6), E Garcia-Berro; (10), B Gendre; (62), S Gezari; (39), A B Giles; (40), M Gilfanov; (10), P Giommi; (102), G Giovannini; (102), M Giroletti; (4), E Gogus; (105), A Goldwurm; (86), K Goluchov; (16), D Gtz; (16), C Gouiffes; (56), M Grassi; (42), P Groot; (17), M Gschwender; (128), L Gualtieri; (32), C Guidorzi; (3), L Guy; (2), D Haas; (50), P Haensel; (29), M Hailey; (19), F Hansen; (42), D H Hartmann; (43), C A Haswell; (88), K Hebeler; (37), A Heger; (2), W Hermsen; (28), J Homan; (19), A Hornstrup; (23, R Hudec; 72),; (45), J Huovelin; (5), A Ingram; (2), J J M in't Zand; (27), G Israel; (20), K Iwasawa; (47), L Izzo; (2), H M Jacobs; (17), F Jetter; (118, T Johannsen; 127),; (2), H M Jacobs; (2), P Jonker; (126), J Jos; (49), P Kaaret; (123), G Kanbach; (23), V Karas; (6), D Karelin; (29), D Kataria; (49), L Keek; (29), T Kennedy; (17), D Klochkov; (50), W Kluzniak; (17), K Kokkotas; (45), S Korpela; (51), C Kouveliotou; (87), I Kreykenbohm; (2), L M Kuiper; (19), I Kuvvetli; (7), C Labanti; (52), D Lai; (53), F K Lamb; (2), P P Laubert; (105), F Lebrun; (8), D Lin; (29), D Linder; (54), G Lodato; (55), F Longo; (19), N Lund; (131), T J Maccarone; (14), D Macera; (8), S Maestre; (62), S Mahmoodifar; (17), D Maier; (56), P Malcovati; (120), I Mandel; (144), V Mangano; (50), A Manousakis; (7), M Marisaldi; (109), A Markowitz; (35), A Martindale; (59), G Matt; (107), I M McHardy; (60), A Melatos; (61), M Mendez; (85), S Mereghetti; (68), M Michalska; (20), S Migliari; (85, R Mignani; 108),; (62), M C Miller; (49), J M Miller; (57), T Mineo; (112), G Miniutti; (64), S Morsink; (65), C Motch; (13), S Motta; (66), M Mouchet; (8), G Mouret; (19), J Mula?ov; (1, F Muleri; 1b),; (140), T Muoz-Darias; (95), I Negueruela; (28), J Neilsen; (43), A J Norton; (28), M Nowak; (35), P O'Brien; (19), P E H Olsen; (102), M Orienti; (99, M Orio; 110),; (7), M Orlandini; (68), P Orleanski; (35), J P Osborne; (69), R Osten; (70), F Ozel; (1, L Pacciani; 1b),; (119), M Paolillo; (6), A Papitto; (20), J M Paredes; (83, A Patruno; 141),; (71), B Paul; (17), E Perinati; (115), A Pellizzoni; (47), A V Penacchioni; (136), M A Perez; (72), V Petracek; (10), C Pittori; (95), J Pons; (6), J Portell; (115), A Possenti; (73), J Poutanen; (122), M Prakash; (16), P Le Provost; (70), D Psaltis; (8), D Rambaud; (8), P Ramon; (76), G Ramsay; (1, M Rapisarda; 1b),; (77), A Rachevski; (77), I Rashevskaya; (78), P S Ray; (6), N Rea; (80), S Reddy; (113, P Reig; 81),; (63), M Reina Aranda; (28), R Remillard; (62), C Reynolds; (124), L Rezzolla; (20), M Ribo; (2), R de la Rie; (115), A Riggio; (138), A Rios; (82, P Rodrguez- Gil; 104),; (16), J Rodriguez; (3), R Rohlfs; (57), P Romano; (83), E M R Rossi; (50), A Rozanska; (29), A Rousseau; (84), F Ryde; (63), L Sabau-Graziati; (6), G Sala; (85), R Salvaterra; (61), A Sanna; (134), J Sandberg; (130), S Scaringi; (16), S Schanne; (86), J Schee; (87), C Schmid; (117), S Shore; (27), R Schneider; (88), A Schwenk; (89), A D Schwope; (114), J -Y Seyler; (90), A Shearer; (29), A Smith; (58), D M Smith; (29), P J Smith; (23), V Sochora; (1), P Soffitta; (61), P Soleri; (29), A Spencer

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Large Observatory For x-ray Timing (LOFT) was studied within ESA M3 Cosmic Vision framework and participated in the final down-selection for a launch slot in 2022-2024. Thanks to the unprecedented combination of effective area and spectral resolution of its main instrument, LOFT will study the behaviour of matter under extreme conditions, such as the strong gravitational field in the innermost regions of accretion flows close to black holes and neutron stars, and the supra-nuclear densities in the interior of neutron stars. The science payload is based on a Large Area Detector (LAD, 10 m 2 effective area, 2-30 keV, 240 eV spectral resolution, 1 deg collimated field of view) and a WideField Monitor (WFM, 2-50 keV, 4 steradian field of view, 1 arcmin source location accuracy, 300 eV spectral resolution). The WFM is equipped with an on-board system for bright events (e.g. GRB) localization. The trigger time and position of these events are broadcast to the ground within 30 s from discovery. In this paper we ...

  2. The Reutter/Wade Toxicity Report and CSEPP Civilian Emergency Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorensen, J.H.

    1999-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Reutter/Wade analysis (Reutter and Wade 1994) was undertaken to improve the technical basis for assessing battlefield casualties from deployment of chemical weapons containing nerve and sulfur mustard agent payloads. The analysis sought to utilize available data and modern, accepted, toxicological methods to develop agent-specific casualty estimators for U.S. military forces. The authors also estimated qualitative confidence levels for each estimator based on the quality and quantity of the data. For percutaneous and inhalation vapor exposures, the report estimated cumulative exposures necessary to achieve lethal (LCt{sub 50}), severe (ED{sub 50}), threshold (percutaneous vapor only, ECt{sub 50}), or mild (nasal vapor, ECt{sub 50}) effects. For percutaneous liquid exposures, the report estimated lethal (LD{sub 50}) and severe (ED{sub 50}) doses. The vapor exposures necessary to achieve mild ocular effects were also estimated. This report examines potential implications of the Reutter/Wade study for off-site or civilian emergency planning in the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP) and summarizes principal findings of the Reutter/Wade report, the National Academy review of Reutter/Wade, and the Institute for Defense Analysis (IDA) expert panel assessment of Reutter/Wade casualty estimators. This report also identifies how estimates of human health effects are used in CSEPP, organized by functional planning topics. Finally CSEPP casualty estimators are considered in light of the Reutter/Wade work.

  3. Mars mission opportunity and transit time sensitivity for a nuclear thermal rocket propulsion application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, A.C.; Mulqueen, J.A.; Nishimuta, E.L.; Emrich, W.J. (George C. Marshall Space Flight Center, Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama 35812 (United States))

    1993-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    President George Bush's 1989 challenge to America to support the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) of Back to the Moon and Human Mission to Mars'' gives the space industry an opportunity to develop effective and efficient space transportation systems. This paper presents stage performance and requirements for a nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) Mars transportation system to support the human Mars mission of the SEI. Two classes of Mars mission profiles are considered in developing the NTR propulsion vehicle performance and requirements. The two Mars mission classes include the opposition class and conjunction class. The opposition class mission is associated with relatively short Mars stay times ranging from 30 to 90 days and total mission duration of 350 to 600 days. The conjunction class mission is associated with much longer Mars stay times ranging from 500 to 600 days and total mission durations of 875 to 1,000 days. Vehicle mass scaling equations are used to determine the NTR stage mass, size, and performance range required for different Mars mission opportunities and for different Mars mission durations. Mission opportunities considered include launch years 2010 to 2018. The 2010 opportunity is the most demanding launch opportunity and the 2018 opportunity is the least demanding opportunity. NTR vehicle mass and size sensitivity to NTR engine thrust level, engine specific impulse, NTR engine thrust-to-weight ratio, and Mars surface payload are presented. NTR propulsion parameter ranges include those associated with NERVA, particle bed reactor (PBR), low-pressure, and ceramic-metal-type engine design.

  4. Interplanetary missions with the GDM propulsion system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kammash, T.; Emrich, W. Jr. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama 35812 (United States)

    1998-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gasdynamic Mirror (GDM) fusion propulsion system utilizes a magnetic mirror machine in which a hot dense plasma is confined long enough to produce fusion energy while allowing a fraction of its charged particle population to escape from one end to generate thrust. The particles escaping through the opposite end have their energy converted to electric power which can be used to sustain the system in a steady state operation. With the aid of a power flow diagram the minimum demands on energy production can be established and the propulsive capability of the system can be determined by solving an appropriate set of governing equations. We apply these results to several missions within the solar system and compute the trip time by invoking a continuous burn, acceleration/deceleration type of trajectory with constant thrust and specific impulse. Ignoring gravitational effects of the planets or the sun, and neglecting the change in the Earth's position during the flight we compute the round trip time for missions from Earth to Mars, Jupiter, and Pluto using linear distances and certain payload fractions. We find that a round trip to Mars with the GDM rocket takes about 170 days while those to Jupiter and Pluto take 494 and 1566 days respectively.

  5. The beryllium hollow-body solar sail: exploration of the Sun's gravitational focus and the inner Oort Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory L. Matloff; Roman Ya. Kezerashvili; Claudio Maccone; Les Johnson

    2008-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Spacecraft kinematics, peak perihelion temperature and space environment effects during solar-radiation-pressure acceleration for a beryllium hollow-body interstellar solar sail inflated with hydrogen fill gas are investigated. We demonstrate that diffusion is alleviated by an on-board fill gas reserve and electrostatic pressure can be alleviated by increasing perihelion distance. For a 0.1 AU perihelion, a 937 m radius sail with a sail mass of 150 kg and a payload mass of 150 kg, perihelion sail temperature is about 1000 K, peak acceleration is about 0.6 g, and solar-system exit velocity is about 400 km/s. After sail deployments, the craft reaches the 200 AU heliopause in 2.5 years, the Sun's inner gravitational focus at 550 AU in about 6.5 years and 2,550 AU in 30 years. The Be hollow-body sail could be applied in the post 2040 time frame to verify general relativity predictions regarding the Sun's inner gravitational focus and to explore particles and fields in the Sun's inner Oort Comet Cloud.

  6. Testing in support of transportation of residues in the pipe overpack container

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, D.J.; Bobbe, J.G.; Arviso, M.; Bronowski, D.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Transportation Systems Dept.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disposition of the large back-log of plutonium residues at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats) will require interim storage and subsequent shipment to a waste repository. Current plants call for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and the transportation to WIPP in the TRUPACT-II. The transportation phase will require the residues to be packaged in a container that is more robust than a standard 55-gallon waste drum. Rocky Flats has designed the Pipe Overpack Container to meet this need. The tests described here were performed to qualify the Pipe Overpack Container as a waste container for shipment in the TRUPACT-II. Using a more robust container will assure the fissile materials in each container can not be mixed with the fissile material from the other containers and will provide criticality control. This will allow an increase in the payload of the TRUPACT-II from 325 fissile gram equivalents to 2,800 fissile gram equivalents.

  7. Mixed Oxide Fresh Fuel Package Auxiliary Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yapuncich, F.; Ross, A. [AREVA Federal Services (AFS), Tacoma WA (United States); Clark, R.H. [Shaw AREVA MOX Services, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC (United States); Ammerman, D. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is overseeing the construction the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) on the Savannah River Site. The new facility, being constructed by NNSA's contractor Shaw AREVA MOX Services, will fabricate fuel assemblies utilizing surplus plutonium as feedstock. The fuel will be used in designated commercial nuclear reactors. The MOX Fresh Fuel Package (MFFP), which has recently been licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) as a type B package (USA/9295/B(U)F-96), will be utilized to transport the fabricated fuel assemblies from the MFFF to the nuclear reactors. It was necessary to develop auxiliary equipment that would be able to efficiently handle the high precision fuel assemblies. Also, the physical constraints of the MFFF and the nuclear power plants require that the equipment be capable of loading and unloading the fuel assemblies both vertically and horizontally. The ability to reconfigure the load/unload evolution builds in a large degree of flexibility for the MFFP for the handling of many types of both fuel and non fuel payloads. The design and analysis met various technical specifications including dynamic and static seismic criteria. The fabrication was completed by three major fabrication facilities within the United States. The testing was conducted by Sandia National Laboratories. The unique design specifications and successful testing sequences will be discussed. (authors)

  8. POET: POlarimeters for Energetic Transients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. E. Hill; M. L. McConnell; P. Bloser; J. Legere; J. Macri; J. Ryan; S. Barthelmy; L. Angelini; T. Sakamoto; J. K. Black; D. H. Hartmann; P. Kaaret; B. Zhang; K. Ioka; T. Nakamura; K. Toma; R. Yamazaki; X. Wu

    2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    POET (Polarimeters for Energetic Transients) is a Small Explorer mission concept proposed to NASA in January 2008. The principal scientific goal of POET is to measure GRB polarization between 2 and 500 keV. The payload consists of two wide FoV instruments: a Low Energy Polarimeter (LEP) capable of polarization measurements in the energy range from 2-15 keV and a high energy polarimeter (Gamma-Ray Polarimeter Experiment -- GRAPE) that will measure polarization in the 60-500 keV energy range. Spectra will be measured from 2 keV up to 1 MeV. The POET spacecraft provides a zenith-pointed platform for maximizing the exposure to deep space. Spacecraft rotation will provide a means of effectively dealing with systematics in the polarization response. POET will provide sufficient sensitivity and sky coverage to measure statistically significant polarization for up to 100 GRBs in a two-year mission. Polarization data will also be obtained for solar flares, pulsars and other sources of astronomical interest.

  9. POET: POlarimeters for Energetic Transients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, J E; Bloser, P; Legere, J; Macri, J; Ryan, J; Barthelmy, S; Angelini, L; Sakamoto, T; Black, J K; Hartmann, D H; Kaaret, Philip; Zhang, B; Ioka, K; Nakamura, T; Toma, K; Yamazaki, R; Wu, X

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    POET (Polarimeters for Energetic Transients) is a Small Explorer mission concept proposed to NASA in January 2008. The principal scientific goal of POET is to measure GRB polarization between 2 and 500 keV. The payload consists of two wide FoV instruments: a Low Energy Polarimeter (LEP) capable of polarization measurements in the energy range from 2-15 keV and a high energy polarimeter (Gamma-Ray Polarimeter Experiment -- GRAPE) that will measure polarization in the 60-500 keV energy range. Spectra will be measured from 2 keV up to 1 MeV. The POET spacecraft provides a zenith-pointed platform for maximizing the exposure to deep space. Spacecraft rotation will provide a means of effectively dealing with systematics in the polarization response. POET will provide sufficient sensitivity and sky coverage to measure statistically significant polarization for up to 100 GRBs in a two-year mission. Polarization data will also be obtained for solar flares, pulsars and other sources of astronomical interest.

  10. STE-QUEST - Test of the Universality of Free Fall Using Cold Atom Interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Aguilera; H. Ahlers; B. Battelier; A. Bawamia; A. Bertoldi; R. Bondarescu; K. Bongs; P. Bouyer; C. Braxmaier; L. Cacciapuoti; C. Chaloner; M. Chwalla; W. Ertmer; M. Franz; N. Gaaloul; M. Gehler; D. Gerardi; L. Gesa; N. Grlebeck; J. Hartwig; M. Hauth; O. Hellmig; W. Herr; S. Herrmann; A. Heske; A. Hinton; P. Ireland; P. Jetzer; U. Johann; M. Krutzik; A. Kubelka; C. Lmmerzahl; A. Landragin; I. Lloro; D. Massonnet; I. Mateos; A. Milke; M. Nofrarias; M. Oswald; A. Peters; K. Posso-Trujillo; E. Rasel; E. Rocco; A. Roura; J. Rudolph; W. Schleich; C. Schubert; T. Schuldt; S. Seidel; K. Sengstock; C. F. Sopuerta; F. Sorrentino; D. Summers; G. M. Tino; C. Trenkel; N. Uzunoglu; W. von Klitzing; R. Walser; T. Wendrich; A. Wenzlawski; P. Weels; A. Wicht; E. Wille; M. Williams; P. Windpassinger; N. Zahzam

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The theory of general relativity describes macroscopic phenomena driven by the influence of gravity while quantum mechanics brilliantly accounts for microscopic effects. Despite their tremendous individual success, a complete unification of fundamental interactions is missing and remains one of the most challenging and important quests in modern theoretical physics. The STE-QUEST satellite mission, proposed as a medium-size mission within the Cosmic Vision program of the European Space Agency (ESA), aims for testing general relativity with high precision in two experiments by performing a measurement of the gravitational redshift of the Sun and the Moon by comparing terrestrial clocks, and by performing a test of the Universality of Free Fall of matter waves in the gravitational field of Earth comparing the trajectory of two Bose-Einstein condensates of Rb85 and Rb87. The two ultracold atom clouds are monitored very precisely thanks to techniques of atom interferometry. This allows to reach down to an uncertainty in the E\\"otv\\"os parameter of at least 2x10E-15. In this paper, we report about the results of the phase A mission study of the atom interferometer instrument covering the description of the main payload elements, the atomic source concept, and the systematic error sources.

  11. Advanced robot locomotion.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neely, Jason C.; Sturgis, Beverly Rainwater; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Feddema, John Todd; Spletzer, Barry Louis; Rose, Scott E.; Novick, David Keith; Wilson, David Gerald; Buerger, Stephen P.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the results of a research effort on advanced robot locomotion. The majority of this work focuses on walking robots. Walking robot applications include delivery of special payloads to unique locations that require human locomotion to exo-skeleton human assistance applications. A walking robot could step over obstacles and move through narrow openings that a wheeled or tracked vehicle could not overcome. It could pick up and manipulate objects in ways that a standard robot gripper could not. Most importantly, a walking robot would be able to rapidly perform these tasks through an intuitive user interface that mimics natural human motion. The largest obstacle arises in emulating stability and balance control naturally present in humans but needed for bipedal locomotion in a robot. A tracked robot is bulky and limited, but a wide wheel base assures passive stability. Human bipedal motion is so common that it is taken for granted, but bipedal motion requires active balance and stability control for which the analysis is non-trivial. This report contains an extensive literature study on the state-of-the-art of legged robotics, and it additionally provides the analysis, simulation, and hardware verification of two variants of a proto-type leg design.

  12. Operator control systems and methods for swing-free gantry-style cranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feddema, John T. (Albuquerque, NM); Petterson, Ben J. (Albuquerque, NM); Robinett, III, Rush D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for eliminating swing motions in gantry-style cranes while subject to operator control is presented. The present invention comprises an infinite impulse response ("IIR") filter and a proportional-integral ("PI") feedback controller (50). The IIR filter receives input signals (46) (commanded velocity or acceleration) from an operator input device (45) and transforms them into output signals (47) in such a fashion that the resulting motion is swing free (i.e., end-point swinging prevented). The parameters of the IIR filter are updated in real time using measurements from a hoist cable length encoder (25). The PI feedback controller compensates for modeling errors and external disturbances, such as wind or perturbations caused by collision with objects. The PI feedback controller operates on cable swing angle measurements provided by a cable angle sensor (27). The present invention adjusts acceleration and deceleration to eliminate oscillations. An especially important feature of the present invention is that it compensates for variable-length cable motions from multiple cables attached to a suspended payload.

  13. Operator control systems and methods for swing-free gantry-style cranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feddema, J.T.; Petterson, B.J.; Robinett, R.D. III

    1998-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method are disclosed for eliminating swing motions in gantry-style cranes while subject to operator control. The present invention comprises an infinite impulse response (IIR) filter and a proportional-integral (PI) feedback controller. The IIR filter receives input signals (commanded velocity or acceleration) from an operator input device and transforms them into output signals in such a fashion that the resulting motion is swing free (i.e., end-point swinging prevented). The parameters of the IIR filter are updated in real time using measurements from a hoist cable length encoder. The PI feedback controller compensates for modeling errors and external disturbances, such as wind or perturbations caused by collision with objects. The PI feedback controller operates on cable swing angle measurements provided by a cable angle sensor. The present invention adjusts acceleration and deceleration to eliminate oscillations. An especially important feature of the present invention is that it compensates for variable-length cable motions from multiple cables attached to a suspended payload. 10 figs.

  14. Intelligent Unmanned Vehicle Systems Suitable For Individual or Cooperative Missions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthew O. Anderson; Mark D. McKay; Derek C. Wadsworth

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energys Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been researching autonomous unmanned vehicle systems for the past several years. Areas of research have included unmanned ground and aerial vehicles used for hazardous and remote operations as well as teamed together for advanced payloads and mission execution. Areas of application include aerial particulate sampling, cooperative remote radiological sampling, and persistent surveillance including real-time mosaic and geo-referenced imagery in addition to high resolution still imagery. Both fixed-wing and rotary airframes are used possessing capabilities spanning remote control to fully autonomous operation. Patented INL-developed auto steering technology is taken advantage of to provide autonomous parallel path swathing with either manned or unmanned ground vehicles. Aerial look-ahead imagery is utilized to provide a common operating picture for the ground and air vehicle during cooperative missions. This paper will discuss the various robotic vehicles, including sensor integration, used to achieve these missions and anticipated cost and labor savings.

  15. Adaptive and mobile ground sensor array.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holzrichter, Michael Warren; O'Rourke, William T.; Zenner, Jennifer; Maish, Alexander B.

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this LDRD was to demonstrate the use of robotic vehicles for deploying and autonomously reconfiguring seismic and acoustic sensor arrays with high (centimeter) accuracy to obtain enhancement of our capability to locate and characterize remote targets. The capability to accurately place sensors and then retrieve and reconfigure them allows sensors to be placed in phased arrays in an initial monitoring configuration and then to be reconfigured in an array tuned to the specific frequencies and directions of the selected target. This report reviews the findings and accomplishments achieved during this three-year project. This project successfully demonstrated autonomous deployment and retrieval of a payload package with an accuracy of a few centimeters using differential global positioning system (GPS) signals. It developed an autonomous, multisensor, temporally aligned, radio-frequency communication and signal processing capability, and an array optimization algorithm, which was implemented on a digital signal processor (DSP). Additionally, the project converted the existing single-threaded, monolithic robotic vehicle control code into a multi-threaded, modular control architecture that enhances the reuse of control code in future projects.

  16. Small space reactor power systems for unmanned solar system exploration missions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloomfield, H.S.

    1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A preliminary feasibility study of the application of small nuclear reactor space power systems to the Mariner Mark II Cassini spacecraft/mission was conducted. The purpose of the study was to identify and assess the technology and performance issues associated with the reactor power system/spacecraft/mission integration. The Cassini mission was selected because study of the Saturn system was identified as a high priority outer planet exploration objective. Reactor power systems applied to this mission were evaluated for two different uses. First, a very small 1 kWe reactor power system was used as an RTG replacement for the nominal spacecraft mission science payload power requirements while still retaining the spacecraft's usual bipropellant chemical propulsion system. The second use of reactor power involved the additional replacement of the chemical propulsion system with a small reactor power system and an electric propulsion system. The study also provides an examination of potential applications for the additional power available for scientific data collection. The reactor power system characteristics utilized in the study were based on a parametric mass model that was developed specifically for these low power applications. The model was generated following a neutronic safety and operational feasibility assessment of six small reactor concepts solicited from U.S. industry. This assessment provided the validation of reactor safety for all mission phases and generatad the reactor mass and dimensional data needed for the system mass model.

  17. SPECTRA OF COSMIC-RAY PROTONS AND HELIUM PRODUCED IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ptuskin, Vladimir; Zirakashvili, Vladimir [Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation of the Russian Academy of Science (IZMIRAN), Troitsk, Moscow Region 142190 (Russian Federation)] [Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation of the Russian Academy of Science (IZMIRAN), Troitsk, Moscow Region 142190 (Russian Federation); Seo, Eun-Suk [Department of Physics and Institute of Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Institute of Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Data obtained in the Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC-2), Cosmic Ray Energetics and Mass (CREAM), and Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA) experiments suggest that the elemental interstellar spectra of cosmic rays below the knee at a few times 10{sup 6} GeV are not simple power laws, but that they experience hardening at a magnetic rigidity of about 240 GV. Another essential feature is the difference between proton and helium energy spectra, such that the He/p ratio increases by more than 50% in the energy range from 10{sup 2} to 10{sup 4} GV. We consider the concavity of the particle spectrum resulting from the nonlinear nature of diffusive shock acceleration in supernova remnants (SNRs) as a possible reason for the observed spectrum hardening. The increase of the helium-to-proton ratio with energy can be interpreted as a consequence of cosmic-ray acceleration by forward and reverse shocks in SNRs. The contribution of particles accelerated by reverse shocks makes the concavity of the produced overall cosmic-ray spectrum more pronounced. The spectra of protons and helium nuclei accelerated in SNRs and released into the interstellar medium are calculated. The derived steady-state interstellar spectra are in reasonably good agreement with observations.

  18. The Use of the Hanford Onsite Packaging and Transportation Safety Program to Meet Cleanup Milestones Under the Hanford Site Cleanup 2015 Vision and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 - 12403

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lavender, John C. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Edwards, W. Scott [Areva Federal Services, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Macbeth, Paul J.; Self, Richard J. [U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); West, Lori D. [Materials and Energy Corporation, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site presents unique challenges in meeting the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) 2015 Cleanup Vision. CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC), its subcontractors, and DOE-RL were challenged to retrieve, transport and remediate a wide range of waste materials. Through a collaborative effort by all Hanford Onsite Central Plateau Cleanup Team Members, disposition pathways for diverse and seemingly impossible to ship wastes were developed under a DOE Order 460.1C-compliant Hanford Onsite Transportation Safety Program. The team determined an effective method for transporting oversized compliant waste payloads to processing and disposition facilities. The use of the onsite TSD packaging authorizations proved to be vital to safely transporting these materials for processing and eventual final disposition. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) provided additional resources to expedite planning and execution of these important cleanup milestones. Through the innovative and creative use of the TSD, the Hanford Onsite Central Plateau Cleanup Team Members have developed and are executing an integrated project plan that enables the safe and compliant transport of a wide variety of difficult-to-transport waste items, accelerating previous cleanup schedules to meet cleanup milestones. (authors)

  19. Design Considerations, Modeling and Analysis for the Multispectral Thermal Imager

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borel, C.C.; Clodius, W.B.; Cooke, B.J.; Smith, B.W.; Weber, P.G.

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of remote sensing systems is driven by the need to provide cost-effective, substantive answers to questions posed by our customers. This is especially important for space-based systems, which tend to be expensive, and which generally cannot be changed after they are launched. We report here on the approach we employed in developing the desired attributes of a satellite mission, namely the Multispectral Thermal Imager. After an initial scoping study, we applied a procedure which we call: "End-to-end modeling and analysis (EEM)." We began with target attributes, translated to observable signatures and then propagated the signatures through the atmosphere to the sensor location. We modeled the sensor attributes to yield a simulated data stream, which was then analyzed to retrieve information about the original target. The retrieved signature was then compared to the original to obtain a figure of merit: hence the term "end-to-end modeling and analysis." We base the EEM in physics to ensure high fidelity and to permit scaling. As the actual design of the payload evolves, and as real hardware is tested, we can update the EEM to facilitate trade studies, and to judge, for example, whether components that deviate from specifications are acceptable.

  20. Opportunities to increase the productivity of spent fuel shipping casks in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winsor, G.H.; Faletti, D.W.; DeSteese, J.G.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trends indicate that future transportation requirements for spent fuel will be different from those anticipated when the current generation of casks and vehicles was designed. Increased storage capacity at most reactors will increase the average post irradiation age of the spent fuel to be transported. A scenario is presented which shows the 18 casks currently available should be sufficient until approximately 1983. Beyond this time, it appears that an adequate transportation system can be maintained by acquiring, as needed, casks of current designs and new casks currently under development. Spent fuel transportation requirements in the post-1990 period can be met by a new generation of casks specifically designed to transport long-cooled fuel. In terms of the number of casks needed, productivity may be increased by 19% if rail cask turnaround time is reduced to 4 days from the current range of 6.5 to 8.5 days. Productivity defined as payloads per cask year could be increased 62% if the turnaround time for legal weight truck casks were reduced from 12 hours to 4 hours. On a similar basis, overweight truck casks show a 28% increase in productivity.

  1. A system architecture for long duration free floating flight for military applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Epley, L.E. (CIRRUS Aerospace Corp., Burke, VA (USA))

    1990-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Accessibility is today's space frontier. Our need for wide-band global communications, earth imaging an sensing, atmospheric measurements and military reconnaissance is endless but growing dependence on space-based systems raises concerns about potential vulnerability. Military commanders want space assets more accessible and under direct local control. As a result, a robust and low cost access to space-like capability has become a national priority. Buoyant vehicles, free floating in the middle stratosphere could provide the kind of cost effective access to space-like capability needed for a verity of missions. These vehicles are inexpensive, invisible and easily launched. Developments in payload electronics, atmospheric wind modeling and materials combined with ever-improving communications and navigation infrastructure are making balloon-borne concepts more attractive. The fundamental question is whether a free floating balloon, used in a pseudo-satellite role, has value in a military system. Flight tests are ongoing under NASA sponsorship. Following these tests NASA intends to use the vehicles for research in the Antarctic. The concept is being reviewed by other agencies interested in stratospheric research. We believe that LDFFF systems have applications in areas of communications, surveillance and other traditional satellite missions. Dialogue with the broader community of space users is needed to expand the applications. This report reviews the status of the recent flight tests and presents an overview of the concept of Long Duration Free Floating Flight for military applications. 12 refs., 13 figs.

  2. On the effects of solar storms to the decaying orbital space debris

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herdiwijaya, Dhani, E-mail: dhani@as.itb.ac.id [Astronomy Division and Bosscha Observatory, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology, Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Rachman, Abdul [Space Science Center, National Institute of Aeronautics and Space, Junjunan 133, Bandung 40173 (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Any man-made object in Earth's orbit that no longer serves a useful purpose is classified as orbital debris. Debris objects come from a variety of sources. The majority is related to satellite fragmentation. Other major sources of debris are propulsion systems, and fragmentation of spent upper stages, payload and mission related debris. Serious concern about orbital debris has been growing. Knowledge of the future debris environment is important to both satellite designers, and mission planners, who need to know what hazards a satellite might encounter during the course of its mission. Therefore, it is important to know how much debris is in orbit, where it is located, and when it will decay. The debris environment is complex and dynamically evolving. Objects of different shape and size behave differently in orbit. The geoeffectiveness space environments include solar flux at 10.7 cm, solar energetic particles flux or speed, solar wind flow pressure, electric field, and geomagnetic indices. We study the decaying orbital debris from Tracking and Impact Prediction (TIP) messages in conjuction with geoeffectiveness space environments through time epoch correlation. We found that the decaying and reentry orbital debris are triggered by space environment enhancement within at least one week before reentry. It is not necessary a transient or high energetic and severe solar storm events are needed in decaying processes. We propose that the gradual enhancement processes of space environment will cause satellite surface charging due to energetic electron and enhance drag force.

  3. SCADA Protocol Anomaly Detection Utilizing Compression (SPADUC) 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon Rueff; Lyle Roybal; Denis Vollmer

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a significant need to protect the nations energy infrastructures from malicious actors using cyber methods. Supervisory, Control, and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems may be vulnerable due to the insufficient security implemented during the design and deployment of these control systems. This is particularly true in older legacy SCADA systems that are still commonly in use. The purpose of INLs research on the SCADA Protocol Anomaly Detection Utilizing Compression (SPADUC) project was to determine if and how data compression techniques could be used to identify and protect SCADA systems from cyber attacks. Initially, the concept was centered on how to train a compression algorithm to recognize normal control system traffic versus hostile network traffic. Because large portions of the TCP/IP message traffic (called packets) are repetitive, the concept of using compression techniques to differentiate non-normal traffic was proposed. In this manner, malicious SCADA traffic could be identified at the packet level prior to completing its payload. Previous research has shown that SCADA network traffic has traits desirable for compression analysis. This work investigated three different approaches to identify malicious SCADA network traffic using compression techniques. The preliminary analyses and results presented herein are clearly able to differentiate normal from malicious network traffic at the packet level at a very high confidence level for the conditions tested. Additionally, the master dictionary approach used in this research appears to initially provide a meaningful way to categorize and compare packets within a communication channel.

  4. Engineering Challenges in Antiproton Triggered Fusion Propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassenti, Brice [Department. of Engineering and Science, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 275 Windsor Avenue, Hattford, CT 06120 (United States); Kammash, Terry [Nuclear Engineering Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    During the last decade antiproton triggered fusion propulsion has been investigated as a method for achieving high specific impulse, high thrust in a nuclear pulse propulsion system. In general the antiprotons are injected into a pellet containing fusion fuel with a small amount of fissionable material (i.e., an amount less than the critical mass) where the products from the fission are then used to trigger a fusion reaction. Initial calculations and simulations indicate that if magnetically insulated inertial confinement fusion is used that the pellets should result in a specific impulse of between 100,000 and 300,000 seconds at high thrust. The engineering challenges associated with this propulsion system are significant. For example, the antiprotons must be precisely focused. The pellet must be designed to contain the fission and initial fusion products and this will require strong magnetic fields. The fusion fuel must be contained for a sufficiently long time to effectively release the fusion energy, and the payload must be shielded from the radiation, especially the excess neutrons emitted, in addition to many other particles. We will review the recent progress, possible engineering solutions and the potential performance of these systems.

  5. Uniform Fin Sizes versus Uniform Fin Root Temperatures for Unsymmetrically Obstructed Solar Probe RTGs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schock, Alfred; Or, Chuen T; Noravian, Heros

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paper presented at the 26th IECEC, August 4-9, 1991 in Boston, MA. The Solar Probe will approach the sun within four solar radii or 0.02 AU. Because of that proximity, the spacecraft must be protected by a thermal shield. The protected umbra is a cone of 4 m diameter and 7.5 m height, and all temperature-sensitive flight components must fit within that cone. Therefore, the RTGs which power the Solar probe cannot be separated from each other and from other payload components by deploying them on long booms. They must be located near and thermally isolated from the spacecraft's paylod. This paper compares the performance of such variable-fin RTGs with that of uniform-fin RTGs. It derives the fin dimensions required for circumferential isothermicity, identifies a design that maximizes the RTGs specific power, and proves the practicality of that design option. However, detailed thermal and electrical analyses led to the somewhat surprising conclusion that (for a given thermal power) the non-uniform-fin design results in the same power output, at a higher maximum hot-junction temperature, as the standard uniform-fin design, despite the latter's nonuniform cold-junction temperatures. There are three copies in the file.

  6. The rationale/benefits of nuclear thermal rocket propulsion for NASA's lunar space transportation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borowski, S.K.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solid core nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) represents the next major evolutionary step in propulsion technology. With its attractive operating characteristics, which include high specific impulse (approximately 850-1000 s) and engine thrust-to-weight (approximately 4-20), the NTR can form the basis for an efficient lunar space transportation system (LTS) capable of supporting both piloted and cargo missions. Studies conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center indicate that an NTR-based LTS could transport a fully-fueled, cargo-laden, lunar excursion vehicle to the Moon, and return it to low Earth orbit (LEO) after mission completion, for less initial mass in LEO than an aerobraked chemical system of the type studied by NASA during its '90-Day Study.' The all-propulsive NTR-powered LTS would also be 'fully reusable' and would have a 'return payload' mass fraction of approximately 23 percent--twice that of the 'partially reusable' aerobraked chemical system. Two NTR technology options are examined--one derived from the graphite-moderated reactor concept developed by NASA and the AEC under the Rover/NERVA (Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application) programs, and a second concept, the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR). The paper also summarizes NASA's lunar outpost scenario, compares relative performance provided by different LTS concepts, and discusses important operational issues (e.g., reusability, engine 'end-of life' disposal, etc.) associated with using this important propulsion technology.

  7. Four years of operations and results with FORTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klingner, P. L. (Phillip L.); Carlson, L. D. (Leslie D.); Dingler, R. D. (Robert D.); Esch-Mosher, D. M. (Diana M.); Jacobson, A. R.; Roussel-Dupre, D. (Diane)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The FORTE (Fast Onboard Recording of Transient Events) satellite was launched on 29 August 1997 and has been in continuous operation since that time. FORTE was placed in a nearly circular, 825-km-altitude, 70 degrees inclination orbit by a Pegasus rocket funded by Air Force Space Test Program. The Department of Energy funded the FORTE satellite, which was designed and built at Los Alamos. FORTE's successful launch and engineered robustness were a result of several years of dedicated work by the joint Los Alamos National Laboratory/Sandia National Laboratory project team, led through mission definition, payload and satellite development, and launch by Dr. Stephen Knox. The project is now led by Dr. Abram Jacobson. FORTE carries a suite of instruments, an optical system and a rf system, for the study of lightning and anthropogenic signals. As a result of this effort, new understandings of lightning events have emerged as well as a more complete understanding of the relationship between optical and rf lightning events. This paper will provide an overview of the FORTE satellite and will discuss the on orbit performance of the subsystems.

  8. Safety analysis report for the TRUPACT-II shipping package (condensed version). Volume 2, Rev. 14

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This appendix determines the effective G values for payload shipping categories of contact handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste materials, based on the radiolytic G values for waste materials that are discussed in detail in Appendix 3.6.8 of the Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package. The effective G values take into account self-absorption of alpha decay energy inside particulate contamination and the fraction of energy absorbed by nongas-generating materials. As described in Appendix 3.6.8, an effective G value, G{sub eff}, is defined by: G{sub eff} - {Sigma}{sub M} (F{sub M} x G{sub M}) F{sub M}-fraction of energy absorbed by material maximum G value for a material where the sum is over all materials present inside a waste container. The G value itself is determined primarily by the chemical properties of the material and its temperature. The value of F is determined primarily by the size of the particles containing the radionuclides, the distribution of radioactivity on the various materials present inside the waste container, and the stopping distance of alpha particles in air, in the waste materials, or in the waste packaging materials.

  9. Interagency cooperation in the development of a cost-effective transportation and disposal solution for vitrified radium bearing material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.L.; Nixon, D.A.; Stone, T.J.; Tope, W.G.; Vogel, R.A. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States); Allen, R.B. [USDOE, Fernald Area Office, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Schofield, W.D. [Foster Wheeler Environmental Corp. (United States)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fernald radium bearing ore residue waste, stored within Silos 1 and 2 (K-65) and Silo 3 waste, will be vitrified for disposal at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). A comprehensive, parametric evaluation of waste form, shielding requirements, packaging, and transportation alternatives was completed to identify the safest, most cost-effective approach. The impacts of waste loading, waste form, regulatory requirements, NTS waste acceptance criteria, as-low-as-resonably-achievable principles, and material handling costs were factored into the recommended approach. Through cooperative work between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), the vitrified K-65 and Silo 3 radioactive material will be classified consistent with the regulations promulgated by DOT in the September 28, 1995 Federal Register. These new regulations adopt International Atomic Energy Agency language to promote a consistent approach for the transportation and management of radioactive material between the international community and the DOT. Use of the new regulations allows classification of the vitrified radioactive material from the Fernald silos under the designation of low specific activity-II and allows the development of a container that is optimized to maximize payload while minimizing internal void space, external surface radiation levels, and external volume. This approach minimizes the required number of containers and shipments, and the related transportation and disposal costs.

  10. NEAT, An Astrometric Telescope To Probe Planetary Systems Down To The Earth Mass Around Nearby Solar-Type Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malbet, F; Goullioud, R; Shao, M; Lagage, P -O; Cara, C; Durand, G; Feautrier, P; Jakobsson, B; Hinglais, E; Mercier, M

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NEAT (Nearby Earth Astrometric Telescope) mission is a proposition submitted to ESA for its 2010 call for M-size mission. The main scientific goal is to detect and characterize planetary systems in an exhaustive way down to 1 Earth mass in the habitable zone and further away, around nearby stars for F, G, and K spectral types. This survey would provide the actual planetary masses, the full characterization of the orbits including their inclination, for all the components of the planetary system down to that mass limit. Extremely- high-precision astrometry, in space, can detect the dynamical effect due to even low mass orbiting planets on their central star, reaching those scientific goals. NEAT will continue the work performed by Hipparcos (1mas precision) and Gaia (7{\\mu}as aimed) by reaching a precision that is improved by two orders of magnitude (0.05{\\mu}as, 1{\\sigma} accuracy). The two modules of the payload, the telescope and the focal plane, must be placed 40m away leading to a formation flying opt...

  11. How to implement decoy-state quantum key distribution for a satellite uplink with 50-dB channel loss

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer-Scott, Evan; Yan, Zhizhong; MacDonald, Allison; Bourgoin, Jean-Philippe; Huebel, Hannes; Jennewein, Thomas [Institute for Quantum Computing, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue W, Waterloo ON, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) takes advantage of fundamental properties of quantum physics to allow two distant parties to share a secret key; however, QKD is hampered by a distance limitation of a few hundred kilometers on Earth. The most immediate solution for global coverage is to use a satellite, which can receive separate QKD transmissions from two or more ground stations and act as a trusted node to link these ground stations. In this article we report on a system capable of performing QKD in the high loss regime expected in an uplink to a satellite using weak coherent pulses and decoy states. Such a scenario profits from the simplicity of its receiver payload, but has so far been considered to be infeasible due to very high transmission losses (40-50 dB). The high loss is overcome by implementing an innovative photon source and advanced timing analysis. Our system handles up to 57 dB photon loss in the infinite key limit, confirming the viability of the satellite uplink scenario. We emphasize that while this system was designed with a satellite uplink in mind, it could just as easily overcome high losses on any free space QKD link.

  12. Proton irradiation effect on SCDs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan-Ji Yang; Jing-Bin Lu; Yu-Sa Wang; Yong Chen; Yu-Peng Xu; Wei-Wei Cui; Wei Li; Zheng-Wei Li; Mao-Shun Li; Xiao-Yan Liu; Juan Wang; Da-Wei Han; Tian-Xiang Chen; Cheng-Kui Li; Jia Huo; Wei Hu; Yi Zhang; Bo Lu; Yue Zhu; Ke-Yan Ma; Di Wu; Yan Liu; Zi-Liang Zhang; Guo-He Yin; Yu Wang

    2014-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Low Energy X-ray Telescope is a main payload on the Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope satellite. The swept charge device is selected for the Low Energy X-ray Telescope. As swept charge devices are sensitive to proton irradiation, irradiation test was carried out on the HI-13 accelerator at the China Institute of Atomic Energy. The beam energy was measured to be 10 MeV at the SCD. The proton fluence delivered to the SCD was $3\\times10^{8}\\mathrm{protons}/\\mathrm{cm}^{2}$ over two hours. It is concluded that the proton irradiation affects both the dark current and the charge transfer inefficiency of the SCD through comparing the performance both before and after the irradiation. The energy resolution of the proton-irradiated SCD is 212 eV@5.9 keV at $-60\\,^{\\circ}\\mathrm{C}$, while it before irradiated is 134 eV. Moreover, better performance can be reached by lowering the operating temperature of the SCD on orbit.

  13. Midwestern High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Project. Highway infrastructure report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sattler, L.R.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In addition to arranging for storage and disposal of radioactive waste, the US Department of Energy (DOE) must develop a safe and efficient transportation system in order to deliver the material that has accumulated at various sites throughout the country. The ability to transport radioactive waste safely has been demonstrated during the past 20 years: DOE has made over 2,000 shipments of spent fuel and other wastes without any fatalities or environmental damage related to the radioactive nature of the cargo. To guarantee the efficiency of the transportation system, DOE must determine the optimal combination of rail transport (which allows greater payloads but requires special facilities) and truck transport Utilizing trucks, in turn, calls for decisions as to when to use legal weight trucks or, if feasible, overweight trucks for fewer but larger shipments. As part of the transportation system, the Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) study contributes to DOE`s development of transportation plans for specific facilities. This study evaluates the ability of different facilities to receive, load and ship the special casks in which radioactive materials will be housed during transport In addition, the DOE`s Near-Site Transportation Infrastructure (NSTI) study (forthcoming) will evaluate the rail, road and barge access to 76 reactor sites from which DOE is obligated to begin accepting spent fuel in 1998. The NSTI study will also assess the existing capabilities of each transportation mode and route, including the potential for upgrade.

  14. Improvements in Hanford TRU Program Utilizing Systems Modeling and Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baynes, P.A.; Bailey, K.B.; McKenney, D.E. [Fluor Hanford, Inc., Richland, WA (United States); Uytioco, E. [Fluor Government Group, Richland, WA (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hanford's Transuranic (TRU) Program is responsible for certifying contact-handled (CH) TRU waste and shipping the certified waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Hanford's CH TRU waste includes material that is in retrievable storage as well as above ground storage, and newly generated waste. Certifying a typical container entails retrieving and then characterizing it (Non-Destructive Examination [NDE], Non-Destructive Assay [NDA], and Head Space Gas Sampling [HSG]), validating records (data review and reconciliation), and designating the container for a payload. The certified payload is then shipped to WIPP. Systems modeling and analysis techniques were applied to Hanford's TRU Program to help streamline the certification process and increase shipping rates. The modeling and analysis yields several benefits: - Maintains visibility on system performance and predicts downstream consequences of production issues. - Predicts future system performance with higher confidence, based on tracking past performance. - Applies speculation analyses to determine the impact of proposed changes (e.g., apparent shortage of feed should not be used as basis to reassign personnel if more feed is coming in the queue). - Positively identifies the appropriate queue for all containers (e.g., discovered several containers that were not actively being worked because they were in the wrong 'physical' location - method used previously for queuing up containers). - Identifies anomalies with the various data systems used to track inventory (e.g., dimensional differences for Standard Waste Boxes). A model of the TRU Program certification process was created using custom queries of the multiple databases for managing waste containers. The model was developed using a simplified process chart based on the expected path for a typical container. The process chart was augmented with the remediation path for containers that do not meet acceptance criteria for WIPP. Containers are sorted into queues based on their current status in the process. A container can be in only one queue at any given time. Existing data systems are queried to establish the quantity of containers in each queue on any given day. This sets the amount of feed available that is then modeled to be processed according to the daily production plans. The daily production plans were created by identifying the equipment necessary and the staff that performs each process step, and determining the expected production rate for each step. Production performance is monitored on a weekly basis with Project senior staff to establish a total operating efficiency (TOE) for each step (comparing actual performance to production capacity). The unit operations were modeled to be constrained by each day's feed queue plus the performance of the preceding step. The TOE for each unit operation was applied to an integrated model to determine bottlenecks and identify areas for improvement. All of the steps were linked to predict future system performance based on available feed and integrated system-level TOE. It has been determined that at times sub-optimization of a particular unit operation is necessary to ensure the system remains balanced (e.g., having excess capacity in assay does no good if there is no feed available because the real-time radiography [RTR] is working at half capacity). Several recommendations have been provided to the Project management team resulting in improvements in the performance of TRU certification activities by Hanford's TRU Program. (authors)

  15. Small Fast Spectrum Reactor Designs Suitable for Direct Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce G. Schnitzler; Stanley K. Borowski

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advancement of U.S. scientific, security, and economic interests through a robust space exploration program requires high performance propulsion systems to support a variety of robotic and crewed missions beyond low Earth orbit. Past studies, in particular those in support of both the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) and Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), have shown nuclear thermal propulsion systems provide superior performance for high mass high propulsive delta-V missions. The recent NASA Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 Study re-examined mission, payload, and transportation system requirements for a human Mars landing mission in the post-2030 timeframe. Nuclear thermal propulsion was again identified as the preferred in-space transportation system. A common nuclear thermal propulsion stage with three 25,000-lbf thrust engines was used for all primary mission maneuvers. Moderately lower thrust engines may also have important roles. In particular, lower thrust engine designs demonstrating the critical technologies that are directly extensible to other thrust levels are attractive from a ground testing perspective. An extensive nuclear thermal rocket technology development effort was conducted from 1955-1973 under the Rover/NERVA Program. Both graphite and refractory metal alloy fuel types were pursued. Reactors and engines employing graphite based fuels were designed, built and ground tested. A number of fast spectrum reactor and engine designs employing refractory metal alloy fuel types were proposed and designed, but none were built. The Small Nuclear Rocket Engine (SNRE) was the last engine design studied by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during the program. At the time, this engine was a state-of-the-art graphite based fuel design incorporating lessons learned from the very successful technology development program. The SNRE was a nominal 16,000-lbf thrust engine originally intended for unmanned applications with relatively short engine operations and the engine and stage design were constrained to fit within the payload volume of the then planned space shuttle. The SNRE core design utilized hexagonal fuel elements and hexagonal structural support elements. The total number of elements can be varied to achieve engine designs of higher or lower thrust levels. Some variation in the ratio of fuel elements to structural elements is also possible. Options for SNRE-based engine designs in the 25,000-lbf thrust range were described in a recent (2010) Joint Propulsion Conference paper. The reported designs met or exceeded the performance characteristics baselined in the DRA 5.0 Study. Lower thrust SNRE-based designs were also described in a recent (2011) Joint Propulsion Conference paper. Recent activities have included parallel evaluation and design efforts on fast spectrum engines employing refractory metal alloy fuels. These efforts include evaluation of both heritage designs from the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and General Electric Company GE-710 Programs as well as more recent designs. Results are presented for a number of not-yet optimized fast spectrum engine options.

  16. Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the waste acceptance criteria applicable to the transportation, storage, and disposal of contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). These criteria serve as the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) primary directive for ensuring that CH-TRU waste is managed and disposed of in a manner that protects human health and safety and the environment.The authorization basis of WIPP for the disposal of CH-TRU waste includes the U.S.Department of Energy National Security and Military Applications of Nuclear EnergyAuthorization Act of 1980 (reference 1) and the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA;reference 2). Included in this document are the requirements and associated criteriaimposed by these acts and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA,reference 3), as amended, on the CH-TRU waste destined for disposal at WIPP.|The DOE TRU waste sites must certify CH-TRU waste payload containers to thecontact-handled waste acceptance criteria (CH-WAC) identified in this document. Asshown in figure 1.0, the flow-down of applicable requirements to the CH-WAC istraceable to several higher-tier documents, including the WIPP operational safetyrequirements derived from the WIPP CH Documented Safety Analysis (CH-DSA;reference 4), the transportation requirements for CH-TRU wastes derived from theTransuranic Package Transporter-Model II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT Certificates ofCompliance (references 5 and 5a), the WIPP LWA (reference 2), the WIPP HazardousWaste Facility Permit (reference 6), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency(EPA) Compliance Certification Decision and approval for PCB disposal (references 7,34, 35, 36, and 37). The solid arrows shown in figure 1.0 represent the flow-down of allapplicable payload container-based requirements. The two dotted arrows shown infigure 1.0 represent the flow-down of summary level requirements only; i.e., the sitesmust reference the regulatory source documents from the U.S. Nuclear RegulatoryCommission (NRC) and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) for acomprehensive and detailed listing of the requirements.This CH-WAC does not address the subject of waste characterization relating to adetermination of whether the waste is hazardous; rather, the sites are referred to theWaste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit fordetails of the sampling and analysis protocols to be used in determining compliance withthe required physical and chemical properties of the waste. Requirements andassociated criteria pertaining to a determination of the radiological properties of thewaste, however, are addressed in appendix A of this document. The collectiveinformation obtained from waste characterization records and acceptable knowledge(AK) serves as the basis for sites to certify that their CH-TRU waste satisfies the WIPPwaste acceptance criteria listed herein.

  17. Advances in technology for the construction of deep-underground facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The workshop was organized in order to address technological issues important to decisions regarding the feasibility of strategic options. The objectives of the workshop were to establish the current technological capabilities for deep-underground construction, to project those capabilities through the compressed schedule proposed for construction, and to identify promising directions for timely allocation of existing research and development resources. The earth has been used as a means of protection and safekeeping for many centuries. Recently, the thickness of the earth cover required for this purpose has been extended to the 2,000- to 3,000-ft range in structures contemplated for nuclear-waste disposal, energy storage, and strategic systems. For defensive missile basing, it is now perceived that the magnitude of the threat has increased through better delivery systems, larger payloads, and variable tactics of attack. Thus, depths of 3,000 to 8,000 ft are being considered seriously for such facilities. Moreover, it appears desirable that the facilities be operational (if not totally complete) for defensive purposes within a five-year construction schedule. Deep excavations such as mines are similar in many respects to nearsurface tunnels and caverns for transit, rail, sewer, water, hydroelectric, and highway projects. But the differences that do exist are significant. Major distinctions between shallow and deep construction derive from the stress fields and behavior of earth materials around the openings. Different methodologies are required to accommodate other variations resulting from increased depth, such as elevated temperatures, reduced capability for site exploration, and limited access during project execution. This report addresses these and other questions devoted to geotechnical characterization, design, construction, and excavation equipment.

  18. GAISUS-1 thermionic converter for the integrated solar upper stage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Begg, L.L.; Heffernan, T.F.; Horner, M.H. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) system is a compact orbital transfer vehicle which generates thrust to boost payloads from LEO to higher orbits. It does this by collecting and concentrating solar flux into a sensible thermal storage, graphite receiver which is used to heat hydrogen propellant to temperatures of up to 2500 K. The ISUS receiver also radiates heat into an array of thermionic converters which produce electrical power. The GAISUS-1 thermionic converter is a first generation planar converter designed to produce electrical power when coupled with the ISUS receiver. GAISUS-1 will deliver over 31 W{sub e} at 1900 K. A wrought Re hotshoe accepts radiant heat from the receiver. The back side of the hotshoe forms the emitting surface of the converter. Special attention was paid to optimize the electrical and thermal losses experienced through the sleeve. Triple and single sleeve geometries were thermally modeled and evaluated, resulting in the selection of a single sleeve design. A high temperature metal/ceramic seal isolates the emitter sleeve from the collector. A Nb collector is used and is an integral part of a Nb/Na heat pipe. The heat pipe transports reject heat from the collector surface to a thermal radiator (condenser) portion of the heat pipe. The converter utilizes an integral graphite Cs reservoir. This type of reservoir automatically produces a rise in Cs pressure in response to a rise in emitter/collector temperatures. This Cs pressure feedback mechanism insures adequate Cs coverage of the emitter over a broad range of operating conditions (temperatures).

  19. Operations of a Radioisotope-based Propulsion System Enabling CubeSat Exploration of the Outer Planets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Steven Howe; Nathan Jerred; Troy Howe; Adarsh Rajguru

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exploration to the outer planets is an ongoing endeavor but in the current economical environment, cost reduction is the forefront of all concern. The success of small satellites such as CubeSats launched to Near-Earth Orbit has lead to examine their potential use to achieve cheaper science for deep space applications. However, to achieve lower cost missions; hardware, launch and operations costs must be minimized. Additionally, as we push towards smaller exploration beds with relative limited power sources, allowing for adequate communication back to Earth is imperative. Researchers at the Center for Space Nuclear Research are developing the potential of utilizing an advanced, radioisotope-based system. This system will be capable of providing both the propulsion power needed to reach the destination and the additional requirements needed to maintain communication while at location. Presented here are a basic trajectory analysis, communication link budget and concept of operations of a dual-mode (thermal and electric) radioisotope-based propulsion system, for a proposed mission to Enceladus (Saturnian icy moon) using a 6U CubeSat payload. The radioisotope system being proposed will be the integration of three sub-systems working together to achieve the overall mission. At the core of the system, stored thermal energy from radioisotope decay is transferred to a passing propellant to achieve high thrust useful for quick orbital maneuvering. An auxiliary closed-loop Brayton cycle can be operated in parallel to the thrusting mode to provide short bursts of high power for high data-rate communications back to Earth. Additionally, a thermal photovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion system will use radiation heat losses from the core. This in turn can provide the electrical energy needed to utilize the efficiency of ion propulsion to achieve quick interplanetary transit times. The intelligent operation to handle all functions of this system under optimized conditions adds to the complexity of the mission architecture.

  20. Incentives for the use of depleted uranium alloys as transport cask containment structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McConnell, P [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Salzbrenner, R; Wellman, G W; Sorenson, K B [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive material transport casks use either lead or depleted uranium (DU) as gamma-ray shielding material. Stainless steel is conventionally used for structural containment. If a DU alloy had sufficient properties to guarantee resistance to failure during both nominal use and accident conditions to serve the dual-role of shielding and containment, the use of other structure materials (i.e., stainless steel) could be reduced. (It is recognized that lead can play no structural role.) Significant reductions in cask weight and dimensions could then be achieved perhaps allowing an increase in payload. The mechanical response of depleted uranium has previously not been included in calculations intended to show that DU-shielded transport casks will maintain their containment function during all conditions. This paper describesa two-part study of depleted uranium alloys: First, the mechanical behavior of DU alloys was determined in order to extend the limited set of mechanical properties reported in the literature. The mechanical properties measured include the tensile behavior the impact energy. Fracture toughness testing was also performed to determine the sensitivity of DU alloys to brittle fracture. Fracture toughness is the inherent material property which quantifies the fracmm resistance of a material. Tensile strength and ductility are significant in terms of other failure modes, however, as win be discussed. These mechanical properties were then input into finite element calculations of cask response to loading conditions to quantify the potential for claiming structural credit for DU. (The term structural credit'' describes whether a material has adequate properties to allow it to assume a positive role in withstanding structural loadings.)

  1. Development of a container for the transportation and storage of plutonium bearing materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Geinitz, R.; Thorp, D. [Safe Sites of Colorado, Golden, CO (United States); Rivera, M. [Los Alamos Technology Associates, Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a large backlog of plutonium contaminated materials at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site near Denver, Colorado, USA. The clean-up of this site requires this material to be packaged in such a way as to allow for efficient transportation to other sites or to a permanent geologic repository. Prior to off-site shipment of the material, it may be stored on-site for a period of time. For this reason, it is desirable to have a container capable of meeting the requirements for storage as well as the requirements for transportation. Most of the off-site transportation is envisioned to take place using the TRUPACT-II Type B package, with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) as the destination. Prior to the development of this new container, the TRUPACT-II had a limit of 325 FGE (fissile gram equivalents) of plutonium due to criticality control concerns. Because of the relatively high plutonium content in the material to be transported, transporting 325 FGE per TRUPACT-II is uneconomical. Thus, the purpose of the new containers is to provide criticality control to increase the allowed TRUPACT-II payload and to provide a safe method for on-site storage prior to transport. This paper will describe the analysis and testing used to demonstrate that the Pipe Overpack Container provides safe on-site storage of plutonium bearing materials in unhardened buildings and provides criticality control during transportation within the TRUPACT-II. Analyses included worst-case criticality analyses, analyses of fork-lift time impacts, and analyses of roof structure collapse onto the container. Testing included dynamic crush tests, bare pipe impact tests, a 30-minute totally engulfing pool-fire test, and multiple package impact tests in end-on and side-on orientations.

  2. The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx): Goals, platforms, and field operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, R.; Springston, S.; Mechoso, C. R.; Bretherton, C. S.; A.Weller, R.; Huebert, B.; Straneo, F.; Albrecht, B. A.; Coe, H.; Allen, G.; Vaughan, G.; Daum, P.; Fairall, C.; Chand, D.; Klenner, L. G.; Garreaud, R.; Grados, C.; Covert, D. S.; Bates, T. S.; Krejci, R.; Russell, L. M.; Szoeke, S. d.; Brewer, A.; Yuter, S. E.; Chaigneau, A.; Toniazzo, T.; Minnis, P.; Palikonda, R.; Abel, S. J.; Brown, W. O. J.; Williams, S.; Fochesatto, J.; Brioude, J.; Bower, K. N

    2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) was an international field program designed to make observations of poorly understood but critical components of the coupled climate system of the southeast Pacific. This region is characterized by strong coastal upwelling, the coolest SSTs in the tropical belt, and is home to the largest subtropical stratocumulus deck on Earth. The field intensive phase of VOCALS-REx took place during October and November 2008 and constitutes a critical part of a broader CLIVAR program (VOCALS) designed to develop and promote scientific activities leading to improved understanding, model simulations, and predictions of the southeastern Pacific (SEP) coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system, on diurnal to interannual timescales. The other major components of VOCALS are a modeling program with a model hierarchy ranging from the local to global scales, and a suite of extended observations from regular research cruises, instrumented moorings, and satellites. The two central themes of VOCALS-REx focus upon (a) links between aerosols, clouds and precipitation and their impacts on marine stratocumulus radiative properties, and (b) physical and chemical couplings between the upper ocean and the lower atmosphere, including the role that mesoscale ocean eddies play. A set of hypotheses designed to be tested with the combined field, monitoring and modeling work in VOCALS is presented here. A further goal of VOCALS-REx is to provide datasets for the evaluation and improvement of large-scale numerical models. VOCALS-REx involved five research aircraft, two ships and two surface sites in northern Chile. We describe the instrument payloads and key mission strategies for these platforms and give a summary of the missions conducted.

  3. Optimization of a CNG series hybrid concept vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aceves, S.M.; Smith, J.R.; Perkins, L.J.; Haney, S.W.; Flowers, D.L.

    1995-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) has favorable characteristics as a vehicular fuel, in terms of fuel economy as well as emissions. Using CNG as a fuel in a series hybrid vehicle has the potential of resulting in very high fuel economy (between 26 and 30 km/liter, 60 to 70 mpg) and very low emissions (substantially lower than Federal Tier II or CARB ULEV). This paper uses a vehicle evaluation code and an optimizer to find a set of vehicle parameters that result in optimum vehicle fuel economy. The vehicle evaluation code used in this analysis estimates vehicle power performance, including engine efficiency and power, generator efficiency, energy storage device efficiency and state-of-charge, and motor and transmission efficiencies. Eight vehicle parameters are selected as free variables for the optimization. The optimum vehicle must also meet two perfect requirements: accelerate to 97 km/h in less than 10 s, and climb an infinitely long hill with a 6% slope at 97 km/h with a 272 kg (600 lb.) payload. The optimizer used in this work was originally developed in the magnetic fusion energy program, and has been used to optimize complex systems, such as magnetic and inertial fusion devices, neutron sources, and mil guns. The optimizer consists of two parts: an optimization package for minimizing non-linear functions of many variables subject to several non-linear equality and/or inequality constraints and a programmable shell that allows interactive configuration and execution of the optimizer. The results of the analysis indicate that the CNG series hybrid vehicle has a high efficiency and low emissions. These results emphasize the advantages of CNG as a near-term alternative fuel for vehicles.

  4. An intelligent inspection and survey robot. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ARIES {number_sign}1 (Autonomous Robotic Inspection Experimental System), has been developed for the Department of Energy to survey and inspect drums containing low-level radioactive waste stored in warehouses at DOE facilities. The drums are typically stacked four high and arranged in rows with three-foot aisle widths. The robot will navigate through the aisles and perform an inspection operation, typically performed by a human operator, making decisions about the condition of the drums and maintaining a database of pertinent information about each drum. A new version of the Cybermotion series of mobile robots is the base mobile vehicle for ARIES. The new Model K3A consists of an improved and enhanced mobile platform and a new turret that will permit turning around in a three-foot aisle. Advanced sonar and lidar systems were added to improve navigation in the narrow drum aisles. Onboard computer enhancements include a VMEbus computer system running the VxWorks real-time operating system. A graphical offboard supervisory UNIX workstation is used for high-level planning, control, monitoring, and reporting. A camera positioning system (CPS) includes primitive instructions for the robot to use in referencing and positioning the payload. The CPS retracts to a more compact position when traveling in the open warehouse. During inspection, the CPS extends up to deploy inspection packages at different heights on the four-drum stacks of 55-, 85-, and 110-gallon drums. The vision inspection module performs a visual inspection of the waste drums. This system will locate and identify each drum, locate any unique visual features, characterize relevant surface features of interest and update a data-base containing the inspection data.

  5. X-RED: A Satellite Mission Concept To Detect Early Universe Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirko Krumpe; Deirdre Coffey; Georg Egger; Francesc Vilardell; Karolien Lefever; Adriane Liermann; Agnes I. D. Hoffmann; Joerg Steiper; Marc Cherix; Simon Albrecht; Pedro Russo; Thomas Strodl; Rurik Wahlin; Pieter Deroo; Arvind Parmar; Niels Lund; Guenther Hasinger

    2005-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma ray bursts (GRBs) are the most energetic eruptions known in the Universe. Instruments such as Compton-GRO/BATSE and the GRB monitor on BeppoSAX have detected more than 2700 GRBs and, although observational confirmation is still required, it is now generally accepted that many of these bursts are associated with the collapse of rapidly spinning massive stars to form black holes. Consequently, since first generation stars are expected to be very massive, GRBs are likely to have occurred in significant numbers at early epochs. X-red is a space mission concept designed to detect these extremely high redshifted GRBs, in order to probe the nature of the first generation of stars and hence the time of reionisation of the early Universe. We demonstrate that the gamma and x-ray luminosities of typical GRBs render them detectable up to extremely high redshifts (z~10-30), but that current missions such as HETE2 and SWIFT operate outside the observational range for detection of high redshift GRB afterglows. Therefore, to redress this, we present a complete mission design from the science case to the mission architecture and payload, the latter comprising three instruments, namely wide field x-ray cameras to detect high redshift gamma-rays, an x-ray focussing telescope to determine accurate coordinates and extract spectra, and an infrared spectrograph to observe the high redshift optical afterglow. The mission is expected to detect and identify for the first time GRBs with z > 10, thereby providing constraints on properties of the first generation of stars and the history of the early Universe.

  6. Multi Megawatt Power System Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Longhurst, Glen Reed; Harvego, Edwin Allan; Schnitzler, Bruce Gordon; Seifert, Gary Dean; Sharpe, John Phillip; Verrill, Donald Alan; Watts, Kenneth Donald; Parks, Benjamin Travis

    2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Missions to the outer planets or to near-by planets requiring short times and/or increased payload carrying capability will benefit from nuclear power. A concept study was undertaken to evaluate options for a multi-megawatt power source for nuclear electric propulsion. The nominal electric power requirement was set at 15 MWe with an assumed mission profile of 120 days at full power, 60 days in hot standby, and another 120 days of full power, repeated several times for 7 years of service. Of the numerous options considered, two that appeared to have the greatest promise were a gas-cooled reactor based on the NERVA Derivative design, operating a closed cycle Brayton power conversion system; and a molten lithium-cooled reactor based on SP-100 technology, driving a boiling potassium Rankine power conversion system. This study examined the relative merits of these two systems, seeking to optimize the specific mass. Conclusions were that either concept appeared capable of approaching the specific mass goal of 3-5 kg/kWe estimated to be needed for this class of mission, though neither could be realized without substantial development in reactor fuels technology, thermal radiator mass efficiency, and power conversion and distribution electronics and systems capable of operating at high temperatures. Though the gas-Brayton systems showed an apparent advantage in specific mass, differences in the degree of conservatism inherent in the models used suggests expectations for the two approaches may be similar. Brayton systems eliminate the need to deal with two-phase flows in the microgravity environment of space.

  7. Hydraulic manipulator design, analysis, and control at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kress, R.L.; Jansen, J.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Robotics and Process Systems Div.; Love, L.J. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States); Basher, A.M.H. [South Carolina State Univ., Orangeburg, SC (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To meet the increased payload capacities demanded by present-day tasks, manipulator designers have turned to hydraulics as a means of actuation. Hydraulics have always been the actuator of choice when designing heavy-life construction and mining equipment such as bulldozers, backhoes, and tunneling devices. In order to successfully design, build, and deploy a new hydraulic manipulator (or subsystem) sophisticated modeling, analysis, and control experiments are usually needed. To support the development and deployment of new hydraulic manipulators Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has outfitted a significant experimental laboratory and has developed the software capability for research into hydraulic manipulators, hydraulic actuators, hydraulic systems, modeling of hydraulic systems, and hydraulic controls. The hydraulics laboratory at ORNL has three different manipulators. First is a 6-Degree-of-Freedom (6-DoF), multi-planer, teleoperated, flexible controls test bed used for the development of waste tank clean-up manipulator controls, thermal studies, system characterization, and manipulator tracking. Finally, is a human amplifier test bed used for the development of an entire new class of teleoperated systems. To compliment the hardware in the hydraulics laboratory, ORNL has developed a hydraulics simulation capability including a custom package to model the hydraulic systems and manipulators for performance studies and control development. This paper outlines the history of hydraulic manipulator developments at ORNL, describes the hydraulics laboratory, discusses the use of the equipment within the laboratory, and presents some of the initial results from experiments and modeling associated with these hydraulic manipulators. Included are some of the results from the development of the human amplifier/de-amplifier concepts, the characterization of the thermal sensitivity of hydraulic systems, and end-point tracking accuracy studies. Experimental and analytical results are included.

  8. Nuclear space power and propulsion requirements and issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swerdling, M. [IR Associates, North Hills, CA (United States); Isenberg, L. [IR Associates, La Habra, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of nuclear power in space is going through a low point. The kinds of missions that would use nuclear power are expensive and there are few new expensive missions. Both NASA and DoD are in a mode of cheaper, faster, better, which means using what is available as much as possible and only incorporating new technology to reduce mission cost. NASA is performing Mission to Planet Earth and detailed exploration missions of Mars. These NASA missions can be done with solar-battery power subsystems and there is no need for nuclear power. The NASA mission to Pluto does require nuclear radioisotope power. Ways to reduce the power subsystem cost and the power level are being investigated. NASA is studying ways to explore beyond Mars with solar-battery power because of the cost and uncertainty in the availability and launchability of nuclear space power systems. The DoD missions are all in earth orbit and can be done with solar-battery systems. The major DoD requirement at present is to reduce costs of all their space missions. One way to do this is to develop highly efficient upper stage boosters that can be integrated with lower cost Earth to low orbit stages and still place their payloads in to higher orbits. One attractive upper stage is a nuclear bimodal (propulsion and power) engine to accomplished lower booster cost to place space assets in GEO. However this is not being pursued because of DOE`s new policy not to fund nuclear space power research and development as well as the difficulty in obtaining launch approval for nuclear propulsion and power systems.

  9. Life-cycle analysis of alternative aviation fuels in GREET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elgowainy, A.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Carter, N.; Stratton, R.; Hileman, J.; Malwitz, A.; Balasubramanian, S. (Energy Systems)

    2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, has been expanded to include well-to-wake (WTWa) analysis of aviation fuels and aircraft. This report documents the key WTWa stages and assumptions for fuels that represent alternatives to petroleum jet fuel. The aviation module in GREET consists of three spreadsheets that present detailed characterizations of well-to-pump and pump-to-wake parameters and WTWa results. By using the expanded GREET version (GREET1{_}2011), we estimate WTWa results for energy use (total, fossil, and petroleum energy) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide) for (1) each unit of energy (lower heating value) consumed by the aircraft or (2) each unit of distance traveled/ payload carried by the aircraft. The fuel pathways considered in this analysis include petroleum-based jet fuel from conventional and unconventional sources (i.e., oil sands); Fisher-Tropsch (FT) jet fuel from natural gas, coal, and biomass; bio-jet fuel from fast pyrolysis of cellulosic biomass; and bio-jet fuel from vegetable and algal oils, which falls under the American Society for Testing and Materials category of hydroprocessed esters and fatty acids. For aircraft operation, we considered six passenger aircraft classes and four freight aircraft classes in this analysis. Our analysis revealed that, depending on the feedstock source, the fuel conversion technology, and the allocation or displacement credit methodology applied to co-products, alternative bio-jet fuel pathways have the potential to reduce life-cycle GHG emissions by 55-85 percent compared with conventional (petroleum-based) jet fuel. Although producing FT jet fuel from fossil feedstock sources - such as natural gas and coal - could greatly reduce dependence on crude oil, production from such sources (especially coal) produces greater WTWa GHG emissions compared with petroleum jet fuel production unless carbon management practices, such as carbon capture and storage, are used.

  10. Enrichment Zoning Options for the Small Nuclear Rocket Engine (SNRE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce G. Schnitzler; Stanley K. Borowski

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advancement of U.S. scientific, security, and economic interests through a robust space exploration program requires high performance propulsion systems to support a variety of robotic and crewed missions beyond low Earth orbit. In NASAs recent Mars Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 study (NASA-SP-2009-566, July 2009), nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) was again selected over chemical propulsion as the preferred in-space transportation system option because of its high thrust and high specific impulse (-900 s) capability, increased tolerance to payload mass growth and architecture changes, and lower total initial mass in low Earth orbit. An extensive nuclear thermal rocket technology development effort was conducted from 1955-1973 under the Rover/NERVA Program. The Small Nuclear Rocket Engine (SNRE) was the last engine design studied by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during the program. At the time, this engine was a state-of-the-art design incorporating lessons learned from the very successful technology development program. Past activities at the NASA Glenn Research Center have included development of highly detailed MCNP Monte Carlo transport models of the SNRE and other small engine designs. Preliminary core configurations typically employ fuel elements with fixed fuel composition and fissile material enrichment. Uniform fuel loadings result in undesirable radial power and temperature profiles in the engines. Engine performance can be improved by some combination of propellant flow control at the fuel element level and by varying the fuel composition. Enrichment zoning at the fuel element level with lower enrichments in the higher power elements at the core center and on the core periphery is particularly effective. Power flattening by enrichment zoning typically results in more uniform propellant exit temperatures and improved engine performance. For the SNRE, element enrichment zoning provided very flat radial power profiles with 551 of the 564 fuel elements within 1% of the average element power. Results for this and alternate enrichment zoning options for the SNRE are compared.

  11. Overview of Requirements for Using Overweight Vehicles to Ship Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thrower, A.W. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Washington, DC (United States); Offner, J. [Booz Allen Hamilton, Washington, DC (United States); Bolton, P. [Booz Allen Hamilton, Santa Fe, NM (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Final Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada, considered a range of options for transportation. In evaluating the impacts of the mostly-legal weight truck scenario, DOE assumed that some shipments would use overweight trucks. The use of overweight trucks is also considered in the Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada, issued for public comment in Fall 2007. With the exception of permit requirements and operating restrictions, the vehicles for overweight shipments would be similar to legal-weight truck shipments but might weigh as much as 52,200 kilograms (115,000 pounds). The use of overweight trucks was determined to be acceptable for the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program because the payload is not divisible and the packaging alone may make shipments overweight. Overweight truck shipments are common, and states routinely issue overweight permits, some for vehicles with a gross vehicle weight up to 58,500 kilograms (129,000 pounds). This paper will present an overview of state overweight truck permitting policies and national and regional approaches to promote safety and uniformity. In conclusion: Overweight truck shipments are made routinely by carriers throughout the country. State permits are obtained by the carriers or by companies that provide permitting services to the carriers. While varying state permit restrictions may add complexity to OCRWM's planning activities, the well-established experience of commercial carriers and efforts to bring uniformity to the permitting process should allow the overweight shipment of SNF to be a viable option. (authors)

  12. Best Practices for Finite Element Analysis of Spent Nuclear Fuel Transfer, Storage, and Transportation Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bajwa, Christopher S.; Piotter, Jason; Cuta, Judith M.; Adkins, Harold E.; Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.; Fort, James A.; Suffield, Sarah R.

    2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Storage casks and transportation packages for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) are designed to confine SNF in sealed canisters or casks, provide structural integrity during accidents, and remove decay through a storage or transportation overpack. The transfer, storage, and transportation of SNF in dry storage casks and transport packages is regulated under 10 CFR Part 72 and 10 CFR Part 71, respectively. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is used with increasing frequency in Safety Analysis Reports and other regulatory technical evaluations related to SNF casks and packages and their associated systems. Advances in computing power have made increasingly sophisticated FEA models more feasible, and as a result, the need for careful review of such models has also increased. This paper identifies best practice recommendations that stem from recent NRC review experience. The scope covers issues common to all commercially available FEA software, and the recommendations are applicable to any FEA software package. Three specific topics are addressed: general FEA practices, issues specific to thermal analyses, and issues specific to structural analyses. General FEA practices covers appropriate documentation of the model and results, which is important for an efficient review process. The thermal analysis best practices are related to cask analysis for steady state conditions and transient scenarios. The structural analysis best practices are related to the analysis of casks and associated payload during standard handling and drop scenarios. The best practices described in this paper are intended to identify FEA modeling issues and provide insights that can help minimize associated uncertainties and errors, in order to facilitate the NRC licensing review process.

  13. Integrating end-to-end encryption and authentication technology into broadband networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierson, L.G.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BISDN services will involve the integration of high speed data, voice, and video functionality delivered via technology similar to Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) switching and SONET optical transmission systems. Customers of BISDN services may need a variety of data authenticity and privacy assurances, via Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) services Cryptographic methods can be used to assure authenticity and privacy, but are hard to scale for implementation at high speed. The incorporation of these methods into computer networks can severely impact functionality, reliability, and performance. While there are many design issues associated with the serving of public keys for authenticated signaling and for establishment of session cryptovariables, this paper is concerned with the impact of encryption itself on such communications once the signaling and setup have been completed. Network security protections should be carefully matched to the threats against which protection is desired. Even after eliminating unnecessary protections, the remaining customer-required network security protections can impose severe performance penalties. These penalties (further discussed below) usually involve increased communication processing for authentication or encryption, increased error rate, increased communication delay, and decreased reliability/availability. Protection measures involving encryption should be carefully engineered so as to impose the least performance, reliability, and functionality penalties, while achieving the required security protection. To study these trade-offs, a prototype encryptor/decryptor was developed. This effort demonstrated the viability of implementing certain encryption techniques in high speed networks. The research prototype processes ATM cells in a SONET OC-3 payload. This paper describes the functionality, reliability, security, and performance design trade-offs investigated with the prototype.

  14. Lamellar crystalline self-assembly behaviour and solid lipid nanoparticles of a palmityl prodrug analogue of Capecitabine?A chemotherapy agent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong, Xiaojuan; Moghaddam, Minoo J.; Sagnella, Sharon M.; Conn, Charlotte E.; Danon, Stephen J.; Waddington, Lynne J.; Drummond, Calum J. (CSIRO/MSE)

    2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An amphiphile prodrug, 5'-deoxy-5-fluoro-N{sup 4}-(palmityloxycarbonyl) cytidine or 5'-deoxy-5-fluoro-N{sup 4}-(hexadecanaloxycarbonyl) cytidine (5-FCPal), consisting of the same head group as the commercially available chemotherapeutic agent Capecitabine, linked to a palmityl hydrocarbon chain via a carbamate bond is reported. Thermal analysis of this prodrug indicates that it melts at {approx}115 C followed quickly by degradation beginning at {approx}120 C. The neat solid 5-FCPal amphiphile acquires a lamellar crystalline arrangement with a d-spacing of 28.6 {+-} 0.3 {angstrom}, indicating interdigitation of the hydrocarbon chains. Under aqueous conditions, solid 5-FCPal is non-swelling and no lyotropic liquid crystalline phase formation is observed. In order to assess the in vitro toxicity and in vivo efficacy in colloidal form, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) with an average size of {approx}700 nm were produced via high pressure homogenization. The in vitro toxicity of the 5-FCPal SLNs against several different cancer and normal cell types was assessed over a 48 h period, and IC{sub 50} values were comparable to those observed for Capecitabine. The in vivo efficacy of the 5-FCPal SLNs was then assessed against the highly aggressive mouse 4T1 breast cancer model. To do so, the prodrug SLNs were administered orally at 3 different dosages (0.1, 0.25, 0.5 mmol/mouse/day) and compared to Capecitabine delivered at the same dosages. After 21 days of receiving the treatments, the 0.5 mmol dose of 5-FCPal exhibited the smallest average tumour volume. Since 5-FCPal is activated in a similar manner to Capecitabine via a 3 step enzymatic pathway with the final step occurring preferentially at the tumour site, formulation of the prodrug into SLNs combines the advantage of selective, localized activation with the sustained release properties of nanostructured amphiphile self-assembly and multiple payload materials thereby potentially creating a more effective anticancer agent.

  15. Improved Hydrogen Gas Getters for TRU Waste -- Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Stone; Michael Benson; Christopher Orme; Thomas Luther; Eric Peterson

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alpha radiolysis of hydrogenous waste and packaging materials generates hydrogen gas in radioactive storage containers. For that reason, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission limits the flammable gas (hydrogen) concentration in the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) containers to 5 vol% of hydrogen in air, which is the lower explosion limit. Consequently, a method is needed to prevent the build up of hydrogen to 5 vol% during the storage and transport of the TRUPACT-II containers (up to 60 days). One promising option is the use of hydrogen getters. These materials scavenge hydrogen from the gas phase and irreversibly bind it in the solid phase. One proven getter is a material called 1,4-bis (phenylethynyl) benzene, or DEB, characterized by the presence of carbon-carbon triple bonds. Carbon may, in the presence of suitable precious metal catalysts such as palladium, irreversibly react with and bind hydrogen. In the presence of oxygen, the precious metal may also eliminate hydrogen by catalyzing the formation of water. This reaction is called catalytic recombination. DEB has the needed binding rate and capacity for hydrogen that potentially could be generated in the TRUPACT II. Phases 1 and 2 of this project showed that uncoated DEB performed satisfactorily in lab scale tests. Based upon these results, Phase 3, the final project phase, included larger scale testing. Test vessels were scaled to replicate the ratio between void space in the inner containment vessel of a TRUPACT-II container and a payload of seven 55-gallon drums. The tests were run with an atmosphere of air for 63.9 days at ambient temperature (15-27C) and a scaled hydrogen generation rate of 2.60E-07 moles per second (0.35 cc/min). A second type of getter known as VEI, a proprietary polymer hydrogen getter characterized by carbon-carbon double bonds, was also tested in Phase 3. Hydrogen was successfully gettered by both getter systems. Hydrogen concentrations remained below 5 vol% (in air) for the duration of the tests. However, catalytic reaction of hydrogen with carbon triple or double bonds in the getter materials did not take place. Instead, catalytic recombination was the predominant gettering mechanism in both getter materials as evidenced by (1) consumption of oxygen in the belljars, (2) production of free water in the belljars, and (3) absence of chemical changes in both getter materials as shown by nuclear magnetic resonance spectra.

  16. Small Reactor Designs Suitable for Direct Nuclear Thermal Propulsion: Interim Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce G. Schnitzler

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advancement of U.S. scientific, security, and economic interests requires high performance propulsion systems to support missions beyond low Earth orbit. A robust space exploration program will include robotic outer planet and crewed missions to a variety of destinations including the moon, near Earth objects, and eventually Mars. Past studies, in particular those in support of both the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) and the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), have shown nuclear thermal propulsion systems provide superior performance for high mass high propulsive delta-V missions. In NASA's recent Mars Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 study, nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) was again selected over chemical propulsion as the preferred in-space transportation system option for the human exploration of Mars because of its high thrust and high specific impulse ({approx}900 s) capability, increased tolerance to payload mass growth and architecture changes, and lower total initial mass in low Earth orbit. The recently announced national space policy2 supports the development and use of space nuclear power systems where such systems safely enable or significantly enhance space exploration or operational capabilities. An extensive nuclear thermal rocket technology development effort was conducted under the Rover/NERVA, GE-710 and ANL nuclear rocket programs (1955-1973). Both graphite and refractory metal alloy fuel types were pursued. The primary and significantly larger Rover/NERVA program focused on graphite type fuels. Research, development, and testing of high temperature graphite fuels was conducted. Reactors and engines employing these fuels were designed, built, and ground tested. The GE-710 and ANL programs focused on an alternative ceramic-metallic 'cermet' fuel type consisting of UO2 (or UN) fuel embedded in a refractory metal matrix such as tungsten. The General Electric program examined closed loop concepts for space or terrestrial applications as well as open loop systems for direct nuclear thermal propulsion. Although a number of fast spectrum reactor and engine designs suitable for direct nuclear thermal propulsion were proposed and designed, none were built. This report summarizes status results of evaluations of small nuclear reactor designs suitable for direct nuclear thermal propulsion.

  17. USED FUEL RAIL SHOCK AND VIBRATION TESTING OPTIONS ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, Steven B.; Best, Ralph E.; Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.; Jensen, Philip J.; Maheras, Steven J.

    2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the rail shock and vibration tests is to complete the framework needed to quantify loads of fuel assembly components that are necessary to guide materials research and establish a technical basis for review organizations such as the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). A significant body of experimental and numerical modeling data exists to quantify loads and failure limits applicable to normal conditions of transport (NCT) rail transport, but the data are based on assumptions that can only be verified through experimental testing. The test options presented in this report represent possible paths for acquiring the data that are needed to confirm the assumptions of previous work, validate modeling methods that will be needed for evaluating transported fuel on a case-by-case basis, and inform material test campaigns on the anticipated range of fuel loading. The ultimate goal of this testing is to close all of the existing knowledge gaps related to the loading of used fuel under NCT conditions and inform the experiments and analysis program on specific endpoints for their research. The options include tests that would use an actual railcar, surrogate assemblies, and real or simulated rail transportation casks. The railcar carrying the cradle, cask, and surrogate fuel assembly payload would be moved in a train operating over rail track modified or selected to impart shock and vibration forces that occur during normal rail transportation. Computer modeling would be used to help design surrogates that may be needed for a rail cask, a casks internal basket, and a transport cradle. The objective of the design of surrogate components would be to provide a test platform that effectively simulates responses to rail shock and vibration loads that would be exhibited by state-of-the-art rail cask, basket, and/or cradle structures. The computer models would also be used to help determine the placement of instrumentation (accelerometers and strain gauges) on the surrogate fuel assemblies, cask and cradle structures, and the railcar so that forces and deflections that would result in the greatest potential for damage to high burnup and long-cooled UNF can be determined. For purposes of this report we consider testing on controlled track when we have control of the track and speed to facilitate modeling.

  18. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles as smart and safe devices for regulating blood biomolecule levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Yan

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Stimuli-responsive end-capped MSN materials are promising drug carriers that securely deliver a large payload of drug molecules without degradation or premature release. A general review of the recent progress in this field is presented, including a summary of a series of hard and soft caps for drug encapsulation and a variety of internal and external stimuli for controlled release of different therapeutics, a discussion of the biocompatibility of MSN both in vitro and in vivo, and a description of the sophisticated stimuli-responsive systems with novel capping agents and controlled release mechanism. The unique internal and external surfaces of MSN were utilized for the development of a glucose-responsive double delivery system end-capped with insulin. This unique system consists of functionalized MSNs capable of releasing insulin when the concentration of sugar in blood exceeds healthy levels. The insulin-free nanoparticles are then up taken by pancreatic cells, and release inside of them another biomolecule that stimulates the production of more insulin. The in vivo application of this system for the treatment of diabetes requires further understanding on the biological behaviors of these nanoparticles in blood vessels. The research presented in this dissertation demonstrated the size and surface effects on the interaction of MSNs with red blood cell membranes, and discovered how the surface of the nanoparticles can be modified to improve their compatibility with red blood cells and avoid their dangerous side effects. In order to optimize the properties of MSN for applying them as efficient intracellular drug carriers it is necessary to understand the factors that can regulate their internalization into and exocytosis out of the cells. The correlation between the particle morphology and aggregation of MSNs to the effectiveness of cellular uptake is discussed and compared with different cell lines. The differences in the degree of exocytosis of MSNs between healthy and cancer cells is reported and found to be responsible for the asymmetric transfer of the particles between both cell types. The fundamental studies on the hemocompatibility, endo- and exocytosis of MSN along with its ability to sequentially release multiple therapeutics in response to different stimuli, allow us to propose MSN as an intravascular vehicle with a great potential for various biomedical applications.

  19. 2-D linear motion system. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE's) nuclear facility decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) program requires buildings to be decontaminated, decommissioned, and surveyed for radiological contamination in an expeditious and cost-effective manner. Simultaneously, the health and safety of personnel involved in the D and D activities is of primary concern. D and D workers must perform duties high off the ground, requiring the use of manlifts or scaffolding, often, in radiologically or chemically contaminated areas or in areas with limited access. Survey and decontamination instruments that are used are sometimes heavy or awkward to use, particularly when the worker is operating from a manlift or scaffolding. Finding alternative methods of performing such work on manlifts or scaffolding is important. The 2-D Linear Motion System (2-D LMS), also known as the Wall Walker{trademark}, is designed to remotely position tools and instruments on walls for use in such activities as radiation surveys, decontamination, and painting. Traditional (baseline) methods for operating equipment for these tasks require workers to perform duties on elevated platforms, sometimes several meters above the ground surface and near potential sources of contamination. The Wall Walker 2-D LMS significantly improves health and safety conditions by facilitating remote operation of equipment. The Wall Walker 2-D LMS performed well in a demonstration of its precision, accuracy, maneuverability, payload capacity, and ease of use. Thus, this innovative technology is demonstrated to be a viable alternative to standard methods of performing work on large, high walls, especially those that have potential contamination concerns. The Wall Walker was used to perform a final release radiological survey on over 167 m{sup 2} of walls. In this application, surveying using a traditional (baseline) method that employs an aerial lift for manual access was 64% of the total cost of the improved technology. However, for areas over approximately 600 m{sup 2}, the Wall Walker would cost less than the baseline. Using the Wall Walker 2-D LMS, ALARA exposure and worker safety is improved, and there is potential for increased productivity. This innovative technology performed better than the baseline by providing real-time monitoring of the tool or instrument position. Also, the Wall Walker 2-D LMS can traverse any two-dimensional path at constant speeds of up to 18.3 linear meters per minute (60 linear feet per minute). The survey production rate for the innovative technology was about 0.6 m{sup 2}/min (6 ft{sup 2}/min); the baseline production rate was approximately 0.3 m{sup 2}/min (3 ft{sup 2}/min), using the same surveying instrument and maximum scanning rate.

  20. Characterisation Progress at the Windscale Pile Reactors. Challenges and Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ervin, P.F. [CH2M HILL International Nuclear Services, Denver, CO (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The decommissioning of the Windscale Pile 1 reactor, fifty years after the 1957 fire, is one of the most technically challenging decommissioning projects in the United Kingdom, if not the world. The decommissioning is being performed by an Alliance of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA), CH2M HILL International Nuclear Services (CHNS) Ltd. and AMEC, NNC. The 1957 Windscale Pile 1 accident is summarized. The resulting fire caused significant characterisation challenges. Challenges to intrusive characterization included hypothesized uranium hydride causing re-ignition of the core fire, unknown fuel configurations leading to a reactor criticality and graphite dust explosions. As a result, the Pile 1 facilities were sealed, isolated and managed in a monitoring and surveillance regime while plans for dismantling were developed. For years the intrusive inspection of the fire damaged region of Pile 1, estimated to contain 15 tonnes of fuel, was precluded based on safety grounds. In June of 2006 the United Kingdom Health and Safety Directorate approved a new Pile 1 safety case that successfully demonstrated that Pile 1 presents a minimal safety risk with no credible risk of a core fire, criticality or graphite dust explosion. Adoption of the new safety case enabled the intrusive inspections of the fire damaged region. Characterisation activities planned and performed since the safety case approval, were prioritised relative to the results potential to mitigate decommissioning project risks. D-Void examinations, irradiation foil hole intrusive inspections, bio-shield and thermal shield plate characterizations were performed. Results obtained allow determination of waste stream composition and confirmation of assumed design conditions. Changes to the strategic approach to safely and efficiently decommission the two Windscale Pile Reactors include waste packaging and storage facilities and confirmation of design assumptions. Fuel channel endoscope inspections have confirmed the strategic approach to safely and efficiently decommission the Windscale Pile 1 Reactor. The first detailed images from deep within the Pile 1 fire affected zone(FAZ) since the 1957 fire are discussed. The decommissioning impacts of these images are provided. Characterisation has confirmed design assumptions and supported decommissioning option evaluation. The results confirmed that the decommissioning strategy of a top down approach, employing an array of light weight, high payload robotic arms to remove the damaged fuel, the graphite core, activated metals and concrete remains the most efficient decommissioning method. (authors)

  1. UNDERFLIGHT CALIBRATION OF SOHO/CDS AND HINODE/EIS WITH EUNIS-07

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Tongjiang; Brosius, Jeffrey W. [Institute for Astrophysics and Computational Sciences (IACS) in the Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue NE, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Thomas, Roger J.; Rabin, Douglas M.; Davila, Joseph M. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Young, Peter R. [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Del Zanna, Giulio, E-mail: tongjiang.wang@nasa.gov [DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flights of Goddard Space Flight Center's Extreme Ultraviolet Normal Incidence Spectrograph (EUNIS) sounding rocket in 2006 and 2007 provided updated radiometric calibrations for Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (SOHO/CDS) and Hinode/Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (Hinode/EIS). EUNIS carried two independent imaging spectrographs covering wavebands of 300-370 A in first order and 170-205 A in second order. After each flight, end-to-end radiometric calibrations of the rocket payload were carried out in the same facility used for pre-launch calibrations of CDS and EIS. During the 2007 flight, EUNIS, SOHO/CDS, and Hinode/EIS observed the same solar locations, allowing the EUNIS calibrations to be directly applied to both CDS and EIS. The measured CDS NIS 1 line intensities calibrated with the standard (version 4) responsivities with the standard long-term corrections are found to be too low by a factor of 1.5 due to the decrease in responsivity. The EIS calibration update is performed in two ways. One uses the direct calibration transfer of the calibrated EUNIS-07 short wavelength (SW) channel. The other uses the insensitive line pairs, in which one member was observed by the EUNIS-07 long wavelength (LW) channel and the other by EIS in either the LW or SW waveband. Measurements from both methods are in good agreement, and confirm (within the measurement uncertainties) the EIS responsivity measured directly before the instrument's launch. The measurements also suggest that the EIS responsivity decreased by a factor of about 1.2 after the first year of operation (although the size of the measurement uncertainties is comparable to this decrease). The shape of the EIS SW response curve obtained by EUNIS-07 is consistent with the one measured in laboratory prior to launch. The absolute value of the quiet-Sun He II 304 A intensity measured by EUNIS-07 is consistent with the radiance measured by CDS NIS in quiet regions near the disk center and the solar minimum irradiance recently obtained by CDS NIS and the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment.

  2. Type B package for the transport of large medical and industrial sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Darrell Dwaine [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Noss, Philip W [AREVA FEDERAL SERVICES

    2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    AREVA Federal Services LLC, under contract to the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Offsite Source Recovery Project, is developing a new Type B(U)-96 package for the transport of unwanted or abandoned high activity gamma and neutron radioactive sealed sources (sources). The sources were used primarily in medical or industrial devices, and are of domestic (USA) or foreign origin. To promote public safety and mitigate the possibility of loss or misuse, the Offsite Source Recovery Project is recovering and managing sources worldwide. The package, denoted the LANL-B, is designed to accommodate the sources within an internal gamma shield. The sources are located either in the IAEA's Long Term Storage Shield (LTSS), or within intact medical or industrial irradiation devices. As the sources are already shielded separately, the package does not include any shielding of its own. A particular challenge in the design of the LANL-B has been weight. Since the LTSS shield weighs approximately 5,000 lb [2,270 kg], and the total package gross weight must be limited to 10,000 lb [4,540 kg], the net weight of the package was limited to 5,000 lb, for an efficiency of 50% (i.e., the payload weight is 50% of the gross weight of the package). This required implementation of a light-weight bell-jar concept, in which the containment takes the form of a vertical bell which is bolted to a base. A single impact limiter is used on the bottom, to protect the elastomer seals and bolted joint. A top-end impact is mitigated by the deformation of a tori spherically-shaped head. Impacts in various orientations on the bottom end are mitigated by a cylindrical, polyurethane foam-filled impact limiter. Internally, energy is absorbed using honeycomb blocks at each end, which fill the torispherical head volumes. As many of the sources are considered to be in normal form, the LANL-B package offers leak-tight containment using an elastomer seal at the joint between the bell and the base, as well as on the single vent port. Leak testing prior to transport may be either using helium mass spectrometry or the pressure-rise concept.

  3. LIFETIME PREDICTION FOR MODEL 9975 O-RINGS IN KAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, E.; Skidmore, E.

    2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently storing plutonium materials in the K-Area Materials Storage (KAMS) facility. The materials are packaged per the DOE 3013 Standard and transported and stored in KAMS in Model 9975 shipping packages, which include double containment vessels sealed with dual O-rings made of Parker Seals compound V0835-75 (based on Viton{reg_sign} GLT). The outer O-ring of each containment vessel is credited for leaktight containment per ANSI N14.5. O-ring service life depends on many factors, including the failure criterion, environmental conditions, overall design, fabrication quality and assembly practices. A preliminary life prediction model has been developed for the V0835-75 O-rings in KAMS. The conservative model is based primarily on long-term compression stress relaxation (CSR) experiments and Arrhenius accelerated-aging methodology. For model development purposes, seal lifetime is defined as a 90% loss of measurable sealing force. Thus far, CSR experiments have only reached this target level of degradation at temperatures {ge} 300 F. At lower temperatures, relaxation values are more tolerable. Using time-temperature superposition principles, the conservative model predicts a service life of approximately 20-25 years at a constant seal temperature of 175 F. This represents a maximum payload package at a constant ambient temperature of 104 F, the highest recorded in KAMS to date. This is considered a highly conservative value as such ambient temperatures are only reached on occasion and for short durations. The presence of fiberboard in the package minimizes the impact of such temperature swings, with many hours to several days required for seal temperatures to respond proportionately. At 85 F ambient, a more realistic but still conservative value, bounding seal temperatures are reduced to {approx}158 F, with an estimated seal lifetime of {approx}35-45 years. The actual service life for O-rings in a maximum wattage package likely lies higher than the estimates due to the conservative assumptions used for the model. For lower heat loads at similar ambient temperatures, seal lifetime is further increased. The preliminary model is based on several assumptions that require validation with additional experiments and longer exposures at more realistic conditions. The assumption of constant exposure at peak temperature is believed to be conservative. Cumulative damage at more realistic conditions will likely be less severe but is more difficult to assess based on available data. Arrhenius aging behavior is expected, but non-Arrhenius behavior is possible. Validation of Arrhenius behavior is ideally determined from longer tests at temperatures closer to actual service conditions. CSR experiments will therefore continue at lower temperatures to validate the model. Ultrasensitive oxygen consumption analysis has been shown to be useful in identifying non-Arrhenius behavior within reasonable test periods. Therefore, additional experiments are recommended and planned to validate the model.

  4. Unmanned air vehicle (UAV) ultra-persitence research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dron, S. B.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories and Northrop Grumman Corporation Integrated Systems, Unmanned Systems (NGIS UMS) collaborated to further ultra-persistence technologies for unmanned air vehicles (UAVs). The greatest shortfalls in UAV capabilities have been repeatedly identified as (1) insufficient flight persistence or 'hang time,' (2) marginal electrical power for running higher power avionics and payload systems, and (3) inadequate communications bandwidth and reach. NGIS UMS requested support from Sandia to develop an ultra-persistent propulsion and power system (UP3S) for potential incorporation into next generation UAV systems. The team members tried to determine which energy storage and power generation concepts could most effectively push UAV propulsion and electrical power capabilities to increase UAV sortie duration from days to months while increasing available electrical power at least two-fold. Primary research and development areas that were pursued included these goals: perform general system engineering and integration analyses; develop initial thermal and electrical power estimates; provide mass, volume, dimensional, and balance estimates; conduct preliminary safety assessments; assess logistics support requirements; perform, preliminary assessments of any security and safeguards; evaluate options for removal, replacement, and disposition of materials; generally advance the potential of the UP3S concept. The effort contrasted and compared eight heat sources technologies, three power conversion, two dual cycle propulsion system configurations, and a single electrical power generation scheme. Overall performance, specific power parameters, technical complexities, security, safety, and other operational features were successfully investigated. Large and medium sized UAV systems were envisioned and operational flight profiles were developed for each concept. Heat source creation and support challenges for domestic and expeditionary operations were considered. Fundamental cost driver analysis was also performed. System development plans were drafted in order to determine where the technological and programmatic critical paths lay. As a result of this effort, UAVs were to be able to provide far more surveillance time and intelligence information per mission while reducing the high cost of support activities. This technology was intended to create unmatched global capabilities to observe and preempt terrorist and weapon of mass destruction (WMD) activities. Various DOE laboratory and contractor personnel and facilities could have been used to perform detailed engineering, fabrication, assembly and test operations including follow-on operational support. Unfortunately, none of the results will be used in the near-term or mid-term future. NGIS UMS and SNL felt that the technical goals for the project were accomplished. NGIS UMS was quite pleased with the results of analysis and design although it was disappointing to all that the political realities would not allow use of the results. Technology and system designs evaluated under this CRADA had previously never been applied to unmanned air vehicles (UAVs). Based upon logistic support cost predictions, because the UAVs would not have had to refuel as often, forward basing support costs could have been reduced due to a decrease in the number and extent of support systems and personnel being required to operate UAVs in remote areas. Basic application of the advanced propulsion and power approach is well understood and industry now understands the technical, safety, and political issues surrounding implementation of these strategies. However, the overall economic impact was not investigated. The results will not be applied/implemented. No near-term benefit to industry or the taxpayer will be encountered as a result of these studies.

  5. Development of autonomous magnetometer rotorcraft for wide area assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roelof Versteeg; Matt Anderson; Les Beard; Eric Corban; Darryl Curley; Jeff Gamey; Ross Johnson; Dwight Junkin; Mark McKay; Jared Salzmann; Mikhail Tchernychev; Suraj Unnikrishnan; Scott Vinson

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large areas across the United States are potentially contaminated with UXO, with some ranges encompassing tens to hundreds of thousands of acres. Technologies are needed which will allow for cost effective wide area scanning with 1) near 100 % coverage and 2) near 100 % detection of subsurface ordnance or features indicative of subsurface ordnance. The current approach to wide area assessment is a multi-level one, in which medium - altitude fixed wing optical imaging is used for an initial site assessment. This assessment is followed with low altitude manned helicopter based magnetometry. Subsequent to this wide area assessment targeted surface investigations are performed using either towed geophysical sensor arrays or man portable sensors. In order to be an effective tool for small UXO detection, the sensing altitude for magnetic site investigations needs to be on the order of 1 3 meters. These altitude requirements mean that manned helicopter surveys will generally only be feasible in large, open and relatively flat terrains. While such surveys are effective in mapping large areas relatively fast there are substantial mobilization/demobilization, staffing and equipment costs associated with these surveys (resulting in costs of approximately $100-$150/acre). In addition, due to the low altitude there are substantial risks to pilots and equipment. Surface towed arrays provide high resolution maps but have other limitations, e.g. in their ability to navigate rough terrain effectively. There is thus a need for other systems which can be used for effective data collection. An UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) magnetometer platform is an obvious alternative. The motivation behind such a system is that it reduces risk to operators, is lower in initial and Operational and Maintenance (O&M) costs (and can thus potentially be applied to smaller sites) and has the potential of being more effective in terms of detection and possibly characterization (through the use of dynamic acquisition, i.e. survey mission inflight reprioritization). We describe and report on a one year effort with as primary goal to provide a recommendation to SERDP for a path forward in the implementation of one or more autonomous unmanned magnetometer rotorcraft platforms. This recommendation (which is provided in chapter 6) is based on the following three elements a) An assessment on the applicability of autonomous rotorcraft magnetometer systems to the current DoD site inventory, and an initial assessment of which type(s) of autonomous unmanned magnetometer rotorcraft platforms (in terms of performance characteristics such as payload, altitude, obstacle avoidance, production rate and flight time) would be most relevant to this inventory (chapter 3); b) An evaluation of the feasibility of assembling such platforms from commercial components (unmanned rotorcraft, control systems and sensors both magnetometer sensors and supporting sensors). This evaluation included several highly successful field tests (chapter 4 and 5); c) A recommendation of the path forward, which includes a detailed outline of the efforts required in the design, assembly and testing of different modular platforms (chapter 6)

  6. U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Federal Fleet Use of Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mindy Kirpatrick; J. E. Francfort

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Per Executive Order 13031, Federal Alternative Fueled Vehicle Leadership, the U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity provided $998,300 in incremental funding to support the deployment of 220 electric vehicles in 36 Federal fleets. The 145 electric Ford Ranger pickups and 75 electric Chrysler EPIC (Electric Powered Interurban Commuter) minivans were operated in 14 states and the District of Columbia. The 220 vehicles were driven an estimated average of 700,000 miles annually. The annual estimated use of the 220 electric vehicles contributed to 39,000 fewer gallons of petroleum being used by Federal fleets and the reduction in emissions of 1,450 pounds of smog-forming pollution. Numerous attempts were made to obtain information from all 36 fleets. Information responses were received from 25 fleets (69% response rate), as some Federal fleet personnel that were originally involved with the Incremental Funding Project were transferred, retired, or simply could not be found. In addition, many of the Department of Defense fleets indicated that they were supporting operations in Iraq and unable to provide information for the foreseeable future. It should be noted that the opinions of the 25 fleets is based on operating 179 of the 220 electric vehicles (81% response rate). The data from the 25 fleets is summarized in this report. Twenty-two of the 25 fleets reported numerous problems with the vehicles, including mechanical, traction battery, and charging problems. Some of these problems, however, may have resulted from attempting to operate the vehicles beyond their capabilities. The majority of fleets reported that most of the vehicles were driven by numerous drivers each week, with most vehicles used for numerous trips per day. The vehicles were driven on average from 4 to 50 miles per day on a single charge. However, the majority of the fleets reported needing gasoline vehicles for missions beyond the capabilities of the electric vehicles, usually because of range limitations. Twelve fleets reported experiencing at least one charge depletion while driving, whereas nine fleets reported not having this problem. Twenty-four of the 25 fleets responded that the electric vehicles were easy to use and 22 fleets indicated that the payload was adequate. Thirteen fleets reported charging problems; eleven fleets reported no charging problems. Nine fleets reported the vehicles broke down while driving; 14 fleets reported no onroad breakdowns. Some of the breakdowns while driving, however, appear to include normal flat tires and idiot lights coming on. In spite of operation and charging problems, 59% of the fleets responded that they were satisfied, very satisfied, or extremely satisfied with the performance of the electric vehicles. As of September 2003, 74 of the electric vehicles were still being used and 107 had been returned to the manufacturers because the leases had concluded.

  7. Medium Truck Duty Cycle Data from Real-World Driving Environments: Project Interim Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the early part of the 20th century, the US trucking industry has provided a safe and economical means of moving commodities across the country. At the present time, nearly 80% of the US domestic freight movement involves the use of trucks. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is spearheading a number of research efforts to improve heavy vehicle fuel efficiencies. This includes research in engine technologies (including hybrid and fuel cell technologies), lightweight materials, advanced fuels, and parasitic loss reductions. In addition, DOE is developing advanced tools and models to support heavy vehicle truck research, and is leading the 21st Century Truck Partnership whose stretch goals involve a reduction by 50% of the fuel consumption of heavy vehicles on a ton-mile basis. This Medium Truck Duty Cycle (MTDC) Project is a critical element in DOE s vision for improved heavy vehicle energy efficiency and is unique in that there is no other national database of characteristic duty cycles for medium trucks. It involves the collection of real-world data for various situational characteristics (rural/urban, freeway/arterial, congested/free-flowing, good/bad weather, etc.) and looks at the unique nature of medium trucks drive cycles (stop-and-go delivery, power takeoff, idle time, short-radius trips), to provide a rich source of data that can contribute to the development of new tools for fuel efficiency and modeling, provide DOE a sound basis upon which to make technology investment decisions, and provide a national archive of real-world-based medium-truck operational data to support heavy vehicle energy efficiency research. The MTDC project involves a two-part field operational test (FOT). For the Part-1 FOT, three vehicles, each from two vocations (urban transit and dry-box delivery) were instrumented for one year of data collection. The Part-2 FOT will involve the towing/recovery and utility vocations. The vehicles participating in the MTDC project are doing so through gratis partnerships in return for early access to the results of this study. Partnerships such as these are critical to FOTs in which real-world data is being collected. In Part 1 of the project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory(ORNL) established partnerships with the H.T. Hackney Company, one of the largest wholesale distributors in the country, distributing products to 21 states; and with the Knoxville Area Transit (KAT), the City of Knoxville s transit system, operating services across the city of Knoxville and parts of Knox co. These partnerships and agreements provided ORNL access to three Class-7 2005/2007 International day-cab tractors, model 8600, which regularly haul 28 ft pup trailers (H.T. Hackney Co) and three Class-7 2005 Optima LF-34 buses (KAT), for collection of duty cycle data. In addition, ORNL has collaborated with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) to determine if there were possible synergies between this duty cycle data collection effort and FMCSA s need to learn more about the operation and duty cycles of the second-largest fuel consuming commercial vehicle category in the US. FMCSA s primary interest was in collecting safety data relative to the driver, carrier, and vehicle. In order to collect the duty cycle and safety-related data, ORNL developed a data acquisition and wireless communication system that was placed on each test vehicle. Each signal recorded in this FOT was collected by means of one of the instruments incorporated into each data acquisition system (DAS). Native signals were obtained directly from the vehicle s J1939 and J1708 data buses. A VBOX II Lite collected Global Positioning System related information including speed, acceleration, and spatial location information at a rate of 5 Hz, and communicated this data via the CAN (J1939) protocol. The Air-Weigh LoadMaxx, a self-weighing system which determines the vehicle s gross weight by means of pressure transducers and posts the weight to the vehicle s J1939 data bus, was used to collect vehicle payload information. A cellular modem, the Raven X