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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ur3 ur4 payload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

CHEVROLET S-10 ELECTRIC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January - February 2000 January - February 2000 Date Prepared: 3/24/2000 1997 GM EV1 (PANASONIC PB-A BATTERIES) PERFORMANCE CHARACTERIZATION SUMMARY ELECTRIC TRANSPORTATION DIVISION Urban Range (On Urban Pomona Loop - see other side for map) Payload (lb) 90.3 88.9 (mi.) Range Without Aux. loads With Aux. loads Maximum 447 Minimum 185 72.6 79.7 UR1 UR2 UR3 UR4 Test UR1 UR2 UR3 UR4 Payload (lb.) 185 185 447 447 AC kWh Recharge 26.91 26.61 27.69 22.80 AC kWh/mi. 0.296 0.331 0.311 0.312 Range (mi.) 90.3 79.7 88.9 72.6 Avg. Ambient Temp. 65°F 72°F 70°F 71°F UR1 Urban Range Test, Min Payload, No Auxiliary Loads UR2 Urban Range Test, Min Payload, A/C on High, Headlights on Low, Radio On UR3 Urban Range Test, Max Payload, No Auxiliary Loads UR4 Urban Range Test, Max Payload, A/C on High, Headlights on Low, Radio On State of Charge Meter (UR1)

2

Toyota_RAV4.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1999 Inductive version tested. 1999 Inductive version tested. Test Date: June 1999 / Revised: 10/07/99 1999 TOYOTA RAV4-EV* (NIMH BATTERIES) PERFORMANCE CHARACTERIZATION SUMMARY ELECTRIC TRANSPORTATION DIVISION Urban Range (On Urban Pomona Loop - see other side for map) Payload (lb) 92.8 89.5 84.8 Range Without Aux. loads With Aux. loads Maximum 760 Minimum 160 UR1 UR2 UR3 UR4 68.9 Test UR1 UR2 UR3 UR4 Payload (lb.) 160 160 766 766 AC kWh Recharge 31.80 33.96 32.72 32.22 AC kWh/mi. 0.329 0.394 0.360 0.434 Range (mi.) 92.8 84.8 89.5 68.9 Avg. Ambient Temp. 68.5°F 75.3°F 80.0°F 87.0°F Note: A/C fluctuating and may have impacted A/C tests. UR1 Urban Range Test, Min Payload, No Auxiliary Loads UR2 Urban Range Test, Min Payload, A/C on High, Headlights on Low, Radio On UR3 Urban Range Test, Max Payload, No Auxiliary Loads UR4

3

Sheet.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CHRYSLER EPIC (NIMH BATTERIES) PERFORMANCE CHARACTERIZATION SUMMARY CHRYSLER EPIC (NIMH BATTERIES) PERFORMANCE CHARACTERIZATION SUMMARY ELECTRIC TRANSPORTATION DIVISION Urban Range (On Urban Pomona Loop - see other side for map) Range (mi.) Weight (lb.) 160 930 Max. Payload Min. Payload 63.6 82.0 without aux. loads with aux. loads 77.6 67.8 Test UR1 UR2 UR3 UR4 Payload (lb.) 160 160 930 930 AC kWh Recharge 53.91 50.03 53.02 52.61 AC kWh/mi. 0.663 0.734 06.75 0.823 Range (mi.) 82.0 67.8 77.6 63.6 Avg. Ambient Temp. 75º F 80º F 79º F 85º F UR1 Urban Range Test, Min Payload, No Auxiliary Loads UR2 Urban Range Test, Min Payload, A/C on High, Headlights on Low, Radio On UR3 Urban Range Test, Max Payload, No Auxiliary Loads UR4 Urban Range Test, Max Payload, A/C on High, Headlights on Low, Radio On State of Charge Meter (UR1) SOC Meter Reading vs Miles Driven 0 10

4

Pack.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 1999 February 1999 Revised: 05/05/99 CHEVROLET S-10 ELECTRIC (NIMH BATTERIES) PERFORMANCE CHARACTERIZATION SUMMARY ELECTRIC TRANSPORTATION DIVISION Urban Range (On Urban Pomona Loop - see other side for map) Test UR1 UR2 UR3 UR4 Payload (lb.) 180 180 920 920 AC kWh Recharge 54.93 57.09 54.98 51.34 AC kWh/mi. 0.78 0.91 0.87 0.85 Range (mi.) 70.4 63.0 63.0 60.4 Avg. Ambient Temp. 63°F 66°F 63°F 50°F UR1 Urban Range Test, Min Payload, No Auxiliary Loads UR2 Urban Range Test, Min Payload, A/C on High, Headlights on Low, Radio On UR3 Urban Range Test, Max Payload, No Auxiliary Loads UR4 Urban Range Test, Max Payload, A/C on High, Headlights on Low, Radio On State of Charge Meter (UR1) Freeway Range (On Freeway Pomona Loop - see other side for map) Test FW1 FW2 FW3 FW4 Payload (lb.) 180 180 920 920 AC kWh Recharge

5

TRUPACT-II residue pipe payload container  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the project to develop, test and certify a new payload container for the TRUPACT-II, a Type B packaging for the shipment of transuranic waste. The new payload container will provide segregation of plutonium waste materials within the TRUPACT-II. This segregation of fissile contents will support a new criticality safety analysis that may allow an increase in the TRUPACT-II Pu-239 Fissile Gram Equivalent (FGE) limit from 325 grams to 2800 grams. The need for this project was brought about by the end of the Cold War and the resulting shift in value of plutonium residues from providing recoverable Defense Program material to being considered disposable waste. This paper will not cover many of the details of the project but will instead aim to provide a general picture of all the project activities.

Geinitz, R. [Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, CO (United States); Gregory, P. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States). Waste Isolation Div.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

honda.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HONDA EV PLUS HONDA EV PLUS NIMH BATTERIES SEPTEMBER 1997 Urban Range (On Urban Pomona Loop - see other side for map) Range (mi.) Without Aux. Loads With Aux. Loads 81.7 97.7 105.3 Payload (lb.) Maximum 860 Minimum 140 UR1 UR2 UR 3 UR4 86.9 Test UR1 UR2 UR3 UR4 Payload (lb.) 140 140 860 860 AC kWh Recharge 40 43 40 45 AC kWh/mi. 0.38 0.49 0.41 0.55 Range (mi.) 105.3 86.9 97.7 81.7 Avg. Ambient Temp. 79° F 83° F 84° F 89° F State of Charge Meter (Urban Range Test) 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 State of Charge Miles Driven 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 Miles Remaining Miles Driven Miles Remaining Start End * * Initial " Miles Remaining" depend on driving economy before recharge Freeway Range (On Freeway Pomona Loop - see other side for map) Range (mi.) Without Aux. Loads With Aux. Loads 90.6 89.1 Maximum 860 Minimum

7

Optical Payload for the STARE Mission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Space-based Telescopes for Actionable Refinement of Ephemeris (STARE) is a nano-sat based mission designed to better determine the trajectory of satellites and space debris in orbit around earth. In this paper, we give a brief overview of the mission and its place in the larger context of Space Situational Awareness (SSA). We then describe the details of the central optical payload, touching on the optical design and characterization of the on-board image sensor used in our Cubesat based prototype. Finally, we discuss the on-board star and satellite track detection algorithm central to the success of the mission.

Simms, L; Riot, V; De Vries, W; Olivier, S S; Pertica, A; Bauman, B J; Phillion, D; Nikolaev, S

2011-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

8

Expanding the Allowable TRUPACT-II Payload  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The partnership between the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and the TRU and Mixed Waste Focus Area (TMFA) was rewarded when several long-term projects came to fruition. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) removed some of the conservatism in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) with their approval of Revision 19. The SARP strictly limits the payload constituents to ensure that hydrogen gas and other flammable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) don't build up to flammable/explosive levels while the transuranic (TRU) waste is sealed in the container during shipment. The CBFO/TMFA development program was based on laboratory experiments with surrogate waste materials, real waste experiments, and theoretical modeling that were used to justify payload expansion. Future work to expand the shipping envelope of the TRUPACT-II focuses on increasing the throughput through the waste certification process and reducing the waste operations costs by removing the need for a repackaging and/or treatment capability or reducing the size of the needed repackaging/treatment capability.

St Michel, Whitney Dorothea; Lott, Sheila

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Expanding the Allowable TRUPACT-II Payload  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The partnership between the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and the TRU and Mixed Waste Focus Area (TMFA) was rewarded when several long-term projects came to fruition. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) removed some of the conservatism in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) with their approval of Revision 19. The SARP strictly limits the payload constituents to ensure that hydrogen gas and other flammable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) don't build up to flammable/explosive levels while the transuranic (TRU) waste is sealed in the container during shipment. The CBFO/TMFA development program was based on laboratory experiments with surrogate waste materials, real waste experiments, and theoretical modeling that were used to justify payload expansion. Future work to expand the shipping envelope of the TRUPACT-II focuses on increasing the throughput through the waste certification process and reducing the waste operations costs by removing the need for a repack aging and/or treatment capability or reducing the size of the needed repackaging/treatment capability.

St. Michel, W. (INEEL); Lott, S. (LANL-Carlsbad Operations)

2002-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

10

ARM-UAV TWP-ICE Payload Instrumentation Details  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Payload Instrumentation Details McCoy, Robert Sandia National Laboratories Tooman, Tim Sandia National Laboratories McFarquhar, Greg University of Illinois Category: Field...

11

High payload six-axis load sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A repairable high-payload six-axis load sensor includes a table, a base, and at least three shear-pin load transducers removably mounted between the table and the base. Removable mounting permits easy replacement of damaged shear pins. Preferably, the shear-pin load transducers are responsive to shear forces imparted along the two axes perpendicular to an axis of minimum sensitivity characteristic of the transducer. Responsive to an applied shear force, each shear-pin load transducer can produce an electrical signal proportional to the reaction force. The load sensor can further include a structure for receiving the proportional electrical signals and computing the applied load corresponding to the proportional electrical signals. The computed load can be expressed in terms of a three-dimensional XYZ Cartesian coordinate system.

Jansen, John F. (Knoxville, TN); Lind, Randall F. (Knoxville, TN)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Overview of the New Horizons Science Payload  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The New Horizons mission was launched on 2006 January 19, and the spacecraft is heading for a flyby encounter with the Pluto system in the summer of 2015. The challenges associated with sending a spacecraft to Pluto in less than 10 years and performing an ambitious suite of scientific investigations at such large heliocentric distances (> 32 AU) are formidable and required the development of lightweight, low power, and highly sensitive instruments. This paper provides an overview of the New Horizons science payload, which is comprised of seven instruments. Alice provides spatially resolved ultraviolet spectroscopy. The Ralph instrument has two components: the Multicolor Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC), which performs panchromatic and color imaging, and the Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array (LEISA), which provides near-infrared spectroscopic mapping capabilities. The Radio Experiment (REX) is a component of the New Horizons telecommunications system that provides both occultation and radiometry capabilities. ...

Weaver, H A; Tapley, M B; Young, L A; Stern, S A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

ford.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FORD RANGER EV FORD RANGER EV LEAD ACID BATTERIES MARCH 1998 Urban Range (On Urban Pomona Loop - see other side for map) Range (mi.) Without Aux. Loads With Aux . Lo a ds Pay load ( lb.) Maximum 640 Minimum 140 UR1 UR2 UR3 UR4 58.3 58.7 60.1 72.1 Test UR1 UR2 UR3 UR4 Payload (lb.) 140 140 640 640 AC kWh Recharge 29.11 28.16 28.20 28.23 AC kWh/mi. 0.40 0.47 0.48 0.48 Range (mi.) 72.1 60.1 58.7 58.3 Avg. Ambient Temp. 79° F 61° F 69° F 64° F State of Charge Meter (Urban Range Test) 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 State of Charge (4=F, 0=E) Miles Driven Miles Driven Miles Remaining * * Initial "Miles Remaining" depend on driving economy before recharge Freeway Range (On Freeway Pomona Loop - see other side for map) Range (mi.) Without Aux. Loads With Au x . L o a ds 51.6 57.2 60 66.4

14

Overview of the New Horizons Science Payload  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The New Horizons mission was launched on 2006 January 19, and the spacecraft is heading for a flyby encounter with the Pluto system in the summer of 2015. The challenges associated with sending a spacecraft to Pluto in less than 10 years and performing an ambitious suite of scientific investigations at such large heliocentric distances (> 32 AU) are formidable and required the development of lightweight, low power, and highly sensitive instruments. This paper provides an overview of the New Horizons science payload, which is comprised of seven instruments. Alice provides spatially resolved ultraviolet spectroscopy. The Ralph instrument has two components: the Multicolor Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC), which performs panchromatic and color imaging, and the Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array (LEISA), which provides near-infrared spectroscopic mapping capabilities. The Radio Experiment (REX) is a component of the New Horizons telecommunications system that provides both occultation and radiometry capabilities. The Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) provides high sensitivity, high spatial resolution optical imaging capabilities. The Solar Wind at Pluto (SWAP) instrument measures the density and speed of solar wind particles. The Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation (PEPSSI) measures energetic protons and CNO ions. The Venetia Burney Student Dust Counter (VB-SDC) is used to record dust particle impacts during the cruise phases of the mission.

H. A. Weaver; W. C. Gibson; M. B. Tapley; L. A. Young; S. A. Stern

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

15

On-orbit support of DARPA-301 payload. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report covers the DARPA-301 payload on the P78-1 satellite. Several gamma-ray detectors with high sensitivity continue to perform well and are completely capable of fulfilling the mission objectives. These objectives are: (1) Provide the technical planning and liaison with the Air Force Satellite Control Facility and other government agencies as required for the on-orbit satellite support of the DARPA-301 payload; (2) Assess the on-orbit operation and quality of data from the DARPA-301 payload on the P78-1 satellite; (3) Provide support, including quick-look analysis and interactions with the Air Force Satellite Control Facility, for a regional event; and, (4) Perform regular analyses of the on-orbit data to maintain updated evaluations of the sensitivities and optimum configurations of the payload for mapping gamma-ray sources.

Imhof, W.L.; Datlowe, D.W.; Mobilia, J.; Nakano, G.H.; Gaines, E.E.

1984-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

16

ASAP: automatic semantics-aware analysis of network payloads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Automatic inspection of network payloads is a prerequisite for effective analysis of network communication. Security research has largely focused on network analysis using protocol specifications, for example for intrusion detection, fuzz testing and ...

Tammo Krueger; Nicole Krmer; Konrad Rieck

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

An optimum robot path planning with payload constraints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a general methodology for the off-line planning of optimal trajectory of robot manipulators by taking into account the grasping forces in the manipulator gripper. The mechanical energy of the actuators has been considered for the ... Keywords: Path planning, Payload constraints, Programming, Robotics

Sezimaria F. P. Saramago; Marco Ceccarelli

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Mir Environmental Effects Payload and Returned Mir Solar Panel Cleanliness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The MIR Environmental Effects Payload (MEEP) was attached to the Docking Module of the MIR space station for 18 months during calendar years 1996 and 1997 (March 1996, STS 76 to October 1997, STS 86). A solar panel array with more than 10 years space ...

Harvey Gale A.; Humes Donald H.; Kinard William H.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

CRC handbook of NASA future missions and payloads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The author presents a detailed and quantitative description of all of the programs, systems, sensors and experiments associated with the next 30 years of space endeavors by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Derived from the fifth issue of the NASA Space Systems Technology Model, the missions and payloads are categorized by applications area: solar system exploration, astrophysics, earth sciences, communications, space transportation and utilization of the space environment. Far-term missions are described as opportunity missions and landmark missions, for the distant future. Technology requirements are collected by discipline: power, propulsion, materials, structures, information systems, navigation, guidance and control. Payload technology requirements are organized by instrument sensing range. This information defines in quantitative terms, the opportunities and limits for future civilian space system capabilities.

Hord, M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Dynamic modelling of a double-pendulum gantry crane system incorporating payload  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The natural sway of crane payloads is detrimental to safe and efficient operation. Under certain conditions, the problem is complicated when the payloads create a double pendulum effect. This paper presents dynamic modelling of a double-pendulum gantry crane system based on closed-form equations of motion. The Lagrangian method is used to derive the dynamic model of the system. A dynamic model of the system incorporating payload is developed and the effects of payload on the response of the system are discussed. Extensive results that validate the theoretical derivation are presented in the time and frequency domains.

Ismail, R. M. T. Raja; Ahmad, M. A.; Ramli, M. S.; Ishak, R.; Zawawi, M. A. [Faculty of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Pahang, Lebuhraya Tun Razak, 26300, Kuantan, Pahang (Malaysia)

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ur3 ur4 payload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

LLNL Compliance Plan for TRUPACT-2 Authorized Methods for Payload Control  

SciTech Connect

This document describes payload control at LLNL to ensure that all shipments of CH-TRU waste in the TRUPACT-II (Transuranic Package Transporter-II) meet the requirements of the TRUPACT-II SARP (safety report for packaging). This document also provides specific instructions for the selection of authorized payloads once individual payload containers are qualified for transport. The physical assembly of the qualified payload and operating procedures for the use of the TRUPACT-II, including loading and unloading operations, are described in HWM Procedure No. 204, based on the information in the TRUPACT-II SARP. The LLNL TRAMPAC, along with the TRUPACT-II operating procedures contained in HWM Procedure No. 204, meet the documentation needs for the use of the TRUPACT-II at LLNL. Table 14-1 provides a summary of the LLNL waste generation and certification procedures as they relate to TRUPACT-II payload compliance.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

The use of filtered bags to increase waste payload capacity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For the past few years, the Department of Energy has favored the direct disposal of low plutonium content residue materials from Rocky Flats rather than engage in expensive and time consuming plutonium recovery operations. One impediment to direct disposal has been the wattage limit imposed by the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant on hydrogenous materials such as combustibles and sludges. The issue of concern is the radiolytic generation and accumulation of hydrogen and other explosive gases in waste containers. The wattage limits that existed through 1996 restricted the amount of plutonium bearing hydrogenous materials that could be packaged in a WIPP bound waste drum to only a fraction of the capacity of a drum. Typically, only about one kilogram of combustible residue could be packaged in a waste drum before the wattage limit was exceeded resulting in an excessively large number of drums to be procured, stored, shipped, and interred. The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site has initiated the use of filtered plastic bags (called bag-out bags) used to remove transuranic waste materials from glove box lines. The bags contain small, disk like HEPA filters which are effective in containing radioactively contaminated particulate material but allow for the diffusion of hydrogen gas. Used in conjunction with filtered 55 gallon drums, filtered bag-out bags were pursued as a means to increase the allowable wattage limits for selected residue materials. In February 1997, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission approved the use of filtered bag-out bags for transuranic waste materials destined for WIPP. The concomitant increase in wattage limits now allows for approximately four times the payload per waste drum for wattage limited materials.

Dustin, D.F.; Thorp, D.T. [Safe Sites of Colorado, Golden, CO (United States); Rivera, M.A. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

23

Impact of Liquefied Natural Gas usage and payload size on Hybrid Wing Body aircraft fuel efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work assessed Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft in the context of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) fuel usage and payload/range scalability at three scales: H1 (B737), H2 (B787) and H3 (B777). The aircraft were optimized for ...

Mody, Pritesh (Pritesh Chetan)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Certification challenges in the development of an innovative high payload capacity spent fuel transportation cask  

SciTech Connect

The design approach and certification strategy used in the development of an innovative transportation cask for legal weight truck shipments of spent nuclear fuel is presented. The proposed approach represents a significant departure from conventional cask designs in that it uses titanium alloy, a material with a high strength-to-weight ratio which has no precedent in transportation cask certification. The significant increase in payload obtainable with the proposed approach, and the associated benefits such as reduced life cycle costs, lower personnel exposure, and lower transportation accident risks are discussed. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Mair, B.R.; Severson, M.J.; Ciez, A.P. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Active control of payload fairing noise using distributed active vibration absorbers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High sound pressure inside a launch vehicle fairing during lift?off can damage the payload. Interior levels of up to 140 dB between 60 and 250 Hz are mostly due to exhaust plume noise combined with the limited transmission loss of lightweight composite fairings and little acoustic damping in the fairing volume. Past work using passive and hybrid passive/reactive noise control devices has shown that their limitations are mostly due to packaging volume and weight penalty. The objective of this work is to design a lightweight

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Second Annual Maintenance, Inspection, and Test Report for PAS-1 Cask Certification for Shipping Payload B  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Packaging, Inc. (NuPac), PAS-1 cask is required to undergo annual maintenance and inspections to retain certification in accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Certificate of Compliance USA/9184B(U) (Appendix A). The packaging configuration being tested and maintained is the NuPac PAS-1 cask for Payload B. The intent of the maintenance and inspections is to ensure the packaging remains in unimpaired physical condition. Two casks, serial numbers 2162-026 and 2162-027, were maintained, inspected, and tested at the 306E Development, Fabrication, and Test Laboratory, located at the Hanford Site's 300 Area. Waste Management Federal Services, Inc. (WMFS), a subsidiary of GTS Duratek, was in charge of the maintenance and testing. Cogema Engineering Corporation (Cogema) directed the operations in the test facility. The maintenance, testing, and inspections were conducted successfully with both PAS-1 casks. The work conducted on the overpacks included weighing, gasket replacement, and plastic pipe plug and foam inspections. The work conducted on the secondary containment vessel (SCV) consisted of visual inspection of the vessel and threaded parts (i.e., fasteners), visual inspection of sealing surfaces, replacement of O-ring seals, and a helium leak test. The work conducted on the primary containment vessel (PCV) consisted of visual inspection of the vessel and threaded parts (i.e., fasteners), visual inspection of sealing surfaces, replacement of O-ring seals, dimensional inspection of the vessel bottom, a helium leak test, and dye penetrant inspection of the welds. The vermiculite material used in the cask rack assembly was replaced.

KELLY, D.J.

2000-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

27

WM2008 Conference, February 24-28, 2008, Phoenix, AZ Shielded Payload Containers Will Enhance the Safety and Efficiency of the DOE's Remote Handled  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Safety and Efficiency of the DOE's Remote Handled Transuranic Waste Disposal Operations - 8199 R. A for Remote Handled (RH) waste. CH waste is emplaced in a variety of payload container configurations. This robust configuration provides an overpack for waste that otherwise would be remotely handled. Up to a 3

28

Shielded Payload Containers Will Enhance the Safety and Efficiency of the DOE's Remote Handled Transuranic Waste Disposal Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) disposal operation currently employs two different disposal methods: one for Contact Handled (CH) waste and another for Remote Handled (RH) waste. CH waste is emplaced in a variety of payload container configurations on the floor of each disposal room. In contrast, RH waste is packaged into a single type of canister and emplaced in pre-drilled holes in the walls of disposal rooms. Emplacement of the RH waste in the walls must proceed in advance of CH waste emplacement. This poses a significant logistical constraint on waste handling operations by requiring significant coordination between waste characterization and preparations for shipping among the various generators. To improve operational efficiency, the Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing a new waste emplacement process for certain RH waste streams that can be safely managed in shielded containers. RH waste with relatively low gamma-emitting activity would be packaged in lead-lined containers, shipped to WIPP in existing certified transportation packages for CH waste, and emplaced in WIPP among the stacks of CH waste containers on the floor of a disposal room. RH waste with high gamma-emitting activity would continue to be emplaced in the boreholes along the walls. The new RH container appears essentially the same as a nominal 208-liter drum, but is built with about 2.5 cm of lead, sandwiched between thick steel sheet. The top and bottom are made of very thick plate steel, for strengthening the package to meet transportation requirements, and provide similar gamma attenuation. This robust configuration provides an overpack for waste that otherwise would be remotely handled. Up to a 3:1 reduction in number of shipments is projected if RH waste were transported in the proposed shielded containers. This paper describes the container design and testing, as well as the regulatory approach used to meet the requirements that apply to WIPP and its associated transportation system. This paper describes the RH transuranic waste inventory that may be candidates for packaging and emplacement in shielded containers. DOE does not propose to use shielded containers to increase the amount of RH waste allowed at WIPP. DOE's approach to gain approval for the transportation of shielded containers and to secure regulatory approval for use of shielded containers from WIPP regulators is discussed. Finally, the paper describes how DOE proposes to count the waste packaged into shielded containers against the RH waste inventory and how this will comply with the volume and radioactivity limitations imposed in the many and sometimes overlapping regulations that apply to WIPP. (authors)

Nelson, R.A. [U. S. Department of Energy, Carlsbad, New Mexico (United States); White, D.S. [Washington Group International, Carlsbad, New Mexico (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Methods for delivering liquid payloads from high altitudes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As part of a military design project, further research was requested into an optimum method for delivering water from high altitude to a civilian population on the ground. This thesis explores current airdrop technology ...

Lipoma, Thomas (Thomas S.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

RTP Payload for DTMF Digits, Telephony Tones and Telephony Signals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This memo describes how to carry dual-tone multifrequency (DTMF) signaling, other tone signals and telephony events in RTP packets.

H. Schulzrinne; S. Petrack

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

SABOT: specification-based payload generation for programmable logic controllers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) drive the behavior of industrial control systems according to uploaded programs. It is now known that PLCs are vulnerable to the uploading of malicious code that can have severe physical consequences. What is not ... Keywords: attack, critical infrastructure, programmable logic controller

Stephen McLaughlin; Patrick McDaniel

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Advanced digital demodulators for on-board processing payloads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Starting with a short summary of the development status of digital demodulators for on-board processing applications, the motivation for and scope of the COMED development program is given. The requirements specifications and realisation concepts for ...

Bernd Hespeler; Stefan Kull; Christof Krner

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

A lean safety review process for payloads on the International Space Station  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The International Space Station has the potential to serve as a unique test platform to enable technologies for a wide array of manned and unmanned NASA missions. In order to live up to its promise, the resources required ...

Luis, Javier de

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

AMOUR V: A Hovering Energy Efficient Underwater Robot Capable of Dynamic Payloads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we describe the design and control algorithms of AMOUR, a low-cost autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) capable of missions of marine survey and monitoring. AMOUR is a highly maneuverable robot capable of hovering and carrying ...

Iuliu Vasilescu; Carrick Detweiler; Marek Doniec; Daniel Gurdan; Stefan Sosnowski; Jan Stumpf; Daniela Rus

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

RTP Payload Format for Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers (SMPTE) 292M Video  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gharai,L. Perkins,C.S. Goncher,G. Mankin,A. Internet Engineering Task Force, RFC 3497 Internet Society

Gharai, L.; Perkins, C.S.; Goncher, G.; Mankin, A.; Internet Engineering Task Force, RFC 3497 Internet Society [More Details

36

Using the Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP) Transport Format with the Host  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This memo defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet community. It does not specify an Internet standard of any kind. Discussion and suggestions for improvement are requested. Distribution of this memo is unlimited. IESG Note The following issues describe IESG concerns about this document. The IESG expects that these issues will be addressed when future versions of HIP are designed. In case of complex Security Policy Databases (SPDs) and the coexistence of HIP and security-related protocols such as IKE, implementors may encounter conditions that are unspecified in these documents. For example, when the SPD defines an IP address subnet to be protected and a HIP host is residing in that IP address area, there is a possibility that the communication is encrypted multiple times. Readers are advised to pay special attention when running HIP

P. Jokela; R. Moskowitz; P. Nikander

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Payload-envelope detection and label-detection integrated photonic circuit for asynchronous variable-length optical-packet switching with 40-Gb/s RZ payloads and 10-Gb/s NRZ labels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

required in order to detect more electrical power at the PD.With the SOA on, the electrical power generated into thethe data, and the electrical power generated JOURNAL OF

Koch, B R; Hu, Z Y; Bowers, J E; Blumenthal, D J

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

CH Packaging Operations for High Wattage Waste at LANL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This procedure provides instructions for assembling the following CH packaging payload: Drum payload assembly Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

39

CH Packaging Operations for High Wattage Waste at LANL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This procedure provides instructions for assembling the following CH packaging payload: Drum payload assembly Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

40

CH Packaging Operations for High Wattage Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides instructions for assembling the following CH packaging payload: Drum payload assembly Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP)

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2006-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ur3 ur4 payload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

CH Packaging Operations Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This procedure provides instructions forassembling the following CH packaging payload: Drum payload assembly Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP)

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2007-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

42

CH Packaging Operations Manual  

SciTech Connect

Introduction - This procedure provides instructions for assembling the following CH packaging payload: - Drum payload assembly - Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly - Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP).

Washington TRU Solutions

2002-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

43

CH Packaging Operations Manual  

SciTech Connect

Introduction - This procedure provides instructions forassembling the following CH packaging payload: Drum payload assembly Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP)

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2006-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

44

CH Packaging Operations Manual  

SciTech Connect

This procedure provides instructions forassembling the following CH packaging payload: Drum payload assembly Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP)

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2007-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

45

CH Packaging Operations Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Introduction - This procedure provides instructions for assembling the following CH packaging payload: -Drum payload assembly -Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly -Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2003-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

46

CH Packaging Operations Manual  

SciTech Connect

Introduction - This procedure provides instructions forassembling the following CH packaging payload: Drum payload assembly Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP)

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

47

February, 2010 Fire Analysis of the Shielded Container  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRUPACT-II Authorized Methods for Payload Control TRU transuranic TRUPACT transuranic package transporter

48

CH Packaging Operations Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides the user with instructions for assembling a payload. All the steps in Subsections 1.2, Preparing 55-Gallon Drum Payload Assembly; 1.3, Preparing "Short" 85-Gallon Drum Payload Assembly (TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT); 1.4, Preparing "Tall" 85-Gallon Drum Payload Assembly (HalfPACT only); 1.5, Preparing 100-Gallon Drum Payload Assembly; 1.6, Preparing SWB Payload Assembly; and 1.7, Preparing TDOP Payload Assembly, must be completed, but may be performed in any order as long as radiological control steps are not bypassed.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

49

Recommendations and Justifications To Remove Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This document is part of an effort to reevaluate 37 FFACO and Administrative URs against the current Soils Risk-Based Corrective Action Evaluation Process. After reviewing 37 existing FFACO and Administrative URs, 3 URs addressed in this document have sufficient information to determine that these current URs may be removed, based on the RBCA criteria. This document presents recommendations on modifications to existing URs that will be consistent with the RBCA criteria.

Birney, Cathleen; Krauss, Mark J.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system safety analysis report for packaging. Volumes 1 and 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This SARP describes the RTG Transportation System Package, a Type B(U) packaging system that is used to transport an RTG or similar payload. The payload, which is included in this SARP, is a generic, enveloping payload that specifically encompasses the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) RTG payload. The package consists of two independent containment systems mounted on a shock isolation transport skid and transported within an exclusive-use trailer.

Ferrell, P.C.

1996-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

51

Passive orientation apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus that can return a payload to a known orientation after unknown motion, without requiring external power or complex mechanical systems. The apparatus comprises a faceted cage that causes the system to rest in a stable position and orientation after arbitrary motion. A gimbal is mounted with the faceted cage and holds the payload, allowing the payload to move relative to the stable faceted cage. The payload is thereby placed in a known orientation by the interaction of gravity with the geometry of the faceted cage, the mass of the system, and the motion of the payload and gimbal. No additional energy, control, or mechanical actuation is required. The apparatus is suitable for use in applications requiring positioning of a payload to a known orientation after arbitrary or uncontrolled motion, including remote sensing and mobile robot applications.

Spletzer, Barry L. (Albuquerque, NM); Fischer, Gary J. (Albuquerque, NM); Martinez, Michael A. (Albuquerque, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Field Operations Program - Honda Insight Hybrid Electric Vehicle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

both Urban and Freeway drive cycles, each conducted at four operating scenarios that mix minimum and maximum payloads with different auxiliary (e.g., lights, air conditioning)...

53

EXTENSION OF A KINETIC APPROACH TO CHEMICAL REACTIONS TO ELECTRONIC ENERGY LEVELS AND REACTIONS INVOLVING CHARGED SPECIES WITH APPLICATION TO DSMC SIMULATIONS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The ability to compute rarefied, ionized hypersonic flows is becoming more important as missions such as Earth reentry, landing high mass payloads on Mars, and (more)

Liechty, Derek Shane

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Electrical power subsystem integration and test for the NPS solar cell array tester CubeSat .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The electrical power subsystem is one of the most important elements of any satellite. This system must provide the necessary power to enable the payload (more)

Fletcher James Martin.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Bradbury Science Museum gets martian fever  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

payload on Curiosity. The museum's TechLab will have a dozen videos and animations about the Curiosity rover from NASA and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Visitors can...

56

The ebXML Test Framework And the Challenges of B2B ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... In addition, ebXML message payloads do not appear ... Also, interoperability does not necessarily mean that ... Test step operation directives consist of ...

2013-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

57

Toyotasummarysheet.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TOYOTA RAV4-EV (CONDUCTIVE) PERFORMANCE CHARACTERIZATION SUMMARY ELECTRIC TRANSPORTATION DIVISION Urban Range (On Urban Pomona Loop - see other side for map) Payload (lb.) 93.0...

58

Prsentation PowerPoint  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brenguier COPAL Objectives Feasibility Study for procurement, refurbishing, modification and instrumentation of a heavy-payload (8 Tons) and long-endurance (10 hours)...

59

Title 40 CFR Part 191 Subparts B and C Compliance Recertification Application 2004 ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Team Procedure TRAMPAC TRUPACT-II Authorized Methods for Payload Control TRIPS Transuranic Reporting, Inventory, and Processing System TRU transuranic TRUPACT Transuranic Package Transporter TSG Technical

60

Test Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of the robot, operator control unit (OCU), payload, and batteries Tools needed ... this test method is to quantitatively evaluate the battery capacity per ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ur3 ur4 payload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

RESEARCH ARTICLE ...  

room environments is essential for the prevention of for-ward contamination, that is, ... Facilities Handbook of Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility

62

Nanostructured Active Therapeutic Vehicles (NATV)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

will improve circulation times by an order of magnitude or better, sense and release therapeutic payloads on trigger, and improve performance compared to...

63

Inhibition recruitment in prefrontal cortex during sleep spindles and gating of hippocampal inputs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

scientific payloads to study celestial gamma ray bursts and X-ray sources. For conduct- ing atmospheric have been high-energy cosmic ray variability using neutron/ meson/Cerenkov monitors, equatorial is likely to carry soft and hard X-ray detectors and imaging payloads, all sky X-ray monitors and a UV

Destexhe, Alain

64

Modeling Interregional Transmission Congestion in the National Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standard for digital optical transmission (bit pipe) q Developed originally by Bellcore. Standardized Overhead 90 Columns Synchronous Payload Envelope 9 Rows Line Overhead 6 Rows #12;Raj JainThe Ohio State Overhead 3 Rows Path Overhead 270 Columns Synchronous Payload Envelope 9 Rows Line Overhead 6 Rows #12;Raj

65

KIDS: keyed intrusion detection system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since most current network attacks happen at the application layer, analysis of packet payload is necessary for their detection. Unfortunately malicious packets may be crafted to mimic normal payload, and so avoid detection if the anomaly detection method ... Keywords: Kerckhoffs' principle, anomaly detection, keyed IDS, network intrusion detection, word model

Sasa Mrdovic; Branislava Drazenovic

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

LogP Quantified: The Case for LowOverhead Local Area Networks 16 Workstation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4000 5000 6000 7000 0 2000 4000 6000 8000 10000 Average UDP Round­trip Time (usec) User Data Payload 2000 4000 6000 8000 10000 Average UDP Round­trip Time (usec) User Data Payload Size (bytes) SS Sw. Enet

Anderson, Tom

67

Aliasing on the world wide web: prevalence and performance implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aliasing occurs in Web transactions when requests containing different URLs elicit replies containing identical data payloads. Conventional caches associate stored data with URLs and can therefore suffer redundant payload transfers due to aliasing and ... Keywords: DTD, HTTP, WWW, Zipf's law, aliasing, cache hierarchies, caching, duplicate suppression, duplicate transfer detection, hypertext transfer protocol, performance analysis, redundant transfers, resource modification, world wide web

Terence Kelly; Jeffrey Mogul

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

HEV Fleet Testing - Honda Civic Hybrid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Total miles driven: 161,532 Cumulative MPG: 37.23 Engine: 4-cylinder, 70 kW @ 5700 rpm Electric Motor: 10 kW Battery: Nickel Metal Hydride Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 882...

69

Detecting unknown network attacks using language models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a method for network intrusion detection based on language models such as n-grams and words. Our method proceeds by extracting these models from TCP connection payloads and applying unsupervised anomaly detection. The essential part ...

Konrad Rieck; Pavel Laskov

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

VIN# JTNBB46K773007129 Vehicle Specifications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

K773007129 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 2.4 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 105 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 1,109 lbs Features: Four-wheel disk brakes ABS w...

71

Vehicle Specifications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

E27C177982 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 2.5 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 105 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 981 lbs Features: Regenerative braking Traction...

72

VIN# JHMFA36216S019329 Vehicle Specifications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

16S019329 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 1.3 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 15 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 968 lbs Features: Front disk brakes wEBD brake...

73

VIN# JHMZE2H59AS011748 Vehicle Specifications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H59AS011748 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 1.3 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 10 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 907 lbs Features: Regenerative braking Traction...

74

VIN# KMHEC4A43BA004932 Vehicle Specifications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3BA004932 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 2.4 L Electric Motor: 30 kW Battery: Lithium Polymer Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 1074 lbs Features: Regenerative braking Traction...

75

Vehicle Specifications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

E87C172351 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 2.5 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 105 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 981 lbs Features: Regenerative braking Traction...

76

VIN# JTNBB46K673006330 Vehicle Specifications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

K673006330 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 2.4 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 105 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 1,109 lbs Features: Four-wheel disk brakes ABS w...

77

Vehicle Specifications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Z07S838122 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 2.4 L 4 cylinder Electric Motor: 14.5 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 1,244 lbs Features: Regenerative braking wABS 4...

78

Vehicle Specifications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2AR194699 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 2.5 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 60 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 850 lbs Features: Regenerative braking Traction...

79

VIN# JHMZE2H78AS010141 Vehicle Specifications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H78AS010141 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 1.3 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 10 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 907 lbs Features: Regenerative braking Traction...

80

Vehicle Specifications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4AR144757 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 2.5 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 60 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 850 lbs Features: Regenerative braking Traction...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ur3 ur4 payload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

VIN# JTDKN3DU5A0006063 Vehicle Specifications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DU5A0006063 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 1.8 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 60 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 885 lbs Features: Regenerative braking Traction...

82

VIN# JHMFA36246S018725 Vehicle Specifications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

46S018725 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 1.3 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 15 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 968 lbs Features: Front disk brakes wEBD brake...

83

Vehicle Specifications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Z37S813344 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 2.4 L 4 cylinder Electric Motor: 14.5 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 1,244 lbs Features: Regenerative braking wABS 4...

84

VIN# JTDKN3DU2A5010462 Vehicle Specifications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DU2A5010462 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 1.8 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 60 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 885 lbs Features: Regenerative braking Traction...

85

VIN# KMHEC4A47BA003539 Vehicle Specifications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7BA003539 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 2.4 L Electric Motor: 30 kW Battery: Lithium Polymer Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 1074 lbs Features: Regenerative braking Traction...

86

Homogeneous and Inhomogeneous Mixing in Cumulus Clouds: Dependence on Local Turbulence Structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The helicopter-borne instrument payload known as the Airborne Cloud Turbulence Observation System (ACTOS) was used to study the entrainment and mixing processes in shallow warm cumulus clouds. The characteristics of the mixing process are ...

Katrin Lehmann; Holger Siebert; Raymond A. Shaw

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

epic.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CHRYSLER EPIC LEAD ACID BATTERIES JUNE 1997 Urban Range (On Urban Pomona Loop - see other side for map) Range (mi.) Without Aux. Loads With Aux. Loads 46.2 55.2 58.6 Payload (lb.)...

88

ev1.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GM EV1 LEAD ACID BATTERIES SEPTEMBER 1997 Urban Range (On Urban Pomona Loop - see other side for map) Range (mi.) Without Aux. Loads With Aux. Loads 60.1 74.8 80.1 Payload (lb.)...

89

OMC-INTEGRAL Memory Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The management of the memory restrictions imposed by the processor (1750A) was one of the major difficulties found in designing the Software (SW) controlling the Optical Monitoring Camera (OMC) payload of the International Gamma Ray Laboratory (INTEGRAL) ...

Jose Manuel Prez Lobato; Eva Martn Lobo

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Virus constructed iron phosphate lithium ion batteries in unmanned aircraft systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FePO? lithium ion batteries that have cathodes constructed by viruses are scaled up in size to examine potential for use as an auxiliary battery in the Raven to power the payload equipment. These batteries are assembled ...

Kolesnikov-Lindsey, Rachel

91

Multiple Instrument Distributed Aperture Sensor (MIDAS) For Planetary Remote Sensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multiple Instrument Distributed Aperture Sensor (MIDAS) For Planetary Remote Sensing Joe Pitman An innovative approach that enables greatly increased return from planetary science remote sensing missions as the primary remote sensing science payload, thereby reducing the cost, resources, complexity, integration

Marcus, Philip S.

92

Methods of and system for swing damping movement of suspended objects  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A payload suspended from a gantry is swing damped in accordance with a control algorithm based on the periodic motion of the suspended mass or by servoing on the forces induced by the suspended mass. 13 figures.

Jones, J.F.; Petterson, B.J.; Strip, D.R.

1991-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

93

VIN# JTEDW21A160006395 Vehicle Specifications Engine...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Toyota Highlander VIN JTEDW21A160006395 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 3.3 L V6 Electric Motor: Front - 123 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Seven Payload: 1,557 lbs Features:...

94

VIN# JTDKB20U740012721 Vehicle Specifications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Toyota Prius VIN JTDKB20U740012721 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 1.5 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 50 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 905 lbs Features: CVT...

95

Element and system design for active and passive vibration isolation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis focusses on broadband vibration isolation, with an emphasis on control of absolute payload motion for ultra-precision instruments such as the MIT/Caltech Laser-Interferometric Gravitational Wave Observatory ...

Zuo, Lei, 1974-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

FACT SHEET U.S. Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

altitude: 25,000 feet (7.5 kilometers) * Maximum gross weight: 36,000 pounds (16,330 kilograms) * Endurance with typical payload fuel: 4 hours * Crew capacity: 2 pilots, 1-4...

97

Microsoft Word - batmetpk.html  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lost due to placemant of battery box. WEIGHT Curb Weight: 4000 lbs Test Weight: 4354 lbs Distribution FR: 4753 % Conversion GVWR: 4700 lbs OEM GVWR: 4260 lbs Payload: 346 lbs...

98

TIRES Tire Mfg: Triangle Tire Model: Radial...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

505 lb Delivered Curb Weight: 2498 lb Distribution FR: 5149 % GVWR: 2998 lb GAWR FR: 17001550 lb Payload 2 : 500 lb Performance Goal: 400 lb DIMENSIONS Wheelbase: 97.0 inches...

99

TIRES Tire Mfg: Triangle Tire Model: Radial...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

472 lb Delivered Curb Weight: 2472 lb Distribution FR: 5149 % GVWR: 2998 lb GAWR FR: 17971562 lb Payload 2 : 526 lb Performance Goal: 400 lb DIMENSIONS Wheelbase: 98.0 inches...

100

CH Packaging Operations Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This procedure provides instructions for assembling the CH Packaging Drum payload assembly, Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly, Abnormal Operations and ICV and OCV Preshipment Leakage Rate Tests on the packaging seals, using a nondestructive Helium (He) Leak Test.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ur3 ur4 payload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

A Balloon Sounding Technique for Measuring SO2 Plumes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on the development of a new technique for inexpensive measurements of SO2 profiles using a modified dual-ozonesonde instrument payload. The presence of SO2 interferes with the standard electrochemical cell (ECC) ozonesonde ...

Gary A. Morris; Walter D. Komhyr; Jun Hirokawa; James Flynn; Barry Lefer; Nicholay Krotkov; Fong Ngan

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Design and development of a high-altitude, in-flight-deployable micro-UAV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A micro-UAV ([mu] UAV) system was developed to provide maximum endurance for a small atmospheric sensing payload. The system, composed of a ([mu] UAV) and protective case, folds and fits into a MJU-10/B flare cartridge ...

Tao, Tony S

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Modification of a Commercial Condensation Particle Counter for Boundary Layer Balloon-Borne Aerosol Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A commercial battery-driven condensation particle counter (TSI-8020) was modified for use in a lightweight payload for tethered balloons to study new particle formation in the planetary boundary layer. After modifications, the instrument was ...

Jost Heintzenberg; Alfred Wiedensohler; Stefan Ktz

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Calibration of the Improved Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder. Part I: Introduction, Spectral, and Radiometric Calibration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Improved Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder (ISAMS) is an infrared spectroradiometer that formed part of the science instrument payload of the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite. An essential part of the success of ISAMS in orbit was a ...

J. Ballard; C. W. P. Palmer; P. E. Morris; T. J. Nightingale; J. Firth; R. J. Knight; P. Venters; R. J. Wells; J. G. Whitney

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Observations of Typhoon Melissa during the Lidar In-Space Technology Experiment (LITE)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lidar In-Space Technology Experiment (LITE) provided the first high-resolution (15 m) vertical profiling of clouds and aerosols from space. The LITE instrument flew aboard the space shuttle as its prime payload during Space Transportation ...

Thomas A. Kovacs; M. Patrick McCormick

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Comparison of heat sink and fan combinations and thermal electric coolers for use in the Mars Gravity Biosatellite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experiment was conducted to help compare possible cooling methods for the payload module of the Mars Gravity Biosatellite. The Satellite will be launched into space with 15 mice on board and rotated to create a 0.38g ...

Parness, Aaron J. (Aaron Joseph), 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Methods of and system for swing damping movement of suspended objects  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A payload suspended from a gantry is swing damped in accordance with a control algorithm based on the periodic motion of the suspended mass or by serving on the forces induced by the suspended mass.

Jones, J.F.; Petterson, B.J.; Strip, D.R.

1989-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

108

Transportation system benefits of early deployment of a 75-ton multipurpose canister system  

SciTech Connect

In 1993 the US Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) began developing two multipurpose canister (MPC) systems to provide a standardized method for interim storage and transportation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at commercial nuclear power plants. One is a 75-ton concept with an estimated payload of about 6 metric tons (t) of SNF, and the other is a 125-ton concept with an estimated payload of nearly 11 t of SNF. These payloads are two to three times the payloads of the largest currently certified US rail transport casks, the IF-300. Although is it recognized that a fully developed 125-ton MPC system is likely to provide a greater cost benefit, and radiation exposure benefit than the lower-capacity 75-ton MPC, the authors of this paper suggest that development and deployment of the 75-ton MPC prior to developing and deploying a 125-ton MPC is a desirable strategy. Reasons that support this are discussed in this paper.

Wankerl, M.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schmid, S.P. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

109

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Instrumentation for the AMR-UAV Payload McCoy, R.F., Tooman, T.T., and Bolton, W.B., Sandia National Laboratories Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team...

110

Design of an adaptive 3-dimensional display enabled by a swarm of autonomous micro air vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is motivated by the concept of a system consisting of a swarm of small, automatically controlled air vehicles, each carrying a colour-controlled light source (payload), capable of executing coordinated maneouvres ...

Mueller, Erich, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Automatic Defense Against Zero-day Polymorphic Worms in Communication Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Able to propagate quickly and change their payload with each infection, polymorphic worms have been able to evade even the most advanced intrusion detection systems (IDS). And, because zero-day worms require only seconds to launch flooding attacks on ...

Mohssen Mohammed, Al-Sakib Khan Pathan

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

26 ford 4-p car data sheet.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

92 lb Delivered Curb Weight: 1431 lb Distribution FR: 4654% GVWR: 2300 lb GAWR FR: 8401530 lb Payload: 899 lb 3 Performance Goal: 400 lb DIMENSIONS Wheelbase: 77.9 inches Track...

113

29 nash car data sheet.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

54 lb Delivered Curb Weight: 1961 lb Distribution FR: 5050 % GVWR: 2593 lb GAWR FR: 11041489 lb Payload: 640 lb 2 Performance Goal: 400 lb DIMENSIONS Wheelbase: 86.6 Track FR:...

114

25 ford 2-p car sheet data.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

48 lb Delivered Curb Weight: 1355 lb Distribution FR: 4456% GVWR: 1900 lb GAWR FR: 7501230 lb Payload: 551 lb 3 Performance Goal: 400 lb DIMENSIONS Wheelbase: 67.9 inches Track...

115

The design of a control architecture for a heavy-lift precision manipulator for use in contact with the environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Robotic manipulators can be used to enhance the strength and dexterity of a human user. This thesis considers the design of a controller for a heavy-lift manipulator for lifting and inserting payloads onto aircraft on the ...

Becker, William T. (William Theodore Leroy)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

A sensor-based automation system for handling nuclear materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automated system is being developed for handling large payloads of radioactive nuclear materials in an analytical laboratory. The automation system performs unpacking and repacking of payloads from shipping and storage containers, and delivery of the payloads to the stations in the laboratory. The system uses machine vision and force/torque sensing to provide sensor-based control of the automation system in order to enhance system safety, flexibility, and robustness, and achieve easy remote operation. The automation system also controls the operation of the laboratory measurement systems and the coordination of them with the robotic system. Particular attention has been given to system design features and analytical methods that provide an enhanced level of operational safety. Independent mechanical gripper interlock and tool release mechanisms were designed to prevent payload mishandling. An extensive Failure Modes and Effects Analysis of the automation system was developed as a safety design analysis tool.

Drotning, W.; Kimberly, H.; Wapman, W.; Darras, D. [and others

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Container for radioactive materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A container for housing a plurality of canister assemblies containing radioactive material and disposed in a longitudinally spaced relation within a carrier to form a payload package concentrically mounted within the container. The payload package includes a spacer for each canister assembly, said spacer comprising a base member longitudinally spacing adjacent canister assemblies from each other and a sleeve surrounding the associated canister assembly for centering the same and conducting heat from the radioactive material in a desired flow path.

Fields, Stanley R. (Richland, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

WIPP Celebrates 14th Anniversary | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Celebrates 14th Anniversary Celebrates 14th Anniversary WIPP Celebrates 14th Anniversary April 29, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis WIPP employees guide a TRU waste payload as it is lifted from a shipping container by an overhead crane. The TRU dock platform allows workers to access the 10-foot-high TRUPACT-II shipping container. WIPP employees guide a TRU waste payload as it is lifted from a shipping container by an overhead crane. The TRU dock platform allows workers to access the 10-foot-high TRUPACT-II shipping container. WIPP Success by the Numbers (as of April 19, 2013) WIPP Success by the Numbers (as of April 19, 2013) WIPP employees guide a TRU waste payload as it is lifted from a shipping container by an overhead crane. The TRU dock platform allows workers to access the 10-foot-high TRUPACT-II shipping container.

119

ARM-UAV Mission Gateway System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM-UAV Mission Gateway System ARM-UAV Mission Gateway System S. T. Moore and S. Bottone Mission Research Corporation Santa Barbara, California Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement-unmanned aerospace vehicle (ARM-UAV) Mission Gateway System (MGS) is a new field support system for the recently reconfigured ARM-UAV payload. The MGS is responsible for the following critical tasks: * Provides an interface for command and control of the ARM-UAV payload during a flight. * Receives and displays mid-flight state of health information, to help ensure the integrity and safety of the payload. * Receives and displays data snapshots, averaged data, or sub-sampled data. * Provides a user configurable, moving map display to enable the Mission Controller and the science

120

A bimodal power and propulsion system based on cermet fuel and heat pipe energy transport  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bimodal space reactor systems provide both thermal propulsion for the spacecraft orbital transfer and electrical power to the spacecraft bus once it is on station. These systems have the potential to increase both the available payload in high energy orbits and the available power to that payload. These increased mass and power capabilities can be used to either reduce mission cost by permitting the use of smaller launch vehicles or to provide increased mission performance from the current launch vehicle. A major barrier to the deployment of these bimodal systems has been the cost associated with their development. This paper describes a bimodal reactor system with performance potential to permit more than 70% of the instrumented payload of the Titan IV/Centaur to be launched from the Atlas IIAS. The development cost is minimized by basing the design on existing component technologies.

Polansky, G.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gunther, N.A. [Gunther (Norman A.), San Jose, CA (United States); Rochow, R.F. [Novatech, Lynchburg, VA (United States); Bixler, C.H. [Bixler (Charles H.), Mannford, OK (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ur3 ur4 payload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

IMPROVEMENTS IN HANFORD TRANSURANIC (TRU) PROGRAM UTILIZING SYSTEMS MODELING AND ANALYSES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hanford's Transuranic (TRU) Program is responsible for certifying contact-handled (CH) TRU waste and shipping the certified waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Hanford's CH TRU waste includes material that is in retrievable storage as well as above ground storage, and newly generated waste. Certifying a typical container entails retrieving and then characterizing it (Real-Time Radiography, Non-Destructive Assay, and Head Space Gas Sampling), validating records (data review and reconciliation), and designating the container for a payload. The certified payload is then shipped to WIPP. Systems modeling and analysis techniques were applied to Hanford's TRU Program to help streamline the certification process and increase shipping rates.

UYTIOCO EM

2007-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

122

CH Packaging Operations for High Wattage Waste at LANL  

SciTech Connect

This procedure provides instructions for assembling the following contact-handled (CH) packaging payloads: - Drum payload assembly - Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly - Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP) In addition, this procedure also provides operating instructions for the TRUPACT-II CH waste packaging. This document also provides instructions for performing ICV and OCV preshipment leakage rate tests on the following packaging seals, using a nondestructive helium (He) leak test: - ICV upper main O-ring seal - ICV outer vent port plug O-ring seal - OCV upper main O-ring seal - OCV vent port plug O-ring seal.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2003-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

123

A Study of Cooling Time Reduction of Interferometric Cryogenic Gravitational Wave Detectors Using a High-Emissivity Coating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In interferometric cryogenic gravitational wave detectors, there are plans to cool mirrors and their suspension systems (payloads) in order to reduce thermal noise, that is, one of the fundamental noise sources. Because of the large payload masses (several hundred kg in total) and their thermal isolation, a cooling time of several months is required. Our calculation shows that a high-emissivity coating (e.g. a diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating) can reduce the cooling time effectively by enhancing radiation heat transfer. Here, we have experimentally verified the effect of the DLC coating on the reduction of the cooling time.

Sakakibara, Y; Suzuki, T; Yamamoto, K; Chen, D; Koike, S; Tokoku, C; Uchiyama, T; Ohashi, M; Kuroda, K

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

A Study of Cooling Time Reduction of Interferometric Cryogenic Gravitational Wave Detectors Using a High-Emissivity Coating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In interferometric cryogenic gravitational wave detectors, there are plans to cool mirrors and their suspension systems (payloads) in order to reduce thermal noise, that is, one of the fundamental noise sources. Because of the large payload masses (several hundred kg in total) and their thermal isolation, a cooling time of several months is required. Our calculation shows that a high-emissivity coating (e.g. a diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating) can reduce the cooling time effectively by enhancing radiation heat transfer. Here, we have experimentally verified the effect of the DLC coating on the reduction of the cooling time.

Y. Sakakibara; N. Kimura; T. Suzuki; K. Yamamoto; D. Chen; S. Koike; C. Tokoku; T. Uchiyama; M. Ohashi; K. Kuroda

2013-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

125

CH Packaging Operations for High Wattage Waste at LANL  

SciTech Connect

This procedure provides instructions for assembling the following contact-handled (CH) packaging payloads: - Drum payload assembly - Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly - Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP) In addition, this procedure also provides operating instructions for the TRUPACT-II CH waste packaging. This document also provides instructions for performing ICV and OCV preshipment leakage rate tests on the following packaging seals, using a nondestructive helium (He) leak test: - ICV upper main O-ring seal - ICV outer vent port plug O-ring seal - OCV upper main O-ring seal - OCV vent port plug O-ring seal.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2003-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

126

CH Packaging Operations for High Wattage Waste at LANL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This procedure provides instructions for assembling the following contact-handled (CH) packaging payloads: - Drum payload assembly - Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly - Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP) In addition, this procedure also provides operating instructions for the TRUPACT-II CH waste packaging. This document also provides instructions for performing ICV and OCV preshipment leakage rate tests on the following packaging seals, using a nondestructive helium (He) leak test: - ICV upper main O-ring seal - ICV outer vent port plug O-ring seal - OCV upper main O-ring seal - OCV vent port plug O-ring seal.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2002-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

127

CH Packaging Operations for High Wattage Waste at LANL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This procedure provides instructions for assembling the following contact-handled (CH) packaging payloads: - Drum payload assembly - Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly - Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP) In addition, this procedure also provides operating instructions for the TRUPACT-II CH waste packaging. This document also provides instructions for performing ICV and OCV preshipment leakage rate tests on the following packaging seals, using a nondestructive helium (He) leak test: - ICV upper main O-ring seal - ICV outer vent port plug O-ring seal - OCV upper main O-ring seal - OCV vent port plug O-ring seal.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2003-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

128

Container for radioactive materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A container is claimed for housing a plurality of canister assemblies containing radioactive material. The several canister assemblies are stacked in a longitudinally spaced relation within a carrier to form a payload concentrically mounted within the container. The payload package includes a spacer for each canister assembly, said spacer comprising a base member longitudinally spacing adjacent canister assemblies from each other and sleeve surrounding the associated canister assembly for centering the same and conducting heat from the radioactive material in a desired flow path. 7 figures.

Fields, S.R.

1984-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

129

Center for the Advancement of Science in Space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organization Elementsg · Research Pathways · Membership Model · Marketplace · Development (Marketing competing organizations. U S OGAs U.S. National Lab Research CASIS SAAs OPFs NPIs ISS Ops NASA Research NASA HQ ISS Payloads Office IMMT SOMD ESMD SMD OCT International Partner OCT CSA ESA USOS O&M RSOS O

130

P2JW340011-0-A01800-1--------XA AZ,EE,MW,SC,SW,WE P2JW340011-0-A01800-1--------XA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. With or without the NIE's opinion of Iran's nuclear program, that world is still a dangerous place. Let's assume's a remarkably big one. North Korea in July 2006 tested the long- range Taepodong-2, a nuclear payload-capable ballistic missile. North Korea has exported its missile technology to Iran and Pakistan. And of course

Rhoads, James

131

System and method to improve the power output and longetivity of a radioisotope thermoelectric generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

By using the helium generated by the alpha emissions of a thermoelectric generator during space travel for cooling the thermal degradation of the thermoelectric generator can be slowed. Slowing degradation allows missions to be longer with little additional expense or payload.

Mowery, A.L. Jr.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

132

30 CHAPTER 2. ABSTRACTS by tracking individual magnetic elements. The analysis reveals a strong spin down near the pole, which  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-resolution, in 4 channels that have been chosen for their relevance to solar physics, space weather and aeronomy all major events in the solar corona with space weather impact (coronal holes, flares, eruptions PROBA2 is an ESA microsatellite scheduled for launch in May 2008. Its scientific payload includes solar

Ng, Chung-Sang

133

System and method to improve the power output and longetivity of a radioisotope thermoelectric generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

By using the helium generated by the alpha emissions of a thermoelectric generator during space travel for cooling, the thermal degradation of the thermoelectric generator can be slowed. Slowing degradation allows missions to be longer with little additional expense or payload.

Mowery, Jr., Alfred L. (Potomac, MD)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Hybrid wet paper coding mechanism for steganography employing n-indicator and fuzzy edge detector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data hiding technique can facilitate security and the safe transmission of important information in the digital domain, which generally requires a high embedding payload and good stego image quality. Recently, a steganographic framework known as wet ... Keywords: Fuzzy edge detector, Indicator, Security, Steganography, Wet paper coding

Chin-Chen Chang; Jung-San Lee; T. Hoang Ngan Le

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Overview: Physical & DataLink LayersOverview: Physical & DataLink Layers How are frames assembled and transmitted ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is SONET?What is SONET? q Synchronous optical network q Standard for digital optical transmission (bit pipe Section Overhead 3 Rows Path Overhead 90 Columns Synchronous Payload Envelope 9 Rows Line Overhead 6 Rows Line Overhead 6 Rows #12;Raj JainThe Ohio State University 13 Location of SPE in STS-1Location of SPE

Murphy, John

136

Satellite Radio: Its Global Impact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geo-Stationary High-powered Satellites · Processed and Transparent Payloads · Solar-Powered Provides A is the satellite transmit characteristics, determined by state-of art satellite power, coverage area; B is Receive WorldSpace XM Sirius MBSAT #12;8 Satellite Radio: A Confluence of Technologies Radio Radio Internet

Udgaonkar, Jayant B.

137

Multiple Instrument Distributed Aperture Sensor (MIDAS) For Remote Sensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multiple Instrument Distributed Aperture Sensor (MIDAS) For Remote Sensing Joe Pitman,a , Alan that enables greatly increased return from earth and planetary science remote sensing missions is described are integrated into MIDAS as the primary remote sensing science payload, thereby reducing the cost, resources

Fienup, James R.

138

N d'ordre 174-2005 THESE prsente devant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and terrestrial atmosphere, and are accelerated in the earth's magnetic field. Often, they #12;9 precipitate to measure x-rays, electric fields, and magnetic fields in the atmosphere below the electron pre- cipitation the circuit boards for processing electric and magnetic fields, as well as a motor for rotating the payload

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

139

A High-Speed FPGA-Based Lossless Data Compression Design for the X-ray Spectrometer Solar Energy Spectra  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to meet the real-time compression requirements effectively for the solar energy spectrum data of the X-ray spectrometer used as a key payload of Chang'E Mission, the design and implementation of the bit wise OR algorithm based on FPGA is presented ... Keywords: data compression, X-ray spectrometer, bitwise OR algorithm, FPGA

RuiMin Ma; HuanYu Wang

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Low-cost propellant launch to LEO from a tethered balloon -- 'Propulsion depots' not 'propellant depots'  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As we have previously reported [1 -- 4], it may be possible to launch payloads into low-Earth orbit (LEO) at a per-kilogram cost that is one to two orders of magnitude lower than current launch systems. The capital investment required would be relatively ...

Brian H. Wilcox; Evan G. Schneider; David A. Vaughan; Jeffrey L. Hall; Chi Yau Yu

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ur3 ur4 payload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

An Overview of a New Chinese Weather Satellite FY-3A  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FengYun-3A (FY-3A), the first satellite in the second generation of the Chinese polar-orbiting meteorological satellites, was launched at Taiyuan, China, launching center on 27 May 2008. Equipped with both sounding and imaging pay-loads, enabling ...

Chaohua Dong; Jun Yang; Zhongdong Yang; Naimeng Lu; Jinming Shi; Peng Zhang; Yujie Liu; Bin Cai; Wenjian Zhang

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

WIPP-016, Rev. 0 Nuclear Criticality Safety Evaluation for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Energy generator sites in the Transuranic Package Transporter Model II (TRUPACT-II) or Half of providing scoping calculations. The standard large box 2 will be shipped in a TRUPACT-III pending U PLANT WIPP-016, REV. 0 MAY 2008 viii OFFICIAL USE ONLY TRAMPAC TRUPACT-II Authorized Methods for Payload

143

Hierarchical multi-pattern matching algorithm for network content inspection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inspection engines that can inspect network content for application-layer information are urgently required. In-depth packet inspection engines, which search the whole packet payload, can identify the interested packets that contain certain patterns. ... Keywords: Content inspection, Intrusion detection, Network security, Network-level security and protection, Pattern matching, Real-time and embedded systems

Tzu-Fang Sheu; Nen-Fu Huang; Hsiao-Ping Lee

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Although shuttle astronauts made their work in space look like an everyday event, it was in fact a hazardous operation. Using robotics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

berthing camera mounted in a hatch window with its light-emitting diodes illuminated. The right pane shows ring of light-emitting diode reflections come from the window pane that the camera was mounted against is the reflection of the Centerline Berthing Camera System light-emitting diodes in the approaching payload window

145

Shippingport Spent Fuel Canister (SSFC) Design Report Project W-518  

SciTech Connect

The SSFC Design Report Describes A spent fuel canister for Shippingport Core 2 blanket fuel assemblies. The design of the SSFC is a minor modification of the MCO. The modification is limited to the Shield Plug which remains unchanged with regard to interfaces with the canister shell. The performance characteristics remain those for the MCO, which bounds the payload of the SSFC.

JOHNSON, D.M.

2000-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

146

NetHost-sensor: Monitoring a target host's application via system calls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intrusion detection has emerged as an important approach to network, host and application security. Network security includes analysing network packet payload and other inert network packet profiles for intrusive trends; whereas, host security may employ ... Keywords: Application security, Dynamic link libraries, Host, Intrusion detection, Network, System calls

A. A. Abimbola; J. M. Munoz; W. J. Buchanan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Progress 44 Manifest (Partial) USOS (U.S. On-Orbit Segment) Cargo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at High Shielding Mass (HiMassSEE) A NASA/JSC Engineering experiment designed to measure space radiation interactions with spacecraft structure and shielding using several passive track detector technologies to provide a more accurate definition of payload accommodations Human Research Program (HRP) resupply

148

Sway control method and system for rotary cranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatuses for reducing the oscillatory motion of rotary crane payloads during operator-commanded or computer-controlled maneuvers. An Input-shaping filter receives input signals from multiple operator input devices and converts them into output signals readable by the crane controller to dampen the payload tangential and radial sway associated with rotation of the jib. The input signals are characterized by a hub rotation trajectory .gamma.(t), which includes a jib angular acceleration .gamma., a trolley acceleration x, and a load-line length velocity L. The system state variables are characterized by a tangential rotation angle .theta.(t) and a radial rotation angle .phi.(t) of the load-line. The coupled equations of motion governing the filter are non-linear and configuration-dependent. In one embodiment, a filter is provided between the operator and the crane for filtering undesired frequencies from the angular .gamma. and trolley x velocities to suppress payload oscillation. In another embodiment, crane commands are computer generated and controlled to suppress vibration of the payload using a postulated asymmetrical shape for the acceleration profiles of the jib, which profiles are uniquely determined by a set of parameters (including the acceleration pulse amplitude and the duration and coast time between pulses), or a dynamic programming approach.

Robinett, Rush D. (Tijeras, NM); Parker, Gordon G. (Houghton, MI); Feddema, John T. (Albuquerque, NM); Dohrmann, Clark R. (Albuquerque, NM); Petterson, Ben J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Remember Me No account?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A spaceship descends with a thunderous roar and deposits a futuristic probe before taking off again, ... Pasadena (California, United States) Artificial Intelligence & Robotics, Astronomy & Space Science, Physics hours ago - AeroMorning] Entities: Payload, The Boeing Company, Means of Transport, Space Tourism First

Arizona, University of

150

AlGaN UV LED and Photodiodes Radiation Hardness and Space Qualifications and Their Applications in Space Science and High Energy Density Physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation provides an overview of robust, radiation hard AlGaN optoelectronic devices and their applications in space exploration & high energy density physics. Particularly, deep UV LED and deep UV photodiodes are discussed with regard to their applications, radiation hardness and space qualification. AC charge management of UV LED satellite payload instruments, which were to be launched in late 2012, is covered.

Sun, K. X.

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

151

Applications of Robust, Radiation Hard AlGaN Optoelectronic Devices in Space Exploration and High Energy Density Physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This slide show presents: space exploration applications; high energy density physics applications; UV LED and photodiode radiation hardness; UV LED and photodiode space qualification; UV LED AC charge management; and UV LED satellite payload instruments. A UV LED satellite will be launched 2nd half 2012.

Sun, K.

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

152

Flexible, extensible, open-source and affordable FPGA-based traffic generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As high-speed links become ubiquitous in current networks, testing new algorithms at high speed is essential for researchers. This task often makes it necessary to generate traffic with some specified features : distribution of packet sizes, payload ... Keywords: FPGA, NetFPGA 10G, combo, flexible, open-source, traffic generator

Tristan Grolat; Matthieu Arzel; Sandrine Vaton; Alban Bourge; Yannick Le Balch; Hicham Bougdal; Manuel Aranaz Padron

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

The Solar Orbiter mission and its prospects for helioseismology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Orbiter is intended to become ESA's next solar mission in heritage of the successful SOHO project. The scientific objectives of the mission, its design, and its scientific payload are reviewed. Specific emphasis is given to the perspectives of Solar Orbiter with respect to helioseismology.

Woch, J; 10.1002/asna.200610743

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

2512 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 36, NO. 5, OCTOBER 2008 Experimental Investigation of 193-nm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Payload Weight (CO) Models Support Energy-Saving Microwave Technologies (NY) Materials Advance Chemical with Marshall Space Flight Center, PWR used its rocket engine experience to make clean energy gasification technology. Compared to standard gasification systems, the capital cost to build a commercial plant using PWR

Scharer, John E.

155

A new experimental technique for investigation of plasma generated with plasmotrons in electrophysical installations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Payload Weight (CO) Models Support Energy-Saving Microwave Technologies (NY) Materials Advance Chemical with Marshall Space Flight Center, PWR used its rocket engine experience to make clean energy gasification technology. Compared to standard gasification systems, the capital cost to build a commercial plant using PWR

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

156

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Payload Weight (CO) Models Support Energy-Saving Microwave Technologies (NY) Materials Advance Chemical with Marshall Space Flight Center, PWR used its rocket engine experience to make clean energy gasification technology. Compared to standard gasification systems, the capital cost to build a commercial plant using PWR

157

Aspiration requirements for the transportation of retrievably stored waste in the TRUPACT-2 package  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) is the shipping package to be used for the transportation of contact-handled transuranic (CH TRU) waste between the various US Department of Energy (DOE) sites, and to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) located near Carlsbad, New Mexico. Waste (payload) containers to be transported in the TRUPACT-II package are required to be vented prior to being shipped. Venting'' refers to the installation of one or more carbon composite filters in the lid of the container, and the puncturing of a rigid liner (if present). This ensures that there is no buildup of pressure or potentially flammable gas concentrations in the container prior to transport. Payload containers in retrievable storage that have been stored in an unvented condition at the DOE sites, may have generated and accumulated potentially flammable concentrations of gases (primarily due to generation of hydrogen by radiolysis) during the unvented storage period. Such payload containers need to be aspirated for a sufficient period of time until safe pre-transport conditions (acceptably low hydrogen concentrations) are achieved. The period of time for which a payload container needs to be in a vented condition before qualifying for transport in a TRUPACT-II package is defined as the aspiration time.'' This paper presents the basis for evaluating the minimum aspiration time for a payload container that has been in unvented storage. Three different options available to the DOE sites for meeting the aspiration requirements are described in this paper. 4 refs., 2 figs.

Djordjevic, S.; Drez, P.; Murthy, D. (International Technology Corp., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Temus, C. (Nuclear Packaging Corp., Federal Way, WA (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

160

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ur3 ur4 payload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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161

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2008-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

162

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2006-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

163

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

166

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

168

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

169

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

170

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

171

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

172

CH-TRU Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

173

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH TRUCON)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2007-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

175

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codesand corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

179

Microsoft PowerPoint - Pg1Draft Talon Heavy Hoist Hook.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Most Most hooks designed for heavy hoisting and lifting operations are open-ended devices. Consequently, the load being carried is only as secure as the skill of the operator performing the lift. Any sudden stops, shift or change in direction of the load during operation could result in the potential disengagement of the load from the hook resulting in damage to the cargo or potential injury to the rigging personnel. The locking mechanism of the Talon makes it virtually impossible for the load to slip or drop from the hook. Only when the cargo is safely lowered into its desired position and the locking mechanism is released can the payload be disengaged. The disengagement of the load is also possible through remote means inherent in the design of the device. Remote release of heavy payloads eliminates the need for rigging personnel to manually release the rigging wires or straps from the hoist

180

Fire in the Ice, Fall 2002  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summer Research Cruises Summer Research Cruises Reveal Secrets of Marine Hydrates * R/V JOIDES Resolution Docks With a Payload of Hydrate Samples * Multinational Team Recovers Sub-Bottom Gulf- of-Mexico Hydrate Cores * Gulf-of-Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium Cruise Locates New Hydrate Site, Tests Pore- Water Sampler and Recovers Sea-Floor Probe * Twenty Days Studying Life in Extreme Environments * Alvin Explores the Juan de Fuca Seafloor * German Researchers Study Hydrate Ridge Aboard the R/V Sonne Alaska Becomes a Huge Hydrates Laboratory * First Dedicated Hydrate Well in Alaska Scheduled for Early 2003 Spotlight on Research * Ian R. McDonald R/V JOIDES RESOLUTION DOCKS WITH A PAYLOAD OF HYDRATE SAMPLES After two months in the Pacific Ocean off the Oregon coast, the research vessel (R/V) JOIDES Resolution docked in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ur3 ur4 payload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Vehicle Specifications Battery Type: Li-Ion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Under hood above powertrain Under hood above powertrain Nominal System Voltage: 333 V Rated Capacity (C/3): 40 Ah Cooling Method: Glycol / Water mix Powertrain Motor Type: DC Brushless Number of Motors: One Motor Cooling Type: Glycol / Water mix Drive Wheels: Rear Wheel Drive Transmission: None (gear ratio only in rear axle) Charger Location: Underhood Charger Port: Driver's side, front quarter panel Type: Conductive (J1772 connector) Input Voltage(s): 120 or 240 VAC Chassis Aluminum Body on Steel Frame Rear Suspension: Solid Axle with Leaf Springs Front Suspension: Dual A-arm with Coil Springs Weights Design Curb Weight: 3250 lbs Delivered Curb Weight: 3310 lbs 7 Distribution F/R: 55.2/44.8% GVWR: 4450 lbs Max Payload: 940 lbs + 200 lbs driver 1 Performance Goal Payload: 1000 lbs + 200 lbs driver

182

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May 15, 2004 [Facility News] May 15, 2004 [Facility News] Mid-latitude Cirrus Cloud Experiment Underway Bookmark and Share NASA's WB-57F research aircraft can carry an instrument payload up to 6,000 lbs. NASA's WB-57F research aircraft can carry an instrument payload up to 6,000 lbs. In late April, scientific collaborators at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) carried out two high-altitude flights over the ARM Climate Research Facility Southern Great Plains (SGP) central facility. The purpose of these flights was to use a new suite of cloud property probes on the WB-57F aircraft to more accurately characterize the properties of mid-latitude cirrus clouds-which are composed solely of ice crystals-than has previously been possible. Eight flights over the SGP central facility were originally planned, but the expected cirrus clouds

183

ARM - Site Instruments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FacilityInstruments FacilityInstruments AAF Information Proposal Process Science (PDF) Baseline Instruments Campaign Instruments Instrumentation Workshop 2008 AAF Fact Sheet G-1 Fact Sheet Images Field Campaigns AAF Campaigns 2007 - UAV Campaigns 1993 - 2006, 2015 Other Aircraft Campaigns 1993 - 2010 AAF Contacts Rickey Petty DOE AAF Program Director Beat Schmid Technical Director AAF Baseline Instruments The following instruments represent available capabilities. The needs of each field campaign will be assessed and additional instruments may be added upon request. For a list of past campaign instruments and their data, see the Airborne Observations instruments. Examples of cabin configurations for the G-1 from past and upcoming campaigns are also available. Payload Example from 2010 Payload Example from 2010

184

Fuel Cells for Robots  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For Robots For Robots Fuel Cells For Robots Pavlo Rudakevych iRobot Pavlo Rudakevych iRobot Product Needs Product Needs * Military/Police/Search and Rescue - PackBot - Gladiator - ThrowBot/UGCV * Industrial and Oil - CoWorker - MicroRig * Military/Police/Search and Rescue - PackBot - Gladiator - ThrowBot/UGCV * Industrial and Oil - CoWorker - MicroRig PackBot PackBot * Mission capable robots * Rugged, portable tools for minimal casualty engagements * Assisting behaviors * Small size and weight * Mission capable robots * Rugged, portable tools for minimal casualty engagements * Assisting behaviors * Small size and weight System Concept System Concept System Concept System Concept System Concept Continued System Concept Continued * Modular payload bays - 3 primary - 1 head - 4 side pods * Each payload socket supports - Ethernet

185

Deuterium microbomb rocket propulsion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large scale manned space flight within the solar system is still confronted with the solution of two problems: 1. A propulsion system to transport large payloads with short transit times between different planetary orbits. 2. A cost effective lifting of large payloads into earth orbit. For the solution of the first problem a deuterium fusion bomb propulsion system is proposed where a thermonuclear detonation wave is ignited in a small cylindrical assembly of deuterium with a gigavolt-multimegampere proton beam, drawn from the magnetically insulated spacecraft acting in the ultrahigh vacuum of space as a gigavolt capacitor. For the solution of the second problem, the ignition is done by argon ion lasers driven by high explosives, with the lasers destroyed in the fusion explosion and becoming part of the exhaust.

Friedwardt Winterberg

2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

186

Magnetic Space Launcher  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A method and facilities for delivering payload and people into outer space are presented. This method uses, in general, engines located on a planetary surface. The installation consists of a space apparatus, power drive stations, which include a flywheel accumulator (for storage) of energy, a variable reducer, a powerful homopolar electric generator and electric rails. The drive stations accelerate the apparatus up to hypersonic speed. The estimations and computations show the possibility of making this project a reality in a short period of time (for payloads which can tolerate high g-forces). The launch will be very cheap at a projected cost of 3 - 5 dollars per pound. The authors developed a theory of this type of the launcher.

Alexander Bolonkin; Mark Krinker

2009-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

187

Network topology analysis.  

SciTech Connect

Emerging high-bandwidth, low-latency network technology has made network-based architectures both feasible and potentially desirable for use in satellite payload architectures. The selection of network topology is a critical component when developing these multi-node or multi-point architectures. This study examines network topologies and their effect on overall network performance. Numerous topologies were reviewed against a number of performance, reliability, and cost metrics. This document identifies a handful of good network topologies for satellite applications and the metrics used to justify them as such. Since often multiple topologies will meet the requirements of the satellite payload architecture under development, the choice of network topology is not easy, and in the end the choice of topology is influenced by both the design characteristics and requirements of the overall system and the experience of the developer.

Kalb, Jeffrey L.; Lee, David S.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Development of the Standard CubeSat Deployer and a CubeSat Class PicoSatellite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cal Poly students are participating in the development of a new class of picosatellite, the CubeSat. CubeSats are ideal as space development projects for universities around the world. In addition to their significant role in educating space scientists and engineers, CubeSats provide a low-cost platform for testing and space qualification of the next generation of small payloads in space. A key component of the project is the development of a standard CubeSat deployer. This deployer is capable of releasing a number of CubeSats as secondary payloads on a wide range of launchers. The standard deployer requires all CubeSats to conform to common physical requirements, and share a standard deployer interface. CubeSat development time and cost can be significantly reduced by the development of standards that are shared by a large number of spacecraft.

Jordi Puig-suari; Clark Turner; W. Ahlgren

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Nuclear rockets  

SciTech Connect

A systems analysis is made of a class of nuclear-propelled rockets in combination with chemical boosters. Various missions are considered including the delivery of 5000-lb payload 5500 nautical miles, the placement of a satellite in an orbit about the earth and the delivery of a payload to escape velocity. The reactors considered are of the heterogeneous type utilizing graphite fuel elements in a matrix of Be or hydrogenous moderator. Liquid hydrogen and ammonia are considered as propellants. Graphical results are presented which show the characteristics and performance of the nuclear rockets as the design parameters are varied. It should be emphasized that this report is not in any sense intended as a handbook of rocket parameters; it is intended only as a guide for determining areas of interest.

York, H.F.; Biehl, A.T.

1955-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

190

The ARM Aerial Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM Aerial Facility ARM Aerial Facility in the Biomass Burn Observation Project (BBOP) 1 Beat Schmid, Technical Director Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, WA Aircraft Technical Information Length: 19.4 m Wingspan: 23.9 m Height: 7.1 m Cabin space: 15.3 m 2 External probes (PMS cans): 8 Maximum gross weight: 16,330 kg Maximum Endurance: 9.5 hours Maximum Range: 4000 km Endurance with full payload: 4-5 hours Crew capacity: 7 max, 2 pilots + 3-5 scientists Cabin payload: 1,900 kg Research Power: 700A @ 28 VDC (incl. 85A @ 115 VAC, 60 Hz) Ceiling: 7.6 km G-1 (BMI owned, ARM base funded, PNNL based and managed, for the science community) AAF G-1 Plan 2013-17 Intensive Airborne Research in Amazonia (IARA) Manaus, Brazil PI: Scot Martin (Harvard)

191

Precision flyer initiator  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A propulsion point design is presented for lifting geological samples from Mars. Vehicle complexity is kept low by choosing a monopropellant single stage. Little new development is needed, as miniature pump fed hydrazine has been demonstrated. Loading the propellant just prior to operation avoids structural, thermal, and safety constraints otherwise imposed by earlier mission phases. hardware mass and engineering effort are thereby diminished. The Mars liftoff mass is 7/8 hydrazine, <5% propulsion hardware, and >3% each for the payload and guidance.

Frank, A

1999-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

192

Vertical sampling flights in support of the 1981 ASCOT cooling tower experiments: field effort and data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the month of August 1981, three nights of experimental sampling of tracers released into the cooling tower plume of a geothermal power plant were conducted. In these experiments a tethered balloon was used to lift a payload so as to obtain vertical profiles of the cooling tower plume and the entrained tracers. A description of the equipment used, the field effort and the data acquired are presented here.

Gay, G.T.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Optical packet marking for fast discarding in an OLS scheme  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose and validate experimentally a Time-to-Live signaling system for an Optical Label Swapping scheme based on 10 Gbit/s DPSK packets and with 100 Mbit/s SCM label. The proposed scheme allows fast packet discarding by using a 3.5 GHz sub-carrier tone. DPSK payload has only a 2 dB power penalty at 10 --9 bit error-rate after superimposing the SCM and TTL labeling signal.

Vegas Olmos Tafur

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Enterprise Service Bus Implementation Profile  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to define an implementation profile for International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 61968 using technologies commonly found on an Enterprise Service Bus (ESB). More specifically, this document describes how message payloads defined by parts 3 through 9 of IEC 61968 are conveyed using Web Services and the Java Message Service (JMS). The goal is to provide details that are sufficient to enable implementations of IEC 61968 to be interoperable.

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

195

Solid Rocket Motor Acoustic Testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Acoustic data are often required for the determination of launch and powered flight loads for rocket systems and payloads. Such data are usually acquired during test firings of the solid rocket motors. In the current work, these data were obtained for two tests at a remote test facility where we were visitors. This paper describes the data acquisition and the requirements for working at a remote site, interfacing with the test hosts.

Rogers, J.D.

1999-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

196

A Cheap Levitating Gas/Load Pipeline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design of new cheap aerial pipelines, a large flexible tube deployed at high altitude, for delivery of natural (fuel) gas, water and other payload over a long distance is delineated. The main component of the natural gas is methane which has a specific weight less than air. A lift force of one cubic meter of methane equals approximately 0.5 kg (1 pound). The lightweight film flexible pipeline can be located in air at high altitude and, as such, does not damage the environment. Using the lift force of this pipeline and wing devices payloads of oil, water, or other fluids, or even solids such as coal, cargo, passengers can be delivered cheaply at long distance. This aerial pipeline dramatically decreases the cost and the time of construction relative to conventional pipelines of steel which saves energy and greatly lowers the capital cost of construction. The article contains a computed project for delivery 24 billion cubic meters of gas and tens of million tons of oil, water or other payload per year.

Alexander Bolonkin

2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

197

A Cheap Levitating Gas/Load Pipeline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design of new cheap aerial pipelines, a large flexible tube deployed at high altitude, for delivery of natural (fuel) gas, water and other payload over a long distance is delineated. The main component of the natural gas is methane which has a specific weight less than air. A lift force of one cubic meter of methane equals approximately 0.5 kg (1 pound). The lightweight film flexible pipeline can be located in air at high altitude and, as such, does not damage the environment. Using the lift force of this pipeline and wing devices payloads of oil, water, or other fluids, or even solids such as coal, cargo, passengers can be delivered cheaply at long distance. This aerial pipeline dramatically decreases the cost and the time of construction relative to conventional pipelines of steel which saves energy and greatly lowers the capital cost of construction. The article contains a computed project for delivery 24 billion cubic meters of gas and tens of million tons of oil, water or other payload per year.

Bolonkin, Alexander

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Science Yield of an Improved Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey's highest recommended space mission was a Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) to efficiently conduct three kinds of studies: dark energy surveys, exoplanet surveys, and guest surveys. In this paper we illustrate four potential WFIRST payloads that accomplish these objectives and that fully utilize optical and technical advances made since the community input to the Decadal Survey. These improvements, developed by our group, are: unobscured 1.3 or 1.5 m apertures; simultaneous dual focal lengths delivering pixel scales of 0.18" for imaging and 0.38" or 0.45" for slitless spectroscopy; the use of a prism in converging light for slitless spectroscopy; and payload features that allow up to 270 days/year observing the Galactic Bulge. These factors combine to allow WFIRST payloads that provide improved survey rates compared to previous mission concepts. In this report we perform direct comparisons of survey speeds for constant survey depth using our optical an...

Levi, Michael E; Lampton, Michael L; Sholl, Michael J

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Near-Earth Object Interception Using Nuclear Thermal Rock Propulsion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Planetary defense has drawn wide study: despite the low probability of a large-scale impact, its consequences would be disastrous. The study presented here evaluates available protection strategies to identify bottlenecks limiting the scale of near-Earth object that could be deflected, using cutting-edge and near-future technologies. It discusses the use of a nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) as a propulsion device for delivery of thermonuclear payloads to deflect or destroy a long-period comet on a collision course with Earth. A worst plausible scenario for the available warning time (10 months) and comet approach trajectory are determined, and empirical data are used to make an estimate of the payload necessary to deflect such a comet. Optimizing the tradeoff between early interception and large deflection payload establishes the ideal trajectory for an interception mission to follow. The study also examines the potential for multiple rocket launch dates. Comparison of propulsion technologies for this mission shows that NTR outperforms other options substantially. The discussion concludes with an estimate of the comet size (5 km) that could be deflected usingNTRpropulsion, given current launch capabilities.

X-L. Zhang; E. Ball; L. Kochmanski; S. D. Howe

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Integration of Radioisotope Heat Source with Stirling Engine and Cooler for Venus Internal-Structure Mission  

SciTech Connect

The primary mission goal is to perform long-term seismic measurements on Venus, to study its largely unknown internal structure. The principal problem is that most payload components cannot long survive Venus's harsh environment, 90 bars at 500 degrees C. To meet the mission life goal, such components must be protected by a refrigerated payload bay. JPL Investigators have proposed a mission concept employing a lander with a spherical payload bay cooled to 25 degrees C by a Stirling cooler powered by a radioisotope-heated Sitrling engine. To support JPL's mission study, NASA/Lewis and MTI have proposed a conceptual design for a hydraulically coupled Stirling engine and cooler, and Fairchild Space - with support of the Department of Energy - has proposed a design and integration scheme for a suitable radioisotope heat source. The key integration problem is to devise a simple, light-weight, and reliable scheme for forcing the radioisotope decay heat to flow through the Stirling engine during operation on Venus, but to reject that heat to the external environment when the Stirling engine and cooler are not operating (e.g., during the cruise phase, when the landers are surrounded by heat shields needed for protection during subsequent entry into the Venusian atmosphere.) A design and integration scheme for achieving these goals, together with results of detailed thermal analyses, are described in this paper. There are 7 copies in the file.

Schock, Alfred

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ur3 ur4 payload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Interim readiness plan  

SciTech Connect

This report provides rough designs and costs for 3 payloads which can be built on a relatively fast time scale. With these, Lawrence Radiation Laboratory (LRL) could measure neutrons and X-rays from high altitude shots. No measurements of soft X-rays (less than or approximately equal to 5 kev), hard X- rays (greater than or approximately equal to 60 kev), or gamma rays would be made. Plans could be made to fly the Simplex payload as part of the spring Lapwing exercise. Some interim capability exists from other sources which might compliment the above measurements. Sandia has developed a mylar sail sampler which could be used for debris experiments. There is a LASL/Sandia scan converter which could be fielded to make fast time-history measurements of the X-ray or gamma ray pulse. Interval time could be measured with a ground based EMP detector. The LRL cost of this interim rocket program is approximately 5 man years of effort and about $140,000 of major procurement. Sandia would need approximately $450,000 to stockpile payloads. I believe the necessary rockets are already stockpiled but some work on the ranges might be required. For example, more launchers are needed on Johnston Atoll. All this money and effort would be expended in FY- 1970 and these rocket experiments would be ready (`on the shelf` or close) by June 1970.

Seward, F. D.

1969-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Hydraulic manipulator research at ORNL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, task requirements have dictated that manipulator payload capacity increase to accommodate greater payloads, greater manipulator length, and larger environmental interaction forces. General tasks such as waste storage tank cleanup and facility dismantlement and decommissioning require manipulator life capacities in the range of hundreds of pounds rather than tens of pounds. To meet the increased payload capacities demanded by present-day tasks, manipulator designers have turned once again to hydraulics as a means of actuation. In order to successfully design, build, and deploy a new hydraulic manipulator (or subsystem), sophisticated modeling, analysis, and control experiments are usually needed. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a history of projects that incorporate hydraulics technology, including mobile robots, teleoperated manipulators, and full-scale construction equipment. In addition, to support the development and deployment of new hydraulic manipulators, ORNL has outfitted a significant experimental laboratory and has developed the software capability for research into hydraulic manipulators, hydraulic actuators, hydraulic systems, modeling of hydraulic systems, and hydraulic controls. The purpose of this article is to describe the past hydraulic manipulator developments and current hydraulic manipulator research capabilities at ORNL. Included are example experimental results from ORNL`s flexible/prismatic test stand.

Kress, R.L.; Jansen, J.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Love, L.J. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Coilgun Launcher for Nanosatellites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nanosatellite space launches could significantly benefit from an electrically powered launch complex, based on an electromagnetic coil launcher. This paper presents results of studies to estimate the required launcher parameters and some fixed facility issues. This study is based on electromagnetic launch, or electromagnetic gun technology, which is constrained to a coaxial geometry to take advantage of the efficiency of closely-coupled coils. A baseline configuration for analysis considers a payload mass of 10 kg, launch velocity of 6 km/s, a second stage solid booster for orbital insertion, and a payload fraction of about 0.1. The launch facility is envisioned as an inclined track, 1-2 km in length, mounted on a hillside at 25 degrees aimed in the orbital inclination of interest. The launcher energy and power requirements fall in the range of 2000 MJ and 2 MW electric. This energy would be supplied by 400 modules of energy storage and magnetic coils. With a prime power generator of 2 MW, a launch rate of some 200 satellites per day is possible. The launch requires high acceleration, so the satellite package must be hardened to launch acceleration on the order of 1000 gee. Parametric evaluations compare performance parameters for a launcher length of 1-2 km, exit velocity of 4-8 km/s, and payloads of 1-100 kg. The EM launch complex could greatly reduce the amount of fuels handling, reduce the turn-around time between launches, allow more concurrence in launch preparation, reduce the manpower requirements for launch vehicle preparation and increase the reliability of launch by using more standardized vehicle preparations. Most importantly, such a facility could reduce the cost per launch and could give true launch-on-demand capability for nanosatellites.

Turman, B.N.

1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

204

Environmental interactions and the SP-100 power system  

SciTech Connect

The Civil Space Technology Initiative High-Capacity-Power Environmental Interactions Program has made great progress in defining and evaluating the interactions of the SP-100 power system with its expected ambient environments. The NASCAP/LEO and POLAR computer codes demonstrated that local electric fields at the user interface module are high. Therefore, particular attention must be paid to geometries and materials in this region to prevent arcing at conductor-insulator junctions in low Earth orbit. NASCAP/LEO and EPSAT computer models revealed that SP-100 payloads float about 100 V negative of the LEO plasma. In addition, ground tests and modeling done for the Space Station Freedom Electrical Grounding Tiger Team found that dielectric coatings often break down at such voltages in a plasma. Thus, surface coatings for SP-100 payloads should be carefully selected. Sputtering may also be a concern for long-duration missions in LEO at these voltages. Much work has been done on a sputtering model to evaluate surface material loss rates on SP-100 payloads. In ground plasma chamber tests of cables and cable insulators at SP-100 voltages, parasitic power losses due to the plasma current collected from possible pinholes or coating defects were quantified and shown to be small. Modeling revealed that the power loss from currents to other surfaces is also small. The atomic oxygen durability of SP-100 materials and coatings continues to be investigated in ground tests. In the upcoming Evaluation of Oxygen Interaction with Materials (EOIM-3) Shuttle flight experiment, a host of SP-100 materials will be evaluated for atomic oxygen durability in LEO. Finally, an evaluation of the interactions of the SP-100 power system with lunar and planetary environments has started. At a workshop on chemical and electrical interactions on Mars recently held at the NASA Lewis Research Center, many of primary interactions were identified.

Ferguson, D.C.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Command shaping for residual vibration free crane maneuvers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cranes used in the construction and transportation industries are generally devices with multiple degrees of freedom including variable load-line length, variable jib length (usually via a trolley), and variable boom angles. Point-to-point payload maneuvers using cranes are performed so as not to excite the spherical pendulum modes of their cable and payload assemblies. Typically, these pendulum modes, although time-varying, exhibit low frequencies. Current crane maneuvers are therefore performed slowly contributing to high construction and transportation costs. This investigation details a general method for applying command shaping to various multiple degree of freedom cranes such that the payload moves to a specified point without residual oscillation. A dynamic programming method is used for general command shaping for optimal maneuvers. Computationally, the dynamic programming approach requires order M calculations to arrive at a solution, where M is the number of discretizations of the input commands. This feature is exploited for the crane command shaping problem allowing for rapid calculation of command histories. Fast generation of commands is a necessity for practical use of command shaping for the applications described in this work. These results are compared to near-optimal solutions where the commands are linear combinations of acceleration pulse basis functions. The pulse shape is required due to hardware requirements. The weights on the basis functions are chosen as the solution to a parameter optimization problem solved using a Recursive Quadratic Programming technique. Simulation results and experimental verification for a variable load-line length rotary crane are presented using both design procedures.

Parker, G.G.; Petterson, B.; Dohrmann, C.; Robinett, R.D.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

PERFORMANCE STATISTICS WEIGHTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

90 lbs 90 lbs Delivered Curb Weight: 2936 lbs Distribution F/R: 59/41 % GVWR: 3795 lbs GAWR F/R: 2335/2250 lbs Payload: 905 lbs Performance Goal: 400 lbs DIMENSIONS Wheelbase: 106 inches Track F/R: 59/58 inches Length: 175 inches Width: 67 inches Height: 57.8 inches Ground Clearance: 4.3 inches Performance Goal: 5.0 inches TIRES Tire Mfg: Goodyear Tire Model: Integrity Tire Size: P185/65R15 Tire Pressure F/R: 35/33 psi

207

PERFORMANCE STATISTICS WEIGHTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

27 lbs 27 lbs Delivered Curb Weight: 3618 lbs Distribution F/R: 58/42 % GVWR: 4680 lbs GAWR F/R: 2440/2440 lbs Payload: 1062 lbs Performance Goal: 400 lbs DIMENSIONS Wheelbase: 103.2 inches Track F/R: 61.1/60.2 inches Length: 174.5 inches Width: 71.4 inches Height: 69.5 inches Ground Clearance: 7.8 inches Performance Goal: 5.0 inches TIRES Tire Mfg: Continental Tire Model: EcoPlus Tire Size: P235/70R16

208

Insight REV dbk.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

67 lbs 67 lbs Delivered Curb Weight: 1959 lbs Distribution F/R: 61/39 % GVWR: 2380 lbs GAWR F/R: 1355/1035 lbs Payload: 411 lbs Performance Goal: 400 lbs DIMENSIONS Wheelbase: 94.5 inches Track F/R: 56.5/52.2 inches Length: 155.1 inches Width: 66.7 inches Height: 51.5 inches Ground Clearance: 4.6 inches Performance Goal: 5.0 inches TIRES Tire Mfg: Bridgestone Tire Model: Potenza Tire Size: 165/65R14

209

PERFORMANCE STATISTICS WEIGHTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3474 lbs 3474 lbs Delivered Curb Weight: 3435 lbs GVWR: 4718 lbs GAWR F/R: 2491/2436 lbs Distribution F/R: % Payload: 1283 lbs Performance Goal: 400 lbs DIMENSIONS Wheelbase: 106.6 in Track F/R: 61.0/61.0 in Length: 181.3 in Width: 71.6 in Height: 65.3 in Ground Clearance: 7.0 in Performance Goal: 5.0 in TIRES Tire Mfg: General Tire Model: Ameri GS60 Tire Size: P215/70R16 Tire Pressure F/R: 35/35 psi

210

High Energy Instrumentation Efforts in Turkey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work summarizes the efforts in Turkey to build a laboratory capable of building and testing high energy astrophysics detectors that work in space. The EC FP6 ASTRONS project contributed strongly to these efforts, and as a result a fully operational laboratory at Sabanci University have been developed. In this laboratory we test and develop Si and CdZnTe based room temperature semiconductor strip detectors and develop detector and electronics system to be used as a payload on potential small Turkish satellites.

Kalemci, Emrah [Sabanci University, Tuzla, Istanbul (Turkey)

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

211

RH-TRU Waste Content Codes (RH-TRUCON)  

SciTech Connect

The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of RH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC).1 The RH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the RH-TRU 72-B. This document is a catalog of RH-TRU 72-B authorized contents by site. A content code is defined by the following components: A two-letter site abbreviation that designates the physical location of the generated/stored waste (e.g., ID for Idaho National Laboratory [INL]). The site-specific letter designations for each of the sites are provided in Table 1. A three-digit code that designates the physical and chemical form of the waste (e.g., content code 317 denotes TRU Metal Waste). For RH-TRU waste to be transported in the RH-TRU 72-B, the first number of this three-digit code is 3. The second and third numbers of the three-digit code describe the physical and chemical form of the waste. Table 2 provides a brief description of each generic code. Content codes are further defined as subcodes by an alpha trailer after the three-digit code to allow segregation of wastes that differ in one or more parameter(s). For example, the alpha trailers of the subcodes ID 322A and ID 322B may be used to differentiate between waste packaging configurations. As detailed in the RH-TRAMPAC, compliance with flammable gas limits may be demonstrated through the evaluation of compliance with either a decay heat limit or flammable gas generation rate (FGGR) limit per container specified in approved content codes. As applicable, if a container meets the watt*year criteria specified by the RH-TRAMPAC, the decay heat limits based on the dose-dependent G value may be used as specified in an approved content code. If a site implements the administrative controls outlined in the RH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 2.4 of the RH-TRU Payload Appendices, the decay heat or FGGR limits based on a 10-day shipping period (rather than the standard 60-day shipping period) may be used as specified in an approved content code. Requests for new or revised content codes may be submitted to the WIPP RH-TRU Payload Engineer for review and approval, provided all RH-TRAMPAC requirements are met.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

RH-TRU Waste Content Codes (RH-TRUCON)  

SciTech Connect

The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of RH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC).1 The RH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the RH-TRU 72-B. This document is a catalog of RH-TRU 72-B authorized contents by site. A content code is defined by the following components: A two-letter site abbreviation that designates the physical location of the generated/stored waste (e.g., ID for Idaho National Laboratory [INL]). The site-specific letter designations for each of the sites are provided in Table 1. A three-digit code that designates the physical and chemical form of the waste (e.g., content code 317 denotes TRU Metal Waste). For RH-TRU waste to be transported in the RH-TRU 72-B, the first number of this three-digit code is 3. The second and third numbers of the three-digit code describe the physical and chemical form of the waste. Table 2 provides a brief description of each generic code. Content codes are further defined as subcodes by an alpha trailer after the three-digit code to allow segregation of wastes that differ in one or more parameter(s). For example, the alpha trailers of the subcodes ID 322A and ID 322B may be used to differentiate between waste packaging configurations. As detailed in the RH-TRAMPAC, compliance with flammable gas limits may be demonstrated through the evaluation of compliance with either a decay heat limit or flammable gas generation rate (FGGR) limit per container specified in approved content codes. As applicable, if a container meets the watt*year criteria specified by the RH-TRAMPAC, the decay heat limits based on the dose-dependent G value may be used as specified in an approved content code. If a site implements the administrative controls outlined in the RH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 2.4 of the RH-TRU Payload Appendices, the decay heat or FGGR limits based on a 10-day shipping period (rather than the standard 60-day shipping period) may be used as specified in an approved content code. Requests for new or revised content codes may be submitted to the WIPP RH-TRU Payload Engineer for review and approval, provided all RH-TRAMPAC requirements are met.

Washington TRU Solutions

2007-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

213

RH-TRU Waste Content Codes  

SciTech Connect

The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of RH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC).1 The RH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the RH-TRU 72-B. This document is a catalog of RH-TRU 72-B authorized contents by site. A content code is defined by the following components: A two-letter site abbreviation that designates the physical location of the generated/stored waste (e.g., ID for Idaho National Laboratory [INL]). The site-specific letter designations for each of the sites are provided in Table 1. A three-digit code that designates the physical and chemical form of the waste (e.g., content code 317 denotes TRU Metal Waste). For RH-TRU waste to be transported in the RH-TRU 72-B, the first number of this three-digit code is 3. The second and third numbers of the three-digit code describe the physical and chemical form of the waste. Table 2 provides a brief description of each generic code. Content codes are further defined as subcodes by an alpha trailer after the three-digit code to allow segregation of wastes that differ in one or more parameter(s). For example, the alpha trailers of the subcodes ID 322A and ID 322B may be used to differentiate between waste packaging configurations. As detailed in the RH-TRAMPAC, compliance with flammable gas limits may be demonstrated through the evaluation of compliance with either a decay heat limit or flammable gas generation rate (FGGR) limit per container specified in approved content codes. As applicable, if a container meets the watt*year criteria specified by the RH-TRAMPAC, the decay heat limits based on the dose-dependent G value may be used as specified in an approved content code. If a site implements the administrative controls outlined in the RH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 2.4 of the RH-TRU Payload Appendices, the decay heat or FGGR limits based on a 10-day shipping period (rather than the standard 60-day shipping period) may be used as specified in an approved content code. Requests for new or revised content codes may be submitted to the WIPP RH-TRU Payload Engineer for review and approval, provided all RH-TRAMPAC requirements are met.

Washington TRU Solutions

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

NEWS The Search for a Previously Unknown Source of Orbital Debris: The Possibility of a Coolant Leak in Radar Ocean Reconnaissance Satellites (JSC-27737)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Early models of the orbital debris environment predicted that upper-stage and payload explosions or collisions between objects might produce a significant population in the size range of 1 mm to 10 cm. However, measurements of objects in this size range, begun in 1989, revealed populations with distribution characteristics different from those predicted by either explosions or collisions. The measured spatial and temporal characteristics required that these new populations consist of a large number of small-debris objects injected into orbit with very low velocities relative to one another. In addition, the measured radar

Robert C. Reynolds; Cindi A. Karpiuk; Don Kessler

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Near-term electric vehicle program. Phase II. Operation and maintenance manual  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed description of the design, operation, and maintenance of the Integrated Test Vehicle (ITV) including instruments and controls, economy, safety and security, troubleshooting, and specifications is given. The ITV employs a dc traction motor and 18 lead-acid batteries which provide a nominal voltage of 108 Vdc. A microcomputer controls many vehicle electrical functions. The ITV is a four-passenger subcompact weighing 3320 lb curb weight with the capacity of carrying a 600 lb payload. The driving range is 75 miles on urban cycle, and the vehicle is equipped with a regenerative braking system. (WHK)

Not Available

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Remote-Handled Transuranic Content Codes  

SciTech Connect

The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document representsthe development of a uniform content code system for RH-TRU waste to be transported in the 72-Bcask. It will be used to convert existing waste form numbers, content codes, and site-specificidentification codes into a system that is uniform across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites.The existing waste codes at the sites can be grouped under uniform content codes without any lossof waste characterization information. The RH-TRUCON document provides an all-encompassing|description for each content code and compiles this information for all DOE sites. Compliance withwaste generation, processing, and certification procedures at the sites (outlined in this document foreach content code) ensures that prohibited waste forms are not present in the waste. The contentcode gives an overall description of the RH-TRU waste material in terms of processes and|packaging, as well as the generation location. This helps to provide cradle-to-grave traceability ofthe waste material so that the various actions required to assess its qualification as payload for the72-B cask can be performed. The content codes also impose restrictions and requirements on themanner in which a payload can be assembled.The RH-TRU Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC), Appendix 1.3.7of the 72-B Cask Safety Analysis Report (SAR), describes the current governing procedures|applicable for the qualification of waste as payload for the 72-B cask. The logic for this|classification is presented in the 72-B Cask SAR. Together, these documents (RH-TRUCON,|RH-TRAMPAC, and relevant sections of the 72-B Cask SAR) present the foundation and|justification for classifying RH-TRU waste into content codes. Only content codes described in thisdocument can be considered for transport in the 72-B cask. Revisions to this document will be madeas additional waste qualifies for transport. |Each content code uniquely identifies the generated waste and provides a system for tracking theprocess and packaging history. Each content code begins with a two-letter site abbreviation thatindicates the shipper of the RH-TRU waste. The site-specific letter designations for each of the|DOE sites are provided in Table 1. Not all of the sites listed in Table 1 have generated/stored RH-|TRU waste.

Washington TRU Solutions

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Safety analysis report for the TRUPACT-II shipping package (condensed version). Volume 1, Rev. 14  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The condensed version of the TRUPACT-II Contact Handled Transuranic Waste Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) contains essential material required by TRUPACT-II users, plus additional contents (payload) information previously submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. All or part of the following sections, which are not required by users of the TRUPACT-II, are deleted from the condensed version: (i) structural analysis, (ii) thermal analysis, (iii) containment analysis, (iv) criticality analysis, (v) shielding analysis, and (vi) hypothetical accident test results.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Nuclear propulsion systems for orbit transfer based on the particle bed reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technology of nuclear direct propulsion orbit transfer systems based on the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) is described. A 200 megawatt illustrative design is presented for LEO to GEO and other high ..delta..V missions. The PBR-NOTV can be used in a one-way mode with the shuttle or an expendable launch vehicle, e.g., the Titan 34D7, or as a two-way reusable space tug. In the one-way mode, payload capacity is almost three times greater than that of chemical OTV's. PBR technology status is described and development needs outlined.

Powell, J.R.; Ludewig, H.; Horn, F.L.; Araj, K.; Benenati, R.; Lazareth, O.; Slovik, G.; Solon, M.; Tappe, W.; Belisle, J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

ELECTRIC PROPULSION APPLICATIONS FOR SNAP SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

The application of SNAP systems to electric propulsion was investigated. A review is given of the basic analysis involved in establishing optimum power levels and payload capabilities for electric spacecraft, and several typical missions are analyzed to determine the usefulness of the SNAP systems which are under development or systems which are based on the current SNAP technology. In general, it is found that SNAP power units in the range of 60 to 180 kw offer significant mission capability when used in conjunction with initial spacecraft weights of about 10,000 lb in a low-level orbit. (auth)

Morse, C.J.

1962-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Work plan for the fabrication of the radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system package mounting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) has available a dedicated system for the transportation of RTG payloads. The RTG Transportation System (System 100) is comprised of four systems; the Package (System 120), the Semi-trailer (System 140), the Gas Management (System 160), and the Facility Transport (System 180). This document provides guidelines on the fabrication, technical requirements, and quality assurance of the Package Mounting (Subsystem 145), part of System 140. The description follows the Development Control Requirements of WHC-CM-6-1, EP 2.4, Rev. 3.

Satoh, J.A.

1994-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ur3 ur4 payload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Pure Nuclear Fusion Bomb Propulsion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent progress towards the non-fission ignition of thermonuclear micro-explosions raises the prospect for a revival of the nuclear bomb propulsion idea, both for the fast transport of large payloads within the solar system and the launch into earth orbit without the release of fission products into the atmosphere. To reach this goal three areas of research are of importance: 1)Compact thermonuclear ignition drivers. 2)Fast ignition and deuterium burn. 3)Space-craft architecture involving magnetic insulation and GeV electrostatic potentials

Winterberg, F

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

LISA technology and instrumentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article reviews the present status of the technology and instrumentation for the joint ESA/NASA gravitational wave detector LISA. It briefly describes the measurement principle and the mission architecture including the resulting sensitivity before focussing on a description of the main payload items, such as the interferomtric measurement system, comprising the optical system with the optical bench and the telescope, the laser system, and the phase measurement system; and the disturbance reduction system with the inertial sensor, the charge control system, and the micropropulsion system. The article touches upon the requirements for the different subsystems that need to be fulfilled to obtain the overall sensitivity.

Jennrich, O

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

SP-100 planetary mission/system preliminary design study. Final report, technical information report  

SciTech Connect

This report contains a discussion on many aspects of a nuclear electric propulsion planetary science mission and spacecraft using the proposed SP-100 nuclear power subsystem. A review of the science rationale for such missions is included. A summary of eleven nuclear electric propulsion planetary missions is presented. A conceptual science payload, mission design, and spacecraft design is included for the Saturn Ring Rendezvous mission. Spacecraft and mission costs have been estimated for two potential sequences of nuclear electric propulsion planetary missions. The integration issues and requirements on the proposed SP-100 power subsystems are identified.

Jones, R.M. [ed.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Space nuclear power system and the design of the nuclear electric propulsion OTV  

SciTech Connect

Payload increases of three to five times that of the Shuttle/Centaur can be achieved using nuclear electric propulsion. Various nuclear power plant options being pursued by the SP-100 Program are described. These concepts can grow from 100 kW/sub e/ to 1MW/sub e/ output. Spacecraft design aspects are addressed, including thermal interactions, plume interactions, and radiation fluences. A baseline configuration is described accounting for these issues. Safety aspects of starting the OTV transfer from an altitude of 300 km indicate no significant additional risk to the biosphere.

Buden, D.; Garrison, P.W.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

SpaceWire model development technology for satellite architecture.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Packet switched data communications networks that use distributed processing architectures have the potential to simplify the design and development of new, increasingly more sophisticated satellite payloads. In addition, the use of reconfigurable logic may reduce the amount of redundant hardware required in space-based applications without sacrificing reliability. These concepts were studied using software modeling and simulation, and the results are presented in this report. Models of the commercially available, packet switched data interconnect SpaceWire protocol were developed and used to create network simulations of data networks containing reconfigurable logic with traffic flows for timing system distribution.

Eldridge, John M.; Leemaster, Jacob Edward; Van Leeuwen, Brian P.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

PERFORMANCE STATISTICS WEIGHTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

40 lbs 40 lbs Delivered Curb Weight: 3556 lbs Distribution F/R: 58/42 % GVWR: 4665 lbs GAWR F/R: Unavailable Payload: 1109 lbs Performance Goal: 400 lbs DIMENSIONS Wheelbase: 109.3 in Track F/R: 62.0/61.6 in Length: 189.2 in Width: 71.7 in Height: 57.9 in Ground Clearance: 5.9 in Performance Goal: 5.0 in TIRES Tire Mfg: Michellin Tire Model: Energy MXV458 Tire Size: P215/60R16 Tire Pressure F/R: 32/32

227

PERFORMANCE STATISTICS WEIGHTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5650 lbs 5650 lbs Delivered Curb Weight: 5579 lbs Distribution F/R: 51.8/48.2 GVWR: 7100 lbs GAWR F/R: 3200/4100 lbs Payload: 1521 lbs Performance Goal: 400 lbs DIMENSIONS Wheelbase: 116.0 in Track F/R: 68.2/67.0 in Length: 202.0 in Width: 79.0 in Height: 74.6 in Ground Clearance: 9.5 in Performance Goal: 5.0 in TIRES Tire Mfg: Bridgestone Tire Model: Dueler H/R Tire Size: P265/65R18 Tire Pressure F/R: 32 psi

228

Ultralight Stainless Steel Urban Bus Concept  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

While stainless steel buses are certainly not new, this study reveals opportunities for substantial improvements in structural performance.The objective of this project was to investigate the mass saving potential of ultra-high strength stainless steel as applied to the structure of a full size urban transit bus.The resulting design for a low floor,hybrid bus has an empty weight less than half that of a conventional transit bus.The reduced curb weight allows for a greater payload,without exceeding legal axle limits. A combination of finite element modeling and dynamic testing of scale models was used to predict structural performance.

J. Bruce Emmons; Leonard J. Blessing

2001-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

229

Tailoring Laser Propulsion for Future Applications in Space  

SciTech Connect

Pulsed laser propulsion may turn out as a low cost alternative for the transportation of small payloads in future. In recent years DLR investigated this technology with the goal of cheaply launching small satellites into low earth orbit (LEO) with payload masses on the order of 5 to 10 kg. Since the required high power pulsed laser sources are yet not at the horizon, DLR focused on new applications based on available laser technology. Space-borne, i.e. in weightlessness, there exist a wide range of missions requiring small thrusters that can be propelled by laser power. This covers space logistic and sample return missions as well as position keeping and attitude control of satellites.First, a report on the proof of concept of a remote controlled laser rocket with a thrust vector steering device integrated in a parabolic nozzle will be given. Second, the road from the previous ground-based flight experiments in earth's gravity using a 100-J class laser to flight experiments with a parabolic thruster in an artificial 2D-zero gravity on an air cushion table employing a 1-J class laser and, with even less energy, new investigations in the field of laser micro propulsion will be reviewed.

Eckel, Hans-Albert; Scharring, Stefan [German Aerospace Center (DLR)-Institute of Technical Physics, Pfaffenwaldring 38-40, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

230

THERMAL UPGRADING OF 9977 RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL (RAM) TYPE B PACKAGE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 9977 package is a radioactive material package that was originally certified to ship Heat Sources and RTG contents up to 19 watts and it is now being reviewed to significantly expand its contents in support of additional DOE missions. Thermal upgrading will be accomplished by employing stacked 3013 containers, a 3013 aluminum spacer and an external aluminum sleeve for enhanced heat transfer. The 7th Addendum to the original 9977 package Safety Basis Report describing these modifications is under review for the DOE certification. The analyses described in this paper show that this well-designed and conservatively analyzed package can be upgraded to carry contents with decay heat up to 38 watts with some simple design modifications. The Model 9977 package has been designed as a replacement for the Department of Transportation (DOT) Fissile Specification 6M package. The 9977 package is a very versatile Type B package which is certified to transport and store a wide spectrum of radioactive materials. The package was analyzed quite conservatively to increase its usefulness and store different payload configurations. Its versatility is evident from several daughter packages such as the 9978 and H1700, and several addendums where the payloads have been modified to suit the Shipper's needs without additional testing.

Gupta, N.; Abramczyk, G.

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

231

A Low-Cost Natural Gas/Freshwater Aerial Pipeline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Offered is a new type of low-cost aerial pipeline for delivery of natural gas, an important industrial and residential fuel, and freshwater as well as other payloads over long distances. The offered pipeline dramatically decreases the construction and operation costs and the time necessary for pipeline construction. A dual-use type of freight pipeline can improve an arid rural environment landscape and provide a reliable energy supply for cities. Our aerial pipeline is a large, self-lofting flexible tube disposed at high altitude. Presently, the term "natural gas" lacks a precise technical definition, but the main components of natural gas are methane, which has a specific weight less than air. A lift force of one cubic meter of methane equals approximately 0.5 kg. The lightweight film flexible pipeline can be located in the Earth-atmosphere at high altitude and poses no threat to airplanes or the local environment. The authors also suggest using lift force of this pipeline in tandem with wing devices for cheap shipment of a various payloads (oil, coal and water) over long distances. The article contains a computed macroproject in northwest China for delivery of 24 billion cubic meter of gas and 23 millions tonnes of water annually.

Alexander Bolonkin; Richard Cathcart

2007-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

232

Technical Review Report for the Mound 1KW Package Safety Analysis Report for Packaging Addendum No. 1, through Revision b  

SciTech Connect

This Technical Review Report (TRR) documents the review, performed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) staff, at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), on the 'Mound 1KW Package Safety Analysis Report for Packaging, Addendum No. 1, Revision b', dated May 2007 (Addendum 1). The Mound 1KW Package is certified by DOE Certificate of Compliance (CoC) number USA/9516/B(U)F-85 for the transportation of Type B quantities of plutonium heat source material. The safety analysis of the package is documented in the 'Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) for the Mound 1KW Package' (i.e., the Mound 1KW SARP, or the SARP). Addendum 1 incorporates a new fueled capsule assembly payload. The following changes have been made to add this payload: (1) The primary containment vessel (PCV) will be of the same design, but will increase in height to 11.16 in.; (2) A new graphite support block will be added to support up to three fueled capsule assemblies per package; (3) The cutting groove height on the secondary containment vessel (SCV) will be heightened to accommodate the taller PCV; and (4) A 3.38 in. high graphite filler block will be placed on top of the PCV. All other packaging features, as described in the Mound 1KW SARP [3], remain unchanged. This report documents the LLNL review of Addendum 1[1]. The specific review for each SARP Chapter is documented herein.

DiSabatino, A; West, M; Hafner, R; Russell, E

2007-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

233

Monolithic ballasted penetrator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a monolithic ballasted penetrator capable of delivering a working payload to a hardened target, such as reinforced concrete. The invention includes a ballast made from a dense heavy material insert and a monolithic case extending along an axis and consisting of a high-strength steel alloy. The case includes a nose end containing a hollow portion in which the ballast is nearly completely surrounded so that no movement of the ballast relative to the case is possible during impact with a hard target. The case is cast around the ballast, joining the two parts together. The ballast may contain concentric grooves or protrusions that improve joint strength between the case and ballast. The case further includes a second hollow portion; between the ballast and base, which has a payload fastened within this portion. The penetrator can be used to carry instrumentation to measure the geologic character of the earth, or properties of arctic ice, as they pass through it.

Hickerson, Jr., James P. (Cedar Crest, NM); Zanner, Frank J. (Sandia Park, NM); Baldwin, Michael D. (Albuquerque, NM); Maguire, Michael C. (Worcester, MA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Role of military scientists and engineers in space (1980-2000)  

SciTech Connect

The Space Transportation System provides military scientists and engineers exciting new capabilities to conduct a variety of pioneering experiments on orbit, taking unique advantage of the space environment itself or observing the planet firsthand from the vantage point of space. The reusable Shuttle/Spacelab configuration permits a more effective use of the human and material resources being committed to the space program in the next decade, and ensures the presence of man in space on a routine basis. However, full-scale exploitation of space for national defense will depend to a great extent on the skillful and successful utilization of the military payload specialists, who will fly and operate various Shuttle-based DoD experiments. This paper explores the doctrine, role, function, and training requirements for DoD payload specialists. The unique advantage of man-in-the-loop activities and the orbiting military scientist conducting experiments in situ is addressed in light of previous US manned space flight experience and the projected capabilities of the Shuttle. 4 figures.

Angelo, J.A. Jr

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Programmable Logic Controllers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) drive the behavior of industrial control systems according to uploaded programs. It is now known that PLCs are vulnerable to the uploading of malicious code that can have severe physical consequences. What is not understood is whether an adversary with no knowledge of the PLCs interface to the control system can execute a damaging, targeted, or stealthy attack against a control system using the PLC. In this paper, we present SABOT, a tool that automatically maps the control instructions in a PLC to an adversary-provided specification of the target control systems behavior. This mapping recovers sufficient semantics of the PLCs internal layout to instantiate arbitrary malicious controller code. This lowers the prerequisite knowledge needed to tailor an attack to a control system. SABOT uses an incremental model checking algorithm to map a few plant devices at a time, until a mapping is found for all adversary-specified devices. At this point, a malicious payload can be compiled and uploaded to the PLC. Our evaluation shows that SABOT correctly compiles payloads for all tested control systems when the adversary correctly specifies full system behavior, and for 4 out of 5 systems in most cases where there where unspecified features. Furthermore, SABOT completed all analyses in under 2 minutes.

Stephen Mclaughlin; Patrick Mcdaniel; Stephen Mclaughlin; Patrick Mcdaniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

LETTER PROGRESS REPORT FOR APRIL 1962 ON HIGH ALTITUDE SAMPLING  

SciTech Connect

Progress is reported in the design and testing of equipment for high- altitude air sampling. The operational characteristics of an air ejector were tested over a complete range of back pressures and primary pressures. Data are tabulated. Modifications were made in an altitude sensor for use on balloons at high altitudes. A balloon flight was made to 110,000 ft with two direct-flow units and an electrostatic precipitator. A sketch is included of the flight train and components used. Total payload on the balloon was 506 lbs. A second balloon flight was made to obtain a vertical profile of radioactive debris with directflow units at 70,000 and 80,000 ft. This was accomplished by using a gondola equipped with two direct-flow units and ballast to float the system at the lower of the two altitudes. After sampling was completed at the lower step, the ballast was dropped, and the system ascended. Total payload on the balloon was 865.5 lb. (C.H.)

1962-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

237

Use of burnup credit for transportation and storage  

SciTech Connect

Burnup credit is the application of the effects of fuel burnup to nuclear criticality design. When burnup credit is considered in the design of storage facilities and transportation casks for spent fuel, the objectives are to reduce the requirements for storage space and to increase the payload of casks with acceptable nuclear criticality safety margins. The spent-fuel carrying capacities of previous-generation transport casks have been limited primarily by requirements to remove heat and/or to provide shielding. Shielding and heat transfer requirements for casks designed to transport older spent fuel with longer decay times are reduced significantly. Thus a considerable weight margin is available to the designer for increasing the payload capacity. One method to achieve an increase in capacity is to reduce fuel assembly spacing. The amount of reduction in assembly spacing is limited by criticality and fuel support structural concerns. The optimum fuel assembly spacing provides the maximum cask loading within a basket that has adequate criticality control and sufficient structural integrity for regulatory accident scenarios. The incorporation of burnup credit in cask designs could result in considerable benefits in the transport of spent fuel. The acceptance of burnup credit for the design of transport casks depends on the resolution of system safety issues and the uncertainties that affect the determination of criticality safety margins. The remainder of this report will examine these issues and the integrated approach under way to resolve them. 20 refs., 2 figs.

Sanders, T.L.; Ewing, R.I. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Lake, W.H. (USDOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Washington, DC (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

RH-TRU Waste Content Codes (RH TRUCON)  

SciTech Connect

The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of RH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC).1 The RH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the RH-TRU 72-B. This document is a catalog of RH-TRU 72-B authorized contents by site. A content code is defined by the following components: A two-letter site abbreviation that designates the physical location of the generated/stored waste (e.g., ID for Idaho National Laboratory [INL]). The site-specific letter designations for each of the sites are provided in Table 1. A three-digit code that designates the physical and chemical form of the waste (e.g., content code 317 denotes TRU Metal Waste). For RH-TRU waste to be transported in the RH-TRU 72-B, the first number of this three-digit code is 3. The second and third numbers of the three-digit code describe the physical and chemical form of the waste. Table 2 provides a brief description of each generic code. Content codes are further defined as subcodes by an alpha trailer after the three-digit code to allow segregation of wastes that differ in one or more parameter(s). For example, the alpha trailers of the subcodes ID 322A and ID 322B may be used to differentiate between waste packaging configurations. As detailed in the RH-TRAMPAC, compliance with flammable gas limits may be demonstrated through the evaluation of compliance with either a decay heat limit or flammable gas generation rate (FGGR) limit per container specified in approved content codes. As applicable, if a container meets the watt*year criteria specified by the RH-TRAMPAC, the decay heat limits based on the dose-dependent G value may be used as specified in an approved content code. If a site implements the administrative controls outlined in the RH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 2.4 of the RH-TRU Payload Appendices, the decay heat or FGGR limits based on a 10-day shipping period (rather than the standard 60-day shipping period) may be used as specified in an approved content code.

Washington TRU Solutions

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Remote-Handled Transuranic Content Codes  

SciTech Connect

The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of RH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC).1 The RH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the RH-TRU 72-B. This document is a catalog of RH-TRU 72-B authorized contents by site. A content code is defined by the following components: A two-letter site abbreviation that designates the physical location of the generated/stored waste (e.g., ID for Idaho National Laboratory [INL]). The site-specific letter designations for each of the sites are provided in Table 1. A three-digit code that designates the physical and chemical form of the waste (e.g., content code 317 denotes TRU Metal Waste). For RH-TRU waste to be transported in the RH-TRU 72-B, the first number of this three-digit code is 3. The second and third numbers of the three-digit code describe the physical and chemical form of the waste. Table 2 provides a brief description of each generic code. Content codes are further defined as subcodes by an alpha trailer after the three-digit code to allow segregation of wastes that differ in one or more parameter(s). For example, the alpha trailers of the subcodes ID 322A and ID 322B may be used to differentiate between waste packaging configurations. As detailed in the RH-TRAMPAC, compliance with flammable gas limits may be demonstrated through the evaluation of compliance with either a decay heat limit or flammable gas generation rate (FGGR) limit per container specified in approved content codes. As applicable, if a container meets the watt*year criteria specified by the RH-TRAMPAC, the decay heat limits based on the dose-dependent G value may be used as specified in an approved content code. If a site implements the administrative controls outlined in the RH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 2.4 of the RH-TRU Payload Appendices, the decay heat or FGGR limits based on a 10-day shipping period (rather than the standard 60-day shipping period) may be used as specified in an approved content code.

Washington TRU Solutions

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Safety-Basis Thermal Analysis for KE Basin Sludge Transport and Storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of safety-basis thermal and gas generation analyses were completed and independently reviewed to assess the thermal performance of a large diameter container (LDC) containing KE Basin sludge. The results demonstrate: (1) the sludge transport system (STS) containing a LDC can safely transport a KE basin sludge payload up to 2.0 m{sup 3} and, (2) large diameter containers with sludge payloads up to 2.0 m{sup 3} can be safely stored in a process cell at T Plant. The transport and storage analyses are based on a conservative set of assumptions, including limiting environmental conditions. Conclusions drawn from the transport and storage results were not impacted by changes in the radial gap between the cask and LDC, purge gas (i.e., either helium or nitrogen), sludge porosity, or thermal conductivity. The design of the transport cask and large diameter container can accommodate reasonable changes in these values. Both transport from KE Basin and long-term storage at T Plant are addressed for sludge payloads up to 2.0 m{sup 3}. Additional analyses determined the expected range of T Plant environmental temperatures, the hydrogen and oxygen generation rate due to the radiolysis of water, and the maximum hydrogen concentration within a process cell due to chemical reactions and the radiolysis of water. All sludge temperature and hydrogen concentration criteria for transport and storage are met. The analyses assumed a safety-basis sludge mixture defined as 60% by volume floor and 40% by volume canister sludge with 35% retained gas, and a conservative segregated (axial) distribution of metallic uranium (resulting from particulate settling) with associated safety-basis properties. The analyses recognized that the retrieval process would produce non-uniform sludge distributions. Four batch process loadings of 0.5m{sup 3} each are assumed. Each process batch loading will settle and segregate (separate) into two layers: an active layer containing all the metallic uranium which is chemically active, and a non-active layer containing uranium oxide, non-uranium material, and no metallic uranium. This is a conservative representation of operational controls designed to limit the metallic uranium concentration. The sludge layers are assumed to remain intact during transport and storage.

HEARD, F.J.; SATHYANARAYANA, J.J.

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ur3 ur4 payload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Multi-functional Bio-synthetic Hybrid Nanostructures for Enhanced Cellular Uptake, Endosomal Escape and Targeted Delivery Toward Diagnostics and Therapeutics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Applications of nanotechnology in medicine, also known as nanomedicine, is a rapidly growing field as it holds great potential in the development of novel therapeutics toward treatment of various diseases. Shell crosslinked knedel-like nanoparticles (SCKs) that are self assembled from amphiphilic block copolymers into polymeric micelles followed by crosslinking selectively throughout the shell domain have been investigated as theranostic agents for the delivery of nucleic acids and incorporation of imaging probes. The main focus of this dissertation is to design and develop unique multifunctional bio-synthetic hybrid nanoparticles that can carry agents for radiolabeling, moieties for inducing stealth properties to minimize protein adsorption in vivo, ligands for site-specific targeting, therapeutic payloads, and are optimized for efficient delivery of cargoes intracellularly and to the target sites toward constructing novel nanoscopic objects for therapy and diagnosis. Alteration of polymeric building blocks of the nanoparticles provides opportunities for precise control over the sizes, shapes, compositions, structures and properties of the nanoparticles. To ensure ideal performance of nanoparticles as theranostic agents, it is critical to ensure high intracellular bioavailability of the therapeutic payload conjugated to nanoparticles. Special efforts were made by employing well-defined multi-step polymerization and polymer modification reactions that involved conjugation of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) to chain terminus of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chain grafts such that they were presented at the outermost surface of SCKs. Additionally, chemical modification reactions were performed on the polymer backbone to integrate positive charges onto the shell of the nanoparticles to afford cationic SCKs (cSCKs) for facilitating cellular entry and electrostatic interactions with negatively charged nucleic acids. Covalent conjugation of F3, a tumor homing peptide, post-assembly of the nanoparticles enhanced cellular uptake and knockdown of nucleolin (a shuttling protein overexpressed at the sites of angiogenesis) and thus inhibiting tumor cell growth. Furthermore, these polymer precursors of the cSCKs were modified with partial to full incorporation of histamines to facilitate their endosomal escape for efficient delivery into the cytosol. The cSCKs were further templated onto high aspect ratio anionic cylinders to form hierarchically-assembled nanostructures that bring together individual components with unique functions, such as one carrying a therapeutic payload and the other with sites for radiolabeling. These higher order nanoobjects enhance circulation in vivo, have capabilities to package nucleic acids electrostatically and contain sites for radiolabeling, providing an overall advantage over the individual components, which could each facilitate only one or the other of the combined functions. Hierarchically-assembled nanostructures were investigated for their cellular uptake, transfection behavior and radiolabeling efficiency, as the next generation of theranostic agents.

Shrestha, Ritu 1984-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21 - 17030 of 26,764 results. 21 - 17030 of 26,764 results. Download CX-001012: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Efficiency of Data Networks through Rate Adaptation CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 03/02/2010 Location(s): New Jersey Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-001012-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-001006: Categorical Exclusion Determination Power Minimization Techniques for Networked Data Centers CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 03/02/2010 Location(s): California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-001006-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-002265: Categorical Exclusion Determination Payload 2 Integration and Environmental Testing at Kirtland Air Force Base

243

Solar wind samples give insight into birth of solar system  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar wind samples Solar wind samples Solar wind samples give insight into birth of solar system Most of the Genesis payload consisted of fragile solar-wind collectors, which had been exposed to the solar particles over a period of two years. June 23, 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

244

ARM - Blog Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0, 2013 [BBOP, Blog, Field Notes] 0, 2013 [BBOP, Blog, Field Notes] BBOP Media Stop Bookmark and Share Editor's note: Eric Francavilla is an intern in the media relations department at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. On August 15, I joined Mary Beckman of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) media relations team for a media event held at the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) base of operations: a small hangar at Bergstrom Aircraft in Pasco, Wash. We invited reporters to see how scientists from the Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory and PNNL have teamed up to fly through forest fire smoke across the Northwest in the name of science. The G-1 research plane, seen here at the Bergstrom Aircraft hangar in Pasco, Wash., carries a payload for BBOP of more than 30 scientific instruments to measure smoke from forest fires and other biomass burns.

245

2009 BMW MINI EVAmerica fact sheet.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3230 lb 3230 lb Delivered Curb Weight: 3306 lb Distribution F/R: 51/49 % GVWR: 3660 lb Payload 2 : 354 lb Performance Goal: 400 lb DIMENSIONS Wheelbase: 97.1 inches Track F/R: 57.4/57.8 inches Length: 145.6 inches Width: 66.3 inches Height: 55.4 inches Ground Clearance: 6.0 inches Performance Goal: 5.0 inches CHARGER Level 1: Location: On-board Type: Conductive Input Voltages: 120VAC Level 2: Location: Off-board Type: Conductive Input Voltages: 240 VAC © 2009 Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved BASE VEHICLE: 2009 BMW MINI E Seatbelt Positions: Two Standard Features: Front Wheel Drive Front Disc and Rear Disc Brakes Regenerative Braking With Coast Down Three-Point Safety Belts Speedometer Odometer State-Of-Charge Meter BATTERY Type: Lithium Ion Number of Modules: 48

246

VIA Motors electric vehicle platform  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Extended-Range Electric Trucks Extended-Range Electric Trucks The fuel economy of a Prius with the payload of a pickup VIA's E-REV powertrain is ideal for America's fleets, cutting fuel costs by up to 75%, while dramatically reducing petroleum consumption and emissions- electricity costs an average of 60 cents per equivalent gallon. Recharging daily, the average driver could expect to refill the gas tank less than 10 times a year rather than once a week. It offers all the advantages of an electric vehicle, without range limitations. Working with vehicle manufacturers, VIA plans to begin delivering E-REV trucks to government and utility fleets in 2011. The onboard generator provides a work site with 15 kW of exportable power Up to 40 miles in all-electric mode and up to 300 miles using the range extender

247

OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Powering Curiosity; Exploring New Horizons - DOE's MMRTG Powering Curiosity; Exploring New Horizons - DOE's MMRTG by Mary Schorn on Thu, 9 Aug, 2012 DOE's RTG is doing it again. The Department's Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) is providing continuous power to the Mars rover Curiosity. This radioactive power source is "essentially a nuclear battery that will operate the rover's instruments, robotic arm, wheels, computers and radio. It is fueled with plutonium-238 that gives off heat as it naturally decays. No moving parts are required to convert this heat into electricity."1 The MMRTG "can go farther, travel to more places, and power and heat a larger and more capable scientific payload compared to the solar power alternative NASA studied. The radioisotope power system gives Curiosity the

248

VEHICLE SPECIFICATIONS Vehicle Features Base Vehicle: 2010 Honda  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Honda Honda Civic Hybrid VIN: JHMFA3F24AS005577 Seatbelt Positions: 5 Standard Features: Air Conditioning Power Locks Power Steering Power Brakes Power Windows Cruise Control Front Disc Brakes Rear Disc Brakes Front Wheel Drive Regenerative Braking Anti-Lock Brakes Traction Control Air Bags AM/FM Stereo with CD State of Charge Meter 1 Weights Design Curb Weight: 2877 lb Delivered Curb Weight: 2982 lb Distribution F/R (%): 57/43 GVWR: 3792 lb GAWR F/R: 1973/1841 lb Payload 2 : 810 lb Performance Goal: 400 lb Dimensions Wheelbase: 106.3 in Track F/R: 59.1/60.2 in Length: 177.3 in Width: 69.0 in Height: 56.3 in Ground Clearance: 6.0 in Performance Goal: 5.0 in Tires Manufacturer: Bridgestone

249

vitko-99.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM-UAV: The Next Phase ARM-UAV: The Next Phase J. Vitko, Jr. and T. P. Tooman Sandia National Laboratories Livermore, California R. G. Ellingson University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement-Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle (ARM-UAV) Program was initiated in 1993 to develop a capability to provide radiation and cloud measurements at the top of the troposphere, thereby capping the top of the grid cell above ARM sites. To date, ARM-UAV has developed the necessary payloads and measurement techniques for radiative flux measurements at mid-latitudes. The upcoming Kauai mission completes the original vision by extending these capabilities to cloud measurements and tropical altitudes. Beyond Kauai, with development largely though not completely done, we will begin transitioning to an operational phase to better support ARM's

250

ARM - Field Campaign - Biomass Burning Observation Project - BBOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsBiomass Burning Observation Project - BBOP govCampaignsBiomass Burning Observation Project - BBOP Campaign Links BNL BBOP Website ARM Aerial Facility Payload Science Plan Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Biomass Burning Observation Project - BBOP 2013.07.01 - 2013.10.24 Website : http://campaign.arm.gov/bbop/ Lead Scientist : Larry Kleinman For data sets, see below. Description This field campaign will address multiple uncertainties in aerosol intensive properties, which are poorly represented in climate models, by means of aircraft measurements in biomass burning plumes. Key topics to be investigated are: Aerosol mixing state and morphology Mass absorption coefficients (MACs) Chemical composition of non-refractory material associated with

251

VEHICLE SPECIFICATIONS Vehicle Features Base Vehicle: 2010 Smart  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Smart Smart Fortwo MHD VIN: WME4513341K406476 Seatbelt Positions: 2 Standard Features: Air Conditioning Power Locks Power Steering Power Brakes Power Windows Cruise Control Front Disc Brakes Rear Drum Brakes Rear Wheel Drive Anti-Lock Brakes Traction Control Air Bags AM/FM Stereo with CD player Weights Design Curb Weight:1,818 lb Delivered Curb Weight: 1.742 lb Distribution F/R (%):44/56 GVWR: 2,244 lb GAWR F/R: 968/1,452 lb Payload 1 : 426 lb Performance Goal: 400 lb Dimensions Wheelbase: 73.5 in Track F/R: 50.5/54.5 in Length: 106.1 in Width: 61.4 in Height: 60.7 in Ground Clearance: 6.25 in Performance Goal: 5.0 in Tires Manufacturer: Continental Model: ContiproContact Size: Front -P155/60/R15

252

Microsoft Word - solcar95.html  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FORCE FORCE VEHICLE SPECIFICATIONS CONVERTED VEHICLE Base Vehicle: 1995 Geo Metro VIN:2C1MR529XS6783464 Seatbelt Positions: Three Standard Features: Power Brakes Front Disk Brakes Front Wheel Drive Dual Air Bags AM/FM Stereo Radio w/Cassette Electric Heater Options as Tested: None BATTERY Manufacturer: GM Ovonic Type: 13.2EV85 Nickel Metal Hydride Number of Modules: 14 Weight of Module: 18 kg Weight of Pack(s): 254 kg Pack Locations: Undertrunk/Underhood Nominal Module Voltage: 13.2 V Nominal System Voltage: 185 V Nominal Capacity (1C): 85 Ah WEIGHTS Design Curb Weight: 2246 lbs Delivered Curb Weight: 2304 lbs Distribution F/R: 50/50 % GVWR: 2755 lbs GAWR F/R: 1432/1366 lbs Payload: 451 lbs Performance Goal: 664 lbs DIMENSIONS Wheelbase: 93.5 inches

253

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nonproliferation Technologies Section is developing the Rocket Deployed Air Sampler (RDAS) system for deployment at various locations off the Nonproliferation Technologies Section is developing the Rocket Deployed Air Sampler (RDAS) system for deployment at various locations off the Savannah River Site. The RDAS system development effort is part of the NNSA Proliferation Detection Program funded through the Department of Energy's Office of Nonproliferation Research and Development (NA-22). The scope of the RDAS development effort includes the design and development, testing, and field operation of several small air sampling payloads deployed on Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) large model rockets. Development, Testing and Operation of the RDAS system Savannah River Site Aiken South Carolina TC - A - 2010 - 018, Rev.0 Apr 8, 2010 Digitally signed by Andrew R. Grainger DN: cn=Andrew R. Grainger, o=DOE-SR, ou=EQMD, email=drew.grainger@srs.gov,

254

VEHICLE SPECIFICATIONS Vehicle Features  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mazda 3 Mazda 3 VIN: JMZBLA4G601111865 Seatbelt Positions: 5 Standard Features: Air Conditioning Power Locks Power Steering Power Brakes Power Windows Cruise Control Front Disc Brakes Rear Disc Brakes Front Wheel Drive Anti-Lock Brakes Traction Control Air Bags AM/FM Stereo with CD Weights Design Curb Weight: 2,954 lb Delivered Curb Weight: 2,850 lb Distribution F/R (%): 63/37 GVWR: 4,050 lb GAWR F/R: 2,057/1,896 lb Payload 1 : 1,096 lb Performance Goal: 400 lb Dimensions Wheelbase: 103.9 in Track F/R: 60.4/59.8 in Length: 175.6 in Width: 69.1 in Height: 57.9 in Ground Clearance: 6.1 in Performance Goal: 5.0 in Tires Manufacturer: Yokohama Model: YK520 Size: P205/55R17 Pressure F/R: 35/33 psi

255

Microsoft Word - FACT SHEET AMWTP Seismic.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mixed Waste Treatment Project vs. Nuclear Power Plants Mixed Waste Treatment Project vs. Nuclear Power Plants Implications of Japanese earthquake and tsunami Treatment - 1 Characterization - 4 Retrieval - 2 Payload - 5 Storage - 3 Shipping - 6 The recent earthquake, tsunami, and subsequent nuclear crises in Japan have renewed focus and concerns regarding the safety of the nuclear industry. The U.S. Department of Energy and Bechtel BWXT Idaho take these concerns very seriously and are confident in the safety of the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP). AMWTP facilities are conservatively designed and were constructed to withstand the natural phenomena of eastern Idaho, which include earthquakes, range fires, wind storms and other external hazards. The site's defense-in-depth protection from these hazards

256

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2, 2011 2, 2011 spacer Subscribe | Contact Us | Archive | Classifieds | Guidelines | Help Search GO spacer Calendar Have a safe day! Monday, Dec. 12 2:30 p.m. Particle Astrophysics Seminar - One West Speaker: Petra Huntemeyer, Michigan Technological University Title: The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory in Mexico 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK 2nd Flr X-Over 4 p.m. All Experimenters' Meeting - Curia II Special Topics: Application of 3D Plotter for an 11T Dipole Magnet Prototype Endpart for CERN LHC; DECam Imager in Chile; SuperCDMS New Payload Operation at Soudan Mine Tuesday, Dec. 13 7 a.m. Special live broadcast from CERN - One West Topic: Latest Higgs results from ATLAS and CMS 3 p.m. LHC Physics Center Topic of the Week Seminar - WH11NE Sunrise Speaker: Richard Gray, Rutgers University

257

NREL: Concentrating Solar Power Research - Laboratory Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Capabilities Laboratory Capabilities To research, develop, and test a variety of concentrating solar power technologies, NREL features the following laboratory capabilities: High-Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) Large Payload Solar Tracker Advanced Optical Materials Laboratory Advanced Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory Optical Testing Laboratory and Beam Characterization System Receiver Test Laboratory Heat Collection Element (HCE) Temperature Survey Photo of NREL's High-Flux Solar Furnace. NREL's High-Flux Solar Furnace. High-Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) The power generated at NREL's High-Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) can be used to expose, test, and evaluate many components-such as receivers, collectors, and reflector materials-used in concentrating solar power systems. The 10-kilowatt HFSF consists of a tracking heliostat and 25 hexagonal

258

Energy Blog | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 28, 2011 November 28, 2011 Nuclear Systems Powering a Mission to Mars This past weekend, the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity launched from Cape Canaveral with the most advanced payload of scientific gear ever used on the red planet -- made possible by nuclear space power systems developed by the Energy Department. November 23, 2011 This holiday season, we wanted to share some easy ways to reduce unnecessary energy use while still enjoying all of your family's favorite dishes. | Image courtesy of Flickr user Jennuine Captures. How to Be Energy Efficient in Your Kitchen this Thanksgiving Easy ways to reduce unnecessary energy use while still enjoying all of your family's favorite dishes. November 23, 2011 Energy Efficiency Wins Top Prize at EPA App Contest

259

Enforcement Letter - ELBWXT082902WS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

858 858 August 29, 2002 Dr. D. B. Shipp [ ] Bechtel BWXT Idaho, L.L.C. 2525 Freemont Avenue Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 Subject: RWMC Enforcement Letter (NTS-ID--BBWI-RWMC-2002-0002) Dear Dr. Shipp: During July 16-17, 2002, personnel from the DOE Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) conducted an onsite investigation at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) of multiple events occurring during 2001-2002. The events all involved transuranic (TRU) waste characterization, handling, and shipping activities. The investigation included a detailed review of the March 2002 event in which an incorrect payload of TRU waste drums was shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). OE also reviewed an additional seven similar events occurring in

260

Nuclear Systems Powering a Mission to Mars | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Systems Powering a Mission to Mars Systems Powering a Mission to Mars Nuclear Systems Powering a Mission to Mars November 28, 2011 - 11:23am Addthis Radioisotope Power Systems, a strong partnership between the Energy Department's Office of Nuclear Energy and NASA, has been providing the energy for deep space exploration. Assistant Secretary Lyons Assistant Secretary Lyons Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy Curiosity Mission: investigate whether the Gale Crater on Mars has ever offered environmental conditions that support the development of microbial life. This past weekend, the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity launched from Cape Canaveral with the most advanced payload of scientific gear ever used on the red planet. Its mission: to investigate whether the Gale Crater on Mars has ever

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ur3 ur4 payload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

SAFETY ANALYSIS REPORT FOR PACKAGING, MODEL 9977, ADDENDUM 3, JUSTIFICATION FOR SMALL GRAM QUANTITY CONTENTS  

SciTech Connect

This Addendum establishes a new family of content envelopes consisting of small quantities of radioactive materials. These content envelopes and specific packing configurations are shown to be subcritical. However, the dose rates of some payloads must be measured and shown to comply with applicable radiation limits. Authorization for shipment of the content envelop requires acceptance of this Addendum by the DOE-HQ certifying official as a supplement to the 9977 SARP Revision 2 and DOE-HQ?s subsequent revision of the CoC Revision 10 (which is based on SARP Addendum 2 and SARP Addendum 4) to authorize the additional content envelope. The Small Gram Quantity Content Envelopes and packing configurations will be incorporated in the next revision of the 9977 SARP.

Abramczyk, G.

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

262

Test of relativistic gravity for propulsion at the Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A design is presented of a laboratory experiment that could test the suitability of relativistic gravity for propulsion of spacecraft to relativistic speeds. An exact time-dependent solution of Einstein's gravitational field equation confirms that even the weak field of a mass moving at relativistic speeds could serve as a driver to accelerate a much lighter payload from rest to a good fraction of the speed of light. The time-dependent field of ultrarelativistic particles in a collider ring is calculated. An experiment is proposed as the first test of the predictions of general relativity in the ultrarelativistic limit by measuring the repulsive gravitational field of bunches of protons in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The estimated 'antigravity beam' signal strength at a resonant detector of each proton bunch is 3 nm/s^2 for 2 ns during each revolution of the LHC. This experiment can be performed off-line, without interfering with the normal operations of the LHC.

Franklin Felber

2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

263

Survivable pulse power space radiator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal radiator system is described for use on an outer space vehicle, which must survive a long period of nonuse and then radiate large amounts of heat for a limited period of time. The radiator includes groups of radiator panels that are pivotally connected in tandem, so that they can be moved to deployed configuration wherein the panels lie largely coplanar, and to a stowed configuration wherein the panels lie in a stack to resist micrometerorite damage. The panels are mounted on a boom which separates a hot power source from a payload. While the panels are stowed, warm fluid passes through their arteries to keep them warm enough to maintain the coolant in a liquid state and avoid embrittlement of material. The panels can be stored in a largely cylindrical shell, with panels progressively further from the boom being of progressively shorter length. 5 figs.

Mims, J.; Buden, D.; Williams, K.

1988-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

264

TRUPACT-II 157 Examination Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of examination and recovery activities performed on the TRUPACT-II 157 shipping container. The container was part of a contact-handled transuranic waste shipment being transported on a truck to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico when an accident occurred. Although the transport vehicle sustained only minor damage, airborne transuranic contamination was detected in air samples extracted from inside TRUPACT-II 157 at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Consequently, the shipping container was rejected, resealed, and returned to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory where the payload was disassembled, examined, and recovered for subsequent reshipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. This report documents the results of those activities.

Barry H. O'Brien; Jeffrey M. Lacy; Kip E. Archibald

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

The flying crowbar  

SciTech Connect

A development history is presented for Project Pluto, a joint USAF-AEC program conducted from 1957 to 1964 to create a 'supersonic low-altitude missile' (SLAM). The SLAM, which was to employ a lightweight nuclear reactor designated 'Tory' to furnish heat for an otherwise rather conventional ramjet powerplant, was projected to be capable of cruising deep into enemy territory at treetop level with a payload of several nuclear bombs that could be dropped over predetermined targets. While no SLAM was ever flight-tested, a highly successful ground test was conducted in May, 1964 with the third of the Tory nuclear reactor variants; 513 MW and the equivalent of 35,000 lb of thrust were generated.

Herken, G.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Test plan for hydrogen getters project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen levels in many transuranic (TRU) waste drums are above the compliance threshold, therefore deeming the drums non-shippable to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Hydrogen getters (alkynes and dialkynes) are known to react irreversibly with hydrogen in the presence of certain catalysts. The primary purpose of this investigation is to ascertain the effectiveness of a hydrogen getter in an environment that contains gaseous compounds commonly found in the headspace of drums containing TRU waste. It is not known whether the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) commonly found in the headspace of TRU waste drums will inhibit (poison) the effectiveness of the hydrogen getter. The results of this study will be used to assess the feasibility of a hydrogen-getter system, which is capable of removing hydrogen from the payload containers or the Transuranic package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) inner containment vessel to increase the quantity of TRU waste that can be shipped to the WIPP.

Mroz, G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Weinrach, J. [Benchmark Environmental Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Draft test plan for hydrogen getters project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen levels in many transuranic (TRU) waste drums are above the compliance threshold, therefore deeming the drums non-shippable to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Hydrogen getters (alkynes and dialkynes) are known to react irreversibly with hydrogen in the presence of certain catalysts. The primary purpose of this investigation is to ascertain the effectiveness of a hydrogen getter in an environment that contains gaseous compounds commonly found in the headspace of drums containing TRU waste. It is not known whether the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) commonly found in the headspace of TRU waste drums will inhibit (poison) the effectiveness of the hydrogen getter. The results of this study will be used to assess the feasibility of a hydrogen-getter system, which is capable of removing hydrogen from the payload containers or the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) inner containment vessel to increase the quantity of TRU waste that can be shipped to the WIPP.

Mroz, G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Weinrach, J. [Benchmark Environmental Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Field Operations Program, Toyota PRIUS Hybrid Electric Vehicle Performance Characterization Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energys Field Operations Program evaluates advanced technology vehicles in real-world applications and environments. Advanced technology vehicles include pure electric, hybrid electric, hydrogen, and other vehicles that use emerging technologies such as fuel cells. Information generated by the Program is targeted to fleet managers and others considering the deployment of advanced technology vehicles. As part of the above activities, the Field Operations Program has initiated the testing of the Toyota Prius hybrid electric vehicle (HEV), a technology increasingly being considered for use in fleet applications. This report describes the Pomona Loop testing of the Prius, providing not only initial operational and performance information, but also a better understanding of HEV testing issues. The Pomona Loop testing includes both Urban and Freeway drive cycles, each conducted at four operating scenarios that mix minimum and maximum payloads with different auxiliary (e.g., lights, air conditioning) load levels.

Francfort, James Edward; Nguyen, N.; Phung, J.; Smith, J.; Wehrey, M.

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Definition of Events For Channel-Oriented Telephony Signalling", Work  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This document specifies an Internet standards track protocol for the Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for improvements. Please refer to the current edition of the "Internet Official Protocol Standards " (STD 1) for the standardization state and status of this protocol. Distribution of this memo is unlimited. This memo updates RFC 4733 to add event codes for telephony signals used for channel-associated signalling when carried in the telephony event RTP payload. It supersedes and adds to the original assignment of event codes for this purpose in Section 3.14 of RFC 2833. As documented in Appendix A of RFC 4733, some of the RFC 2833 events have been deprecated because their specification was ambiguous, erroneous, or redundant. In fact, the degree of change from Section 3.14 of RFC 2833 is such that implementations of the present document will be fully backward compatible with RFC 2833 implementations only

H. Schulzrinne; T. Taylor

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Solar sail propulsion: enabling new capabilities for heliophysics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar sails can play a critical role in enabling solar and heliophysics missions. Solar sail technology within NASA is currently at 80% of TRL-6, suitable for an in-flight technology demonstration. It is conceivable that an initial demonstration could carry scientific payloads that, depending on the type of mission, are commensurate with the goals of the three study panels of the 2010 Heliophysics Survey. Follow-on solar sail missions, leveraging advances in solar sail technology to support Heliophysics Survey goals, would then be feasible. This white paper reports on a sampling of missions enabled by solar sails, the current state of the technology, and what funding is required to advance the current state of technology such that solar sails can enable these missions.

Johnson, L; Alhorn, D; Heaton, A; Vansant, T; Campbell, B; Pappa, R; Keats, W; Liewer, P C; Alexander, D; Ayon, J; Wawrzyniak, G; Burton, R; Carroll, D; Matloff, G; Kezerashvili, R Ya

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Shipment and Disposal of Solidified Organic Waste (Waste Type IV) to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In April of 2005, the last shipment of transuranic (TRU) waste from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site to the WIPP was completed. With the completion of this shipment, all transuranic waste generated and stored at Rocky Flats was successfully removed from the site and shipped to and disposed of at the WIPP. Some of the last waste to be shipped and disposed of at the WIPP was waste consisting of solidified organic liquids that is identified as Waste Type IV in the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC) document. Waste Type IV waste typically has a composition, and associated characteristics, that make it significantly more difficult to ship and dispose of than other Waste Types, especially with respect to gas generation. This paper provides an overview of the experience gained at Rocky Flats for management, transportation and disposal of Type IV waste at WIPP, particularly with respect to gas generation testing. (authors)

D'Amico, E. L [Washington TRU Solutions (United States); Edmiston, D. R. [John Hart and Associates (United States); O'Leary, G. A. [CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC (United States); Rivera, M. A. [Aspen Resources Ltd., Inc. (United States); Steward, D. M. [Boulder Research Enterprises, LLC (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Energy-Efficient Delay-Constrained Transmission and Sensing for Cognitive Radio Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we study energy-efficient transmission for Cognitive Radio (CR) which opportunistically operates on Primary User's (PU's) channel through spectrum sensing. Spectrum sensing and compulsory idling (for incumbent protection) introduce energy-overheads for Secondary User's (SU's) operations, and thus an appropriate balance between energy consumption in data transmission and energy-overheads is required. We formulate this problem as a discrete-time Markov Decision Process (MDP) in which the SU aims at minimizing its average cost (including both energy consumption and delay cost) to finish a target traffic payload through an appropriate rate allocation. Based on Certainty Equivalent Control, we propose a low-complexity rate-adaptation policy that achieves comparable performance as the optimal policy. With the low-complexity policy, we quantify the impact of energy-overheads (including the power consumption for spectrum sensing and compulsory idling) on the SU transmission strategy. Specifically, the SU...

Wu, Yuan; Tsang, Danny H K; Qian, Liping

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

PAT-1 safety analysis report addendum author responses to request for additional information.  

SciTech Connect

The Plutonium Air Transportable Package, Model PAT-1, is certified under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations Part 71 by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) per Certificate of Compliance (CoC) USA/0361B(U)F-96 (currently Revision 9). The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) submitted SAND Report SAND2009-5822 to NRC that documented the incorporation of plutonium (Pu) metal as a new payload for the PAT-1 package. NRC responded with a Request for Additional Information (RAI), identifying information needed in connection with its review of the application. The purpose of this SAND report is to provide the authors responses to each RAI. SAND Report SAND2010-6106 containing the proposed changes to the Addendum is provided separately.

Weiner, Ruth F.; Schmale, David T.; Kalan, Robert J.; Akin, Lili A.; Miller, David Russell; Knorovsky, Gerald Albert; Yoshimura, Richard Hiroyuki; Lopez, Carlos; Harding, David Cameron; Jones, Perry L.; Morrow, Charles W.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Shielding analysis of neuron emitting sealed sources in S100 pipe component OVERPACK/TRUPACT-11 geometries using MCNP transport code and empirical measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this work was to estimate an upper bound for the dose at the mid-plane on the surface of a S100 Overpack, i.e., a specially designed drum for transuranium (TRU) waste containing shielding and sealed neutron sources. In addition, the dose at the surface and at a distance for a TRUPACT-II Container with 14 S100 Overpack drums was also estimated for the Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT), for Normal Condition of Transport with crushed Overpacks and for accident conditions. The source modeled was a Plutonium-Beryllium source with the Plutonium infinitely dilute in the Beryllium. In the calculations, a source of one curie per drum was modeled. The resulting dose from the calculations may be scaled to reflect multi-curie level sources. When these results are scaled to 28 curies per drum, the limiting payload, the dose rates obtained meet the requirements of the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report.

Perry, R. T. (Robert T.); Brown, T. H. (Thomas H.); Tompkins, J. A.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Implementation of Revision 19 of the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission on July 27, 2001 approved Revision 19 of the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report (SAR) and the associated TRUPACT-II Authorized Methods for Payload Control (TRAMPAC). Key initiatives in Revision 19 included matrix depletion, unlimited mixing of shipping categories, a flammability assessment methodology, and an alternative methodology for the determination of flammable gas generation rates. All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites shipping transuranic (TRU) waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) were required to implement Revision 19 methodology into their characterization and waste transportation programs by May 20, 2002. An implementation process was demonstrated by the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) in Golden, Colorado. The three-part process used by RFETS included revision of the site-specific TRAMPAC, an evaluation of the contact-handled TRU waste inventory against the regulations in Revision 19, and design and development of software to facilitate future inventory analyses.

D'Amico, E.; O'Leary, J.; Bell, S.; Djordjevic, S.; Givens, C,; Shokes, T.; Thompson, S.; Stahl, S.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

276

Quality Assurance Program Plan for TRUPACT-II Gas Generation Test Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gas Generation Test Program (GGTP), referred to as the Program, is designed to establish the concentration of flammable gases and/or gas generation rates in a test category waste container intended for shipment in the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II). The phrase "gas generationtesting" shall refer to any activity that establishes the flammable gas concentration or the flammable gas generation rate. This includes, but is not limited to, measurements performed directly on waste containers or during tests performed on waste containers. This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) documents the quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) requirements that apply to the Program. The TRUPACT-II requirements and technical bases for allowable flammable gas concentration and gas generation rates are described in the TRUPACT-II Authorized Methods for Payload Control (TRAMPAC).

Carlsbad Field Office

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

CMMAD Usability Case Study in Support of Countermine and Hazard Sensing  

SciTech Connect

During field trials, operator usability data were collected in support of lane clearing missions and hazard sensing for two robot platforms with Robot Intelligence Kernel (RIK) software and sensor scanning payloads onboard. The tests featured autonomous and shared robot autonomy levels where tasking of the robot used a graphical interface featuring mine location and sensor readings. The goal of this work was to provide insights that could be used to further technology development. The efficacy of countermine systems in terms of mobility, search, path planning, detection, and localization were assessed. Findings from objective and subjective operator interaction measures are reviewed along with commentary from soldiers having taken part in the study who strongly endorse the system.

Victor G. Walker; David I. Gertman

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Mars Pathfinder Microrover A Small, Low-Cost, Low-Power Spacecraft  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On December 5, 1996, NASA will launch its first Discovery Class Mission, the Mars Pathfinder. On July 4, 1997 the 450 kg spacecraft will enter into the Martian atmosphere and descend directly to the surface using a viking style aeroshell, parachutes, RAD rockets, and airbags to slow its decent. Once on the surface the tetrahedrally-shaped lander will open like a flower and release a 10.5 kg rover previously to the inside surface of one of the lander's three deployable petals. The rover will then drive off the lander and begin to perform a wide range of scientific and technological experiments. The significance of the rover is that although it is formally part of the mission's instrument payload, it is in reality a small spacecraft. It performs all the functions that a typical spacecraft performs including: navigation; command and data handling (command execution, data acquisition, telemetry packetization); power generation, distribution, and control; thermal control; telecommunications...

Henry Stone

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Final report on evaluation of cyclocraft support of oil and gas operations in wetland areas  

SciTech Connect

The cyclocraft is a proven hybrid aircraft, capable of VTOL, lifting heavy and bulky loads, highly controllable, having high safety characteristics and low operating costs. Mission Research Corporation (MRC), under Department of Energy sponsorship, is evaluating the potential use of cyclocraft in the transport of drill rigs, mud, pipes and other materials and equipment, in a cost effective and environmentally safe manner, to support oil and gas drilling, production, and transportation operations in wetland areas. Based upon the results of an earlier parametric study, a cyclocraft design, having a payload capacity of 45 tons and designated H.1 Cyclocraft, was selected for further study, including the preparation of a preliminary design and a development plan, and the determination of operating costs. This report contains all of the results derived from the program to evaluate the use of cyclocraft in the support of oil and gas drilling and production operations in wetland areas.

Eggington, W.J.; Stevens, P.M.; John, C.J.; Harder, B.J.; Lindstedt, D.M.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

The PACSAT Communications Experiment (PCE)  

SciTech Connect

While VITA (Volunteers in Technical Assistance) is the recognized world leader in low earth orbiting (LEO) satellite technology (below 1 GHz), its involvement in communications technologies is to facilitate renewable energy technology transfer to developing countries. A communications payload was incorporated into the UoSat 2 satellite (Surrey Univ., UK), launched in 1984; a prototype satellite (PCE) was also launched Jan 1990. US DOE awarded a second grant to VITA to design and test the prototype ground stations (command and field), install field ground stations in several developing country sites, pursue the operational licensing process, and transfer the evaluation results to the design of an operating system. This report covers the principal tasks of this grant.

1993-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ur3 ur4 payload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

The PACSAT Communications Experiment (PCE). Final report, August 13, 1990--February 12, 1992  

SciTech Connect

While VITA (Volunteers in Technical Assistance) is the recognized world leader in low earth orbiting (LEO) satellite technology (below 1 GHz), its involvement in communications technologies is to facilitate renewable energy technology transfer to developing countries. A communications payload was incorporated into the UoSat 2 satellite (Surrey Univ., UK), launched in 1984; a prototype satellite (PCE) was also launched Jan 1990. US DOE awarded a second grant to VITA to design and test the prototype ground stations (command and field), install field ground stations in several developing country sites, pursue the operational licensing process, and transfer the evaluation results to the design of an operating system. This report covers the principal tasks of this grant.

1993-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

282

Nuclear-powered Hysat spacecraft: comparative design study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The study shows that the all-nuclear spacecraft can have a substantial weight advantage over a hybrid (nuclear/solar) or all-solar spacecraft, owing to a further reduction in power requirement, and to the elimination of such equipment as the sensor gimbal and rotating joint assemblies. Because the need for a sun-oriented section is eliminated, the all-nuclear spacecraft can be designed as a monolithic structure, with the sensor and other payload firmly secured in a fixed position on the structure. This enhances attitude stability while minimizing structural weight and eliminating the need for flexible fluid lines. Sensor motion can be produced, varied, and controlled within the limits specified by the study contractors by moving the entire spacecraft in the prescribed pattern. A simple attitude control system using available hardware suffices to meet all requirements.

Raab, B.

1975-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

AGING AND SURVEILLANCE OF VITON GLT O-RINGS IN MODEL 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGES  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive material packages (DOT Type B) such as the Model 9975 are used to transport Pu-bearing materials. The 9975 package provides double payload containment via nested stainless steel primary (PCV) and secondary (SCV) containment vessels. The containment vessels are closed by a conical plug sealed with dual O-rings (Figure 1) made of Parker Seals compound V0835-75, based on Viton{reg_sign} GLT fluoroelastomer. The outer O-ring is credited as being leaktight per ANSI N14.5 with a leak rate of <1E-07 ref cc/sec. The 9975 package is being used for interim storage in the K-Area Material Storage (KAMS) facility at the Savannah River Site. The aging performance of the O-rings is being studied to provide the storage facility a technical basis for service life prediction and safety analysis.

Hoffman, E; Skidmore,E; Daugherty, W; Dunn, A; Dunn, K

2009-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

284

AGING AND SURVEILLANCE OF VITON GLT O-RINGS IN MODEL 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radioactive material packages (DOT Type B) such as the Model 9975 are used to transport Pu-bearing materials. The 9975 package provides double payload containment via nested stainless steel primary (PCV) and secondary (SCV) containment vessels. The containment vessels are closed by a conical plug sealed with dual O-rings (Figure 1) made of Parker Seals compound V0835-75, based on Viton{reg_sign} GLT fluoroelastomer. The outer O-ring is credited as being leaktight per ANSI N14.5 with a leak rate of aging performance of the O-rings is being studied to provide the storage facility a technical basis for service life prediction and safety analysis.

Hoffman, E; Skidmore,E; Daugherty, W; Dunn, A; Dunn, K

2009-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

285

Radiation Level Changes at RAM Package Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper will explore design considerations required to meet the regulations that limit radiation level variations at external surfaces of radioactive material (RAM) packages. The radiation level requirements at package surfaces (e.g. TS-R-1 paragraphs 531 and 646) invoke not only maximum radiation levels, but also strict limits on the allowable increase in the radiation level during transport. This paper will explore the regulatory requirements by quantifying the amount of near surface movement and/or payload shifting that results in a 20% increase in the radiation level at the package surface. Typical IP-2, IP-3, Type A and Type B packaging and source geometries will be illustrated. Variations in surface radiation levels are typically the result of changes in the geometry of the surface due to an impact, puncture or crush event, or shifting and settling of radioactive contents.

Opperman, Erich [Washington Savannah River Company; Hawk, Mark B [ORNL; Kapoor, Ashok [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Packaging and Transportation; Natali, Ronald [R. B. Natali Consulting, Inc.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

New Horizons: Anticipated Scientific Investigations at the Pluto System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The New Horizons spacecraft will achieve a wide range of measurement objectives at the Pluto system, including color and panchromatic maps, 1.25-2.50 micron spectral images for studying surface compositions, and measurements of Pluto's atmosphere (temperatures, composition, hazes, and the escape rate). Additional measurement objectives include topography, surface temperatures, and the solar wind interaction. The fulfillment of these measurement objectives will broaden our understanding of the Pluto system, such as the origin of the Pluto system, the processes operating on the surface, the volatile transport cycle, and the energetics and chemistry of the atmosphere. The mission, payload, and strawman observing sequences have been designed to acheive the NASA-specified measurement objectives and maximize the science return. The planned observations at the Pluto system will extend our knowledge of other objects formed by giant impact (such as the Earth-moon), other objects formed in the outer solar system (such ...

Young, Leslie A; Weaver, Harold A; Bagenal, Fran; Binzel, Richard P; Buratti, Bonnie; Cheng, Andrew F; Cruikshank, Dale; Gladstone, G Randall; Grundy, William M; Hinson, David P; Horanyi, Mihaly; Jennings, Donald E; Linscott, Ivan R; McComas, David J; McKinnon, William B; McNutt, Ralph; Moore, Jeffery M; Murchie, Scott; Porco, Carolyn C; Reitsema, Harold; Reuter, Dennis C; Spencer, John R; Slater, David C; Strobel, Darrell; Summers, Michael E; Tyler, G Leonard

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Studying the Imaging Characteristics of Ultra Violet Imaging Telescope (UVIT) through Numerical Simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ultra-Violet Imaging Telescope (UVIT) is one of the five payloads aboard the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO)'s ASTROSAT space mission. The science objectives of UVIT are broad, extending from individual hot stars, star-forming regions to active galactic nuclei. Imaging performance of UVIT would depend on several factors in addition to the optics, e.g. resolution of the detectors, Satellite Drift and Jitter, image frame acquisition rate, sky background, source intensity etc. The use of intensified CMOS-imager based photon counting detectors in UVIT put their own complexity over reconstruction of the images. All these factors could lead to several systematic effects in the reconstructed images. A study has been done through numerical simulations with artificial point sources and archival image of a galaxy from GALEX data archive, to explore the effects of all the above mentioned parameters on the reconstructed images. In particular the issues of angular resolution, photometric accuracy and photometric...

Srivastava, Mudit K; Tandon, Shyam N

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Lidar-based Hazard Avoidance for Safe Landing on Mars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hazard avoidance is a key technology for landing large payloads safely on the surface of Mars. During hazard avoidance a lander uses onboard sensors to detect hazards in the landing zone, autonomously selects a safe landing site, and then maneuvers to the new site. Design of a system for hazard avoidance is facilitated by simulation where trades involving sensor and mission requirements can be explored. This paper describes the algorithms and models that comprise a scanning lidarbased hazard avoidance simulation including a terrain generator, a lidar model, hazard avoidance algorithms and powered landing guidance algorithms. Preliminary simulation results show that the proposed hazard avoidance algorithms are effective at detecting hazards and guiding the lander to a safe landing site. 1

Andrew Johnson; James Collier; Aron Wolf

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Herschel Space Observatory - An ESA facility for far-infrared and submillimetre astronomy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Herschel was launched on 14 May 2009, and is now an operational ESA space observatory offering unprecedented observational capabilities in the far-infrared and submillimetre spectral range 55-671 {\\mu}m. Herschel carries a 3.5 metre diameter passively cooled Cassegrain telescope, which is the largest of its kind and utilises a novel silicon carbide technology. The science payload comprises three instruments: two direct detection cameras/medium resolution spectrometers, PACS and SPIRE, and a very high-resolution heterodyne spectrometer, HIFI, whose focal plane units are housed inside a superfluid helium cryostat. Herschel is an observatory facility operated in partnership among ESA, the instrument consortia, and NASA. The mission lifetime is determined by the cryostat hold time. Nominally approximately 20,000 hours will be available for astronomy, 32% is guaranteed time and the remainder is open to the worldwide general astronomical community through a standard competitive proposal procedure.

Pilbratt, G L; Passvogel, T; Crone, G; Doyle, D; Gageur, U; Heras, A M; Jewell, C; Metcalfe, L; Ott, S; Schmidt, M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Binary hyper-redundant robotic manipulator concept  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Continuously actuated robotic manipulators are the most common type of manipulators even though they require sophisticated and expensive control and sensor systems to function with high accuracy and repeatability. Binary hyper-redundant (Bi-HR) robotic manipulators are potential candidates to be used in applications where high repeatability and reasonable accuracy are required. Such applications include pick-and-place, spot welding and assistants to people with disabilities. Generally, the Bi-HR manipulator is relatively inexpensive, lightweight, and has a high payload to arm weight ratio. This paper discusses a concept of Bi-HR manipulator, influencing concepts to the Bi-HR, examples of applications, and its advantages and disadvantages. 1.

Jackrit Suthakorn

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

The Experimental Performance of a Mobile Manipulator Control Algorithm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results are presented of an experimental study of a recently developed motion control algorithm for mobile manipulators. First, the dynamic interactions between a mobile manipulator and its vehicle are shown to lead to poor performance when a conventional fixed-base controller, which neglects these interactions, is used. Then the mobile manipulator control algorithm, which accounts for dynamic vehicle motions caused by manipulator motions, is shown to be stable and to perform well, while using only limited sensory data, such as would be practically available in highly unstructured field environments. 1:Introduction Robotic manipulators are being considered for a wide variety of applications outside of their traditional factory settings. These applications, such as fire-fighting, toxic waste cleanup, and planetary exploration will require the manipulators to operate from moving vehicles, i.e. as mobile manipulators, see Fig. 1 [1]. Gravity Large Payload Sensing Suspension & Soil...

Norbert A. M. Hootsmans; Steven Dubowsky; Patrick Z. Mo

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Technical Review Report for the Application for Contents Amendment for Shipping Isentropic Compression Experiment (ICE) Apparatus in 9977 Packaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the review of Application for Contents Amendment for Shipping Isentropic Compression Experiment (ICE) Apparatus in 9977 Packaging, prepared by Savannah River Packaging Technology (SRPT) of Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) of Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, -- the Submittal -- at the request of the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Agency's (NNSA) Albuquerque Facility Operations Division, for the shipment of the ICE apparatus from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), to Sandia National Laboratory (SNL). The ICE apparatus consists of a stainless steel assembly containing about 8 grams of {sup 239}Pu or its dose equivalent as noted in Table 1, Comparison of 9977 Content C.1 and the ICE Radioactive Contents, of the Submittal. The ICE target is mounted on the transport container assembly base. A Viton{sup R} O-ring seals the transport container base to the transport container body. Another Viton{sup R} O-ring seals the transport container handle to the transport container body. The ICE apparatus weighs less than 30 pounds and has less than 0.6 watts decay heat rate. For the Model 9977 Package, the maximum payload weight is 100 pounds and the maximum decay heat rate is 19 watts. Thus, the maximum payload weight and the maximum decay heat rate for the Model 9977 Package easily bound those for the ICE apparatus. This Addendum supplements the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), Revision 2, for the Model 9977 Package and Addendum 1, Revision 2, to Revision 2 of the Model 9977 Package SARP. The ICE apparatus is considered as part of Content Envelope C.6, Samples and Sources, under the submittal for the Model 9978 Package SARP currently under review. The Staff at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) recommends that the Submittal be approved by the DOE-Headquarters Certifying Official (EM-60), and incorporated into a subsequent revision to the current Certificate of Compliance (CoC), to the Model 9977-96 Packaging.

West, M

2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

293

Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Dynamic-Tracking Directional Wireless Antennas for Low Powered Applications that Require Reliable Extended Range Operations in Time Critical Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The proven value of DOD Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) will ultimately transition to National and Homeland Security missions that require real-time aerial surveillance, situation awareness, force protection, and sensor placement. Public services first responders who routinely risk personal safety to assess and report a situation for emergency actions will likely be the first to benefit from these new unmanned technologies. Packable or Portable small class UAVs will be particularly useful to the first responder. They require the least amount of training, no fixed infrastructure, and are capable of being launched and recovered from the point of emergency. All UAVs require wireless communication technologies for real- time applications. Typically on a small UAV, a low bandwidth telemetry link is required for command and control (C2), and systems health monitoring. If the UAV is equipped with a real-time Electro-Optical or Infrared (EO/Ir) video camera payload, a dedicated high bandwidth analog/digital link is usually required for reliable high-resolution imagery. In most cases, both the wireless telemetry and real-time video links will be integrated into the UAV with unity gain omni-directional antennas. With limited on-board power and payload capacity, a small UAV will be limited with the amount of radio-frequency (RF) energy it transmits to the users. Therefore, packable and portable UAVs will have limited useful operational ranges for first responders. This paper will discuss the limitations of small UAV wireless communications. The discussion will present an approach of utilizing a dynamic ground based real-time tracking high gain directional antenna to provide extend range stand-off operation, potential RF channel reuse, and assured telemetry and data communications from low-powered UAV deployed wireless assets.

Scott G. Bauer; Matthew O. Anderson; James R. Hanneman

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

DEVELOPMENT OF THE TRU WASTE TRANSPORTATION FLEET--A SUCCESS STORY  

SciTech Connect

Since March 1999, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located in southeastern New Mexico, has been operated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO), as a repository for the permanent disposal of defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste. More than 1,450 shipments of TRU waste for WIPP disposal have been completed, and the WIPP is currently receiving 12 to 16 shipments per week from five DOE sites around the nation. One of the largest fleets of Type B packagings supports the transportation of TRU waste to WIPP. This paper discusses the development of this fleet since the original Certificate of Compliance (C of C) for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) was issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 1989. Evolving site programs, closure schedules of major sites, and the TRU waste inventory at the various DOE sites have directed the sizing and packaging mix of this fleet. This paper discusses the key issues that guided this fleet development, including the following: While the average weight of a 55-gallon drum packaging debris could be less than 300 pounds (lbs.), drums containing sludge waste or compacted waste could approach the maximum allowable weight of 1,000 lbs. A TRUPACT-II shipment may consist of three TRUPACT-II packages, each of which is limited to a total weight of 19,250 lbs. Payload assembly weights dictated by ''as-built'' TRUPACT-II weights limit each drum to an average weight of 312 lbs when three TRUPACT-IIs are shipped. To optimize the shipment of heavier drums, the HalfPACT packaging was designed as a shorter and lighter version of the TRUPACT-II to accommodate a heavier load. Additional packaging concepts are currently under development, including the ''TRUPACT-III'' packaging being designed to address ''oversized'' boxes that are currently not shippable in the TRUPACT-II or HalfPACT due to size constraints. Shipment optimization is applicable not only to the addition of new packagings, but also to the addition of new payload containers (used inside the NRC-approved Type B packaging) with revised design limits. For example, to address the shipment of specific TRU waste forms, a series of pipe overpack payload containers have been designed and approved by the NRC. The ''standard'' pipe overpack configuration is designed to allow the shipment of higher fissile gram containers, each with a maximum fissile gram equivalent (FGE) loading of 200 grams (g). For shipments of waste packaged in the standard pipe overpack, the FGE limit is 2,800 g per TRUPACT-II and 1,400 g per HalfPACT. The ''S100'' and ''S200'' pipe overpack configurations allow the use of shielded configurations of the pipe overpack for shipment of specific gamma- and neutron-emitting waste forms. The 72-B Cask and the 10-160B Cask have been approved by the NRC for the transportation of remote-handled (RH) TRU waste, which comprises a small fraction of the overall inventory that will be shipped to WIPP.

Devarakonda, Murthy; Morrison, Cindy; Brown, Mike

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

295

TRUPACT-II Operating and Maintenance Instructions  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to provide the technical requirements for preparation for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of a Transuranic Package Transporter Model II (TRUPACT-II) Shipping Package and directly related components. This document complies with the minimum requirements as specified in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificate of Compliance (C of C) 9218. In the event there is a conflict between this document and the TRUPACT-II SARP, the TRUPACT-II SARP shall govern. TRUPACT-II C of C number 9218 states, ''... each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application.'' It further states, ''... each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the application.'' Chapter 9 of the TRUPACT-II SARP charges the Westinghouse Electric Corporation Waste Isolation Division (WID) with assuring that the TRUPACT-II is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. To meet this requirement and verify consistency of operations when loading and unloading the TRUPACT-II on the trailer, placing a payload in the packaging, unloading the payload from the packaging, or performing maintenance, the U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Area Office (U.S. DOE/CAO) finds it necessary to implement the changes that follow. This TRUPACT-II maintenance document represents a change to previous philosophy regarding site specific procedures for the use of the TRUPACT-II. This document details the instructions to be followed to consistently operate and maintain the TRUPACT-II. The intent of these instructions is to ensure that all users of the TRUPACT-II follow the same or equivalent instructions. Users may achieve this intent by any of the following methods: (1) Utilizing these instructions as is, or (2) Attaching a site-specific cover page/letter to this document stating that these are the instructions to be used at their location, or (3) Sites may prepare their own document using the steps in this document word-for-word, in-sequence, including Notes and Cautions. Site specific information may be included as deemed necessary. Submit the document to WID National TRU Programs for approval. Any revision made subsequent to WID TRU Program's approval shall be reviewed and approved by WID TRU Programs. A copy of the approval letter from WID National TRU Programs should be available for audit purposes. Users shall develop site-specific procedures addressing leak testing, preoperational activities, quality assurance, hoisting and rigging, and radiation health physics to be used in conjunction with the instructions contained in this document. Users desiring to recommend changes to this document may submit their recommendations to the WID National TRU Programs for evaluation. If approved, the change(s) will be incorporated into this document for use by all TRUPACT-II users. User sites will be audited to this document to ensure compliance within one year from the effective date of this revision. This document discusses operating instructions, required inspections and maintenance for the following: TRUPACT-II packaging, and Miscellaneous packaging, special tools, and equipment. Packaging and payload handling equipment and transport trailers have been specifically designed for use with the TRUPACT-II Packaging. This document discusses the required instructions for use of the following equipment in conjunction with the TRUPACT-II Packaging: TRUPACT-II Mobile Loading Unit (MLU), Adjustable Center-of-Gravity Lift Fixture (ACGLF), and TRUPACT-II Transport Trailer. Attachment E contains the various TRUPACT-II packaging interface control drawings, leak-test and vent-port tool drawings, ACGLF drawings, and tie-down drawings that identify the various system components.

Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Waste Isolation Division

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

296

Feasibility Study for an Autonomous UAV -Magnetometer System -- Final Report on SERDP SEED 1509:2206  

SciTech Connect

Large areas across the United States are potentially contaminated with UXO, with some ranges encompassing tens to hundreds of thousands of acres. Technologies are needed which will allow for cost effective wide area scanning with 1) near 100 % coverage and 2) near 100 % detection of subsurface ordnance or features indicative of subsurface ordnance. The current approach to wide area scanning is a multi-level one, in which medium altitude fixed wing optical imaging is used for an initial site assessment. This assessment is followed with low altitude manned helicopter based magnetometry followed by surface investigations using either towed geophysical sensor arrays or man portable sensors. In order to be effective for small UXO detection, the sensing altitude for magnetic site investigations needs to be on the order of 1 3 meters. These altitude requirements means that manned helicopter surveys will generally only be feasible in large, open and relatively flat terrains. While such surveys are effective in mapping large areas relatively fast there are substantial mobilization/demobilization, staffing and equipment costs associated with these surveys (resulting in costs of approximately $100-$150/acre). Surface towed arrays provide high resolution maps but have other limitations, e.g. in their ability to navigate rough terrain effectively. Thus, other systems are needed allowing for effective data collection. An UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) magnetometer platform is an obvious alternative. The motivation behind such a system is that it would be safer for the operators, cheaper in initial and O&M costs, and more effective in terms of site characterization. However, while UAV data acquisition from fixed wing platforms for large (> 200 feet) stand off distances is relatively straight forward, a host of challenges exist for low stand-off distance (~ 6 feet) UAV geophysical data acquisition. The objective of SERDP SEED 1509:2006 was to identify the primary challenges associated with a low stand off distance autonomous UAV magnetometer platform and to investigate whether these challenges can be resolved successfully such that a successful UAV magnetometer platform can be constructed. The primary challenges which were identified and investigated include: 1. The feasibility of assembling a payload package which integrates magnetometers, accurate positioning systems (DGPS, height above ground measurement), obstacle avoidance systems, power infrastructure, communications and data storage as well as auxiliary flight controls 2. The availability of commercial UAV platforms with autonomous flight capability which can accommodate this payload package 3. The feasibility of integrating obstacle avoidance controls in UAV platform control 4. The feasibility of collecting high quality magnetic data in the vicinity of an UAV.

Roelof Versteeg; Mark McKay; Matt Anderson; Ross Johnson; Bob Selfridge; Jay Bennett

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

NEP for a Kuiper Belt Object Rendezvous Mission  

SciTech Connect

Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) are a recently-discovered set of solar system bodies which lie at about the orbit of Pluto (40 AU) out to about 100 astronomical units (AU). There are estimated to be about 100,000 KBOS with a diameter greater than 100 km. KBOS are postulated to be composed of the pristine material which formed our solar system and may even have organic materials in them. A detailed study of KBO size, orbit distribution, structure, and surface composition could shed light on the origins of the solar system and perhaps even on the origin of life in our solar system. A rendezvous mission including a lander would be needed to perform chemical analysis of the surface and sub-surface composition of KBOS. These requirements set the size of the science probe at around a ton. Mission analyses show that a fission-powered system with an electric thruster could rendezvous at 40 AU in about 13.0 years with a total {Delta}V of 46 krnk. It would deliver a 1000-kg science payload while providing ample onboard power for relaying data back to earth. The launch mass of the entire system (power, thrusters, propellant, navigation, communication, structure, science payload, etc.) would be 7984 kg if it were placed into an earth-escape trajectory (C=O). Alternatively, the system could be placed into a 700-km earth orbit with more propellant,yielding a total mass in LEO of 8618 kg, and then spiral out of earth orbit to arrive at the KBO in 14.3 years. To achieve this performance, a fission power system with 100 kW of electrical power and a total mass (reactor, shield, conversion, and radiator) of about 2350 kg. Three possible configurations are proposed: (1) a UZrH-fueled, NaK-cooled reactor with a steam Rankine conversion system, (2) a UN-fueled gas-cooled reactor with a recuperated Brayton conversion system, and (3) a UN-fueled heatpipe-cooled reactor with a recuperated Brayton conversion system. (Boiling and condensation in the Rankine system is a technical risk at present.) All three of these systems have the potential to meet the weight requirement for the trip and to be built in the near term.

HOUTS,MICHAEL G.; LENARD,ROGER X.; LIPINSKI,RONALD J.; PATTON,BRUCE; POSTON,DAVID I.; WRIGHT,STEVEN A.

1999-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

298

DOE NCSP Review of TRUPACT-II/HalfPACT Fissile Limits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Office of Nuclear Material & Spent Fuel, EM-21, tasked the CSSG to perform a scoping study to determine the feasibility of increasing the fissile mass loading limits for specified TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT packages and containers. The results of the scoping study may provide insights and technical guidance for establishing fissile mass loading limits at waste generator sites and at the waste repository. The goal is to reduce costs of transporting fissile material to the WIPP from EM's various closure sites. This report documents the results of the scoping study and demonstrates that it is feasible to significantly increase the fissile mass loading limits in the TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT packages and containers. Depending upon the particular payload containers used, the number of shipments to WIPP could be reduced by at least a factor of 2 and as much as a factor of 16 and the number of total payload containers required ''down-hole'' at WIPP could be reduced by at least a factor of 2 and as much as about 6. These cost savings result simply from applying a more realistic criticality analysis model rather than the very conservative, hypothetical, bounding analysis used to support the existing fissile mass loading limits. However, the applications of existing and developmental computational tools, nuclear data, and experiments from the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program have the potential to further reduce transportation and disposal container costs on the order of 7% to 17%. It is suggested that EM proceed with an effort to do the required formal analyses and pursue SARP supplements to take advantage of these savings. The success of these analyses are dependent upon the availability of the majority of the infrastructure supported by the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program as defined in the Five-Year Plan for the program. Finally, it should be noted that these potential cost savings are based only on a criticality safety feasibility study and do not take into account other technical factors from other disciplines that may or may not impact the final approved loadings. The CSSG concurs that the results of this scoping study addresses the tasking statement provided by EM-21.

Goluoglu, S.

2002-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

299

Deep PDF parsing to extract features for detecting embedded malware.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The number of PDF files with embedded malicious code has risen significantly in the past few years. This is due to the portability of the file format, the ways Adobe Reader recovers from corrupt PDF files, the addition of many multimedia and scripting extensions to the file format, and many format properties the malware author may use to disguise the presence of malware. Current research focuses on executable, MS Office, and HTML formats. In this paper, several features and properties of PDF Files are identified. Features are extracted using an instrumented open source PDF viewer. The feature descriptions of benign and malicious PDFs can be used to construct a machine learning model for detecting possible malware in future PDF files. The detection rate of PDF malware by current antivirus software is very low. A PDF file is easy to edit and manipulate because it is a text format, providing a low barrier to malware authors. Analyzing PDF files for malware is nonetheless difficult because of (a) the complexity of the formatting language, (b) the parsing idiosyncrasies in Adobe Reader, and (c) undocumented correction techniques employed in Adobe Reader. In May 2011, Esparza demonstrated that PDF malware could be hidden from 42 of 43 antivirus packages by combining multiple obfuscation techniques [4]. One reason current antivirus software fails is the ease of varying byte sequences in PDF malware, thereby rendering conventional signature-based virus detection useless. The compression and encryption functions produce sequences of bytes that are each functions of multiple input bytes. As a result, padding the malware payload with some whitespace before compression/encryption can change many of the bytes in the final payload. In this study we analyzed a corpus of 2591 benign and 87 malicious PDF files. While this corpus is admittedly small, it allowed us to test a system for collecting indicators of embedded PDF malware. We will call these indicators features throughout the rest of this report. The features are extracted using an instrumented PDF viewer, and are the inputs to a prediction model that scores the likelihood of a PDF file containing malware. The prediction model is constructed from a sample of labeled data by a machine learning algorithm (specifically, decision tree ensemble learning). Preliminary experiments show that the model is able to detect half of the PDF malware in the corpus with zero false alarms. We conclude the report with suggestions for extending this work to detect a greater variety of PDF malware.

Munson, Miles Arthur; Cross, Jesse S. (Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

PERFORMANCE STATISTICS WEIghTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2650 lbs 2650 lbs Delivered Curb Weight 9 : 2615 lbs Distribution F/R 9 (%): 58.6/41.4 GVWR: 3164 lbs GAWR F/R: 1797/1378lbs Payload 5 : 564 lbs Performance Goal: 400 lbs DIMENSIONS Wheelbase: 95.9 in Track F/R: 59.6/59.1 in Length: 160.6 in Width: 68.5 in Height: 54.9 in Ground Clearance: 5.3 in Performance Goal: 5.0 in TIRES Tire Mfg: Dunlop Tire Model: SP Sport 1000m Tire Size: 195 / 55 R16 86V Tire Pressure F/R: 30/30 psi Spare Installed: Yes ENgINE Model: 1.5 L I4 Output 8 : 122 hp @ 6000 rpm Configuration: Inline Four-cylinder Displacement: 1.5 L Fuel Tank Capacity: 10.6 gal Fuel Type: Unleaded Gasoline © 2010 Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved VEhICLE FEATuRES Base Vehicle: 2011 Honda CRZ EX Hybrid VIN: JHMZF1C64BS002982

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ur3 ur4 payload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

PERFORMANCE STATISTICS WEIghTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

245 lbs 245 lbs Delivered Curb Weight: 4118 lbs GVWR: 5675 lbs GAWR F/R: 2865/3130 lbs Distribution F/R: 59/41 % Payload: 1557 lbs Performance Goal: 400 lbs DIMENSIONS Wheelbase: 106.7 in Track F/R: 61.9/61.1 in Length: 185.3 in Width: 71.5 in Height: 68.6 in Ground Clearance: 5.9 in Performance Goal: 5.0 in TIRES Tire Mfg: Goodyear Tire Model: Integrity Tire Size: P225/65R17 Tire Pressure F/R: 32/32 Spare Installed: Yes ENgINE Model: 3MZ-FE Output: 208 hp @ 5600 rpm Configuration: V6 Displacement: 3.3 L Fuel Tank Capacity: 17.2 gal Fuel Type: Unleaded Gasoline © 2010 Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved VEhICLE FEATuRES Base Vehicle: 2006 Highlander VIN: JTEDW21A860005681 Seatbelt Positions: Seven Standard Features: Air Conditioning

302

untitled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2723 lbs 2723 lbs Delivered Curb Weight: 2756 lbs Distribution F/R (%): 58/42 GVWR: 3630 lbs GAWR F/R: 1881/1782lbs Payload 5 : 907 lbs Performance Goal: 400 lbs DIMENSIONS Wheelbase: 100.4 in Track F/R: 58.7/58.1 in Length: 172.3 in Width: 66.7 in Height: 56.2 in Ground Clearance: 5.5 in Performance Goal: 5.0 in TIRES Tire Mfg: Dunlop Tire Model: SP31 A/S Tire Size: 175 / 65 R15 84S Tire Pressure F/R: 33/33 psi Spare Installed: Yes ENGINE Model: 1.3 L LDA series I4 Output: 98 hp @ 5800 rpm Configuration: Inline Four-cylinder Displacement: 1.3 L Fuel Tank Capacity: 10.6 gal Fuel Type: Unleaded Gasoline © 2009 Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved VEHICLE FEATURES Base Vehicle: 2010 Honda Insight Hybrid VIN: JHMZE2H78AS010141 Seatbelt Positions: Five Standard Features:

303

untitled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

720 lbs 720 lbs Delivered Curb Weight: 3698 lbs Distribution F/R (%): 60.4/39.6 GVWR: 4701 lbs GAWR F/R: 2492/2209 lbs Payload 5 : 850 lbs Performance Goal: 400 lbs DIMENSIONS Wheelbase: 107.4 in Track F/R: 61.7/61.3 in Length: 190.6 in Width: 72.2 in Height: 56.9 in Ground Clearance: 7 in Performance Goal: 5.0 in TIRES Tire Mfg: Michelin Tire Model: Energy MXV4 SS Tire Size: P225/50VR17 Tire Pressure F/R: 33/33 psi Spare Installed: Yes ENGINE Model: 2.5L Atkinson Cycle Output: 156 hp @ 6000 rpm Configuration: Inline Four-cylinder Displacement: 2.5 L Fuel Tank Capacity: 17.5 gal Fuel Type: Unleaded Gasoline © 2009 Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved VEHICLE FEATURES Base Vehicle: 2010 Ford Fusion Hybrid VIN: 3FADP0L34AR144757 Seatbelt Positions: Five

304

PERFORMANCE STATISTICS WEIghTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

365 lbs 365 lbs Delivered Curb Weight: 4510 lbs Distribution F/R: 57/43 % GVWR: 5520 lbs GAWR F/R: 2865/2865 lbs Payload: 1010 lbs Performance Goal: 400 lbs DIMENSIONS Wheelbase: 107.0 inches Track F/R: 62/61.2 inches Length: 187.2 inches Width: 72.6 inches Height: 66.4 inches Ground Clearance: 7.1 inches Performance Goal: 5.0 inches TIRES Tire Mfg: Goodyear Tire Model: Eagle RS-A Tire Size: P215/55R18 Tire Pressure F/R: 30/30 psi Spare Installed: Yes ENgINE Model: 3MZ-FE Output: 208 hp @ 5600 rpm Configuration: DOHC V6 Displacement: 3.3 L Fuel Tank Capacity: 17.2 Gallons Fuel Type: Unleaded Gasoline © 2010 Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved VEhICLE FEATuRES Base Vehicle: 2006 Lexus RX 400h VIN: JTJHW31U160002575 Seatbelt Positions: Five

305

Criticality safety and shielding design issues in the development of a high-capacity cask for truck transport  

SciTech Connect

General Atomics (GA) will be submitting an application for certification to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for the GA-4 and GA-9 Casks In 1992. The GA-4 and GA-9 Casks are high-capacity legal weight truck casks designed to transport light water reactor spent fuel assemblies. To maintain a capacity of four pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) spent fuel assemblies, the GA-4 Cask uses burnup credit as part of the criticality control for initial enrichments over 3.0 wt% U-235. Using the US Department of Energy (DOE) Burnup Credit Program as a basis, GA has performed burnup credit analysis which is included in the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP). The GA-9 Cask can meet the criticality safety requirements using the ``fresh fuel`` assumption. Our approach to shielding design is to optimize the GA-4 and GA-9 Cask shielding configurations for minimum weights and maximum payloads. This optimization involves the use of the most effective shielding material, square cross-section geometry with rounded corners and tapered neutron shielding sections in the non-fuel regions.

Boshoven, J.K.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Criticality safety and shielding design issues in the development of a high-capacity cask for truck transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

General Atomics (GA) will be submitting an application for certification to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for the GA-4 and GA-9 Casks In 1992. The GA-4 and GA-9 Casks are high-capacity legal weight truck casks designed to transport light water reactor spent fuel assemblies. To maintain a capacity of four pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) spent fuel assemblies, the GA-4 Cask uses burnup credit as part of the criticality control for initial enrichments over 3.0 wt% U-235. Using the US Department of Energy (DOE) Burnup Credit Program as a basis, GA has performed burnup credit analysis which is included in the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP). The GA-9 Cask can meet the criticality safety requirements using the fresh fuel'' assumption. Our approach to shielding design is to optimize the GA-4 and GA-9 Cask shielding configurations for minimum weights and maximum payloads. This optimization involves the use of the most effective shielding material, square cross-section geometry with rounded corners and tapered neutron shielding sections in the non-fuel regions.

Boshoven, J.K.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

SCADA Protocol Anomaly Detection Utilizing Compression (SPADUC) 2013  

SciTech Connect

There is a significant need to protect the nations energy infrastructures from malicious actors using cyber methods. Supervisory, Control, and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems may be vulnerable due to the insufficient security implemented during the design and deployment of these control systems. This is particularly true in older legacy SCADA systems that are still commonly in use. The purpose of INLs research on the SCADA Protocol Anomaly Detection Utilizing Compression (SPADUC) project was to determine if and how data compression techniques could be used to identify and protect SCADA systems from cyber attacks. Initially, the concept was centered on how to train a compression algorithm to recognize normal control system traffic versus hostile network traffic. Because large portions of the TCP/IP message traffic (called packets) are repetitive, the concept of using compression techniques to differentiate non-normal traffic was proposed. In this manner, malicious SCADA traffic could be identified at the packet level prior to completing its payload. Previous research has shown that SCADA network traffic has traits desirable for compression analysis. This work investigated three different approaches to identify malicious SCADA network traffic using compression techniques. The preliminary analyses and results presented herein are clearly able to differentiate normal from malicious network traffic at the packet level at a very high confidence level for the conditions tested. Additionally, the master dictionary approach used in this research appears to initially provide a meaningful way to categorize and compare packets within a communication channel.

Gordon Rueff; Lyle Roybal; Denis Vollmer

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

An Exploration Perspective of Beamed Energy Propulsion  

SciTech Connect

The Vision for Exploration is currently focused on flying the Space Shuttle safely to complete our Space Station obligations, retiring the Shuttle in 2010, then returning humans to the Moon and learning how to proceed to Mars and beyond. The NASA budget still includes funds for science and aeronautics but the primary focus is on human exploration. Fiscal constraints have led to pursuing exploration vehicles that use heritage hardware, particularly existing boosters and engines, with the minimum modifications necessary to satisfy mission requirements. So, pursuit of immature technologies is not currently affordable by NASA. Beamed energy is one example of an immature technology, from a human exploration perspective, that may eventually provide significant benefits for human exploration of space, but likely not in the near future. Looking to the more distant future, this paper will examine some of the criteria that must be achieved by beamed energy propulsion to eventually contribute to human exploration of the solar system. The analysis focuses on some of the implications of increasing the payload fraction of a launch vehicle, with a quick look at trans-lunar injection. As one would expect, there is potential for benefit, and there are concerns. The analysis concludes with an assessment of the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) for some beamed energy propulsion components, indicating that TRL 2 is close to being completed.

Cole, John [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Marshall Space Flight Center, AL 35812 (United States)

2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

309

Parameter Studies for the VISTA Spacecraft Concept  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The baseline design for the VISTA spacecraft concept employs a diode-pumped solid-state laser (DPSSL) driver. This type of driver is now under development at LLNL and elsewhere as an extension of the mature solid-state (glass) laser technology developed for terrestrial applications of inertial confinement fusion (ICF). A DPSSL is repratable up to at least 30 Hz, and has an efficiency soon to be experimentally verified of at least 10%. By using a detailed systems code including the essential physics of a DPSSL, we have run parameter studies for the baseline roundtrip (RT) to Mars with a 100-ton payload. We describe the results of these studies as a function of the optimized (minimum) RT flight duration. We also demonstrate why DT fuel gives the best performance, although DD, D3He, or even antimatter can be used, and why DT-ignited DD is probably the fuel most preferred. We also describe the overall power flow, showing where the fusion energy is ultimately utilized, and estimate the variation in performance to the planets dictated by variations in target gain and other parameters.

Orth, C D

2000-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

310

PAT-1 safety analysis report addendum.  

SciTech Connect

The Plutonium Air Transportable Package, Model PAT-1, is certified under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations Part 71 by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) per Certificate of Compliance (CoC) USA/0361B(U)F-96 (currently Revision 9). The purpose of this SAR Addendum is to incorporate plutonium (Pu) metal as a new payload for the PAT-1 package. The Pu metal is packed in an inner container (designated the T-Ampoule) that replaces the PC-1 inner container. The documentation and results from analysis contained in this addendum demonstrate that the replacement of the PC-1 and associated packaging material with the T-Ampoule and associated packaging with the addition of the plutonium metal content are not significant with respect to the design, operating characteristics, or safe performance of the containment system and prevention of criticality when the package is subjected to the tests specified in 10 CFR 71.71, 71.73 and 71.74.

Weiner, Ruth F.; Schmale, David T.; Kalan, Robert J.; Akin, Lili A.; Miller, David Russell; Knorovsky, Gerald Albert; Yoshimura, Richard Hiroyuki; Lopez, Carlos; Harding, David Cameron; Jones, Perry L.; Morrow, Charles W.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

arcControlTower: the System for Atlas Production and Analysis on ARC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PanDA, the Atlas management and distribution system for production and analysis jobs on EGEE and OSG clusters, is based on pilot jobs to increase the throughput and stability of the job execution on grid. The ARC middleware uses specific approach which tightly connects the job requirements with cluster capabilities like resource usage, software availability and caching of input files. The pilot concept renders the ARC features useless. The arcControlTower is the job submission system which merges the pilot benefits and ARC advantages. It takes the pilot payload from the panda server and submits the jobs to the Nordugrid ARC clusters as regular jobs, with all the job resources known in advance. All the pilot communication with the PanDA server is done by the arcControlTower, so it plays the role of a pilot factory and the pilot itself. There are several advantages to this approach: no grid middleware is needed on the worker nodes, the fair-share between the production and user jobs is tuned with the arcControl...

Filipcic, A; The ATLAS collaboration

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

arcControlTower, the System for Atlas Production and Analysis on ARC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract content Panda, the Atlas management and distribution system for production and analysis jobs on EGEE and OSG clusters, is based on pilot jobs to increase the throughput and stability of the job execution on grid. The ARC middleware uses specific approach which tightly connects the job requirements with cluster capabilities like resource usage, software availability and caching of input files. The pilot concept renders the ARC features useless. The arcControlTower is the job submission system which merges the pilot benefits and ARC advantages. It takes the pilot payload from the panda server and submits the jobs to the Nordugrid ARC clusters as regular jobs, with all the resources known in advance. All the pilot communication with the panda server is done by the arcControlTower, so it plays the role of a pilot factory and the pilot itself. There are several advantages to this approach: no grid middleware is needed on the worker nodes, the fair-share between the production and user jobs is tuned with t...

Filipcic, A; The ATLAS collaboration

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Operator control systems and methods for swing-free gantry-style cranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for eliminating swing motions in gantry-style cranes while subject to operator control is presented. The present invention comprises an infinite impulse response ("IIR") filter and a proportional-integral ("PI") feedback controller (50). The IIR filter receives input signals (46) (commanded velocity or acceleration) from an operator input device (45) and transforms them into output signals (47) in such a fashion that the resulting motion is swing free (i.e., end-point swinging prevented). The parameters of the IIR filter are updated in real time using measurements from a hoist cable length encoder (25). The PI feedback controller compensates for modeling errors and external disturbances, such as wind or perturbations caused by collision with objects. The PI feedback controller operates on cable swing angle measurements provided by a cable angle sensor (27). The present invention adjusts acceleration and deceleration to eliminate oscillations. An especially important feature of the present invention is that it compensates for variable-length cable motions from multiple cables attached to a suspended payload.

Feddema, John T. (Albuquerque, NM); Petterson, Ben J. (Albuquerque, NM); Robinett, III, Rush D. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Speculations on future opportunities to evolve Brayton powerplants aboard the space station  

SciTech Connect

The Space Station provides a unique, low-risk environment in which to evolve new capabilities. In this way, the Station will grow in capacity, in its range of capabilities, and in its economy of operation as a laboratory, as a center for materials processing, and as a center for space operations. Although both Rankine and Brayton cycles, two concepts for solar-dynamic power generation, now compete to power the Station, this paper confines its attention to the Brayton cycle using a mixture of He and Xe as its working fluid. Such a Brayton powerplant to supply the Station`s increasing demands for both electric power and heat has the potential to gradually evolve higher and higher performance by exploiting already-evolved materials (ASTAR-811C and molten-Li heat storage), its peak cycle temperature rising ultimately to 1500 K. Adapting the Station to exploit long tethers (200 to 300 km long) could yield large increases in payloads to LEO, to GEO, and to distant destinations in the solar system. Such tethering of the Space Station would not only require additional power for electric propulsion but also would so increase nuclear safety that nuclear powerplants might provide this power. From an 8000-kWt SP-100 reactor, thermoelectric power generation could produce 300 kWe, or adapted solar-Brayton cycle, 2400 to 2800 kWe.

English, R.E.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

SHARP, a first step towards a full sized Jules Verne Launcher  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A vital element for space exploration and utilization is the ability to affordably place large quantities of consumables and building material into low earth orbit. Calculations and supportive data indicate this can be done with a large hydrogen gas gun referred to as the Jules Verne Launcher (JVL). We present a design for the JVL based upon the concept of side injecting preheated hydrogen along a long barrel. This dramatically reduces the peak pressures in the launcher as well as the pressures and g-loads at the vehicle. The JVL has the promise of reducing payload delivery costs to Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to below $500/kg. The Super High Altitude Research Project (SHARP) is a conventional two-stage hydrogen gas gun which is configured to launch 5 kg packages on suborbital trajectories. It is the first step towards the much larger Jules Verne system and will demonstrate several important features of the larger system. SHARP is currently in the middle of a series of tests aimed at its first milestone. This is to launch 5 kg at 4 km/sec horizontally. In its inclined configuration SHARP should launch vehicles to apogees in excess of 400 km and ranges in excess of 700 km.

Bertolini, L.R.; Hunter, J.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Powell, J.R. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Tidman, D.A. [GT-Devices, Inc., Alexandria, VA (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

The beryllium hollow-body solar sail: exploration of the Sun's gravitational focus and the inner Oort Cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spacecraft kinematics, peak perihelion temperature and space environment effects during solar-radiation-pressure acceleration for a beryllium hollow-body interstellar solar sail inflated with hydrogen fill gas are investigated. We demonstrate that diffusion is alleviated by an on-board fill gas reserve and electrostatic pressure can be alleviated by increasing perihelion distance. For a 0.1 AU perihelion, a 937 m radius sail with a sail mass of 150 kg and a payload mass of 150 kg, perihelion sail temperature is about 1000 K, peak acceleration is about 0.6 g, and solar-system exit velocity is about 400 km/s. After sail deployments, the craft reaches the 200 AU heliopause in 2.5 years, the Sun's inner gravitational focus at 550 AU in about 6.5 years and 2,550 AU in 30 years. The Be hollow-body sail could be applied in the post 2040 time frame to verify general relativity predictions regarding the Sun's inner gravitational focus and to explore particles and fields in the Sun's inner Oort Comet Cloud.

Matloff, Gregory L; Maccone, Claudio; Johnson, Les

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

The beryllium hollow-body solar sail: exploration of the Sun's gravitational focus and the inner Oort Cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spacecraft kinematics, peak perihelion temperature and space environment effects during solar-radiation-pressure acceleration for a beryllium hollow-body interstellar solar sail inflated with hydrogen fill gas are investigated. We demonstrate that diffusion is alleviated by an on-board fill gas reserve and electrostatic pressure can be alleviated by increasing perihelion distance. For a 0.1 AU perihelion, a 937 m radius sail with a sail mass of 150 kg and a payload mass of 150 kg, perihelion sail temperature is about 1000 K, peak acceleration is about 0.6 g, and solar-system exit velocity is about 400 km/s. After sail deployments, the craft reaches the 200 AU heliopause in 2.5 years, the Sun's inner gravitational focus at 550 AU in about 6.5 years and 2,550 AU in 30 years. The Be hollow-body sail could be applied in the post 2040 time frame to verify general relativity predictions regarding the Sun's inner gravitational focus and to explore particles and fields in the Sun's inner Oort Comet Cloud.

Gregory L. Matloff; Roman Ya. Kezerashvili; Claudio Maccone; Les Johnson

2008-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

318

Accidental Drop of a Carbon Steel/Lead Shipping Cask (HFEF 14) at Low Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A shielded cask is used to transport radioactive materials between facilities at the Idaho National Laboratory. The cask was fabricated with an outer and inner shell of A36 carbon steel with lead poured in the annular space between the shells to provide radiation shielding. Carbon steel is known to be susceptible to low-temperature brittle fracture under impact loading. This paper will present the analysis results representing postulated transportation accidents during on-site transfers of the cask at subzero temperatures. The accident scenarios were based on a series of cask drops onto a rigid surface from a height of 1.83m (6 ft.) Finite element models of the cask and its contents were solved and post processed using the ABAQUS software. Each model was examined for failure to contain radioactive materials and/or significant loss of radiation shielding. Results of these analyses show that the body of the cask exhibits considerable ruggedness and will remain largely intact after the impact. There will be deformation of the main cask body with localized brittle failure of the cask outer shell and door structure. The cask payload outer waste can remains in the cask but will experience some permanent plastic deformation in each drop. It will not be deformed to the point where it will rupture, thus maintaining confinement of the can contents.

Brian D. Hawkes; Michael E. Nitzel

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Parallel IP Lookup using Multiple SRAM-based Pipelines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pipelined SRAM-based algorithmic solutions have become competitive alternatives to TCAMs (ternary content addressable memories) for high throughput IP lookup. Multiple pipelines can be utilized in parallel to improve the throughput further. However, several challenges must be addressed to make such solutions feasible. First, the memory distribution over different pipelines as well as across different stages of each pipeline must be balanced. Second, the traffic among these pipelines should be balanced. Third, the intra-flow packet order should be preserved. In this paper, we propose a parallel SRAM-based multi-pipeline architecture for IP lookup. A two-level mapping scheme is developed to balance the memory requirement among the pipelines as well as across the stages in a pipeline. To balance the traffic, we propose a flow pre-caching scheme to exploit the inherent caching in the architecture. Our technique uses neither a large reorder buffer nor complex reorder logic. Instead, a payload exchange scheme exploiting the pipeline delay is used to maintain the intra-flow packet order. Extensive simulation using real-life traffic traces shows that the proposed architecture with 8 pipelines can achieve a throughput of up to 10 billion packets per second (GPPS) while preserving intra-flow packet order.

Weirong Jiang; et al.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Test Plan for Hydrogen Getters Project - Phase II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen levels in many transuranic (TRU) waste drums are above the compliance threshold, therefore deeming the drums non-shippable to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Hydrogen getters (alkynes and dialkynes) are known to react irreversibly with hydrogen in the presence of certain catalysts. The primary purpose of this investigation is to ascertain the effectiveness of a hydrogen getter in an environment that contains gaseous compounds commonly found in the headspace of drums containing TRU waste. It is not known whether the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) commonly found in the headspace of TRU waste drums will inhibit (''poison'') the effectiveness of the hydrogen getter. The result of this study will be used to assess the feasibility of a hydrogen-getter system, which is capable of removing hydrogen from the payload containers or the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) inner containment vessel to increase the quantity of TRU waste that can be shipped to the WIPP. Phase II for the Hydrogen Getters Project will focus on four primary objectives: Conduct measurements of the relative permeability of hydrogen and chlorinated VOCs through Tedlar (and possibly other candidate packaging materials) Test alternative getter systems as alternatives to semi-permeable packaging materials. Candidates include DEB/Pd/Al2O3 and DEB/Cu-Pd/C. Develop, test, and deploy kinetic optimization model Perform drum-scale test experiments to demonstrate getter effectiveness

Mroz, G.

1999-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ur3 ur4 payload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

TRUPACT-II Hydrogen G-Valve Program Test Plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This test plan describes the objectives, scope, participants, and components of the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) Hydrogen G-Value Program (GH2P). The GH2P builds on the experience, results, and experimental setup of the TRUPACT-II Matrix Depletion Program (MDP) to establish effective hydrogen G-values (G-values) for additional waste matrices. This plan details the experimental design and test matrices for experiments to measure the G-value for additional waste matrices, including first- and second-stage sludges at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, and molten salt extraction residues with varying amounts of residual moisture (i.e., unbound water). Data collected from the GH2P will be used to support an application to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission for G-values and corresponding wattage limits for the TRUPACT-II payloads containing these waste matrices. The testing will also evaluate the ability to determine G-values on a waste stream basis.

Mroz, Eugene J.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Uncertainties in the effects of burnup and their impact on criticality safety licensing criteria  

SciTech Connect

Current criteria for criticality safety for spent fuel shipping and storage casks are conservative because no credit is permitted for the effects of burnup of the fuel inside the cask. Cask designs that will transport and store large numbers of fuel assemblies (20 or more) must devote a substantial part of their payload to criticality control measures if they are to meet this criteria. The Department of Energy is developing the data necessary to support safety analyses that incorporate the effects of burnup for the next generation of spent fuel shipping casks. The efforts described here are devoted to the development of acceptance criteria that will be the basis for accepting safety analyses. Preliminary estimates of the uncertainties of the effects of burnup have been developed to provide a basis for the consideration of critically safety criteria. The criticality safety margins in a spent fuel shipping or storage cask are dominated by the portions of a fuel assembly that are in low power regions of a reactor core, and the reactor operating conditions are very different from spent fuel storage or transport cask conditions. Consequently, the experience that has been gathered during years of reactor operation does not apply directly to the prediction of criticality safety margins for spent fuel shipping or storage casks. The preliminary estimates of the uncertainties presented in this paper must be refined by both analytical and empirical studies that address both the magnitude of the uncertainties and their interdependence. 9 refs., 5 figs.

Carlson, R.W.; Fisher, L.E.

1990-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

323

Design Considerations, Modeling and Analysis for the Multispectral Thermal Imager  

SciTech Connect

The design of remote sensing systems is driven by the need to provide cost-effective, substantive answers to questions posed by our customers. This is especially important for space-based systems, which tend to be expensive, and which generally cannot be changed after they are launched. We report here on the approach we employed in developing the desired attributes of a satellite mission, namely the Multispectral Thermal Imager. After an initial scoping study, we applied a procedure which we call: "End-to-end modeling and analysis (EEM)." We began with target attributes, translated to observable signatures and then propagated the signatures through the atmosphere to the sensor location. We modeled the sensor attributes to yield a simulated data stream, which was then analyzed to retrieve information about the original target. The retrieved signature was then compared to the original to obtain a figure of merit: hence the term "end-to-end modeling and analysis." We base the EEM in physics to ensure high fidelity and to permit scaling. As the actual design of the payload evolves, and as real hardware is tested, we can update the EEM to facilitate trade studies, and to judge, for example, whether components that deviate from specifications are acceptable.

Borel, C.C.; Clodius, W.B.; Cooke, B.J.; Smith, B.W.; Weber, P.G.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

DYNA3D analysis of the DT-20 shipping container  

SciTech Connect

A DYNA3D model of the DT-20 shipping container was constructed. Impact onto a rigid steel surface at a velocity of 44 ft/sec (30 foot gravity drop) was studied. The orientation of most interest was a side-drop, but end and corner drops were also studied briefly. The assembly for the baseline side impact contained a 150 lb. payload. During this drop, the outer drum sustains plastic strains of up to 0.15, with most the deformation near the rim. The plywood/Celotex packing is crushed about 3 inches. The inner sealed can sees significant stresses, but barely reaches the onset of yielding in some local areas. Based on hand calculations, the bolts joining the can halves could see stresses near 50 ksi. It is felt that overall, the container should survive this drop. However, detailed modeling of the rim closure and the center bolted joint was not possible due to time constraints. Furthermore, better material models and properties are needed for the Celotex, plywood, and honeycomb in particular. 39 figs., 1 tab.

Logan, R.W.; Lovejoy, S.C.

1991-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

325

Four years of operations and results with FORTE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The FORTE (Fast Onboard Recording of Transient Events) satellite was launched on 29 August 1997 and has been in continuous operation since that time. FORTE was placed in a nearly circular, 825-km-altitude, 70 degrees inclination orbit by a Pegasus rocket funded by Air Force Space Test Program. The Department of Energy funded the FORTE satellite, which was designed and built at Los Alamos. FORTE's successful launch and engineered robustness were a result of several years of dedicated work by the joint Los Alamos National Laboratory/Sandia National Laboratory project team, led through mission definition, payload and satellite development, and launch by Dr. Stephen Knox. The project is now led by Dr. Abram Jacobson. FORTE carries a suite of instruments, an optical system and a rf system, for the study of lightning and anthropogenic signals. As a result of this effort, new understandings of lightning events have emerged as well as a more complete understanding of the relationship between optical and rf lightning events. This paper will provide an overview of the FORTE satellite and will discuss the on orbit performance of the subsystems.

Klingner, P. L. (Phillip L.); Carlson, L. D. (Leslie D.); Dingler, R. D. (Robert D.); Esch-Mosher, D. M. (Diana M.); Jacobson, A. R.; Roussel-Dupre, D. (Diane)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Safety analysis report for the TRUPACT-II shipping package (condensed version). Volume 2, Rev. 14  

SciTech Connect

This appendix determines the effective G values for payload shipping categories of contact handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste materials, based on the radiolytic G values for waste materials that are discussed in detail in Appendix 3.6.8 of the Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package. The effective G values take into account self-absorption of alpha decay energy inside particulate contamination and the fraction of energy absorbed by nongas-generating materials. As described in Appendix 3.6.8, an effective G value, G{sub eff}, is defined by: G{sub eff} - {Sigma}{sub M} (F{sub M} x G{sub M}) F{sub M}-fraction of energy absorbed by material maximum G value for a material where the sum is over all materials present inside a waste container. The G value itself is determined primarily by the chemical properties of the material and its temperature. The value of F is determined primarily by the size of the particles containing the radionuclides, the distribution of radioactivity on the various materials present inside the waste container, and the stopping distance of alpha particles in air, in the waste materials, or in the waste packaging materials.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

A Low-Cost Natural Gas/Freshwater Aerial Pipeline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Offered is a new type of low-cost aerial pipeline for delivery of natural gas, an important industrial and residential fuel, and freshwater as well as other payloads over long distances. The offered pipeline dramatically decreases the construction and operation costs and the time necessary for pipeline construction. A dual-use type of freight pipeline can improve an arid rural environment landscape and provide a reliable energy supply for cities. Our aerial pipeline is a large, self-lofting flexible tube disposed at high altitude. Presently, the term "natural gas" lacks a precise technical definition, but the main components of natural gas are methane, which has a specific weight less than air. A lift force of one cubic meter of methane equals approximately 0.5 kg. The lightweight film flexible pipeline can be located in the Earth-atmosphere at high altitude and poses no threat to airplanes or the local environment. The authors also suggest using lift force of this pipeline in tandem with wing devices for che...

Bolonkin, A; Bolonkin, Alexander; Cathcart, Richard

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Materials of Criticality Safety Concern in Waste Packages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

10 CFR 71.55 requires in part that the fissile material package remain subcritical when considering 'the most reactive credible configuration consistent with the chemical and physical form of the material'. As waste drums and packages may contain unlimited types of materials, determination of the appropriately bounding moderator and reflector materials to ensure compliance with 71.55 requires a comprehensive analysis. Such an analysis was performed to determine the materials or elements that produce the most reactive configuration with regards to both moderation and reflection of a Pu-239 system. The study was originally performed for the TRUPACT-II shipping package and thus the historical fissile mass limit for the package, 325 g Pu-239, was used [1]. Reactivity calculations were performed with the SCALE package to numerically assess the moderation or reflection merits of the materials [2]. Additional details and results are given in SAIC-1322-001 [3]. The development of payload controls utilizing process knowledge to determine the classification of special moderator and/or reflector materials and the associated fissile mass limit is also addressed. (authors)

Larson, S.L. [Science Applications International Corporation, 301 Laboratory Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Day, B.A. [Washington TRU Solutions LLC, 4021 National Parks Highway, Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Testing in support of transportation of residues in the pipe overpack container  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The disposition of the large back-log of plutonium residues at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats) will require interim storage and subsequent shipment to a waste repository. Current plants call for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and the transportation to WIPP in the TRUPACT-II. The transportation phase will require the residues to be packaged in a container that is more robust than a standard 55-gallon waste drum. Rocky Flats has designed the Pipe Overpack Container to meet this need. The tests described here were performed to qualify the Pipe Overpack Container as a waste container for shipment in the TRUPACT-II. Using a more robust container will assure the fissile materials in each container can not be mixed with the fissile material from the other containers and will provide criticality control. This will allow an increase in the payload of the TRUPACT-II from 325 fissile gram equivalents to 2,800 fissile gram equivalents.

Ammerman, D.J.; Bobbe, J.G.; Arviso, M.; Bronowski, D.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Transportation Systems Dept.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

TRUPACT-II procedures and maintenance instructions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide the technical requirements for operation, inspection and maintenance of a TRUPACT-II Shipping Package and directly related components. This document shall supply the minimum requirements as specified in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) and Certificate of Compliance (C of C) 9218. In the event there is a conflict between this document and the TRUPACT-II SARP (NRC Certificate of Compliance No. 9218), the TRUPACT-II SARP shall govern. This document details the operations, maintenance, repair, replacement of components, as well as the documentation required and the procedures to be followed to maintain the integrity of the TRUPACT-II container. These procedures may be modified for site use, but as a minimum all parameters and format listed herein must be included in any site modified version. For convenience and where applicable steps may be performed out of sequence. Packaging and payload handling equipment and transport trailers have been specifically designed for use with the TRUPACT-II Packaging. This document discusses the minimum required procedures for use of the adjustable center of gravity lift fixture and the TRUPACT-II transport trailer in conjunction with the TRUPACT-II Packaging.

NONE

1994-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

331

The BEAR program NRL plasma physics instrumentation measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The BEAR program was a joint effort to launch, and demonstrate the feasibility of operating, a 1 MeV 10 ma Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) accelerator from a space platform. The accelerator design and manufacture were the responsibility of Los Alamos National Lab (LANL); diagnostics associated with accelerator operation and beam-plasma effects were also to be undertaken by LANL and NRL. Payload Integration and Telemetry was provided by the Air Force Geophysical Lab (AFGL) and Northeastern University (NEU). Beam effects on the local plasma in addition to accelerator produced vehicle effects (e.g., charging) were the responsibility of NRL as outlined herein. The BEAR rocket was launched successfully during the early morning hours of July 13 from White Sands Missile Range, White Sands, N.M. The NRL contribution to this effort included three instrument packages designed to diagnose beam-plasma and vehicle-plasma interactions. The instruments included: (1) Langmuir probe (LP) design consisting of 4 separate sensors; (2) High voltage (HIV) Langmuir Probe designed to monitor vehicle charging through current polarity changes; and (3) Plasma Wave Receive (PWR) designed to characterize the plasma wave emissions covering a broad frequency range from near DC to 50 MHz.

Walker, D.N.; Baumback, M.M.; Haas, D.G.; Rodriguez, P.; Siefring, C.L.; Doggett, R.A. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

1989-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

332

Power system requirements and selection for the space exploration initiative  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) seeks to reestablish a US program of manned and unmanned space exploration. The President has called for a program which includes a space station element, a manned habitation of the moon, and a human exploration of Mars. The NASA Synthesis Group has developed four significantly different architectures for the SEI program. One key element of a space exploration effort is the power required to support the missions. The Power Speciality Team of the Synthesis Group was tasked with assessing and evaluating the power requirements and candidate power technologies for such missions. Inputs to the effort came from existing NASA studies as well as other governments agency inputs such as those from DOD and DOE. In addition, there were industry and university briefings and results of solicitations from the AIAA and the general public as part of the NASA outreach effort. Because of the variety of power needs in the SEI program, there will be a need for multiple power system technologies including solar, nuclear and electrochemical. Due to the high rocket masses required to propel payloads to the moon and beyond to Mars, there is great emphasis placed on the need for high power density and high energy density systems. Power system technology development work is needed results will determine the ultimate technology selections. 23 refs., 10 figs.

Biringer, K.L. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Bartine, D.E. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Buden, D. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Foreman, J. (Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)); Harrison, S. (Strategic Defense Initiative Organization, Washington, DC (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Cactus and Visapult: An ultra-high performance grid-distributedvisualization architecture using connectionless protocols  

SciTech Connect

This past decade has seen rapid growth in the size,resolution, and complexity of Grand Challenge simulation codes. Thistrend is accompanied by a trend towards multinational, multidisciplinaryteams who carry out this research in distributed teams, and thecorresponding growth of Grid infrastructure to support these widelydistributed Virtual Organizations. As the number and diversity ofdistributed teams grow, the need for visualization tools to analyze anddisplay multi-terabyte, remote data becomes more pronounced and moreurgent. One such tool that has been successfully used to address thisproblem is Visapult. Visapult is a parallel visualization tool thatemploys Grid-distributed components, latency tolerant visualization andgraphics algorithms, along with high performance network I/O in order toachieve effective remote analysis of massive datasets. In this paper wediscuss improvements to network bandwidth utilization and responsivenessof the Visapult application that result from using connectionlessprotocols to move data payload between the distributed Visapultcomponents and a Grid-enabled, high performance physics simulation usedto study gravitational waveforms of colliding black holes: The Cactuscode. These improvements have boosted Visapult's network efficiency to88-96 percent of the maximum theoretical available bandwidth onmulti-gigabit Wide Area Networks, and greatly enhanced interactivity.Such improvements are critically important for future development ofeffective interactive Grid applications.

Bethel, E. Wes; Shalf, John

2002-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

334

Engineering Challenges in Antiproton Triggered Fusion Propulsion  

SciTech Connect

During the last decade antiproton triggered fusion propulsion has been investigated as a method for achieving high specific impulse, high thrust in a nuclear pulse propulsion system. In general the antiprotons are injected into a pellet containing fusion fuel with a small amount of fissionable material (i.e., an amount less than the critical mass) where the products from the fission are then used to trigger a fusion reaction. Initial calculations and simulations indicate that if magnetically insulated inertial confinement fusion is used that the pellets should result in a specific impulse of between 100,000 and 300,000 seconds at high thrust. The engineering challenges associated with this propulsion system are significant. For example, the antiprotons must be precisely focused. The pellet must be designed to contain the fission and initial fusion products and this will require strong magnetic fields. The fusion fuel must be contained for a sufficiently long time to effectively release the fusion energy, and the payload must be shielded from the radiation, especially the excess neutrons emitted, in addition to many other particles. We will review the recent progress, possible engineering solutions and the potential performance of these systems.

Cassenti, Brice [Department. of Engineering and Science, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 275 Windsor Avenue, Hattford, CT 06120 (United States); Kammash, Terry [Nuclear Engineering Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

335

doi:10.1155/2010/953537 Review Article Nanotargeted Radionuclides for Cancer Nuclear Imaging and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Current progress in nanomedicine has exploited the possibility of designing tumor-targeted nanocarriers being able to deliver radionuclide payloads in a site or molecular selective manner to improve the efficacy and safety of cancer imaging and therapy. Radionuclides of auger electron-, ?-, ?-, and ?-radiation emitters have been surface-bioconjugated or after-loaded in nanoparticles to improve the efficacy and reduce the toxicity of cancer imaging and therapy in preclinical and clinical studies. This article provides a brief overview of current status of applications, advantages, problems, up-to-date research and development, and future prospects of nanotargeted radionuclides in cancer nuclear imaging and radiotherapy. Passive and active nanotargeting delivery of radionuclides with illustrating examples for tumor imaging and therapy are reviewed and summarized. Research on combing different modes of selective delivery of radionuclides through nanocarriers targeted delivery for tumor imaging and therapy offers the new possibility of large increases in cancer diagnostic efficacy and therapeutic index. However, further efforts and challenges in preclinical and clinical efficacy and toxicity studies are required to translate those advanced technologies to the clinical applications for cancer patients. 1.

Internal Radiotherapy; Gann Ting; Chih-hsien Chang; Hsin-ell Wang; Te-wei Lee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Octahedron configuration for a displacement noise-cancelling gravitational wave detector in space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study for the first time a 3-dimensional octahedron constellation for a space-based gravitational wave detector, which we call OGO: the Octahedral Gravitational Observatory. With six spacecraft the constellation is able to remove laser frequency noise and acceleration disturbances from the gravitational wave signal without needing LISA-like drag-free control, thereby simplifying the payloads and placing less stringent demands on the thrusters. We generalize LISA's time-delay interferometry (TDI) to displacement-noise free interferometry (DFI) by deriving a set of generators for those combinations of the data streams which cancel laser and acceleration noise. Orbit dynamical considerations suggest a halo orbit near the Lagrangian point L1, allowing only relatively short arms. For these orbits, we derive the sensitivity curve of this detector concept, which has a peak sensitivity near 100 Hz. We compare this version of OGO to the present generation of ground-based detectors and to some future detectors. Since the sensitivity of OGO is limited mainly by shot noise, we discuss how the overall sensitivity could be improved by using advanced technologies that reduce just this noise source. We also investigate the scientific potentials of such a detector, which include observing gravitational waves from compact binary coalescences, the stochastic background and pulsars as well as the possibility to test alternative theories of gravity. Finding alternative orbits that allow longer arms for the octahedron constellation might further improve its sensitivity and science output.

Yan Wang; Stanislav Babak; Antoine Petiteau; David Keitel; Markus Otto; Simon Barke; Fumiko Kawazoe; Alexander Khalaidovski; Vitali Mller; Daniel Schtze; Holger Wittel; Karsten Danzmann; Bernard F. Schutz

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

337

Evaluation of using cyclocranes to support drilling and production of oil and gas in wetland areas. Fourth quarterly technical progress report, Second quarter, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The planned program falls under wetlands area research related to drilling, production, and transportation of oil and gas resources. Specifically the planned program addresses an evaluation of using cyclocraft to transport drill rigs, mud, pipes and other materials and equipment in a cost effective and environmentally safe manner to support oil and gas drilling and production operations in wetland areas. The cyclocraft is a proven hybrid aircraft that utilizes aerostatic and aerodynamic lift. This type of aircraft has considerable payload capacity, VTOL capability, high controllability, low operating cost, low downwash and high safety. The benefits of using a cyclocraft to transport drill rigs and materials over environmentally-sensitive surfaces would be significant. The cyclocraft has considerable cost and operational advantages over the helicopter. The major activity during the second quarter of 1993 was focussed on completion of Task 4, Preliminary Design. The selected design has been designated H.1 Cyclocraft by MRC. Also during the report period, Task 6, Ground Support, was completed and a report containing the results was submitted to DOE. This task addressed the complete H.1 Cyclocraft system, i.e. it included the need personnel, facilities and equipment to support cyclocraft operations in wetland areas.

Eggington, W.J.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Evaluation of using cyclocranes to support drilling and production of oil and gas in Wetland Areas. Fourth quarterly report, [October--December 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The planned program falls under wetlands area research related to drilling, production, and transportation of oil and gas resources. Specifically the planned program addresses an evaluation of using cyclocraft to transport drill rigs, mud, pipes and other materials and equipment in a cost effective and environmentally safe manner to support oil and gas drilling and production operations in wetland areas. During the.reporting period, a report that contained the results of each of the five subtasks that comprise Task 1, Environmental Considerations, was prepared and submitted to DOE. The subtasks were an overview of oil and gas activities in wetlands; a review of present wetland access practices; identification of past environmental impacts experienced; definition of marsh habitat considerations and discussion of forested wetland considerations. In Task 2, Transport Requirements, a report on the acquisition of data on the transport requirements to support oil and gas drilling and production operations in Wetland Areas was prepared and submitted to DOE. Task 3, Parametric Analysis, was completed during the reporting period. The analysis showed that a cyclocraft, having a payload capacity of 45 tons, was the most economic and would be able to transport all of the required equipment and materials. The final report on the parametric analysis was to be submitted in January, 1993.

Eggington, W.J.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

339

Evaluation of using cyclocranes to support drilling and production of oil and gas in wetland areas. Third quarterly technical progress report, First quarter, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The planned program falls under wetlands area research related to drilling, production, and transportation of oil and gas resources. Specifically the planned program addresses an evaluation of using cyclocraft to transport drill rigs, mud, pipes and other materials and equipment in a cost effective and environmentally safe manner to support oil and gas drilling and production operations in wetland areas. The cyclocraft is a proven hybrid aircraft that utilizes aerostatic and aerodynamic lift. This type of aircraft has considerable payload capacity, VTOL capability, high controllability, low operating cost, low downwash and high safety. The benefits of using a cyclocraft to transport drill rigs and materials over environmentally-sensitive surfaces would be significant. The cyclocraft has considerable cost and operational advantages over the helicopter. The major activity during the report period was focussed on Task 4, Preliminary Design. The selected design has been designated H.1 Cyclocraft by MRC. The preliminary design work was based on the results of the three preceding tasks. A report was initiated that contains descriptions of the H.1 Cyclocraft and its subsystems; options available for the final aircraft design process; performance, geometry, weights and power data; logistics and considerations relating to cyclocraft operations in wetlands.

Eggington, W.J.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Evaluation of using cyclocranes to support drilling and production of oil and gas in wetland areas. Fifth quarterly technical progress report, Third quarter, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The planned program falls under wetlands area research related to drilling, production, and transportation of oil and gas resources. Specifically the planned program addresses an evaluation of using cyclocraft to transport drill rigs, mud, pipes and other materials and equipment in a cost effective and environmentally safe manner to support oil and gas drilling and production operations in wetland areas. The cyclocraft is a proven hybrid aircraft that utilizes aerostatic and aerodynamic lift. This type of aircraft has considerable payload capacity, VTOL capability, high controllability, low operating cost, low downwash and high safety. The benefits of using a cyclocraft to transport drill rigs and materials over environmentally-sensitive surfaces would be significant. The cyclocraft has considerable cost and operational advantages over the helicopter. In 1992, Task 1, Environmental Considerations, and Task 2, Transport Requirements, were completed. In the first two quarters of 1993, Task 3, Parametric Analysis, Task 4, Preliminary Design, and Task 6, Ground Support, were completed. Individual reports containing results obtained from each of these tasks were submitted to DOE. In addition, through June 30, 1993, a Subscale Test Plan was prepared under Task 5, Subscale Tests, and work was initiated on Task 7, Environmental Impacts, Task 8, Development Plan, Task 9, Operating Costs, and Task 10, Technology Transfer.

Eggington, W.J.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ur3 ur4 payload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

FOUR YEARS OF OPERATIONS AND RESULTS WITH FORTE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The FORTE (Fast Onboard Recording of Transient Events) satellite was launched on 29 August 1997 and has been in continuous operation since that time. FORTE was placed in a nearly circular, 825-km-altitude, 70 degrees inclination orbit by a Pegasus rocket funded by Air Force Space Test Program. The Department of Energy funded the FORTE satellite, which was designed and built at Los Alamos. FORTE's successful launch and engineered robustness were a result of several years of dedicated work by the joint Los Alamos National Laboratory/Sandia National Laboratory project team, led through mission definition, payload and satellite development, and launch by Dr. Stephen Knox. The project is now led by Dr. Abram Jacobson. FORTE carries a suite of instruments, an optical system and a rf system, for the study of lightning and anthropogenic signals. As a result of this effort, new understandings of lightning events have emerged as well as a more complete understanding of the relationship between optical and rf lightning events. This paper will provide an overview of the FORTE satellite and will discuss the on orbit performance of the subsystems.

D. ROUSSEL-DUPRE; P. KLINGNER; L. CARLSON; ET AL

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Performance enhancement using power beaming for electric propulsion earth orbital transporters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An electric propulsion Earth orbital transport vehicle (EOTV) can effectively deliver large payloads using much less propellant than chemical transfer methods. By using an EOTV instead of a chemical upper stage, either a smaller launch vehicle can be used for the same satellite mass or larger satellite can be deployed using the same launch vehicle. However, the propellant mass savings from using the higher specific impulse of electric propulsion may not be enough to overcome the disadvantage of the added mass and cost of the electric propulsion power source. Power system limitations have been a major factor delaying the acceptance and use of electric propulsion. This paper outlines the power requirements of electric propulsion technology being developed today, including arcjets, magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters, and ion engines. Power supply characteristics are discussed for nuclear, solar, and power-beaming systems. Operational characteristics are given for each, as are the impacts of the power supply alternative on the overall craft performance. Because of its modular nature, the power-beaming approach is able to meet the power requirements of all three electric propulsion types. Also, commonality of approach allows different electric propulsion approaches to be powered by a single power supply approach. Power beaming exhibits better flexibility and performance than on-board nuclear or solar power systems.

Dagle, J.E.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

How to implement decoy-state quantum key distribution for a satellite uplink with 50 dB channel loss  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum key distribution (QKD) takes advantage of fundamental properties of quantum physics to allow two distant parties to share a secret key; however, QKD is hampered by a distance limitation of a few hundred kilometers on earth. The most immediate solution for global coverage is to use a satellite, which can receive separate QKD transmissions from two or more ground stations and act as a trusted node to link these ground stations. In this article, we report a system capable of performing QKD in the high loss regime expected in an uplink to a satellite using weak coherent pulses and decoy states. Such a scenario profits from the simplicity of its receiver payload, but has so far considered to be infeasible due to very high transmission losses (40 - 50 dB). The high loss is overcome by implementing an innovative photon source and advanced timing analysis. Our system handles up to 57 dB photon loss in the infinite key limit, confirming the viability of the satellite uplink scenario. We emphasize that while this system was designed with a satellite uplink in mind, it could just as easily overcome high losses on any free space QKD link.

Evan Meyer-Scott; Zhizhong Yan; Allison MacDonald; Jean-Philippe Bourgoin; Hannes Hbel; Thomas Jennewein

2011-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

344

LARES succesfully launched in orbit: satellite and mission description  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On February 13th 2012, the LARES satellite of the Italian Space Agency (ASI) was launched into orbit with the qualification flight of the new VEGA launcher of the European Space Agency (ESA). The payload was released very accurately in the nominal orbit. The name LARES means LAser RElativity Satellite and summarises the objective of the mission and some characteristics of the satellite. It is, in fact, a mission designed to test Einstein's General Relativity Theory (specifically 'frame dragging' and Lense-Thirring effect). The satellite is passive and covered with optical retroreflectors that send back laser pulses to the emitting ground station. This allows accurate positioning of the satellite, which is important for measuring the very small deviations from Galilei-Newton's laws. In 2008, ASI selected the prime industrial contractor for the LARES system with a heavy involvement of the universities in all phases of the programme, from the design to the construction and testing of the satellite and separation system. The data exploitation phase started immediately after the launch under a new contract between ASI and those universities. Tracking of the satellite is provided by the International Laser Ranging Service. Due to its particular design, LARES is the orbiting object with the highest known mean density in the solar system. In this paper, it is shown that this peculiarity makes it the best proof particle ever manufactured. Design aspects, mission objectives and preliminary data analysis will be also presented.

Antonio Paolozzi; Ignazio Ciufolini

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

345

New Horizons: Anticipated Scientific Investigations at the Pluto System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The New Horizons spacecraft will achieve a wide range of measurement objectives at the Pluto system, including color and panchromatic maps, 1.25-2.50 micron spectral images for studying surface compositions, and measurements of Pluto's atmosphere (temperatures, composition, hazes, and the escape rate). Additional measurement objectives include topography, surface temperatures, and the solar wind interaction. The fulfillment of these measurement objectives will broaden our understanding of the Pluto system, such as the origin of the Pluto system, the processes operating on the surface, the volatile transport cycle, and the energetics and chemistry of the atmosphere. The mission, payload, and strawman observing sequences have been designed to acheive the NASA-specified measurement objectives and maximize the science return. The planned observations at the Pluto system will extend our knowledge of other objects formed by giant impact (such as the Earth-moon), other objects formed in the outer solar system (such as comets and other icy dwarf planets), other bodies with surfaces in vapor-pressure equilibrium (such as Triton and Mars), and other bodies with N2:CH4 atmospheres (such as Titan, Triton, and the early Earth).

Leslie A. Young; S. Alan Stern; Harold A. Weaver; Fran Bagenal; Richard P. Binzel; Bonnie Buratti; Andrew F. Cheng; Dale Cruikshank; G. Randall Gladstone; William M. Grundy; David P. Hinson; Mihaly Horanyi; Donald E. Jennings; Ivan R. Linscott; David J. McComas; William B. McKinnon; Ralph McNutt; Jeffery M. Moore; Scott Murchie; Carolyn C. Porco; Harold Reitsema; Dennis C. Reuter; John R. Spencer; David C. Slater; Darrell Strobel; Michael E. Summers; G. Leonard Tyler

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

346

Gamma-ray albedo of the moon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use the GEANT4 Monte Carlo framework to calculate the gamma-ray albedo of the Moon due to interactions of cosmic ray (CR) nuclei with moon rock. Our calculation of the albedo spectrum agrees with the EGRET data. We show that the spectrum of gamma rays from the Moon is very steep with an effective cutoff around 4 GeV (600 MeV for the inner part of the Moon disc). Apart from other astrophysical sources, the albedo spectrum of the Moon is well understood, including its absolute normalisation; this makes it a useful "standard candle" for gamma-ray telescopes, such as the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). The albedo flux depends on the incident CR spectrum which changes over the solar cycle. Therefore, it is possible to monitor the CR spectrum using the albedo gamma-ray flux. Simultaneous measurements of CR proton and helium spectra by the Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA), and observations of the albedo gamma rays by the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT), can be used to test the model predictions and will enable the GLAST LAT to monitor the CR spectrum near the Earth beyond the lifetime of PAMELA.

Igor V. Moskalenko; Troy A. Porter

2007-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

347

The Gamma-ray Albedo of the Moon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use the GEANT4 Monte Carlo framework to calculate the gamma-ray albedo of the Moon due to interactions of cosmic ray (CR) nuclei with moon rock. Our calculation of the albedo spectrum agrees with the EGRET data. We show that the spectrum of gamma rays from the Moon is very steep with an effective cutoff around 3-4 GeV (600 MeV for the inner part of the Moon disk) and exhibits a narrow pion-decay line at 67.5 MeV, perhaps unique in astrophysics. Apart from other astrophysical sources, the albedo spectrum of the Moon is well understood, including its absolute normalisation; this makes it a useful "standard candle" for gamma-ray telescopes. The steep albedo spectrum also provides a unique opportunity for energy calibration of gamma-ray telescopes, such as the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). Since the albedo flux depends on the incident CR spectrum which changes over the solar cycle, it is possible to monitor the CR spectrum using the albedo gamma-ray flux. Simultaneous measurements of CR proton and helium spectra by the Payload for Antimatter-Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA), and observations of the albedo gamma rays by the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT), can be used to test the model predictions and will enable the LAT to monitor the CR spectrum near the Earth beyond the lifetime of the PAMELA.

Igor V. Moskalenko; Troy A. Porter

2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

348

Science with Micro-X: the TES Microcalorimeter X-ray Imaging Rocket  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Micro-X is a proposed sounding rocket experiment that will combine a transition-edge-sensor X-ray-microcalorimeter array with a conical imaging mirror to obtain high-spectral-resolution images of extended and point X-ray sources. We describe the payload and the science targeted by this mission including the discussion of three possible Micro-X targets: the Puppis A supernova remnant, the Virgo Cluster, and Circinus X-1. For example, a Micro-X observation of the bright eastern knot of Puppis A will obtain a line-dominated spectrum with 90,000 counts collected in 300 seconds at 2 eV resolution across the 0.3-2.5 keV band. Micro-X will utilize plasma diagnostics to determine the thermodynamic and ionization state of the plasma, to search for line shifts and broadening associated with dynamical processes, and seek evidence of ejecta enhancement. For clusters of galaxies, Micro-X can uniquely study turbulence and the temperature distribution function. For binaries, Micro-X's high resolution spectra will separate the different processes contributing to the Fe K lines at 6 keV and give a clear view of the geometry of the gas flows and circumstellar gas.

Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Bandler, S R; Bautz, M; Boyce, K R; Brown, G V; Deiker, S; Doriese, W B; Flanagan, K; Galeazzi, M; Hilton, G C; Hwang, U; Irwin, K D; Kallman, T; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Kissel, S; Levine, A; Loewenstein, M; Martinez-Galarce, D; McCammon, D; Mushotzky, R; Petre, R; Porter, F S; Reistema, C D; Saab, T; Serlemitsos, P; Schulz, N; Smith, R; Ullom, J N

2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

349

Test plan for headspace gas sampling of remote-handled transuranic waste containers at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Seventeen remote-handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste canisters currently are stored in vertical, underground shafts at Technical Area (TA)-54, Area G, at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). These 17 RH TRU waste canisters are destined to be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for permanent disposal in the geologic repository. As the RH TRU canister is likely to be the final payload container prior to placement into the 72-B cask and shipment to the WIPP, these waste canisters provide a unique opportunity to ascertain representative flammable gas concentrations in packaged RH-TRU waste. Hydrogen, which is produced by the radiolytic decomposition of hydrogenous constituents in the waste matrix, is the primary flammable gas of concern with RH TRU waste. The primary objectives of the experiment that is described by this test plan are to sample and analyze the waste canister headspace gases to determine the concentration of hydrogen in the headspace gas and to calculate the hydrogen gas generation rate for comparison to the applicable maximum allowable hydrogen generation rate (mole/sec) limits. It is a goal of this experiment to determine the headspace gas concentrations of other gases (e.g., oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with molecular weights less than 60 g/mole) that are produced by radiolysis or present when the waste was packaged. Additionally, the temperature, pressure, and flow rate of the headspace gas will be measured.

Field, L.R.; Villarreal, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

350

Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) Request for Comments: 5879  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heuristics for Detecting ESP-NULL Packets This document describes a set of heuristics for distinguishing IPsec ESP-NULL (Encapsulating Security Payload without encryption) packets from encrypted ESP packets. These heuristics can be used on intermediate devices, like traffic analyzers, and deep-inspection engines, to quickly decide whether or not a given packet flow is encrypted, i.e., whether or not it can be inspected. Use of these heuristics does not require any changes made on existing IPsec hosts that are compliant with RFC 4303. Status of This Memo This document is not an Internet Standards Track specification; it is published for informational purposes. This document is a product of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF). It represents the consensus of the IETF community. It has received public review and has been approved for publication by the Internet Engineering Steering Group (IESG). Not all documents approved by the IESG are a candidate for any level of Internet Standard; see Section 2 of RFC 5741. Information about the current status of this document, any errata, and how to provide feedback on it may be obtained at

T. Kivinen; Authentec Inc; D. Mcdonald

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

The scalability of OTR (out-of-core thermionic reactor) space nuclear power systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this document, masses of the STAR-C power system and an optimized out-of-core thermionic reactor (OTR) power system versus power level are investigated. The impacts of key system parameters on system performance are also addressed. The STAR-C is mass competitive below about 15 kWe, but at higher power levels the scalability is relatively poor. An optimized OR is the least massive space nuclear power system below 25 kWe, and scales well to 50 kWe. The system parameters that have a significant impact on the scalability of the STAR-C are core thermal flux, thermionic converter efficiency, and core length to diameter ratio. The emissivity of the core surface is shown to be a relatively unimportant parameter. For an optimized OR power system, the most significant system parameter is the maximum allowable fuel temperature. It is also shown that if advanced radiation-hardened electronics are used in the satellite payload, a very large mass savings is realized. 10 refs., 23 figs., 7 tabs.

Gallup, D.R.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

How to implement decoy-state quantum key distribution for a satellite uplink with 50-dB channel loss  

SciTech Connect

Quantum key distribution (QKD) takes advantage of fundamental properties of quantum physics to allow two distant parties to share a secret key; however, QKD is hampered by a distance limitation of a few hundred kilometers on Earth. The most immediate solution for global coverage is to use a satellite, which can receive separate QKD transmissions from two or more ground stations and act as a trusted node to link these ground stations. In this article we report on a system capable of performing QKD in the high loss regime expected in an uplink to a satellite using weak coherent pulses and decoy states. Such a scenario profits from the simplicity of its receiver payload, but has so far been considered to be infeasible due to very high transmission losses (40-50 dB). The high loss is overcome by implementing an innovative photon source and advanced timing analysis. Our system handles up to 57 dB photon loss in the infinite key limit, confirming the viability of the satellite uplink scenario. We emphasize that while this system was designed with a satellite uplink in mind, it could just as easily overcome high losses on any free space QKD link.

Meyer-Scott, Evan; Yan, Zhizhong; MacDonald, Allison; Bourgoin, Jean-Philippe; Huebel, Hannes; Jennewein, Thomas [Institute for Quantum Computing, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue W, Waterloo ON, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

New concept: deepwater NGL/LPG plant. [Natural gas liquids and liquefied petroleum gas  

SciTech Connect

Floating platforms for processing natural gas liquids and liquefied petroleum gas (NGL/LPG) need to be stable for the processing and transfer of the products. Floating platforms are economically more attractive for producing marginal fields in deeper waters. Most of the proposed designs for crude oil and natural gas production have been tension-leg platforms, but 3 Norwegian companies are offering a converted ship as an alternative. The 3 companies will used a ship fitted with pontoons that can be raised and lowered to increase the vessel's stability. The NGL/LPG system was designed for a North Sea oil field. The feasibility study which the 3 companies completed was for a liquefaction and storage ship with a capacity of 75,000 cu m. The joint venture feels a ship has several advantages: large payload capacity; large storage capacity; ample deck space for equipment; easy to maintain; can be drydocked if necessary; and has a lower building cost. The 2 key elements to the system are the stabilization system and the turret platform.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

SOFT X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY OF THE CYGNUS LOOP SUPERNOVA REMNANT  

SciTech Connect

We present the results of a suborbital rocket flight whose scientific target was the Cygnus Loop Supernova Remnant. The payload consists of wire grid collimators, off-plane grating arrays, and gaseous electron multiplier (GEM) detectors. The system is designed for spectral measurements in the 17-107 A bandpass with a resolution up to {approx}60 ({lambda}/{Delta}{lambda}). The Extended X-ray Off-plane Spectrometer (EXOS) was launched on a Terrier-Black Brant rocket on 2009 November 13 from White Sands Missile Range and obtained 340 s of useable scientific data. The X-ray emission is dominated by O VII and O VIII, including the He-like O VII triplet at {approx}22 A. Another emission feature at {approx}45 A is composed primarily of Si XI and Si XII. The best-fit model to this spectrum is an equilibrium plasma model at a temperature of log(T) = 6.4 (0.23 keV).

Oakley, Phil [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., 37-582F, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)] [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., 37-582F, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); McEntaffer, Randall [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Van Allen Hall, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Van Allen Hall, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Cash, Webster, E-mail: Oakley@mit.edu [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)] [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

355

Small Unilamellar Vesicles: A Platform Technology for Molecular Imaging of Brain Tumors  

SciTech Connect

Molecular imaging enables the non-invasive investigation of cellular and molecular processes. Although there are challenges to overcome, the development of targeted contrast agents to increase the sensitivity of molecular imaging techniques is essential for their clinical translation. In this study, spontaneously forming, small unilamellar vesicles (sULVs) (30 nm diameter) were used as a platform to build a bimodal (i.e., optical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)) targeted contrast agent for the molecular imaging of brain tumors. sULVs were loaded with a gadolinium (Gd) chelated lipid (Gd-DPTA-BOA), functionalized with targeting antibodies (anti-EGFR monoclonal and anti-IGFBP7 single domain), and incorporated a near infrared dye (Cy5.5). The resultant sULVs were characterized in vitro using small angle neutron scattering (SANS), phantom MRI and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Antibody targeted and nontargeted Gd loaded sULVs labeled with Cy5.5 were assessed in vivo in a brain tumor model in mice using time domain optical imaging and MRI. The results demonstrated that a spontaneously forming, nanosized ULVs loaded with a high payload of Gd can selectively target and image, using MR and optical imaging, brain tumor vessels when functionalized with anti-IGFBP7 single domain antibodies. The unique features of these targeted sULVs make them promising molecular MRI contrast agents.

Iqbal, U [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada; Albaghdadi, H [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada; Nieh, Mu-Ping [University of Connecticut, Storrs; Tuor, U.I [National Research Council of Canada, Calcary, AB, Canada; Mester, Z [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada; Stanimirovic, D [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada; Katsaras, John [ORNL; Abulrob, A [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

ACCELERATING HANFORD TRANSURANC (TRU) WASTE CERTIFICATION & SHIPMENT FROM 2 PER YEAR TO 12 PER MONTH  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's site at Hanford has significantly accelerated the characterization of transuranic (TRU) waste and its subsequent shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)--from a total of two shipments in fiscal year 2002 to twelve shipments per month. The challenges encountered and experience gained in achieving this acceleration provide valuable lessons that can be used by others in the waste industry. Lessons learned as well as estimates of cost savings and schedule benefits are described. At the start of the acceleration effort, three separate facilities managed by multiple organizations characterized and handled the drums. To consolidate the majority of these activities under one organization and in one facility required RCRA permit and safety basis modifications. and a myriad of construction activities--but all with very visible benefit. Transferring drums between the separate facilities involved multiple organizations, and required meeting a complex set of transportation and safety basis requirements. Consolidating characterization activities into a single facility greatly simplified this process, realizing very significant operational efficiencies. Drums stockpiled in buildings for future processing previously were stored with recognition of physical, chemical, and radiological hazards, but without consideration for future processing. Drums are now stored using a modular approach so that feed for characterization processing takes drums from the accessible module face rather than randomly throughout the storage building. This approach makes drum handling more efficient, minimizes the potential for worker injuries, and supports the principles of ''as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA) exposure from the waste. Sampling the headspace gas of the TRU waste packages was a major bottleneck in the characterization process, and hence an obstacle to acceleration. Sampling rates were improved by a combination of insulating and heating a waste storage building to provide sufficient space for the required temperature residence time; installing filter and sample ports in the drums using a pneumatic dart method; improving gas analysis time using cryofocusing technology and using both onsite and offsite labs for redundancy of analysis capability. The need for real-time radiography was reduced by implementing avisual examination technique as the waste was being packaged. Key to implementing the visual examination technique was the use of a ''portable procedure'' that can be used anywhere on the Hanford Site. This approach has been used successfully for packaging newly generated waste from various decontamination and decommissioning projects. Using a glovebox for repackaging drums has also been a rate-limiting step in accelerating the characterization of TRU waste at Hanford. The impacts of this requirement, however, have been minimized in two ways: first, by venting certain heat-sealed bags, and second, by implementing hydrogen and methane testing of headspace gas for high gram drums with multiple layers of confinement. The details of these specific efforts are included in a separate paper. Payload assembly and loading efficiencies of the TRUPACT-II, and certification and shipment efficiencies were instrumental to Hanford's successfully accelerating shipments. Loading time of TRUPACT II's for a shipment (three TRUPACTS per shipment) went from four days to two days. Future acceleration plans include certification of a box radioassay unit to assay TRU standard waste boxes (SWB) for shipment to WIPP and adding additional payload building/loadout stations to increase the shipping capabilities.

MCDONALD, K.M.

2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

357

Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to summarize the waste acceptance criteria applicable to the transportation, storage, and disposal of contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). These criteria serve as the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) primary directive for ensuring that CH-TRU waste is managed and disposed of in a manner that protects human health and safety and the environment.The authorization basis of WIPP for the disposal of CH-TRU waste includes the U.S.Department of Energy National Security and Military Applications of Nuclear EnergyAuthorization Act of 1980 (reference 1) and the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA;reference 2). Included in this document are the requirements and associated criteriaimposed by these acts and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA,reference 3), as amended, on the CH-TRU waste destined for disposal at WIPP.|The DOE TRU waste sites must certify CH-TRU waste payload containers to thecontact-handled waste acceptance criteria (CH-WAC) identified in this document. Asshown in figure 1.0, the flow-down of applicable requirements to the CH-WAC istraceable to several higher-tier documents, including the WIPP operational safetyrequirements derived from the WIPP CH Documented Safety Analysis (CH-DSA;reference 4), the transportation requirements for CH-TRU wastes derived from theTransuranic Package Transporter-Model II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT Certificates ofCompliance (references 5 and 5a), the WIPP LWA (reference 2), the WIPP HazardousWaste Facility Permit (reference 6), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency(EPA) Compliance Certification Decision and approval for PCB disposal (references 7,34, 35, 36, and 37). The solid arrows shown in figure 1.0 represent the flow-down of allapplicable payload container-based requirements. The two dotted arrows shown infigure 1.0 represent the flow-down of summary level requirements only; i.e., the sitesmust reference the regulatory source documents from the U.S. Nuclear RegulatoryCommission (NRC) and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) for acomprehensive and detailed listing of the requirements.This CH-WAC does not address the subject of waste characterization relating to adetermination of whether the waste is hazardous; rather, the sites are referred to theWaste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit fordetails of the sampling and analysis protocols to be used in determining compliance withthe required physical and chemical properties of the waste. Requirements andassociated criteria pertaining to a determination of the radiological properties of thewaste, however, are addressed in appendix A of this document. The collectiveinformation obtained from waste characterization records and acceptable knowledge(AK) serves as the basis for sites to certify that their CH-TRU waste satisfies the WIPPwaste acceptance criteria listed herein.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

358

Small Fast Spectrum Reactor Designs Suitable for Direct Nuclear Thermal Propulsion  

SciTech Connect

Advancement of U.S. scientific, security, and economic interests through a robust space exploration program requires high performance propulsion systems to support a variety of robotic and crewed missions beyond low Earth orbit. Past studies, in particular those in support of both the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) and Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), have shown nuclear thermal propulsion systems provide superior performance for high mass high propulsive delta-V missions. The recent NASA Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 Study re-examined mission, payload, and transportation system requirements for a human Mars landing mission in the post-2030 timeframe. Nuclear thermal propulsion was again identified as the preferred in-space transportation system. A common nuclear thermal propulsion stage with three 25,000-lbf thrust engines was used for all primary mission maneuvers. Moderately lower thrust engines may also have important roles. In particular, lower thrust engine designs demonstrating the critical technologies that are directly extensible to other thrust levels are attractive from a ground testing perspective. An extensive nuclear thermal rocket technology development effort was conducted from 1955-1973 under the Rover/NERVA Program. Both graphite and refractory metal alloy fuel types were pursued. Reactors and engines employing graphite based fuels were designed, built and ground tested. A number of fast spectrum reactor and engine designs employing refractory metal alloy fuel types were proposed and designed, but none were built. The Small Nuclear Rocket Engine (SNRE) was the last engine design studied by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during the program. At the time, this engine was a state-of-the-art graphite based fuel design incorporating lessons learned from the very successful technology development program. The SNRE was a nominal 16,000-lbf thrust engine originally intended for unmanned applications with relatively short engine operations and the engine and stage design were constrained to fit within the payload volume of the then planned space shuttle. The SNRE core design utilized hexagonal fuel elements and hexagonal structural support elements. The total number of elements can be varied to achieve engine designs of higher or lower thrust levels. Some variation in the ratio of fuel elements to structural elements is also possible. Options for SNRE-based engine designs in the 25,000-lbf thrust range were described in a recent (2010) Joint Propulsion Conference paper. The reported designs met or exceeded the performance characteristics baselined in the DRA 5.0 Study. Lower thrust SNRE-based designs were also described in a recent (2011) Joint Propulsion Conference paper. Recent activities have included parallel evaluation and design efforts on fast spectrum engines employing refractory metal alloy fuels. These efforts include evaluation of both heritage designs from the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and General Electric Company GE-710 Programs as well as more recent designs. Results are presented for a number of not-yet optimized fast spectrum engine options.

Bruce G. Schnitzler; Stanley K. Borowski

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

A Review of Laser Ablation Propulsion  

SciTech Connect

Laser Ablation Propulsion is a broad field with a wide range of applications. We review the 30-year history of laser ablation propulsion from the transition from earlier pure photon propulsion concepts of Oberth and Saenger through Kantrowitz's original laser ablation propulsion idea to the development of air-breathing 'Lightcraft' and advanced spacecraft propulsion engines. The polymers POM and GAP have played an important role in experiments and liquid ablation fuels show great promise. Some applications use a laser system which is distant from the propelled object, for example, on another spacecraft, the Earth or a planet. Others use a laser that is part of the spacecraft propulsion system on the spacecraft. Propulsion is produced when an intense laser beam strikes a condensed matter surface and produces a vapor or plasma jet. The advantages of this idea are that exhaust velocity of the propulsion engine covers a broader range than is available from chemistry, that it can be varied to meet the instantaneous demands of the particular mission, and that practical realizations give lower mass and greater simplicity for a payload delivery system. We review the underlying theory, buttressed by extensive experimental data. The primary problem in laser space propulsion theory has been the absence of a way to predict thrust and specific impulse over the transition from the vapor to the plasma regimes. We briefly discuss a method for combining two new vapor regime treatments with plasma regime theory, giving a smooth transition from one regime to the other. We conclude with a section on future directions.

Phipps, Claude [Photonic Associates, LLC, 200A Ojo de la Vaca Road, Santa Fe NM 87508 (United States); Bohn, Willy [Bohn Laser Consult, Weinberg Weg 43, Stuttgart (Germany); Lippert, Thomas [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Sasoh, Akihiro [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya (Japan); Schall, Wolfgang [DLR Institute of Technical Physics, Stuttgart (Germany); Sinko, John [Micro-Nano GCOE, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan)

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

360

Overview of the VISTA Spacecraft Concept Powered by Inertial Confinement Fusion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

VISTA was conceived through a detailed systems analysis as a viable, realistic, and defensible spacecraft concept based on advanced ICF technology but existing or near-term technology for other systems. It is a conical self-contained single-stage piloted spacecraft in which a magnetic thrust chamber directs the plasma emissions from inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets into a rearward exhaust. VISTA's propulsion system is therefore unique because it is based on (1) a rather mature technology (ICF), which is known to work with sufficient driver input; (2) direct heating of all expellant by the fusion process, thus providing high mass flow rates without significant degradation of jet efficiency; and (3) a magnetic thrust chamber, which avoids the plasma thermalization and resultant degradation of specific impulse that are unavoidable with the use of mechanical thrust chambers. VISTA therefore has inherently high power/mass ratios and high specific impulses. With advanced ICF technology, ultra-fast roundtrips (RTs) to objects within the solar system are possible (e.g., {ge}145 days RT to Mars, {ge}7 years RT to Pluto). Such short-duration missions are imperative to minimize the human physiological deteriorations arising from zero gravity and the cosmic-radiation. In addition, VISTA offers on-board artificial gravity and propellant-based shielding from cosmic rays, thus reducing the physiological deteriorations to insignificant levels. In this paper, we give an overview of the various vehicle systems for this concept, estimate the general missions performance capabilities for interplanetary missions, and describe in detail the performance for the baseline mission of a piloted roundtrip to Mars with a 100-ton payload. Items requiring further research include a reduction of the wet mass from its baseline value of 6,000 metric tons, and the development of fast ignition or its equivalent to provide target gains in excess of several hundred. With target gains well above several hundred, there is no other known technology that can compete with VISTA's performance.

Orth, C D

2000-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

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361

Optimization of a CNG series hybrid concept vehicle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) has favorable characteristics as a vehicular fuel, in terms of fuel economy as well as emissions. Using CNG as a fuel in a series hybrid vehicle has the potential of resulting in very high fuel economy (between 26 and 30 km/liter, 60 to 70 mpg) and very low emissions (substantially lower than Federal Tier II or CARB ULEV). This paper uses a vehicle evaluation code and an optimizer to find a set of vehicle parameters that result in optimum vehicle fuel economy. The vehicle evaluation code used in this analysis estimates vehicle power performance, including engine efficiency and power, generator efficiency, energy storage device efficiency and state-of-charge, and motor and transmission efficiencies. Eight vehicle parameters are selected as free variables for the optimization. The optimum vehicle must also meet two perfect requirements: accelerate to 97 km/h in less than 10 s, and climb an infinitely long hill with a 6% slope at 97 km/h with a 272 kg (600 lb.) payload. The optimizer used in this work was originally developed in the magnetic fusion energy program, and has been used to optimize complex systems, such as magnetic and inertial fusion devices, neutron sources, and mil guns. The optimizer consists of two parts: an optimization package for minimizing non-linear functions of many variables subject to several non-linear equality and/or inequality constraints and a programmable shell that allows interactive configuration and execution of the optimizer. The results of the analysis indicate that the CNG series hybrid vehicle has a high efficiency and low emissions. These results emphasize the advantages of CNG as a near-term alternative fuel for vehicles.

Aceves, S.M.; Smith, J.R.; Perkins, L.J.; Haney, S.W.; Flowers, D.L.

1995-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

362

RACORO Extended-Term Aircraft Observations of Boundary-Layer Clouds  

SciTech Connect

A first-of-a-kind, extended-term cloud aircraft campaign was conducted to obtain an in-situ statistical characterization of boundary-layer clouds needed to investigate cloud processes and refine retrieval algorithms. Coordinated by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerial Facility (AAF), the Routine AAF Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD) Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign operated over the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site from 22 January to 30 June 2009, collecting 260 h of data during 59 research flights. A comprehensive payload aboard the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft measured cloud microphysics, solar and thermal radiation, aerosol properties, and atmospheric state parameters. Proximity to the SGP's extensive complement of surface measurements provides ancillary data that supports modeling studies and enables evaluating a variety of surface retrieval algorithms. The five-month duration enabled sampling a range of conditions associated with the seasonal transition from winter to summer. Although about two-thirds of the cloud flights occurred in May and June, boundary-layer cloud fields were sampled under a variety of environmental and aerosol conditions, with about 75% of the flights occurring in cumulus and stratocumulus. Preliminary analyses show how these data are being used to analyze cloud-aerosol relationships, determine the aerosol sizes that are responsible for nucleating cloud drops, characterize the horizontal variability of the cloud radiative impacts, and evaluate air-borne and surface-based cloud property retrievals. We discuss how conducting an extended-term campaign requires a simplified operating paradigm that is different from that used for typical, short-term, intensive aircraft field programs.

Vogelmann, A. M.; McFarquhar, Greg; Ogren, John A.; Turner, David D.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Feingold, G.; Long, Charles N.; Jonsson, Haf; Bucholtz, Anthony; Collins, Donald R.; Diskin, G. S.; Gerber, H.; Lawson, Paul; Woods, Roy; Andrews, Elizabeth; Yang, Hee-Jung; Chiu, Christine J.; Hartsock, Daniel; Hubbe, John M.; Lo, Chaomei; Marshak, A.; Monroe, Justin; McFarlane, Sally A.; Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Toto, Tami

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

363

Overview of Requirements for Using Overweight Vehicles to Ship Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Final Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada, considered a range of options for transportation. In evaluating the impacts of the mostly-legal weight truck scenario, DOE assumed that some shipments would use overweight trucks. The use of overweight trucks is also considered in the Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada, issued for public comment in Fall 2007. With the exception of permit requirements and operating restrictions, the vehicles for overweight shipments would be similar to legal-weight truck shipments but might weigh as much as 52,200 kilograms (115,000 pounds). The use of overweight trucks was determined to be acceptable for the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program because the payload is not divisible and the packaging alone may make shipments overweight. Overweight truck shipments are common, and states routinely issue overweight permits, some for vehicles with a gross vehicle weight up to 58,500 kilograms (129,000 pounds). This paper will present an overview of state overweight truck permitting policies and national and regional approaches to promote safety and uniformity. In conclusion: Overweight truck shipments are made routinely by carriers throughout the country. State permits are obtained by the carriers or by companies that provide permitting services to the carriers. While varying state permit restrictions may add complexity to OCRWM's planning activities, the well-established experience of commercial carriers and efforts to bring uniformity to the permitting process should allow the overweight shipment of SNF to be a viable option. (authors)

Thrower, A.W. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Washington, DC (United States); Offner, J. [Booz Allen Hamilton, Washington, DC (United States); Bolton, P. [Booz Allen Hamilton, Santa Fe, NM (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Hydraulic manipulator design, analysis, and control at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To meet the increased payload capacities demanded by present-day tasks, manipulator designers have turned to hydraulics as a means of actuation. Hydraulics have always been the actuator of choice when designing heavy-life construction and mining equipment such as bulldozers, backhoes, and tunneling devices. In order to successfully design, build, and deploy a new hydraulic manipulator (or subsystem) sophisticated modeling, analysis, and control experiments are usually needed. To support the development and deployment of new hydraulic manipulators Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has outfitted a significant experimental laboratory and has developed the software capability for research into hydraulic manipulators, hydraulic actuators, hydraulic systems, modeling of hydraulic systems, and hydraulic controls. The hydraulics laboratory at ORNL has three different manipulators. First is a 6-Degree-of-Freedom (6-DoF), multi-planer, teleoperated, flexible controls test bed used for the development of waste tank clean-up manipulator controls, thermal studies, system characterization, and manipulator tracking. Finally, is a human amplifier test bed used for the development of an entire new class of teleoperated systems. To compliment the hardware in the hydraulics laboratory, ORNL has developed a hydraulics simulation capability including a custom package to model the hydraulic systems and manipulators for performance studies and control development. This paper outlines the history of hydraulic manipulator developments at ORNL, describes the hydraulics laboratory, discusses the use of the equipment within the laboratory, and presents some of the initial results from experiments and modeling associated with these hydraulic manipulators. Included are some of the results from the development of the human amplifier/de-amplifier concepts, the characterization of the thermal sensitivity of hydraulic systems, and end-point tracking accuracy studies. Experimental and analytical results are included.

Kress, R.L.; Jansen, J.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Robotics and Process Systems Div.; Love, L.J. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States); Basher, A.M.H. [South Carolina State Univ., Orangeburg, SC (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Calibration of the Spectrometer aboard the INTEGRAL satellite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SPI, the Spectrometer on board the ESA INTEGRAL satellite, to be launched in October 2002, will study the gamma-ray sky in the 20 keV to 8 MeV energy band with a spectral resolution of 2 keV for photons of 1 MeV, thanks to its 19 germanium detectors spanning an active area of 500 cm2. A coded mask imaging technique provides a 2 deg angular resolution. The 16 deg field of view is defined by an active BGO veto shield, furthermore used for background rejection. In April 2001 the flight model of SPI underwent a one-month calibration campaign at CEA in Bruy\\`eres le Ch\\^atel using low intensity radioactive sources and the CEA accelerator for homogeneity measurements and high intensity radioactive sources for imaging performance measurements. After integration of all scientific payloads (the spectrometer SPI, the imager IBIS and the monitors JEM-X and OMC) on the INTEGRAL satellite, a cross-calibration campaign has been performed at the ESA center in Noordwijk. A set of sources has been placed in the field of view of the different instruments in order to compare their performances and determine their mutual influence. Some of those sources had already been used in Bruy\\`eres during the SPI standalone test. For the lowest energy band calibration an X-ray generator has been used. We report on the scientific goals of this calibration activity, and present the measurements performed as well as some preliminary results.

Stphane Schanne; B. Cordier; M. Gros; D. Atti; P. v. Ballmoos; L. Bouchet; R. Carli; P. Connell; R. Diehl; P. Jean; J. Kiener; A. v. Kienlin; J. Kndlseder; P. Laurent; G. Lichti; P. Mandrou; J. Paul; P. Paul; J. -P. Roques; F. Sanchez; V. Schnfelder; C. Shrader; G. Skinner; A. Strong; S. Sturner; V. Tatischeff; B. Teegarden; G. Vedrenne; G. Weidenspointner; C. Wunderer

2003-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

366

Development of a container for the transportation and storage of plutonium bearing materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a large backlog of plutonium contaminated materials at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site near Denver, Colorado, USA. The clean-up of this site requires this material to be packaged in such a way as to allow for efficient transportation to other sites or to a permanent geologic repository. Prior to off-site shipment of the material, it may be stored on-site for a period of time. For this reason, it is desirable to have a container capable of meeting the requirements for storage as well as the requirements for transportation. Most of the off-site transportation is envisioned to take place using the TRUPACT-II Type B package, with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) as the destination. Prior to the development of this new container, the TRUPACT-II had a limit of 325 FGE (fissile gram equivalents) of plutonium due to criticality control concerns. Because of the relatively high plutonium content in the material to be transported, transporting 325 FGE per TRUPACT-II is uneconomical. Thus, the purpose of the new containers is to provide criticality control to increase the allowed TRUPACT-II payload and to provide a safe method for on-site storage prior to transport. This paper will describe the analysis and testing used to demonstrate that the Pipe Overpack Container provides safe on-site storage of plutonium bearing materials in unhardened buildings and provides criticality control during transportation within the TRUPACT-II. Analyses included worst-case criticality analyses, analyses of fork-lift time impacts, and analyses of roof structure collapse onto the container. Testing included dynamic crush tests, bare pipe impact tests, a 30-minute totally engulfing pool-fire test, and multiple package impact tests in end-on and side-on orientations.

Ammerman, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Geinitz, R.; Thorp, D. [Safe Sites of Colorado, Golden, CO (United States); Rivera, M. [Los Alamos Technology Associates, Golden, CO (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Rosie - mobile robot worksystem for decommissioning and dismantling operations. Final report, April 1, 1996--January 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect

RedZone Robotics, Inc. has undertaken development of an advanced remote worksystem - Rosie - specifically designed to meet the challenges of performing a wide range of decontamination and dismantlement (D&D) operations in nuclear environments. The Rosie worksystem includes a locomotor, heavy manipulator, operator console, and control system for remote operations. The locomotor is a highly mobile platform with tether management and hydraulic power onboard. The heavy manipulator is a high-payload, long-reach boom used to deploy a wide variety of tools and/or sensors into the work area. Rosie`s advanced control system, broad work capabilities, and hardening/reliability for hazardous duty make it a new and unique capability that facilitates completion of significant cleanup projects throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) and private sector. Endurance testing of the first Rosie system from September 1995 to March 1996 has proven its capabilities and appropriateness for D&D applications. Design enhancements were incorporated into the second Rosie system to improve and add features necessary for deployment at a DOE facility decommissioning. This second Rosie unit was deployed to the Argonne National Laboratory`s CP-5 reactor facility in early December 1996, and it is currently being used in the decommissioning of the reactor there. This report will overview this second Rosie system and the design enhancements made to it based on the lessons learned during the design, fabrication, and testing of the first Rosie system. The Rosie system has been designed to be a versatile and adaptable tool that can be used in many different applications in D&D work at nuclear facilities. It can carry a wide variety of tooling, sensors, and other robotic equipment at the tip of its heavy manipulator, and it can deploy those items to many different hazardous work areas. Rosie`s capabilities and system design address the need for durability and reliability in these environments.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

368

Life-cycle analysis of alternative aviation fuels in GREET  

SciTech Connect

The Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, has been expanded to include well-to-wake (WTWa) analysis of aviation fuels and aircraft. This report documents the key WTWa stages and assumptions for fuels that represent alternatives to petroleum jet fuel. The aviation module in GREET consists of three spreadsheets that present detailed characterizations of well-to-pump and pump-to-wake parameters and WTWa results. By using the expanded GREET version (GREET1{_}2011), we estimate WTWa results for energy use (total, fossil, and petroleum energy) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide) for (1) each unit of energy (lower heating value) consumed by the aircraft or (2) each unit of distance traveled/ payload carried by the aircraft. The fuel pathways considered in this analysis include petroleum-based jet fuel from conventional and unconventional sources (i.e., oil sands); Fisher-Tropsch (FT) jet fuel from natural gas, coal, and biomass; bio-jet fuel from fast pyrolysis of cellulosic biomass; and bio-jet fuel from vegetable and algal oils, which falls under the American Society for Testing and Materials category of hydroprocessed esters and fatty acids. For aircraft operation, we considered six passenger aircraft classes and four freight aircraft classes in this analysis. Our analysis revealed that, depending on the feedstock source, the fuel conversion technology, and the allocation or displacement credit methodology applied to co-products, alternative bio-jet fuel pathways have the potential to reduce life-cycle GHG emissions by 55-85 percent compared with conventional (petroleum-based) jet fuel. Although producing FT jet fuel from fossil feedstock sources - such as natural gas and coal - could greatly reduce dependence on crude oil, production from such sources (especially coal) produces greater WTWa GHG emissions compared with petroleum jet fuel production unless carbon management practices, such as carbon capture and storage, are used.

Elgowainy, A.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Carter, N.; Stratton, R.; Hileman, J.; Malwitz, A.; Balasubramanian, S. (Energy Systems)

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

369

Enrichment Zoning Options for the Small Nuclear Rocket Engine (SNRE)  

SciTech Connect

Advancement of U.S. scientific, security, and economic interests through a robust space exploration program requires high performance propulsion systems to support a variety of robotic and crewed missions beyond low Earth orbit. In NASAs recent Mars Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 study (NASA-SP-2009-566, July 2009), nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) was again selected over chemical propulsion as the preferred in-space transportation system option because of its high thrust and high specific impulse (-900 s) capability, increased tolerance to payload mass growth and architecture changes, and lower total initial mass in low Earth orbit. An extensive nuclear thermal rocket technology development effort was conducted from 1955-1973 under the Rover/NERVA Program. The Small Nuclear Rocket Engine (SNRE) was the last engine design studied by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during the program. At the time, this engine was a state-of-the-art design incorporating lessons learned from the very successful technology development program. Past activities at the NASA Glenn Research Center have included development of highly detailed MCNP Monte Carlo transport models of the SNRE and other small engine designs. Preliminary core configurations typically employ fuel elements with fixed fuel composition and fissile material enrichment. Uniform fuel loadings result in undesirable radial power and temperature profiles in the engines. Engine performance can be improved by some combination of propellant flow control at the fuel element level and by varying the fuel composition. Enrichment zoning at the fuel element level with lower enrichments in the higher power elements at the core center and on the core periphery is particularly effective. Power flattening by enrichment zoning typically results in more uniform propellant exit temperatures and improved engine performance. For the SNRE, element enrichment zoning provided very flat radial power profiles with 551 of the 564 fuel elements within 1% of the average element power. Results for this and alternate enrichment zoning options for the SNRE are compared.

Bruce G. Schnitzler; Stanley K. Borowski

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

An intelligent inspection and survey robot. Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ARIES {number_sign}1 (Autonomous Robotic Inspection Experimental System), has been developed for the Department of Energy to survey and inspect drums containing low-level radioactive waste stored in warehouses at DOE facilities. The drums are typically stacked four high and arranged in rows with three-foot aisle widths. The robot will navigate through the aisles and perform an inspection operation, typically performed by a human operator, making decisions about the condition of the drums and maintaining a database of pertinent information about each drum. A new version of the Cybermotion series of mobile robots is the base mobile vehicle for ARIES. The new Model K3A consists of an improved and enhanced mobile platform and a new turret that will permit turning around in a three-foot aisle. Advanced sonar and lidar systems were added to improve navigation in the narrow drum aisles. Onboard computer enhancements include a VMEbus computer system running the VxWorks real-time operating system. A graphical offboard supervisory UNIX workstation is used for high-level planning, control, monitoring, and reporting. A camera positioning system (CPS) includes primitive instructions for the robot to use in referencing and positioning the payload. The CPS retracts to a more compact position when traveling in the open warehouse. During inspection, the CPS extends up to deploy inspection packages at different heights on the four-drum stacks of 55-, 85-, and 110-gallon drums. The vision inspection module performs a visual inspection of the waste drums. This system will locate and identify each drum, locate any unique visual features, characterize relevant surface features of interest and update a data-base containing the inspection data.

NONE

1995-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx): Goals, platforms, and field operations  

SciTech Connect

The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) was an international field program designed to make observations of poorly understood but critical components of the coupled climate system of the southeast Pacific. This region is characterized by strong coastal upwelling, the coolest SSTs in the tropical belt, and is home to the largest subtropical stratocumulus deck on Earth. The field intensive phase of VOCALS-REx took place during October and November 2008 and constitutes a critical part of a broader CLIVAR program (VOCALS) designed to develop and promote scientific activities leading to improved understanding, model simulations, and predictions of the southeastern Pacific (SEP) coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system, on diurnal to interannual timescales. The other major components of VOCALS are a modeling program with a model hierarchy ranging from the local to global scales, and a suite of extended observations from regular research cruises, instrumented moorings, and satellites. The two central themes of VOCALS-REx focus upon (a) links between aerosols, clouds and precipitation and their impacts on marine stratocumulus radiative properties, and (b) physical and chemical couplings between the upper ocean and the lower atmosphere, including the role that mesoscale ocean eddies play. A set of hypotheses designed to be tested with the combined field, monitoring and modeling work in VOCALS is presented here. A further goal of VOCALS-REx is to provide datasets for the evaluation and improvement of large-scale numerical models. VOCALS-REx involved five research aircraft, two ships and two surface sites in northern Chile. We describe the instrument payloads and key mission strategies for these platforms and give a summary of the missions conducted.

Wood, R.; Springston, S.; Mechoso, C. R.; Bretherton, C. S.; A.Weller, R.; Huebert, B.; Straneo, F.; Albrecht, B. A.; Coe, H.; Allen, G.; Vaughan, G.; Daum, P.; Fairall, C.; Chand, D.; Klenner, L. G.; Garreaud, R.; Grados, C.; Covert, D. S.; Bates, T. S.; Krejci, R.; Russell, L. M.; Szoeke, S. d.; Brewer, A.; Yuter, S. E.; Chaigneau, A.; Toniazzo, T.; Minnis, P.; Palikonda, R.; Abel, S. J.; Brown, W. O. J.; Williams, S.; Fochesatto, J.; Brioude, J.; Bower, K. N

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

372

Battery availability for near-term (1998) electric vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Battery Requirements were determined for a wide spectrum of electric vehicles ranging from 2-passenger sports cars and microvans to full-size vans with a payload of 500 kg. All the vehicles utilize ac, high voltage (340--360 V) powertrains and have acceleration performance (0--80 km/h in less than 15 seconds) expected to be the norm in 1988 electric vehicles. Battery packs were configured for each of the vehicles using families of sealed lead-acid and nickel-cadmium modules which are either presently available in limited quantities or are being developed by battery companies which market a similar battery technology. It was found that the battery families available encompass the Ah cell sizes required for the various vehicles and that they could be packaged in the space available in each vehicle. The acceleration performance and range of the vehicles were calculated using the SIMPLEV simulation program. The results showed that all the vehicles had the required acceleration characteristics and ranges between 80--160 km (50--100 miles) with the ranges using nickel-cadmium batteries being 40--60% greater than those using lead-acid batteries. Significant changes in the design of electric vehicles over the last fifteen years are noted. These changes make the design of the batteries more difficult by increasing the peak power density required from about 60 W/kg to 100--150 W/kg and by reducing the Ah cell size needed from about 150 Ah to 30--70 Ah. Both of these changes in battery specifications increase the difficulty of achieving low $/kWh cost and long cycle life. This true for both lead-acid and nickel-cadmium batteries. 25 refs., 6 figs., 16 tabs.

Burke, A.F.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Advances in technology for the construction of deep-underground facilities  

SciTech Connect

The workshop was organized in order to address technological issues important to decisions regarding the feasibility of strategic options. The objectives of the workshop were to establish the current technological capabilities for deep-underground construction, to project those capabilities through the compressed schedule proposed for construction, and to identify promising directions for timely allocation of existing research and development resources. The earth has been used as a means of protection and safekeeping for many centuries. Recently, the thickness of the earth cover required for this purpose has been extended to the 2,000- to 3,000-ft range in structures contemplated for nuclear-waste disposal, energy storage, and strategic systems. For defensive missile basing, it is now perceived that the magnitude of the threat has increased through better delivery systems, larger payloads, and variable tactics of attack. Thus, depths of 3,000 to 8,000 ft are being considered seriously for such facilities. Moreover, it appears desirable that the facilities be operational (if not totally complete) for defensive purposes within a five-year construction schedule. Deep excavations such as mines are similar in many respects to nearsurface tunnels and caverns for transit, rail, sewer, water, hydroelectric, and highway projects. But the differences that do exist are significant. Major distinctions between shallow and deep construction derive from the stress fields and behavior of earth materials around the openings. Different methodologies are required to accommodate other variations resulting from increased depth, such as elevated temperatures, reduced capability for site exploration, and limited access during project execution. This report addresses these and other questions devoted to geotechnical characterization, design, construction, and excavation equipment.

Not Available

1987-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

374

Advantages of the shielded containers at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) disposal operations currently employ two different disposal methods: one for Contact Handled (CH) waste and another for Remote Handled (RH) waste. CH waste is emplaced in a variety of payload container configurations on the floor of each disposal room. In contrast, RH waste is packaged into a single type of canister and emplaced in pre-drilled holes in the walls of disposal rooms. Emplacement of the RH waste in the walls must proceed in advance of CH waste emplacement and therefore poses logistical constraints, in addition to the loss of valuable disposal capacity. To improve operational efficiency and disposal capacity, the Department of Energy (DOE) has proposed a shielded container for certain RH waste streams. RH waste with relatively low gammaemitting activity would be packaged in lead-lined containers, shipped to WIPP in existing certified transportation packages for CH waste and emplaced in WIPP among the stacks of CH waste containers on the floor of a disposal room. RH waste with high gamma-emitting activity would continue to be emplaced in the boreholes along the walls. The new RH container is similar to the nominal 208-liter (55-gallon) drum, however it includes about 2.5 cm (1 in) of lead, sandwiched between thick steel sheets. Furthermore, the top and bottom are made of thick plate steel to strengthening the package to meet transportation requirements. This robust configuration provides an overpack for materials that otherwise would be RH waste. This paper describes the container and the regulatory approach used to meet the requirements imposed by regulations that apply to WIPP. This includes a Performance Assessment used to evaluate WIPP's long-term performance and the DOE's approach to gain approval for the transportation of shielded containers. This paper also describes estimates of the DOE's RH transuranic waste inventory that may be packaged and emplaced in shielded containers. Finally, the paper includes a discussion of how the DOE proposes to track the waste packaged into shielded containers against the RH waste inventory and how this will comply with the regulated volume.

Nelson, Roger A. (U.S. Department of Energy, Carlsbad, NM); Dunagan, Sean C.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

VISTA -- A Vehicle for Interplanetary Space Transport Application Powered by Inertial Confinement Fusion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is an ideal technology to power self-contained single-stage piloted (manned) spacecraft within the solar system because of its inherently high power/mass ratios and high specific impulses (i.e., high exhaust velocities). These technological advantages are retained when ICF is utilized with a magnetic thrust chamber, which avoids the plasma thermalization and resultant degradation of specific impulse that are unavoidable with the use of mechanical thrust chambers. We started with Rod Hyde's 1983 description of an ICF-powered engine concept using a magnetic thrust chamber, and conducted a more detailed systems study to develop a viable, realistic, and defensible spacecraft concept based on ICF technology projected to be available in the first half of the 21st century. The results include an entirely new conical spacecraft conceptual design utilizing near-existing radiator technology. We describe the various vehicle systems for this new concept, estimate the missions performance capabilities for general missions to the planets within the solar system, and describe in detail the performance for the baseline mission of a piloted roundtrip to Mars with a 100-ton payload. For this mission, we show that roundtrips totaling {ge}145 days are possible with advanced DT fusion technology and a total (wet) spacecraft mass of about 6000 metric tons. Such short-duration missions are advantageous to minimize the known cosmic-radiation hazards to astronauts, and are even more important to minimize the physiological deteriorations arising from zero gravity. These ICF-powered missions are considerably faster than those available using chemical or nuclear-electric-propulsion technologies with minimum-mass vehicle configurations. VISTA also offers onboard artificial gravity and propellant-based shielding from cosmic rays, thus reducing the known hazards and physiological deteriorations to insignificant levels. We emphasize, however, that the degree to which an ICF-powered vehicle can outperform a vehicle using any other realistic technology depends on the degree to which terrestrial-based ICF research can develop the necessary energy gain from ICF targets. With aggressive progress in such terrestrial research, VISTA will be able to make roundtrip missions to Pluto in {approx}7 years, and missions to points just beyond the solar system within a human lifetime.

Orth, C D

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

376

Estimation of the reliability of space nuclear power systems by probabilistic risk assessment techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A successful space mission depends on the reliable operation of the spacecraft's electrical power system. For payloads requiring high power levels, various designs of space nuclear power systems (SNPS) are available. Designers have conducted limited spacecraft component reliability analysis and full-scale testing of SNPS is impractical. Therefore, a properly-designed reliability analysis, systematically applied, may provide an effective means for making judgments about the relative reliability of competing SNPSS. This work examines the applicability of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) techniques for estimating SNPS reliability from design studies. The nuclear electric power industry has used PRA techniques to accurately analyze the reliability of complex systems. However, these PRA techniques for nuclear power plants require modifications for SNPS reliability assessment. This study validates these modified PRA techniques by examining the reliability of the SP-I 00 and the Small Ex-core Heat Pipe Thermionic Reactor (SEHPTR). The present analysis focuses on the SNPS failure to produce nominal electrical power. Typical events threatening the reliability of the SNPS will consist of hardware failures, external events, and command errors or software deficiencies. This work involves the following systematic steps for each SNPS: e System familiarization Performance of a "failure modes and effects analysis" to deten-nine how the failures of components might cause a system failure Construction of system and component fault trees Reliability data estimationFault tree quantification (using CAFTA'O and UNCERT'O) 'Me reliability data estimation relies on occurrence probabilities for each component failure mode. Various methods for estimating failure rates from existing reliability databases or from engineering approximations were investigated. This work employs the Monte Carlo sampling technique to associate numerical uncertainty levels with the quantitative reliability estimates produced for each SNPS. The quantitative results estimate the reliability of the systems studied as 0.9494 for the SP-100 and 0.9453 for the SEHPTR. The associated error factor is approximately 2.0, corresponding to the system modeling and reliability data uncertainties. Importance measures and sensitivity analyses indicate that the fuel damage, sensor, electrical component, mechanical component, drive, and power conditioning, control, and distribution subsystem failures can be critical to the system's reliability.

Gutner, Sophie Isabelle

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Radiological Contingency Planning for the Mars Science Laboratory Launch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) provides technical support to the requesting federal agency such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Department of Defense, the National Space and Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), or a state agency to address the radiological consequences of an event. These activities include measures to alleviate damage, loss, hardship, or suffering caused by the incident; protect public health and safety; restore essential government services; and provide emergency assistance to those affected. Scheduled to launch in the fall of 2009, Mars Science Laboratory is part of NASA's Mars Exploration Program, a long-term effort of robotic exploration of the red planet. Mars Science Laboratory is a rover that will assess whether Mars ever was, or is still today, an environment able to support microbial life. In other words, its mission is to determine the planet's "habitability." The Mars Science Laboratory rover will carry a radioisotope power system that generates electricity from the heat of plutonium's radioactive decay. This power source gives the mission an operating lifespan on Mars' surface of a full Martian year (687 Earth days) or more, while also providing significantly greater mobility and operational flexibility, enhanced science payload capability, and exploration of a much larger range of latitudes and altitudes than was possible on previous missions to Mars. National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), based in Las Vegas, Nevada, will support the DOE in its role for managing the overall radiological contingency planning support effort. This paper will focus on new technologies that NSTec is developing to enhance the overall response capability that would be required for a highly unlikely anomaly. This paper presents recent advances in collecting and collating data transmitted from deployed teams and sensors. NSTec is responsible to prepare the contingency planning for a range of areas from monitoring and assessment, sample collection and control, contaminated material release criteria, data management, reporting, recording, and even communications. The tools NSTec has available to support these efforts will be reported. The data platform NSTec will provide shall also be compatible with integration of assets and field data acquired with other DOE, NASA, state, and local resources, personnel, and equipment. This paper also outlines the organizational structure for response elements in radiological contingency planning.

Paul Guss

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Development of colorimetric solid Phase Extraction (C-SPE) for in-flight Monitoring of spacecraft Water Supplies  

SciTech Connect

Although having recently been extremely successful gathering data on the surface of Mars, robotic missions are not an effective substitute for the insight and knowledge about our solar system that can be gained though first-hand exploration. Earlier this year, President Bush presented a ''new course'' for the U.S. space program that shifts NASA's focus to the development of new manned space vehicles to the return of humans to the moon. Re-establishing the human presence on the moon will eventually lead to humans permanently living and working in space and also serve as a possible launch point for missions into deeper space. There are several obstacles to the realization of these goals, most notably the lack of life support and environmental regeneration and monitoring hardware capable of functioning on long duration spaceflight. In the case of the latter, past experience on the International Space Station (ISS), Mir, and the Space Shuttle has strongly underscored the need to develop broad spectrum in-flight chemical sensors that: (1) meet current environmental monitoring requirements on ISS as well as projected requirements for future missions, and (2) enable the in-situ acquisition and analysis of analytical data in order to further define on-orbit monitoring requirements. Additionally, systems must be designed to account for factors unique to on-orbit deployment such as crew time availability, payload restrictions, material consumption, and effective operation in microgravity. This dissertation focuses on the development, ground testing, and microgravity flight demonstration of Colorimetric Solid Phase Extraction (C-SPE) as a candidate technology to meet the near- and long-term water quality monitoring needs of NASA. The introduction will elaborate further on the operational and design requirements for on-orbit water quality monitoring systems by discussing some of the characteristics of an ''ideal'' system. A description of C-SPE and how the individual components of the platform are combined to satisfy many of these requirements is then presented, along with a literature review on the applications of C-SPE and similar sorption-spectrophotometric techniques. Finally, a brief overview of diffuse reflection spectroscopy and the Kubelka-Munk function, which are used to quantify analytes via C-SPE, is presented.

Daniel Bryan Gazda

2004-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

379

Mesoporous silica nanoparticles as smart and safe devices for regulating blood biomolecule levels  

SciTech Connect

Stimuli-responsive end-capped MSN materials are promising drug carriers that securely deliver a large payload of drug molecules without degradation or premature release. A general review of the recent progress in this field is presented, including a summary of a series of hard and soft caps for drug encapsulation and a variety of internal and external stimuli for controlled release of different therapeutics, a discussion of the biocompatibility of MSN both in vitro and in vivo, and a description of the sophisticated stimuli-responsive systems with novel capping agents and controlled release mechanism. The unique internal and external surfaces of MSN were utilized for the development of a glucose-responsive double delivery system end-capped with insulin. This unique system consists of functionalized MSNs capable of releasing insulin when the concentration of sugar in blood exceeds healthy levels. The insulin-free nanoparticles are then up taken by pancreatic cells, and release inside of them another biomolecule that stimulates the production of more insulin. The in vivo application of this system for the treatment of diabetes requires further understanding on the biological behaviors of these nanoparticles in blood vessels. The research presented in this dissertation demonstrated the size and surface effects on the interaction of MSNs with red blood cell membranes, and discovered how the surface of the nanoparticles can be modified to improve their compatibility with red blood cells and avoid their dangerous side effects. In order to optimize the properties of MSN for applying them as efficient intracellular drug carriers it is necessary to understand the factors that can regulate their internalization into and exocytosis out of the cells. The correlation between the particle morphology and aggregation of MSNs to the effectiveness of cellular uptake is discussed and compared with different cell lines. The differences in the degree of exocytosis of MSNs between healthy and cancer cells is reported and found to be responsible for the asymmetric transfer of the particles between both cell types. The fundamental studies on the hemocompatibility, endo- and exocytosis of MSN along with its ability to sequentially release multiple therapeutics in response to different stimuli, allow us to propose MSN as an intravascular vehicle with a great potential for various biomedical applications.

Zhao, Yan

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

Improved Hydrogen Gas Getters for TRU Waste -- Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Alpha radiolysis of hydrogenous waste and packaging materials generates hydrogen gas in radioactive storage containers. For that reason, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission limits the flammable gas (hydrogen) concentration in the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) containers to 5 vol% of hydrogen in air, which is the lower explosion limit. Consequently, a method is needed to prevent the build up of hydrogen to 5 vol% during the storage and transport of the TRUPACT-II containers (up to 60 days). One promising option is the use of hydrogen getters. These materials scavenge hydrogen from the gas phase and irreversibly bind it in the solid phase. One proven getter is a material called 1,4-bis (phenylethynyl) benzene, or DEB, characterized by the presence of carbon-carbon triple bonds. Carbon may, in the presence of suitable precious metal catalysts such as palladium, irreversibly react with and bind hydrogen. In the presence of oxygen, the precious metal may also eliminate hydrogen by catalyzing the formation of water. This reaction is called catalytic recombination. DEB has the needed binding rate and capacity for hydrogen that potentially could be generated in the TRUPACT II. Phases 1 and 2 of this project showed that uncoated DEB performed satisfactorily in lab scale tests. Based upon these results, Phase 3, the final project phase, included larger scale testing. Test vessels were scaled to replicate the ratio between void space in the inner containment vessel of a TRUPACT-II container and a payload of seven 55-gallon drums. The tests were run with an atmosphere of air for 63.9 days at ambient temperature (15-27C) and a scaled hydrogen generation rate of 2.60E-07 moles per second (0.35 cc/min). A second type of getter known as VEI, a proprietary polymer hydrogen getter characterized by carbon-carbon double bonds, was also tested in Phase 3. Hydrogen was successfully gettered by both getter systems. Hydrogen concentrations remained below 5 vol% (in air) for the duration of the tests. However, catalytic reaction of hydrogen with carbon triple or double bonds in the getter materials did not take place. Instead, catalytic recombination was the predominant gettering mechanism in both getter materials as evidenced by (1) consumption of oxygen in the belljars, (2) production of free water in the belljars, and (3) absence of chemical changes in both getter materials as shown by nuclear magnetic resonance spectra.

Mark Stone; Michael Benson; Christopher Orme; Thomas Luther; Eric Peterson

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

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381

UNDERFLIGHT CALIBRATION OF SOHO/CDS AND HINODE/EIS WITH EUNIS-07  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flights of Goddard Space Flight Center's Extreme Ultraviolet Normal Incidence Spectrograph (EUNIS) sounding rocket in 2006 and 2007 provided updated radiometric calibrations for Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (SOHO/CDS) and Hinode/Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (Hinode/EIS). EUNIS carried two independent imaging spectrographs covering wavebands of 300-370 A in first order and 170-205 A in second order. After each flight, end-to-end radiometric calibrations of the rocket payload were carried out in the same facility used for pre-launch calibrations of CDS and EIS. During the 2007 flight, EUNIS, SOHO/CDS, and Hinode/EIS observed the same solar locations, allowing the EUNIS calibrations to be directly applied to both CDS and EIS. The measured CDS NIS 1 line intensities calibrated with the standard (version 4) responsivities with the standard long-term corrections are found to be too low by a factor of 1.5 due to the decrease in responsivity. The EIS calibration update is performed in two ways. One uses the direct calibration transfer of the calibrated EUNIS-07 short wavelength (SW) channel. The other uses the insensitive line pairs, in which one member was observed by the EUNIS-07 long wavelength (LW) channel and the other by EIS in either the LW or SW waveband. Measurements from both methods are in good agreement, and confirm (within the measurement uncertainties) the EIS responsivity measured directly before the instrument's launch. The measurements also suggest that the EIS responsivity decreased by a factor of about 1.2 after the first year of operation (although the size of the measurement uncertainties is comparable to this decrease). The shape of the EIS SW response curve obtained by EUNIS-07 is consistent with the one measured in laboratory prior to launch. The absolute value of the quiet-Sun He II 304 A intensity measured by EUNIS-07 is consistent with the radiance measured by CDS NIS in quiet regions near the disk center and the solar minimum irradiance recently obtained by CDS NIS and the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment.

Wang Tongjiang; Brosius, Jeffrey W. [Institute for Astrophysics and Computational Sciences (IACS) in the Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue NE, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Thomas, Roger J.; Rabin, Douglas M.; Davila, Joseph M. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Young, Peter R. [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Del Zanna, Giulio, E-mail: tongjiang.wang@nasa.gov [DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Small Reactor Designs Suitable for Direct Nuclear Thermal Propulsion: Interim Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advancement of U.S. scientific, security, and economic interests requires high performance propulsion systems to support missions beyond low Earth orbit. A robust space exploration program will include robotic outer planet and crewed missions to a variety of destinations including the moon, near Earth objects, and eventually Mars. Past studies, in particular those in support of both the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) and the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), have shown nuclear thermal propulsion systems provide superior performance for high mass high propulsive delta-V missions. In NASA's recent Mars Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 study, nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) was again selected over chemical propulsion as the preferred in-space transportation system option for the human exploration of Mars because of its high thrust and high specific impulse ({approx}900 s) capability, increased tolerance to payload mass growth and architecture changes, and lower total initial mass in low Earth orbit. The recently announced national space policy2 supports the development and use of space nuclear power systems where such systems safely enable or significantly enhance space exploration or operational capabilities. An extensive nuclear thermal rocket technology development effort was conducted under the Rover/NERVA, GE-710 and ANL nuclear rocket programs (1955-1973). Both graphite and refractory metal alloy fuel types were pursued. The primary and significantly larger Rover/NERVA program focused on graphite type fuels. Research, development, and testing of high temperature graphite fuels was conducted. Reactors and engines employing these fuels were designed, built, and ground tested. The GE-710 and ANL programs focused on an alternative ceramic-metallic 'cermet' fuel type consisting of UO2 (or UN) fuel embedded in a refractory metal matrix such as tungsten. The General Electric program examined closed loop concepts for space or terrestrial applications as well as open loop systems for direct nuclear thermal propulsion. Although a number of fast spectrum reactor and engine designs suitable for direct nuclear thermal propulsion were proposed and designed, none were built. This report summarizes status results of evaluations of small nuclear reactor designs suitable for direct nuclear thermal propulsion.

Bruce G. Schnitzler

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Evaluation of the effect of contact between risers and guide frames on offshore spar platform motions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A computer program is developed for the dynamic analysis of a spar platform coupled with mooring lines and risers in waves, winds, and currents. The new multi-contact analysis program is developed for the nonlinear multi-contact coupling between vertical risers and guide frames inside of the spar moon-pool. The program extends capability of the current coupled dynamic analysis program, WINPOST, by adding the capability of analyzing riser effects caused by the contact forces and moments from buoyancy-cans inside the spar moon-pool on the global spar motions. The gap between the buoyancy can and riser guide frames are modeled using three different types of nonlinear gap springs. The new riser model also considers the Coulomb damping between the buoyancy-cans and riser guide frames, and it also calculates the impact force on risers for use in fatigue analysis. The spar platform generally uses vertical risers with dry trees. However, as the water depth increases, the size of the buoyancy-can increases, and it makes installation more difficult. The pneumatic riser support system does not use buoyancy-cans and is an alternative solution to the buoyancy-can approach. The dynamic characteristics of pneumatic riser support system are studied by using the newly developed numerical analysis program. The damped Mathieu instability diagram for the damped Mathieu's equation is developed. Due to spar heave and pitch coupling, Mathieu's instability may become excited in long period waves. In the numerical analysis program, pitch and roll hydrostatic stiffness are recalculated for heave motion in every time step to check Mathieu's instability for the spar platform. Simplified vortex-induced vibration effects on the spar platform are considered in newly developed numerical analysis program, and the results are systematically compared with those of the original program WINPOST. The results in this paper show that the buoyancy-can effect significantly reduces the spar pitch motion, and the Coulomb damping effect also significantly reduces the spar heave motion. The buoyancy-can effect also plays an important role in Mathieu instability. The results also show that a pneumatic riser support system increases the spar heave motion and payload.

Koo, Bon-Jun

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

United States navy fleet problems and the development of carrier aviation, 1929-1933  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. Navy first took official notice of aviation in 1910, but its development of carrier aviation lagged behind Great Britain??s until the 1920s. The first American aircraft carrier, the Langley, commissioned in 1919, provided the Navy with a valuable platform to explore the potential uses of carrier aviation, but was usually limited to scouting and fleet air defense in the U.S. Navy??s annual interwar exercises called fleet problems. This began to change in 1929 with the introduction of the carriers Lexington and Saratoga in Fleet Problem IX. After this exercise, which included a raid by aircraft from the Saratoga that ??destroyed?? the Pacific side of the Panama Canal, the carriers were assigned a wider variety of roles over the next five years of exercises. During this time, the carriers gained their independence from the battle line, which the smaller and slower Langley had been unable to do. Reflecting the advanced capabilities of the new carriers, the fleet problems conducted during Admiral William Veazie Pratt??s tenure as Chief of Naval Operations, 1930-1933, began to test the employment of the new carriers as the centerpiece of one of the opposing fleets within the exercises. The Lexington and Saratoga were used offensively during these exercises, employing their aircraft to sink surface ships, though not battleships, and successfully strike targets ashore. The carriers became successful in spite of the unreliability of early 1930s carrier aircraft, particularly the torpedo bombers, that could carry heavy payloads. Lessons learned from the Lexington and Saratoga Fleet Problems IX through XIV influenced the design of the next generation of American aircraft carriers, the Yorktownclass, which were authorized in 1933. These new carriers were faster and much larger than the carrier Ranger, commissioned in 1934 and designed before the Lexington and Saratoga began participating in the exercises. Features incorporated into the Yorktownclass based on operational experience included the reduced need for large surface batteries because of the use of escort vessels, the emphasis of armoring against shellfire over aerial bombs and torpedoes, and the capability to launch large numbers of aircraft quickly.

Wadle, Ryan David

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Type B package for the transport of large medical and industrial sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AREVA Federal Services LLC, under contract to the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Offsite Source Recovery Project, is developing a new Type B(U)-96 package for the transport of unwanted or abandoned high activity gamma and neutron radioactive sealed sources (sources). The sources were used primarily in medical or industrial devices, and are of domestic (USA) or foreign origin. To promote public safety and mitigate the possibility of loss or misuse, the Offsite Source Recovery Project is recovering and managing sources worldwide. The package, denoted the LANL-B, is designed to accommodate the sources within an internal gamma shield. The sources are located either in the IAEA's Long Term Storage Shield (LTSS), or within intact medical or industrial irradiation devices. As the sources are already shielded separately, the package does not include any shielding of its own. A particular challenge in the design of the LANL-B has been weight. Since the LTSS shield weighs approximately 5,000 lb [2,270 kg], and the total package gross weight must be limited to 10,000 lb [4,540 kg], the net weight of the package was limited to 5,000 lb, for an efficiency of 50% (i.e., the payload weight is 50% of the gross weight of the package). This required implementation of a light-weight bell-jar concept, in which the containment takes the form of a vertical bell which is bolted to a base. A single impact limiter is used on the bottom, to protect the elastomer seals and bolted joint. A top-end impact is mitigated by the deformation of a tori spherically-shaped head. Impacts in various orientations on the bottom end are mitigated by a cylindrical, polyurethane foam-filled impact limiter. Internally, energy is absorbed using honeycomb blocks at each end, which fill the torispherical head volumes. As many of the sources are considered to be in normal form, the LANL-B package offers leak-tight containment using an elastomer seal at the joint between the bell and the base, as well as on the single vent port. Leak testing prior to transport may be either using helium mass spectrometry or the pressure-rise concept.

Brown, Darrell Dwaine [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Noss, Philip W [AREVA FEDERAL SERVICES

2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

386

IMPLEMENTING HEAT SEALED BAG RELIEF & HYDROGEN & METANE TESTING TO REDUCE THE NEED TO REPACK HANFORD TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's site at Hanford has a significant quantity of drums containing heat-sealed bags that required repackaging under previous revisions of the TRUPACT-II Authorized Methods for Payload Control (TRAMPAC) before being shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Since glovebox repackaging is the most rate-limiting and resource-intensive step for accelerating Hanford waste certification, a cooperative effort between Hanford's TRU Program and the WIPP site significantly reduced the number of drums requiring repackaging. More specifically, recent changes to the TRAMPAC (Revision 19C), allow relief for heat-sealed bags having more than 390 square inches of surface area. This relief is based on data provided by Hanford on typical Hanford heat-sealed bags, but can be applied to other sites generating transuranic waste that have waste packaged in heat-sealed bags. The paper provides data on the number of drums affected, the attendant cost savings, and the time saved. Hanford also has a significant quantity of high-gram drums with multiple layers of confinement including heat-scaled bags. These higher-gram drums are unlikely to meet the decay-heat limits required for analytical category certification under the TRAMPAC. The combination of high-gram drums and accelerated reprocessing/shipping make it even more difficult to meet the decay-heat limits because of necessary aging requirements associated with matrix depletion. Hydrogen/methane sampling of headspace gases can be used to certify waste that does not meet decay-heat limits of the more restrictive analytical category using the test category. The number of drums that can be qualified using the test category is maximized by assuring that the detection limit for hydrogen and methane is as low as possible. Sites desiring to ship higher-gram drums must understand the advantages of using hydrogen/methane sampling and shipping under the test category. Headspace gas sampling, as specified by the WIPP Waste Analysis Plan, provides the sample necessary for hydrogen/methane analysis. Most Hanford drums are not equipped with a filter through which a headspace gas sample can be obtained. A pneumatic system is now used to insert ''dart'' filters. The filters were developed by the vendor and approved for WIPP certification at the request of the Hanford Site. The same pneumatic system is used to install septum-type sample ports to allow the headspace to be sampled. Together, these steps allow the Hanford Site to avoid repackaging a large percentage of drums, and thus accelerate certification of waste destined for WIPP.

MCDONALD, K.M.

2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

387

Transportation Safety Excellence in Operations Through Improved Transportation Safety Document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent accomplishment of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) Nuclear Safety analysis group was to obtain DOE-ID approval for the inter-facility transfer of greater-than-Hazard-Category-3 quantity radioactive/fissionable waste in Department of Transportation (DOT) Type A drums at MFC. This accomplishment supported excellence in operations through safety analysis by better integrating nuclear safety requirements with waste requirements in the Transportation Safety Document (TSD); reducing container and transport costs; and making facility operations more efficient. The MFC TSD governs and controls the inter-facility transfer of greater-than-Hazard-Category-3 radioactive and/or fissionable materials in non-DOT approved containers. Previously, the TSD did not include the capability to transfer payloads of greater-than-Hazard-Category-3 radioactive and/or fissionable materials using DOT Type A drums. Previous practice was to package the waste materials to less-than-Hazard-Category-3 quantities when loading DOT Type A drums for transfer out of facilities to reduce facility waste accumulations. This practice allowed operations to proceed, but resulted in drums being loaded to less than the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) waste acceptance criteria (WAC) waste limits, which was not cost effective or operations friendly. An improved and revised safety analysis was used to gain DOE-ID approval for adding this container configuration to the MFC TSD safety basis. In the process of obtaining approval of the revised safety basis, safety analysis practices were used effectively to directly support excellence in operations. Several factors contributed to the success of MFCs effort to obtain approval for the use of DOT Type A drums, including two practices that could help in future safety basis changes at other facilities. 1) The process of incorporating the DOT Type A drums into the TSD at MFC helped to better integrate nuclear safety requirements with waste requirements. MFCs efforts illustrate that utilizing the requirements of other disciplines, beyond nuclear safety, can provide an efficient process. Analyzing current processes to find better ways of meeting the requirements of multiple disciplines within a safety basis can lead to a more cost-effective, streamlined process. 2) Incorporating the DOT Type A drums into the MFC TSD was efficient because safety analysts utilized a transportation plan that provided analysis that could also be used for the change to the TSD addendum. In addition, because the plan they used had already been approved and was in use by the Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) at the INL, justification for the change to the TSD was more compelling. MFC safety analysts proved that streamlining a process can be made more feasible by drawing from analysis that has already been completed.

Dr. Michael A. Lehto; MAL

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Federal Fleet Use of Electric Vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Per Executive Order 13031, Federal Alternative Fueled Vehicle Leadership, the U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity provided $998,300 in incremental funding to support the deployment of 220 electric vehicles in 36 Federal fleets. The 145 electric Ford Ranger pickups and 75 electric Chrysler EPIC (Electric Powered Interurban Commuter) minivans were operated in 14 states and the District of Columbia. The 220 vehicles were driven an estimated average of 700,000 miles annually. The annual estimated use of the 220 electric vehicles contributed to 39,000 fewer gallons of petroleum being used by Federal fleets and the reduction in emissions of 1,450 pounds of smog-forming pollution. Numerous attempts were made to obtain information from all 36 fleets. Information responses were received from 25 fleets (69% response rate), as some Federal fleet personnel that were originally involved with the Incremental Funding Project were transferred, retired, or simply could not be found. In addition, many of the Department of Defense fleets indicated that they were supporting operations in Iraq and unable to provide information for the foreseeable future. It should be noted that the opinions of the 25 fleets is based on operating 179 of the 220 electric vehicles (81% response rate). The data from the 25 fleets is summarized in this report. Twenty-two of the 25 fleets reported numerous problems with the vehicles, including mechanical, traction battery, and charging problems. Some of these problems, however, may have resulted from attempting to operate the vehicles beyond their capabilities. The majority of fleets reported that most of the vehicles were driven by numerous drivers each week, with most vehicles used for numerous trips per day. The vehicles were driven on average from 4 to 50 miles per day on a single charge. However, the majority of the fleets reported needing gasoline vehicles for missions beyond the capabilities of the electric vehicles, usually because of range limitations. Twelve fleets reported experiencing at least one charge depletion while driving, whereas nine fleets reported not having this problem. Twenty-four of the 25 fleets responded that the electric vehicles were easy to use and 22 fleets indicated that the payload was adequate. Thirteen fleets reported charging problems; eleven fleets reported no charging problems. Nine fleets reported the vehicles broke down while driving; 14 fleets reported no onroad breakdowns. Some of the breakdowns while driving, however, appear to include normal flat tires and idiot lights coming on. In spite of operation and charging problems, 59% of the fleets responded that they were satisfied, very satisfied, or extremely satisfied with the performance of the electric vehicles. As of September 2003, 74 of the electric vehicles were still being used and 107 had been returned to the manufacturers because the leases had concluded.

Mindy Kirpatrick; J. E. Francfort

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Successful Demolition of Historic Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Facilities: Managing the Process to Maximize Recycle Value to Fund Demolition  

SciTech Connect

This paper will present the history of the Atlas 36 and Titan 40 Space Launch Complexes (SLC), the facility assessment process, demolition planning, recycle methodology, and actual facility demolition that resulted in a 40% reduction in baseline cost. These two SLC launched hundreds of payloads into space from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (AFS), Florida. The Atlas-Centaur family of rockets could lift small- to medium-size satellites designed for communications, weather, or military use, placing them with near pinpoint accuracy into their intended orbits. The larger Titan family was relied upon for heavier lifting needs, including launching military satellites as well as interplanetary probes. But despite their efficiency and cost-effectiveness, the Titan rockets, as well as earlier generation Atlas models, were retired in 2005. Concerns about potential environmental health hazards from PCBs and lead-based paint chipping off the facilities also contributed to the Air Force's decision in 2005 to dismantle and demolish the Atlas and Titan missile-launching systems. Lockheed Martin secured the complex following the final launch, removed equipment and turned over the site to the Air Force for decommissioning and demolition (D and D). AMEC was retained by the Air Force to perform demolition planning and facility D and D in 2004. AMEC began with a review of historical information, interviews with past operations personnel, and 100% facility assessment of over 100 structures. There where numerous support buildings that due to their age contained asbestos containing material (ACM), PCB-impacted material, and universal material that had to be identified and removed prior to demolition. Environmental testing had revealed that the 36B mobile support tower (MST) exceeded the TSCA standard for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) paint (<50 ppm), as did the high bay sections of the Titan Vertical Integration Building (VIB). Thus, while most of the steel structures could be completely recycled, about one-third of 36B MST and the affected areas of the VIB were to be consigned to an on-site regulated waste landfill. In all, it is estimated that approximately 10,000,000 kg (11,000 tons) of PCB-coated steel will be land-filled and 23,000,000 kg (25,000 tons) will be recycled. The recycling of the steel and other materials made it possible to do additional demolition by using these funds. Therefore, finding ways to maximize the recycle value of materials became a key factor in the pre-demolition characterization and implementation strategy. This paper will present the following: - Critical elements in demolition planning working at an active launch facility; - Characterization and strategy to maximize steel recycle; - Waste disposition strategy to maximize recycle/reuse and minimize disposal; - Recycle options available at DOD installations that allow for addition funds for demolition; - Innovation in demolition methodologies for large structures - explosive demolition and large-scale dismantlement; - H and S aspects of explosive demolition and large scale dismantlement. In conclusion: The Cape Canaveral AFS Demolition Program has been a great success due to the integration of multiple operations and contractors working together to determine the most cost-effective demolition methods. It is estimated that by extensive pre-planning and working with CCAFS representatives, as well as maximizing the recycle credits of various material, primarily steel, that the government will be able to complete what was base-lined to be a $30 M demolition program for < $20 M. Other factors included a competitive subcontractor environment where they were encouraged with incentives to maximize recycle/reuse of material and creative demolition solutions. Also, by overlapping multiple demolition tasks at multiple facilities allowed for a reduction in field oversight. (authors)

Jones, A.; Hambro, L. [AMEC Earth and Environmental, Inc., Cocoa, FL (United States); Hooper, K. [U.S. Air Force 45th Space Wing, Patrick AFB, Florida (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

LIFETIME PREDICTION FOR MODEL 9975 O-RINGS IN KAMS  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently storing plutonium materials in the K-Area Materials Storage (KAMS) facility. The materials are packaged per the DOE 3013 Standard and transported and stored in KAMS in Model 9975 shipping packages, which include double containment vessels sealed with dual O-rings made of Parker Seals compound V0835-75 (based on Viton{reg_sign} GLT). The outer O-ring of each containment vessel is credited for leaktight containment per ANSI N14.5. O-ring service life depends on many factors, including the failure criterion, environmental conditions, overall design, fabrication quality and assembly practices. A preliminary life prediction model has been developed for the V0835-75 O-rings in KAMS. The conservative model is based primarily on long-term compression stress relaxation (CSR) experiments and Arrhenius accelerated-aging methodology. For model development purposes, seal lifetime is defined as a 90% loss of measurable sealing force. Thus far, CSR experiments have only reached this target level of degradation at temperatures {ge} 300 F. At lower temperatures, relaxation values are more tolerable. Using time-temperature superposition principles, the conservative model predicts a service life of approximately 20-25 years at a constant seal temperature of 175 F. This represents a maximum payload package at a constant ambient temperature of 104 F, the highest recorded in KAMS to date. This is considered a highly conservative value as such ambient temperatures are only reached on occasion and for short durations. The presence of fiberboard in the package minimizes the impact of such temperature swings, with many hours to several days required for seal temperatures to respond proportionately. At 85 F ambient, a more realistic but still conservative value, bounding seal temperatures are reduced to {approx}158 F, with an estimated seal lifetime of {approx}35-45 years. The actual service life for O-rings in a maximum wattage package likely lies higher than the estimates due to the conservative assumptions used for the model. For lower heat loads at similar ambient temperatures, seal lifetime is further increased. The preliminary model is based on several assumptions that require validation with additional experiments and longer exposures at more realistic conditions. The assumption of constant exposure at peak temperature is believed to be conservative. Cumulative damage at more realistic conditions will likely be less severe but is more difficult to assess based on available data. Arrhenius aging behavior is expected, but non-Arrhenius behavior is possible. Validation of Arrhenius behavior is ideally determined from longer tests at temperatures closer to actual service conditions. CSR experiments will therefore continue at lower temperatures to validate the model. Ultrasensitive oxygen consumption analysis has been shown to be useful in identifying non-Arrhenius behavior within reasonable test periods. Therefore, additional experiments are recommended and planned to validate the model.

Hoffman, E.; Skidmore, E.

2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

391

Scaled Testing of Hydrogen Gas Getters for Transuranic Waste  

SciTech Connect

Alpha radiolysis of hydrogenous waste and packaging materials generates hydrogen gas in radioactive storage and shipment containers. Hydrogen forms a flammable mixture with air over a wide range of concentrations (5% to 75%), and very low energy is needed to ignite hydrogen-air mixtures. For these reasons, the concentration of hydrogen in waste shipment containers (Transuranic Package Transporter-II or TRUPACT-II containers) needs to remain below the lower explosion limit of hydrogen in air (5 vol%). Accident scenarios and the resulting safety analysis require that this limit not be exceeded. The use of 'hydrogen getters' is being investigated as a way to prevent the build up of hydrogen in TRUPACT-II containers. Preferred getters are solid materials that scavenge hydrogen from the gas phase and chemically and irreversibly bind it into the solid state. In this study, two getter systems are evaluated: a) 1,4-bis (phenylethynyl)benzene or DEB, characterized by the presence of carbon-carbon triple bonds; and b) a proprietary polymer hydrogen getter, VEI or TruGetter, characterized by carbon-carbon double bonds. Carbon in both getter types may, in the presence of suitable precious metal catalysts such as palladium, irreversibly react with and bind hydrogen. With oxygen present, the precious metal may also eliminate hydrogen by catalyzing the formation of water. This reaction is called catalytic recombination. DEB and VEI performed satisfactorily in lab scale tests using small test volumes (ml-scale), high hydrogen generation rates, and short time spans of hours to days. The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether DEB and VEI perform satisfactorily in actual drum-scale tests with realistic hydrogen generation rates and time frames. The two getter systems were evaluated in test vessels comprised of a Gas Generation Test Program-style bell-jar and a drum equipped with a composite drum filter. The vessels were scaled to replicate the ratio between void space in the inner containment vessel of a TRUPACT-II container and volume of a payload of seven 55-gallon drums. The tests were conducted in an atmosphere of air for 60 days at ambient temperature (15 to 27 deg. C) and a scaled hydrogen generation rate of 2.60 E-07 moles hydrogen per second (0.35 cc/min). Hydrogen was successfully 'gettered' by both systems. Hydrogen concentrations remained below 5 vol% (in air) for the duration of the tests. However, catalytic reaction of hydrogen with carbon triple or double bonds in the getter materials did not take place. Instead, catalytic recombination was the predominant mechanism in both getters as evidenced by 1) consumption of oxygen in the bell-jars; 2) production of free water in the bell-jars; and 3) absence of chemical changes in both getters as shown by NMR spectra. (authors)

Kaszuba, J.; Mroz, E.; Haga, M.; Hollis, W. K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico, 87545 (United States); Peterson, E.; Stone, M.; Orme, C.; Luther, T.; Benson, M. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2208 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Unmanned air vehicle (UAV) ultra-persitence research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories and Northrop Grumman Corporation Integrated Systems, Unmanned Systems (NGIS UMS) collaborated to further ultra-persistence technologies for unmanned air vehicles (UAVs). The greatest shortfalls in UAV capabilities have been repeatedly identified as (1) insufficient flight persistence or 'hang time,' (2) marginal electrical power for running higher power avionics and payload systems, and (3) inadequate communications bandwidth and reach. NGIS UMS requested support from Sandia to develop an ultra-persistent propulsion and power system (UP3S) for potential incorporation into next generation UAV systems. The team members tried to determine which energy storage and power generation concepts could most effectively push UAV propulsion and electrical power capabilities to increase UAV sortie duration from days to months while increasing available electrical power at least two-fold. Primary research and development areas that were pursued included these goals: perform general system engineering and integration analyses; develop initial thermal and electrical power estimates; provide mass, volume, dimensional, and balance estimates; conduct preliminary safety assessments; assess logistics support requirements; perform, preliminary assessments of any security and safeguards; evaluate options for removal, replacement, and disposition of materials; generally advance the potential of the UP3S concept. The effort contrasted and compared eight heat sources technologies, three power conversion, two dual cycle propulsion system configurations, and a single electrical power generation scheme. Overall performance, specific power parameters, technical complexities, security, safety, and other operational features were successfully investigated. Large and medium sized UAV systems were envisioned and operational flight profiles were developed for each concept. Heat source creation and support challenges for domestic and expeditionary operations were considered. Fundamental cost driver analysis was also performed. System development plans were drafted in order to determine where the technological and programmatic critical paths lay. As a result of this effort, UAVs were to be able to provide far more surveillance time and intelligence information per mission while reducing the high cost of support activities. This technology was intended to create unmatched global capabilities to observe and preempt terrorist and weapon of mass destruction (WMD) activities. Various DOE laboratory and contractor personnel and facilities could have been used to perform detailed engineering, fabrication, assembly and test operations including follow-on operational support. Unfortunately, none of the results will be used in the near-term or mid-term future. NGIS UMS and SNL felt that the technical goals for the project were accomplished. NGIS UMS was quite pleased with the results of analysis and design although it was disappointing to all that the political realities would not allow use of the results. Technology and system designs evaluated under this CRADA had previously never been applied to unmanned air vehicles (UAVs). Based upon logistic support cost predictions, because the UAVs would not have had to refuel as often, forward basing support costs could have been reduced due to a decrease in the number and extent of support systems and personnel being required to operate UAVs in remote areas. Basic application of the advanced propulsion and power approach is well understood and industry now understands the technical, safety, and political issues surrounding implementation of these strategies. However, the overall economic impact was not investigated. The results will not be applied/implemented. No near-term benefit to industry or the taxpayer will be encountered as a result of these studies.

Dron, S. B.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Medium Truck Duty Cycle Data from Real-World Driving Environments: Project Interim Report  

SciTech Connect

Since the early part of the 20th century, the US trucking industry has provided a safe and economical means of moving commodities across the country. At the present time, nearly 80% of the US domestic freight movement involves the use of trucks. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is spearheading a number of research efforts to improve heavy vehicle fuel efficiencies. This includes research in engine technologies (including hybrid and fuel cell technologies), lightweight materials, advanced fuels, and parasitic loss reductions. In addition, DOE is developing advanced tools and models to support heavy vehicle truck research, and is leading the 21st Century Truck Partnership whose stretch goals involve a reduction by 50% of the fuel consumption of heavy vehicles on a ton-mile basis. This Medium Truck Duty Cycle (MTDC) Project is a critical element in DOE s vision for improved heavy vehicle energy efficiency and is unique in that there is no other national database of characteristic duty cycles for medium trucks. It involves the collection of real-world data for various situational characteristics (rural/urban, freeway/arterial, congested/free-flowing, good/bad weather, etc.) and looks at the unique nature of medium trucks drive cycles (stop-and-go delivery, power takeoff, idle time, short-radius trips), to provide a rich source of data that can contribute to the development of new tools for fuel efficiency and modeling, provide DOE a sound basis upon which to make technology investment decisions, and provide a national archive of real-world-based medium-truck operational data to support heavy vehicle energy efficiency research. The MTDC project involves a two-part field operational test (FOT). For the Part-1 FOT, three vehicles, each from two vocations (urban transit and dry-box delivery) were instrumented for one year of data collection. The Part-2 FOT will involve the towing/recovery and utility vocations. The vehicles participating in the MTDC project are doing so through gratis partnerships in return for early access to the results of this study. Partnerships such as these are critical to FOTs in which real-world data is being collected. In Part 1 of the project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory(ORNL) established partnerships with the H.T. Hackney Company, one of the largest wholesale distributors in the country, distributing products to 21 states; and with the Knoxville Area Transit (KAT), the City of Knoxville s transit system, operating services across the city of Knoxville and parts of Knox co. These partnerships and agreements provided ORNL access to three Class-7 2005/2007 International day-cab tractors, model 8600, which regularly haul 28 ft pup trailers (H.T. Hackney Co) and three Class-7 2005 Optima LF-34 buses (KAT), for collection of duty cycle data. In addition, ORNL has collaborated with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) to determine if there were possible synergies between this duty cycle data collection effort and FMCSA s need to learn more about the operation and duty cycles of the second-largest fuel consuming commercial vehicle category in the US. FMCSA s primary interest was in collecting safety data relative to the driver, carrier, and vehicle. In order to collect the duty cycle and safety-related data, ORNL developed a data acquisition and wireless communication system that was placed on each test vehicle. Each signal recorded in this FOT was collected by means of one of the instruments incorporated into each data acquisition system (DAS). Native signals were obtained directly from the vehicle s J1939 and J1708 data buses. A VBOX II Lite collected Global Positioning System related information including speed, acceleration, and spatial location information at a rate of 5 Hz, and communicated this data via the CAN (J1939) protocol. The Air-Weigh LoadMaxx, a self-weighing system which determines the vehicle s gross weight by means of pressure transducers and posts the weight to the vehicle s J1939 data bus, was used to collect vehicle payload information. A cellular modem, the Raven X

Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z