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1

CHEVROLET S-10 ELECTRIC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

January - February 2000 January - February 2000 Date Prepared: 3/24/2000 1997 GM EV1 (PANASONIC PB-A BATTERIES) PERFORMANCE CHARACTERIZATION SUMMARY ELECTRIC TRANSPORTATION DIVISION Urban Range (On Urban Pomona Loop - see other side for map) Payload (lb) 90.3 88.9 (mi.) Range Without Aux. loads With Aux. loads Maximum 447 Minimum 185 72.6 79.7 UR1 UR2 UR3 UR4 Test UR1 UR2 UR3 UR4 Payload (lb.) 185 185 447 447 AC kWh Recharge 26.91 26.61 27.69 22.80 AC kWh/mi. 0.296 0.331 0.311 0.312 Range (mi.) 90.3 79.7 88.9 72.6 Avg. Ambient Temp. 65°F 72°F 70°F 71°F UR1 Urban Range Test, Min Payload, No Auxiliary Loads UR2 Urban Range Test, Min Payload, A/C on High, Headlights on Low, Radio On UR3 Urban Range Test, Max Payload, No Auxiliary Loads UR4 Urban Range Test, Max Payload, A/C on High, Headlights on Low, Radio On State of Charge Meter (UR1)

2

Toyota_RAV4.PDF  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1999 Inductive version tested. 1999 Inductive version tested. Test Date: June 1999 / Revised: 10/07/99 1999 TOYOTA RAV4-EV* (NIMH BATTERIES) PERFORMANCE CHARACTERIZATION SUMMARY ELECTRIC TRANSPORTATION DIVISION Urban Range (On Urban Pomona Loop - see other side for map) Payload (lb) 92.8 89.5 84.8 Range Without Aux. loads With Aux. loads Maximum 760 Minimum 160 UR1 UR2 UR3 UR4 68.9 Test UR1 UR2 UR3 UR4 Payload (lb.) 160 160 766 766 AC kWh Recharge 31.80 33.96 32.72 32.22 AC kWh/mi. 0.329 0.394 0.360 0.434 Range (mi.) 92.8 84.8 89.5 68.9 Avg. Ambient Temp. 68.5°F 75.3°F 80.0°F 87.0°F Note: A/C fluctuating and may have impacted A/C tests. UR1 Urban Range Test, Min Payload, No Auxiliary Loads UR2 Urban Range Test, Min Payload, A/C on High, Headlights on Low, Radio On UR3 Urban Range Test, Max Payload, No Auxiliary Loads UR4

3

Modular Countermine Payload for Small Robots  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Payloads for small robotic platforms have historically been designed and implemented as platform and task specific solutions. A consequence of this approach is that payloads cannot be deployed on different robotic platforms without substantial re-engineering efforts. To address this issue, we developed a modular countermine payload that is designed from the ground-up to be platform agnostic. The payload consists of the multi-mission payload controller unit (PCU) coupled with the configurable mission specific threat detection, navigation and marking payloads. The multi-mission PCU has all the common electronics to control and interface to all the payloads. It also contains the embedded processor that can be used to run the navigational and control software. The PCU has a very flexible robot interface which can be configured to interface to various robot platforms. The threat detection payload consists of a two axis sweeping arm and the detector. The navigation payload consists of several perception sensors that are used for terrain mapping, obstacle detection and navigation. Finally, the marking payload consists of a dual-color paint marking system. Through the multi-mission PCU, all these payloads are packaged in a platform agnostic way to allow deployment on multiple robotic platforms, including Talon and Packbot.

Herman Herman; Doug Few; Roelof Versteeg; Jean-Sebastien Valois; Jeff McMahill; Michael Licitra; Edward Henciak

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Sheet.PDF  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CHRYSLER EPIC (NIMH BATTERIES) PERFORMANCE CHARACTERIZATION SUMMARY CHRYSLER EPIC (NIMH BATTERIES) PERFORMANCE CHARACTERIZATION SUMMARY ELECTRIC TRANSPORTATION DIVISION Urban Range (On Urban Pomona Loop - see other side for map) Range (mi.) Weight (lb.) 160 930 Max. Payload Min. Payload 63.6 82.0 without aux. loads with aux. loads 77.6 67.8 Test UR1 UR2 UR3 UR4 Payload (lb.) 160 160 930 930 AC kWh Recharge 53.91 50.03 53.02 52.61 AC kWh/mi. 0.663 0.734 06.75 0.823 Range (mi.) 82.0 67.8 77.6 63.6 Avg. Ambient Temp. 75º F 80º F 79º F 85º F UR1 Urban Range Test, Min Payload, No Auxiliary Loads UR2 Urban Range Test, Min Payload, A/C on High, Headlights on Low, Radio On UR3 Urban Range Test, Max Payload, No Auxiliary Loads UR4 Urban Range Test, Max Payload, A/C on High, Headlights on Low, Radio On State of Charge Meter (UR1) SOC Meter Reading vs Miles Driven 0 10

5

Pack.PDF  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

February 1999 February 1999 Revised: 05/05/99 CHEVROLET S-10 ELECTRIC (NIMH BATTERIES) PERFORMANCE CHARACTERIZATION SUMMARY ELECTRIC TRANSPORTATION DIVISION Urban Range (On Urban Pomona Loop - see other side for map) Test UR1 UR2 UR3 UR4 Payload (lb.) 180 180 920 920 AC kWh Recharge 54.93 57.09 54.98 51.34 AC kWh/mi. 0.78 0.91 0.87 0.85 Range (mi.) 70.4 63.0 63.0 60.4 Avg. Ambient Temp. 63°F 66°F 63°F 50°F UR1 Urban Range Test, Min Payload, No Auxiliary Loads UR2 Urban Range Test, Min Payload, A/C on High, Headlights on Low, Radio On UR3 Urban Range Test, Max Payload, No Auxiliary Loads UR4 Urban Range Test, Max Payload, A/C on High, Headlights on Low, Radio On State of Charge Meter (UR1) Freeway Range (On Freeway Pomona Loop - see other side for map) Test FW1 FW2 FW3 FW4 Payload (lb.) 180 180 920 920 AC kWh Recharge

6

Optical Payload for the STARE Mission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Space-based Telescopes for Actionable Refinement of Ephemeris (STARE) is a nano-sat based mission designed to better determine the trajectory of satellites and space debris in orbit around earth. In this paper, we give a brief overview of the mission and its place in the larger context of Space Situational Awareness (SSA). We then describe the details of the central optical payload, touching on the optical design and characterization of the on-board image sensor used in our Cubesat based prototype. Finally, we discuss the on-board star and satellite track detection algorithm central to the success of the mission.

Simms, L; Riot, V; De Vries, W; Olivier, S S; Pertica, A; Bauman, B J; Phillion, D; Nikolaev, S

2011-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

7

An intelligent, onboard signal processing payload concept  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our approach to onboard processing will enable a quicker return and improved quality of processed data from small, remote-sensing satellites. We describe an intelligent payload concept which processes RF lightning signal data onboard the spacecraft in a power-aware manner. Presently, onboard processing is severely curtailed due to the conventional management of limited resources and power-unaware payload designs. Delays of days to weeks are commonly experienced before raw data is received, processed into a human-usable format, and finally transmitted to the end-user. We enable this resource-critical technology of onboard processing through the concept of Algorithm Power Modulation (APM). APM is a decision process used to execute a specific software algorithm, from a suite of possible algorithms, to make the best use of the available power. The suite of software algorithms chosen for our application is intended to reduce the probability of false alarms through postprocessing. Each algorithm however also has a cost in energy usage. A heuristic decision tree procedure is used which selects an algorithm based on the available power, time allocated, algorithm priority, and algorithm performance. We demonstrate our approach to power-aware onboard processing through a preliminary software simulation.

Shriver, P. M. (Patrick M.); Harikumar, J. (Jayashree); Briles, S. C. (Scott C.); Gokhale, M. (Maya)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

ARM-UAV TWP-ICE Payload Instrumentation Details  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Payload Instrumentation Details McCoy, Robert Sandia National Laboratories Tooman, Tim Sandia National Laboratories McFarquhar, Greg University of Illinois Category: Field...

9

High payload six-axis load sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A repairable high-payload six-axis load sensor includes a table, a base, and at least three shear-pin load transducers removably mounted between the table and the base. Removable mounting permits easy replacement of damaged shear pins. Preferably, the shear-pin load transducers are responsive to shear forces imparted along the two axes perpendicular to an axis of minimum sensitivity characteristic of the transducer. Responsive to an applied shear force, each shear-pin load transducer can produce an electrical signal proportional to the reaction force. The load sensor can further include a structure for receiving the proportional electrical signals and computing the applied load corresponding to the proportional electrical signals. The computed load can be expressed in terms of a three-dimensional XYZ Cartesian coordinate system.

Jansen, John F. (Knoxville, TN); Lind, Randall F. (Knoxville, TN)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

honda.PDF  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

HONDA EV PLUS HONDA EV PLUS NIMH BATTERIES SEPTEMBER 1997 Urban Range (On Urban Pomona Loop - see other side for map) Range (mi.) Without Aux. Loads With Aux. Loads 81.7 97.7 105.3 Payload (lb.) Maximum 860 Minimum 140 UR1 UR2 UR 3 UR4 86.9 Test UR1 UR2 UR3 UR4 Payload (lb.) 140 140 860 860 AC kWh Recharge 40 43 40 45 AC kWh/mi. 0.38 0.49 0.41 0.55 Range (mi.) 105.3 86.9 97.7 81.7 Avg. Ambient Temp. 79° F 83° F 84° F 89° F State of Charge Meter (Urban Range Test) 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 State of Charge Miles Driven 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 Miles Remaining Miles Driven Miles Remaining Start End * * Initial " Miles Remaining" depend on driving economy before recharge Freeway Range (On Freeway Pomona Loop - see other side for map) Range (mi.) Without Aux. Loads With Aux. Loads 90.6 89.1 Maximum 860 Minimum

11

Control system and method for payload control in mobile platform cranes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A crane control system and method provides a way to generate crane commands responsive to a desired payload motion to achieve substantially pendulation-free actual payload motion. The control system and method apply a motion compensator to maintain a payload in a defined payload configuration relative to an inertial coordinate frame. The control system and method can further comprise a pendulation damper controller to reduce an amount of pendulation between a sensed payload configuration and the defined payload configuration. The control system and method can further comprise a command shaping filter to filter out a residual payload pendulation frequency from the desired payload motion.

Robinett, III, Rush D. (Tijeras, NM); Groom, Kenneth N. (Albuquerque, NM); Feddema, John T. (Albuquerque, NM); Parker, Gordon G. (Houghton, MI)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

EChO Payload electronics architecture and SW design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EChO is a three-modules (VNIR, SWIR, MWIR), highly integrated spectrometer, covering the wavelength range from 0.55 $\\mu$m, to 11.0 $\\mu$m. The baseline design includes the goal wavelength extension to 0.4 $\\mu$m while an optional LWIR module extends the range to the goal wavelength of 16.0 $\\mu$m. An Instrument Control Unit (ICU) is foreseen as the main electronic subsystem interfacing the spacecraft and collecting data from all the payload spectrometers modules. ICU is in charge of two main tasks: the overall payload control (Instrument Control Function) and the housekeepings and scientific data digital processing (Data Processing Function), including the lossless compression prior to store the science data to the Solid State Mass Memory of the Spacecraft. These two main tasks are accomplished thanks to the Payload On Board Software (P-OBSW) running on the ICU CPUs.

Focardi, M; Farina, M; Pancrazzi, M; Ottensamer, R; Lim, T L; Pezzuto, S; Micela, G; Pace, E

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

ford.PDF  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FORD RANGER EV FORD RANGER EV LEAD ACID BATTERIES MARCH 1998 Urban Range (On Urban Pomona Loop - see other side for map) Range (mi.) Without Aux. Loads With Aux . Lo a ds Pay load ( lb.) Maximum 640 Minimum 140 UR1 UR2 UR3 UR4 58.3 58.7 60.1 72.1 Test UR1 UR2 UR3 UR4 Payload (lb.) 140 140 640 640 AC kWh Recharge 29.11 28.16 28.20 28.23 AC kWh/mi. 0.40 0.47 0.48 0.48 Range (mi.) 72.1 60.1 58.7 58.3 Avg. Ambient Temp. 79° F 61° F 69° F 64° F State of Charge Meter (Urban Range Test) 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 State of Charge (4=F, 0=E) Miles Driven Miles Driven Miles Remaining * * Initial "Miles Remaining" depend on driving economy before recharge Freeway Range (On Freeway Pomona Loop - see other side for map) Range (mi.) Without Aux. Loads With Au x . L o a ds 51.6 57.2 60 66.4

14

Shielded Payload Containers Will Enhance the Safety and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Drop Test #12;End Drop Test Results · Pre- and post-drop position of SCAs and radial shock absorber configuration in HalfPACT under current design and licensing bases: - 7,600 lb max payload - 30 watts max decay Q-2 Q-3 Q-4 Q-1 Q-2 Q-3 Q-4 2007 2008 2009 Engineering and testing Stakeholder meeting 11/29/07 EPA

15

LASP Micro Bus--an integral aspect of mission customization Payload Accommodation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LMB LASP Micro Bus--an integral aspect of mission customization Payload Accommodation Build time accommodation on-orbit. The LASP Micro Bus (LMB) is an integral aspect of our mission customization capability, volume allocated to payload = 30+ MB/orbit ADCS: 3-axis stabilized; accuracy = 10 arc*sec, knowledge = 2

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

16

E-sail test payload of ESTCube-1 nanosatellite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The scientific mission of ESTCube-1, launched in May 2013, is to measure the Electric solar wind sail (E-sail) force in orbit. The experiment is planned to push forward the development of E-sail, a propulsion method recently invented at the Finnish Meteorological Institute. E-sail is based on extracting momentum from the solar wind plasma flow by using long thin electrically charged tethers. ESTCube-1 is equipped with one such tether, together with hardware capable of deploying and charging it. At the orbital altitude of ESTCube-1 (660--680~km) there is no solar wind present. Instead, ESTCube-1 shall observe the interaction between the charged tether and the ionospheric plasma. The ESTCube-1 payload uses a 10-meter, partly two-filament E-sail tether and a motorized reel on which it is stored. The tether shall be deployed from a spinning satellite with the help of centrifugal force. An additional mass is added at the tip of the tether to assist with the deployment. During E-sail experiment the tether shall be ...

Envall, Jouni; Toivanen, Petri; Pajusalu, Mihkel; Ilbis, Erik; Kalde, Jaanus; Averin, Matis; Kuuste, Henri; Laizans, Kaspars; Allik, Viljo; Rauhala, Timo; Seppnen, Henri; Kiprich, Sergiy; Ukkonen, Jukka; Haeggstrm, Edward; Kalvas, Taneli; Tarvainen, Olli; Kauppinen, Janne; Nuottajrvi, Antti; Koivisto, Hannu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Quality assurance guidance for TRUPACT-II (Transuranic Package Transporter-II) payload control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) approved by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), discusses authorized methods for payload control in Appendix 1.3.7 and the Quality Assurance (QA) requirements in Section 9.3. Subsection 9.3.2.1 covers maintenance and use of the TRUPACT-II and the specific QA requirements are given in DOE/WIPP 89-012. Subsection 9.3.2.2 covers payload compliance, for which this document was written. 6 refs.

Not Available

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Impact of Liquefied Natural Gas usage and payload size on Hybrid Wing Body aircraft fuel efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work assessed Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft in the context of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) fuel usage and payload/range scalability at three scales: H1 (B737), H2 (B787) and H3 (B777). The aircraft were optimized for ...

Mody, Pritesh (Pritesh Chetan)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

www.sea.co.uk a Cohort plc company Lunar Lander Science payload  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

www.sea.co.uk a Cohort plc company Lunar Lander ­ Science payload Capability · Instrument design-European #12;www.sea.co.uk a Cohort plc company Lunar Lander ­ IMU Capability · MEMS IMU Heritage · MEMS gyro

Anand, Mahesh

20

Speed-sensorless control of switched-reluctance motors with uncertain payload  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Speed-sensorless control of switched-reluctance motors with uncertain payload Antonio Loría Gerardo that the model of switched- reluctance motors does not admit such handy change of coordinates, imposes Espinosa­Pérez Erik Chumacero Missie Aguado-Rojas Abstract-- We present a controller for switched-reluctance

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ur3 ur4 payload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Suitability of Shape Memory Alloys for vibration isolation with application to launch vehicle payloads  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2001 Major Subject; Aerospace Engineering SUITABILITY OF SHAPE iVIEMORY ALLOYS FOR VIBRATION ISOLA'I ION IVITH APPLICATION TO LAUNCH VEHICLE PAYLOADS A Thesis JOHN JERAMY MAYES Submitted to Texas... CHAPTER I IiUTRODUCTIOX Technology has advanced significantly in recent years, enabling significant increases in the performance of many types of devices while also allowing those devices to become smaller in size and mass. The advances in the dcsigri...

Mayes, John Jeramy

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

22

Design and performance of a parachute for the recovery of a 760-lb payload  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 26-ft-diameter ribbon parachute deployed using a pilot parachute system has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories for the recovery of a 760-lb payload released at subsonic and transonic speeds. The wide range of deployment dynamic pressures led to the design, utilizing wind tunnel testing and computer simulation, of a unique pilot parachute system verified in full-scale flight tests. Performance data from 20 full-scale flight tests were used to evaluate system performance and structural validity. The concical ribbon parachute design chosen for this development effort follows the practice of previous Sandia National Laboratory parachute development programs for high performance airdropped payloads. The design process for this parachute system included a tradeoff study to evaluate and compare the performance between an equivalent drag area 26-foot-diameter single parachute system and a cluster system of three 14-ft-diameter parachutes. The results showed a small advantage for the cluster system in inflation and initial deceleration characteristics. However, the higher cost, higher weight, greater packing complexity and greater risk involved in the development of the cluster system outweighed the performance advantages and led to the choice of the 26-ft-diameter parachute as the baseline design for the development. This paper describes the design and performance of the 26-ft-diameter parachute which was chosen for the recovery of a 760-lb payload. The results of 20 full-scale flight test of this parachute system are summarized. 8 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

Waye, D.E.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Proposal for Qualification of Gas-Generating Radioactive Payloads for Transportation within a Type B Package  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characterization data describing radioactive materials (RAM) in storage are likely those associated with the processes that produced the materials or with the mission for which they were produced. Along with impurity data, often absent or unknown as a result of post-processing storage environment is moisture content. Radiolysis of moisture may lead to a hydrogen flammability hazard within a closed volume such as a storage can or a transportation package. This paper offers a practical means of qualifying payloads of unknown moisture content for shipment within Type B packaging, while supporting the DOE program to maintain radworker dose as low as reasonable achievable (ALARA). Specifically, the paper discusses part of a qualification program carried out at the Savannah River Site for onsite shipment of legacy RAM within the DDF-1 package. The DDF-1 is an onsite-only prototype of the currently certified 9975 package. Measurement of storage-can lid bulge can provide an upper bound for pressure within a storage can. Subsequent belljar testing can measure the rate of gas leakage from a storage can. These actions are shown sufficient to ensure that the performance of the 9975 containment vessels can accommodate the deflagration energy from flammable gas mixtures within Normal Conditions of Transport, and, and the consequences of a detonation shock wave within Hypothetical Accident Conditions.

Houghtaling, T.K.

2002-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

24

THE COSMIC INFRARED BACKGROUND EXPERIMENT (CIBER): A SOUNDING ROCKET PAYLOAD TO STUDY THE NEAR INFRARED EXTRAGALACTIC BACKGROUND LIGHT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment (CIBER) is a suite of four instruments designed to study the near infrared (IR) background light from above the Earth's atmosphere. The instrument package comprises two imaging telescopes designed to characterize spatial anisotropy in the extragalactic IR background caused by cosmological structure during the epoch of reionization, a low resolution spectrometer to measure the absolute spectrum of the extragalactic IR background, and a narrow band spectrometer optimized to measure the absolute brightness of the zodiacal light foreground. In this paper we describe the design and characterization of the CIBER payload. The detailed mechanical, cryogenic, and electrical design of the system are presented, including all system components common to the four instruments. We present the methods and equipment used to characterize the instruments before and after flight, and give a detailed description of CIBER's flight profile and configurations. CIBER is designed to be recoverable and has flown four times, with modifications to the payload having been informed by analysis of the first flight data. All four instruments performed to specifications during the subsequent flights, and the scientific data from these flights are currently being analyzed.

Zemcov, M.; Bock, J.; Hristov, V.; Levenson, L. R.; Mason, P. [Department of Physics, Mathematics, and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Arai, T.; Matsumoto, T.; Matsuura, S.; Tsumura, K.; Wada, T. [Department of Space Astronomy and Astrophysics, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Battle, J. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Cooray, A. [Center for Cosmology, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Keating, B.; Renbarger, T. [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Kim, M. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, D. H.; Nam, U. W. [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI), Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Sullivan, I. [Department of Physics, The University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Suzuki, K., E-mail: zemcov@caltech.edu [Instrument Development Group of Technical Center, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8602 (Japan)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

25

Compatibility issues of potential payloads for the USA/9904/B(U)F-85 RTG transportation system (RTGTS) for the 'Pluto Express' mission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The specific electric power system for the 'Pluto Express' mission has yet to be specified. However, electric power will be provided by either radioisotopic thermoelectric generators (RTG), radioisotope thermophotovoltaic systems (RTPV), alkali metal thermal to electrical conversion (AMTEC) systems, radioisotope Stirling systems, or a combination of these. The selected radioisotopic power system will also be transported using the USA/9904/B(U)F-85, Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Transportation System (RTGTS). As a result, all of the potential payloads present uniquely different environmental and physical configuration requirements. This paper presents the major compatibility issues of the potential payloads for the USA/9904/B(U)F-85 RTG Transportation System for the 'Pluto Express' mission.

Miller, Roger G.; Barklay, Chadwick D.; Howell, Edwin I.; Frazier, Timothy A. [EG and G Mound Applied Technologies P.O. Box 3000 Miamisburg, Ohio 45343-3000 (United States); U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 66 Miamisburg, Ohio 45343-0066 (United States)

1997-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

26

G-1 Payload  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

External SensorProbe Requirements Check to Select Permanent RAF Instruments GPS (TANS & DSM) Fuselage & Data Rack 28VDC 12VDC Fuselage top antennas Particle size (PCASP-300) 40 On...

27

Shielded Payload Containers Will Enhance the Safety and Efficiency of the DOE's Remote Handled Transuranic Waste Disposal Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) disposal operation currently employs two different disposal methods: one for Contact Handled (CH) waste and another for Remote Handled (RH) waste. CH waste is emplaced in a variety of payload container configurations on the floor of each disposal room. In contrast, RH waste is packaged into a single type of canister and emplaced in pre-drilled holes in the walls of disposal rooms. Emplacement of the RH waste in the walls must proceed in advance of CH waste emplacement. This poses a significant logistical constraint on waste handling operations by requiring significant coordination between waste characterization and preparations for shipping among the various generators. To improve operational efficiency, the Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing a new waste emplacement process for certain RH waste streams that can be safely managed in shielded containers. RH waste with relatively low gamma-emitting activity would be packaged in lead-lined containers, shipped to WIPP in existing certified transportation packages for CH waste, and emplaced in WIPP among the stacks of CH waste containers on the floor of a disposal room. RH waste with high gamma-emitting activity would continue to be emplaced in the boreholes along the walls. The new RH container appears essentially the same as a nominal 208-liter drum, but is built with about 2.5 cm of lead, sandwiched between thick steel sheet. The top and bottom are made of very thick plate steel, for strengthening the package to meet transportation requirements, and provide similar gamma attenuation. This robust configuration provides an overpack for waste that otherwise would be remotely handled. Up to a 3:1 reduction in number of shipments is projected if RH waste were transported in the proposed shielded containers. This paper describes the container design and testing, as well as the regulatory approach used to meet the requirements that apply to WIPP and its associated transportation system. This paper describes the RH transuranic waste inventory that may be candidates for packaging and emplacement in shielded containers. DOE does not propose to use shielded containers to increase the amount of RH waste allowed at WIPP. DOE's approach to gain approval for the transportation of shielded containers and to secure regulatory approval for use of shielded containers from WIPP regulators is discussed. Finally, the paper describes how DOE proposes to count the waste packaged into shielded containers against the RH waste inventory and how this will comply with the volume and radioactivity limitations imposed in the many and sometimes overlapping regulations that apply to WIPP. (authors)

Nelson, R.A. [U. S. Department of Energy, Carlsbad, New Mexico (United States); White, D.S. [Washington Group International, Carlsbad, New Mexico (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Compatibility issues of potential payloads for the USA/9904/B(U)F-85 RTG transportation system (RTGTS) for the {open_quotes}Pluto Express{close_quotes} mission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The specific electric power system for the {open_quotes}Pluto Express{close_quotes} mission has yet to be specified. However, electric power will be provided by either radioisotopic thermoelectric generators (RTG), radioisotope thermophotovoltaic systems (RTPV), alkali metal thermal to electrical conversion (AMTEC) systems, radioisotope Stirling systems, or a combination of these. The selected radioisotopic power system will also be transported using the USA/9904/B(U)F-85, Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Transportation System (RTGTS). As a result, all of the potential payloads present uniquely different environmental and physical configuration requirements. This paper presents the major compatibility issues of the potential payloads for the USA/9904/B(U)F-85 RTG Transportation System for the {open_quotes}Pluto Express{close_quotes} mission. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Miller, R.G.; Barklay, C.D.; Howell, E.I. [EGG Mound Applied Technologies P.O. Box 3000 Miamisburg, Ohio45343-3000 (United States); Frazier, T.A. [U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 66 Miamisburg, Ohio45343-0066 (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Technology Investments Mission and Payload  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to target specific events (such as forest fires, releases of pollutants, and industrial accidents) where high-spatial-resolution analysis would provide benefits. A substantial fraction of its time would-demonstrated a multispectral imaging airborne Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) system designed for geostationary observations

Christian, Eric

30

Technology Investments Mission and Payload  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to target specific events (such as forest fires, releases of pollutants, and industrial accidents) where high-spatial-resolution analysis would provide benefits. A substantial fraction of its time would airborne Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) system designed for geostationary observations. The concept

Christian, Eric

31

Chapter 6 - Nuclear-Powered Payload Safety  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter introduces the concepts of Space Nuclear Power Systems (SNPSs), describes the history and nature of these ingenious energy-generating machines. The basic principles of the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) and the recently developed Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG) are explored and an account of their application in several extra-terrestrial missions is presented. Nuclear fission power as a promising alternative for future outer planet and extra-solar explorations is discussed. The flight safety review and launch approval processes for U.S., as well as the failures and accidents for U.S. and U.S.S.R. (Russian) nuclear powered space missions since 1961 are presented chronologically. A comprehensive probabilistic consequence analysis of all conceivable potential hazards associated with nuclear powered space flights is set out. The chapter concludes with how \\{SNPSs\\} must be designed with the built-in safety features to minimize accidents and to prevent radiation exposure.

Firooz A. Allahdadi; Sayavur I. Bakhtiyarov; Gregory D. Wyss; Gary F. Polansky; Joseph A. Sholtis; Curt D. Botts

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

IMiniature Integrated Payload Suites 2010 Phase II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exchange Membrane (PEM) water-electrolysis fuel cell supplies gH2/gO2 to a simple pressure-fed thruster pointing to enable the low-cost CubeSat platform to be used to conduct high-performance missions. The Power-Isp fuel. Second, a deployable solar array that stows along the long sides of the CubeSat and deploys

33

COOPERATIVE AND SUPERVISORY CONTROL FOR PAYLOAD MANIPULATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, battery information functions, path planning algorithms, and trajectory tracking control laws. A hardware demonstration was produced that showed the robot performing the desired the user communicated through patterns. v DEDICATION I would... through the central computer. Another important piece of information that can be communicated is the current battery charge and capacity of the robot. After the user commands a task to the robot through the use of a pattern, the robot measures its...

Holmstrom, Kristen

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

34

Three sun sensors for stratospheric balloon payloads  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe three sun sensors which have been developed for balloon borne experiments. The sensors have different resolutions and sky coverage and have been developed and used in the BOOMERanG project.

G. Romeo; P. de Bernardis; G. Di Stefano; S. Masi; F. Piacentini; F. Pongetti; S. Rao

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

RTP Payload Format for Redundant Audio Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Perkins,C.S. Kouvelas,I. Hodson,O. Hardman,V. Handley,M. Bolot,J.C. Vega-Garcia,A. Fosse-Parisis,S. Internet Engineering Task Force, RFC 2198 Internet Society

Perkins, C.S.; Kouvelas, I.; Hodson, O.; Hardman, V.; Handley, M.; Bolot, J.C.; Vega-Garcia, A.; Fosse-Parisis, S.; Internet Engineering Task Force, RFC 2198 Internet Society [More Details

36

Steven P. Landau Technical Plans and Payload Integration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Groton, Connecticut, integrating the TRIDENT II (D5) Strategic Weapon System into the OHIO Class across both the SSBN Strategic Weapon System and SSGN Attack Weapon System. Mr. Landau was also

37

Update on the Micro-X Sounding Rocket payload  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Micro-X High Resolution Microcalorimeter X-ray Imaging Rocket is a sounding rocket experiment that will combine a transition-edge-sensor X-ray-microcalorimeter array with a conical imaging mirror to obtain high- ...

Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectal

38

Vibration Isolation Design for the Micro-X Rocket Payload  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Micro-X is a NASA-funded, sounding rocket-borne X-ray imaging spectrometer that will allow high precision measurements of velocity structure, ionization state and elemental composition of extended astrophysical systems. ...

Heine, Sarah Nicole Trowbridge

39

Long duration hard X-ray transatlantic payload  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The HXR80M large-area hard X-ray experiment, to be flown aboard a transatlantic balloon, is described. The detectors are two multiwire spectroscopic proportional counters (MWSPC) with a 2700-sq-cm sensitive area each. The two detectors are filled with an extremely pure xenon-isobutane mixture at high pressure (3-6 atm) in order to obtain good spectral resolution and high efficiency. The onboard data handling is performed by microprocessor-controlled electronics. The scientific aim of the experiment is the survey of the sky belt around the 38th parallel and in particular the observation of faint galactic objects and galactic binary systems in the 15-200 keV range.

La Padula, C.D.; Bazzano, A.; Boccaccini, L.; Mastropietro, M.; Patriarca, R.; Polcaro, V.F.; Ubertini, P.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

E-Print Network 3.0 - allowable trupact-ii payload Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

HalfPACT Amendment Requests 3. Letter from T.E. Sellmer to M. Rahimi dated March Source: Yucca Mountain Project, US EPA Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 2 Planned...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ur3 ur4 payload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Health and cleanliness of the XMM-Newton science payload since launch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On December 10th 2004 the XMM-Newton observatory celebrated its 5th year in orbit. Since the beginning of the mission steady health and contamination monitoring has been performed by the XMM-Newton SOC and the instrument teams. Main targets of the monitoring, using scientific data for all instruments on board, are the behaviour of the Charge Transfer Efficiency, the gain, the effective area and the bad, hot and noisy pixels. The monitoring is performed by combination of calibration observations using internal radioactive calibration sources with observations of astronomical targets. In addition a set of housekeeping parameters is continuously monitored reflecting the health situation of the instruments from an engineering point of view. We show trend behaviour over the 5 years especially in combination with events like solar flares and other events affecting the performance of the instruments.

M. G. F. Kirsch et al.

2005-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

42

Design of a Surface Albedo Modification Payload for Near Earth Asteroid (NEA) Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atmospheric Oxygen AU Astronomical Unit ETF Effective Thickness Factor FF1 Far-field 1 FPTE First Pass Transfer Efficiency GCR Galactic Cosmic Radiation JPL Jet Propulsion Laboratory KACST King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology LEO Low Earth... once every 800 years. During this encounter, it will be a 3rd magnitude object visible in the night sky. This Apophis keyhole of 2029 is only 600 m wide but if it passes through this keyhole region direct impact will occur exactly 7 years later. JPL...

Ge, Shen

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

43

Payload-envelope detection and label-detection integrated photonic circuit for asynchronous variable-length optical-packet switching with 40-Gb/s RZ payloads and 10-Gb/s NRZ labels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ing and Integrated Optoelectronics Laboratory, University ofinterests include optoelectronics integration and packaging,

Koch, B R; Hu, Z Y; Bowers, J E; Blumenthal, D J

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Modeling Techniques Used to Analyze Safety of Payloads for Generic Missile Type Weapons Systems During an Indirect Lightning Strike  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During lightning strikes buildings and other structures can act as imperfect Faraday Cages, enabling electromagnetic fields to be developed inside the facilities. Some equipment stored inside these facilities may unfortunately act as antenna systems. It is important to have techniques developed to analyze how much voltage, current, or energy dissipation may be developed over valuable components. In this discussion we will demonstrate the modeling techniques used to accurately analyze a generic missile type weapons system as it goes through different stages of assembly. As work is performed on weapons systems detonator cables can become exposed. These cables will form different monopole and loop type antenna systems that must be analyzed to determine the voltages developed over the detonator regions. Due to the low frequencies of lightning pulses, a lumped element circuit model can be developed to help analyze the different antenna configurations. We will show an example of how numerical modeling can be used to develop the lumped element circuit models used to calculate voltage, current, or energy dissipated over the detonator region of a generic missile type weapons system.

Perkins, M P; Ong, M M; Crull, E W; Brown Jr., C G

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

45

RADIOISOTOPE-DRIVEN DUAL-MODE PROPULSION SYSTEM FOR CUBESAT-SCALE PAYLOADS TO THE OUTER PLANETS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is apparent the cost of planetary exploration is rising as mission budgets declining. Currently small scientific beds geared to performing limited tasks are being developed and launched into low earth orbit (LEO) in the form of small-scale satellite units, i.e., CubeSats. These micro- and nano-satellites are gaining popularity among the university and science communities due to their relatively low cost and design flexibility. To date these small units have been limited to performing tasks in LEO utilizing solar-based power. If a reasonable propulsion system could be developed, these CubeSat platforms could perform exploration of various extra-terrestrial bodies within the solar system engaging a broader range of researchers. Additionally, being mindful of mass, smaller cheaper launch vehicles (approximately 1,000 kgs to LEO) can be targeted. Thus, in effect, allows for beneficial exploration to be conducted within limited budgets. Researchers at the Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) are proposing a low mass, radioisotope-based, dual-mode propulsion system capable of extending the exploration realm of these CubeSats out of LEO.

N. D. Jerred; T. M. Howe; S. D. Howe; A. Rajguru

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Abstract LB-94: Nanoparticle-based RNAi therapy for the delivery of personalized siRNA payloads to KRAS-driven tumors.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Characterization of the Effect of Hyperthermia on Nanoparticle Extravasation from Tumor Vasculature...tumor interstitium. From 40 to 42C, nanoparticle extravasation increased with temperature...stasis in tumor vessels. Enhanced nanoparticle extravasation was observed several...

Tina L. Yuan; Chih-Shia Lee; Christof Fellmann; Cayde Ritchie; Changwoo Lee; Colin Merrifield; Thomas Schluep; Scott W. Lowe; Ji Luo; Frank McCormick

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

47

Appears in Proc. International Workshop on Planning and Scheduling for Space, Moffett Field, CA, March 2013. Onboard Mission Planning on the Intelligent Payload  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solar panels for electrical power generation and is anticipated to have 1-1.5W powe of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. data rates would require

Schaffer, Steven

48

CH Packaging Operations for High Wattage Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides instructions for assembling the following CH packaging payload: Drum payload assembly Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP)

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2006-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

49

CH Packaging Operations for High Wattage Waste at LANL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This procedure provides instructions for assembling the following CH packaging payload: Drum payload assembly Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

50

CH Packaging Operations for High Wattage Waste at LANL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This procedure provides instructions for assembling the following CH packaging payload: Drum payload assembly Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

51

CH Packaging Operations Manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Introduction - This procedure provides instructions for assembling the following CH packaging payload: -Drum payload assembly -Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly -Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2003-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

52

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 9, 72297242, 2009 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/9/7229/2009/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- sorption Spectroscopy) payload during two stratospheric balloon flights from a station in Northern Brazil

Meskhidze, Nicholas

53

CH Packaging Operations Manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides the user with instructions for assembling a payload. All the steps in Subsections 1.2, Preparing 55-Gallon Drum Payload Assembly; 1.3, Preparing "Short" 85-Gallon Drum Payload Assembly (TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT); 1.4, Preparing "Tall" 85-Gallon Drum Payload Assembly (HalfPACT only); 1.5, Preparing 100-Gallon Drum Payload Assembly; 1.6, Preparing SWB Payload Assembly; and 1.7, Preparing TDOP Payload Assembly, must be completed, but may be performed in any order as long as radiological control steps are not bypassed.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

54

Bespoke Balloon Launched Sensorcraft for Atmospheric Research Missions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to input mission and payload requirements and quickly receive designs that can be 3D printed and flown the scientific payload needs to be specified. The additional hardware required for flight, such as batteries

Sóbester, András

55

Mixed convection and heat management in the Mars gravity biosatellite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Mars Gravity Biosatellite will house fifteen mice in a low Earth orbit satellite spinning about its longitudinal axis. The satellite's payload thermal control system will reject heat through the base of the payload ...

Marsh, Jesse B. (Jesse Benjamin)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

A stereo vision system for support of planetary surface exploration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and for controlling the motion of the rover, using light emitting diodes on the payload cab of the rover

Pollefeys, Marc

57

Calibration, Terrain Reconstruction and Path Planning for a Planetary Exploration System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and localization of the rover. The lat- ter makes use of four Light Emitting Diodes on the rover payload cab

Pollefeys, Marc

58

Competition between butter and oleomargarine in Argentina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Department) L i i( (! L !!! )!'gd tr l (Member) (Memoer) {Member (Member) (Member) January I9'70 ABSTRACT Competit1nn between Butter a id Olcomargar1ne in Argentina (January 1970) Is1dro Bduardo Blanco, Contador Pdbi. jco Universidad del Litoral D... at the expense of butter. Butter consumpt1on is comparatively low in Argentina and there is ind1cation that the majority of those who presently consume the product will continue to do so, The author expresses his gratitude to ur. 4'rank S. Scott, Jr. for his...

Blanco, Isidro Edwardo

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

59

E-Print Network 3.0 - aircraft plume model Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research in Military Aircraft Emissions Photo of a B-52 bomber taking off (above) and landing... ) Focus on high-payload aircraft Aircraft emissions play a significant...

60

The Development of Instrumentation and Methods for Measurement of Air-Sea Interaction and Coastal Processes from Manned and Unmanned Aircraft /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NovAtel SPAN circuitry FLIR long-wave IR camera (A325)payload also includes a FLIR (Willsonville, Oregon) A325

Reineman, Benjamin D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ur3 ur4 payload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Banging the Freedom drum  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Electric is developing the polar platform and attached payload accommodations on the main station; and Rocketdyne is developing the power systems.

Joseph Palca

1989-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

62

Autonomous Realtime Threat-Hunting Robot (ARTHR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Idaho National Laboratory researchers developed an intelligent plug-and-play robot payload that transforms commercial robots into effective first responders for deadly chemical, radiological and explosive threats.

INL

2008-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

63

Autonomous Realtime Threat-Hunting Robot (ARTHR  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Idaho National Laboratory researchers developed an intelligent plug-and-play robot payload that transforms commercial robots into effective first responders for deadly chemical, radiological and explosive threats.

INL

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

NNSA Supports NASA MARS Scientific Laboratory Launch | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

thermoelectric generators (RTGs), will give Curiosity several times as much electricity as earlier rovers, and are necessary for the much larger and more-advanced payload...

65

ARM-UAV TWP-ICE Activities and Data  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

instrument operational status, data availability and daily flight details for the ARM-UAV Proteus payload flown during the TWP-ICE experiment are presented. Data was also...

66

A serially concatenated BCH-Turbo code scheme over an Additive White Gaussion Noise channel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, ;q(s', s) P(sls')p(yr-Is' s) 21 DE- INTERLEA VER. e L21 Ip Y MAP DECODER I e 12 N-BIT INTERLEAVER. MAP DECODER 2. e y N-BIT INTERLEAVER. 2p y Fig. 5. Turbo code rlecoder P(uI )p(yk ur) (3. 27) where P() stands for the probability... 3 4 7 9 12 16 17 20 25 25 25 27 29 33 33 35 38 REFERENCES APPENDIX A 41 VITA LIST OF TABLES TABLE Page I Berlckamp-Massey algorithm , 'l l LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE Page Convolui, ional encoder for s, (2, 1, 2) convolutional...

Ovalekar, Sameer V.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

BLINC: Multilevel Traffic Classification in the Dark  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the dark" ­ No port numbers ­ No payload web streaming P2P #12;3 The problem of workload characterizationBLINC: Multilevel Traffic Classification in the Dark Thomas Karagiannis, UC Riverside Konstantina ­ Why in the dark? · Traffic profiling based on TCP/UDP ports ­ Misleading · Payload

Rajamani, Sriram K.

68

Internet Engineering Task Force Individual Submission INTERNETDRAFT Lennox/Schulzrinne  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­lennox­sip­reg­payload­01.ps Columbia University October 31, 2000 Expires: April 2001 Transporting User Control Information in SIP REGISTER Payloads Status of this Memo This document is an Internet­Draft and is in full conformance with all provisions of Section 10 of RFC2026. Internet­Drafts are working documents

Lennox, Jonathan

69

Internet Engineering Task Force Individual Submission INTERNET-DRAFT Lennox/Schulzrinne  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-lennox-sip-reg-payload-01.ps Columbia University October 31, 2000 Expires: April 2001 Transporting User Control Information in SIP REGISTER Payloads Status of this Memo This document is an Internet-Draft and is in full conformance with all provisions of Section 10 of RFC2026. Internet-Drafts are working documents

Lennox, Jonathan

70

Internet Engineering Task Force Individual Submission INTERNETDRAFT Lennox/Schulzrinne  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­lennox­sip­reg­payload­00.ps Columbia University March 6, 2000 Expires: September 2000 Transporting User Control Information in SIP REGISTER Payloads Status of this Memo This document is an Internet­Draft and is in full conformance with all provisions of Section 10 of RFC2026. Internet­Drafts are working documents

Lennox, Jonathan

71

Water-soluble carbon nanotube compositions for drug delivery and medicinal applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Compositions comprising a plurality of functionalized carbon nanotubes and at least one type of payload molecule are provided herein. The compositions are soluble in water and PBS in some embodiments. In certain embodiments, the payload molecules are insoluble in water. Methods are described for making the compositions and administering the compositions. An extended release formulation for paclitaxel utilizing functionalized carbon nanotubes is also described.

Tour, James M.; Lucente-Schultz, Rebecca; Leonard, Ashley; Kosynkin, Dmitry V.; Price, Brandi Katherine; Hudson, Jared L.; Conyers, Jr., Jodie L.; Moore, Valerie C.; Casscells, S. Ward; Myers, Jeffrey N.; Milas, Zvonimir L.; Mason, Kathy A.; Milas, Luka

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

72

Transportation system benefits of early deployment of a 75-ton multipurpose canister system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1993 the US Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) began developing two multipurpose canister (MPC) systems to provide a standardized method for interim storage and transportation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at commercial nuclear power plants. One is a 75-ton concept with an estimated payload of about 6 metric tons (t) of SNF, and the other is a 125-ton concept with an estimated payload of nearly 11 t of SNF. These payloads are two to three times the payloads of the largest currently certified US rail transport casks, the IF-300. Although is it recognized that a fully developed 125-ton MPC system is likely to provide a greater cost benefit, and radiation exposure benefit than the lower-capacity 75-ton MPC, the authors of this paper suggest that development and deployment of the 75-ton MPC prior to developing and deploying a 125-ton MPC is a desirable strategy. Reasons that support this are discussed in this paper.

Wankerl, M.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schmid, S.P. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

73

NASA's Planetary Science Program Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from Mercury August 6 ­ One Year Anniversary of Curiosity Landing on Mars ­ BRRISON launch ­ Payload Anomaly October 1 ­ Close approach of Comet ISON observing Comet ISON November 25 ­ VESPER rocket launch observing Venus November

Rathbun, Julie A.

74

Propane Vehicle Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

The driving range for dedicated and bi-fuel vehicles is also comparable. Extra storage tanks can increase range, but the tank size and additional weight affect payload capacity....

75

Autonomous Realtime Threat-Hunting Robot (ARTHR)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Idaho National Laboratory researchers developed an intelligent plug-and-play robot payload that transforms commercial robots into effective first responders for deadly chemical, radiological and explosive threats. To learn more, visit

Idaho National Laboratory - David Bruemmer, Curtis Nielsen

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

76

Autonomous Realtime Threat-Hunting Robot (ARTHR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Idaho National Laboratory researchers developed an intelligent plug-and-play robot payload that transforms commercial robots into effective first responders for deadly chemical, radiological and explosive threats. To learn more, visit

Idaho National Laboratory - David Bruemmer, Curtis Nielsen

2008-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

77

Fast star tracker centroid algorithm for high performance CubeSat with air bearing validation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

State of the art CubeSats such as ExoplanetSat require pointing precision for the science payload on the order of arcseconds. ExoplanetSat uses dual stage control to achieve the pointing requirement. Reaction wheels provide ...

Knutson, Matthew W. (Matthew Walter)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

CH Packaging Operations Manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This procedure provides instructions for assembling the CH Packaging Drum payload assembly, Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly, Abnormal Operations and ICV and OCV Preshipment Leakage Rate Tests on the packaging seals, using a nondestructive Helium (He) Leak Test.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

79

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Satellite Data Link on the ARM-UAV Payload McCoy, R.F, Tooman, T.T., and Bolton, W.B., Sandia National Laboratories Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team...

80

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Instrumentation for the AMR-UAV Payload McCoy, R.F., Tooman, T.T., and Bolton, W.B., Sandia National Laboratories Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ur3 ur4 payload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Fact #721: April 2, 2012 Heavy Trucks Move Freight Efficiently  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Though discussions of vehicle efficiency are often centered on a measurement of miles per gallon, it is also important to consider how efficiently a vehicle carries its payload. Although heavy...

82

HEV Fleet Testing - Summary Fact Sheet for 2010 Ford Fusion  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ford Fusion VIN 3FADP0L32AR194699 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 2.5 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 60 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 850 lbs Features:...

83

HEV Fleet Testing - Summary Fact Sheet 2011 Hyundai Sonata vin...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hyundai Sonata VIN KMHEC4A47BA003539 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 2.4 L Electric Motor: 30 kW Battery: Lithium Polymer Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 1074 lbs Features:...

84

HEV Fleet Testing - Summary Fact Sheet 2011 Hyundai Sonata vin...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2011 Hyundai Sonata VIN KMHEC4A43BA004932 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 2.4 L Electric Motor: 30 kW Battery: Lithium Polymer Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 1074 lbs Features:...

85

HEV Fleet Testing - Summary Fact Sheet 2010 Toyota Prius  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Toyota Prius VIN JTDKN3DU2A5010462 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 1.8 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 60 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 885 lbs Features:...

86

Life Consumption Assessment of a Large Jet Engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Engine operating and maintenance cost is a major ... is decided by the thrust rating of the engine. For long range flights, the fuel load as well as the payload increases demanding higher take-off thrust of the engine

R. K. Mishra; Chinmay Beura

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Mars Science Laboratory Mission and Science Investigation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The major subsystems of the MSL Project consist of a single rover (with science payload), a Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator, an Earth-Mars cruise stage, an...

John P. Grotzinger; Joy Crisp; Ashwin R. Vasavada

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Comparison of heat sink and fan combinations and thermal electric coolers for use in the Mars Gravity Biosatellite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experiment was conducted to help compare possible cooling methods for the payload module of the Mars Gravity Biosatellite. The Satellite will be launched into space with 15 mice on board and rotated to create a 0.38g ...

Parness, Aaron J. (Aaron Joseph), 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Failure prediction of cross-rolled beryllium sheets subjected to transverse point loads  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(1968), but nonlinear materials and large deflections are not taken into account. 1. 2. 5 Existing Policy at Johnson Space Center For a cross-rolled beryllium structure to be certified as a payload on the space shuttle, the following requirements... (1968), but nonlinear materials and large deflections are not taken into account. 1. 2. 5 Existing Policy at Johnson Space Center For a cross-rolled beryllium structure to be certified as a payload on the space shuttle, the following requirements...

Mascorro, Edward

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

90

WIPP Celebrates 14th Anniversary | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Celebrates 14th Anniversary Celebrates 14th Anniversary WIPP Celebrates 14th Anniversary April 29, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis WIPP employees guide a TRU waste payload as it is lifted from a shipping container by an overhead crane. The TRU dock platform allows workers to access the 10-foot-high TRUPACT-II shipping container. WIPP employees guide a TRU waste payload as it is lifted from a shipping container by an overhead crane. The TRU dock platform allows workers to access the 10-foot-high TRUPACT-II shipping container. WIPP Success by the Numbers (as of April 19, 2013) WIPP Success by the Numbers (as of April 19, 2013) WIPP employees guide a TRU waste payload as it is lifted from a shipping container by an overhead crane. The TRU dock platform allows workers to access the 10-foot-high TRUPACT-II shipping container.

91

ARM-UAV Mission Gateway System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ARM-UAV Mission Gateway System ARM-UAV Mission Gateway System S. T. Moore and S. Bottone Mission Research Corporation Santa Barbara, California Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement-unmanned aerospace vehicle (ARM-UAV) Mission Gateway System (MGS) is a new field support system for the recently reconfigured ARM-UAV payload. The MGS is responsible for the following critical tasks: * Provides an interface for command and control of the ARM-UAV payload during a flight. * Receives and displays mid-flight state of health information, to help ensure the integrity and safety of the payload. * Receives and displays data snapshots, averaged data, or sub-sampled data. * Provides a user configurable, moving map display to enable the Mission Controller and the science

92

The use of accelerated radiation testing for avionics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In recent years the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) for military and national security applications has been increasing. One possible use of these vehicles is as remote sensing platforms where the UAV carries several sensors to provide real-time information about biological chemical or radiological agents that might have been released into the environment. One such UAV the Global Hawk has a payload space that can carry nearly one ton of sensing equipment which makes these platforms significantly larger than many satellites. Given the size of the potential payload and the heightened radiation environment at high altitudes these systems could be affected by the radiation-induced failure mechanisms from the naturally occurring terrestrial environment. In this paper we will explore the use of accelerated radiation testing to prepare UAV payloads for deployment.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Procurement of a fully licensed radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fully licensed transportation system for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators and Light-Weight Radioisotope Heater Units is currently being designed and built. The system will comply with all applicable U.S. Department of Transportation regulations without the use of a DOE Alternative.'' The U.S. Department of Transportation has special double containment'' requirements for plutonium. The system packaging uses a doubly contained bell jar'' concept. A refrigerated trailer is used for cooling the high-heat payloads. The same packaging is used for both high- and low-heat payloads. The system is scheduled to be available for use by mid-1992.

Adkins, H.E.; Bearden, T.E. (Westinghouse Hanford Company, P.O. Box 1970, N1-42, Richland, Washington 99352 (US))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Procurement of a fully licensed radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fully licensed transportation system for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators and Light-Weight Radioisotope Heater Units is currently being designed and built. The system will comply with all applicable US Department of Transportation regulations without the use of a DOE Alternative.'' The US Department of Transportation has special double containment'' requirements for plutonium. The system packaging uses a doubly contained bell jar'' concept. A refrigerated trailer is used for cooling the high-heat payloads. The same packaging is used for both high- and low-heat payloads. The system is scheduled to be available for use by mid-1992. 4 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Adkins, H.E.; Bearden, T.E.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Container for radioactive materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A container is claimed for housing a plurality of canister assemblies containing radioactive material. The several canister assemblies are stacked in a longitudinally spaced relation within a carrier to form a payload concentrically mounted within the container. The payload package includes a spacer for each canister assembly, said spacer comprising a base member longitudinally spacing adjacent canister assemblies from each other and sleeve surrounding the associated canister assembly for centering the same and conducting heat from the radioactive material in a desired flow path. 7 figures.

Fields, S.R.

1984-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

96

A nuclear vibron model applied to light and heavy nuclear molecules  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A nuclear vibron model for nuclear molecules consisting of two clusters with inner structure is investigated. The Hamiltonian model has a UC1(6)?UC2(6)?UR(4)?SUC1(3)?SUC2(3)?SUR(3) dynamical symmetry. Applying a geometrical mapping, the relation of the parameter of the coherent state to the relative distance of the two clusters is deduced. The Hamiltonian model exhibits a minimum at relative distances different from zero. It is discussed how to deduce the potential, knowing the spectrum, and how to deduce the spectrum, knowing the potential. As a classical example the system 12C+12C is taken, where the spectrum is known and the internuclear potential can be obtained. This system serves as a consistency check of the method. Afterwards, the heavy system 96Sr+146Ba, playing a role as a subsystem of a possible three cluster molecule, is investigated and the possible structure of the spectrum is deduced. We show that in order to obtain a Hamiltonian consistent with a geometrical picture, the structure of this Hamiltonian is restricted. Ambiguities of the structure of the spectrum still exist but can be ordered into different classes.

Huitzilin Ypez-Martnez; Peter O. Hess; ?erban Mi?icu

2003-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

97

GPS Antennas Small Fine Arm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pressurized Module JEM Remote Manipulator System (JEM-RMS) Power System Rack Payload Airlock Environmental Control and Life-Support/Thermal Control System Rack RMS Console Experiment Racks Communications Rack Common Berthing Mechanism PM/EF Mating Mechanism Workstation Rack Stowage Rack Japanese Experiment Module

98

NASA FactsNationalAeronautics and SpaceAdministration Goddard Space Flight Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or sensors. Electrical power is abundant throughout the aircraft. Provision is made for standard 110/60 Hz AC, 110/ 400 Hz AC and 28VDC regulated power hookups, but unique power requirements are easily designed rack modules. Multiple instrument payloads are an economical way for cooperating scientists

99

Chaos based Zero-steganography algorithm  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For the purpose of our tests a set of 512 512 and 256 256 color...3 and 4, respectivelywere used as cover images. Whereas, a 64 64 and ... as payload for the former and the latter set, respectivelyshown in F...

Muhammad Bilal; Sana Imtiaz; Wadood Abdul

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Quantifying sources and sinks of trace gases using space-borne measurements: current and future science  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the 9 year period), due to energy growth and technology renewal...measurements, and (iii) using a constellation of satellites. At the moment...e.g. the Iridium NEXT constellation representing 66 LEO payloads...consumption and fire radiative energy release. J. Geophys. Res...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ur3 ur4 payload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

AlAA 92-0980 Design of Multipurpose Spacecraft BUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The spacecraft bus uses three- axis stabilization consisting of three reaction wheel system. The electric power system consists of single-axis tracking silicon solar array and Ni2 H2 batteries. The propulsion differences in orbit, yaw axis control, attitude pointing, and thermal control requirements. The AVHRR payload

102

Collaborative microdrones: applications and research challenges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Microdrones are small-scale unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) carrying payloads such as cameras and sensors. Such microdrones enable us to obtain a bird's eye view of the environment which is helpful in many applications such as environmental monitoring, ... Keywords: aerial imaging, formation flight, microdrones, mission planning, networked autonomous systems

Markus Quaritsch; Emil Stojanovski; Christian Bettstetter; Gerhard Friedrich; Hermann Hellwagner; Bernhard Rinner; Michael Hofbaur; Mubarak Shah

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Fluid-Structure Interaction Simulations of a Tension-Cone Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fluid-Structure Interaction Simulations of a Tension-Cone Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator of an aerodynamic tension-cone supersonic decelerator prototype intended for large mass payload deploy- ment. Introduction The concept of the inflatable aerodynamic decelerator (IAD) was first proposed in the 1960's

Cirak, Fehmi

104

Applications of Robust, Radiation Hard AlGaN Optoelectronic Devices in Space Exploration and High Energy Density Physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This slide show presents: space exploration applications; high energy density physics applications; UV LED and photodiode radiation hardness; UV LED and photodiode space qualification; UV LED AC charge management; and UV LED satellite payload instruments. A UV LED satellite will be launched 2nd half 2012.

Sun, K.

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

105

AlGaN UV LED and Photodiodes Radiation Hardness and Space Qualifications and Their Applications in Space Science and High Energy Density Physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation provides an overview of robust, radiation hard AlGaN optoelectronic devices and their applications in space exploration & high energy density physics. Particularly, deep UV LED and deep UV photodiodes are discussed with regard to their applications, radiation hardness and space qualification. AC charge management of UV LED satellite payload instruments, which were to be launched in late 2012, is covered.

Sun, K. X.

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

106

Strong electric fields from positive lightning strokes in the stratosphere R. H. Holzworth,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strong electric fields from positive lightning strokes in the stratosphere R. H. Holzworth,1 M. P] A balloon payload launched in Brazil has measured vector electric fields from lightning at least an order of the electric field transient propagation. These measurements imply that lightning electric fields

Thomas, Jeremy N.

107

Design and Development of a High-Altitude, In-Flight-Deployable Micro-UAV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A micro-UAV system was developed to provide maximum endurance for a small atmospheric sensing payload. The system, composed of a micro-UAV and protective case, folds and fits into a MJU-10/B flare cartridge (7.1 x 2.4 ...

Tao, Tony S.

2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

108

System and method to improve the power output and longetivity of a radioisotope thermoelectric generator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By using the helium generated by the alpha emissions of a thermoelectric generator during space travel for cooling, the thermal degradation of the thermoelectric generator can be slowed. Slowing degradation allows missions to be longer with little additional expense or payload.

Mowery, Jr., Alfred L. (Potomac, MD)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

System and method to improve the power output and longevity of a radioisotope thermoelectric generator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By using the helium generated by the alpha emissions of a thermoelectric generator during space travel for cooling, the thermal degradation of the thermoelectric generator can be slowed. Slowing degradation allows missions to be longer with little additional expense or payload. 1 figures.

Mowery, A.L. Jr.

1993-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

110

National Aeronautics and Space Administration NASA embarks on the Tropical Composition,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

role in determining how much solar energy is trapped in Earth's atmosphere. The TTL is the transitional capacity AC/DC electrical system, permitting it to carry a variety of payloads on a single mission Research Center Moffett Field, California, 94035 www.nasa.gov TC4 ER-2 Aircraft Platform Instruments

111

Flight Control System for a Micromechanical Flying Insect: Architecture and Implementation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of California at Berkeley {lusche|xinyan|sastry}@robotics.eecs.berkeley.edu Abstract This paper describes recent limited payload capacity and require still air, their unmatched maneuverability, low fab- rication cost UNIT MFI's POWER SUPPLY SOLAR CELLS BATTERIES UNIT ACTUATORS LOCOMOTORY UNIT MFI Control Trasduced

Sastry, S. Shankar

112

Space science: First results from Spacelab 2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the Spacelab systems and biological experiments, and two payload specialists, both of whom were solar scientists and operated many of the experiments. What follows is an account of the ... moon rather than a new moon during the flight. However, several previously hidden active solar regions had moved around onto the ...

Eugene W. Urban

1986-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

113

Patrick Scheuermann Center Director  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

propulsion test facilities; and ensured Stennis continued to serve as the systems engineering center at Stennis for NASA's Reusable Launch Vehicle program, a NASA-industry effort to develop a new generation of rockets to safely and cost-effectively send payloads to space. He also served as project manager

114

Bill Steigerwald Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

microwave background radiation. Tophat is the second balloon experiment currently flying over Antarctica and constraints, it may fly for another several days to several weeks before the payload is cut down and recoveredHat experiment includes a spinning telescope and a detector system. It maps a 48-degree diameter disk of the sky

115

Structural design and analysis of a lightweight composite sandwich space radiator panel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The goal of this study is to design and analyze a sandwich composite panel with lightweight graphite foam core and carbon epoxy face sheets that can function as a radiator for the given payload in a satellite. This arrangement provides a lightweight...

Mukundan, Sudharsan

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

116

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Violet: A High-Agility Nanosatellite for Demonstrating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-precision sensors, such as a star tracker and a fiber-optic rate gyroscope, with high-agility kinematics: 10 o /sec ultraviolet telescope, which includes flight-spare Deep Impact CCDs and serves as a representative payload,7,11 . By providing an in-orbit testbed for steering algorithms, the Violet project is designed to uncover some

Peck, Mason A.

117

Design and Optimization of Future Aircraft for Assessing the Fuel Burn Trends of Commercial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

aircraft R1 Maximum payload at maximum range SFC Engine specific fuel consumption Sref Reference area STADesign and Optimization of Future Aircraft for Assessing the Fuel Burn Trends of Commercial Francisco, CA 94104, U.S.A. Accurately predicting the fuel burn performance and CO2 emissions of future

Alonso, Juan J.

118

Seminar 10! Project Management & System Design!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(e.g., sample return)" �# Power and Propulsion" �#Solar cells" �# Kick motor/ payload assist module of the Development of Space Systems" !# Organization" #12;Systems Engineering" Pisacane, V., Fundamentals of Space System Design, Ch. 1! Product Development" Pisacane, V., Fundamentals of Space System Design, Ch. 1! #12

Stengel, Robert F.

119

Introduction to special section on the Phoenix Mission: Landing Site Characterization Experiments, Mission Overviews, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

braking strategy. After a safe landing, twin fan-like solar panels are unfurled and provide the energy lander with a science payload inherited from MPL and 2001 instruments gives significant advantages, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. 10 Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Katlenburg

Duck, Thomas J.

120

November 15, 2002 10:7 WSPC/Trim Size: 9in x 6in for Proceedings SaabYorkPaper PERFORMANCE AND BACKGROUND MEASUREMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND BACKGROUND MEASUREMENTS OF THE CDMS II TOWER I DETECTORS AT THE STANFORD UNDERGROUND FACILITY T. SAAB , P at the Stanford Underground Facility (SUF) shallow depth site in the fall of 2001. With a payload consisting of 4. An extensive description of the Stanford Underground Facility (SUF) can be found in 2 . 2. Results From

California at Berkeley, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ur3 ur4 payload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Abstract LB-165: Early detection of the therapeutic effect in tumors treated with a thermosensitive liposome (TSL) using noninvasive ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...CA Abstract LB-165: Early detection of the therapeutic effect in...A TSL is a drug delivery vehicle designed to release its payload...the VisualSonics Vevo LAZR system at time points before and after...Kolios, Shyh-Dar Li. Early detection of the therapeutic effect in...

Jonathan P. May; Eno Hysi; Lauren Wirtzfeld; Elijus Undzys; Michael C. Kolios; and Shyh-Dar Li

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Page 1 of 2 Radiogram No. 8355u Form 24 for 02/05/2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

:00-14:40 FE-1 Maintenance. SM and FGB Flush Counter (), Water Supply System (SVO), POTOK Air Purification System Data Calldowns 14:35-14:40 FE-6 Payload MPC Restricted Playback Start 15:30-17:00 FE-1 Physical

Waliser, Duane E.

123

An Overview of a New Chinese Weather Satellite FY-3A  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

FengYun-3A (FY-3A), the first satellite in the second generation of the Chinese polar-orbiting meteorological satellites, was launched at Taiyuan, China, launching center on 27 May 2008. Equipped with both sounding and imaging pay-loads, enabling ...

Chaohua Dong; Jun Yang; Zhongdong Yang; Naimeng Lu; Jinming Shi; Peng Zhang; Yujie Liu; Bin Cai; Wenjian Zhang

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

System and method to improve the power output and longetivity of a radioisotope thermoelectric generator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By using the helium generated by the alpha emissions of a thermoelectric generator during space travel for cooling the thermal degradation of the thermoelectric generator can be slowed. Slowing degradation allows missions to be longer with little additional expense or payload.

Mowery, A.L. Jr.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

125

Optical logic gates and its application e-mail : slee@kist.re.kr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

recognition system, label / payload separation system, gray code to BCD converter, binary counter, parity bit] [9] [8]* ETC Gray code to BCD converter Binary counter Parity bit checker Encryption system Flip . gray code to BCD converter, binary counter, parity bit checker, encryption system, Flip-flop memory

Park, Namkyoo

126

Planetary and Space Science 55 (2007) 18451876 Huygens' entry and descent through Titan's atmosphere--Methodology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Austria c Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844-1023, USA d ESA Research and Scientific Support Department, ESTEC, 2200 AG Noordwijk, The Netherlands e the scientific payload. This paper presents the methodology and discuss the results of the reconstruction effort

Atkinson, David H.

127

Sway control method and system for rotary cranes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatuses for reducing the oscillatory motion of rotary crane payloads during operator-commanded or computer-controlled maneuvers. An Input-shaping filter receives input signals from multiple operator input devices and converts them into output signals readable by the crane controller to dampen the payload tangential and radial sway associated with rotation of the jib. The input signals are characterized by a hub rotation trajectory .gamma.(t), which includes a jib angular acceleration .gamma., a trolley acceleration x, and a load-line length velocity L. The system state variables are characterized by a tangential rotation angle .theta.(t) and a radial rotation angle .phi.(t) of the load-line. The coupled equations of motion governing the filter are non-linear and configuration-dependent. In one embodiment, a filter is provided between the operator and the crane for filtering undesired frequencies from the angular .gamma. and trolley x velocities to suppress payload oscillation. In another embodiment, crane commands are computer generated and controlled to suppress vibration of the payload using a postulated asymmetrical shape for the acceleration profiles of the jib, which profiles are uniquely determined by a set of parameters (including the acceleration pulse amplitude and the duration and coast time between pulses), or a dynamic programming approach.

Robinett, Rush D. (Tijeras, NM); Parker, Gordon G. (Houghton, MI); Feddema, John T. (Albuquerque, NM); Dohrmann, Clark R. (Albuquerque, NM); Petterson, Ben J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Space Sci Rev DOI 10.1007/s11214-012-9952-7  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/Public Outreach payload, Moon Knowledge Acquired by Middle-School Students (MoonKAM), in which middle school outstanding questions regarding the Moon's thermal evolution, and will be applicable more generally obtained by orbital remote sensing and surface samples, as well as experimental measurements of planetary

Zuber, Maria

129

IDS Business Support, Communications and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to space to achieve thermal control and maintain components at acceptable temperatures. An Active Thermal a constant coolant supply to equipment, payloads and avionics to maintain proper temperature. The U Thermal Control System (ATCS) Overview EEATCS (5A-12A.1)/EATCS (12A.1+) Active Thermal Control System

130

On the Design of Shape Memory Alloy Wire Bundle Actuators Kathryn J. De Laurentis1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the use of compact, smart material based actuators to power the robot joints [1]. Smart materials alter memory alloys and polymers are examples of smart materials. The interest in these types of actuators one of the highest payload to weight ratios among "smart material" based actua- tors. Therefore, SMAs

Mavroidis, Constantinos

131

56113.Transport and integration 13.1 Transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be classified according to the hazard involved: · Mirror segments. The size of each segment allows transport by laser beams. This grid defines the X-Y-Z location of each node of the structure. Each node can several light cranes with a maximum payload of 3 tons. thereby allowing for redundancy. · The structural

Liske, Jochen

132

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

134

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

135

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codesand corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

136

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

137

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2006-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

139

CH-TRU Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ur3 ur4 payload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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141

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

143

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

144

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

145

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH TRUCON)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Microsoft PowerPoint - Pg1Draft Talon Heavy Hoist Hook.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Most Most hooks designed for heavy hoisting and lifting operations are open-ended devices. Consequently, the load being carried is only as secure as the skill of the operator performing the lift. Any sudden stops, shift or change in direction of the load during operation could result in the potential disengagement of the load from the hook resulting in damage to the cargo or potential injury to the rigging personnel. The locking mechanism of the Talon makes it virtually impossible for the load to slip or drop from the hook. Only when the cargo is safely lowered into its desired position and the locking mechanism is released can the payload be disengaged. The disengagement of the load is also possible through remote means inherent in the design of the device. Remote release of heavy payloads eliminates the need for rigging personnel to manually release the rigging wires or straps from the hoist

147

Fire in the Ice, Fall 2002  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summer Research Cruises Summer Research Cruises Reveal Secrets of Marine Hydrates * R/V JOIDES Resolution Docks With a Payload of Hydrate Samples * Multinational Team Recovers Sub-Bottom Gulf- of-Mexico Hydrate Cores * Gulf-of-Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium Cruise Locates New Hydrate Site, Tests Pore- Water Sampler and Recovers Sea-Floor Probe * Twenty Days Studying Life in Extreme Environments * Alvin Explores the Juan de Fuca Seafloor * German Researchers Study Hydrate Ridge Aboard the R/V Sonne Alaska Becomes a Huge Hydrates Laboratory * First Dedicated Hydrate Well in Alaska Scheduled for Early 2003 Spotlight on Research * Ian R. McDonald R/V JOIDES RESOLUTION DOCKS WITH A PAYLOAD OF HYDRATE SAMPLES After two months in the Pacific Ocean off the Oregon coast, the research vessel (R/V) JOIDES Resolution docked in

148

Vehicle Specifications Battery Type: Li-Ion  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Under hood above powertrain Under hood above powertrain Nominal System Voltage: 333 V Rated Capacity (C/3): 40 Ah Cooling Method: Glycol / Water mix Powertrain Motor Type: DC Brushless Number of Motors: One Motor Cooling Type: Glycol / Water mix Drive Wheels: Rear Wheel Drive Transmission: None (gear ratio only in rear axle) Charger Location: Underhood Charger Port: Driver's side, front quarter panel Type: Conductive (J1772 connector) Input Voltage(s): 120 or 240 VAC Chassis Aluminum Body on Steel Frame Rear Suspension: Solid Axle with Leaf Springs Front Suspension: Dual A-arm with Coil Springs Weights Design Curb Weight: 3250 lbs Delivered Curb Weight: 3310 lbs 7 Distribution F/R: 55.2/44.8% GVWR: 4450 lbs Max Payload: 940 lbs + 200 lbs driver 1 Performance Goal Payload: 1000 lbs + 200 lbs driver

149

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

May 15, 2004 [Facility News] May 15, 2004 [Facility News] Mid-latitude Cirrus Cloud Experiment Underway Bookmark and Share NASA's WB-57F research aircraft can carry an instrument payload up to 6,000 lbs. NASA's WB-57F research aircraft can carry an instrument payload up to 6,000 lbs. In late April, scientific collaborators at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) carried out two high-altitude flights over the ARM Climate Research Facility Southern Great Plains (SGP) central facility. The purpose of these flights was to use a new suite of cloud property probes on the WB-57F aircraft to more accurately characterize the properties of mid-latitude cirrus clouds-which are composed solely of ice crystals-than has previously been possible. Eight flights over the SGP central facility were originally planned, but the expected cirrus clouds

150

ARM - Site Instruments  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FacilityInstruments FacilityInstruments AAF Information Proposal Process Science (PDF) Baseline Instruments Campaign Instruments Instrumentation Workshop 2008 AAF Fact Sheet G-1 Fact Sheet Images Field Campaigns AAF Campaigns 2007 - UAV Campaigns 1993 - 2006, 2015 Other Aircraft Campaigns 1993 - 2010 AAF Contacts Rickey Petty DOE AAF Program Director Beat Schmid Technical Director AAF Baseline Instruments The following instruments represent available capabilities. The needs of each field campaign will be assessed and additional instruments may be added upon request. For a list of past campaign instruments and their data, see the Airborne Observations instruments. Examples of cabin configurations for the G-1 from past and upcoming campaigns are also available. Payload Example from 2010 Payload Example from 2010

151

The Simbol-X Anticoincidence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Simbol-X telescope will be constitued by two satellites in formation flight. One will host the mirror module and the other the detector payload. This payload will be built with two main detectors able to measure the position, energy and arrival time of each focused photon, between 0.5 and 80 keV. The high sensitivity required by Simbol-X will necessitate low noise background detectors. To achieve this goal, those detectors will be surrounded by a passive graded shield, aimed to stop the out of field of view photons, and an active anticoiencidence system to tag the passing particles. This anticoiencidence detector, whose conception, optimisation and realization are under responsibility of the APC Laboratory, Paris, is based on plastic scintillator plates associated to multi-anodes photo-multipliers via optical fibers. In this paper, we will present the present status of the anticoiencidence system and its expected performances.

Chabaud, J.; Colonges, S.; Barbay, J.; Baronick, J. P.; Benallou, M.; Gilliot, M.; Jaeger, J. J.; Nicolas, M.; Ollivier, E.; Waisbard, J.; Yoffo, B. [Laboratoire APC-AstroParticules and Cosmologie, Batiment Condorcet, 10 rue Alice Domon et Leonie Duquet, 75205, Paris Cedex 13 (France); Laurent, P.; Ferrando, P. [CEA DSM/IRFU/Service d'astrophysique, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Laboratoire APC-AstroParticules and Cosmologie, Batiment Condorcet, 10 rue Alice Domon et Leonie Duquet, 75205, Paris Cedex 13 (France)

2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

152

Design and construction of a carbon fiber gondola for the SPIDER balloon-borne telescope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce the light-weight carbon fiber and aluminum gondola designed for the SPIDER balloon-borne telescope. SPIDER is designed to measure the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation with unprecedented sensitivity and control of systematics in search of the imprint of inflation: a period of exponential expansion in the early Universe. The requirements of this balloon-borne instrument put tight constrains on the mass budget of the payload. The SPIDER gondola is designed to house the experiment and guarantee its operational and structural integrity during its balloon-borne flight, while using less than 10% of the total mass of the payload. We present a construction method for the gondola based on carbon fiber reinforced polymer tubes with aluminum inserts and aluminum multi-tube joints. We describe the validation of the model through Finite Element Analysis and mechanical tests.

Soler, J D; Amiri, M; Benton, S J; Bock, J J; Bond, J R; Bryan, S A; Chiang, C; Contaldi, C C; Crill, B P; Dor, O P; Farhang, M; Filippini, J P; Fissel, L M; Fraisse, A A; Gambrel, A E; Gandilo, N N; Golwala, S; Gudmundsson, J E; Halpern, M; Hasselfield, M; Hilton, G C; Holmes, W A; Hristov, V V; Irwin, K D; Jones, W C; Kermish, Z D; Kuo, C L; MacTavish, C J; Mason, P V; Megerian, K G; Moncelsi, L; Nagy, J M; Netterfield, C B; O'Brient, R; Rahlin, A S; Reintsema, C D; Ruhl, J E; Runyan, M C; Shariff, J A; Trangsrud, A; Tucker, C; Tucker, R S; Turner, A D; Weber, A C; Wiebe, D V; Young, E Y

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Cost analysis of air cargo transport and effects of fluctuations in fuel price  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study developed a model with cost functions formulated for different stages of cargo transport operation. A case analysis was performed with actual data from four air cargo traffic routes and eight aircraft types to validate the applicability of the model. The results show that the optimal payloads for various aircraft types vary with fuel price fluctuations. Furthermore, this study determined optimal types of freighter aircraft for different routes. Freight rates increase with rises in fuel price due to the corresponding increase in the fuel surcharge, thus bringing in higher total revenue. When the increase in total revenue exceeds the rise in fuel cost, the optimal payload will drop. Not only can the cost functions reveal the impact of fuel price fluctuations on different aspects of air cargo transport, they can also assist airlines in selecting the aircraft type with the best fuel economy for different route distances and cargo volumes.

Ching-Cheng Chao; Ching-Wen Hsu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Safety issues in robotic handling of nuclear weapon parts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Robotic systems are being developed by the Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center at Sandia National Laboratories to perform automated handling tasks with radioactive weapon parts. These systems will reduce the occupational radiation exposure to workers by automating operations that are currently performed manually. The robotic systems at Sandia incorporate several levels of mechanical, electrical, and software safety for handling hazardous materials. For example, tooling used by the robot to handle radioactive parts has been designed with mechanical features that allow the robot to release its payload only at designated locations in the robotic workspace. In addition, software processes check for expected and unexpected situations throughout the operations. Incorporation of features such as these provides multiple levels of safety for handling hazardous or valuable payloads with automated intelligent systems.

Drotning, W.; Wapman, W.; Fahrenholtz, J.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

155

Fuel Cells for Robots  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

For Robots For Robots Fuel Cells For Robots Pavlo Rudakevych iRobot Pavlo Rudakevych iRobot Product Needs Product Needs * Military/Police/Search and Rescue - PackBot - Gladiator - ThrowBot/UGCV * Industrial and Oil - CoWorker - MicroRig * Military/Police/Search and Rescue - PackBot - Gladiator - ThrowBot/UGCV * Industrial and Oil - CoWorker - MicroRig PackBot PackBot * Mission capable robots * Rugged, portable tools for minimal casualty engagements * Assisting behaviors * Small size and weight * Mission capable robots * Rugged, portable tools for minimal casualty engagements * Assisting behaviors * Small size and weight System Concept System Concept System Concept System Concept System Concept Continued System Concept Continued * Modular payload bays - 3 primary - 1 head - 4 side pods * Each payload socket supports - Ethernet

156

The ARM Aerial Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ARM Aerial Facility ARM Aerial Facility in the Biomass Burn Observation Project (BBOP) 1 Beat Schmid, Technical Director Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, WA Aircraft Technical Information Length: 19.4 m Wingspan: 23.9 m Height: 7.1 m Cabin space: 15.3 m 2 External probes (PMS cans): 8 Maximum gross weight: 16,330 kg Maximum Endurance: 9.5 hours Maximum Range: 4000 km Endurance with full payload: 4-5 hours Crew capacity: 7 max, 2 pilots + 3-5 scientists Cabin payload: 1,900 kg Research Power: 700A @ 28 VDC (incl. 85A @ 115 VAC, 60 Hz) Ceiling: 7.6 km G-1 (BMI owned, ARM base funded, PNNL based and managed, for the science community) AAF G-1 Plan 2013-17 Intensive Airborne Research in Amazonia (IARA) Manaus, Brazil PI: Scot Martin (Harvard)

157

Page 1 of 3 Radiogram No. 9353u Form 24 for 06/01/2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

center) 08:55-09:25 FE-3 HRF Blood Collection Hardware Stowage 09:00-09:40 FE-1 (Payload Server) S Exercise (TVIS), Day 4 10:25-10:55 FE-5 HM2 Placard Transfer 10:25-12:00 FE-2 Life On The Station Photo and hardware stow 12:25-12:45 FE-5 HMS Visual Testing Activity 12:45-13:00 FE-5 ESA Weekly Crew Conference 12

158

Vertical sampling flights in support of the 1981 ASCOT cooling tower experiments: field effort and data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the month of August 1981, three nights of experimental sampling of tracers released into the cooling tower plume of a geothermal power plant were conducted. In these experiments a tethered balloon was used to lift a payload so as to obtain vertical profiles of the cooling tower plume and the entrained tracers. A description of the equipment used, the field effort and the data acquired are presented here.

Gay, G.T.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Design and analysis of active vibration control in a microgravity environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to investigate payload responses to disturbances that will most likely be present in the Space Station. Experiments were conducted first with the cart constrained to move in one dimension (one degree-of- freedom), and then with the cart having planar motion... Previous Research. Present Research III DYNAMIC MODELING. One-Dimensional Motion. Planar Motion. 6 10 IV CONTROL METHODS. 19 Position Control Velocity Control Displacement Control Combinational Control Pulse Width Modulation. 19 20 21 21 24...

Atwood, Clay Brian

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

160

A multi-reactor configuration for multi-megawatt spacecraft power supplies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and various conceptual designs were explored. One design was selected for further refinement and analysis. Various configurations of power units with differing number, size, and conversion technology were involved. Optimum reactor/payload separation... distances were found to run from 60 to 80m. It was found that reliability studies utilizing spare power conversion units and reactors do not necessarily result in the most mass effective means of insuring mission success for NEP vehicles. By increasing...

George, Jeffrey Alan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ur3 ur4 payload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Some special sub-systems for stratospheric balloon flights in India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During last few years several new sub-systems for balloon were developed and are being regularly used in the balloon flights. Some of these sub-systems are i) positive monitor for magnetic ballast release using an opto-electronic device ii) one-way pressure switch to terminate flight for runaway balloon iii) in-flight payload reel down system for atmospheric science experiment. The design, usage and performance of these and other sub-systems will be presented.

S.V. Damle; G.S. Gokhale; R.U. Kundapurkar

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Missile sizing for ascent-phase intercept  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computer code has been developed to determine the size of a ground-launched, multistage missile which can intercept a theater ballistic missile before it leaves the atmosphere. Typical final conditions for the inteceptor are 450 km range, 60 km altitude, and 80 sec flight time. Given the payload mass (35 kg), which includes a kinetic kill vehicle, and achievable values for the stage mass fractions (0.85), the stage specific impulses (290 sec), and the vehicle density (60 lb/ft{sup 3}), the launch mass is minimized with respect to the stage payload mass ratios, the stage burn times, and the missile angle of attack history subject to limits on the angle of attack (10 deg), the dynamic pressure (60,000 psf), and the maneuver load (200,000 psf deg). For a conical body, the minimum launch mass is approximately 1900 kg. The missile has three stages, and the payload coasts for 57 sec. A trade study has been performed by varying the flight time, the range, and the dynamic pressure Emits. With the results of a sizing study for a 70 lb payload and q{sub max} = 35,000 psf, a more detailed design has been carried out to determine heat shield mass, tabular aerodynamics, and altitude dependent thrust. The resulting missile has approximately 100 km less range than the sizing program predicted primarily because of the additional mass required for heat protection. On the other hand, launching the same missile from an aircraft increases its range by approximately 100 km. Sizing the interceptor for air launch with the same final conditions as the ground-launched missile reduces its launch mass to approximately 1000 kg.

Hull, D.G. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics; Salguero, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Hydraulic manipulator research at ORNL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently, task requirements have dictated that manipulator payload capacity increase to accommodate greater payloads, greater manipulator length, and larger environmental interaction forces. General tasks such as waste storage tank cleanup and facility dismantlement and decommissioning require manipulator life capacities in the range of hundreds of pounds rather than tens of pounds. To meet the increased payload capacities demanded by present-day tasks, manipulator designers have turned once again to hydraulics as a means of actuation. In order to successfully design, build, and deploy a new hydraulic manipulator (or subsystem), sophisticated modeling, analysis, and control experiments are usually needed. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a history of projects that incorporate hydraulics technology, including mobile robots, teleoperated manipulators, and full-scale construction equipment. In addition, to support the development and deployment of new hydraulic manipulators, ORNL has outfitted a significant experimental laboratory and has developed the software capability for research into hydraulic manipulators, hydraulic actuators, hydraulic systems, modeling of hydraulic systems, and hydraulic controls. The purpose of this article is to describe the past hydraulic manipulator developments and current hydraulic manipulator research capabilities at ORNL. Included are example experimental results from ORNL`s flexible/prismatic test stand.

Kress, R.L.; Jansen, J.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Love, L.J. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Solar bimodal mission and operational analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent interest by both government and industry has prompted evaluation of a solar bimodal upper stage for propulsion/power applications in Earth orbit. The solar bimodal system provides an integral propulsion and power system for the orbit transfer and on-orbit phases of a satellite mission. This paper presents an initial systems evaluation of a solar bimodal system used to place satellite payloads for Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO), High Earth Orbit (HEO-Molniya class), and Mid Earth Orbit (GPS class) missions with emphasis on the GEO mission. The analysis was performed as part of the Operational Effectiveness and Cost Comparison Study (OECS) sponsored by Phillips Laboratory (PL). The solar bimodal concept was investigated on a mission operational and performance basis for on-orbit power levels ranging from less than 1 kWe to 20 kWe. Atlas IIAS, Delta 7920, and Titan IV launch vehicles were considered for injecting the solar bimodal upper stage and payload into initial orbits ranging from Low Earth Orbit (LEO) (185{times}185 km circular) to higher apogee altitudes (185{times}18,500 km elliptical). The influences of engine thrust, power level, trip time, staging altitude, and thermal storage charge-discharge characteristics on the mission payload capability were developed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Frye, P. [Rockwell Aerospace, Rocketdyne Division, Canoga Park, California (United States); Law, G. [The Aerospace Corporation, El Segundo, California (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Integration of Radioisotope Heat Source with Stirling Engine and Cooler for Venus Internal-Structure Mission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary mission goal is to perform long-term seismic measurements on Venus, to study its largely unknown internal structure. The principal problem is that most payload components cannot long survive Venus's harsh environment, 90 bars at 500 degrees C. To meet the mission life goal, such components must be protected by a refrigerated payload bay. JPL Investigators have proposed a mission concept employing a lander with a spherical payload bay cooled to 25 degrees C by a Stirling cooler powered by a radioisotope-heated Sitrling engine. To support JPL's mission study, NASA/Lewis and MTI have proposed a conceptual design for a hydraulically coupled Stirling engine and cooler, and Fairchild Space - with support of the Department of Energy - has proposed a design and integration scheme for a suitable radioisotope heat source. The key integration problem is to devise a simple, light-weight, and reliable scheme for forcing the radioisotope decay heat to flow through the Stirling engine during operation on Venus, but to reject that heat to the external environment when the Stirling engine and cooler are not operating (e.g., during the cruise phase, when the landers are surrounded by heat shields needed for protection during subsequent entry into the Venusian atmosphere.) A design and integration scheme for achieving these goals, together with results of detailed thermal analyses, are described in this paper. There are 7 copies in the file.

Schock, Alfred

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

The FORTE receiver and sub-band triggering unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The FORTE payload receiver and trigger unit represent a significant advance over the currently flying BLACKBEARD payload aboard the ALEXIS satellite. Not only is the polarization sensitive antenna array massive compared to the BLACKBEARD monopole, but the event triggering scheme is completely different. Electromagnetic pulses (EWs) are dispersed when they pass through the ionosphere creating a chirped frequency signal which can be helpful in discriminating between natural and man-made signals. Payloads designed to digitize and store the RF signatures of these signals must include sophisticated triggering circuitry to select events of interest and prevent false alarms from wasting the available memory storage resources. The FORTE wideband receiver tunes from 20 to 320 MHz with eight sub-band trigger channels distributed across the 20 MHz IF bandwidth. The conditions which must be satisfied to generate an event trigger are processor controlled. Early testing of the prototype indicates an ability to reliably trigger on chirped RF signals several dB below the noise level. FORTE is scheduled to be launched with a Pegasus XL vehicle in late 1995.

Enemark, D.C.; Shipley, M.E.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Balloon observations of ultra-low-frequency waves in the electric field above the South Pole  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The physics of ultra-low-frequency waves in the magnetosphere, near the cusp and in the polar cap, is important because this region is one where ultra-low-frequency wave energy from the magnetopause can most easily enter the magnetosphere. During the 1985-1986 South Pole balloon campaign, eight stratospheric balloon payloads were launched from Amundsen-Scott Station, South Geographic Pole, Antarctica, to record data on ultra-low-frequency waves. The payloads were instrumented with three-axis double-probe electric field detectors and X-ray scintillation counters. This paper concentrates on the third flight of this series, which was launched at 2205 universal time on 21 December 1985. Good data were received from the payload until the transmitter failed at 0342 universal time on 22 December. During most of the four hours that the balloon was afloat, an intense ultra-low-frequency wave event was in progress. The electric-field data from this period have been examined in detail and compared with magnetic field data, obtained with ground-based fluxgate and induction magnetometers to determine the characteristics of the waves. After float was reached, the electric-field data in figure 1 show large-amplitude, quasi-periodic fluctuations suggesting the presence of intense ultra-low-frequency wave activity. In conclusion, the electric-field signature observed from flight 3 appears to have been essentially an electrostatic event or possibly a short-wavelength hydromagnetic wave with a varying and interesting polarization character. The authors are continuing the analysis of the data to determine the source of the observed ultra-low-frequency waves.

Liao, B.; Benbrrook, J.R.; Bering E.A. III; Byrne, G.J.; Theall, J.R. (Univ. of Houston, TX (USA))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

PERFORMANCE STATISTICS WEIGHTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

90 lbs 90 lbs Delivered Curb Weight: 2936 lbs Distribution F/R: 59/41 % GVWR: 3795 lbs GAWR F/R: 2335/2250 lbs Payload: 905 lbs Performance Goal: 400 lbs DIMENSIONS Wheelbase: 106 inches Track F/R: 59/58 inches Length: 175 inches Width: 67 inches Height: 57.8 inches Ground Clearance: 4.3 inches Performance Goal: 5.0 inches TIRES Tire Mfg: Goodyear Tire Model: Integrity Tire Size: P185/65R15 Tire Pressure F/R: 35/33 psi

169

PERFORMANCE STATISTICS WEIGHTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

40 lbs 40 lbs Delivered Curb Weight: 3556 lbs Distribution F/R: 58/42 % GVWR: 4665 lbs GAWR F/R: Unavailable Payload: 1109 lbs Performance Goal: 400 lbs DIMENSIONS Wheelbase: 109.3 in Track F/R: 62.0/61.6 in Length: 189.2 in Width: 71.7 in Height: 57.9 in Ground Clearance: 5.9 in Performance Goal: 5.0 in TIRES Tire Mfg: Michellin Tire Model: Energy MXV458 Tire Size: P215/60R16 Tire Pressure F/R: 32/32

170

PERFORMANCE STATISTICS WEIGHTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5650 lbs 5650 lbs Delivered Curb Weight: 5579 lbs Distribution F/R: 51.8/48.2 GVWR: 7100 lbs GAWR F/R: 3200/4100 lbs Payload: 1521 lbs Performance Goal: 400 lbs DIMENSIONS Wheelbase: 116.0 in Track F/R: 68.2/67.0 in Length: 202.0 in Width: 79.0 in Height: 74.6 in Ground Clearance: 9.5 in Performance Goal: 5.0 in TIRES Tire Mfg: Bridgestone Tire Model: Dueler H/R Tire Size: P265/65R18 Tire Pressure F/R: 32 psi

171

PERFORMANCE STATISTICS WEIGHTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

27 lbs 27 lbs Delivered Curb Weight: 3618 lbs Distribution F/R: 58/42 % GVWR: 4680 lbs GAWR F/R: 2440/2440 lbs Payload: 1062 lbs Performance Goal: 400 lbs DIMENSIONS Wheelbase: 103.2 inches Track F/R: 61.1/60.2 inches Length: 174.5 inches Width: 71.4 inches Height: 69.5 inches Ground Clearance: 7.8 inches Performance Goal: 5.0 inches TIRES Tire Mfg: Continental Tire Model: EcoPlus Tire Size: P235/70R16

172

Insight REV dbk.indd  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

67 lbs 67 lbs Delivered Curb Weight: 1959 lbs Distribution F/R: 61/39 % GVWR: 2380 lbs GAWR F/R: 1355/1035 lbs Payload: 411 lbs Performance Goal: 400 lbs DIMENSIONS Wheelbase: 94.5 inches Track F/R: 56.5/52.2 inches Length: 155.1 inches Width: 66.7 inches Height: 51.5 inches Ground Clearance: 4.6 inches Performance Goal: 5.0 inches TIRES Tire Mfg: Bridgestone Tire Model: Potenza Tire Size: 165/65R14

173

PERFORMANCE STATISTICS WEIGHTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3474 lbs 3474 lbs Delivered Curb Weight: 3435 lbs GVWR: 4718 lbs GAWR F/R: 2491/2436 lbs Distribution F/R: % Payload: 1283 lbs Performance Goal: 400 lbs DIMENSIONS Wheelbase: 106.6 in Track F/R: 61.0/61.0 in Length: 181.3 in Width: 71.6 in Height: 65.3 in Ground Clearance: 7.0 in Performance Goal: 5.0 in TIRES Tire Mfg: General Tire Model: Ameri GS60 Tire Size: P215/70R16 Tire Pressure F/R: 35/35 psi

174

RH-TRU Waste Content Codes (RH-TRUCON)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of RH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC).1 The RH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the RH-TRU 72-B. This document is a catalog of RH-TRU 72-B authorized contents by site. A content code is defined by the following components: A two-letter site abbreviation that designates the physical location of the generated/stored waste (e.g., ID for Idaho National Laboratory [INL]). The site-specific letter designations for each of the sites are provided in Table 1. A three-digit code that designates the physical and chemical form of the waste (e.g., content code 317 denotes TRU Metal Waste). For RH-TRU waste to be transported in the RH-TRU 72-B, the first number of this three-digit code is 3. The second and third numbers of the three-digit code describe the physical and chemical form of the waste. Table 2 provides a brief description of each generic code. Content codes are further defined as subcodes by an alpha trailer after the three-digit code to allow segregation of wastes that differ in one or more parameter(s). For example, the alpha trailers of the subcodes ID 322A and ID 322B may be used to differentiate between waste packaging configurations. As detailed in the RH-TRAMPAC, compliance with flammable gas limits may be demonstrated through the evaluation of compliance with either a decay heat limit or flammable gas generation rate (FGGR) limit per container specified in approved content codes. As applicable, if a container meets the watt*year criteria specified by the RH-TRAMPAC, the decay heat limits based on the dose-dependent G value may be used as specified in an approved content code. If a site implements the administrative controls outlined in the RH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 2.4 of the RH-TRU Payload Appendices, the decay heat or FGGR limits based on a 10-day shipping period (rather than the standard 60-day shipping period) may be used as specified in an approved content code. Requests for new or revised content codes may be submitted to the WIPP RH-TRU Payload Engineer for review and approval, provided all RH-TRAMPAC requirements are met.

Washington TRU Solutions

2007-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

175

RH-TRU Waste Content Codes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of RH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC).1 The RH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the RH-TRU 72-B. This document is a catalog of RH-TRU 72-B authorized contents by site. A content code is defined by the following components: A two-letter site abbreviation that designates the physical location of the generated/stored waste (e.g., ID for Idaho National Laboratory [INL]). The site-specific letter designations for each of the sites are provided in Table 1. A three-digit code that designates the physical and chemical form of the waste (e.g., content code 317 denotes TRU Metal Waste). For RH-TRU waste to be transported in the RH-TRU 72-B, the first number of this three-digit code is 3. The second and third numbers of the three-digit code describe the physical and chemical form of the waste. Table 2 provides a brief description of each generic code. Content codes are further defined as subcodes by an alpha trailer after the three-digit code to allow segregation of wastes that differ in one or more parameter(s). For example, the alpha trailers of the subcodes ID 322A and ID 322B may be used to differentiate between waste packaging configurations. As detailed in the RH-TRAMPAC, compliance with flammable gas limits may be demonstrated through the evaluation of compliance with either a decay heat limit or flammable gas generation rate (FGGR) limit per container specified in approved content codes. As applicable, if a container meets the watt*year criteria specified by the RH-TRAMPAC, the decay heat limits based on the dose-dependent G value may be used as specified in an approved content code. If a site implements the administrative controls outlined in the RH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 2.4 of the RH-TRU Payload Appendices, the decay heat or FGGR limits based on a 10-day shipping period (rather than the standard 60-day shipping period) may be used as specified in an approved content code. Requests for new or revised content codes may be submitted to the WIPP RH-TRU Payload Engineer for review and approval, provided all RH-TRAMPAC requirements are met.

Washington TRU Solutions

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

RH-TRU Waste Content Codes (RH-TRUCON)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of RH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC).1 The RH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the RH-TRU 72-B. This document is a catalog of RH-TRU 72-B authorized contents by site. A content code is defined by the following components: A two-letter site abbreviation that designates the physical location of the generated/stored waste (e.g., ID for Idaho National Laboratory [INL]). The site-specific letter designations for each of the sites are provided in Table 1. A three-digit code that designates the physical and chemical form of the waste (e.g., content code 317 denotes TRU Metal Waste). For RH-TRU waste to be transported in the RH-TRU 72-B, the first number of this three-digit code is 3. The second and third numbers of the three-digit code describe the physical and chemical form of the waste. Table 2 provides a brief description of each generic code. Content codes are further defined as subcodes by an alpha trailer after the three-digit code to allow segregation of wastes that differ in one or more parameter(s). For example, the alpha trailers of the subcodes ID 322A and ID 322B may be used to differentiate between waste packaging configurations. As detailed in the RH-TRAMPAC, compliance with flammable gas limits may be demonstrated through the evaluation of compliance with either a decay heat limit or flammable gas generation rate (FGGR) limit per container specified in approved content codes. As applicable, if a container meets the watt*year criteria specified by the RH-TRAMPAC, the decay heat limits based on the dose-dependent G value may be used as specified in an approved content code. If a site implements the administrative controls outlined in the RH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 2.4 of the RH-TRU Payload Appendices, the decay heat or FGGR limits based on a 10-day shipping period (rather than the standard 60-day shipping period) may be used as specified in an approved content code. Requests for new or revised content codes may be submitted to the WIPP RH-TRU Payload Engineer for review and approval, provided all RH-TRAMPAC requirements are met.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Concept options for the aerial survey of Titan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Various aerial platforms intended for long endurance survey of the Titan surface are presented. A few novel concepts are introduced, including a heated methane balloon and a balloon with a tethered wind turbine. All the concept options are predicted to have lower scientific payload fractions than the Huygens probe. It is concluded that the selection of the best aerial platform option depends on more accurate mass estimates and a clear decision on whether, or not, in situ surface composition measurements are required in conjunction with aerial remote sensing.

G.E. Dorrington

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Solar thermal propulsion status and future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The status of solar absorber/thruster research is reviewed, and potential future applications and advanced solar thermal propulsion concepts are discussed. Emphasis is placed on two concepts, the windowless heat exchanger cavity and the porous material absorption concepts. Mission studies demonstrate greater than 50 percent increase in payload compared to chemical propulsion for a LEO-to-GEO mission. Alternative missions that have been considered for this concept include the Thousand Astronomical Unit mission, LEO-to-lunar orbit, and other SEI missions. It is pointed out that solar thermal propulsion is inherently simple and capable of moderate-to-high engine performance at moderate-to-low thrust levels. 15 refs.

Shoji, J.M.; Frye, P.E.; Mcclanahan, J.A. (Rockwell International Corp., Rocketdyne Div., Canoga Park, CA (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Safety analysis report for the TRUPACT-II shipping package (condensed version). Volume 1, Rev. 14  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The condensed version of the TRUPACT-II Contact Handled Transuranic Waste Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) contains essential material required by TRUPACT-II users, plus additional contents (payload) information previously submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. All or part of the following sections, which are not required by users of the TRUPACT-II, are deleted from the condensed version: (i) structural analysis, (ii) thermal analysis, (iii) containment analysis, (iv) criticality analysis, (v) shielding analysis, and (vi) hypothetical accident test results.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Sandia Multispectral Airborne Lidar for UAV Deployment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has initiated the development of an airborne system for W laser remote sensing measurements. System applications include the detection of effluents associated with the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and the detection of biological weapon aerosols. This paper discusses the status of the conceptual design development and plans for both the airborne payload (pointing and tracking, laser transmitter, and telescope receiver) and the Altus unmanned aerospace vehicle platform. Hardware design constraints necessary to maintain system weight, power, and volume limitations of the flight platform are identified.

Daniels, J.W.; Hargis,Jr. P.J.; Henson, T.D.; Jordan, J.D.; Lang, A.R.; Schmitt, R.L.

1998-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ur3 ur4 payload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

UAVs in climate research: The ARM Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the last year, a Department of Energy/Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program project known as ``ARM-UAV`` has made important progress in developing and demonstrating the utility of unmanned aerospace vehicles as platforms for scientific measurements. Recent accomplishments include a series of flights using an atmospheric research payload carried by a General Atomics Gnat UAV at Edwards AFB, California, and over ground instruments located in north-central Oklahoma. The reminder of this discussion will provide background on the program and describe the recent flights.

Bolton, W.R.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Work plan for the fabrication of the radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system package mounting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) has available a dedicated system for the transportation of RTG payloads. The RTG Transportation System (System 100) is comprised of four systems; the Package (System 120), the Semi-trailer (System 140), the Gas Management (System 160), and the Facility Transport (System 180). This document provides guidelines on the fabrication, technical requirements, and quality assurance of the Package Mounting (Subsystem 145), part of System 140. The description follows the Development Control Requirements of WHC-CM-6-1, EP 2.4, Rev. 3.

Satoh, J.A.

1994-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

183

Hypersonic airbreathing vehicle visions and enhancing technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper addresses the visions for hypersonic airbreathing vehicles and the advanced technologies that forge and enhance the designs. The matrix includes space access vehicles (single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO), two-stage-to-orbit (2STO) and three-stage-to-orbit (3STO)) and endoatmospheric vehicles (airplanes{emdash}missiles are omitted). The characteristics, the performance potential, the technologies and the synergies will be discussed. A common design constraint is that all vehicles (space access and endoatmospheric) have enclosed payload bays. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Hunt, J.L.; Lockwood, M.K.; Petley, D.H.; Pegg, R.J. [NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) Hampton, Virginia (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Dynamic Analysis and Modeling of Jansen Mechanism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Theo Jansen mechanism is gaining wide spread popularity among legged robotics researchers due to its scalable design, energy efficiency, low payload to machine load ratio, bio-inspired locomotion, deterministic foot trajectory among others. In this paper, we present dynamic analysis of a four legged Theo Jansen link mechanism using projection method that results in constraint force and equivalent Lagrange's equation of motion necessary for any meaningful extension and/or optimization of this niche mechanism. Numerical simulations using MaTX is presented in conjunction with the dynamic analysis. This research sets a theoretical basis for future investigation into Theo Jansen mechanism.

Shunsuke Nansai; Mohan Rajesh Elara; Masami Iwase

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Characterization and Liquid Chromatography-MS/MS Based Quantification of Hydroxylated Fullerenes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

School of Sustainable Engineering and The Built Environment, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Center for Environmental Biotechnology, The Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287, United States ... (1) One particular vision is to engineer nanomaterials that can carry a payload of drugs and other clinically relevant compounds to a target delivery site, e.g., to cancer cells. ... The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIEHS or the National Institutes of Health. ...

Tzu-Chiao Chao; Guixue Song; Nicole Hansmeier; Paul Westerhoff; Pierre Herckes; Rolf U. Halden

2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

186

Maglev Launch: Ultra?low Cost, Ultra?high Volume Access to Space for Cargo and Humans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Despite decades of efforts to reduce rocket launch costs improvements are marginal. Launch cost to LEO for cargo is ?$10 000 per kg of payload and to higher orbit and beyond much greater. Human access to the ISS costs $20 million for a single passenger. Unless launch costs are greatly reduced large scale commercial use and human exploration of the solar system will not occur. A new approach for ultra low cost access to spaceMaglev Launchmagnetically accelerates levitated spacecraft to orbital speeds 8 km/sec or more in evacuated tunnels on the surface using Maglev technology like that operating in Japan for high speed passenger transport. The cost of electric energy to reach orbital speed is less than $1 per kilogram of payload. Two Maglev launch systems are described the Gen?1System for unmanned cargo craft to orbit and Gen?2 for large?scale access of human to space. Magnetically levitated and propelled Gen?1 cargo craft accelerate in a 100 kilometer long evacuated tunnel entering the atmosphere at the tunnel exit which is located in high altitude terrain (?5000 meters) through an electrically powered MHD Window that prevents outside air from flowing into the tunnel. The Gen?1 cargo craft then coasts upwards to space where a small rocket burn ?0.5 km/sec establishes the final orbit. The Gen?1 reference design launches a 40 ton 2 meter diameter spacecraft with 35 tons of payload. At 12 launches per day a single Gen?1 facility could launch 150 000 tons annually. Using present costs for tunneling superconductors cryogenic equipment materials etc. the projected construction cost for the Gen?1 facility is 20 billion dollars. Amortization cost plus Spacecraft and O&M costs total $43 per kg of payload. For polar orbit launches sites exist in Alaska Russia and China. For equatorial orbit launches sites exist in the Andes and Africa. With funding the Gen?1 system could operate by 2020 AD. The Gen?2 system requires more advanced technology. Passenger spacecraft enter the atmosphere at 70 000 feet where deceleration is acceptable. A levitated evacuated launch tube is used with the levitation force generated by magnetic interaction between superconducting cables on the levitated launch tube and superconducting cables on the ground beneath. The Gen?2 system could launch 100s of thousands of passengers per year and operate by 2030 AD. Maglev launch will enable large human scale exploration of space thousands of gigawatts of space solar power satellites for beamed power to Earth a robust defense against asteroids and comets and many other applications not possible now.

James Powell; George Maise; John Rather

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

De-wrinkling of pre-tensioned membranes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-length. In Cunliffe (2003), trimming simulations are performed for a right-angled, isosceles membrane behaving as a biaxially-loaded quarter panel in a solar sail and, by trial and error, it is found that compressive stresses mostly disappear when all edges... % of the total area (Stamper et al.,1. Introduction Gossamer structures are thin-wa favoured in the design, construction spacecraft, such as solar-propelled sa telescopes and, more recently, de- inside restricted payload volumes, th ratios of any deployable...

Bonin, A. S.; Seffen, K. A.

2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

188

SpaceWire model development technology for satellite architecture.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Packet switched data communications networks that use distributed processing architectures have the potential to simplify the design and development of new, increasingly more sophisticated satellite payloads. In addition, the use of reconfigurable logic may reduce the amount of redundant hardware required in space-based applications without sacrificing reliability. These concepts were studied using software modeling and simulation, and the results are presented in this report. Models of the commercially available, packet switched data interconnect SpaceWire protocol were developed and used to create network simulations of data networks containing reconfigurable logic with traffic flows for timing system distribution.

Eldridge, John M.; Leemaster, Jacob Edward; Van Leeuwen, Brian P.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

THE ADIABATIC DEMAGNETIZATION REFRIGERATOR FOR THE MICRO-X SOUNDING ROCKET TELESCOPE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Micro-X Imaging X-ray Spectrometer is a sounding rocket payload slated for launch in 2011. An array of Transition Edge Sensors, which is operated at a bath temperature of 50 mK, will be used to obtain a high resolution spectrum of the Puppis-A supernova remnant. An Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator (ADR) with a 75 gram Ferric Ammonium Alum (FAA) salt pill in the bore of a 4 T superconducting magnet provides a stable heat sink for the detector array only a few seconds after burnout of the rocket motors. This requires a cold stage design with very short thermal time constants. A suspension made from Kevlar strings holds the 255 gram cold stage in place. It is capable of withstanding loads in excess of 200 g. Stable operation of the TES array in proximity to the ADR magnet is ensured by a three-stage magnetic shielding system which consists of a superconducting can, a high-permeability shield and a bucking coil. The development and testing of the Micro-X payload is well underway.

Wikus, P.; Bagdasarova, Y.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Leman, S. W.; Rutherford, J. M.; Trowbridge, S. N. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Adams, J. S.; Bandler, S. R.; Eckart, M. E.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Doriese, W. B. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); McCammon, D. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2010-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

190

A Low-Cost Natural Gas/Freshwater Aerial Pipeline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Offered is a new type of low-cost aerial pipeline for delivery of natural gas, an important industrial and residential fuel, and freshwater as well as other payloads over long distances. The offered pipeline dramatically decreases the construction and operation costs and the time necessary for pipeline construction. A dual-use type of freight pipeline can improve an arid rural environment landscape and provide a reliable energy supply for cities. Our aerial pipeline is a large, self-lofting flexible tube disposed at high altitude. Presently, the term "natural gas" lacks a precise technical definition, but the main components of natural gas are methane, which has a specific weight less than air. A lift force of one cubic meter of methane equals approximately 0.5 kg. The lightweight film flexible pipeline can be located in the Earth-atmosphere at high altitude and poses no threat to airplanes or the local environment. The authors also suggest using lift force of this pipeline in tandem with wing devices for cheap shipment of a various payloads (oil, coal and water) over long distances. The article contains a computed macroproject in northwest China for delivery of 24 billion cubic meter of gas and 23 millions tonnes of water annually.

Alexander Bolonkin; Richard Cathcart

2007-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

191

Sharp and the Jules Verne Launcher  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has built the worlds largest hydrogen gas gun called SHARP, (Super High Altitude Research Project). Originally designed to launch 5 kg to a 450 km altitude, SHARP is configured horizontally at Site 300 in Tracy, California. SHARP is successfully delivering 5 kg scramjets at Mach 9 in aerophysics tests. Some of the results of the scramjet tests are enlightening and are presented insofar as they are relevant to future launches into space. Using a light gas gun to launch payloads into orbit has been analyzed. We look at LEO (Low Earth Orbit), GEO (Geosynchronous Earth Orbit), and LO (Lunar Orbit). We present a conceptual design for a large light gas gun called the Jules Verne Launcher (JVL). The JVL can deliver 3.3 metric tons to a 500 km low earth orbit. We anticipate one launch per day. We present the history of light gas guns, the SHARP design and performance, and the JVL design. Another section is devoted to the vehicle environment and resultant design. Lastly, we present a cost analysis. Our results indicated that the JVL will be able to deliver 1000 metric tons of payload to LEO yearly. The cost will be 5{percent} of the best US rocket delivery cost. This technology will enable the next phase of man{close_quote}s exploration of space. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Hunter, J.; Cartland, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Imaging and Detection Program, P.O. Box 808, L-495, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Design of the magnetic diagnostics unit onboard LISA Pathfinder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) is a joint mission of ESA and NASA which aims to be the first space-borne gravita- tional wave observatory. Due to the high complexity and technological challenges that LISA will face, ESA decided to launch a technological demonstrator, LISA Pathfinder. The payload of LISA Pathfinder is the so-called LISA Technology Package, and will be the highest sensitivity geodesic explorer flown to date. The LISA Technology Package is designed to measure relative accelerations between two test masses in nominal free fall (geodesic motion). The magnetic, thermal and radiation disturbances affecting the payload are monitored and dealt by the diagnostics subsystem. The diagnostics subsystem consists of several modules, and one of these is the magnetic diagnostics unit. Its main function is the assessment of differential acceleration noise between test masses due to the magnetic effects. To do so, it has to determine the magnetic characteristics of the test masses, namely their magnetic remanences and susceptibilities. In this paper we show how this can be achieved to the desired accuracy.

Marc Diaz-Aguil; Ignacio Mateos; Juan Ramos-Castro; Alberto Lobo; Enrique Garca-Berro

2012-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

193

Improving ISR Radar Utilization (How I quit blaming the user and made the radar easier to use).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In modern multi - sensor multi - mode Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance ( ISR ) platforms, the plethora of options available to a sensor/payload operator are quite large, leading to an over - worked operator often down - selecting to favorite sensors an d modes. For example, Full Motion Video (FMV) is justifiably a favorite sensor at the expense of radar modes, even if radar modes can offer unique and advantageous information. The challenge is then to increase the utilization of the radar modes in a man ner attractive to the sensor/payload operator. We propose that this is best accomplished by combining sensor modes and displays into 'super - modes'. - 4 - Acknowledgements This report is the result of a n unfunded research and development activity . Sandia Natio nal Laboratories is a multi - program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE - AC04 - 94AL850 00.

Doerry, Armin W.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

A Fission-Powered Interstellar Precursor Mission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An 'interstellar precursor mission' lays the groundwork for eventual interstellar exploration by studying the interstellar medium and by stretching technologies that have potential application for eventual interstellar exploration. The numerous scientific goals for such a mission include generating a 3-D stellar map of our galaxy, studying Kuiper-belt and Oort cloud objects, and observing distant objects using the sun's gravitational lens as the primary of an enormous telescope. System equations are developed for a space tug which propels a 2500-kg scientific payload to 550 astronomical units in about 20 years. The tug to transport this payload uses electric propulsion with an Isp of 15,000 seconds and a fission reactor with a closed Brayton cycle to genemte the electricity. The optimal configuration may be to thrust for only about 6 years and then coast for the remaining 14 pars. This spacecraft does not require any physics breakthroughs or major advances in technology. The fission power syslem can be engineered and built by drawing upon known technologies developed for relatgd systems over the past 40 years. The tug system would eventually reach 1000 a.u in 33 years, and would have adequate power to relay large amounts of data throughout its journey.

Lenard, R.X.; Lipinski, R.J.; West, J.L.; Wright, S.A.

1998-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

195

THERMAL UPGRADING OF 9977 RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL (RAM) TYPE B PACKAGE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 9977 package is a radioactive material package that was originally certified to ship Heat Sources and RTG contents up to 19 watts and it is now being reviewed to significantly expand its contents in support of additional DOE missions. Thermal upgrading will be accomplished by employing stacked 3013 containers, a 3013 aluminum spacer and an external aluminum sleeve for enhanced heat transfer. The 7th Addendum to the original 9977 package Safety Basis Report describing these modifications is under review for the DOE certification. The analyses described in this paper show that this well-designed and conservatively analyzed package can be upgraded to carry contents with decay heat up to 38 watts with some simple design modifications. The Model 9977 package has been designed as a replacement for the Department of Transportation (DOT) Fissile Specification 6M package. The 9977 package is a very versatile Type B package which is certified to transport and store a wide spectrum of radioactive materials. The package was analyzed quite conservatively to increase its usefulness and store different payload configurations. Its versatility is evident from several daughter packages such as the 9978 and H1700, and several addendums where the payloads have been modified to suit the Shipper's needs without additional testing.

Gupta, N.; Abramczyk, G.

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

196

Rosetta lander in situ characterization of a comet nucleus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rosetta is one of the cornerstone missions within the science program Horizon 2000 of the European Space Agency (ESA). Its objective is the characterization of comet Wirtanen, which will be reached after 9 years of cruise in the year 2012. As comets are believed to be the most primitive bodies in our planetary system, having preserved material from the early stages of its formation, the Rosetta mission shall result in a better understanding of the formation of the solar system. The Rosetta Lander, part of the Rosetta payload, is contributed to the mission by an international consortium of research institutes. It will perform in situ measurements on the surface of the comet nucleus. The science objectives of the Rosetta Lander can be comprised by: determination of the composition of cometary near surface matter: bulk elemental abundances, isotopes, minerals, ices, carbonaceous compounds, organics volatiles -in dependance on time and insolation. measurement of physical parameters mechanical strength, density, sound speed, electrical permittivity, heat conductivity and temperature. investigation of topology, surface structure including colour and albedo, near surface structure (strategraphy) and internal structure. the comets interaction with solar wind. The payload of the Rosetta Lander consists of nine instruments with a total mass of about 20kg. The Rosetta Lander system with an overall mass of about 85kg consists of a light weight structure of carbonfibre material, solar cells to provide power, a thermal control system securing operation without the use of radiactive heaters, a telecommunications system, using the orbiter as relay to Earth and a central computer, serving all subsystems and the payload. The lander will be ejected from the main spacecraft after selection of an adequate landing area from an orbit, about 15km above the surface of the nucleus. The actual descent strategy is highly depending on the (yet unknown) physical parameters of P/Wirtanen (like mass, shape and rotation period). Thus, a flexible landing concept, which allows the setting of the landing parameters interactively during the mission is required. Landing will take place on a tripod that includes a device that dissipates most of the impact energy and allows rotation of the main structure. At impact, a hold-down thruster and the shot of an anchoring harpoon will avoid rebound from the surface.

K. Wittmann; B. Feuerbacher; S. Ulamec; H. Rosenbauer; J.P. Bibring; D. Moura; R. Mugnuolo; S. diPippo; K. Szego; G. Haerendel

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

21 - 17030 of 26,764 results. 21 - 17030 of 26,764 results. Download CX-001012: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Efficiency of Data Networks through Rate Adaptation CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 03/02/2010 Location(s): New Jersey Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-001012-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-001006: Categorical Exclusion Determination Power Minimization Techniques for Networked Data Centers CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 03/02/2010 Location(s): California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-001006-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-002265: Categorical Exclusion Determination Payload 2 Integration and Environmental Testing at Kirtland Air Force Base

198

Solar wind samples give insight into birth of solar system  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Solar wind samples Solar wind samples Solar wind samples give insight into birth of solar system Most of the Genesis payload consisted of fragile solar-wind collectors, which had been exposed to the solar particles over a period of two years. June 23, 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

199

ARM - Blog Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0, 2013 [BBOP, Blog, Field Notes] 0, 2013 [BBOP, Blog, Field Notes] BBOP Media Stop Bookmark and Share Editor's note: Eric Francavilla is an intern in the media relations department at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. On August 15, I joined Mary Beckman of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) media relations team for a media event held at the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) base of operations: a small hangar at Bergstrom Aircraft in Pasco, Wash. We invited reporters to see how scientists from the Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory and PNNL have teamed up to fly through forest fire smoke across the Northwest in the name of science. The G-1 research plane, seen here at the Bergstrom Aircraft hangar in Pasco, Wash., carries a payload for BBOP of more than 30 scientific instruments to measure smoke from forest fires and other biomass burns.

200

2009 BMW MINI EVAmerica fact sheet.pdf  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3230 lb 3230 lb Delivered Curb Weight: 3306 lb Distribution F/R: 51/49 % GVWR: 3660 lb Payload 2 : 354 lb Performance Goal: 400 lb DIMENSIONS Wheelbase: 97.1 inches Track F/R: 57.4/57.8 inches Length: 145.6 inches Width: 66.3 inches Height: 55.4 inches Ground Clearance: 6.0 inches Performance Goal: 5.0 inches CHARGER Level 1: Location: On-board Type: Conductive Input Voltages: 120VAC Level 2: Location: Off-board Type: Conductive Input Voltages: 240 VAC © 2009 Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved BASE VEHICLE: 2009 BMW MINI E Seatbelt Positions: Two Standard Features: Front Wheel Drive Front Disc and Rear Disc Brakes Regenerative Braking With Coast Down Three-Point Safety Belts Speedometer Odometer State-Of-Charge Meter BATTERY Type: Lithium Ion Number of Modules: 48

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201

VIA Motors electric vehicle platform  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Extended-Range Electric Trucks Extended-Range Electric Trucks The fuel economy of a Prius with the payload of a pickup VIA's E-REV powertrain is ideal for America's fleets, cutting fuel costs by up to 75%, while dramatically reducing petroleum consumption and emissions- electricity costs an average of 60 cents per equivalent gallon. Recharging daily, the average driver could expect to refill the gas tank less than 10 times a year rather than once a week. It offers all the advantages of an electric vehicle, without range limitations. Working with vehicle manufacturers, VIA plans to begin delivering E-REV trucks to government and utility fleets in 2011. The onboard generator provides a work site with 15 kW of exportable power Up to 40 miles in all-electric mode and up to 300 miles using the range extender

202

OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Powering Curiosity; Exploring New Horizons - DOE's MMRTG Powering Curiosity; Exploring New Horizons - DOE's MMRTG by Mary Schorn on Thu, 9 Aug, 2012 DOE's RTG is doing it again. The Department's Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) is providing continuous power to the Mars rover Curiosity. This radioactive power source is "essentially a nuclear battery that will operate the rover's instruments, robotic arm, wheels, computers and radio. It is fueled with plutonium-238 that gives off heat as it naturally decays. No moving parts are required to convert this heat into electricity."1 The MMRTG "can go farther, travel to more places, and power and heat a larger and more capable scientific payload compared to the solar power alternative NASA studied. The radioisotope power system gives Curiosity the

203

VEHICLE SPECIFICATIONS Vehicle Features Base Vehicle: 2010 Honda  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Honda Honda Civic Hybrid VIN: JHMFA3F24AS005577 Seatbelt Positions: 5 Standard Features: Air Conditioning Power Locks Power Steering Power Brakes Power Windows Cruise Control Front Disc Brakes Rear Disc Brakes Front Wheel Drive Regenerative Braking Anti-Lock Brakes Traction Control Air Bags AM/FM Stereo with CD State of Charge Meter 1 Weights Design Curb Weight: 2877 lb Delivered Curb Weight: 2982 lb Distribution F/R (%): 57/43 GVWR: 3792 lb GAWR F/R: 1973/1841 lb Payload 2 : 810 lb Performance Goal: 400 lb Dimensions Wheelbase: 106.3 in Track F/R: 59.1/60.2 in Length: 177.3 in Width: 69.0 in Height: 56.3 in Ground Clearance: 6.0 in Performance Goal: 5.0 in Tires Manufacturer: Bridgestone

204

vitko-99.PDF  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ARM-UAV: The Next Phase ARM-UAV: The Next Phase J. Vitko, Jr. and T. P. Tooman Sandia National Laboratories Livermore, California R. G. Ellingson University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement-Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle (ARM-UAV) Program was initiated in 1993 to develop a capability to provide radiation and cloud measurements at the top of the troposphere, thereby capping the top of the grid cell above ARM sites. To date, ARM-UAV has developed the necessary payloads and measurement techniques for radiative flux measurements at mid-latitudes. The upcoming Kauai mission completes the original vision by extending these capabilities to cloud measurements and tropical altitudes. Beyond Kauai, with development largely though not completely done, we will begin transitioning to an operational phase to better support ARM's

205

ARM - Field Campaign - Biomass Burning Observation Project - BBOP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsBiomass Burning Observation Project - BBOP govCampaignsBiomass Burning Observation Project - BBOP Campaign Links BNL BBOP Website ARM Aerial Facility Payload Science Plan Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Biomass Burning Observation Project - BBOP 2013.07.01 - 2013.10.24 Website : http://campaign.arm.gov/bbop/ Lead Scientist : Larry Kleinman For data sets, see below. Description This field campaign will address multiple uncertainties in aerosol intensive properties, which are poorly represented in climate models, by means of aircraft measurements in biomass burning plumes. Key topics to be investigated are: Aerosol mixing state and morphology Mass absorption coefficients (MACs) Chemical composition of non-refractory material associated with

206

VEHICLE SPECIFICATIONS Vehicle Features Base Vehicle: 2010 Smart  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Smart Smart Fortwo MHD VIN: WME4513341K406476 Seatbelt Positions: 2 Standard Features: Air Conditioning Power Locks Power Steering Power Brakes Power Windows Cruise Control Front Disc Brakes Rear Drum Brakes Rear Wheel Drive Anti-Lock Brakes Traction Control Air Bags AM/FM Stereo with CD player Weights Design Curb Weight:1,818 lb Delivered Curb Weight: 1.742 lb Distribution F/R (%):44/56 GVWR: 2,244 lb GAWR F/R: 968/1,452 lb Payload 1 : 426 lb Performance Goal: 400 lb Dimensions Wheelbase: 73.5 in Track F/R: 50.5/54.5 in Length: 106.1 in Width: 61.4 in Height: 60.7 in Ground Clearance: 6.25 in Performance Goal: 5.0 in Tires Manufacturer: Continental Model: ContiproContact Size: Front -P155/60/R15

207

Microsoft Word - solcar95.html  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FORCE FORCE VEHICLE SPECIFICATIONS CONVERTED VEHICLE Base Vehicle: 1995 Geo Metro VIN:2C1MR529XS6783464 Seatbelt Positions: Three Standard Features: Power Brakes Front Disk Brakes Front Wheel Drive Dual Air Bags AM/FM Stereo Radio w/Cassette Electric Heater Options as Tested: None BATTERY Manufacturer: GM Ovonic Type: 13.2EV85 Nickel Metal Hydride Number of Modules: 14 Weight of Module: 18 kg Weight of Pack(s): 254 kg Pack Locations: Undertrunk/Underhood Nominal Module Voltage: 13.2 V Nominal System Voltage: 185 V Nominal Capacity (1C): 85 Ah WEIGHTS Design Curb Weight: 2246 lbs Delivered Curb Weight: 2304 lbs Distribution F/R: 50/50 % GVWR: 2755 lbs GAWR F/R: 1432/1366 lbs Payload: 451 lbs Performance Goal: 664 lbs DIMENSIONS Wheelbase: 93.5 inches

208

 

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nonproliferation Technologies Section is developing the Rocket Deployed Air Sampler (RDAS) system for deployment at various locations off the Nonproliferation Technologies Section is developing the Rocket Deployed Air Sampler (RDAS) system for deployment at various locations off the Savannah River Site. The RDAS system development effort is part of the NNSA Proliferation Detection Program funded through the Department of Energy's Office of Nonproliferation Research and Development (NA-22). The scope of the RDAS development effort includes the design and development, testing, and field operation of several small air sampling payloads deployed on Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) large model rockets. Development, Testing and Operation of the RDAS system Savannah River Site Aiken South Carolina TC - A - 2010 - 018, Rev.0 Apr 8, 2010 Digitally signed by Andrew R. Grainger DN: cn=Andrew R. Grainger, o=DOE-SR, ou=EQMD, email=drew.grainger@srs.gov,

209

VEHICLE SPECIFICATIONS Vehicle Features  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mazda 3 Mazda 3 VIN: JMZBLA4G601111865 Seatbelt Positions: 5 Standard Features: Air Conditioning Power Locks Power Steering Power Brakes Power Windows Cruise Control Front Disc Brakes Rear Disc Brakes Front Wheel Drive Anti-Lock Brakes Traction Control Air Bags AM/FM Stereo with CD Weights Design Curb Weight: 2,954 lb Delivered Curb Weight: 2,850 lb Distribution F/R (%): 63/37 GVWR: 4,050 lb GAWR F/R: 2,057/1,896 lb Payload 1 : 1,096 lb Performance Goal: 400 lb Dimensions Wheelbase: 103.9 in Track F/R: 60.4/59.8 in Length: 175.6 in Width: 69.1 in Height: 57.9 in Ground Clearance: 6.1 in Performance Goal: 5.0 in Tires Manufacturer: Yokohama Model: YK520 Size: P205/55R17 Pressure F/R: 35/33 psi

210

Microsoft Word - FACT SHEET AMWTP Seismic.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mixed Waste Treatment Project vs. Nuclear Power Plants Mixed Waste Treatment Project vs. Nuclear Power Plants Implications of Japanese earthquake and tsunami Treatment - 1 Characterization - 4 Retrieval - 2 Payload - 5 Storage - 3 Shipping - 6 The recent earthquake, tsunami, and subsequent nuclear crises in Japan have renewed focus and concerns regarding the safety of the nuclear industry. The U.S. Department of Energy and Bechtel BWXT Idaho take these concerns very seriously and are confident in the safety of the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP). AMWTP facilities are conservatively designed and were constructed to withstand the natural phenomena of eastern Idaho, which include earthquakes, range fires, wind storms and other external hazards. The site's defense-in-depth protection from these hazards

211

Fermilab Today  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2, 2011 2, 2011 spacer Subscribe | Contact Us | Archive | Classifieds | Guidelines | Help Search GO spacer Calendar Have a safe day! Monday, Dec. 12 2:30 p.m. Particle Astrophysics Seminar - One West Speaker: Petra Huntemeyer, Michigan Technological University Title: The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory in Mexico 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK 2nd Flr X-Over 4 p.m. All Experimenters' Meeting - Curia II Special Topics: Application of 3D Plotter for an 11T Dipole Magnet Prototype Endpart for CERN LHC; DECam Imager in Chile; SuperCDMS New Payload Operation at Soudan Mine Tuesday, Dec. 13 7 a.m. Special live broadcast from CERN - One West Topic: Latest Higgs results from ATLAS and CMS 3 p.m. LHC Physics Center Topic of the Week Seminar - WH11NE Sunrise Speaker: Richard Gray, Rutgers University

212

RH Packaging Operations Manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This procedure provides operating instructions for the RH-TRU 72-B Road Cask, Waste Shipping Package. In this document, ''Packaging'' refers to the assembly of components necessary to ensure compliance with the packaging requirements (not loaded with a payload). ''Package'' refers to a Type B packaging that, with its radioactive contents, is designed to retain the integrity of its containment and shielding when subject to the normal conditions of transport and hypothetical accident test conditions set forth in 10 CFR Part 71. Loading of the RH 72-B cask can be done two ways, on the RH cask trailer in the vertical position or by removing the cask from the trailer and loading it in a facility designed for remote-handling (RH). Before loading the 72-B cask, loading procedures and changes to the loading procedures for the 72-B cask must be sent to CBFO at sitedocuments@wipp.ws for approval.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2003-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

213

High altitude balloon flights of position sensitive CdZnTe detectors for high energy X-ray astronomy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) is a semiconductor detector well suited for high energy X-ray astronomy. The High-Energy X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (HEXIS) program is developing this technology for use in a hard X-ray all-sky survey and as a focal plane imager for missions such as FAR_XITE and Constellation X. We have designed a novel electrode geometry that improves interaction localization and depth of interaction determination. The HEXIS program has flown two high altitude balloon payloads from Ft. Summer NM to investigate background properties and shielding effects on a position sensitive CZT detector in the energy range of 20350 keV.

Kimberly R. Slavis; Paul Dowkontt; Fred Duttweiler; John Epstein; Paul L. Hink; George L. Huszar; Philippe C. Leblanc; James L. Matteson; Robert T. Skelton; Ed Stephan

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

The Cibola flight experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cibola Flight Experiment (CFE) is an experimental small satellite carrying a reconfigurable processing instrument developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory that demonstrates the feasibility of using FPGA-based high-performance computing for sensor processing in the space environment. The CFE satellite was launched on March 8, 2007 in low-earth orbit and has operated extremely well since its deployment. The nine Xilinx Virtex FPGAs used in the payload have been used for several high-throughput sensor processing applications and for single-event upset (SEU) monitoring and mitigation. This paper will describe the CFE system and summarize its operational results. In addition, this paper will describe the results from several SEU detection circuits that were performed on the spacecraft.

Caffrey, Michael Paul [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nelson, Anthony [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Salazar, Anthony [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Roussel - Dupre, Diane [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Katko, Kim [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Palmer, Joseph [ISE-3; Robinson, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wirthlin, Michael [BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIV; Howes, William [BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIV; Richins, Daniel [BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIV

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Implementation of Revision 19 of the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission on July 27, 2001 approved Revision 19 of the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report (SAR) and the associated TRUPACT-II Authorized Methods for Payload Control (TRAMPAC). Key initiatives in Revision 19 included matrix depletion, unlimited mixing of shipping categories, a flammability assessment methodology, and an alternative methodology for the determination of flammable gas generation rates. All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites shipping transuranic (TRU) waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) were required to implement Revision 19 methodology into their characterization and waste transportation programs by May 20, 2002. An implementation process was demonstrated by the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) in Golden, Colorado. The three-part process used by RFETS included revision of the site-specific TRAMPAC, an evaluation of the contact-handled TRU waste inventory against the regulations in Revision 19, and design and development of software to facilitate future inventory analyses.

D'Amico, E.; O'Leary, J.; Bell, S.; Djordjevic, S.; Givens, C,; Shokes, T.; Thompson, S.; Stahl, S.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

216

Solar sail propulsion: enabling new capabilities for heliophysics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar sails can play a critical role in enabling solar and heliophysics missions. Solar sail technology within NASA is currently at 80% of TRL-6, suitable for an in-flight technology demonstration. It is conceivable that an initial demonstration could carry scientific payloads that, depending on the type of mission, are commensurate with the goals of the three study panels of the 2010 Heliophysics Survey. Follow-on solar sail missions, leveraging advances in solar sail technology to support Heliophysics Survey goals, would then be feasible. This white paper reports on a sampling of missions enabled by solar sails, the current state of the technology, and what funding is required to advance the current state of technology such that solar sails can enable these missions.

Johnson, L; Alhorn, D; Heaton, A; Vansant, T; Campbell, B; Pappa, R; Keats, W; Liewer, P C; Alexander, D; Ayon, J; Wawrzyniak, G; Burton, R; Carroll, D; Matloff, G; Kezerashvili, R Ya

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

TRUPACT-II 157 Examination Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of examination and recovery activities performed on the TRUPACT-II 157 shipping container. The container was part of a contact-handled transuranic waste shipment being transported on a truck to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico when an accident occurred. Although the transport vehicle sustained only minor damage, airborne transuranic contamination was detected in air samples extracted from inside TRUPACT-II 157 at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Consequently, the shipping container was rejected, resealed, and returned to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory where the payload was disassembled, examined, and recovered for subsequent reshipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. This report documents the results of those activities.

Barry H. O'Brien; Jeffrey M. Lacy; Kip E. Archibald

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Comparison of M46 broad-band visible data with ELF data from the Sprites `96 campaign  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lightning data, recorded with satellite optical sensors, are compared with extremely low frequency (ELF) and Schumann resonance (SR) data from the Sprites `96 Campaign. The satellite data are broad-band visible events recorded by the M46 satellite payload. Full width at half maximum and optical tail durations from the satellite data are compared with ELF slow tail features and Schumann resonance spectral color. In addition, continuing current estimates were computed for several positive cloud-to-ground (PCG) strokes. These estimates were derived using relative optical intensities from the satellite data and a peak current measurement from National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) data. This assessment of M46 lightning data supports correlations between visible and ELF signatures. More data must be studied for compelling proof.

Mitchell, E.A.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Parameter identification for joint elements in a revolute-joint detector manipulator.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A revolute-joint robot is being developed for the spatial positioning of an x-ray detector at the Advanced Photon Source. Commercially available revolute-joint manipulators do not meet our size, positioning, or payload specifications. One idea being considered is the modification of a commercially available robot, with the goal of improving the repeatability and trajectory accuracy. Theoretical, computational, and experimental procedures are being used to (1) identify, (2) simulate the dynamics of an existing robot system using a multibody approach, and eventually (3) design an improved version, with low dynamic positioning uncertainty. A key aspect of the modeling and performance prediction is accurate stiffness and damping values for the robot joints. This paper discusses the experimental identification of the stiffness and damping parameters for one robot harmonic drive joint.

Preissner, C.; Shu, D.; Royston, T.; Experimental Facilities Division (APS); Univ. of Illinois at Chicago

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Low-Z Shell Pellet Experiments on DIII-D  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Small (o.d. = 1.8 mm, t = 0.37 mm) polystyrene shells filled with either pressurized argon gas or boron powder have been fired into DIII-D plasmas for disruption mitigation experiments. The pellet shells were observed to burn up at rhoapprox =0.5, roughly consistent with ablation rate calculations. Pellet slowing from 350 m/s down to 100 m/s was observed, which is not well-understood at present. Negligible plasma current contraction or MHD onset were seen as a result of the shell burn-up in the plasma edge, consistent with calculations. The pellet payloads were observed to ionize rapidly in the pellet vicinity (<1 cm radius) and rapid (<15 ms) mixing through the plasma core was observed.

Hollmann, E. M.; Yu, J. H. [University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 92093-0417 (United States); James, A. N.; Parks, P. B.; Evans, T. E.; Humphreys, D. A.; Jackson, G. L.; La Haye, R. J.; Strait, E. J.; West, W. P.; Wu, W. [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Jernigan, T. C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

2009-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ur3 ur4 payload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Capacitance probe for detection of anomalies in non-metallic plastic pipe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure relates to analysis of materials using a capacitive sensor to detect anomalies through comparison of measured capacitances. The capacitive sensor is used in conjunction with a capacitance measurement device, a location device, and a processor in order to generate a capacitance versus location output which may be inspected for the detection and localization of anomalies within the material under test. The components may be carried as payload on an inspection vehicle which may traverse through a pipe interior, allowing evaluation of nonmetallic or plastic pipes when the piping exterior is not accessible. In an embodiment, supporting components are solid-state devices powered by a low voltage on-board power supply, providing for use in environments where voltage levels may be restricted.

Mathur, Mahendra P. (Pittsburgh, PA); Spenik, James L. (Morgantown, WV); Condon, Christopher M. (Morgantown, WV); Anderson, Rodney (Grafton, WV); Driscoll, Daniel J. (Morgantown, WV); Fincham, Jr., William L. (Fairmont, WV); Monazam, Esmail R. (Morgantown, WV)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

222

Infrared source test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Infrared Source Test (IRST) is to demonstrate the ability to track a ground target with an infrared sensor from an airplane. The system is being developed within the Advance Technology Program`s Theater Missile Defense/Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) section. The IRST payload consists of an Amber Radiance 1 infrared camera system, a computer, a gimbaled mirror, and a hard disk. The processor is a custom R3000 CPU board made by Risq Modular Systems, Inc. for LLNL. The board has ethernet, SCSI, parallel I/O, and serial ports, a DMA channel, a video (frame buffer) interface, and eight MBytes of main memory. The real-time operating system VxWorks has been ported to the processor. The application code is written in C on a host SUN 4 UNIX workstation. The IRST is the result of a combined effort by physicists, electrical and mechanical engineers, and computer scientists.

Ott, L.

1994-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

223

Space radiation shielding analysis and dosimetry for the space shuttle program  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Active and passive radiation dosimeters have been flown on every Space Shuttle mission to measure the naturally?occurring background Van Allen and galactic cosmic radiation doses that astronauts and radiation?sensitive experiments and payloads receive. A review of the various models utilized at the NASA/Johnson Space Center Radiation Analysis and Dosimetry is presented. An analytical shielding model of the Shuttle was developed as an engineering tool to aid in making premission radiation dose calculations and is discussed in detail. The anatomical man models are also discussed. A comparison between the onboard dosimeter measurements for the 24 Shuttle missions to date and the dose calculations using the radiation environment and shielding models is presented.

William Atwell; E. R. Beever; A. C. Hardy; R. G. Richmond; B. L. Cash

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Completion processing for data communications instructions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Completion processing of data communications instructions in a distributed computing environment, including receiving, in an active messaging interface (`AMI`) data communications instructions, at least one instruction specifying a callback function; injecting into an injection FIFO buffer of a data communication adapter, an injection descriptor, each slot in the injection FIFO buffer having a corresponding slot in a pending callback list; listing in the pending callback list any callback function specified by an instruction, incrementing a pending callback counter for each listed callback function; transferring payload data as per each injection descriptor, incrementing a transfer counter upon completion of each transfer; determining from counter values whether the pending callback list presently includes callback functions whose data transfers have been completed; calling by the AMI any such callback functions from the pending callback list, decrementing the pending callback counter for each callback function called.

Blocksome, Michael A; Kumar, Sameer; Parker, Jeffrey J

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

225

CMMAD Usability Case Study in Support of Countermine and Hazard Sensing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During field trials, operator usability data were collected in support of lane clearing missions and hazard sensing for two robot platforms with Robot Intelligence Kernel (RIK) software and sensor scanning payloads onboard. The tests featured autonomous and shared robot autonomy levels where tasking of the robot used a graphical interface featuring mine location and sensor readings. The goal of this work was to provide insights that could be used to further technology development. The efficacy of countermine systems in terms of mobility, search, path planning, detection, and localization were assessed. Findings from objective and subjective operator interaction measures are reviewed along with commentary from soldiers having taken part in the study who strongly endorse the system.

Victor G. Walker; David I. Gertman

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

PAT-1 safety analysis report addendum author responses to request for additional information.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Plutonium Air Transportable Package, Model PAT-1, is certified under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations Part 71 by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) per Certificate of Compliance (CoC) USA/0361B(U)F-96 (currently Revision 9). The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) submitted SAND Report SAND2009-5822 to NRC that documented the incorporation of plutonium (Pu) metal as a new payload for the PAT-1 package. NRC responded with a Request for Additional Information (RAI), identifying information needed in connection with its review of the application. The purpose of this SAND report is to provide the authors responses to each RAI. SAND Report SAND2010-6106 containing the proposed changes to the Addendum is provided separately.

Weiner, Ruth F.; Schmale, David T.; Kalan, Robert J.; Akin, Lili A.; Miller, David Russell; Knorovsky, Gerald Albert; Yoshimura, Richard Hiroyuki; Lopez, Carlos; Harding, David Cameron; Jones, Perry L.; Morrow, Charles W.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Implementation of an Onboard Visual Tracking System with Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents a visual tracking system that is capable or running real time on-board a small UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle). The tracking system is computationally efficient and invariant to lighting changes and rotation of the object or the camera. Detection and tracking is autonomously carried out on the payload computer and there are two different methods for creation of the image patches. The first method starts detecting and tracking using a stored image patch created prior to flight with previous flight data. The second method allows the operator on the ground to select the interest object for the UAV to track. The tracking system is capable of re-detecting the object of interest in the events of tracking failure. Performance of the tracking system was verified both in the lab and during actual flights of the UAV. Results show that the system can run on-board and track a diverse set of objects in real time.

Qadir, Ashraf; Neubert, Jeremiah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

50500 MeV ??ray emission in the early phase of SN1987A  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SN1987A was observed on 19th April 1987 with a combined high energy ??ray and hard x?ray payload flown on a stratospheric balloon from Alice Springs Australia. The ??ray detector sensitive in the energy range 50500 MeV was an optical spark chamber with 400cm2 area a field of view of 60 FWHM and a time resolution of 10 ?s. The counting rate profile at ?2.2 mb float altitude has lead to a 3? upper limit to the steady ??ray flux of 710? 4 ph cm? 2 s? 1 in the 50500 MeV range. This upper limit is compared to our predictions for the time profile of ??ray emission from SN1987A resulting from pulsar acceleration of particles to cosmic ray energies.

R. K. Sood; J. A. Thomas; L. Waldron; R. K. Manchanda; P. Ubertini; A. Bazzano; C. D. La Padula; G. K. Rochester; T. J. Sumner; G. Frye; T. Jenins; R. Koga; P. Albats

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

50--500 MeV. gamma. -ray emission in the early phase of SN1987A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SN1987A was observed on 19th April 1987 with a combined high energy ..gamma..-ray and hard x-ray payload, flown on a stratospheric balloon from Alice Springs, Australia. The ..gamma..-ray detector, sensitive in the energy range 50--500 MeV, was an optical spark chamber with 400cm/sup 2/ area, a field of view of 60/sup 0/ FWHM and a time resolution of 10 ..mu..s. The counting rate profile at approx.2.2 mb float altitude has lead to a 3sigma upper limit to the steady ..gamma..-ray flux of 7 x 10/sup -4/ ph cm/sup -2/ s/sup -1/ in the 50--500 MeV range. This upper limit is compared to our predictions for the time profile of ..gamma..-ray emission from SN1987A resulting from pulsar acceleration of particles to cosmic ray energies.

Sood, R.K.; Thomas, J.A.; Waldron, L.; Manchanda, R.K.; Ubertini, P.; Bazzano, A.; La Padula, C.D.; Rochester, G.K.; Sumner, T.J.; Frye, G.; and others

1988-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

230

Mission analysis for hybrid thermionic nuclear reactor LEO-to-GEO transfer applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper details the results of mission analyses concerning a hybrid STAR-C based system, which is based on a safe solid fuel form for high-temperature reactor core operation and a rugged planar thermionic energy converter for long-life steady-state electric power production. Hybrid power/propulsion system concepts are shown to offer superior performance capabilities for Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) to Geosynchronous-Earth-Orbit (GEO) orbital transfer applications over chemical propulsion systems. A key feature of the hybrid power/propulsion system is that the propulsion system uses the on-board payload power system. Mission results for hybrid concepts using Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP), Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP), and combination of NTP and NEP are discussed.

Widman, F.W. Jr.; North, D.M. (Rockwell International/Rocketdyne Division, 6633 Canoga Avenue, Canoga Park, California 91303 (United States)); Choong, P.T.; Teofilo, V.L. (Lockheed Missiles and Space Company, Inc., 1111 Lockheed Way, Synnyvale, California 94088 (United States))

1993-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

231

SAFETY ANALYSIS REPORT FOR PACKAGING, MODEL 9977, ADDENDUM 3, JUSTIFICATION FOR SMALL GRAM QUANTITY CONTENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Addendum establishes a new family of content envelopes consisting of small quantities of radioactive materials. These content envelopes and specific packing configurations are shown to be subcritical. However, the dose rates of some payloads must be measured and shown to comply with applicable radiation limits. Authorization for shipment of the content envelop requires acceptance of this Addendum by the DOE-HQ certifying official as a supplement to the 9977 SARP Revision 2 and DOE-HQ?s subsequent revision of the CoC Revision 10 (which is based on SARP Addendum 2 and SARP Addendum 4) to authorize the additional content envelope. The Small Gram Quantity Content Envelopes and packing configurations will be incorporated in the next revision of the 9977 SARP.

Abramczyk, G.

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

232

Survivable pulse power space radiator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal radiator system is described for use on an outer space vehicle, which must survive a long period of nonuse and then radiate large amounts of heat for a limited period of time. The radiator includes groups of radiator panels that are pivotally connected in tandem, so that they can be moved to deployed configuration wherein the panels lie largely coplanar, and to a stowed configuration wherein the panels lie in a stack to resist micrometerorite damage. The panels are mounted on a boom which separates a hot power source from a payload. While the panels are stowed, warm fluid passes through their arteries to keep them warm enough to maintain the coolant in a liquid state and avoid embrittlement of material. The panels can be stored in a largely cylindrical shell, with panels progressively further from the boom being of progressively shorter length. 5 figs.

Mims, J.; Buden, D.; Williams, K.

1988-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

233

Robot trajectory planning via dynamic programming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The method of dynamic programming is applied to three example problems dealing with robot trajectory planning. The first two examples involve end-effector tracking of a straight line with rest-to-rest motions of planar two-link and three-link rigid robots. These examples illustrate the usefulness of the method for producing smooth trajectories either in the presence or absence of joint redundancies. The last example demonstrates the use of the method for rest-to-rest maneuvers of a single-link manipulator with a flexible payload. Simulation results for this example display interesting symmetries that are characteristic of such maneuvers. Details concerning the implementation and computational aspects of the method are discussed.

Dohrmann, C.R.; Robinett, R.D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

PAMELA's Measurements of Magnetospheric Effects on High Energy Solar Particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The nature of particle acceleration at the Sun, whether through flare reconnection processes or through shocks driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), is still under scrutiny despite decades of research. The measured properties of solar energetic particles (SEPs) have long been modeled in different particle-acceleration scenarios. The challenge has been to disentangle to the effects of transport from those of acceleration. The Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA) instrument, enables unique observations of SEPs including composition and the angular distribution of the particles about the magnetic field, i.e. pitch angle distribution, over a broad energy range (>80 MeV) -- bridging a critical gap between space-based measurements and ground-based. We present high-energy SEP data from PAMELA acquired during the 2012 May 17 SEP event. These data exhibit differential anisotropies and thus transport features over the instrument rigidity range. SEP protons exhibit two dist...

Adriani, O; Bazilevskaya, G A; Bellotti, R; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bongi, M; Bonvicini, V; Bottai, S; Bravar, U; Bruno, A; Cafagna, F; Campana, D; Carbone, R; Carlson, P; Casolino, M; Castellini, G; Christian, E C; De Donato, C; de Nolfo, G A; De Santis, C; De Simone, N; Di Felice, V; Formato, V; Galper, A M; Karelin, A V; Koldashov, S V; Koldobskiy, S; Krutkov, S Y; Kvashnin, A N; Lee, M; Leonov, A; Malakhov, V; Marcelli, L; Martucci, M; Mayorov, A G; Menn, W; Merg, M; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Monaco, A; Mori, N; Munini, R; Osteria, G; Palma, F; Panico, B; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Ricci, M; Ricciarini, S B; Ryan, J M; Sarkar, R; Scotti, V; Simon, M; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Stochaj, S; Stozhkov, Y I; Thakur, N; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Voronov, S A; Yurkin, Y T; Zampa, G; Zampa, N

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

An automated miniature robotic vehicle inspection system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel, autonomous reconfigurable robotic inspection system for quantitative NDE mapping is presented. The system consists of a fleet of wireless (802.11g) miniature robotic vehicles, each approximately 175 125 85 mm with magnetic wheels that enable them to inspect industrial structures such as storage tanks, chimneys and large diameter pipe work. The robots carry one of a number of payloads including a two channel MFL sensor, a 5 MHz dry coupled UT thickness wheel probe and a machine vision camera that images the surface. The system creates an NDE map of the structure overlaying results onto a 3D model in real time. The authors provide an overview of the robot design, data fusion algorithms (positioning and NDE) and visualization software.

Dobie, Gordon; Summan, Rahul; MacLeod, Charles; Pierce, Gareth; Galbraith, Walter [Centre for Ultrasonic Engineering, University of Strathclyde, 204 George Street, Glasgow, G1 1XW (United Kingdom)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

236

Quality Assurance Program Plan for TRUPACT-II Gas Generation Test Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gas Generation Test Program (GGTP), referred to as the Program, is designed to establish the concentration of flammable gases and/or gas generation rates in a test category waste container intended for shipment in the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II). The phrase "gas generationtesting" shall refer to any activity that establishes the flammable gas concentration or the flammable gas generation rate. This includes, but is not limited to, measurements performed directly on waste containers or during tests performed on waste containers. This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) documents the quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) requirements that apply to the Program. The TRUPACT-II requirements and technical bases for allowable flammable gas concentration and gas generation rates are described in the TRUPACT-II Authorized Methods for Payload Control (TRAMPAC).

Carlsbad Field Office

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Shipment and Disposal of Solidified Organic Waste (Waste Type IV) to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In April of 2005, the last shipment of transuranic (TRU) waste from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site to the WIPP was completed. With the completion of this shipment, all transuranic waste generated and stored at Rocky Flats was successfully removed from the site and shipped to and disposed of at the WIPP. Some of the last waste to be shipped and disposed of at the WIPP was waste consisting of solidified organic liquids that is identified as Waste Type IV in the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC) document. Waste Type IV waste typically has a composition, and associated characteristics, that make it significantly more difficult to ship and dispose of than other Waste Types, especially with respect to gas generation. This paper provides an overview of the experience gained at Rocky Flats for management, transportation and disposal of Type IV waste at WIPP, particularly with respect to gas generation testing. (authors)

D'Amico, E. L [Washington TRU Solutions (United States); Edmiston, D. R. [John Hart and Associates (United States); O'Leary, G. A. [CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC (United States); Rivera, M. A. [Aspen Resources Ltd., Inc. (United States); Steward, D. M. [Boulder Research Enterprises, LLC (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Concept of spinsonde for multi-cycle measurement of vertical wind profile of tropical cyclones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tropical cyclones and cyclogenesis are active areas of research. Chute-operated dropsondes jointly developed by NASA and NCAR are capable of acquiring high resolution vertical wind profile of tropical cyclones. This paper proposes a chute-free vertical retardation technique (termed as spinsonde) that can accurately measure vertical wind profile. Unlike the expendable dropsondes, the spinsonde allows multi-cycle measurement to be performed within a single flight. Proof of principle is demonstrated using a simulation software and results indicate that the GPS ground speed correlates with the wind speeds to within +/-5 km/h. This technique reduces flying weight and increases payload capacity by eliminating bulky chutes. Maximum cruising speed (Vh) achieved by the spinsonde UAV is 372 km/h.

Poh, Chung-How

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

NREL: Concentrating Solar Power Research - Laboratory Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Laboratory Capabilities Laboratory Capabilities To research, develop, and test a variety of concentrating solar power technologies, NREL features the following laboratory capabilities: High-Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) Large Payload Solar Tracker Advanced Optical Materials Laboratory Advanced Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory Optical Testing Laboratory and Beam Characterization System Receiver Test Laboratory Heat Collection Element (HCE) Temperature Survey Photo of NREL's High-Flux Solar Furnace. NREL's High-Flux Solar Furnace. High-Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) The power generated at NREL's High-Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) can be used to expose, test, and evaluate many components-such as receivers, collectors, and reflector materials-used in concentrating solar power systems. The 10-kilowatt HFSF consists of a tracking heliostat and 25 hexagonal

240

Energy Blog | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

November 28, 2011 November 28, 2011 Nuclear Systems Powering a Mission to Mars This past weekend, the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity launched from Cape Canaveral with the most advanced payload of scientific gear ever used on the red planet -- made possible by nuclear space power systems developed by the Energy Department. November 23, 2011 This holiday season, we wanted to share some easy ways to reduce unnecessary energy use while still enjoying all of your family's favorite dishes. | Image courtesy of Flickr user Jennuine Captures. How to Be Energy Efficient in Your Kitchen this Thanksgiving Easy ways to reduce unnecessary energy use while still enjoying all of your family's favorite dishes. November 23, 2011 Energy Efficiency Wins Top Prize at EPA App Contest

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ur3 ur4 payload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Enforcement Letter - ELBWXT082902WS  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

858 858 August 29, 2002 Dr. D. B. Shipp [ ] Bechtel BWXT Idaho, L.L.C. 2525 Freemont Avenue Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 Subject: RWMC Enforcement Letter (NTS-ID--BBWI-RWMC-2002-0002) Dear Dr. Shipp: During July 16-17, 2002, personnel from the DOE Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) conducted an onsite investigation at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) of multiple events occurring during 2001-2002. The events all involved transuranic (TRU) waste characterization, handling, and shipping activities. The investigation included a detailed review of the March 2002 event in which an incorrect payload of TRU waste drums was shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). OE also reviewed an additional seven similar events occurring in

242

Nuclear Systems Powering a Mission to Mars | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Systems Powering a Mission to Mars Systems Powering a Mission to Mars Nuclear Systems Powering a Mission to Mars November 28, 2011 - 11:23am Addthis Radioisotope Power Systems, a strong partnership between the Energy Department's Office of Nuclear Energy and NASA, has been providing the energy for deep space exploration. Assistant Secretary Lyons Assistant Secretary Lyons Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy Curiosity Mission: investigate whether the Gale Crater on Mars has ever offered environmental conditions that support the development of microbial life. This past weekend, the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity launched from Cape Canaveral with the most advanced payload of scientific gear ever used on the red planet. Its mission: to investigate whether the Gale Crater on Mars has ever

243

Test of relativistic gravity for propulsion at the Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A design is presented of a laboratory experiment that could test the suitability of relativistic gravity for propulsion of spacecraft to relativistic speeds. An exact time-dependent solution of Einstein's gravitational field equation confirms that even the weak field of a mass moving at relativistic speeds could serve as a driver to accelerate a much lighter payload from rest to a good fraction of the speed of light. The time-dependent field of ultrarelativistic particles in a collider ring is calculated. An experiment is proposed as the first test of the predictions of general relativity in the ultrarelativistic limit by measuring the repulsive gravitational field of bunches of protons in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The estimated 'antigravity beam' signal strength at a resonant detector of each proton bunch is 3 nm/s^2 for 2 ns during each revolution of the LHC. This experiment can be performed off-line, without interfering with the normal operations of the LHC.

Franklin Felber

2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

244

Automatic building of a web-like structure based on thermoplastic adhesive  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Animals build structures to extend their control over certain aspects of the environment; e.g., orb-weaver spiders build webs to capture prey, etc. Inspired by this behaviour of animals, we attempt to develop robotics technology that allows a robot to automatically builds structures to help it accomplish certain tasks. In this paper we show automatic building of a web-like structure with a robot arm based on thermoplastic adhesive (TPA) material. The material properties of TPA, such as elasticity, adhesiveness, and low melting temperature, make it possible for a robot to form threads across an open space by an extrusion-drawing process and then combine several of these threads into a web-like structure. The problems addressed here are discovering which parameters determine the thickness of a thread and determining how web-like structures may be used for certain tasks. We first present a model for the extrusion and the drawing of TPA threads which also includes the temperature-dependent material properties. The model verification result shows that the increasing relative surface area of the TPA thread as it is drawn thinner increases the heat loss of the thread, and that by controlling how quickly the thread is drawn, a range of diameters can be achieved from 0.20.75 mm. We then present a method based on a generalized nonlinear finite element truss model. The model was validated and could predict the deformation of various web-like structures when payloads are added. At the end, we demonstrate automatic building of a web-like structure for payload bearing.

Derek Leach; Liyu Wang; Dorothea Reusser; Fumiya Iida

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

TRUPACT-II Operating and Maintenance Instructions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide the technical requirements for preparation for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of a Transuranic Package Transporter Model II (TRUPACT-II) Shipping Package and directly related components. This document complies with the minimum requirements as specified in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificate of Compliance (C of C) 9218. In the event there is a conflict between this document and the TRUPACT-II SARP, the TRUPACT-II SARP shall govern. TRUPACT-II C of C number 9218 states, ''... each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application.'' It further states, ''... each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the application.'' Chapter 9 of the TRUPACT-II SARP charges the Westinghouse Electric Corporation Waste Isolation Division (WID) with assuring that the TRUPACT-II is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. To meet this requirement and verify consistency of operations when loading and unloading the TRUPACT-II on the trailer, placing a payload in the packaging, unloading the payload from the packaging, or performing maintenance, the U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Area Office (U.S. DOE/CAO) finds it necessary to implement the changes that follow. This TRUPACT-II maintenance document represents a change to previous philosophy regarding site specific procedures for the use of the TRUPACT-II. This document details the instructions to be followed to consistently operate and maintain the TRUPACT-II. The intent of these instructions is to ensure that all users of the TRUPACT-II follow the same or equivalent instructions. Users may achieve this intent by any of the following methods: (1) Utilizing these instructions as is, or (2) Attaching a site-specific cover page/letter to this document stating that these are the instructions to be used at their location, or (3) Sites may prepare their own document using the steps in this document word-for-word, in-sequence, including Notes and Cautions. Site specific information may be included as deemed necessary. Submit the document to WID National TRU Programs for approval. Any revision made subsequent to WID TRU Program's approval shall be reviewed and approved by WID TRU Programs. A copy of the approval letter from WID National TRU Programs should be available for audit purposes. Users shall develop site-specific procedures addressing leak testing, preoperational activities, quality assurance, hoisting and rigging, and radiation health physics to be used in conjunction with the instructions contained in this document. Users desiring to recommend changes to this document may submit their recommendations to the WID National TRU Programs for evaluation. If approved, the change(s) will be incorporated into this document for use by all TRUPACT-II users. User sites will be audited to this document to ensure compliance within one year from the effective date of this revision. This document discusses operating instructions, required inspections and maintenance for the following: TRUPACT-II packaging, and Miscellaneous packaging, special tools, and equipment. Packaging and payload handling equipment and transport trailers have been specifically designed for use with the TRUPACT-II Packaging. This document discusses the required instructions for use of the following equipment in conjunction with the TRUPACT-II Packaging: TRUPACT-II Mobile Loading Unit (MLU), Adjustable Center-of-Gravity Lift Fixture (ACGLF), and TRUPACT-II Transport Trailer. Attachment E contains the various TRUPACT-II packaging interface control drawings, leak-test and vent-port tool drawings, ACGLF drawings, and tie-down drawings that identify the various system components.

Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Waste Isolation Division

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

246

DUAL-MODE PROPULSION SYSTEM ENABLING CUBESAT EXPLORATION OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) Phase I Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is apparent the cost of planetary exploration is rising as mission budgets declining. Currently small scientific beds geared to performing limited tasks are being developed and launched into low earth orbit (LEO) in the form of small-scale satellite units, i.e., CubeSats. These micro- and nano-satellites are gaining popularity among the university and science communities due to their relatively low cost and design flexibility. To date these small units have been limited to performing tasks in LEO utilizing solar-based power. If a reasonable propulsion system could be developed, these CubeSat platforms could perform exploration of various extra-terrestrial bodies within the solar system engaging a broader range of researchers. Additionally, being mindful of mass, smaller cheaper launch vehicles (~1,000 kgs to LEO) can be targeted. This, in effect, allows for beneficial explora-tion to be conducted within limited budgets. Researchers at the Center for Space Nuclear Re-search (CSNR) are proposing a low mass, radioisotope-based, dual-mode propulsion system capable of extending the exploration realm of these CubeSats out of LEO. The proposed radioisotope-based system would leverage the high specific energies [J/kg] associated with radioisotope materials and enhance their inherent low specific powers [W/g]. This is accomplished by accumulating thermal energy from nuclear decay within a central core over time. This allows for significant amounts of power to be transferred to a flowing gas over short periods of time. In the proposed configuration the stored energy can be utilized in two ways: (1) with direct propellant injection to the core, the energy can be converted into thrust through the use of a converging-diverging nozzle and (2) by flowing a working fluid through the core and subsequent Brayton engine, energy within the core can be converted to electrical energy. The first scenario achieves moderate ranges of thrust, but at a higher Isp than traditional chemical-based systems. The second scenario allows for the production of electrical power, which is then available for electric-based propulsion. Additionally, once at location the production of electrical power can be dedicated to the payloads communication system for data transfer. Ultimately, the proposed dual-mode propulsion platform capitalizes on the benefits of two types of propulsion methods the thrust of thermal propulsion ideal for quick orbital maneuvers and the specific impulse of electric propulsion ideal for efficient inter-planetary travel. Previous versions of this RTR-based concept have been studied for various applications [NETS 1-3]. The current version of this concept is being matured through a NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) Phase I grant, awarded for FY 2014. In this study the RTR concept is being developed to deliver a 6U CubeSat payload to the orbit of the Saturnian moon - Enceladus. Additionally, this study will develop an entire mission architecture for Enceladus targeting a total allowable launch mass of 1,000 kg.

Nathan Jerred; Troy Howe; Adarsh Rajguru; Dr. Steven Howe

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Landing on small bodies: From the Rosetta Lander to MASCOT and beyond  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent planning for science and exploration missions has emphasized the high interest in the close investigation of small bodies in the Solar System. In particular in-situ observations of asteroids and comets play an important role in this field and will contribute substantially to our understanding of the formation and history of the Solar System. The first dedicated comet Lander is Philae, an element of ESA's Rosetta mission to comet 67/P ChuryumovGerasimenko. Rosetta was launched in 2004. After more than 7 years of cruise (including three Earth and one Mars swing-by as well as two asteroid flybys) the spacecraft has gone into a deep space hibernation in June 2011. When approaching the target comet in early 2014, Rosetta will be re-activated. The cometary nucleus will be characterized remotely to prepare for Lander delivery, currently foreseen for November 2014. The Rosetta Lander was developed and manufactured, similar to a scientific instrument, by a consortium consisting of international partners. Project management is located at DLR in Cologne/Germany, with co-project managers at CNES (France) and ASI (Italy). The scientific lead is at the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Science (Lindau, Germany) and the Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale (Paris). Mainly scientific institutes provided the subsystems, instruments and the complete, qualified lander system. Operations are performed in two dedicated centers, the Lander Control Center (LCC) at DLR-MUSC and the Science Operations and Navigation Center (SONC) at CNES. This concept was adopted to reduce overall cost of the project and is foreseen also to be applied for development and operations of future small bodies landers. A mission profiting from experience gained during Philae development and operations is MASCOT, a surface package for the Japanese Hayabusa 2 mission. MASCOT is a small (?10kg) mobile device, delivered to the surface of asteroid 1999JU3. There it will operate for about 16h. During this time a camera, a magnetometer, a thermal monitor and an IR analytical instrument will provide ground truth and thus will even be able to support the selection of possible sampling sites for the main spacecraft. MASCOT is a flexible design that can be adapted to a wide range of missions and possible target bodies. Also the payload is flexible to some extent (with an overall mass in the 3kg range). For example, the surface package is part of the optional strawman payload for MarcoPolo-R, a European asteroid sample return mission, proposed for ESA Cosmic Vision M-class.

Stephan Ulamec; Jens Biele; Pierre-W. Bousquet; Philippe Gaudon; Koen Geurts; Tra-Mi Ho; Christian Krause; Caroline Lange; Rainer Willnecker; Lars Witte

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Feasibility Study for an Autonomous UAV -Magnetometer System -- Final Report on SERDP SEED 1509:2206  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large areas across the United States are potentially contaminated with UXO, with some ranges encompassing tens to hundreds of thousands of acres. Technologies are needed which will allow for cost effective wide area scanning with 1) near 100 % coverage and 2) near 100 % detection of subsurface ordnance or features indicative of subsurface ordnance. The current approach to wide area scanning is a multi-level one, in which medium altitude fixed wing optical imaging is used for an initial site assessment. This assessment is followed with low altitude manned helicopter based magnetometry followed by surface investigations using either towed geophysical sensor arrays or man portable sensors. In order to be effective for small UXO detection, the sensing altitude for magnetic site investigations needs to be on the order of 1 3 meters. These altitude requirements means that manned helicopter surveys will generally only be feasible in large, open and relatively flat terrains. While such surveys are effective in mapping large areas relatively fast there are substantial mobilization/demobilization, staffing and equipment costs associated with these surveys (resulting in costs of approximately $100-$150/acre). Surface towed arrays provide high resolution maps but have other limitations, e.g. in their ability to navigate rough terrain effectively. Thus, other systems are needed allowing for effective data collection. An UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) magnetometer platform is an obvious alternative. The motivation behind such a system is that it would be safer for the operators, cheaper in initial and O&M costs, and more effective in terms of site characterization. However, while UAV data acquisition from fixed wing platforms for large (> 200 feet) stand off distances is relatively straight forward, a host of challenges exist for low stand-off distance (~ 6 feet) UAV geophysical data acquisition. The objective of SERDP SEED 1509:2006 was to identify the primary challenges associated with a low stand off distance autonomous UAV magnetometer platform and to investigate whether these challenges can be resolved successfully such that a successful UAV magnetometer platform can be constructed. The primary challenges which were identified and investigated include: 1. The feasibility of assembling a payload package which integrates magnetometers, accurate positioning systems (DGPS, height above ground measurement), obstacle avoidance systems, power infrastructure, communications and data storage as well as auxiliary flight controls 2. The availability of commercial UAV platforms with autonomous flight capability which can accommodate this payload package 3. The feasibility of integrating obstacle avoidance controls in UAV platform control 4. The feasibility of collecting high quality magnetic data in the vicinity of an UAV.

Roelof Versteeg; Mark McKay; Matt Anderson; Ross Johnson; Bob Selfridge; Jay Bennett

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

NEP for a Kuiper Belt Object Rendezvous Mission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) are a recently-discovered set of solar system bodies which lie at about the orbit of Pluto (40 AU) out to about 100 astronomical units (AU). There are estimated to be about 100,000 KBOS with a diameter greater than 100 km. KBOS are postulated to be composed of the pristine material which formed our solar system and may even have organic materials in them. A detailed study of KBO size, orbit distribution, structure, and surface composition could shed light on the origins of the solar system and perhaps even on the origin of life in our solar system. A rendezvous mission including a lander would be needed to perform chemical analysis of the surface and sub-surface composition of KBOS. These requirements set the size of the science probe at around a ton. Mission analyses show that a fission-powered system with an electric thruster could rendezvous at 40 AU in about 13.0 years with a total {Delta}V of 46 krnk. It would deliver a 1000-kg science payload while providing ample onboard power for relaying data back to earth. The launch mass of the entire system (power, thrusters, propellant, navigation, communication, structure, science payload, etc.) would be 7984 kg if it were placed into an earth-escape trajectory (C=O). Alternatively, the system could be placed into a 700-km earth orbit with more propellant,yielding a total mass in LEO of 8618 kg, and then spiral out of earth orbit to arrive at the KBO in 14.3 years. To achieve this performance, a fission power system with 100 kW of electrical power and a total mass (reactor, shield, conversion, and radiator) of about 2350 kg. Three possible configurations are proposed: (1) a UZrH-fueled, NaK-cooled reactor with a steam Rankine conversion system, (2) a UN-fueled gas-cooled reactor with a recuperated Brayton conversion system, and (3) a UN-fueled heatpipe-cooled reactor with a recuperated Brayton conversion system. (Boiling and condensation in the Rankine system is a technical risk at present.) All three of these systems have the potential to meet the weight requirement for the trip and to be built in the near term.

HOUTS,MICHAEL G.; LENARD,ROGER X.; LIPINSKI,RONALD J.; PATTON,BRUCE; POSTON,DAVID I.; WRIGHT,STEVEN A.

1999-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

250

Shielding and criticality analyses of phase I reference truck and rail cask designs for spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results are presented herein to determine the adequacy with respect to shielding regulations of reference designs for a truck cask containing 2 PWR or 5 BWR assemblies of standard burnup (45 GWd/MTU for PWR, 40 GWd/MTU for BWR) and 1 PWR assembly with extended burnup (55 GWd/MTU). The study also includes reference and modified rail cask designs with projected payloads of 8, 10, or 12 PWR assemblies. The burnup/age trends are analyzed in one dimension for both Pb and depleted uranium (DU) gamma-ray shields. The results of the two-dimensional shielding analysis uphold the one-dimensional results as being an appropriate means of studying the burnup/age trends for the truck cask. These results show that the reference design for the Pb-shield truck cask is inadequate for all cases considered, while the DU-shield truck cask is capable of carrying the desired payloads. The one-dimensional shielding analysis results for the reference Pb and DU rail casks indicate substantial margins exist in the side doses for reasonable burnup/age combinations. For a Pb-cask configuration, margins exist primarily for long-cooled (15 years) fuel. For the modified Pb and DU rail casks, the 2-m dose rates offer substantial margins below the regulatory limits for all burnup values considered provided the spent fuel has cooled for {>=}10 years. The modified Pb and DU casks yield essentially identical results and, hence, could be considered equivalent from a shielding perspective. The criticality analyses that were performed indicate that a truck basket can be designed to provide an adequate subcritical margin for 2 PWR assemblies enriched to 5 wt%. While the 10- and 12- assembly rail cask designs are very close to the regulatory limit of 0.95 for k{sub eff}, after accounting for a 0.01 {Delta}k bias and 2 standard deviations, the limit is exceeded by about 3%. It is believed that a combination of decreased enrichments and/or increased water gaps should allow these baskets to be acceptable.

Broadhead, B.L.; Childs, R.L.; Parks, C.V.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

PERFORMANCE STATISTICS WEIghTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2650 lbs 2650 lbs Delivered Curb Weight 9 : 2615 lbs Distribution F/R 9 (%): 58.6/41.4 GVWR: 3164 lbs GAWR F/R: 1797/1378lbs Payload 5 : 564 lbs Performance Goal: 400 lbs DIMENSIONS Wheelbase: 95.9 in Track F/R: 59.6/59.1 in Length: 160.6 in Width: 68.5 in Height: 54.9 in Ground Clearance: 5.3 in Performance Goal: 5.0 in TIRES Tire Mfg: Dunlop Tire Model: SP Sport 1000m Tire Size: 195 / 55 R16 86V Tire Pressure F/R: 30/30 psi Spare Installed: Yes ENgINE Model: 1.5 L I4 Output 8 : 122 hp @ 6000 rpm Configuration: Inline Four-cylinder Displacement: 1.5 L Fuel Tank Capacity: 10.6 gal Fuel Type: Unleaded Gasoline © 2010 Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved VEhICLE FEATuRES Base Vehicle: 2011 Honda CRZ EX Hybrid VIN: JHMZF1C64BS002982

252

PERFORMANCE STATISTICS WEIghTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

245 lbs 245 lbs Delivered Curb Weight: 4118 lbs GVWR: 5675 lbs GAWR F/R: 2865/3130 lbs Distribution F/R: 59/41 % Payload: 1557 lbs Performance Goal: 400 lbs DIMENSIONS Wheelbase: 106.7 in Track F/R: 61.9/61.1 in Length: 185.3 in Width: 71.5 in Height: 68.6 in Ground Clearance: 5.9 in Performance Goal: 5.0 in TIRES Tire Mfg: Goodyear Tire Model: Integrity Tire Size: P225/65R17 Tire Pressure F/R: 32/32 Spare Installed: Yes ENgINE Model: 3MZ-FE Output: 208 hp @ 5600 rpm Configuration: V6 Displacement: 3.3 L Fuel Tank Capacity: 17.2 gal Fuel Type: Unleaded Gasoline © 2010 Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved VEhICLE FEATuRES Base Vehicle: 2006 Highlander VIN: JTEDW21A860005681 Seatbelt Positions: Seven Standard Features: Air Conditioning

253

untitled  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2723 lbs 2723 lbs Delivered Curb Weight: 2756 lbs Distribution F/R (%): 58/42 GVWR: 3630 lbs GAWR F/R: 1881/1782lbs Payload 5 : 907 lbs Performance Goal: 400 lbs DIMENSIONS Wheelbase: 100.4 in Track F/R: 58.7/58.1 in Length: 172.3 in Width: 66.7 in Height: 56.2 in Ground Clearance: 5.5 in Performance Goal: 5.0 in TIRES Tire Mfg: Dunlop Tire Model: SP31 A/S Tire Size: 175 / 65 R15 84S Tire Pressure F/R: 33/33 psi Spare Installed: Yes ENGINE Model: 1.3 L LDA series I4 Output: 98 hp @ 5800 rpm Configuration: Inline Four-cylinder Displacement: 1.3 L Fuel Tank Capacity: 10.6 gal Fuel Type: Unleaded Gasoline © 2009 Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved VEHICLE FEATURES Base Vehicle: 2010 Honda Insight Hybrid VIN: JHMZE2H78AS010141 Seatbelt Positions: Five Standard Features:

254

untitled  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

720 lbs 720 lbs Delivered Curb Weight: 3698 lbs Distribution F/R (%): 60.4/39.6 GVWR: 4701 lbs GAWR F/R: 2492/2209 lbs Payload 5 : 850 lbs Performance Goal: 400 lbs DIMENSIONS Wheelbase: 107.4 in Track F/R: 61.7/61.3 in Length: 190.6 in Width: 72.2 in Height: 56.9 in Ground Clearance: 7 in Performance Goal: 5.0 in TIRES Tire Mfg: Michelin Tire Model: Energy MXV4 SS Tire Size: P225/50VR17 Tire Pressure F/R: 33/33 psi Spare Installed: Yes ENGINE Model: 2.5L Atkinson Cycle Output: 156 hp @ 6000 rpm Configuration: Inline Four-cylinder Displacement: 2.5 L Fuel Tank Capacity: 17.5 gal Fuel Type: Unleaded Gasoline © 2009 Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved VEHICLE FEATURES Base Vehicle: 2010 Ford Fusion Hybrid VIN: 3FADP0L34AR144757 Seatbelt Positions: Five

255

PERFORMANCE STATISTICS WEIghTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

365 lbs 365 lbs Delivered Curb Weight: 4510 lbs Distribution F/R: 57/43 % GVWR: 5520 lbs GAWR F/R: 2865/2865 lbs Payload: 1010 lbs Performance Goal: 400 lbs DIMENSIONS Wheelbase: 107.0 inches Track F/R: 62/61.2 inches Length: 187.2 inches Width: 72.6 inches Height: 66.4 inches Ground Clearance: 7.1 inches Performance Goal: 5.0 inches TIRES Tire Mfg: Goodyear Tire Model: Eagle RS-A Tire Size: P215/55R18 Tire Pressure F/R: 30/30 psi Spare Installed: Yes ENgINE Model: 3MZ-FE Output: 208 hp @ 5600 rpm Configuration: DOHC V6 Displacement: 3.3 L Fuel Tank Capacity: 17.2 Gallons Fuel Type: Unleaded Gasoline © 2010 Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved VEhICLE FEATuRES Base Vehicle: 2006 Lexus RX 400h VIN: JTJHW31U160002575 Seatbelt Positions: Five

256

Packaging and transportation of radioactive liquid at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Beginning in the 1940`s, radioactive liquid waste has been generated at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site as a result of defense material production. The liquid waste is currently stored in 177 underground storage tanks. As part of the tank remediation efforts, Type B quantity packagings for the transport of large volumes of radioactive liquids are required. There are very few Type B liquid packagings in existence because of the rarity of large-volume radioactive liquid payloads in the commercial nuclear industry. Development of aboveground transport systems for large volumes of radioactive liquids involves institutional, economic, and technical issues. Although liquid shipments have taken place under DOE-approved controlled conditions within the boundaries of the Hanford Site for many years, offsite shipment requires compliance with DOE, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and US Department of Transportation (DOT) directives and regulations. At the present time, no domestic DOE nor NRC-certified Type B packagings with the appropriate level of shielding are available for DOT-compliant transport of radioactive liquids in bulk volumes. This paper will provide technical details regarding current methods used to transport such liquids on and off the Hanford Site, and will provide a status of packaging development programs for future liquid shipments.

Smith, R.J.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Rosie: A mobile worksystem for decontamination and dismantlement operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

RedZone Robotics, Inc. and Carnegie Mellon University`s Field Robotics Center have undertaken a contract to develop a next-generation worksystem for decommissioning and dismantlement tasks in Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Currently, the authors are closing the second phase of this three phase effort and have completed the design and fabrication of the worksystem: Rosie. Rosie includes a locomotor, heavy manipulator, control center, and control system for robot operation. The locomotor is an omni-directional platform with tether management and hydraulic power capabilities. The heavy manipulator is a high-payload, long-reach system intended to deploy tools into the work area. The heavy manipulator is capable of deploying systems such as the Dual-Arm Work Module--a five degree-of-freedom platform supporting two highly dexterous manipulators--or a single manipulator for performing simpler, less dexterous tasks. Rosie is telerobotic to the point of having servo-controlled motions which can be operated and coordinated through the control center.

Thompson, B.R.; Conley, L.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

The Large Observatory For x-ray Timing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Large Observatory For x-ray Timing (LOFT) was studied within ESA M3 Cosmic Vision framework and participated in the final down-selection for a launch slot in 2022-2024. Thanks to the unprecedented combination of effective area and spectral resolution of its main instrument, LOFT will study the behaviour of matter under extreme conditions, such as the strong gravitational field in the innermost regions of accretion flows close to black holes and neutron stars, and the supra-nuclear densities in the interior of neutron stars. The science payload is based on a Large Area Detector (LAD, 10 m 2 effective area, 2-30 keV, 240 eV spectral resolution, 1 deg collimated field of view) and a WideField Monitor (WFM, 2-50 keV, 4 steradian field of view, 1 arcmin source location accuracy, 300 eV spectral resolution). The WFM is equipped with an on-board system for bright events (e.g. GRB) localization. The trigger time and position of these events are broadcast to the ground within 30 s from discovery. In this paper we ...

Feroci, M; Bozzo, E; Barret, D; Brandt, S; Hernanz, M; van der Klis, M; Pohl, M; Santangelo, A; Stella, L; Watts, A; Wilms, J; Zane, S; Ahangarianabhari, M; Albertus, C; Alford, M; Alpar, A; Altamirano, D; Alvarez, L; Amati, L; Amoros, C; Andersson, N; Antonelli, A; Argan, A; Artigue, R; Artigues, B; Atteia, J -L; Azzarello, P; Bakala, P; Baldazzi, G; Balman, S; Barbera, M; van Baren, C; Bhattacharyya, S; Baykal, A; Belloni, T; Bernardini, F; Bertuccio, G; Bianchi, S; Bianchini, A; Binko, P; Blay, P; Bocchino, F; Bodin, P; Bombaci, I; Bidaud, J -M Bonnet; Boutloukos, S; Bradley, L; Braga, J; Brown, E; Bucciantini, N; Burderi, L; Burgay, M; Bursa, M; Budtz-Jrgensen, C; Cackett, E; Cadoux, F R; Cais, P; Caliandro, G A; Campana, R; Campana, S; Capitanio, F; Casares, J; Casella, P; Castro-Tirado, A J; Cavazzuti, E; Cerda-Duran, P; Chakrabarty, D; Chteau, F; Chenevez, J; Coker, J; Cole, R; Collura, A; Cornelisse, R; Courvoisier, T; Cros, A; Cumming, A; Cusumano, G; D'A, A; D'Elia, V; Del Monte, E; De Luca, A; De Martino, D; Dercksen, J P C; De Pasquale, M; De Rosa, A; Del Santo, M; Di Cosimo, S; Diebold, S; Di Salvo, T; 1), I Donnarumma; (32), A Drago; (33), M Durant; (107), D Emmanoulopoulos; (135), M H Erkut; (85), P Esposito; (1, Y Evangelista; 1b),; (24), A Fabian; (34), M Falanga; (25), Y Favre; (35), C Feldman; (128), V Ferrari; (3), C Ferrigno; (133), M Finger; (36), M H Finger; (35, G W Fraser; +),; (2), M Frericks; (7), F Fuschino; (125), M Gabler; (37), D K Galloway; (6), J L Galvez Sanchez; (6), E Garcia-Berro; (10), B Gendre; (62), S Gezari; (39), A B Giles; (40), M Gilfanov; (10), P Giommi; (102), G Giovannini; (102), M Giroletti; (4), E Gogus; (105), A Goldwurm; (86), K Goluchov; (16), D Gtz; (16), C Gouiffes; (56), M Grassi; (42), P Groot; (17), M Gschwender; (128), L Gualtieri; (32), C Guidorzi; (3), L Guy; (2), D Haas; (50), P Haensel; (29), M Hailey; (19), F Hansen; (42), D H Hartmann; (43), C A Haswell; (88), K Hebeler; (37), A Heger; (2), W Hermsen; (28), J Homan; (19), A Hornstrup; (23, R Hudec; 72),; (45), J Huovelin; (5), A Ingram; (2), J J M in't Zand; (27), G Israel; (20), K Iwasawa; (47), L Izzo; (2), H M Jacobs; (17), F Jetter; (118, T Johannsen; 127),; (2), H M Jacobs; (2), P Jonker; (126), J Jos; (49), P Kaaret; (123), G Kanbach; (23), V Karas; (6), D Karelin; (29), D Kataria; (49), L Keek; (29), T Kennedy; (17), D Klochkov; (50), W Kluzniak; (17), K Kokkotas; (45), S Korpela; (51), C Kouveliotou; (87), I Kreykenbohm; (2), L M Kuiper; (19), I Kuvvetli; (7), C Labanti; (52), D Lai; (53), F K Lamb; (2), P P Laubert; (105), F Lebrun; (8), D Lin; (29), D Linder; (54), G Lodato; (55), F Longo; (19), N Lund; (131), T J Maccarone; (14), D Macera; (8), S Maestre; (62), S Mahmoodifar; (17), D Maier; (56), P Malcovati; (120), I Mandel; (144), V Mangano; (50), A Manousakis; (7), M Marisaldi; (109), A Markowitz; (35), A Martindale; (59), G Matt; (107), I M McHardy; (60), A Melatos; (61), M Mendez; (85), S Mereghetti; (68), M Michalska; (20), S Migliari; (85, R Mignani; 108),; (62), M C Miller; (49), J M Miller; (57), T Mineo; (112), G Miniutti; (64), S Morsink; (65), C Motch; (13), S Motta; (66), M Mouchet; (8), G Mouret; (19), J Mula?ov; (1, F Muleri; 1b),; (140), T Muoz-Darias; (95), I Negueruela; (28), J Neilsen; (43), A J Norton; (28), M Nowak; (35), P O'Brien; (19), P E H Olsen; (102), M Orienti; (99, M Orio; 110),; (7), M Orlandini; (68), P Orleanski; (35), J P Osborne; (69), R Osten; (70), F Ozel; (1, L Pacciani; 1b),; (119), M Paolillo; (6), A Papitto; (20), J M Paredes; (83, A Patruno; 141),; (71), B Paul; (17), E Perinati; (115), A Pellizzoni; (47), A V Penacchioni; (136), M A Perez; (72), V Petracek; (10), C Pittori; (95), J Pons; (6), J Portell; (115), A Possenti; (73), J Poutanen; (122), M Prakash; (16), P Le Provost; (70), D Psaltis; (8), D Rambaud; (8), P Ramon; (76), G Ramsay; (1, M Rapisarda; 1b),; (77), A Rachevski; (77), I Rashevskaya; (78), P S Ray; (6), N Rea; (80), S Reddy; (113, P Reig; 81),; (63), M Reina Aranda; (28), R Remillard; (62), C Reynolds; (124), L Rezzolla; (20), M Ribo; (2), R de la Rie; (115), A Riggio; (138), A Rios; (82, P Rodrguez- Gil; 104),; (16), J Rodriguez; (3), R Rohlfs; (57), P Romano; (83), E M R Rossi; (50), A Rozanska; (29), A Rousseau; (84), F Ryde; (63), L Sabau-Graziati; (6), G Sala; (85), R Salvaterra; (61), A Sanna; (134), J Sandberg; (130), S Scaringi; (16), S Schanne; (86), J Schee; (87), C Schmid; (117), S Shore; (27), R Schneider; (88), A Schwenk; (89), A D Schwope; (114), J -Y Seyler; (90), A Shearer; (29), A Smith; (58), D M Smith; (29), P J Smith; (23), V Sochora; (1), P Soffitta; (61), P Soleri; (29), A Spencer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Nuclear bimodal new vision solar system missions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents an analysis of the potential mission capability using space reactor bimodal systems for planetary missions. Missions of interest include the Main belt asteroids, Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune, and Pluto. The space reactor bimodal system, defined by an Air Force study for Earth orbital missions, provides 10 kWe power, 1000 N thrust, 850 s Isp, with a 1500 kg system mass. Trajectories to the planetary destinations were examined and optimal direct and gravity assisted trajectories were selected. A conceptual design for a spacecraft using the space reactor bimodal system for propulsion and power, that is capable of performing the missions of interest, is defined. End-to-end mission conceptual designs for bimodal orbiter missions to Jupiter and Saturn are described. All missions considered use the Delta 3 class or Atlas 2AS launch vehicles. The space reactor bimodal power and propulsion system offers both; new vision {open_quote}{open_quote}constellation{close_quote}{close_quote} type missions in which the space reactor bimodal spacecraft acts as a carrier and communication spacecraft for a fleet of microspacecraft deployed at different scientific targets and; conventional missions with only a space reactor bimodal spacecraft and its science payload. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Mondt, J.F. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109-8099 (United States); Zubrin, R.M. [Lockheed Martin Corp., Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, Colorado 80201 (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Safety analysis report for the TRUPACT-II shipping package (condensed version). Volume 2, Rev. 14  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This appendix determines the effective G values for payload shipping categories of contact handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste materials, based on the radiolytic G values for waste materials that are discussed in detail in Appendix 3.6.8 of the Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package. The effective G values take into account self-absorption of alpha decay energy inside particulate contamination and the fraction of energy absorbed by nongas-generating materials. As described in Appendix 3.6.8, an effective G value, G{sub eff}, is defined by: G{sub eff} - {Sigma}{sub M} (F{sub M} x G{sub M}) F{sub M}-fraction of energy absorbed by material maximum G value for a material where the sum is over all materials present inside a waste container. The G value itself is determined primarily by the chemical properties of the material and its temperature. The value of F is determined primarily by the size of the particles containing the radionuclides, the distribution of radioactivity on the various materials present inside the waste container, and the stopping distance of alpha particles in air, in the waste materials, or in the waste packaging materials.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

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261

On the effects of solar storms to the decaying orbital space debris  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Any man-made object in Earth's orbit that no longer serves a useful purpose is classified as orbital debris. Debris objects come from a variety of sources. The majority is related to satellite fragmentation. Other major sources of debris are propulsion systems, and fragmentation of spent upper stages, payload and mission related debris. Serious concern about orbital debris has been growing. Knowledge of the future debris environment is important to both satellite designers, and mission planners, who need to know what hazards a satellite might encounter during the course of its mission. Therefore, it is important to know how much debris is in orbit, where it is located, and when it will decay. The debris environment is complex and dynamically evolving. Objects of different shape and size behave differently in orbit. The geoeffectiveness space environments include solar flux at 10.7 cm, solar energetic particles flux or speed, solar wind flow pressure, electric field, and geomagnetic indices. We study the decaying orbital debris from Tracking and Impact Prediction (TIP) messages in conjuction with geoeffectiveness space environments through time epoch correlation. We found that the decaying and reentry orbital debris are triggered by space environment enhancement within at least one week before reentry. It is not necessary a transient or high energetic and severe solar storm events are needed in decaying processes. We propose that the gradual enhancement processes of space environment will cause satellite surface charging due to energetic electron and enhance drag force.

Herdiwijaya, Dhani, E-mail: dhani@as.itb.ac.id [Astronomy Division and Bosscha Observatory, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology, Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Rachman, Abdul [Space Science Center, National Institute of Aeronautics and Space, Junjunan 133, Bandung 40173 (Indonesia)

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

262

Extension of the quantum-kinetic model to lunar and Mars return physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability to compute rarefied, ionized hypersonic flows is becoming more important as missions such as Earth reentry, landing high-mass payloads on Mars, and the exploration of the outer planets and their satellites are being considered. A recently introduced molecular-level chemistry model, the quantum-kinetic, or Q-K, model that predicts reaction rates for gases in thermal equilibrium and non-equilibrium using only kinetic theory and fundamental molecular properties, is extended in the current work to include electronic energy level transitions and reactions involving charged particles. Like the Q-K procedures for neutral species chemical reactions, these new models are phenomenological procedures that aim to reproduce the reaction/transition rates but do not necessarily capture the exact physics. These engineering models are necessarily efficient due to the requirement to compute billions of simulated collisions in direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) simulations. The new models are shown to generally agree within the spread of reported transition and reaction rates from the literature for near equilibrium conditions.

Liechty, D. S. [Aerothermodynamics Branch, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia 23681 (United States)] [Aerothermodynamics Branch, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia 23681 (United States); Lewis, M. J. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)] [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

A Low-Cost Natural Gas/Freshwater Aerial Pipeline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Offered is a new type of low-cost aerial pipeline for delivery of natural gas, an important industrial and residential fuel, and freshwater as well as other payloads over long distances. The offered pipeline dramatically decreases the construction and operation costs and the time necessary for pipeline construction. A dual-use type of freight pipeline can improve an arid rural environment landscape and provide a reliable energy supply for cities. Our aerial pipeline is a large, self-lofting flexible tube disposed at high altitude. Presently, the term "natural gas" lacks a precise technical definition, but the main components of natural gas are methane, which has a specific weight less than air. A lift force of one cubic meter of methane equals approximately 0.5 kg. The lightweight film flexible pipeline can be located in the Earth-atmosphere at high altitude and poses no threat to airplanes or the local environment. The authors also suggest using lift force of this pipeline in tandem with wing devices for che...

Bolonkin, A; Bolonkin, Alexander; Cathcart, Richard

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

SPECTRA OF COSMIC-RAY PROTONS AND HELIUM PRODUCED IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data obtained in the Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC-2), Cosmic Ray Energetics and Mass (CREAM), and Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA) experiments suggest that the elemental interstellar spectra of cosmic rays below the knee at a few times 10{sup 6} GeV are not simple power laws, but that they experience hardening at a magnetic rigidity of about 240 GV. Another essential feature is the difference between proton and helium energy spectra, such that the He/p ratio increases by more than 50% in the energy range from 10{sup 2} to 10{sup 4} GV. We consider the concavity of the particle spectrum resulting from the nonlinear nature of diffusive shock acceleration in supernova remnants (SNRs) as a possible reason for the observed spectrum hardening. The increase of the helium-to-proton ratio with energy can be interpreted as a consequence of cosmic-ray acceleration by forward and reverse shocks in SNRs. The contribution of particles accelerated by reverse shocks makes the concavity of the produced overall cosmic-ray spectrum more pronounced. The spectra of protons and helium nuclei accelerated in SNRs and released into the interstellar medium are calculated. The derived steady-state interstellar spectra are in reasonably good agreement with observations.

Ptuskin, Vladimir; Zirakashvili, Vladimir [Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation of the Russian Academy of Science (IZMIRAN), Troitsk, Moscow Region 142190 (Russian Federation)] [Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation of the Russian Academy of Science (IZMIRAN), Troitsk, Moscow Region 142190 (Russian Federation); Seo, Eun-Suk [Department of Physics and Institute of Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Institute of Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

265

Performance of International Space Station Alpha electric power systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Space Station Alpha (ISSA) will be an Earth-orbiting laboratory in space. It will house experimental payloads, distribute resource utilities, and support human habitation for conducting research and science experiments in a microgravity environment. Electrical power is a major utility to support successful achievement of the mission goal. The ISSA United States On-Orbit Segment (USOS) Electric Power System (EPS) power generation capability will vary with orbital parameters, natural and induced environment, and hardware aging/replacement throughout the ISSA life. Power capability will be further restricted by various assembly configurations during ISSA buildup, by various flight attitudes, by shadowing on the solar arrays, by EPS operational constraints, such as pointing accuracy, battery charging, as well as operating voltage setpoints, and by ISSA operational constraints either to avoid long-term solar array shadowing from the adjacent solar array or to accommodate ISSA maneuver during proximity operations with other space vehicles, mating, and departing. Design of the ISSA USOS EPS takes into consideration the various equipment degradation modes, operation constraints, and orbital conditions to make it compatible with the environments and to meet power, lifetime, and performance requirements.

Hill, R.; Lu, C.Y.; Padhye, V.; Hajela, G.; Hague, L. [Rockwell International, Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Division

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

Analysis of the mass distribution of a functionally extended delta robot  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper is concerned with the functional extension of a delta robot. This research is a contribution to the project Ra 1736/10-1 which was funded by the German Research Foundation. The topic of the project addresses a task-oriented decision analysis for designing such extension mechanisms, since handling and assembly processes have significant effects on the required functionality of the production device. For this purpose, the mobile platform of a common delta robot is endowed with three additional, rotational DOF to enhance its motion capability. Each DOF requires an additional motor so that different drive concepts are conceivable. Since the motors and their positions within the structure are key components for a lightweight design, different motor arrangements are considered to influence moving masses. For this purpose, five elementary types of motor arrangement are analyzed. To this end, the paper investigates and evaluates the stress impact of the additional mechanisms on the delta robot, which is a crucial criterion out of many other necessary criteria for the decision problem. To exploit the advantages of delta robots, such as high acceleration and high payload, the analysis allows finding an appropriate design with respect to a given trajectory. The investigation is based on a dynamic model of the structure which is developed and validated with a second modeling approach. First, results are obtained with a pick-and-place operation as a sample application. Finally, possibilities for future developments are identified to enhance the benefit of the analysis.

Gunnar Borchert; Massimiliano Battistelli; Gundula Runge; Annika Raatz

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Advanced robot locomotion.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the results of a research effort on advanced robot locomotion. The majority of this work focuses on walking robots. Walking robot applications include delivery of special payloads to unique locations that require human locomotion to exo-skeleton human assistance applications. A walking robot could step over obstacles and move through narrow openings that a wheeled or tracked vehicle could not overcome. It could pick up and manipulate objects in ways that a standard robot gripper could not. Most importantly, a walking robot would be able to rapidly perform these tasks through an intuitive user interface that mimics natural human motion. The largest obstacle arises in emulating stability and balance control naturally present in humans but needed for bipedal locomotion in a robot. A tracked robot is bulky and limited, but a wide wheel base assures passive stability. Human bipedal motion is so common that it is taken for granted, but bipedal motion requires active balance and stability control for which the analysis is non-trivial. This report contains an extensive literature study on the state-of-the-art of legged robotics, and it additionally provides the analysis, simulation, and hardware verification of two variants of a proto-type leg design.

Neely, Jason C.; Sturgis, Beverly Rainwater; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Feddema, John Todd; Spletzer, Barry Louis; Rose, Scott E.; Novick, David Keith; Wilson, David Gerald; Buerger, Stephen P.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

NRF TRIGA packaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Training Reactor Isotopes, General Atomics (TRIGA{reg_sign}) Reactors are in use at four US Department of Energy (DOE) complex facilities and at least 23 university, commercial, or government facilities. The development of the Neutron Radiography Facility (NRF) TRIGA packaging system began in October 1993. The Hanford Site NRF is being shut down and requires an operationally user-friendly transportation and storage packaging system for removal of the TRIGA fuel elements. The NRF TRIGA packaging system is designed to remotely remove the fuel from the reactor and transport the fuel to interim storage (up to 50 years) on the Hanford Site. The packaging system consists of a cask and an overpack. The overpack is used only for transport and is not necessary for storage. Based upon the cask`s small size and light weight, small TRIGA reactors will find it versatile for numerous refueling and fuel storage needs. The NRF TRIGA packaging design also provides the basis for developing a certifiable and economical packaging system for other TRIGA reactor facilities. The small size of the NRF TRIGA cask also accommodates placing the cask into a larger certified packaging for offsite transport. The Westinghouse Hanford Company NRF TRIGA packaging, as described herein can serve other DOE sites for their onsite use, and the design can be adapted to serve university reactor facilities, handling a variety of fuel payloads.

Clements, M.D.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

An Unprecedented Constraint on Water Content in the Sunlit Lunar Exosphere Seen by Lunar-Based Ultraviolet Telescope of Chang'e-3 Mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The content of $\\mathrm{OH/H_2O}$ molecules in the tenuous exosphere of the Moon is still an open issue at present. We here report an unprecedented upper limit of the content of the OH radicals, which is obtained from the in-situ measurements carried out \\rm by the Lunar-based Ultraviolet Telescope, a payload of Chinese Chang'e-3 mission. By analyzing the diffuse background in the images taken by the telescope, the column density and surface concentration of the OH radicals are inferred to be $<10^{11}\\ \\mathrm{cm^{-2}}$ and $<10^{4}\\ \\mathrm{cm^{-3}}$ (by assuming a hydrostatic equilibrium with a scale height of 100km), respectively, by assuming that the recorded background is fully contributed by their resonance fluorescence emission. The resulted concentration is lower than the previously reported value by about two orders of magnitude, and is close to the prediction of the sputtering model. In addition, the same measurements and method allow us to derive a surface concentration of $<10^{2}\\ \\math...

Wang, J; Qiu, Y L; Meng, X M; Cai, H B; Cao, L; Deng, J S; Han, X H; Wei, J Y

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Heat pump augmented radiator for low-temperature space applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Closed-cycle, space-based heat rejection systems depend solely on radiation to achieve their heat dissipation function. Since the payload heat rejection temperature is typically 50 K above that of the radiation sink in near earth orbit, the size and mass of these systems can be appreciable. Size (and potentially mass) reductions are achievable by increasing the rejection temperature via a heat pump. Two heat pump concept were examined to determine if radiator area reductions could be realized without increasing the mass of the heat rejection system. The first was a conventional, electrically-driven vapor compression system. The second is an innovative concept using a solid-vapor adsorption system driven by reject heat from the prime power system. The mass and radiator area of the heat pumpradiator systems were compared to that of a radiator only system to determine the merit of the heat pump concepts. Results for the compressor system indicated that the mass minimum occured at a temperature lift of about 50 K and radiator area reductions of 35% were realized. With a radiator specific mass of 10 kgm/sup 2/, the heat pump system is 15% higher than the radiator only baseline system. The complex compound chemisorption systems showed more promising results. Using water vapor as the working fluid in a single stage heat amplifier resulted in optimal temperature lifts exceeding 150 K. This resulted in a radiator area reduction of 83% with a mass reduction of 64%. 7 refs., 9 figs.

Olszewski, M.; Rockenfeller, U.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

The Run 2 ATLAS Analysis Event Data Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During the LHC's first Long Shutdown (LS1) ATLAS set out to establish a new analysis model, based on the experience gained during Run 1. A key component of this is a new Event Data Model (EDM), called the xAOD. This format, which is now in production, provides the following features: A separation of the EDM into interface classes that the user code directly interacts with, and data storage classes that hold the payload data. The user sees an Array of Structs (AoS) interface, while the data is stored in a Struct of Arrays (SoA) format in memory, thus making it possible to efficiently auto-vectorise reconstruction code. A simple way of augmenting and reducing the information saved for different data objects. This makes it possible to easily decorate objects with new properties during data analysis, and to remove properties that the analysis does not need. A persistent file format that can be explored directly with ROOT, either with or without loading any additional libraries. This allows fast interactive naviga...

SNYDER, S; The ATLAS collaboration; NOWAK, M; EIFERT, T; BUCKLEY, A; ELSING, M; GILLBERG, D; MOYSE, E; KOENEKE, K; KRASZNAHORKAY, A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Unmanned airships for near earth remote sensing missions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years the study of Earth processes has increased significantly. Conventional aircraft have been employed to a large extent in gathering much of this information. However, with this expansion of research has come the need to investigate and measure phenomena that occur beyond the performance capabilities of conventional aircraft. Where long dwell times or observations at very low attitudes are required there are few platforms that can operate safely, efficiently, and cost-effectively. One type of aircraft that meets all three parameters is the unmanned, autonomously operated airship. The UAV airship is smaller than manned airships but has similar performance characteristics. It`s low speed stability permits high resolution observations and provides a low vibration environment for motion sensitive instruments. Maximum airspeed is usually 30mph to 35mph and endurance can be as high as 36 hours. With scientific payload capacities of 100 kilos and more, the UAV airship offers a unique opportunity for carrying significant instrument loads for protracted periods at the air/surface interface. The US Army has operated UAV airships for several years conducting border surveillance and monitoring, environmental surveys, and detection and mapping of unexploded ordinance. The technical details of UAV airships, their performance, and the potential of such platforms for more advanced research roles will be presented. 3 refs., 5 figs.

Hochstetler, R.D. [Research Adventures,Inc., Kensington, MD (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, January 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The subject of this newsletter is the ARM unmanned aerospace vehicle program. The ARM Program's focus is on climate research, specifically research related to solar radiation and its interaction with clouds. The SGP CART site contains highly sophisticated surface instrumentation, but even these instruments cannot gather some crucial climate data from high in the atmosphere. The Department of Energy and the Department of Defense joined together to use a high-tech, high-altitude, long-endurance class of unmanned aircraft known as the unmanned aerospace vehicle (UAV). A UAV is a small, lightweight airplane that is controlled remotely from the ground. A pilot sits in a ground-based cockpit and flies the aircraft as if he were actually on board. The UAV can also fly completely on its own through the use of preprogrammed computer flight routines. The ARM UAV is fitted with payload instruments developed to make highly accurate measurements of atmospheric flux, radiance, and clouds. Using a UAV is beneficial to climate research in many ways. The UAV puts the instrumentation within the environment being studied and gives scientists direct measurements, in contrast to indirect measurements from satellites orbiting high above Earth. The data collected by UAVs can be used to verify and calibrate measurements and calculated values from satellites, therefore making satellite data more useful and valuable to researchers.

Sisterson, D.L.

2000-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

274

Solar-powered unmanned aerial vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An analysis was performed to determine the impact of various power system components and mission requirements on the size of solar-powered high altitude long endurance (HALE)-type aircraft. The HALE unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) has good potential for use in many military and civil applications. The primary power system components considered in this study were photovoltaic (PV) modules for power generation and regenerative fuel cells for energy storage. The impact of relevant component performance on UAV size and capability were considered; including PV module efficiency and mass, power electronics efficiency, and fuel cell specific energy. Mission parameters such as time of year, flight altitude, flight latitude, and payload mass and power were also varied to determine impact on UAV size. The aircraft analysis method used determines the required aircraft wing aspect ratio, wing area, and total mass based on maximum endurance or minimum required power calculations. The results indicate that the capacity of the energy storage system employed, fuel cells in this analysis, greatly impacts aircraft size, whereas the impact of PV module efficiency and mass is much less important. It was concluded that an energy storage specific energy (total system) of 250--500 Whr/kg is required to enable most useful missions, and that PV cells with efficiencies greater than {approximately} 12% are suitable for use.

Reinhardt, K.C.; Lamp, T.R.; Geis, J.W. [Wright Lab., Wright Patterson AFB, OH (United States). Aero Propulsion and Power Directorate; Colozza, A.J. [NYMA Corp., Brookpark, OH (United States). Aerospace Technology Development

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

275

Power system requirements and selection for the space exploration initiative  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) seeks to reestablish a US program of manned and unmanned space exploration. The President has called for a program which includes a space station element, a manned habitation of the moon, and a human exploration of Mars. The NASA Synthesis Group has developed four significantly different architectures for the SEI program. One key element of a space exploration effort is the power required to support the missions. The Power Speciality Team of the Synthesis Group was tasked with assessing and evaluating the power requirements and candidate power technologies for such missions. Inputs to the effort came from existing NASA studies as well as other governments agency inputs such as those from DOD and DOE. In addition, there were industry and university briefings and results of solicitations from the AIAA and the general public as part of the NASA outreach effort. Because of the variety of power needs in the SEI program, there will be a need for multiple power system technologies including solar, nuclear and electrochemical. Due to the high rocket masses required to propel payloads to the moon and beyond to Mars, there is great emphasis placed on the need for high power density and high energy density systems. Power system technology development work is needed results will determine the ultimate technology selections. 23 refs., 10 figs.

Biringer, K.L. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Bartine, D.E. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Buden, D. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Foreman, J. (Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)); Harrison, S. (Strategic Defense Initiative Organization, Washington, DC (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Recommissioning the K-1600 Seismic Test Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Center of Natural Phenomena Engineering (CNPE) was established under the technical direction of Dr. James E. Beavers with a mandate to assess, by analyses and testing, the seismic capacity of building structures that house sensitive processes at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. This mandate resulted in a need to recommission the K-1600 Seismic Test Facility (STF) at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, which had been shutdown for 6 years. This paper documents the history of the facility and fives some salient construction, operation, and performance details of its 8-ton, 20-foot center of gravity payload bi-axial seismic simulator. A log of activities involved in the restart of this valuable resource is included as Table 1. Some of problems and solutions associated with recommissioning the facility under a relatively limited budget are included. The unique attributes of the shake table are discussed. The original mission and performance requirements are compared to current expanded mission and performance capabilities. Potential upgrades to further improve the capabilities of the test facility as an adjunct to the CNPE are considered. Additional uses for the facility are proposed, including seismic qualification testing of devices unique to enrichment technologies and associated hazardous waste treatment and disposal processes. In summary, the STF restart in conjunction with CNPE has added a vital, and unique facility to the list of current national resources utilized for earthquake engineering research and development. 3 figs., 1 tab.

Wynn, C.C. (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)); Brewer, D.W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Space station: Infrastructure for radiation measurements in low Earth orbit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has recently begun the design and development phase of the Space Station Program. International negotiations with the Europeans Japanese and Canadians are progressing and they will soon join the United States in the development to complete plans for a cooperative international space endeavor. The Space Station will prove a permanently manned facility in low earth orbit to support scientific research technology development and commercial activities. In addition free?flying platforms will be developed to carry a variety of user payloads in polar orbit in co?orbit with the station and eventually into geosynchronous orbit. The Station and platforms represent an infrastructure of research facilities in space which could be utilized for measurements of naturally occurring radiation and secondary emissions over extended periods of time. High energy radiation experiments at the Station/platforms might vary in objective from scientific purpose of characterizing the radiation evironment for improved model accuracy. This paper describes the Space Station Program content schedule and approach for inputting user requirements into the design process. Conference participants can then assess to what extent this future capability in space matches their future research initiatives.

B. D. Meredith

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

A case for Mars: A case for nuclear thermal rockets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is now possible to make general comparisons of candidate propulsion systems for human exploration of Mars. Preliminary review indicates that the propulsion system most likely to meet all mission requirements is the Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR). Advanced cryogenic chemical propulsion systems achieve a maximum specific impulse (Isp) of about 470 seconds. The Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA) program of the 1960's built engines with Isp's of about 825 seconds. Performance of an NTR depends on achievable materials temperatures, but materials has progressed significantly since the 1960's. Also, some of the current research undertaken to improve chemical rocket performance, such as aerobraking or schemes to minify payload, applies to an NTR as well, although it is not essential. The NTR is reusable, and can be developed into a complete space transportation system. Only 3--4% of the nuclear fuel would be used in a Mars mission, and an engine can be used until about 40% of the fuel is expended. Nuclear thermal rockets can take mankind to the moon, to Mars, and beyond, but development must begin now. There is potential for orderly growth into nuclear concepts far beyond NERVA. Using chemical propulsion for lunar missions and delaying NTR development will only result in higher costs and delayed or cancelled Mars missions.

Neuman, J.E.; Van Haaften, D.H.; Madsen, W.W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Astrodynamical Space Test of Relativity using Optical Devices I (ASTROD I) - A class-M fundamental physics mission proposal for Cosmic Vision 2015-2025: 2010 Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper on ASTROD I is based on our 2010 proposal submitted for the ESA call for class-M mission proposals, and is a sequel and an update to our previous paper [Experimental Astronomy 23 (2009) 491-527; designated as Paper I] which was based on our last proposal submitted for the 2007 ESA call. In this paper, we present our orbit selection with one Venus swing-by together with orbit simulation. In Paper I, our orbit choice is with two Venus swing-bys. The present choice takes shorter time (about 250 days) to reach the opposite side of the Sun. We also present a preliminary design of the optical bench, and elaborate on the solar physics goals with the radiation monitor payload. We discuss telescope size, trade-offs of drag-free sensitivities, thermal issues and present an outlook. ASTROD I is a planned interplanetary space mission with multiple goals. The primary aims are: to test General Relativity with an improvement in sensitivity of over 3 orders of magnitude, improving our understanding of gravity and ...

Braxmaier, Claus; Foulon, Bernard; Gkl, Ertan; Grimani, Catia; Guo, Jian; Herrmann, Sven; Lmmerzahl, Claus; Ni, Wei-Tou; Peters, Achim; Rievers, Benny; Samain, tienne; Selig, Hanns; Shaul, Diana; Svehla, Drazen; Touboul, Pierre; Wang, Gang; Wu, An-Ming; Zakharov, Alexander F

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Environmental study of the National Aerospace Plane. Final report, 1 December 1991-30 December 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the United States (US) National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) Program is to develop hypersonic technologies required for future military and Civilian aerospace plane systems to reduce payload cost to orbit and provide for flexible-responsive space operations. If successful, the NASP Program will be the stimulus for developing a whole new class of airbreathing hypersonic aircraft powered by clean-burning scramjet engines using liquid hydrogen as the primary fuel. As part of this development, the potential to cause environmental impacts from these type of vehicles must be considered and analyzed. This process has been initiated using the NASP Program's proposed X-30 flight research vehicle and flight test program as a basis for analysis. Environmental issues addressed include noise and sonic booms, stratospheric ozone depletion, public health and safety, hazardous materials/waste, air quality, biological and cultural resources, geology and soils, and water use. Although this study is not yet complete, preliminary analysis has determined that the X-30 vehicle and flight test program would have minimal environmental impact.

Brown, C.; Wierzbanowski, T.; Reda, H.; Duecker, G.T.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ur3 ur4 payload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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281

The First Limits on the Ultra-high Energy Neutrino Fluence from Gamma-Ray Bursts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We set the first limits on the ultra-high energy (UHE) neutrino fluence at energies greater than 109?GeV from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) based on data from the second flight of the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA). During the 31 day flight of ANITA-II, 26 GRBs were recorded by Swift or Fermi. Of these, we analyzed the 12 GRBs which occurred during quiet periods when the payload was away from anthropogenic activity. In a blind analysis, we observe 0 events on a total background of 0.0044 events in the combined prompt window for all 12 low-background bursts. We also observe 0 events from the remaining 14 bursts. We place a 90% confidence level limit on the E ?4 prompt neutrino fluence between 108?GeV E 12?GeV of E 4? = 2.5 ? 1017?GeV3?cm?2 from GRB090107A. This is the first reported limit on the UHE neutrino fluence from GRBs above 109?GeV, and the strongest limit above 108?GeV.

A. G. Vieregg; K. Palladino; P. Allison; B. M. Baughman; J. J. Beatty; K. Belov; D. Z. Besson; S. Bevan; W. R. Binns; C. Chen; P. Chen; J. M. Clem; A. Connolly; M. Detrixhe; D. De Marco; P. F. Dowkontt; M. DuVernois; P. W. Gorham; E. W. Grashorn; B. Hill; S. Hoover; M. Huang; M. H. Israel; A. Javaid; K. M. Liewer; S. Matsuno; B. C. Mercurio; C. Miki; M. Mottram; J. Nam; R. J. Nichol; A. Romero-Wolf; L. Ruckman; D. Saltzberg; D. Seckel; G. S. Varner; Y. Wang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Safety assessment of high consequence robotics system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper outlines the use of a failure modes and effects analysis for the safety assessment of a robotic system being developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The robotic system, the weigh and leak check system, is to replace a manual process for weight and leakage of nuclear materials at the DOE Pantex facility. Failure modes and effects analyses were completed for the robotics process to ensure that safety goals for the systems have been met. Due to the flexible nature of the robot configuration, traditional failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) were not applicable. In addition, the primary focus of safety assessments of robotics systems has been the protection of personnel in the immediate area. In this application, the safety analysis must account for the sensitivities of the payload as well as traditional issues. A unique variation on the classical FMEA was developed that permits an organized and quite effective tool to be used to assure that safety was adequately considered during the development of the robotic system. The fundamental aspects of the approach are outlined in the paper.

Robinson, D.G.; Atcitty, C.B.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Spider Optimization: Probing the Systematics of a Large Scale B-Mode Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spider is a long-duration, balloon-borne polarimeter designed to measure large scale Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization with very high sensitivity and control of systematics. The instrument will map over half the sky with degree angular resolution in I, Q and U Stokes parameters, in four frequency bands from 96 to 275 GHz. Spider's ultimate goal is to detect the primordial gravity wave signal imprinted on the CMB B-mode polarization. One of the challenges in achieving this goal is the minimization of the contamination of B-modes by systematic effects. This paper explores a number of instrument systematics and observing strategies in order to optimize B-mode sensitivity. This is done by injecting realistic-amplitude, time-varying systematics in a set of simulated time-streams. Tests of the impact of detector noise characteristics, pointing jitter, payload pendulations, polarization angle offsets, beam systematics and receiver gain drifts are shown. Spider's default observing strategy is to spin continuously in azimuth, with polarization modulation achieved by either a rapidly spinning half-wave plate or a rapidly spinning gondola and a slowly stepped half-wave plate. Although the latter is more susceptible to systematics, results shown here indicate that either mode of operation can be used by Spider.

C. J. MacTavish; P. A. R. Ade; E. S. Battistelli; S. Benton; R. Bihary; J. J. Bock; J. R. Bond; J. Brevik; S. Bryan; C. R. Contaldi; B. P. Crill; O. Dor; L. Fissel; S. R. Golwala; M. Halpern; G. Hilton; W. Holmes; V. V. Hristov; K. Irwin; W. C. Jones; C. L. Kuo; A. E. Lange; C. Lawrie; T. G. Martin; P. Mason; T. E. Montroy; C. B. Netterfield; D. Riley; J. E. Ruhl; A. Trangsrud; C. Tucker; A. Turner; M. Viero; D. Wiebe

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

THERMAL EVALUATION OF ALTERNATE SHIPPING CASK FOR GTRI EXPERIMENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) has many experiments yet to be irradiated in support of the High Performance Research Reactor fuels development program. Most of the experiments will be irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), then later shipped to the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) located at the Materials and Fuels Complex for post irradiation examination. To date, the General Electric (GE)-2000 cask has been used to transport GTRI experiments between these facilities. However, the availability of the GE-2000 cask to support future GTRI experiments is at risk. In addition, the internal cavity of the GE-2000 cask is too short to accommodate shipping the larger GTRI experiments. Therefore, an alternate shipping capability is being pursued. The Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, Research Reactor (BRR) cask has been determined to be the best alternative to the GE-2000 cask. An evaluation of the thermal performance of the BRR cask is necessary before proceeding with fabrication of the newly designed cask hardware and the development of handling, shipping, and transport procedures. This paper presents the results of the thermal evaluation of the BRR cask loaded with a representative set of fueled and non-fueled experiments. When analyzed with identical payloads, experiment temperatures were found to be lower with the BRR cask than with the GE-2000 cask. From a thermal standpoint, the BRR cask was found to be a suitable alternate to the GE-2000 cask.

Donna Post Guillen

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

UV spectral measurements at moderately high resolution and of OH resonance scattering resolved by polarization during the MANTRA 20022004 stratospheric balloon flights  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A moderately high-resolution (stratospheric balloon payloads of 2002 and 2004. The instrument measures both the direct sunlight and the radiation scattered by the atmosphere. The latter can be observed in two orthogonal polarization directions, at 90 from the solar azimuth and at several elevations above the horizon. As the OH molecule is the principal resonant scatterer in this spectral region, this permits the inference of both ozone and OH column amounts as well as limited profile information. This paper describes the instrument and its in-flight characterization, the basic data processing and the influence of several aspects of the flight profile. The direct sun measurements are analyzed both to characterize the spectrometer responsivity to scattered radiation and to estimate the ozone abundance at the flight altitude and above. An example of a high-resolution solar spectrum at 37km altitude is presented and compared with others in the literature. The measured OH and Rayleigh-scattered spectra are used to derive OH radiation intensity measurements (the OH airglow), which are compared with others in the literature.

D.W. Tarasick; D.I. Wardle; C.T. McElroy; C. McLinden; S. Brown; B. Solheim

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

The BaR-SPOrt Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BaR-SPOrt (Balloon-borne Radiometers for Sky Polarisation Observations) is an experiment to measure the linearly polarized emission of sky patches at 32 and 90 GHz with sub-degree angular resolution. It is equipped with high sensitivity correlation polarimeters for simultaneous detection of both the U and Q stokes parameters of the incident radiation. On-axis telescope is used to observe angular scales where the expected polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMBP) peaks. This project shares most of the know-how and sophisticated technology developed for the SPOrt experiment onboard the International Space Station. The payload is designed to flight onboard long duration stratospheric balloons both in the Northern and Southern hemispheres where low foreground emission sky patches are accessible. Due to the weakness of the expected CMBP signal (in the range of microK), much care has been spent to optimize the instrument design with respect to the systematics generation, observing time efficiency and long term stability. In this contribution we present the instrument design, and first tests on some components of the 32 GHz radiometer.

M. Zannoni; S. Cortiglioni; G. Bernardi; E. Carretti; S. Cecchini; C. Macculi; E. Morelli; C. Sbarra; G. Ventura; L. Nicastro; J. Monari; M. Poloni; S. Poppi; V. Natale; M. Baralis; O. Peverini; R. Tascone; G. Virone; A. Boscaleri; E. Pascale; G. Boella; S. Bonometto; M. Gervasi; G. Sironi; M. Tucci; R. Nesti; R. Fabbri; P. de Bernardis; M. De Petris; S. Masi; M. V. Sazhin; E. N. Vinyajkin

2003-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

287

A system for grabbing integrated video frames remotely  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A system for grabbing integrated video frames produced by a remote camera is described. As part of the pointed platform in a balloon?borne experiment we use a video charge?coupled?device camera to obtain wide field star images. To obtain images with a sufficient signal?to?noise ratio integration times of up to 1 s are required. In applications where the frame grabber and camera are physically close to each other timing the frame grabber trigger is straightforward; however there are several advantages to locating the frame grabber not on the balloon payload. As a result commands issued simultaneously to the frame grabber on the ground and the camera on the balloon can be delayed relative to each other resulting in failure to acquire an image. We have developed a system where at the end of an integration a tone is injected into the video field preceding the transmission of the integrated frame; the tone is used on the ground by a decoder circuit to control the frame grabber acquisition of the integrated frame. The system has operated successfully in the flight of a stratospheric balloon?borne telescope.

M. Halpern; S. Knotek; G. S. Tucker

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

The PLATO End-to-End CCD Simulator -- Modelling space-based ultra-high precision CCD photometry for the assessment study of the PLATO Mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The PLATO satellite mission project is a next generation ESA Cosmic Vision satellite project dedicated to the detection of exo-planets and to asteroseismology of their host-stars using ultra-high precision photometry. The main goal of the PLATO mission is to provide a full statistical analysis of exo-planetary systems around stars that are bright and close enough for detailed follow-up studies. Many aspects concerning the design trade-off of a space-based instrument and its performance can best be tackled through realistic simulations of the expected observations. The complex interplay of various noise sources in the course of the observations made such simulations an indispensable part of the assessment study of the PLATO Payload Consortium. We created an end-to-end CCD simulation software-tool, dubbed PLATOSim, which simulates photometric time-series of CCD images by including realistic models of the CCD and its electronics, the telescope optics, the stellar field, the pointing uncertainty of the satellite ...

Zima, W; De Ridder, J; Salmon, S; Catala, C; Kjeldsen, H; Aerts, C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Large-eddy simulations of impinging over-expanded supersonic jet noise for launcher applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During the lift-off phase of a space launcher powerful rocket motors generate harsh acoustic environment on the launch pad. Following the blast waves created at ignition jet noise is a major contributor to the acoustic loads received by the launcher and its payload. Recent simulations performed at ONERA to compute the noise emitted by solid rocket motors at lift-off conditions are described. Far-field noise prediction is achieved by associating a LES solution of the jet flow with an acoustics surface integral method. The computations are carried out with in-house codes CEDRE for the LES solution and KIM for Ffowcs Williams & Hawkings porous surface integration method. The test case is that of a gas generator fired vertically onto a 45 degrees inclined flat plate which impingement point is located 10 diameters from nozzle exit. Computations are run for varied numerical conditions such as turbulence modeling along the plate and different porous surfaces location and type. Results are discussed and compared with experimental acoustic measurements obtained by CNES at MARTEL facility.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Ultra-fast escape maneuver of an octopus-inspired robot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We design and test an octopus-inspired flexible hull robot that demonstrates outstanding fast-starting performance. The robot is hyper-inflated with water, and then rapidly deflates to expel the fluid so as to power the escape maneuver. Using this robot we verify for the first time in laboratory testing that rapid size-change can be used to induce separation elimination in bluff bodies travelling several body lengths, and recover fluid energy which can be employed to improve the propulsive performance. The robot is found to experience extraordinary speeds, over ten body lengths per second, exceeding that of a similarly propelled optimally streamlined rigid rocket. The net thrust force on the robot is over 30\\% \\textit{larger} than the theoretical value for a rocket in vacuo, resulting in the rapid acceleration. Finally, over 53\\% of the initial energy is converted into payload kinetic energy, a performance that exceeds the estimated energy conversion efficiency of fast-starting fish. The Reynolds number based...

Weymouth, G D; Triantafyllou, M S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Remotely deployable aerial inspection using tactile sensors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For structural monitoring applications, the use of remotely deployable Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) inspection platforms offer many advantages, including improved accessibility, greater safety and reduced cost, when compared to traditional manual inspection techniques. The use of such platforms, previously reported by researchers at the University Strathclyde facilitates the potential for rapid scanning of large areas and volumes in hazardous locations. A common problem for both manual and remote deployment approaches lies in the intrinsic stand-off and surface coupling issues of typical NDE probes. The associated complications of these requirements are obviously significantly exacerbated when considering aerial based remote inspection and deployment, resulting in simple visual techniques being the preferred sensor payload. Researchers at Bristol Robotics Laboratory have developed biomimetic tactile sensors modelled on the facial whiskers (vibrissae) of animals such as rats and mice, with the latest sensors actively sweeping their tips across the surface in a back and forth motion. The current work reports on the design and performance of an aerial inspection platform and the suitability of tactile whisking sensors to aerial based surface monitoring applications.

MacLeod, C. N.; Cao, J.; Pierce, S. G.; Dobie, G.; Summan, R. [Centre for Ultrasonic Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, G1 1XW (United Kingdom); Sullivan, J. C.; Pipe, A. G. [Bristol Robotics Laboratory, University of the West of England, Bristol, BS16 1QY (United Kingdom)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

292

Hydrogen fuel in a marine environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen may offer considerable potential as a marine fuel. The lower fuel mass when compared with existing hydrocarbon fuels can usefully increase payload which in turn benefits the economics of oceanic transport and provides the opportunity to compete in new markets. The potential to virtually eliminate pollution at the point of use may prove significant at a time when exhaust emissions from shipping are becoming a matter of global concern. The potential for hydrogen in the marine environment, the current state of transferable technologies and the particular technical and economic issues that need to be addressed are considered in the context of a design study being conducted on a high-speed foil-assisted catamaran capable of transporting 600TEU at speeds of up to 64kn (118.5km/h) over trans-Pacific and trans-Atlantic trade routes. It is concluded that such a vessel is technically feasible and could achieve door-to-door delivery times, as part of an integrated transport chain, otherwise only possible by airfreight but at a fraction of the cost.

I.J.S. Veldhuis; R.N. Richardson; H.B.J. Stone

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Bubble Manipulation by Self Organization of Bubbles inside Ultrasonic Wave  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Microbubble manipulation using ultrasonic waves is a promising technology in the fields of future medicine and biotechnology. For example, it is considered that bubble trapping using ultrasonic waves may play an important role in drug or gene delivery systems in order to trap the drugs or genes in the diseased tissue. Usually, when bubbles are designed so that they carry payloads, such as drug or gene, they tend to be harder than free bubbles. These hard bubbles receive a small acoustic radiation force, which is not sufficient for bubble manipulation. In this paper, a novel method of microbubble manipulation using ultrasonic waves is proposed. This method uses seed bubbles in order to manipulate target bubbles. When the seed bubbles are introduced into the ultrasonic wave field, they start to oscillate to produce a bubble aggregation of a certain size. Then the target bubbles are introduced, the target bubbles attach around the seed bubbles producing a bubble mass with bilayers (inner layer: seed bubbles, outer layer: target bubbles). The target bubbles are manipulated as a bilayered bubble mass. Basic experiments are carried out using polyvinyl chloride (PVC) shell bubbles. No target bubbles are trapped when only the target bubbles are introduced. However, they are trapped if the seed bubbles are introduced in advance.

Yoshiki Yamakoshi; Masato Koganezawa

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

EPRI-SCE testing and evaluation of electric vehicles: Lucas van and Jet 007, 750, and 1400. Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the second phase of the EPRI-SCE Electric Vehicle Project, in which four additional electric vehicles (EVs) were tested and evaluated: the Jet Industries Model 007 passenger car, Model 750 pickup truck, and Model 1400 passenger van; and the Lucas-Bedford Model CFE cargo van. During the first phase of this project, four EVs were also tested: Jet 500, Volkswagen Type 2, DAUG Type GM2, and Battronic Minivan. The project emphasizes road-testing of vehicles to acquire data on their useful driving range, performance, reliability, and driver acceptance in utility-fleet use. Each vehicle was driven more than 100 miles along SCE-selected test routes to determine the effects of different terrains (level, slight grades, and steep grades), traffic conditions (one-, two-, three-, and four-stops/mile and freeway), and payload. The vehicle component failures that occurred during testing are itemized and described briefly, and assessments are made of expected field reliability. Other vehicle characteristics and measurements of interest are presented. The data base on these test vehicles is intended to provide the reader an overview of the real world performance that can be expected from present-day state-of-the-art EVs.

Not Available

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

FY07 Final Report for Calibration Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Remote infrared (IR) sensing provides a valuable method for detection and identification of materials associated with nuclear proliferation. Current challenges for remote sensors include minimizing the size, mass, and power requirements for cheaper, smaller, and more deployable instruments without affecting the measurement performance. One area that is often overlooked is sensor calibration design that is optimized to minimize the cost, size, weight, and power of the payload. Yet, an on-board calibration system is essential to account for changes in the detector response once the instrument has been removed from the laboratory. The Calibration Systems project at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is aimed towards developing and demonstrating compact quantum cascade (QC) laser-based calibration systems for infrared sensor systems in order to provide both a spectral and radiometric calibration while minimizing the impact on the instrument payload. In FY05, PNNL demonstrated a multi-level radiance scheme that provides six radiance levels for an enhanced linearity check compared to the currently accepted two-point scheme. PNNL began testing the repeatability of this scheme using a cryogenically cooled, single-mode quantum cascade laser (QCL). A cyclic variation in the power was observed that was attributed to the thermal cycling of the laser's dewar. In FY06, PNNL continued testing this scheme and installed an auxiliary liquid nitrogen reservoir to limit the thermal cycling effects. Although better repeatability was achieved over a longer time period, power fluctuations were still observed due to the thermal cycling. Due to the limitations with the cryogenic system, PNNL began testing Fabry-Perot QCLs that operate continuous-wave (cw) or quasi-cw at room temperature (RT) in FY06. PNNL demonstrated a multi-level scheme that provides five radiance levels in 105 seconds with excellent repeatability. We have continued testing this repeatability in FY07. A burn-in effect appears in which the power increases over a certain time period. Repeatability better than 1%, however, is demonstrated for most of the radiance levels after this initial burn-in. In FY06, PNNL also began investigating a fiber-coupled RT QCL for a compact IR calibration source. PNNL demonstrated a uniform beam profile by measuring a time-averaged response and modulating the fiber optic with a motor to minimize the effects of speckle. In FY07, PNNL examined the power stability of fiber-coupled QCLs. Feedback appears to degrade the stability so that anti-reflective coatings for fibers may be essential. In FY07, PNNL continued to investigate the stability of room temperature QCLs as well as the measurement technique to provide a quantitative estimate for the measurement uncertainty. We designed and built a custom environmental enclosure to reduce the measurement uncertainty. After an initial burn-in, we have achieved uncertainties better than 0.1% for data collected over almost 100 hours of operation. We also built a bench-top system to demonstrate how the QC laser can be used to calibrate a microbolometer array and illustrated the importance of a multi-point calibration.

Myers, Tanya L.; Broocks, Bryan T.; Cannon, Bret D.; Ho, Nicolas

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to summarize the waste acceptance criteria applicable to the transportation, storage, and disposal of contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). These criteria serve as the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) primary directive for ensuring that CH-TRU waste is managed and disposed of in a manner that protects human health and safety and the environment.The authorization basis of WIPP for the disposal of CH-TRU waste includes the U.S.Department of Energy National Security and Military Applications of Nuclear EnergyAuthorization Act of 1980 (reference 1) and the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA;reference 2). Included in this document are the requirements and associated criteriaimposed by these acts and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA,reference 3), as amended, on the CH-TRU waste destined for disposal at WIPP.|The DOE TRU waste sites must certify CH-TRU waste payload containers to thecontact-handled waste acceptance criteria (CH-WAC) identified in this document. Asshown in figure 1.0, the flow-down of applicable requirements to the CH-WAC istraceable to several higher-tier documents, including the WIPP operational safetyrequirements derived from the WIPP CH Documented Safety Analysis (CH-DSA;reference 4), the transportation requirements for CH-TRU wastes derived from theTransuranic Package Transporter-Model II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT Certificates ofCompliance (references 5 and 5a), the WIPP LWA (reference 2), the WIPP HazardousWaste Facility Permit (reference 6), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency(EPA) Compliance Certification Decision and approval for PCB disposal (references 7,34, 35, 36, and 37). The solid arrows shown in figure 1.0 represent the flow-down of allapplicable payload container-based requirements. The two dotted arrows shown infigure 1.0 represent the flow-down of summary level requirements only; i.e., the sitesmust reference the regulatory source documents from the U.S. Nuclear RegulatoryCommission (NRC) and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) for acomprehensive and detailed listing of the requirements.This CH-WAC does not address the subject of waste characterization relating to adetermination of whether the waste is hazardous; rather, the sites are referred to theWaste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit fordetails of the sampling and analysis protocols to be used in determining compliance withthe required physical and chemical properties of the waste. Requirements andassociated criteria pertaining to a determination of the radiological properties of thewaste, however, are addressed in appendix A of this document. The collectiveinformation obtained from waste characterization records and acceptable knowledge(AK) serves as the basis for sites to certify that their CH-TRU waste satisfies the WIPPwaste acceptance criteria listed herein.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

297

Hydraulic manipulator design, analysis, and control at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To meet the increased payload capacities demanded by present-day tasks, manipulator designers have turned to hydraulics as a means of actuation. Hydraulics have always been the actuator of choice when designing heavy-life construction and mining equipment such as bulldozers, backhoes, and tunneling devices. In order to successfully design, build, and deploy a new hydraulic manipulator (or subsystem) sophisticated modeling, analysis, and control experiments are usually needed. To support the development and deployment of new hydraulic manipulators Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has outfitted a significant experimental laboratory and has developed the software capability for research into hydraulic manipulators, hydraulic actuators, hydraulic systems, modeling of hydraulic systems, and hydraulic controls. The hydraulics laboratory at ORNL has three different manipulators. First is a 6-Degree-of-Freedom (6-DoF), multi-planer, teleoperated, flexible controls test bed used for the development of waste tank clean-up manipulator controls, thermal studies, system characterization, and manipulator tracking. Finally, is a human amplifier test bed used for the development of an entire new class of teleoperated systems. To compliment the hardware in the hydraulics laboratory, ORNL has developed a hydraulics simulation capability including a custom package to model the hydraulic systems and manipulators for performance studies and control development. This paper outlines the history of hydraulic manipulator developments at ORNL, describes the hydraulics laboratory, discusses the use of the equipment within the laboratory, and presents some of the initial results from experiments and modeling associated with these hydraulic manipulators. Included are some of the results from the development of the human amplifier/de-amplifier concepts, the characterization of the thermal sensitivity of hydraulic systems, and end-point tracking accuracy studies. Experimental and analytical results are included.

Kress, R.L.; Jansen, J.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Robotics and Process Systems Div.; Love, L.J. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States); Basher, A.M.H. [South Carolina State Univ., Orangeburg, SC (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Use of the Modified Light Duty Utility Arm to Perform Nuclear Waste Cleanup of Underground Waste Storage Tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Modified Light Duty Utility Arm (MLDUA) is a selectable seven or eight degree-of-freedom robot arm with a 16.5 ft (5.03 m) reach and a payload capacity of 200 lb. (90.72 kg). The utility arm is controlled in either joystick-based telerobotic mode or auto sequence robotics mode. The MLDUA deployment system deploys the utility arm vertically into underground radioactive waste storage tanks located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These tanks are constructed of gunite material and consist of two 25 ft (7.62 m) diameter tanks in the North Tank Farm and six 50 ft (15.24 m) diameter tanks in the South Tank Farm. After deployment inside a tank, the utility arm reaches and grasps the confined sluicing end effecter (CSEE) which is attached to the hose management arm (HMA). The utility arm positions the CSEE within the tank to allow the HMA to sluice the tank's liquid and solid waste from the tank. The MLDUA is used to deploy the characterization end effecter (CEE) and gunite scarifying end effecter (GSEE) into the tank. The CEE is used to survey the tank wall's radiation levels and the physical condition of the walls. The GSEE is used to scarify the tank walls with high-pressure water to remove the wall scale buildup and a thin layer of gunite which reduces the radioactive contamination that is embedded into the gunite walls. The MLDUA is also used to support waste sampling and wall core-sampling operations. Other tools that have been developed for use by the MLDUA include a pipe-plugging end effecter, pipe-cutting end effecter, and pipe-cleaning end effecter. Washington University developed advance robotics path control algorithms for use in the tanks. The MLDUA was first deployed in June 1997 and has operated continuously since then. Operational experience in the first four tanks remediated is presented in this paper.

Blank, J.A.; Burks, B.L.; DePew, R.E.; Falter, D.D.; Glassell, R.L.; Glover, W.H.; Killough, S.M.; Lloyd, P.D.; Love, L.J.; Randolph, J.D.; Van Hoesen, S.D.; Vesco, D.P.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Pixel detectors for x-ray imaging spectroscopy in space  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pixelated semiconductor detectors for X-ray imaging spectroscopy are foreseen as key components of the payload of various future space missions exploring the x-ray sky. Located on the platform of the new Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma satellite, the eROSITA (extended Roentgen Survey with an Imaging Telescope Array) instrument will perform an imaging all-sky survey up to an X-ray energy of 10 keV with unprecedented spectral and angular resolution. The instrument will consist of seven parallel oriented mirror modules each having its own pnCCD camera in the focus. The satellite born X-ray observatory SIMBOL-X will be the first mission to use formation-flying techniques to implement an X-ray telescope with an unprecedented focal length of around 20 m. The detector instrumentation consists of separate high- and low energy detectors, a monolithic 128 ? 128 DEPFET macropixel array and a pixellated CdZTe detector respectively, making energy band between 0.5 to 80 keV accessible. A similar concept is proposed for the next generation X-ray observatory IXO. Finally, the MIXS (Mercury Imaging X-ray Spectrometer) instrument on the European Mercury exploration mission BepiColombo will use DEPFET macropixel arrays together with a small X-ray telescope to perform a spatially resolved planetary XRF analysis of Mercury's crust. Here, the mission concepts and their scientific targets are briefly discussed, and the resulting requirements on the detector devices together with the implementation strategies are shown.

J Treis; R Andritschke; R Hartmann; S Herrmann; P Holl; T Lauf; P Lechner; G Lutz; N Meidinger; M Porro; R H Richter; F Schopper; H Soltau; L Strder

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

The technology development status of the Solar Probe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The continuing development of new spacecraft technologies promises to enable the Solar Probe to be the first mission to travel in the atmosphere or corona of the sun. The most significant technology challenge is the thermal shield that would protect the spacecraft from the flux of 3000 suns (400? W/cm ? ** ??2) at the perihelion radius of 4 solar radii while allowing the spacecraft subsystems to operate at near room temperature. One of the key design issues of the shield is not simply surviving but operating at temperatures well above 2000K while minimizing the sublimation from the shield surface. Excessive sublimation could cause interference with the plasma science experiments that are fundamental to the Solar Probes scientific objectives of measuring the birth and development of the solar wind. The selection of a special type of carbon-carbon as the shield material seems assured at this time. Tests of this material in late 1996 were designed to confirm its optical surface properties and mass loss characteristics and the results are encouraging. The shield concept incorporates dual functions as a thermal shield and as a large high gain antenna. This latter function is important because of the difficult communications environment encountered within the solar corona. A high temperature feed concept under development is discussed here. The NASA guideline requiring non-nuclear power sources has introduced the requirement for alternative power sources. The current concept uses high temperature photovoltaic arrays as well as high energy low mass batteries to provide power during the perihelion phase of the mission. Testing of photovoltaic cells at high sun angles was completed in 1996 and the results are presented here. Finally a miniaturized science payload which relies on the latest advances in analyzer and detector technologies will be developed to minimize mass and power requirements.

James E. Randolph; Juan A. Ayon; Geoffrey D. Harvey; William A. Imbriale; Robert N. Miyake; Robert L. Mueller; Bill J. Nesmith; P. Richard Turner; Ray B. Dirling Jr.; Jeffrey C. Preble; Suraj Rawal; Wallace L. Vaughn

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ur3 ur4 payload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Optimization of a CNG series hybrid concept vehicle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) has favorable characteristics as a vehicular fuel, in terms of fuel economy as well as emissions. Using CNG as a fuel in a series hybrid vehicle has the potential of resulting in very high fuel economy (between 26 and 30 km/liter, 60 to 70 mpg) and very low emissions (substantially lower than Federal Tier II or CARB ULEV). This paper uses a vehicle evaluation code and an optimizer to find a set of vehicle parameters that result in optimum vehicle fuel economy. The vehicle evaluation code used in this analysis estimates vehicle power performance, including engine efficiency and power, generator efficiency, energy storage device efficiency and state-of-charge, and motor and transmission efficiencies. Eight vehicle parameters are selected as free variables for the optimization. The optimum vehicle must also meet two perfect requirements: accelerate to 97 km/h in less than 10 s, and climb an infinitely long hill with a 6% slope at 97 km/h with a 272 kg (600 lb.) payload. The optimizer used in this work was originally developed in the magnetic fusion energy program, and has been used to optimize complex systems, such as magnetic and inertial fusion devices, neutron sources, and mil guns. The optimizer consists of two parts: an optimization package for minimizing non-linear functions of many variables subject to several non-linear equality and/or inequality constraints and a programmable shell that allows interactive configuration and execution of the optimizer. The results of the analysis indicate that the CNG series hybrid vehicle has a high efficiency and low emissions. These results emphasize the advantages of CNG as a near-term alternative fuel for vehicles.

Aceves, S.M.; Smith, J.R.; Perkins, L.J.; Haney, S.W.; Flowers, D.L.

1995-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

302

Using the anchoring device of a comet lander to determine surface mechanical properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Owing to the low surface gravity of the Rosetta target comet 46P/Wirtanen, a means of anchoring the Rosetta Lander to the cometary surface will be necessary. This task can be accomplished by firing an anchor into the cometary soil immediately after touchdown to prevent a rebound of the spacecraft from the surface or subsequent ejection by other forces, and to allow for mechanical activities (drilling, etc.) at the landing site. The rationale for anchoring is examined, based on estimates of the main forces likely to act on the spacecraft after landing. We report on the development of an anchoring device using a pyrotechnic gas generator as a power source and an instrumented anchor. In addition to the anchoring function, which is the primary purpose of this system, the integration of acceleration and temperature sensors into the tip offers the possibility to determine some important material properties of the cometary surface layer. The accelerometer is designed to measure the deceleration history of the projectile and is thus expected to give information on how the material properties (in particular strength) change within the penetrated layer(s), while the temperature sensor will measure temperature variations at the depth at which the anchor finally comes to rest. As the mechanical properties of the material are not known, it is difficult to predict the final depth of the anchor with any great certainty, but it may well be greater than that reached by any other of the lander's instruments. The instrumented anchor will be part of the MUPUS experiment, selected to form part of the Rosetta Lander payload. We report on results of laboratory simulations of anchor penetration performed at the Institut fr Weltraumforschung, Graz, and compare these with models of projectile penetration. The value of the results expected from the penetrometry experiment in the context of an improved understanding of cometary processes is discussed.

Norbert I. Kmle; Andrew J. Ball; Gnter Kargl; Jakob Stcker; Markus Thiel; Harjinder S. Jolly; Masarapauya Dziruni; John C. Zarnecki

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

The gamma-ray burst monitor for Lobster-ISS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lobster-ISS is an X-ray all-sky monitor experiment selected by ESA two years ago for a Phase A study (now almost completed) for a future flight (2009) aboard the Columbus Exposed Payload Facility of the International Space Station. The main instrument, based on MCP optics with Lobster-eye geometry, has an energy passband from 0.1 to 3.5keV, an unprecedented daily sensitivity of 2נ10?12ergcm?2s?1, and it is capable to scan, during each orbit, the entire sky with an angular resolution of 46?. This X-ray telescope is flanked by a Gamma Ray Burst Monitor, with the minimum requirement of recognizing true \\{GRBs\\} from other transient events. In this paper we describe the GRBM. In addition to the minimum requirement, the instrument proposed is capable to roughly localize \\{GRBs\\} which occur in the Lobster FOV (162נ22.5) and to significantly extend the scientific capabilities of the main instrument for the study of \\{GRBs\\} and X-ray transients. The combination of the two instruments will allow an unprecedented spectral coverage (from 0.1 up to 300/700keV) for a sensitive study of the GRB prompt emission in the passband where \\{GRBs\\} and X-Ray Flashes emit most of their energy. The low-energy spectral band (0.110keV) is of key importance for the study of the GRB environment and the search of transient absorption and emission features from GRBs, both goals being crucial for unveiling the GRB phenomenon. The entire energy band of Lobster-ISS is not covered by either the Swift satellite or other GRB missions foreseen in the next decade.

L. Amati; F. Frontera; N. Auricchio; E. Caroli; A. Basili; A. Bogliolo; G. Di Domenico; T. Franceschini; C. Guidorzi; G. Landini; N. Masetti; E. Montanari; M. Orlandini; E. Palazzi; S. Silvestri; J.B. Stephen; G. Ventura

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Photovoltaic electric power applied to Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Photovoltaic electric-powered flight is receiving a great deal of attention in the context of the United States` Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) program. This paper addresses some of the enabling technical areas and their potential solutions. Of particular interest are the long-duration, high-altitude class of UAV`s whose mission it is to achieve altitudes between 60,000 and 100,000 feet, and to remain at those altitudes for prolonged periods performing various mapping and surveillance activities. Addressed herein are studies which reveal the need for extremely light-weight and efficient solar cells, high-efficiency electric motor-driven propeller modules, and power management and distribution control elements. Since the potential payloads vary dramatically in their power consumption and duty cycles, a typical load profile has been selected to provide commonality for the propulsion power comparisons. Since missions vary widely with respect to ground coverage requirements, from repeated orbiting over a localized target to long-distance routes over irregular terrain, the authors have also averaged the power requirements for on-board guidance and control power, as well as ground control and communication link utilization. In the context of the national technology reinvestment program, wherever possible they modeled components and materials which have been qualified for space and defense applications, yet are compatible with civilian UAV activities. These include, but are not limited to, solar cell developments, electric storage technology for diurnal operation, local and ground communications, power management and distribution, and control servo design. And finally, the results of tests conducted by Wright Laboratory on ultralight, highly efficient MOCVD GaAs solar cells purchased from EPI Materials Ltd. (EML) of the UK are presented. These cells were also used for modeling the flight characteristics of UAV aircraft.

Geis, J.; Arnold, J.H. [Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Advances in technology for the construction of deep-underground facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The workshop was organized in order to address technological issues important to decisions regarding the feasibility of strategic options. The objectives of the workshop were to establish the current technological capabilities for deep-underground construction, to project those capabilities through the compressed schedule proposed for construction, and to identify promising directions for timely allocation of existing research and development resources. The earth has been used as a means of protection and safekeeping for many centuries. Recently, the thickness of the earth cover required for this purpose has been extended to the 2,000- to 3,000-ft range in structures contemplated for nuclear-waste disposal, energy storage, and strategic systems. For defensive missile basing, it is now perceived that the magnitude of the threat has increased through better delivery systems, larger payloads, and variable tactics of attack. Thus, depths of 3,000 to 8,000 ft are being considered seriously for such facilities. Moreover, it appears desirable that the facilities be operational (if not totally complete) for defensive purposes within a five-year construction schedule. Deep excavations such as mines are similar in many respects to nearsurface tunnels and caverns for transit, rail, sewer, water, hydroelectric, and highway projects. But the differences that do exist are significant. Major distinctions between shallow and deep construction derive from the stress fields and behavior of earth materials around the openings. Different methodologies are required to accommodate other variations resulting from increased depth, such as elevated temperatures, reduced capability for site exploration, and limited access during project execution. This report addresses these and other questions devoted to geotechnical characterization, design, construction, and excavation equipment.

Not Available

1987-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

306

Life-cycle analysis of alternative aviation fuels in GREET  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, has been expanded to include well-to-wake (WTWa) analysis of aviation fuels and aircraft. This report documents the key WTWa stages and assumptions for fuels that represent alternatives to petroleum jet fuel. The aviation module in GREET consists of three spreadsheets that present detailed characterizations of well-to-pump and pump-to-wake parameters and WTWa results. By using the expanded GREET version (GREET1{_}2011), we estimate WTWa results for energy use (total, fossil, and petroleum energy) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide) for (1) each unit of energy (lower heating value) consumed by the aircraft or (2) each unit of distance traveled/ payload carried by the aircraft. The fuel pathways considered in this analysis include petroleum-based jet fuel from conventional and unconventional sources (i.e., oil sands); Fisher-Tropsch (FT) jet fuel from natural gas, coal, and biomass; bio-jet fuel from fast pyrolysis of cellulosic biomass; and bio-jet fuel from vegetable and algal oils, which falls under the American Society for Testing and Materials category of hydroprocessed esters and fatty acids. For aircraft operation, we considered six passenger aircraft classes and four freight aircraft classes in this analysis. Our analysis revealed that, depending on the feedstock source, the fuel conversion technology, and the allocation or displacement credit methodology applied to co-products, alternative bio-jet fuel pathways have the potential to reduce life-cycle GHG emissions by 55-85 percent compared with conventional (petroleum-based) jet fuel. Although producing FT jet fuel from fossil feedstock sources - such as natural gas and coal - could greatly reduce dependence on crude oil, production from such sources (especially coal) produces greater WTWa GHG emissions compared with petroleum jet fuel production unless carbon management practices, such as carbon capture and storage, are used.

Elgowainy, A.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Carter, N.; Stratton, R.; Hileman, J.; Malwitz, A.; Balasubramanian, S. (Energy Systems)

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

307

In situ observations of the ionized environment of Mars: the antenna impedance measurements experiment, AIM, proposed as part of the Mars advanced radar for subsurface and ionospheric sounding, MARSIS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although the priority is not very high, one of the scientific objectives of the Mars Express mission is to study the interaction of the Martian atmosphere with the interplanetary medium. Regarding Mars, the term atmosphere must be interpreted in its broadest sense, that is including the exospheric neutral and charged particles of planetary origin, which both extend deeply into the interplanetary medium and strongly interact with it. The antenna impedance measurements (AIM) experiment has been proposed within this framework. The main idea was to take advantage of the presence of a radar antenna onboard the Mars Express Orbiter and to measure its self-impedance in a frequency bandwidth that contains the plasma frequency. Both the real and imaginary parts of the antenna impedance are functions of the total plasma density and electron temperature. Consequently, with about 700g of electronics, box, cables, and a rather simple interface to the radar antenna it becomes possible to monitor two local aeronomical parameters that play a fundamental role in the interaction between the Martian environment and the solar wind. Due to its lower-frequency bandwidth (8kHz2 MHz), which allows a full coverage from the shocked solar wind down to the ionosphere, its capability of measuring the electron temperature, and the reliability of its measurements the AIM experiment perfectly complements the Mars advanced radar for subsurface and ionospheric sounding (MARSIS) ionospheric investigations. In particular, careful computations show that the electron temperature can hardly be derived from the passive electric field measurements planned to be made by MARSIS. Unfortunately, due to a too late decision about the additional payload selection, the proposal of AIM as part of the MARSIS has been rejected.

J.G Trotignon; H.-C Sran; C Bghin; N MeyerVernet; R Manning; R Grard; H Laakso

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

An intelligent inspection and survey robot. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ARIES {number_sign}1 (Autonomous Robotic Inspection Experimental System), has been developed for the Department of Energy to survey and inspect drums containing low-level radioactive waste stored in warehouses at DOE facilities. The drums are typically stacked four high and arranged in rows with three-foot aisle widths. The robot will navigate through the aisles and perform an inspection operation, typically performed by a human operator, making decisions about the condition of the drums and maintaining a database of pertinent information about each drum. A new version of the Cybermotion series of mobile robots is the base mobile vehicle for ARIES. The new Model K3A consists of an improved and enhanced mobile platform and a new turret that will permit turning around in a three-foot aisle. Advanced sonar and lidar systems were added to improve navigation in the narrow drum aisles. Onboard computer enhancements include a VMEbus computer system running the VxWorks real-time operating system. A graphical offboard supervisory UNIX workstation is used for high-level planning, control, monitoring, and reporting. A camera positioning system (CPS) includes primitive instructions for the robot to use in referencing and positioning the payload. The CPS retracts to a more compact position when traveling in the open warehouse. During inspection, the CPS extends up to deploy inspection packages at different heights on the four-drum stacks of 55-, 85-, and 110-gallon drums. The vision inspection module performs a visual inspection of the waste drums. This system will locate and identify each drum, locate any unique visual features, characterize relevant surface features of interest and update a data-base containing the inspection data.

NONE

1995-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

Rosie - mobile robot worksystem for decommissioning and dismantling operations. Final report, April 1, 1996--January 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

RedZone Robotics, Inc. has undertaken development of an advanced remote worksystem - Rosie - specifically designed to meet the challenges of performing a wide range of decontamination and dismantlement (D&D) operations in nuclear environments. The Rosie worksystem includes a locomotor, heavy manipulator, operator console, and control system for remote operations. The locomotor is a highly mobile platform with tether management and hydraulic power onboard. The heavy manipulator is a high-payload, long-reach boom used to deploy a wide variety of tools and/or sensors into the work area. Rosie`s advanced control system, broad work capabilities, and hardening/reliability for hazardous duty make it a new and unique capability that facilitates completion of significant cleanup projects throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) and private sector. Endurance testing of the first Rosie system from September 1995 to March 1996 has proven its capabilities and appropriateness for D&D applications. Design enhancements were incorporated into the second Rosie system to improve and add features necessary for deployment at a DOE facility decommissioning. This second Rosie unit was deployed to the Argonne National Laboratory`s CP-5 reactor facility in early December 1996, and it is currently being used in the decommissioning of the reactor there. This report will overview this second Rosie system and the design enhancements made to it based on the lessons learned during the design, fabrication, and testing of the first Rosie system. The Rosie system has been designed to be a versatile and adaptable tool that can be used in many different applications in D&D work at nuclear facilities. It can carry a wide variety of tooling, sensors, and other robotic equipment at the tip of its heavy manipulator, and it can deploy those items to many different hazardous work areas. Rosie`s capabilities and system design address the need for durability and reliability in these environments.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

310

Background Measurements from Balloon-Borne CZT Detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report detector characteristics and background measurements from two prototype imaging CZT detectors flown on a scientific balloon payload in May 2001. The detectors are both platinum-contact 10mm x 10mm x 5mm CZT crystals, each with a 4 $\\times$ 4 array of pixels tiling the anode. One is made from IMARAD horizontal Bridgman CZT, the other from eV Products high-pressure Bridgman material. Both detectors were mounted side-by-side in a flip-chip configuration and read out by a 32-channel IDE VA/TA ASIC preamp/shaper. We enclosed the detectors in the same 40deg field-of-view collimator (comprisinga graded passive shield and plastic scintillator) used in our previously-reported September 2000 flight. I-V curves for the detectors are diode-like, and we find that the platinum contacts adhere significantly better to the CZT surfaces than gold to previous detectors. The detectors and instrumentation performed well in a 20-hour balloon flight on 23/24 May 2001. Although we discovered a significant instrumental background component in flight, it was possible to measure and subtract this component from the spectra. The resulting IMARAD detector background spectrum (from 30 keV to ~450 keV) reaches ~5 x 10^{-3}$ counts/cm^2 -sec-keV at 100 keV and has a power-law index of ~2 at high energies. The eV Products detector has a similar spectrum, although there is more uncertainty in the energy scale because of calibration complications.

Johnathan A Jenkins; Tomohiko Narita; Jonathan E. Grindlay; Peter F. Bloser; Carl Stahle; Brad Parker; Scott Barthelmy

2002-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

311

Operations of a Radioisotope-based Propulsion System Enabling CubeSat Exploration of the Outer Planets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Exploration to the outer planets is an ongoing endeavor but in the current economical environment, cost reduction is the forefront of all concern. The success of small satellites such as CubeSats launched to Near-Earth Orbit has lead to examine their potential use to achieve cheaper science for deep space applications. However, to achieve lower cost missions; hardware, launch and operations costs must be minimized. Additionally, as we push towards smaller exploration beds with relative limited power sources, allowing for adequate communication back to Earth is imperative. Researchers at the Center for Space Nuclear Research are developing the potential of utilizing an advanced, radioisotope-based system. This system will be capable of providing both the propulsion power needed to reach the destination and the additional requirements needed to maintain communication while at location. Presented here are a basic trajectory analysis, communication link budget and concept of operations of a dual-mode (thermal and electric) radioisotope-based propulsion system, for a proposed mission to Enceladus (Saturnian icy moon) using a 6U CubeSat payload. The radioisotope system being proposed will be the integration of three sub-systems working together to achieve the overall mission. At the core of the system, stored thermal energy from radioisotope decay is transferred to a passing propellant to achieve high thrust useful for quick orbital maneuvering. An auxiliary closed-loop Brayton cycle can be operated in parallel to the thrusting mode to provide short bursts of high power for high data-rate communications back to Earth. Additionally, a thermal photovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion system will use radiation heat losses from the core. This in turn can provide the electrical energy needed to utilize the efficiency of ion propulsion to achieve quick interplanetary transit times. The intelligent operation to handle all functions of this system under optimized conditions adds to the complexity of the mission architecture.

Dr. Steven Howe; Nathan Jerred; Troy Howe; Adarsh Rajguru

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Simultaneous observations of Pc 1 micropulsation activity and stratospheric electrodynamic perturbations on 27 January 2003  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The 2nd Polar Patrol Balloon campaign (2nd-PPB) was carried out at Syowa Station in Antarctica during 20022003. Identical stratospheric balloon payloads were launched as close together in time as allowed by weather conditions to constitute a cluster of balloons during their flights. A very pronounced negative ion conductivity enhancement was observed at 32km in the stratosphere below the auroral zone on 27 January 2003 from 1500 to 2200 UT. During this event, the conductivity doubled for an interval of about 7h. This perturbation was associated with an extensive Pc 1 or Pi 1 wave event that was observed by several Antarctic ground stations, balloon PPB 10, and the Polar spacecraft. No appreciable X-ray precipitation was observed in association with this event, which would point to >60Mev proton precipitation as a possible magnetospherestratosphere coupling mechanism responsible for the conductivity enhancement. Such precipitation is consistent with the wave data. During the latter half of the event, Ez was briefly positive. There was a tropospheric Southern Ocean storm system underneath the balloon during this interval. If the event was associated with this storm system and not energetic proton precipitation, the observations imply an electrified Southern Ocean storm and major perturbations in stratospheric conductivity driven by a tropospheric disturbance. This event represents a poorly understood source for global circuit current. Precipitating energetic proton data from Akebono and NOAA POES spacecraft show significant >16MeV precipitation was occurring at the location of PPB 8 but not PPB 10, suggesting that proton precipitation was, in fact, the responsible coupling mechanism.

E. Bering; M. Engebretson; R. Holzworth; A. Kadokura; M. Kokorowski; B. Reddell; J. Posch; H. Yamagishi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

GAISUS-1 thermionic converter for the integrated solar upper stage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) system is a compact orbital transfer vehicle which generates thrust to boost payloads from LEO to higher orbits. It does this by collecting and concentrating solar flux into a sensible thermal storage, graphite receiver which is used to heat hydrogen propellant to temperatures of up to 2500 K. The ISUS receiver also radiates heat into an array of thermionic converters which produce electrical power. The GAISUS-1 thermionic converter is a first generation planar converter designed to produce electrical power when coupled with the ISUS receiver. GAISUS-1 will deliver over 31 W{sub e} at 1900 K. A wrought Re hotshoe accepts radiant heat from the receiver. The back side of the hotshoe forms the emitting surface of the converter. Special attention was paid to optimize the electrical and thermal losses experienced through the sleeve. Triple and single sleeve geometries were thermally modeled and evaluated, resulting in the selection of a single sleeve design. A high temperature metal/ceramic seal isolates the emitter sleeve from the collector. A Nb collector is used and is an integral part of a Nb/Na heat pipe. The heat pipe transports reject heat from the collector surface to a thermal radiator (condenser) portion of the heat pipe. The converter utilizes an integral graphite Cs reservoir. This type of reservoir automatically produces a rise in Cs pressure in response to a rise in emitter/collector temperatures. This Cs pressure feedback mechanism insures adequate Cs coverage of the emitter over a broad range of operating conditions (temperatures).

Begg, L.L.; Heffernan, T.F.; Horner, M.H. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

314

The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx): Goals, platforms, and field operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) was an international field program designed to make observations of poorly understood but critical components of the coupled climate system of the southeast Pacific. This region is characterized by strong coastal upwelling, the coolest SSTs in the tropical belt, and is home to the largest subtropical stratocumulus deck on Earth. The field intensive phase of VOCALS-REx took place during October and November 2008 and constitutes a critical part of a broader CLIVAR program (VOCALS) designed to develop and promote scientific activities leading to improved understanding, model simulations, and predictions of the southeastern Pacific (SEP) coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system, on diurnal to interannual timescales. The other major components of VOCALS are a modeling program with a model hierarchy ranging from the local to global scales, and a suite of extended observations from regular research cruises, instrumented moorings, and satellites. The two central themes of VOCALS-REx focus upon (a) links between aerosols, clouds and precipitation and their impacts on marine stratocumulus radiative properties, and (b) physical and chemical couplings between the upper ocean and the lower atmosphere, including the role that mesoscale ocean eddies play. A set of hypotheses designed to be tested with the combined field, monitoring and modeling work in VOCALS is presented here. A further goal of VOCALS-REx is to provide datasets for the evaluation and improvement of large-scale numerical models. VOCALS-REx involved five research aircraft, two ships and two surface sites in northern Chile. We describe the instrument payloads and key mission strategies for these platforms and give a summary of the missions conducted.

Wood, R.; Springston, S.; Mechoso, C. R.; Bretherton, C. S.; A.Weller, R.; Huebert, B.; Straneo, F.; Albrecht, B. A.; Coe, H.; Allen, G.; Vaughan, G.; Daum, P.; Fairall, C.; Chand, D.; Klenner, L. G.; Garreaud, R.; Grados, C.; Covert, D. S.; Bates, T. S.; Krejci, R.; Russell, L. M.; Szoeke, S. d.; Brewer, A.; Yuter, S. E.; Chaigneau, A.; Toniazzo, T.; Minnis, P.; Palikonda, R.; Abel, S. J.; Brown, W. O. J.; Williams, S.; Fochesatto, J.; Brioude, J.; Bower, K. N

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

315

Overview of Requirements for Using Overweight Vehicles to Ship Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Final Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada, considered a range of options for transportation. In evaluating the impacts of the mostly-legal weight truck scenario, DOE assumed that some shipments would use overweight trucks. The use of overweight trucks is also considered in the Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada, issued for public comment in Fall 2007. With the exception of permit requirements and operating restrictions, the vehicles for overweight shipments would be similar to legal-weight truck shipments but might weigh as much as 52,200 kilograms (115,000 pounds). The use of overweight trucks was determined to be acceptable for the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program because the payload is not divisible and the packaging alone may make shipments overweight. Overweight truck shipments are common, and states routinely issue overweight permits, some for vehicles with a gross vehicle weight up to 58,500 kilograms (129,000 pounds). This paper will present an overview of state overweight truck permitting policies and national and regional approaches to promote safety and uniformity. In conclusion: Overweight truck shipments are made routinely by carriers throughout the country. State permits are obtained by the carriers or by companies that provide permitting services to the carriers. While varying state permit restrictions may add complexity to OCRWM's planning activities, the well-established experience of commercial carriers and efforts to bring uniformity to the permitting process should allow the overweight shipment of SNF to be a viable option. (authors)

Thrower, A.W. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Washington, DC (United States); Offner, J. [Booz Allen Hamilton, Washington, DC (United States); Bolton, P. [Booz Allen Hamilton, Santa Fe, NM (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System (GAUSS). Topical report, October 1993--March 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of the project are to construct a geophysical sensor system based on a remotely operated model helicopter (ROH) and to evaluate the efficacy of the system for characterization of hazardous environmental sites. Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System (GAUSS) is a geophysical survey system that uses a ROH as the survey vehicle. We have selected the ROH because of its advantages over fixed wing and ground based vehicles. Lower air speed and superior maneuverability of the ROH make it better suited for geophysical surveys than a fixed wing model aircraft. The ROH can fly close to the ground, allowing detection of weak or subtle anomalies. Unlike ground based vehicles, the ROH can traverse difficult terrain while providing a stable sensor platform. ROH does not touch the ground during the course of a survey and is capable of functioning over water and surf zones. The ROH has been successfully used in the motion picture industry and by geology companies for payload bearing applications. The only constraint to use of the airborne system is that the ROH must remain visible to the pilot. Obstructed areas within a site can be characterized by relocating the base station to alternate positions. GAUSS consists of a ROH with radio controller, a data acquisition and processing (DAP) system, and lightweight digital sensor systems. The objective of our Phase I research was to develop a DAP and sensors suitable for ROH operation. We have constructed these subsystems and integrated them to produce an automated, hand-held geophysical surveying system, referred to as the ``pre-prototype``. We have performed test surveys with the pre-prototype to determine the functionality of the and DAP and sensor subsystems and their suitability for airborne application. The objective of the Phase II effort will be to modify the existing subsystems and integrate them into an airborne prototype. Efficacy of the prototype for geophysical survey of hazardous sites will then be determined.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

NASAS RPS Design Reference Mission Set for Solar System Exploration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

NASAs 2006 Solar System Exploration (SSE) Strategic Roadmap identified a set of proposed large Flagship medium New Frontiers and small Discovery class missions addressing key exploration objectives. These objectives respond to the recommendations by the National Research Council (NRC) reported in the SSE Decadal Survey. The SSE Roadmap is down?selected from an over?subscribed set of missions called the SSE Design Reference Mission (DRM) set Missions in the Flagship and New Frontiers classes can consider Radioisotope Power Systems (RPSs) while small Discovery class missions are not permitted to use them due to cost constraints. In line with the SSE DRM set and the SSE Roadmap missions the RPS DRM set represents a set of missions which can be enabled or enhanced by RPS technologies. At present NASA has proposed the development of two new types of RPSs. These are the Multi?Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) with static power conversion; and the Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG) with dynamic conversion. Advanced RPSs under consideration for possible development aim to increase specific power levels. In effect this would either increase electric power generation for the same amount of fuel or reduce fuel requirements for the same power output compared to the proposed MMRTG or SRG. Operating environments could also influence the design such that an RPS on the proposed Titan Explorer would use smaller fins to minimize heat rejection in the extreme cold environment; while the Venus Mobile Explorer long?lived in?situ mission would require the development of a new RPS in order to tolerate the extreme hot environment and to simultaneously provide active cooling to the payload and other electric components. This paper discusses NASAs SSE RPS DRM set in line with the SSE DRM set. It gives a qualitative assessment regarding the impact of various RPS technology and configuration options on potential mission architectures which could support NASAs RPS technology development planning and provide an understanding of fuel need trades over the next three decades.

Tibor S. Balint

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Grand Observatories and multiple-OWL for high energy neutrino astrophysics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A possible Space Factory on the International Space Station (ISS) for Grand Observatories would permit a large astrophysical observatory in space. Grand-Observatories could revolutionize the great observatories that were hitherto pre-assembled and deployed by the Space Transportation System (STS). The concept of the ISS-Space-Factory envisages a plan of orbital construction fine-tuning and deployment of large-scale astrophysical instruments into the desired free-flying orbit. It incorporates physical aids of the robotics arms and Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVA) of astronauts. This concept study also examines the necessary infrastructure on ISS for manufacturing a large spaceship for future deployment to the Moon Mars and other interplanetary destinations. We envision a step-by-step advancement of the Space Factory with the most frontier astrophysical programs. Less demanding experiments could precede the construction of the most demanding optical telescopes. Multiple-OWL (Orbiting-array of Wide-angle Light collector) has very forgiving optical resolution (?0.1 degrees) and would be suitable for the first generation payload to be built on and deployed from the ISS. This system is an earths night-sky-watcher for observing the highest energy cosmic rays and other atmospheric phenomena and is currently in the SEU Explorer Concept. Using the Space Factory this collector can drastically advance its capacity to cover a 120 Field-of-View (FOV) in which the entire horizon of the earth (?6000 km diameter) can be viewed from a low-earth orbit (?1000 km). We have already developed a revolutionary wide-angle Fresnel-lens optic in the OWL program and the Multiple-OWL can use several units of them. As one of the Grand Observatories the proposed Multiple-OWL satellite can open a new window for observational universe in terms of high energy neutrino astrophysics. The OWL may also be used for monitoring earth-threatening meteorites if flipped on orbit at daytime for deep space observation.

Yoshiyuki Takahashi; John O. Dimmock; Lloyd W. Hillman; James B. Hadaway; David J. Lamb; Mamoru Mohri; Toshikazu Ebisuzaki

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Development and Application of an Oversize Reusable DOT 7A Type A Overpack Container at the Y-12 National Security Complex - 13150  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste Management personnel at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) are concluding a multi-year effort to dispose of a large backlog of low-level waste. Six containers presented a particularly difficult technical challenge in that they each contained large robust equipment (mostly salt baths) with elevated levels of highly enriched uranium (exceeding U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) fissile-excepted quantities). The equipment was larger than the standard 1.2 m x 1.2 m x 1.8 m (4 ft x 4 ft x 6 ft) DOT Specification 7A Type A box and would have been very difficult to size-reduce because of several inches of steel plate (along with insulating block and concrete) in the equipment design. A critical breakthrough for the success of the project involved procuring and developing two oversize reusable DOT Specification 7A Type A (fissile tested) containers (referred to as the CTI Model 7AF-690-SC) that could be used as overpacks for the original boxes of equipment. The 7A Type A overpack containers are approximately 3.5 m long x 2.7 m wide x 2.8 m high (11.7 ft x 8.9 ft x 9.2 ft) with a maximum gross weight of 10,660 kg (23,500 lb) and a payload capacity of 6,804 kg (15,000 lbs). The boxes were designed and fabricated using a split cavity design that allowed the gasketed and bolted closure to lie along the horizontal centerline of the box. The central closure location in this design allows for strengthening of box corners that tend to be points of weakness or failure in 49CFR173.465 drop tests. By combining the split cavity design with large diameter tubing and diagonal cross bracing, drop test requirements of 49CFR173.465(1) and (2) were met and demonstrated through finite element analysis modeling. The development and use of this new container dramatically reduced the need for down-sizing the equipment and allowed the project to meet objectives within cost and schedule targets. (authors)

Tharp, Tim [B and W Technical Services Y-12, LLC, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)] [B and W Technical Services Y-12, LLC, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Martin, David [Container Technologies Industries, LLC, Helenwood, TN 37755 (United States)] [Container Technologies Industries, LLC, Helenwood, TN 37755 (United States); Franco, Paul [Navarro Research and Engineering, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)] [Navarro Research and Engineering, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Advantages of the shielded containers at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) disposal operations currently employ two different disposal methods: one for Contact Handled (CH) waste and another for Remote Handled (RH) waste. CH waste is emplaced in a variety of payload container configurations on the floor of each disposal room. In contrast, RH waste is packaged into a single type of canister and emplaced in pre-drilled holes in the walls of disposal rooms. Emplacement of the RH waste in the walls must proceed in advance of CH waste emplacement and therefore poses logistical constraints, in addition to the loss of valuable disposal capacity. To improve operational efficiency and disposal capacity, the Department of Energy (DOE) has proposed a shielded container for certain RH waste streams. RH waste with relatively low gammaemitting activity would be packaged in lead-lined containers, shipped to WIPP in existing certified transportation packages for CH waste and emplaced in WIPP among the stacks of CH waste containers on the floor of a disposal room. RH waste with high gamma-emitting activity would continue to be emplaced in the boreholes along the walls. The new RH container is similar to the nominal 208-liter (55-gallon) drum, however it includes about 2.5 cm (1 in) of lead, sandwiched between thick steel sheets. Furthermore, the top and bottom are made of thick plate steel to strengthening the package to meet transportation requirements. This robust configuration provides an overpack for materials that otherwise would be RH waste. This paper describes the container and the regulatory approach used to meet the requirements imposed by regulations that apply to WIPP. This includes a Performance Assessment used to evaluate WIPP's long-term performance and the DOE's approach to gain approval for the transportation of shielded containers. This paper also describes estimates of the DOE's RH transuranic waste inventory that may be packaged and emplaced in shielded containers. Finally, the paper includes a discussion of how the DOE proposes to track the waste packaged into shielded containers against the RH waste inventory and how this will comply with the regulated volume.

Nelson, Roger A. (U.S. Department of Energy, Carlsbad, NM); Dunagan, Sean C.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ur3 ur4 payload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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321

Computation of Hypersonic Flow about Maneuvering Vehicles with Changing Shapes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vehicles moving at hypersonic speeds have great importance to the National Security. Ballistic missile re-entry vehicles (RV's) travel at hypersonic speeds, as do missile defense intercept vehicles. Despite the importance of the problem, no computational analysis method is available to predict the aerodynamic environment of maneuvering hypersonic vehicles, and no analysis is available to predict the transient effects of their shape changes. The present state-of-the-art for hypersonic flow calculations typically still considers steady flow about fixed shapes. Additionally, with present computational methods, it is not possible to compute the entire transient structural and thermal loads for a re-entry vehicle. The objective of this research is to provide the required theoretical development and a computational analysis tool for calculating the hypersonic flow about maneuvering, deforming RV's. This key enabling technology will allow the development of a complete multi-mechanics simulation of the entire RV flight sequence, including important transient effects such as complex flight dynamics. This will allow the computation of the as-delivered state of the payload in both normal and unusual operational environments. This new analysis capability could also provide the ability to predict the nonlinear, transient behavior of endo-atmospheric missile interceptor vehicles to the input of advanced control systems. Due to the computational intensity of fluid dynamics for hypersonics, the usual approach for calculating the flow about a vehicle that is changing shape is to complete a series of steady calculations, each with a fixed shape. However, this quasi-steady approach is not adequate to resolve the frequencies characteristic of a vehicle's structural dynamics. Our approach is to include the effects of the unsteady body shape changes in the finite-volume method by allowing for arbitrary translation and deformation of the control volumes. Furthermore, because the Eulerian computational mesh for the fluid domain must be attached to the vehicle as it undergoes potentially high accelerations, that mesh must be viewed in a non-inertial coordinate frame. The usual conservation-law form of the fluid dynamic governing equations must be augmented. This approach thus requires the derivation of a significantly new numerical formulation, especially to incorporate a modern flux-splitting methodology as needed for numerical stability and accuracy.

Ferencz, R M; Felker, F F; Castillo, V M

2004-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

322

The data processor of the EUSO-Balloon experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The JEM-EUSO instrument is a wide-angle refractive telescope in near-ultraviolet wavelength region being proposed for attachment to the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) onboard International Space Station (ISS). The main scientific goal of the mission is the study of Extreme Energy Cosmic Rays (EECR) above 5 ? 1019 eV. The instrument consists of high transmittance optical Fresnel lenses with a diameter of 2.5 m, a focal surface covered by ~ 5000 Multi Anode Photo Multiplier Tubes of 64 pixels, front-end readout, trigger and system electronics. The EUSO-Balloon experiment is a pathfinder mission in which a telescope of smaller dimension than the one designed for the ISS will be mounted onboard a stratospheric balloon. The main objective of this pathfinder mission, planned for 2014, is to perform a full scale end-to-end test of all the key technologies and instrumentation of JEM-EUSO detectors and to prove the global detection chain. Furthermore, EUSO-Balloon will measure the atmospheric and terrestrial UV background components, in different observational modes, fundamental for the development of the simulations. Through a series of stratospheric balloon flights performed by the French Space Agency CNES, EUSO-Balloon also has the potential to detect Extensive Air Showers from above, paving the way for any future large scale, space-based EECR observatory. In this paper we will present the Data Processor (DP) of EUSO-Balloon, which is the component of the Electronics System which performs the data management and the instrument control. More in detail, the DP controls the front-end electronics, performs the 2nd level trigger filtering, tags events with arrival time and payload position through a GPS system, manages the Mass Memory for data storage, measures live and dead time of the telescope, provides signals for time synchronization of the event, performs housekeeping monitor, and handles the interface to the telemetry system. The DP has to operate at high altitude in unpressurized environment, and this represents a technological challenge for heat dissipation. We will describe the main components of the system, the state-of-the-art and the results of the tests carried out.

V Scotti; G Osteria

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Project Plan, Status, and Lessons Learned for the LANL 3,706 m{sup 3} TRU Waste Campaign - 13085  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is currently engaged in a campaign to disposition 3,706 m{sup 3} of transuranic (TRU) waste stored above grade at its Technical Area 54 (TA-54) Area G waste management facility before June 30, 2014. This campaign includes complete removal of all non-cemented above-grade TRU waste that was in storage on October 1, 2011, and is defined as 3,706 m{sup 3} of material. TRU waste containers were placed into storage up to 40 years ago, and most of the older containers must be remediated to address compliance issues before the waste can be characterized, certified as meeting the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC), and shipped for disposition. More than half of the remaining TRU waste volume stored above grade is contained within oversize boxes that contain waste items that must be repackaged or size reduced. Facilities and major types of equipment needed to remediate and characterize the TRU waste inventory include two additional oversize box processing lines that are being brought into service as Nuclear Hazard Category III facilities in fiscal year (FY) 2013. Multiple work shifts are scheduled for most remediation lines in FY 2013. An integrated risk-based project management schedule for all disposition activities has been developed that is based on a 'Solution Package' approach. Inventories of containers that have issues in common were compiled into about 15 waste categories and about 75 'Solution Packages' that identify all of the activities needed to disposition the inventory of TRU waste in storage. Scheduled activities include all precursor activities to begin remediation, remediation processing, characterization and certification to the WIPP WAC, and shipping of containers to WIPP. Other industrial processing practices that have been adopted to improve efficiency include staging of containers for remediation, characterization, and shipping; establishment of a transportation center; and load management practices for transportation payloads. Progress and accomplishments during FY 2012 are reviewed, and plans for FY 2013 are presented in some detail. Lessons learned on adoption of industrial processing practices are also discussed. (authors)

Johns-Hughes, K.W.; Clemmons, J.S.; Cox, D.R.; Hargis, K.M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Bishop, M.L. [Los Alamos Site Office, National Nuclear Security Administration, U. S. Department of Energy, 3747 W. Jemez Road, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos Site Office, National Nuclear Security Administration, U. S. Department of Energy, 3747 W. Jemez Road, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

USED FUEL RAIL SHOCK AND VIBRATION TESTING OPTIONS ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the rail shock and vibration tests is to complete the framework needed to quantify loads of fuel assembly components that are necessary to guide materials research and establish a technical basis for review organizations such as the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). A significant body of experimental and numerical modeling data exists to quantify loads and failure limits applicable to normal conditions of transport (NCT) rail transport, but the data are based on assumptions that can only be verified through experimental testing. The test options presented in this report represent possible paths for acquiring the data that are needed to confirm the assumptions of previous work, validate modeling methods that will be needed for evaluating transported fuel on a case-by-case basis, and inform material test campaigns on the anticipated range of fuel loading. The ultimate goal of this testing is to close all of the existing knowledge gaps related to the loading of used fuel under NCT conditions and inform the experiments and analysis program on specific endpoints for their research. The options include tests that would use an actual railcar, surrogate assemblies, and real or simulated rail transportation casks. The railcar carrying the cradle, cask, and surrogate fuel assembly payload would be moved in a train operating over rail track modified or selected to impart shock and vibration forces that occur during normal rail transportation. Computer modeling would be used to help design surrogates that may be needed for a rail cask, a casks internal basket, and a transport cradle. The objective of the design of surrogate components would be to provide a test platform that effectively simulates responses to rail shock and vibration loads that would be exhibited by state-of-the-art rail cask, basket, and/or cradle structures. The computer models would also be used to help determine the placement of instrumentation (accelerometers and strain gauges) on the surrogate fuel assemblies, cask and cradle structures, and the railcar so that forces and deflections that would result in the greatest potential for damage to high burnup and long-cooled UNF can be determined. For purposes of this report we consider testing on controlled track when we have control of the track and speed to facilitate modeling.

Ross, Steven B.; Best, Ralph E.; Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.; Jensen, Philip J.; Maheras, Steven J.

2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

325

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Status and Plans - 2012 - 12049  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a deep geologic repository for safe disposal of long-lived transuranic radioactive waste related to the nation's defense, is completing its 12. year of operations. WIPP's mission includes coordination of all Department of Energy (DOE) sites to prepare, package and characterize transuranic (TRU) waste for final shipment and emplacement in WIPP. Five of the 10 disposal panels planned have been filled and sealed from ventilation. Additional small quantity sites have been de-inventoried by consolidating their waste through the certified characterization line at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). New emplacement methods for RH waste in shielded containers are being considered for disposal by WIPP's regulatory authorities. A new large Type B shipping package, was added to the WIPP transportation fleet, and facility modifications to the WIPP waste unloading and emplacement processes for large containers were completed in 2011. Shipments from the Savannah River site in these new large rectangular packages began in August 2011. Licensing efforts are proceeding for a new criticality control over-pack container that will allow almost twice the fissile content to be shipped than previously. This will reduce the number and cost of shipments of Special Nuclear Material (SNM) declared as waste. Modifications to WIPP regulatory requirements for the disposal footprint and disposal unit closure systems are in progress. These, and other developments, make for exciting times at WIPP. This paper provides an up-to-date look at the many aspects of America's only deep geologic long-lived radioactive waste repository, which is completing its 12. year of operations. A record year of safe and compliant shipments to WIPP tops the list of accomplishments in 2011. Four more small quantity sites were de-inventoried by consolidating their waste through the certified characterization line at INL in 2011. A new Type B shipping package, the TRUPACT-III has been added to the transportation fleet, and large waste boxes are being shipped from SRS without the need for repackaging. New emplacement methods for remote-handled waste in shielded containers are undergoing regulatory review. WIPP plans to license a new criticality control payload container that will allow almost twice the fissile content to be shipped than previously, thereby reducing the number and cost of shipments of SNM declared as waste. Other regulatory modifications planned in 2012 include approval of a design change that would replace the disposal concept for panels 9 and 10 from using the common access drifts (the 'mains') with a new footprint south of panels 4 and 5. DOE also plans to change the panel closure design set forth in its certification by EPA and the HWFP by the NMED. The panel closure design change will be a rule making under EPA's procedures and a class 3 permit modification request under NMED procedures. Plans for achieving 90% of legacy TRU waste retrieval and emplacement in WIPP by 2015 have been developed. Key to the success of this so-called 90/15 plan is adequate funding, both for WIPP operations, as well as for TRU retrieval programs at the generator sites. (authors)

Nelson, Roger A.; Ziemianski, Edward J. [U.S. Department of Energy, Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Development of autonomous magnetometer rotorcraft for wide area assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large areas across the United States are potentially contaminated with UXO, with some ranges encompassing tens to hundreds of thousands of acres. Technologies are needed which will allow for cost effective wide area scanning with 1) near 100 % coverage and 2) near 100 % detection of subsurface ordnance or features indicative of subsurface ordnance. The current approach to wide area assessment is a multi-level one, in which medium - altitude fixed wing optical imaging is used for an initial site assessment. This assessment is followed with low altitude manned helicopter based magnetometry. Subsequent to this wide area assessment targeted surface investigations are performed using either towed geophysical sensor arrays or man portable sensors. In order to be an effective tool for small UXO detection, the sensing altitude for magnetic site investigations needs to be on the order of 1 3 meters. These altitude requirements mean that manned helicopter surveys will generally only be feasible in large, open and relatively flat terrains. While such surveys are effective in mapping large areas relatively fast there are substantial mobilization/demobilization, staffing and equipment costs associated with these surveys (resulting in costs of approximately $100-$150/acre). In addition, due to the low altitude there are substantial risks to pilots and equipment. Surface towed arrays provide high resolution maps but have other limitations, e.g. in their ability to navigate rough terrain effectively. There is thus a need for other systems which can be used for effective data collection. An UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) magnetometer platform is an obvious alternative. The motivation behind such a system is that it reduces risk to operators, is lower in initial and Operational and Maintenance (O&M) costs (and can thus potentially be applied to smaller sites) and has the potential of being more effective in terms of detection and possibly characterization (through the use of dynamic acquisition, i.e. survey mission inflight reprioritization). We describe and report on a one year effort with as primary goal to provide a recommendation to SERDP for a path forward in the implementation of one or more autonomous unmanned magnetometer rotorcraft platforms. This recommendation (which is provided in chapter 6) is based on the following three elements a) An assessment on the applicability of autonomous rotorcraft magnetometer systems to the current DoD site inventory, and an initial assessment of which type(s) of autonomous unmanned magnetometer rotorcraft platforms (in terms of performance characteristics such as payload, altitude, obstacle avoidance, production rate and flight time) would be most relevant to this inventory (chapter 3); b) An evaluation of the feasibility of assembling such platforms from commercial components (unmanned rotorcraft, control systems and sensors both magnetometer sensors and supporting sensors). This evaluation included several highly successful field tests (chapter 4 and 5); c) A recommendation of the path forward, which includes a detailed outline of the efforts required in the design, assembly and testing of different modular platforms (chapter 6)

Roelof Versteeg; Matt Anderson; Les Beard; Eric Corban; Darryl Curley; Jeff Gamey; Ross Johnson; Dwight Junkin; Mark McKay; Jared Salzmann; Mikhail Tchernychev; Suraj Unnikrishnan; Scott Vinson

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Development of Cu-64 labeled EGF for In Vivo PET Imaging of EGFR Expression  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this project we proposed to establish feasibility of the development of targeted tracers for radionuclide imaging of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) in cancer patients. The significance and impact of the proposed radiotracers are determined by the crucial role that EGFR plays in many cancers and by the rapid entrance of EGFR-inhibiting drugs into clinic. Clinical experience, however, revealed that only 10-25% of patients that are defined as EGFR-positive by immunohistochemical analysis respond to EGFR-directed therapeutics and there is poor correlation between EGFR immunohistochemistry and treatment. Therefore, for more efficacious use of EGFR-targeting therapeutics, there is a need for information about EGFR activity in patients. We hypothesized that radionuclide imaging of functionally active EGFR will provide such information and would allow for 1) rational patient stratification, 2) rapid monitoring of responses to therapy, and 3) development of personalized treatment regimens. We hypothesized that tracers based epidermal growth factor (EGF), a natural EGFR ligand, as a targeting vector would be particularly advantageous. First, only functionally active and therefore critical for disease progression EGFRs will bind and internalize an EGF-based tracer. Second, continuous internalization of EGF-based tracers by recyclable EGFR would lead to intracellular accumulation of radionuclide and improved signal-to-background ratio. Third, small size of EGF relative to antibodies would facilitate tumor penetration with vastly better non-specific soft tissue and blood clearance rates. Fourth, as a human protein, EGF is not expected to be immunogenic. Finally, at the beginning of this project, we have already engineered and expressed functionally active EGF with an N-terminal Cys-tag for site-specific conjugation of various payloads, including radionuclide chelators. In the Phase I of this project, in collaboration with Dr. Blankenbergs group at Stanford University, 1. To synthesize and validate in vitro EGF-PEG-DOTA conjugate. The key accomplishment in this part of the project is synthesis of functionally active EGF-PEG-DOTA, construction, expression, and purification of functionally active Cys-tagged dimeric EGF (dEGF) and synthesis of corresponding dEGF-PEG-DOTA, development of protocols for radiolabeling EGF-PEG-DOTA and dEGF-PEG-DOTA with 64Cu. 2. To establish clearance, biodistribution, and stability of EGF-based PET 64Cu radiotracer. These characteristics are established for both EGF-PEG-DOTA/64Cu and dEGF-PEG-DOTA/64Cu and found to be comparable with reported data on 64Cu-radiolabeled antibodies. 3. To evaluate PET tumor imaging with EGF-based 64Cu radiotracer in mouse tumor models. Tumor imaging was evaluated in orthotopic human MDA231luc breast carcinoma model in SCID mice. Tracers accumulated in tumor area, allowing for detection of as small as few millimeter tumors. The Technical Objectives of the projects are accomplished and the results are published in Bioconjugate Chem. 20, 742, 2009.

Backer, Joseph M.

2009-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

328

Toward Robust Climate Baselining: Objective Assessment of Climate Change Using Widely Distributed Miniaturized Sensors for Accurate World-Wide Geophysical Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A gap-free, world-wide, ocean-, atmosphere-, and land surface-spanning geophysical data-set of three decades time-duration containing the full set of geophysical parameters characterizing global weather is the scientific perquisite for defining the climate; the generally-accepted definition in the meteorological community is that climate is the 30-year running-average of weather. Until such a tridecadal climate base line exists, climate change discussions inevitably will have a semi-speculative, vs. a purely scientific, character, as the baseline against which changes are referenced will be at least somewhat uncertain. The contemporary technology base provides ways-and-means for commencing the development of such a meteorological measurement-intensive climate baseline, moreover with a program budget far less than the {approx}$2.5 B/year which the US. currently spends on ''global change'' studies. In particular, the recent advent of satellite-based global telephony enables real-time control of, and data-return from, instrument packages of very modest scale, and Silicon Revolution-based sensor, data-processing and -storage advances permit 'intelligent' data-gathering payloads to be created with 10 gram-scale mass budgets. A geophysical measurement system implemented in such modern technology is a populous constellation 03 long-lived, highly-miniaturized robotic weather stations deployed throughout the weather-generating portions of the Earths atmosphere, throughout its oceans and across its land surfaces. Leveraging the technological advances of the OS, the filly-developed atmospheric weather station of this system has a projected weight of the order of 1 ounce, and contains a satellite telephone, a GPS receiver, a full set of atmospheric sensing instruments and a control computer - and has an operational life of the order of 1 year and a mass-production cost of the order of $20. Such stations are effectively ''intra-atmospheric satellites'' but likely have serial-production unit costs only about twenty-billionths that of a contemporary NASA global change satellite, whose entirely-remote sensing capabilities they complement with entirely-local sensing. It's thus feasible to deploy millions of them, and thereby to intensively monitor all aspects of the Earths weather. Analogs of these atmospheric weather stations will be employed to provide comparable-quality reporting of oceanic and land-surface geophysical parameters affecting weather. This definitive climate baselining system could be in initial-prototype operation on a one-year time-scale, and in intermediate-scale, proof-of-principle operation within three years, at a total cost of {approx}$95M. Steady-state operating costs are estimated to be {approx} $75M/year, or {approx}3% of the current US. ''global change'' program-cost. Its data-return would be of great value very quickly as simply the best weather information, and within a few years as the definitive climatic variability-reporting system. It would become the generator of a definitive climate baseline at a total present-value cost of {approx}$0.9 B.

Teller, E; Leith, C; Canavan, G; Marion, J; Wood, L

2001-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

329

Reconfigurable computing in space: from current technology to reconfigurable systems-on-a-chip.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance, in-system reprogrammability, flexibility, and reduced costs of SRAM-based FPGAs make them very interesting for high-speed, on-orbit data processing, but, because the current generation of radiation-tolerant SRAM-based FPGAs are derived directly from COTS versions of the chips, several issues must be dealt with for space, including SEU sensitivities, power consumption, thermal problems, and support logic. This paper will discuss Los Alamos National Laboratory's approach to using the Xilinx XQVR1000 FPGAs for on-orbit processing in the Cibola Flight Experiment (CFE) as well as the possibilities and challenges of using newer, system-on-a-reprogrammable-chip FPGAs, such as Virtex I1 Pro, in space-based reconfigurable computing. The reconfigurable computing payload for CFE includes three processing boards, each having three radiation-tolerant Xilinx XQVRl 000 FPGAs. The reconfigurable computing architecture for this project is intended for in-flight, real-time processing of two radio fi-equency channels, each producing 12-bit samples at 100 million samples/second. In this system, SEU disruptions in data path operations can be tolerated while disruptions in the control path are much less tolerable. With this system in mind, LANL has developed an SEU management scheme with strategies for handling upsets in all of the FPGA resources known to be sensitive to radiation-induced SEUs. While mitigation schemes for many resources will be discussed, the paper will concentrate on SEU management strategies and tools developed at LANL for the configuration bitstream and 'half latches'. To understand the behavior of specific designs under SEUs in the configuration bitstream, LANL and Brigham Young University have developed an SEU simulator using ISI's SLAACl-V reconfigurable computing board. The simulator can inject single-bit upsets into a design's configuration bitstream to simulate SEUs and observe how these simulated SEUs affect the design's operation. Using fast partial configuration, the simulator can cover the entire bitstream of a Xilinx XQVRl 000 FPGA, which has 6 million configuration bits, in about 30 minutes. Instead of using a combination of TMR and configuration scrubbing for bitstream SEU mitigation, the approach developed for CFE uses minimal logic redundancy along with an SEU detection and correction scheme to handle bitstream SEUs. Though this approach allows some SEUs to affect less critical user logic, it requires considerably fewer FPGA resources than TMR and allows bitstream SEU rates to be monitored. 'Half latches', another class of SEU sensitive FPGA state elements, are used to provide logic constants in user FPGA designs but are not explicitly controlled by the configuration bitstream. Upsets in half latches cannot be detected by readback nor corrected via configuration repair or scrubbing - only a full reconfiguration can reliably restore their state. We have created a tool, called RadDRC, which can replace all critical half latches with more visible and correctable constant sources. Lastly, in looking forward, this paper will briefly consider the possible benefits and risks of using reconfigurable system-on-a-chip FPGAs, such as the Virtex II Pro, for reconfigurable computing in space. The paper concludes with a summary of challenges for using reconfigurable computing in space and a summary of future research at LANL in this area.

Graham, R. C. (Robert C.); Caffrey, M. P. (Michael Paul); Johnson, D. E. (Darrel Eric); Wirthlin, M. J. (Michael J.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z