National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for upward bound math

  1. College Bound American Indian Math and Science Enrichment Program (AIMS). Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-09-01

    Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute (SIPI), was founded in 1971 and is located on 164 acres in northwest Albuquerque, New Mexico in the center of New Mexico`s agricultural and high-tech corridors. SIPI became accredited as a community college in 1993, serves Native Americans nationwide, and is governed by a nationally-tribally appointed Board of Regents (Jicarilla Apache, Joint Oklahoma Tribes, Mescalero Apache, Navajo Nation-Arizona, Navajo Nation-New Mexico, Ten Southern Pueblos, and Eight Northern Pueblos, Southern Ute, Inter-tribal Council of Arizona, and Oglala Sioux). In 1993, The US Department of Education, TRIO Programs no longer funded the Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute (SIPI) Summer Math and Science Enrichment Program. However, with US Department of Energy funding SIPI was able to continue service to the Native American community under the new title of College Bound American Indian Math and Science (AIMS) Enrichment Program. This new program continued the goals and objectives of the TRIO program with an expanded focus that included students from more Native American communities nationwide. The program also interfaced with a teacher enrichment program (Rural American Indian Science Education-RAISE) sponsored by the Bureau of Indian Affairs and Sandia National Labs (SNL). SIPI in collaboration with Sandia National Laboratories and Lawrence Livermore National (LLNL) Laboratory established a mathematics and science enrichment program at SIPI for students attending rural high schools serving predominantly Native American populations. The primary goal of the program was to provide 9th--12th grade students, mostly Native American, the skills and knowledge, interest and motivation, and strategies to remain in high school and pursue a college education in a math, science, or technology based field. Each year, the program included a six-week intensive residential summer program located at SIPI as well as academic year support activities at the student`s high school. A summary of the program activities during the grant period is given.

  2. Math Libraries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FFTW GNU Science Library (GSL) LAPACK LibSci Math Kernel Library (MKL) NAG PETSc PSPLINE ScaLAPACK SLEPc SPRNG TPSL Trilinos Math Libraries List Programming Tools List Performance and Debugging Tools Grid Software and Services NERSC Software Downloads Policies User Surveys NERSC Users Group User Announcements Help Staff Blogs Request Repository Mailing List Operations for: Passwords & Off-Hours Status 1-800-66-NERSC, option 1 or 510-486-6821 Account Support https://nim.nersc.gov

  3. Help:Math | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    math> x21+y Subscript <math>CO2<math> CO2 Subscript Grouping <math>ai,j> ai,j Fraction <math>1over2<math> <math>fracxyz> 1over2...

  4. Applied & Computational Math

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Computational Math - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us ... Twitter Google + Vimeo GovDelivery SlideShare Applied & Computational Math HomeEnergy ...

  5. Applied Math & Software

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Math & Software - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us ... Twitter Google + Vimeo GovDelivery SlideShare Applied Math & Software HomeTransportation ...

  6. Math Library Performance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Math Library Performance Math Library Performance Fully optimizing a given application's performance often requires a deep understanding of the source, an accurate profile for a ...

  7. Math Kernel Library (MKL)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kernel Library (MKL) Math Kernel Library (MKL) Description The Intel Math Kernel Library (Intel MKL) contains highly optimized, extensively threaded math routines for science, engineering, and financial applications. Core math functions include BLAS, LAPACK, ScaLAPACK, Sparse Solvers, Fast Fourier Transforms, Vector Math, and more. MKL is available on NERSC computer platforms where the Intel compilers are available. For instances, on Cori and Edison. If you use intel compilers to compile your

  8. Using the ACML Math Library

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ACML Math Library Using the ACML Math Library The AMD ACML math library is available on Euclid. This library is described at the ACML Math Library. To compile and link with it, ...

  9. Information Science, Computing, Applied Math

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capabilities Information Science, Computing, Applied Math science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Information Science, Computing, Applied Math National security ...

  10. Math Library Performance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Math Library Performance Math Library Performance Fully optimizing a given application's performance often requires a deep understanding of the source, an accurate profile for a representative run, and the ability to have changes to the source accepted upstream. However, in many cases, significant performance gains can be achieved by simply optimizing the code over the matrix of possible compilers, compiler options and libraries available on a given machine. Here, we explore the performance

  11. Women's History Month: Ebony Vauss, Solar Energy Technologies...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    By encountering real-life applications of math and science through the program, Vauss and ... University of San Francisco Upward Bound Math and Science Program. (Photo courtesy of ...

  12. Applied Math & Software

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Math & Software - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  13. Applied & Computational Math

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Computational Math - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  14. Using the ACML Math Library

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ACML Math Library Using the ACML Math Library The AMD ACML math library is available on Euclid. This library is described at the ACML Math Library. To compile and link with it, load the ACML library and include the $ACML environment variable as part of your compile/link line: % module load acml % mpicc -o cblas cblas.c $ACML If you have the gnu compilers loaded, use the acml-gnu module instead. Last edited: 2011-04-06 13:02:19

  15. List of Math Libraries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Libraries List List of Math Libraries Package Platform Version Module Install Date Date Made Default A Fortran interface to the GNU Scientific Library (GSL) edison 1.0.0 fgsl/1.0.0 2015-04-14 2015-04-14 ACML cori 5.3.1 acml/5.3.1 2015-12-22 2015-12-22 ACML cori 6.1.0.31 acml/6.1.0.31 2015-12-22 ACML edison 5.3.1 acml/5.3.1 2016-01-26 2016-01-26 ACML edison 6.1.0.31 acml/6.1.0.31 2016-01-26 acml genepool 5.1.0 acml/5.1.0 2012-07-07 acml genepool_sl6 5.1.0 acml/5.1.0 2015-03-06 acml phoebe 5.1.0

  16. Activation of 200 MW refusegenerated CHP upward regulation effect...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EU Smart Grid Projects Map1 Overview Waste CHP plants can be used in the electricity market for upward regulation by bypassing the steam turbine. The technical design for this...

  17. Information Science, Computing, Applied Math

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capabilities » Information Science, Computing, Applied Math /science-innovation/_assets/images/icon-science.jpg Information Science, Computing, Applied Math National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos National Laboratory for the best of both. No place on Earth pursues a broader array of world-class scientific endeavors. Computer, Computational, and Statistical Sciences (CCS)» High Performance Computing (HPC)» Extreme Scale Computing, Co-design»

  18. Real-time sub-<math display='inline'>math>ngstrom...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Real-time sub-<math display'inline'><math>ngstrom imaging of reversible and irreversible conformations in rhodium catalysts and graphene Kisielowski, Christian; Wang,...

  19. Phase diagram of Josephson junction between<math

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    diagram of Josephson junction between<math display'inline'>s<math>and display'inline'>s<math>superconductors in the dirty limit...

  20. Math of Popping Bubbles in a Foam

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Math of Popping Bubbles in a Foam Math of Popping Bubbles in a Foam Berkeley Lab researchers mathematically describe the complex evolution and disappearance of foamy bubbles May 9, ...

  1. Math and Science Academy for Teachers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Teachers (MSA) is an intensive three-year program designed to support whole-school continuous improvement in math and science teaching and learning. L NL Math and Science...

  2. STEM Women All-Stars Hit the Road | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    STEM Women All-Stars Hit the Road STEM Women All-Stars Hit the Road April 30, 2012 - 4:32pm Addthis Karina Edmonds, Technology Transfer Coordinator for the Department of Energy, meets with girls from the University of San Francisco Upward Bound Math and Science Program. (Photo courtesy of USF Upward Bound Math and Science Program) Karina Edmonds, Technology Transfer Coordinator for the Department of Energy, meets with girls from the University of San Francisco Upward Bound Math and Science

  3. Regional math teacher wins presidential award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional math teacher wins presidential award Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:Mar. 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Regional math teacher wins presidential award Regional economic growth celebrated February 1, 2014 Vivian Valencia, (fourth-grade math teacher at the San Juan Elementary School in Espanola) recently won the Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching Vivian Valencia,

  4. Northern New Mexico Math & Science Academy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Northern New Mexico Math & Science Academy for Teachers (MSA) Program Description MSA is an intensive and comprehensive professional development program for K-12 teachers. Participants commit to attend a three-week Summer Institute for three years during which they study best practices in math and science education. Teachers also receive instructional support and additional math and science content workshops during the school year. Program Objectives 1. To increase teachers' content

  5. Math and Science Academy for Teachers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Teachers (K-12) » Math & Science Academy for Teachers Northern New Mexico Math & Science Academy for Teachers The Laboratory's Math and Science Academy (MSA) provides quality STEM education professional development for teachers in participating schools and districts. Contacts Community Relations & Partnerships (505) 665-4400 Lorenzo Gonzales (505) 699-4050 Email Zachary Leonard (505) 699-4053 Email Monica J. Martinez-Archuleta (505) 500-6076 Email Randy Merker (505) 500-5898 Email

  6. Northern New Mexico Math & Science Academy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Northern New Mexico Math & Science Academy for Teachers (MSA) Program Description MSA is an intensive and comprehensive professional development program for K-12 teachers....

  7. Math and Science Academy helps Native American schools empower...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Math and Science Academy helps Native American schools empower teachers Community ... Latest Issue:Mar. 2016 all issues All Issues submit Math and Science Academy helps ...

  8. Scientists compose complex math equations to replicate behaviors...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Models: Rob Jacob Scientists compose complex math equations to replicate behaviors ... It's math in action. A global model depends on submodels Submodels can be broken into two ...

  9. Nominate Your Mentor for the Presidential Award in Science, Math...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Nominate Your Mentor for the Presidential Award in Science, Math, and Engineering Mentoring Nominate Your Mentor for the Presidential Award in Science, Math, and Engineering ...

  10. Former NERSC Consultant Mentors Math, Computer Science Students

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Former NERSC Consultant Mentors Math, Computer Science Students Former NERSC Consultant Mentors Math, Computer Science Students March 10, 2015 Frank Hale, a former consultant in ...

  11. The detection of upwardly propagating waves channeling energy from the chromosphere to the low corona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freij, N.; Nelson, C. J.; Mumford, S.; Erdlyi, R.; Scullion, E. M.; Wedemeyer, S.

    2014-08-10

    There have been ubiquitous observations of wave-like motions in the solar atmosphere for decades. Recent improvements to space- and ground-based observatories have allowed the focus to shift to smaller magnetic structures on the solar surface. In this paper, high-resolution ground-based data taken using the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope is combined with co-spatial and co-temporal data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) satellite to analyze running penumbral waves (RPWs). RPWs have always been thought to be radial wave propagation that occurs within sunspots. Recent research has suggested that they are in fact upwardly propagating field-aligned waves (UPWs). Here, RPWs within a solar pore are observed for the first time and are interpreted as UPWs due to the lack of a penumbra that is required to support RPWs. These UPWs are also observed co-spatially and co-temporally within several SDO/AIA elemental lines that sample the transition region and low corona. The observed UPWs are traveling at a horizontal velocity of around 17 0.5 km s{sup 1} and a minimum vertical velocity of 42 21 km s{sup 1}. The estimated energy of the waves is around 150 W m{sup 2}, which is on the lower bound required to heat the quiet-Sun corona. This is a new, yet unconsidered source of wave energy within the solar chromosphere and low corona.

  12. Boosting Native American students' math scores

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Boosting Native American students' math scores Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:Mar. 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Boosting Native American students' math scores Professional development opportunities for teachers provide essential foundation May 5, 2014 Mara Herrera teaches a young student at San Felipe Pueblo Elementary School. Mara Herrera teaches a young student at San Felipe Pueblo Elementary School. Contact

  13. Physical Uncertainty Bounds (PUB)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaughan, Diane Elizabeth; Preston, Dean L.

    2015-03-19

    This paper introduces and motivates the need for a new methodology for determining upper bounds on the uncertainties in simulations of engineered systems due to limited fidelity in the composite continuum-level physics models needed to simulate the systems. We show that traditional uncertainty quantification methods provide, at best, a lower bound on this uncertainty. We propose to obtain bounds on the simulation uncertainties by first determining bounds on the physical quantities or processes relevant to system performance. By bounding these physics processes, as opposed to carrying out statistical analyses of the parameter sets of specific physics models or simply switching out the available physics models, one can obtain upper bounds on the uncertainties in simulated quantities of interest.

  14. Renormalization Group Flows, Cycles, and<math display='inline...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Group Flows, Cycles, and<math display'inline'>c<math>-Theorem Folklore Curtright, Thomas L.; Jin, Xiang; Zachos, Cosmas K. Not Available American Physical Society None...

  15. Imagine Education recognized for innovative approach to math education

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovative approach to math education Imagine Education recognized for innovative approach to math education Endeavored to remake the way middle-school math is taught through its first-of-its-kind, story-based, online math game, called Ko's Journey. July 20, 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma

  16. Math of Popping Bubbles in a Foam

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Math of Popping Bubbles in a Foam Math of Popping Bubbles in a Foam Berkeley Lab researchers mathematically describe the complex evolution and disappearance of foamy bubbles May 9, 2013 Media Contacts: UC Berkeley: Robert Sanders, rsanders@berkeley.edu, (510) 643-6998 Berkeley Lab: Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, (510) 495-2404 Written By Robert Sanders Bubble baths and soapy dishwater, the refreshing head on a beer and the luscious froth on a cappuccino. All are foams, beautiful yet ephemeral as the

  17. Effects of Increased Upward Flux of Saline Water Caused by CO2 Storage or Other Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murdoch, Lawrence; Xie, Shuang; Falta, Ronald W.; Yonkofski, Catherine MR

    2015-08-01

    Injection of CO2 in deep saline aquifers is being considered to reduce greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, and this process is expected to increase the pressure in these deep aquifers. One potential consequence of pressurization is an increase in the upward flux of saline water. Saline groundwater occurs naturally at shallow depths in many sedimentary basins, so an upward flux of solutes could degrade the quality of freshwater aquifers and threaten aquatic ecosystems. One problem could occur where saline water flowed upward along preferential paths, like faults or improperly abandoned wells. Diffuse upward flow through the natural stratigraphy could also occur in response to basin pressurization. This process would be slower, but diffuse upward flow could affect larger areas than flow through preferential paths, and this motivated us to evaluate this process. We analyzed idealized 2D and 3D geometries representing the essential details of a shallow, freshwater aquifer underlain by saline ground water in a sedimentary basin. The analysis was conducted in two stages, one that simulated the development of a freshwater aquifer by flushing out saline water, and another that simulated the effect of a pulse-like increase in the upward flux from the basin. The results showed that increasing the upward flux from a basin increased the salt concentration and mass loading of salt to streams, and decrease the depth to the fresh/salt transition. The magnitude of these effects varied widely, however, from a small, slow process that would be challenging to detect, to a large, rapid response that could be an environmental catastrophe. The magnitude of the increased flux, and the initial depth to the fresh/salt transition in groundwater controlled the severity of the response. We identified risk categories for salt concentration, mass loading, and freshwater aquifer thickness, and we used these categories to characterize the severity of the response. This showed that risks would likely be minor if the upward flux was smaller than a few tenths of the magnitude of recharge, according to the 2D analyses. The 3D analyses also show that upward flux could occur without a significant increase in the risk categories. The major contribution of this work is that it shows how a large increase in diffuse upward flux from a basin could cause significant problems, but a small increase in upward flux may occur without significantly affecting risks to the shallow freshwater flow system. This heightens the importance of understanding interactions between shallow and deep hydrologic systems when characterizing CO2 storage projects.

  18. Former NERSC Consultant Mentors Math, Computer Science Students

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Former NERSC Consultant Mentors Math, Computer Science Students Former NERSC Consultant Mentors Math, Computer Science Students March 10, 2015 Frank Hale, a former consultant in NERSC's User Services Group (USG) who currently tutors math at Diablo Valley College (DVC) in Pleasant Hill, CA, recently brought a group of computer science enthusiasts from the college to NERSC for a tour. Hale, the first person hired into the USG when NERSC relocated from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to

  19. Girls learn about careers in math and science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Girls learn about careers In math and science Girls learn about careers in math and science Expanding Your Horizons is designed to introduce girls to a variety of careers that require math and science backgrounds, and to stress the importance of taking math and science classes during high school. March 5, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from

  20. Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) Education Summit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    STEM Education Summit STEM Education Summit The Laboratory views its investment in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education as strengthening the Lab's strategic...

  1. DOE Applied Math Summit | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    DOE Applied Math Summit Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About ... ASCR Workshops and Conferences DOE Applied Math Summit Print Text Size: A A A ...

  2. Sources of biogenic methane to form marine gas hydrates: In situ production or upward migration?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paull, C.K.; Ussler, W. III; Borowski, W.S.

    1993-09-01

    Potential sources of biogenic methane in the Carolina Continental Rise -- Blake Ridge sediments have been examined. Two models were used to estimate the potential for biogenic methane production: (1) construction of sedimentary organic carbon budgets, and (2) depth extrapolation of modern microbial production rates. While closed-system estimates predict some gas hydrate formation, it is unlikely that >3% of the sediment volume could be filled by hydrate from methane produced in situ. Formation of greater amounts requires migration of methane from the underlying continental rise sediment prism. Methane may be recycled from below the base of the gas hydrate stability zone by gas hydrate decomposition, upward migration of the methane gas, and recrystallization of gas hydrate within the overlying stability zone. Methane bubbles may also form in the sediment column below the depth of gas hydrate stability because the methane saturation concentration of the pore fluids decreases with increasing depth. Upward migration of methane bubbles from these deeper sediments can add methane to the hydrate stability zone. From these models it appears that recycling and upward migration of methane is essential in forming significant gas hydrate concentrations. In addition, the depth distribution profiles of methane hydrate will differ if the majority of the methane has migrated upward rather than having been produced in situ.

  3. Empirical Math Model: Ideal Gas Law | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Empirical Math Model: Ideal Gas Law Empirical Math Model: Ideal Gas Law January 29, 2013 - 9:54am Addthis What are the key facts? Empirical models are generally most useful in describing conditions close to the experiments used to develop or calibrate them. Predictive tools are essential to understanding phenomena that can not be described experimentally, like used fuel behavior over thousands of years in a repository. Predictability is measured by understanding errors where they are introduced

  4. Mentoring to Increase Diversity in Science, Tech, Engineering and Math |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Mentoring to Increase Diversity in Science, Tech, Engineering and Math Mentoring to Increase Diversity in Science, Tech, Engineering and Math Mentoring is particularly suited in STEM to help with diversity because STEM is a social networking activity. The Department provides mentoring through programs at colleges/Universities, research internshipa, and professional societies. Read this presentation to learn more. File mentoring for diversity October 2011.pptx More

  5. Math and Science Academy helps Native American schools empower teachers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Math and Science Academy helps Native American schools empower teachers Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:Mar. 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Math and Science Academy helps Native American schools empower teachers Ongoing professional support is key October 1, 2014 Jemez Day School teacher Patrick Lewis and young student. Jemez Day School teacher Patrick Lewis and young student. Contact Community Programs Director

  6. Fractional diffusion on bounded domains

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Defterli, Ozlem; D'Elia, Marta; Du, Qiang; Gunzburger, Max Donald; Lehoucq, Richard B.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2015-03-13

    We found that the mathematically correct specification of a fractional differential equation on a bounded domain requires specification of appropriate boundary conditions, or their fractional analogue. In this paper we discuss the application of nonlocal diffusion theory to specify well-posed fractional diffusion equations on bounded domains.

  7. Applied Math PI Meet | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Applied Math PI Meet Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About ... ASCR Workshops and Conferences Applied Math PI Meet Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare ...

  8. File:The MacGyver Wind Math Competition.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The MacGyver Wind Math Competition.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:The MacGyver Wind Math Competition.pdf Size of this preview: 800 ...

  9. Exotic equilibria of Harary graphs and a new minimum degree lower bound for synchronization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canale, Eduardo A.; Monzn, Pablo

    2015-02-15

    This work is concerned with stability of equilibria in the homogeneous (equal frequencies) Kuramoto model of weakly coupled oscillators. In 2012 [R. Taylor, J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 45, 115 (2012)], a sufficient condition for almost global synchronization was found in terms of the minimum degreeorder ratio of the graph. In this work, a new lower bound for this ratio is given. The improvement is achieved by a concrete infinite sequence of regular graphs. Besides, non standard unstable equilibria of the graphs studied in Wiley et al. [Chaos 16, 015103 (2006)] are shown to exist as conjectured in that work.

  10. Effect of ignition conditions on upward flame spread on a composite material in a corner configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohlemiller, T.; Cleary, T.; Shields, J.

    1996-12-31

    This paper focuses on the issue of fire growth on composite materials beyond the region immediately subjected to an ignition source. Suppression of this growth is one of the key issues in realizing the safe usage of composite structural materials. A vinyl ester/glass composite was tested in the form of a 90{degrees} comer configuration with an inert ceiling segment 2.44 m above the top of the fire source. The igniter was a propane burner, either 23 or 38 cm in width with power output varied from 30 to 150 Kw. Upward flame spread rate and heat release rate were measured mainly for a brominated vinyl ester resin but limited results were also obtained for a non-flame retarded vinyl ester and a similar composite coated with an intumescent paint. Rapid fire growth beyond the igniter region was seen for the largest igniter power case; the intumescent coating successfully prevented fire growth for this case.

  11. Los Alamos Middle School team wins regional MathCounts competition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos Middle School team wins Regional MathCounts competition Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:Mar. 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Los Alamos Middle School wins regional MathCounts event Competes against 60 other middle schools for the title. March 1, 2013 Los Alamos Middle School won the regional MathCounts competition. Los Alamos Middle School won the regional MathCounts competition. Contacts Editor Linda

  12. Correlation effects and bound states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinovjev, G. M.; Molodtsov, S. V.

    2012-11-15

    Bound states in a simple quark model that are due to correlation effects are analyzed. The confining properties of this model in meson (quark-antiquark and diquark) channels manifest themselves at any quark momenta, and an extra potential field may only enhance the confining effect.

  13. Scientists compose complex math equations to replicate behaviors of Earth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    systems | Argonne National Laboratory Rob Jacob talks about climate models Climate Models: Rob Jacob Scientists compose complex math equations to replicate behaviors of Earth systems By Angela Hardin * December 16, 2015 Tweet EmailPrint Whenever news breaks about what Earth's climate is expected to be like decades into the future or how much rainfall various regions around the country or the world are likely to receive, those educated estimates are generated by a global climate model. But

  14. Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) Education Summit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    STEM Education Summit STEM Education Summit The Laboratory views its investment in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education as strengthening the Lab's strategic direction and developing its current and future workforce. Contacts Education Janelle Vigil-Maestas Community Relations & Partnerships (505) 665-4329 Email Student Challenge A LANL STEM Education Summit was held in Los Alamos in April 2013. Participants at the summit reviewed the Lab's commitments in improving STEM

  15. High School Girls Honored for Math, Science Achievements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    School Girls Honored for Math, Science Achievements - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste

  16. Calling Excellent Math and Science Teachers-- Einstein Fellowship Deadline is January 4

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Elementary and secondary math and science teachers are eligible the fellowship that bring them to DC to share their teaching expertise with policy makers.

  17. MidSchoolMath conference helps teachers, students and regional economy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MidSchoolMath Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:Mar. 2016 all issues All Issues » submit MidSchoolMath conference helps teachers, students and regional economy International participants come to Santa Fe from as far away as Colombia and Dubai April 1, 2015 A group of MidSchoolMath participants takes a welcome break. A group of MidSchoolMath participants takes a welcome break. Contact Community Programs Director Kurt

  18. COLLOQUIUM: Fluke: The Math and Myth of Coincidence | Princeton Plasma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Lab March 30, 2016, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Fluke: The Math and Myth of Coincidence Professor Joseph Mazur Marlboro College Colloquium Committee: The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory 2015-2016 Colloquium Committee is comprised of the following people. Please feel free to contact them by e-mail regarding any possible speakers or topics for future colloquia. Carol Ann Austin, caustin@pppl.gov Mike Mardenfeld, mmarden@pppl.gov David Mikkelsen,

  19. Bounds on Transport Coefficients of Porous Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berryman, J G

    2005-03-21

    An analytical formulation of conductivity bounds by Bergman and Milton is used in a different way to obtain rigorous bounds on the real transport coefficients (electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, and/or fluid permeability) of a fluid-saturated porous medium. These bounds do not depend explicitly on the porosity, but rather on two formation factors--one associated with the pore space and the other with the solid frame. Hashin-Shtrikman bounds for transport in random polycrystals of porous-material laminates will also be discussed.

  20. Got Questions about Women in Science, Tech, Engineering, or Math (STEM)?

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Tweet us! | Department of Energy Got Questions about Women in Science, Tech, Engineering, or Math (STEM)? Tweet us! Got Questions about Women in Science, Tech, Engineering, or Math (STEM)? Tweet us! March 15, 2012 - 3:26pm Q&A What questions do you have for the experts during our Women in STEM Tweet Up? Ask Us Addthis Join us for a conversation about women in science, technology, engineering, and Math (STEM) on Twitter on Thursday, March 22 at 2:30pm EDT by following the hashtag #STEM.

  1. Lab receives $25,000 for Math and Science Academy from Chevron Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Company Lab receives $25,000 for Math and Science Academy Lab receives $25,000 for Math and Science Academy from Chevron Energy Technology Company The program is conducted by LANL in cooperation with its regional education, business, and government partners. November 30, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience,

  2. Nominate Your Mentor for the Presidential Award in Science, Math, and

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Engineering Mentoring | Department of Energy Nominate Your Mentor for the Presidential Award in Science, Math, and Engineering Mentoring Nominate Your Mentor for the Presidential Award in Science, Math, and Engineering Mentoring May 24, 2012 - 4:59pm Addthis Bill Valdez Bill Valdez Director of Workforce Management Editor's Note: This blog was originally posted by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. Do you know someone who has been an excellent example, role model, and

  3. Performance bound for real OTEC heat engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, C.

    1987-01-01

    Maximum power and efficiency at the maximum power of an irreversible OTEC heat engine are treated. When time is explicitly considered in the energy exchanges between the heat engine and its surroundings, it is found that there is a bound on the efficiency of the real OTEC heat engine at the maximum power condition. This bound can guide the evaluation of existing OTEC systems or influence design of future OTEC heat engines.

  4. Experimental investigation on heat transfer and frictional characteristics of vertical upward rifled tube in supercritical CFB boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Dong; Pan, Jie; Zhu, Xiaojing; Bi, Qincheng; Chen, Tingkuan; Zhou, Chenn Q.

    2011-02-15

    Water wall design is a key issue for supercritical Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) boiler. On account of the good heat transfer performance, rifled tube is applied in the water wall design of a 600 MW supercritical CFB boiler in China. In order to investigate the heat transfer and frictional characteristics of the rifled tube with vertical upward flow, an in-depth experiment was conducted in the range of pressure from 12 to 30 MPa, mass flux from 230 to 1200 kg/(m{sup 2} s), and inner wall heat flux from 130 to 720 kW/m{sup 2}. The wall temperature distribution and pressure drop in the rifled tube were obtained in the experiment. The normal, enhanced and deteriorated heat transfer characteristics were also captured. In this paper, the effects of pressure, inner wall heat flux and mass flux on heat transfer characteristics are analyzed, the heat transfer mechanism and the frictional resistance performance are discussed, and the corresponding empirical correlations are presented. The experimental results show that the rifled tube can effectively prevent the occurrence of departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) and keep the tube wall temperature in a permissible range under the operating condition of supercritical CFB boiler. (author)

  5. Experimental study of forced convection heat transfer during upward and downward flow of helium at high pressure and high temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francisco Valentin; Narbeh Artoun; Masahiro Kawaji; Donald M. McEligot

    2015-08-01

    Fundamental high pressure/high temperature forced convection experiments have been conducted in support of the development of a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) with a prismatic core. The experiments utilize a high temperature/high pressure gas flow test facility constructed for forced convection and natural circulation experiments. The test section has a single 16.8 mm ID flow channel in a 2.7 m long, 108 mm OD graphite column with four 2.3kW electric heater rods placed symmetrically around the flow channel. This experimental study presents the role of buoyancy forces in enhancing or reducing convection heat transfer for helium at high pressures up to 70 bar and high temperatures up to 873 degrees K. Wall temperatures have been compared among 10 cases covering the inlet Re numbers ranging from 500 to 3,000. Downward flows display higher and lower wall temperatures in the upstream and downstream regions, respectively, than the upward flow cases due to the influence of buoyancy forces. In the entrance region, convection heat transfer is reduced due to buoyancy leading to higher wall temperatures, while in the downstream region, buoyancyinduced mixing causes higher convection heat transfer and lower wall temperatures. However, their influences are reduced as the Reynolds number increases. This experimental study is of specific interest to VHTR design and validation of safety analysis codes.

  6. Theory and Modeling of Weakly Bound/Physisorbed Materials for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Theory and Modeling of Weakly BoundPhysisorbed Materials for Hydrogen Storage Theory and Modeling of Weakly BoundPhysisorbed Materials for Hydrogen Storage Presentation on the...

  7. Bounding the Pseudogap in Cuprate High-TC Superconductors (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bounding the Pseudogap in Cuprate High-TC Superconductors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Bounding the Pseudogap in Cuprate High-TC Superconductors You are accessing...

  8. Bounding the Pseudogap in Cuprate High-TC Superconductors (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Bounding the Pseudogap in Cuprate High-TC Superconductors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Bounding the Pseudogap in Cuprate High-TC Superconductors ...

  9. Bound states in the Higgs model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di Leo, L.; Darewych, J.W. )

    1994-02-01

    We derive relativistic wave equations for the bound states of two Higgs bosons within the Higgs sector of the minimal standard model. The variational method and the Hamiltonian formalism of QFT are used to obtain the equations using a simple [vert bar][ital hh][r angle]+[vert bar][ital hhh][r angle] Fock-space ansatz. We present approximate solutions of these equations for a range of Higgs boson masses, and explore the parameter space which corresponds to the existence of two-Higgs-boson bound states.

  10. “Nodal Gap” induced by the incommensurate diagonal spin density modulation in underdoped high- <math id='M1'>Tcmath> superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Tao; Gao, Yi; Zhu, Jian -Xin

    2015-03-07

    Recently it was revealed that the whole Fermi surface is fully gapped for several families of underdoped cuprates. The existence of the finite energy gap along the <math id='M2'>dmath>-wave nodal lines (nodal gap) contrasts the common understanding of the <math id='M3'>dmath>-wave pairing symmetry, which challenges the present theories for the high-<math id='M4'>Tcmath>superconductors. Here we propose that the incommensurate diagonal spin-density-wave order can account for the above experimental observation. The Fermi surface and the local density of states are also studied. Our results are in good agreement with many important experiments in high-<math id='M5'>Tcmath>superconductors.

  11. Efficiency bounds for nonequilibrium heat engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehta, Pankaj; Polkovnikov, Anatoli

    2013-05-15

    We analyze the efficiency of thermal engines (either quantum or classical) working with a single heat reservoir like an atmosphere. The engine first gets an energy intake, which can be done in an arbitrary nonequilibrium way e.g. combustion of fuel. Then the engine performs the work and returns to the initial state. We distinguish two general classes of engines where the working body first equilibrates within itself and then performs the work (ergodic engine) or when it performs the work before equilibrating (non-ergodic engine). We show that in both cases the second law of thermodynamics limits their efficiency. For ergodic engines we find a rigorous upper bound for the efficiency, which is strictly smaller than the equivalent Carnot efficiency. I.e. the Carnot efficiency can be never achieved in single reservoir heat engines. For non-ergodic engines the efficiency can be higher and can exceed the equilibrium Carnot bound. By extending the fundamental thermodynamic relation to nonequilibrium processes, we find a rigorous thermodynamic bound for the efficiency of both ergodic and non-ergodic engines and show that it is given by the relative entropy of the nonequilibrium and initial equilibrium distributions. These results suggest a new general strategy for designing more efficient engines. We illustrate our ideas by using simple examples. -- Highlights: ? Derived efficiency bounds for heat engines working with a single reservoir. ? Analyzed both ergodic and non-ergodic engines. ? Showed that non-ergodic engines can be more efficient. ? Extended fundamental thermodynamic relation to arbitrary nonequilibrium processes.

  12. Scientists Help Teachers With Their Math and Science (EdWeek.org) |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab https://www.jlab.org/news/articles/scientists-help-teachers-their-math-and-science-edweekorg Scientists Help Teachers With Their Math and Science By Sean Cavanagh, EdWeek.org November 16, 2007 Imagine a classroom filled with thousands of feet of cable and a pair of microscopes four stories high. Students work alongside top-tier scientists, who use the surrounding instruments to probe nuclear matter in the hope of one day producing breakthroughs in science and technology. The

  13. High School Girls Honored for Math, Science Achievements at Sandia National Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Now in its 23rd year, the Math and Science Awards program is sponsored by the Sandia Women’s Connection. This year’s event honored more students, with the addition of four high schools in Oakland, Calif., and included recognition of the students by federal and state officials. Teachers from 15 high schools in Livermore, Dublin, Pleasanton, Tracy, Manteca and Oakland nominated high school juniors whom they deemed outstanding in math and science, so the students can include the award on college and scholarship applications.

  14. #WomenInSTEM: Using Science and Math to Power the Globe | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Using Science and Math to Power the Globe #WomenInSTEM: Using Science and Math to Power the Globe May 27, 2014 - 5:05pm Addthis Dr. Rhonda Jordan is an energy specialist at World Bank and our latest #WomenInSTEM video profile. | Video by Matty Greene. Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Matty Greene Matty Greene Former Videographer Earlier this year we launched #WomenInSTEM, a video series highlighting the accomplishments of

  15. Extremum seeking with bounded update rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheinker, Alexander; Krsti?, Miroslav

    2013-11-16

    In this work, we present a form of extremum seeking (ES) in which the unknown function being minimized enters the systems dynamics as the argument of a cosine or sine term, thereby guaranteeing known bounds on update rates and control efforts. We present general n-dimensional optimization and stabilization results as well as 2D vehicle control, with bounded velocity and control efforts. For application to autonomous vehicles, tracking a source in a GPS denied environment with unknown orientation, this ES approach allows for smooth heading angle actuation, with constant velocity, and in application to a unicycle-type vehicle results in control ability as if the vehicle is fully actuated. Our stability analysis is made possible by the classic results of Kurzweil, Jarnik, Sussmann, and Liu, regarding systems with highly oscillatory terms. In our stability analysis, we combine the averaging results with a semi-global practical stability result under small parametric perturbations developed by Moreau and Aeyels.

  16. Methods and apparatus to produce stick-slip motion of logging tool attached to a wireline drawn upward by a continuously rotating wireline drum

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vail, III, William Banning (Bothell, WA); Momii, Steven Thomas (Seattle, WA)

    1998-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are described to produce stick-slip motion of a logging tool within a cased well attached to a wireline that is drawn upward by a continuously rotating wireline drum. The stick-slip motion results in the periodic upward movement of the tool in the cased well described in terms of a dwell time during which time the tool is stationary, the move time during which time the tool moves, and the stroke that is upward distance that the tool translates during the "slip" portion of the stick-slip motion. This method of measurement is used to log the well at different vertical positions of the tool. Therefore, any typical "station-to-station logging tool" may be modified to be a "continuous logging tool", where "continuous" means that the wireline drum continually rotates while the tool undergoes stick-slip motion downhole and measurements are performed during the dwell times when the tool is momentarily stationary. The stick-slip methods of operation and the related apparatus are particularly described in terms of making measurements of formation resistivity from within a cased well during the dwell times when the tool is momentarily stationary during the periodic stick-slip motion of the logging tool.

  17. Methods and apparatus to produce stick-slip motion of logging tool attached to a wireline drawn upward by a continuously rotating wireline drum

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vail, W.B. III; Momii, S.T.

    1998-02-10

    Methods and apparatus are described to produce stick-slip motion of a logging tool within a cased well attached to a wireline that is drawn upward by a continuously rotating wireline drum. The stick-slip motion results in the periodic upward movement of the tool in the cased well described in terms of a dwell time during which time the tool is stationary, the move time during which time the tool moves, and the stroke that is upward distance that the tool translates during the ``slip`` portion of the stick-slip motion. This method of measurement is used to log the well at different vertical positions of the tool. Therefore, any typical ``station-to-station logging tool`` may be modified to be a ``continuous logging tool,`` where ``continuous`` means that the wireline drum continually rotates while the tool undergoes stick-slip motion downhole and measurements are performed during the dwell times when the tool is momentarily stationary. The stick-slip methods of operation and the related apparatus are particularly described in terms of making measurements of formation resistivity from within a cased well during the dwell times when the tool is momentarily stationary during the periodic stick-slip motion of the logging tool. 12 figs.

  18. Applied Math PI Meet | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Applied Math PI Meet Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) Community Resources ASCR Discovery Monthly News Roundup News Archives ASCR Program Documents ASCR Workshops and Conferences Workshops & Conferences Archive DOE Simulations Summit Scientific Grand Challenges Workshop Series SciDAC Conferences HPC Operations Review and Best

  19. DOE Applied Math Summit | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    DOE Applied Math Summit Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) Community Resources ASCR Discovery Monthly News Roundup News Archives ASCR Program Documents ASCR Workshops and Conferences Workshops & Conferences Archive DOE Simulations Summit Scientific Grand Challenges Workshop Series SciDAC Conferences HPC Operations Review and Best

  20. Applied Math PI Meet Talks | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    ASCR Workshops and Conferences » Applied Math PI Meet Talks Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) Community Resources ASCR Discovery Monthly News Roundup News Archives ASCR Program Documents ASCR Workshops and Conferences Workshops & Conferences Archive DOE Simulations Summit Scientific Grand Challenges Workshop Series SciDAC

  1. Upper Bound on the First Star Formation History (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Upper Bound on the First Star Formation History Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Upper Bound on the First Star Formation History You are accessing a document from the...

  2. Copy of Bound Original For Scanning

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Copy of Bound Original For Scanning Document # 1\1\ i g -b DOE/El/-0005/6 Formerly Utilized IVIEWAEC Site! Remedial Action Progrhn, F@diilogical Survey of the Seaway Industrial Par Tonawanda, New Yor May 197 Final Repel Prepared f U.S. Department of Enerc Assistant Secretary for Environme Division of Environmental Control Technolo Washington, D.C. 205, uric Contract No. W-7405-ENG- - - - Available from: ' : -. National Technical Information Service (NTIS) U.S. Department of Comnerce 5285 Port

  3. Improved lower bound on the entropic uncertainty relation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jafarpour, Mojtaba; Sabour, Abbass

    2011-09-15

    We present a lower bound on the entropic uncertainty relation for the distinguished measurements of two observables in a d-dimensional Hilbert space for d up to 5. This bound provides an improvement over the best one yet available. The feasibility of the obtained bound presenting an improvement for higher dimensions is also discussed.

  4. Extremum seeking with bounded update rates

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Scheinker, Alexander; Krstić, Miroslav

    2013-11-16

    In this work, we present a form of extremum seeking (ES) in which the unknown function being minimized enters the system’s dynamics as the argument of a cosine or sine term, thereby guaranteeing known bounds on update rates and control efforts. We present general n-dimensional optimization and stabilization results as well as 2D vehicle control, with bounded velocity and control efforts. For application to autonomous vehicles, tracking a source in a GPS denied environment with unknown orientation, this ES approach allows for smooth heading angle actuation, with constant velocity, and in application to a unicycle-type vehicle results in control abilitymore » as if the vehicle is fully actuated. Our stability analysis is made possible by the classic results of Kurzweil, Jarnik, Sussmann, and Liu, regarding systems with highly oscillatory terms. In our stability analysis, we combine the averaging results with a semi-global practical stability result under small parametric perturbations developed by Moreau and Aeyels.« less

  5. Nonuniversal gaugino masses and muon<math display='inline'>g-2math>

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gogoladze, Ilia; Nasir, Fariha; Shafi, Qaisar; n, Cem Salih

    2014-08-11

    We consider two classes of supersymmetric models with nonuniversal gaugino masses at the grand unification scale MGUT in an attempt to resolve the apparent muon g-2 anomaly encountered in the Standard Model. We explore two distinct scenarios, one in which all gaugino masses have the same sign at MGUT, and a second case with opposite sign gaugino masses. The sfermion masses in both cases are assumed to be universal at MGUT. We exploit the nonuniversality among gaugino masses to realize large mass splitting between the colored and noncolored sfermions. Thus, the sleptons can have masses in the few hundred GeV range, whereas the colored sparticles turn out to be an order of magnitude or so heavier. In both models the resolution of the muon g-2 anomaly is compatible, among other things, with a 125126 GeV Higgs boson mass and the WMAP dark matter bounds.

  6. LANL gets young women involved in math and science at 31st Expanding Your

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Horizons Conference April 6 31st Expanding Your Horizons Conference LANL gets young women involved in math and science at 31st Expanding Your Horizons Conference April 6 The young women will participate in hands-on activities in such fields as astronomy, robotics, forensics, chemistry, and earth science. March 4, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering

  7. SRS 'teach-ins' show why math and science are cool | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration 'teach-ins' show why math and science are cool | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo

  8. Relativistic self-focusing of ultra-high intensity X-ray laser beams in warm quantum plasma with upward density profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habibi, M.; Ghamari, F.

    2014-05-15

    The results of a numerical study of high-intensity X-ray laser beam interaction with warm quantum plasma (WQP) are presented. By means of an upward ramp density profile combined with quantum factors specially the Fermi velocity, we have demonstrated significant relativistic self-focusing (RSF) of a Gaussian electromagnetic beam in the WQP where the Fermi temperature term in the dielectric function is important. For this purpose, we have considered the quantum hydrodynamics model that modifies refractive index of inhomogeneous WQPs with the inclusion of quantum correction through the quantum statistical and diffraction effects in the relativistic regime. Also, to better illustration of the physical difference between warm and cold quantum plasmas and their effect on the RSF, we have derived the envelope equation governing the spot size of X-ray laser beam in Q-plasmas. In addition to the upward ramp density profile, we have found that the quantum effects would be caused much higher oscillation and better focusing of X-ray laser beam in the WQP compared to that of cold quantum case. Our computational results reveal the importance of the use of electrons density profile and Fermi speed in enhancing self-focusing of laser beam.

  9. Evaluation of American Indian Science and Engineering Society Intertribal Middle School Science and Math Bowl Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AISES, None

    2013-09-25

    The American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) has been funded under a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) grant (Grant Award No. DE-SC0004058) to host an Intertribal Middle-School Science and Math Bowl (IMSSMB) comprised of teams made up of a majority of American Indian students from Bureau of Indian Education-funded schools and public schools. The intent of the AISES middle school science and math bowl is to increase participation of American Indian students at the DOE-sponsored National Science Bowl. Although national in its recruitment scope, the AISES Intertribal Science and Math Bowl is considered a regional science bowl, equivalent to the other 50 regional science bowls which are geographically limited to states. Most regional bowls do not have American Indian student teams competing, hence the AISES bowl is meant to encourage American Indian student teams to increase their science knowledge in order to participate at the national level. The AISES competition brings together teams from various American Indian communities across the nation. Each team is provided with funds for travel to and from the event, as well as for lodging and meals. In 2011 and 2012, there were 10 teams participating; in 2013, the number of teams participating doubled to 20. Each Science and Math Bowl team is comprised of four middle school grades 6 through 8 students, one alternate, and a teacher who serves as advisor and coach although in at least two cases, the coach was not a teacher, but was the Indian Education Coordinator. Each team member must have at least a 3.0 GPA. Furthermore, the majority of students in each team must be comprised of American Indian, Alaska Native or Native Hawaiian students. Under the current DOE grant, AISES sponsored three annual middle school science bowl competitions over the years 2011, 2012 and 2013. The science and math bowls have been held in late March concurrently with the National American Indian Science and Engineering Fair (NAISEF) and EXPO at the Albuquerque, NM Convention Center. Albuquerque is also the home of the AISES national office. The AISES staff also recruits volunteers to assist with implementation of the science and math bowl event. In 2011, there were 7 volunteers; in 2012, 15 volunteers, and in 2013, 19 volunteers. Volunteers are recruited from a variety of local sources, including Sandia Laboratories, Southwest Indian Polytechnic Institute students, Department of Defense, as well as family members of AISES staff. For AISES, the goals of the Intertribal Middle School Science and Math Bowl project are to have more Native students learn science, for them to gain confidence in competing, and to reward their effort in order to motivate them to pursue studies in the sciences and engineering. For DOE, the goals of the project are to get more Native students to compete at the National Science Bowl, held in Washington, DC.

  10. Organically bound tritium analysis in environmental samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baglan, N.; Cossonnet, C.; Fournier, M.; Momoshima, N.; Ansoborlo, E.

    2015-03-15

    Organically bound tritium (OBT) has become of increased interest within the last decade, with a focus on its behaviour and also its analysis, which are important to assess tritium distribution in the environment. In contrast, there are no certified reference materials and no standard analytical method through the international organization related to OBT. In order to resolve this issue, an OBT international working group was created in May 2012. Over 20 labs from around the world participated and submitted their results for the first intercomparison exercise results on potato (Sep 2013). The samples, specially-prepared potatoes, were provided in March 2013 to each participant. Technical information and results from this first exercise are discussed here for all the labs which have realised the five replicates necessary to allow a reliable statistical treatment. The results are encouraging as the increased number of participating labs did not degrade the observed dispersion of the results for a similar activity level. Therefore, the results do not seem to depend on the analytical procedure used. From this work an optimised procedure can start to be developed to deal with OBT analysis and will guide subsequent planned OBT trials by the international group.

  11. Small-Scale Structure of Spacetime: Bounds and Conjectures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klinkhamer, F. R.

    2008-03-06

    This review consists of two parts. The first part establishes certain astrophysical bounds on the smoothness of classical spacetime.Some of the best bounds to date are based on the absence of vacuum Cherenkov radiation in ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays. The second part discusses possible implications of these bounds for the quantum structure of spacetime. One conjecture is that the fundamental length scale of quantum spacetime may be different from the Planck length.

  12. Bound Neutrons Pave Way to Free Ones | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bound Neutrons Pave Way to Free Ones Bound Neutrons Some experiments seem to show that the building blocks of protons and neutrons inside a nucleus are somehow different from that of free ones. Other experiments show they behave differently when they pair up: they move faster and frequently overlap. NEWPORT NEWS, VA, February 7, 2011 - A study of bound protons and neutrons conducted at the Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility has allowed scientists, for the first

  13. Crystal structure of elongation factor 4 bound to a clockwise...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Search Title: Crystal structure of elongation factor 4 bound to a clockwise ratcheted ribosome Authors: Gagnon, Matthieu G. ; Lin, Jinzhong ; Bulkley, David ; Steitz, Thomas A. ...

  14. Bound Brook, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bound Brook, New Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.5684363, -74.5384889 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappi...

  15. South Bound Brook, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bound Brook, New Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.5534364, -74.531544 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappin...

  16. Bound states in a hyperbolic asymmetric double-well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartmann, R. R.

    2014-01-15

    We report a new class of hyperbolic asymmetric double-well whose bound state wavefunctions can be expressed in terms of confluent Heun functions. An analytic procedure is used to obtain the energy eigenvalues and the criterion for the potential to support bound states is discussed.

  17. Two-photon bound state in self-focusing media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiao, R.Y.; Deutsch, I.H. ); Garrison, J.C. )

    1991-09-09

    We derive a two-photon bound-state solution to the problem of quantum propagation of light in Kerr-effect nonlinear media which classically would exhibit self-focusing and self-trapping. We propose an experiment to see this two-photon bound state.

  18. Students Sharpen Science and Math Skills at Middle School Science Bowl -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Releases | NREL Students Sharpen Science and Math Skills at Middle School Science Bowl March 8, 2004 Golden, Colo. - The buzzer has sounded, the clock is ticking and all eyes are on you-what is the vitamin deficiency that causes Rickets? If you answered "Vitamin D" in 10 seconds or less, you're ready to join students from across Colorado participating in the first annual Middle School Science Bowl on March 13 at the Colorado School of Mines in Golden. This academic competition

  19. #WomenInSTEM: Using Science & Math to Power the Globe

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Jordan, Rhonda

    2014-06-04

    Growing up, Dr. Rhonda Jordan always enjoyed math and science. After completing her master's in electrical engineering at Columbia University she co-founded a startup in Tanzania that provides access to power for residents who are not connected to the electrical grid. This video is part of the Energy Department's #WomenInSTEM video series. At the Energy Department, we're committed to supporting a diverse talent pool of STEM innovators ready to address the challenges and opportunities of our growing clean energy economy.

  20. #WomenInSTEM: Using Science & Math to Power the Globe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, Rhonda

    2014-05-27

    Growing up, Dr. Rhonda Jordan always enjoyed math and science. After completing her master's in electrical engineering at Columbia University she co-founded a startup in Tanzania that provides access to power for residents who are not connected to the electrical grid. This video is part of the Energy Department's #WomenInSTEM video series. At the Energy Department, we're committed to supporting a diverse talent pool of STEM innovators ready to address the challenges and opportunities of our growing clean energy economy.

  1. Culturally relevant science: An approach to math science education for Hispanics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montellano, B.O. de

    1996-11-14

    This report describes later stages of a program to develop culturally relevant science and math programs for Hispanic students. Part of this effort was follow-up with 17 teachers who participated in early stages of the program. Response was not very good. Included with the report is a first draft effort for curriculum materials which could be used as is in such a teaching effort. Several of the participating teachers were invited to a writing workshop, where lesson plans were drafted, and critiqued and following rework are listed in this publication. Further work needs to be completed and is ongoing.

  2. AN INDIRECT SEARCH FOR WEAKLY INTERACTING MASSIVE PARTICLES IN THE SUN USING 3109.6 DAYS OF UPWARD-GOING MUONS IN SUPER-KAMIOKANDE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, T.; Abe, K.; Hayato, Y.; Iida, T.; Kameda, J.; Koshio, Y.; Kouzuma, Y.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Nakahata, M.; Nakayama, S.; Obayashi, Y.; Sekiya, H.; Shiozawa, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Takeda, A.; Takenaga, Y.; Ueno, K.; Ueshima, K.; Yamada, S.; Collaboration: Super-Kamiokande Collaboration; and others

    2011-12-01

    We present the result of an indirect search for high energy neutrinos from Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) annihilation in the Sun using upward-going muon (upmu) events at Super-Kamiokande. Data sets from SKI-SKIII (3109.6 days) were used for the analysis. We looked for an excess of neutrino signal from the Sun as compared with the expected atmospheric neutrino background in three upmu categories: stopping, non-showering, and showering. No significant excess was observed. The 90% C.L. upper limits of upmu flux induced by WIMPs of 100 GeV c{sup -2} were 6.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -15} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} and 4.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -15} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for the soft and hard annihilation channels, respectively. These limits correspond to upper limits of 4.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -39} cm{sup -2} and 2.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -40} cm{sup -2} for spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon scattering cross sections in the soft and hard annihilation channels, respectively.

  3. Structure of the Ebola Virus Glycoprotein Bound to an Antibody...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structure of the Ebola Virus Glycoprotein Bound to an Antibody from a Human Survivor Print Ebolavirus, one of two members of the family of filoviruses, causes a severe hemorrhagic...

  4. Out of bounds additive manufacturing (Journal Article) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Out of bounds additive manufacturing Citation Details In-Document Search ... GrantContract Number: AC05-00OR22725 Type: Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Advanced ...

  5. Widget:BoundingCoordinatesHelper | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This widget creates an interactive Google map to assist with the input of bounding box coordinates. The map will output the NE and SW corners of a rectangular extent to two...

  6. Bound Neutrons Pave Way to Free Ones | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bound Neutrons Pave Way to Free Ones Unexpected Connection - Some experiments seem to show that the building blocks of protons and neutrons inside a nucleus are somehow different from that of free neutrons and protons. Other experiments show protons and neutrons behave differently when they pair up. A new study shows these two different lines of research are correlated, leading to information on the internal structure of free neutrons without the assistance of a theoretical model. Bound Neutrons

  7. Briefly Bound to Activate: Transient Binding of a Second Catalytic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Magnesium Activates the Structure and Dynamics of CDK2 Kinase for Catalysis (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Briefly Bound to Activate: Transient Binding of a Second Catalytic Magnesium Activates the Structure and Dynamics of CDK2 Kinase for Catalysis Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Briefly Bound to Activate: Transient Binding of a Second Catalytic Magnesium Activates the Structure and Dynamics of CDK2 Kinase for Catalysis We have

  8. Bounding gauged skyrmion masses (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bounding gauged skyrmion masses Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Bounding gauged skyrmion masses Authors: Brihaye, Yves ; Hill, Christopher T. ; Zachos, Cosmas K. Publication Date: 2004-09-01 OSTI Identifier: 1151557 Report Number(s): ANL-HEP-PR-04-89 DOE Contract Number: AC02-07CH11359 Resource Type: Journal Article Research Org: Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL Sponsoring Org: USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25) Country of

  9. Cosmological stability bound in massive gravity and bigravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fasiello, Matteo; Tolley, Andrew J. E-mail: andrew.j.tolley@case.edu

    2013-12-01

    We give a simple derivation of a cosmological bound on the graviton mass for spatially flat FRW solutions in massive gravity with an FRW reference metric and for bigravity theories. This bound comes from the requirement that the kinetic term of the helicity zero mode of the graviton is positive definite. The bound is dependent only on the parameters in the massive gravity potential and the Hubble expansion rate for the two metrics. We derive the decoupling limit of bigravity and FRW massive gravity, and use this to give an independent derivation of the cosmological bound. We recover our previous results that the tension between satisfying the Friedmann equation and the cosmological bound is sufficient to rule out all observationally relevant FRW solutions for massive gravity with an FRW reference metric. In contrast, in bigravity this tension is resolved due to different nature of the Vainshtein mechanism. We find that in bigravity theories there exists an FRW solution with late-time self-acceleration for which the kinetic terms for the helicity-2, helicity-1 and helicity-0 are generically nonzero and positive making this a compelling candidate for a model of cosmic acceleration. We confirm that the generalized bound is saturated for the candidate partially massless (bi)gravity theories but the existence of helicity-1/helicity-0 interactions implies the absence of the conjectured partially massless symmetry for both massive gravity and bigravity.

  10. V-156: Linux Kernel Array Bounds Checking Flaw Lets Local Users...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6: Linux Kernel Array Bounds Checking Flaw Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges V-156: Linux Kernel Array Bounds Checking Flaw Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges May...

  11. Closeness to spheres of hypersurfaces with normal curvature bounded below

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borisenko, A A; Drach, K D

    2013-11-30

    For aRiemannian manifold M{sup n+1} and acompact domain ??M{sup n+1} bounded by ahypersurface ?? with normal curvature bounded below, estimates are obtained in terms of the distance from O to ?? for the angle between the geodesic line joining afixed interior point O in ? to apoint on ?? and the outward normal to the surface. Estimates for the width of aspherical shell containing such ahypersurface are also presented. Bibliography: 9 titles.

  12. Bioavailability of sediment-bound contaminants to marine organisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, B.; Neff, J.

    1993-09-01

    The bioavailability of sediment-bound contaminants to marine organisms indicates that there exists a potential for transfer of these contaminants through marine food webs to commercial fisheries products consumed by humans. However, there has been relatively little effort to combine and synthesize data on chemical/biological interactions between benthic animals and seagrasses and the sediments in which they reside on the one hand, and on the chemistry of bioaccumulation on the other. This report provides a conceptual basis for an approach to bioavailability and biomagnification of sediment-bound contaminants that reviews biological and chemical approaches.

  13. LOWER BOUNDS ON INTERGALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELDS FROM SIMULTANEOUSLY OBSERVED

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GeV-TeV LIGHT CURVES OF THE BLAZAR Mrk 501 (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect INTERGALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELDS FROM SIMULTANEOUSLY OBSERVED GeV-TeV LIGHT CURVES OF THE BLAZAR Mrk 501 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: LOWER BOUNDS ON INTERGALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELDS FROM SIMULTANEOUSLY OBSERVED GeV-TeV LIGHT CURVES OF THE BLAZAR Mrk 501 We derive lower bounds on intergalactic magnetic fields (IGMFs) from upper limits on the pair echo emission from the blazar Mrk 501, that is, delayed GeV

  14. Towards flavored bound states beyond rainbows and ladders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Bennich, B.; Rojas, E.; Melo, J. P. B. C. de; Paracha, M. A.

    2014-11-11

    We give a snapshot of recent progress in solving the Dyson-Schwinger equation with a beyond rainbow-ladder ansatz for the dressed quark-gluon vertex which includes ghost contributions. We discuss the motivations for this approach with regard to heavy-flavored bound states and form factors and briefly describe future steps to be taken.

  15. PICO: An Object-Oriented Framework for Branch and Bound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ECKSTEIN,JONATHAN; HART,WILLIAM E.; PHILLIPS,CYNTHIA A.

    2000-12-01

    This report describes the design of PICO, a C++ framework for implementing general parallel branch-and-bound algorithms. The PICO framework provides a mechanism for the efficient implementation of a wide range of branch-and-bound methods on an equally wide range of parallel computing platforms. We first discuss the basic architecture of PICO, including the application class hierarchy and the package's serial and parallel layers. We next describe the design of the serial layer, and its central notion of manipulating subproblem states. Then, we discuss the design of the parallel layer, which includes flexible processor clustering and communication rates, various load balancing mechanisms, and a non-preemptive task scheduler running on each processor. We describe the application of the package to a branch-and-bound method for mixed integer programming, along with computational results on the ASCI Red massively parallel computer. Finally we describe the application of the branch-and-bound mixed-integer programming code to a resource constrained project scheduling problem for Pantex.

  16. Evidence for a Bound H Dibaryon from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beane, S. R.; Chang, E.; Parreno, A.; Detmold, W.; Orginos, K.; Joo, B.; Lin, H. W.; Savage, M. J.; Luu, T. C.; Torok, A.; Walker-Loud, A.

    2011-04-22

    We present evidence for the existence of a bound H dibaryon, an I=0, J=0, s=-2 state with valence quark structure uuddss, at a pion mass of m{sub {pi}{approx}3}89 MeV. Using the results of lattice QCD calculations performed on four ensembles of anisotropic clover gauge-field configurations, with spatial extents of L{approx}2.0, 2.5, 3.0, and 3.9 fm at a spatial lattice spacing of b{sub s{approx}}0.123 fm, we find an H dibaryon bound by B{sub {infinity}}{sup H}=16.6{+-}2.1{+-}4.6 MeV at a pion mass of m{sub {pi}{approx}3}89 MeV.

  17. Traveling Electrons in Loosely Bound Layers | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Traveling Electrons in Loosely Bound Layers September 24, 2015 Tweet EmailPrint Extremely large magnetoresistance (XMR) was recently discovered in WTe2, triggering extensive research on this material regarding the XMR origin. Since WTe2 is a layered compound with metal layers sandwiched between adjacent insulating chalcogenide layers, this material has been considered to be electronically two-dimensional. Here a team of users from Argonne's Materials Science Division and Northern Illinois

  18. Angular-momentum nonclassicality by breaking classical bounds on statistics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luis, Alfredo; Rivas, Angel

    2011-10-15

    We derive simple practical procedures revealing the quantum behavior of angular momentum variables by the violation of classical upper bounds on the statistics. Data analysis is minimum and definite conclusions are obtained without evaluation of moments, or any other more sophisticated procedures. These nonclassical tests are very general and independent of other typical quantum signatures of nonclassical behavior such as sub-Poissonian statistics, squeezing, or oscillatory statistics, being insensitive to the nonclassical behavior displayed by other variables.

  19. Revivals of zitterbewegung of a bound localized Dirac particle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romera, Elvira

    2011-11-15

    In this paper a bound localized Dirac particle is shown to exhibit a revival of the zitterbewegung (ZB) oscillation amplitude. These revivals go beyond the known quasiclassical regenerations in which the ZB oscillation amplitude is decreasing from period to period. This phenomenon is studied in a Dirac oscillator and it is shown that it is possible to set up wave packets in which there is a regeneration of the initial ZB amplitude.

  20. A 1.3-Å Structure of Zinc-bound N-terminal Domain of Calmodulin...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Zinc-bound N-terminal Domain of Calmodulin Elucidates Potential Early Ion-binding Step Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A 1.3- Structure of Zinc-bound ...

  1. Structure of DNA-Bound FEN1 Reveals Mechanism of Action

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structure of DNA-Bound FEN1 Reveals Mechanism of Action Structure of DNA-Bound FEN1 Reveals Mechanism of Action Print Tuesday, 24 January 2012 11:30 DNA replication is a critical...

  2. Optimal bounds for solving tridiagonal systems with preconditioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zellini, P. )

    1988-10-01

    Let (1) Tx=f be a linear tridiagonal system system of n equations in the unknown x/sub 1/, ..., x/sub n/. It is proved that 3n-2 (nonscalar) multiplications/divisions are necessary to solve (1) in a straight-line program excluding divisions by elements of f. This bound is optimal if the cost of preconditioning of T is not counted. Analogous results are obtained in case (i) T is bidiagonal and (ii) T and f are both centrosymmetric. The existence of parallel algorithms to solve (1) with preconditioning and with minimal multiplicative redundancy is also discussed.

  3. Hysteresis cycle in a turbulent, spherically bounded MHD dynamo model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hysteresis cycle in a turbulent, spherically bounded MHD dynamo model This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article. 2009 New J. Phys. 11 013027 (http://iopscience.iop.org/1367-2630/11/1/013027) Download details: IP Address: 128.104.165.161 The article was downloaded on 14/12/2011 at 21:42 Please note that terms and conditions apply. View the table of contents for this issue, or go to the journal homepage for more Home Search Collections

  4. Evidence for a bound H-dibaryon using lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Will Detmold

    2012-04-01

    The H-dibaryon, a J = 0 state with the valence quark content udsuds, has long been hypothesized to exist because of the attractive nature of color magnetic gluon exchange in the flavor- singlet channel. Using lattice QCD the NPLQCD collaboration have investigated this system and evidence is presented for the existence of a stable H-dibaryon, albeit at a quark mass somewhat larger than that in nature. This calculation is reviewed and combined with subsequent calculations by the HALQCD collaboration at the SU(3) flavor symmetric point to identify bounds on the H-dibaryon mass at the physical quark masses.

  5. Quarkonium-nucleus bound states from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beane, S.  R.; Chang, E.; Cohen, S.  D.; Detmold, W.; Lin, H. -W.; Orginos, K.; Parreño, A.; Savage, M.  J.

    2015-06-11

    Quarkonium-nucleus systems are composed of two interacting hadronic states without common valence quarks, which interact primarily through multi-gluon exchanges, realizing a color van der Waals force. We present lattice QCD calculations of the interactions of strange and charm quarkonia with light nuclei. Both the strangeonium-nucleus and charmonium-nucleus systems are found to be relatively deeply bound when the masses of the three light quarks are set equal to that of the physical strange quark. Extrapolation of these results to the physical light-quark masses suggests that the binding energy of charmonium to nuclear matter is B < 40 MeV.

  6. Fast concurrent array-based stacks, queues and deques using fetch-and-increment-bounded, fetch-and-decrement-bounded and store-on-twin synchronization primitives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Dong; Gara, Alana; Heidelberger, Philip; Kumar, Sameer; Ohmacht, Martin; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard; Wisniewski, Robert

    2014-09-16

    Implementation primitives for concurrent array-based stacks, queues, double-ended queues (deques) and wrapped deques are provided. In one aspect, each element of the stack, queue, deque or wrapped deque data structure has its own ticket lock, allowing multiple threads to concurrently use multiple elements of the data structure and thus achieving high performance. In another aspect, new synchronization primitives FetchAndIncrementBounded (Counter, Bound) and FetchAndDecrementBounded (Counter, Bound) are implemented. These primitives can be implemented in hardware and thus promise a very fast throughput for queues, stacks and double-ended queues.

  7. Synthesis and application of new polymer bound catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fetterly, Brandon Michael

    2005-08-01

    Nitric acid has been shown to be a weak acid in acetonitrile. It is conceivable that a nitrate salt of a weakly Lewis acidic cation could furnish a ''naked'' nitrate anion as a basic catalyst in a variety of reactions in non-aqueous solvents. Such a nitrate salt could also be bound to a polymeric support via the cation, thereby allowing for reclamation and recycling of the nitrate ion. This subject is dealt with in Chapter 2, wherein my contributions consisted of performing all the reactions with the polymer supported catalyst and carrying out the experiments necessary to shed light on the reaction mechanisms. Chapter 3 contains a description of the structure and catalytic properties of an azidoproazaphosphatrane. This compound is an air-stable versatile catalyst that has proven useful not only homogeneously, but also when bound to a solid support. The synthesis of a polymer bound proazaphosphatrane containing a trivalent phosphorus is presented in Chapter 4. Such a compound has been sought after by our group for a number of years. Not only does the synthesis I have accomplished for it allow for easier separation of proazaphosphatrane catalysts from reaction mixtures, but recycling of the base is made much simpler. Proazaphosphatranes are useful homogeneous catalysts that activate atoms in other reagents, thus enhancing their reactivity. The next chapters deal with two such reactions with aldehydes and ketones, namely silylcyanations with trialkylsilylcyanides (Chapters 5 and 6) and reductions with poly(methylhydrosiloxane), in Chapter 7. In Chapter 5, Zhigang Wang performed the initial optimization and scoping of the reaction, while repetitions of the scoping experiments for reproducibility, determination of diastereomeric ratios, and experiments aimed at elucidating aspects of the mechanism were performed by me. The proazaphosphatrane coordinates to the silicon atom in both cases, thereby allowing the aforementioned reactions to proceed under much milder conditions. Proazaphosphatranes are also effective Broensted-Lowry bases. This is illustrated in Chapter 8 wherein a wide variety of conjugate addition reactions are catalyzed by proazaphosphatranes. In that chapter, repetitions of the nitroalkane addition reactions for reproducibility, improved spectral data for the products and comparisons of literature yields of all reactions were performed by the author.

  8. Reactivity of Metal Ions Bound to Water-Soluble Polymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sauer, N.N.; Watkins, J.G.; Lin, M.; Birnbaum, E.R.; Robison, T.W.; Smith, B.F.; Gohdes, J.W.; McDonald, J.G.

    1999-06-29

    The intent of this work is to determine the effectiveness of catalysts covalently bound to polymers and to understand the consequences of supporting the catalysts on catalyst efficiency and selectivity. Rhodium phosphine complexes with functional groups for coupling to polymers were prepared. These catalyst precursors were characterized using standard techniques including IR, NMR, and elemental analysis. Studies on the modified catalysts showed that they were still active hydrogenation catalysts. However, tethering of the catalysts to polyamines gave systems with low hydrogenation activity. Analogous biphasic systems were also explored. Phosphine ligands with a surfactant-like structure have been synthesized and used to prepare catalytically active complexes of palladium. The palladium complexes were utilized in Heck-type coupling reactions (e.g. coupling of iodobenzene and ethyl acrylate to produce ethyl cinnamate) under vigorously stirred biphasic reaction conditions, and were found to offer superior performance over a standard water-soluble palladium catalyst under analogous conditions.

  9. Finite Energy and Bounded Attacks on Control System Sensor Signals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Djouadi, Seddik M; Melin, Alexander M; Ferragut, Erik M; Laska, Jason A

    2014-01-01

    Control system networks are increasingly being connected to enterprise level networks. These connections leave critical industrial controls systems vulnerable to cyber-attacks. Most of the effort in protecting these cyber-physical systems (CPS) has been in securing the networks using information security techniques and protection and reliability concerns at the control system level against random hardware and software failures. However, besides these failures the inability of information security techniques to protect against all intrusions means that the control system must be resilient to various signal attacks for which new analysis and detection methods need to be developed. In this paper, sensor signal attacks are analyzed for observer-based controlled systems. The threat surface for sensor signal attacks is subdivided into denial of service, finite energy, and bounded attacks. In particular, the error signals between states of attack free systems and systems subject to these attacks are quantified. Optimal sensor and actuator signal attacks for the finite and infinite horizon linear quadratic (LQ) control in terms of maximizing the corresponding cost functions are computed. The closed-loop system under optimal signal attacks are provided. Illustrative numerical examples are provided together with an application to a power network with distributed LQ controllers.

  10. Chirality of weakly bound complexes: The potential energy surfaces for the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    hydrogen-peroxide-noble-gas interactions (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Chirality of weakly bound complexes: The potential energy surfaces for the hydrogen-peroxide-noble-gas interactions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Chirality of weakly bound complexes: The potential energy surfaces for the hydrogen-peroxide-noble-gas interactions We consider the analytical representation of the potential energy surfaces of relevance for the intermolecular dynamics of weakly bound

  11. Unitarity bounds in the Higgs model including triplet fields with custodial

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    symmetry (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Unitarity bounds in the Higgs model including triplet fields with custodial symmetry Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Unitarity bounds in the Higgs model including triplet fields with custodial symmetry We study bounds on Higgs-boson masses from perturbative unitarity in the Georgi-Machacek model, whose Higgs sector is composed of a scalar isospin doublet and a real and a complex isospin triplet field. This model can be compatible with

  12. Theory and Modeling of Weakly Bound/Physisorbed Materials for Hydrogen

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Storage | Department of Energy Theory and Modeling of Weakly Bound/Physisorbed Materials for Hydrogen Storage Theory and Modeling of Weakly Bound/Physisorbed Materials for Hydrogen Storage Presentation on the Theory and Modeling of Weakly Bound/Physisorbed Materials for Hydrogen Storage given at the DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials on May 18, 2006. PDF icon storage_theory_session_williamson.pdf More Documents & Publications Summary Report from Theory Focus Session

  13. Application of the bounds-analysis approach to arsenic and gallium...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on January 23, 2016 Title: Application of the bounds-analysis approach to arsenic and gallium antisite...

  14. Structure of the protein core of translation initiation factor 2 in apo, GTP-bound and GDP-bound forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simonetti, Angelita; Fabbretti, Attilio; Hazemann, Isabelle; Jenner, Lasse; Gualerzi, Claudio O.; Klaholz, Bruno P.

    2013-06-01

    The crystal structures of the eubacterial translation initiation factor 2 in apo form and with bound GDP and GTP reveal conformational changes upon nucleotide binding and hydrolysis, notably of the catalytically important histidine in the switch II region. Translation initiation factor 2 (IF2) is involved in the early steps of bacterial protein synthesis. It promotes the stabilization of the initiator tRNA on the 30S initiation complex (IC) and triggers GTP hydrolysis upon ribosomal subunit joining. While the structure of an archaeal homologue (a/eIF5B) is known, there are significant sequence and functional differences in eubacterial IF2, while the trimeric eukaryotic IF2 is completely unrelated. Here, the crystal structure of the apo IF2 protein core from Thermus thermophilus has been determined by MAD phasing and the structures of GTP and GDP complexes were also obtained. The IF2GTP complex was trapped by soaking with GTP in the cryoprotectant. The structures revealed conformational changes of the protein upon nucleotide binding, in particular in the P-loop region, which extend to the functionally relevant switch II region. The latter carries a catalytically important and conserved histidine residue which is observed in different conformations in the GTP and GDP complexes. Overall, this work provides the first crystal structure of a eubacterial IF2 and suggests that activation of GTP hydrolysis may occur by a conformational repositioning of the histidine residue.

  15. UPPER BOUND ON THE FIRST STAR FORMATION HISTORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Madejski, Grzegorz M.; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.; Domnguez, Alberto

    2014-02-01

    Our understanding of the nature of the extragalactic background light (EBL) has improved with the recent development of gamma-ray observation techniques. An open subject in the context of the EBL is the reionization epoch, which is an important probe of the formation history of first stars, the so-called Population III (Pop III) stars. Although the mechanisms for the formation of PopIII stars are rather well understood on theoretical grounds, their formation history is still veiled in mystery because of their faintness. To shed light on this matter, we study jointly the gamma-ray opacity of distant objects and the reionization constraints from studies of intergalactic gas. By combining these studies, we obtain a sensitive upper bound on the PopIII star formation rate density of ?-dot {sub ?}(z)<0.01[(1+z)/(1+7.0)]{sup 3.4}(f{sub esc}/0.2){sup ?1}(C/3.0)M{sub ?}yr{sup ?1}Mpc{sup ?3} at z ? 7, where f {sub esc} and C are the escape fraction of ionizing photons from galaxies and the clumping factor of the intergalactic hydrogen gas. This limit is a ?10times tighter constraint compared with previous studies that take into account gamma-ray opacity constraints only. Even if we do not include the current gamma-ray constraints, the results do not change. This is because the detected gamma-ray sources are still at z ? 4.35 where the reionization has already finished.

  16. Bounding Radionuclide Inventory and Accident Consequence Calculation for the 1L Target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelsey, Charles T. IV

    2011-01-01

    A bounding radionuclide inventory for the tungsten of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) IL Target is calculated. Based on the bounding inventory, the dose resulting from the maximum credible incident (MCI) is calculated for the maximally exposed offsite individual (MEOl). The design basis accident involves tungsten target oxidation following a loss of cooling accident. Also calculated for the bounding radionuclide inventory is the ratio to the LANSCE inventory threshold for purposes of inventory control as described in the target inventory control policy. A bounding radionuclide inventory calculation for the lL Target was completed using the MCNPX and CINDER'90 codes. Continuous beam delivery at 200 {micro}A to 2500 mA{center_dot}h was assumed. The total calculated activity following this irradiation period is 205,000 Ci. The dose to the MEOI from the MCI is 213 mrem for the bounding inventory. The LANSCE inventory control threshold ratio is 132.

  17. Identifying and bounding uncertainties in nuclear reactor thermal power calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, J.; Hauser, E.; Estrada, H.

    2012-07-01

    Determination of the thermal power generated in the reactor core of a nuclear power plant is a critical element in the safe and economic operation of the plant. Direct measurement of the reactor core thermal power is made using neutron flux instrumentation; however, this instrumentation requires frequent calibration due to changes in the measured flux caused by fuel burn-up, flux pattern changes, and instrumentation drift. To calibrate the nuclear instruments, steam plant calorimetry, a process of performing a heat balance around the nuclear steam supply system, is used. There are four basic elements involved in the calculation of thermal power based on steam plant calorimetry: The mass flow of the feedwater from the power conversion system, the specific enthalpy of that feedwater, the specific enthalpy of the steam delivered to the power conversion system, and other cycle gains and losses. Of these elements, the accuracy of the feedwater mass flow and the feedwater enthalpy, as determined from its temperature and pressure, are typically the largest contributors to the calorimetric calculation uncertainty. Historically, plants have been required to include a margin of 2% in the calculation of the reactor thermal power for the licensed maximum plant output to account for instrumentation uncertainty. The margin is intended to ensure a cushion between operating power and the power for which safety analyses are performed. Use of approved chordal ultrasonic transit-time technology to make the feedwater flow and temperature measurements (in place of traditional differential-pressure- based instruments and resistance temperature detectors [RTDs]) allows for nuclear plant thermal power calculations accurate to 0.3%-0.4% of plant rated power. This improvement in measurement accuracy has allowed many plant operators in the U.S. and around the world to increase plant power output through Measurement Uncertainty Recapture (MUR) up-rates of up to 1.7% of rated power, while also decreasing the probability of significant over-power events. This paper will examine the basic elements involved in calculation of thermal power using ultrasonic transit-time technology and will discuss the criteria for bounding uncertainties associated with each element in order to achieve reactor thermal power calculations to within 0.3% to 0.4%. (authors)

  18. New bounded skew central difference scheme. Part 1: Formulation and testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moukalled, F.; Darwish, M.

    1997-01-01

    The skew central difference scheme is combined with the normalized variable formulation to yield a new bounded skew central difference scheme. The newly developed scheme is tested and compared with the upwind scheme, the bounded skew upwind scheme, and the high-resolution SMART scheme by solving four problems: (1) pure convection of a step profile in an oblique velocity field; (2) sudden expansion of an oblique flow field in a rectangular cavity; (3) driven flow in a skew cavity; and (4) gradual expansion in an axisymmetric, nonorthogonal channel. Results generated reveal the new scheme to be bounded and to be the most accurate among those investigated.

  19. Ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray bounds on nonbirefringent modified Maxwell theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klinkhamer, F. R.; Risse, M.

    2008-01-01

    A particularly simple Lorentz-violating modification of the Maxwell theory of photons maintains gauge invariance, CPT, and renormalization. This modified Maxwell theory, coupled to standard Dirac particles, involves 19 dimensionless 'deformation parameters'. Ten of these parameters lead to birefringence and are already tightly constrained by astrophysics. New bounds on the remaining nine nonbirefringent parameters can be obtained from the absence of vacuum Cherenkov radiation for ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs). Using selected UHECR events recorded at the Pierre Auger Observatory and assigning pseudorandom directions (i.e., assuming large-scale isotropy), Cherenkov bounds are found at the 10{sup -18} level, which improve considerably upon current laboratory bounds. Future UHECR observations may reduce these Cherenkov bounds to the 10{sup -23} level.

  20. Structure of DNA-Bound FEN1 Reveals Mechanism of Action

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structure of DNA-Bound FEN1 Reveals Mechanism of Action Print DNA replication is a critical step in the life of all organisms, insuring that each new cell gets an accurate copy of...

  1. Verifying the error bound of numerical computation implemented in computer systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sawada, Jun

    2013-03-12

    A verification tool receives a finite precision definition for an approximation of an infinite precision numerical function implemented in a processor in the form of a polynomial of bounded functions. The verification tool receives a domain for verifying outputs of segments associated with the infinite precision numerical function. The verification tool splits the domain into at least two segments, wherein each segment is non-overlapping with any other segment and converts, for each segment, a polynomial of bounded functions for the segment to a simplified formula comprising a polynomial, an inequality, and a constant for a selected segment. The verification tool calculates upper bounds of the polynomial for the at least two segments, beginning with the selected segment and reports the segments that violate a bounding condition.

  2. Out of bounds additive manufacturing (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Out of bounds additive manufacturing Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Out of bounds additive manufacturing Lockheed Martin and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working on an additive manufacturing system capable of manufacturing components measured not in terms of inches or feet, but multiple yards in all dimensions with the potential to manufacture parts that are completely unbounded in size. Authors: Holshouser, Chris [1] ; Newell, Clint [1] ; Palas, Sid [1] ; Love,

  3. Fano-type coupling of a bound paramagnetic state with 2D continuum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rozhansky, I. V.; Averkiev, N. S.; Lhderanta, E.

    2013-12-04

    We analyze an effect of a bound impurity state located at a tunnel distance from a quantum well (QW). The study is focused on the resonance case when the bound state energy lies within the continuum of the QW states. Using the developed theory we calculate spin polarization of 2D holes induced by paramagnetic (Mn) delta-layer in the vicinity of the QW and indirect exchange interaction between two impurities located at a tunnel distance from electron gas.

  4. Structure of the human M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor bound to an

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    antagonist (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Structure of the human M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor bound to an antagonist Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structure of the human M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor bound to an antagonist The parasympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system regulates the activity of multiple organ systems. Muscarinic receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate the response to acetylcholine released from

  5. Crystal structure of the[mu]-opioid receptor bound to a morphinan

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    antagonist (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Crystal structure of the[mu]-opioid receptor bound to a morphinan antagonist Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Crystal structure of the[mu]-opioid receptor bound to a morphinan antagonist Opium is one of the world's oldest drugs, and its derivatives morphine and codeine are among the most used clinical drugs to relieve severe pain. These prototypical opioids produce analgesia as well as many undesirable side effects (sedation, apnoea

  6. Crystal structure of elongation factor 4 bound to a clockwise ratcheted

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ribosome (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Crystal structure of elongation factor 4 bound to a clockwise ratcheted ribosome Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Crystal structure of elongation factor 4 bound to a clockwise ratcheted ribosome Authors: Gagnon, Matthieu G. ; Lin, Jinzhong ; Bulkley, David ; Steitz, Thomas A. [1] ; HHMI) [2] + Show Author Affiliations (Yale) ( Publication Date: 2014-08-14 OSTI Identifier: 1150141 Resource

  7. Analytical continuation from bound to resonant states in the Dirac equation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    with quadrupole-deformed potentials (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Analytical continuation from bound to resonant states in the Dirac equation with quadrupole-deformed potentials Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on August 27, 2016 Title: Analytical continuation from bound to resonant states in the Dirac equation with quadrupole-deformed potentials Authors: Xu, Xu-Dong ; Zhang, Shi-Sheng ; Signoracci, A. J. ; Smith, M. S. ; Li, Z. P.

  8. Crystal structure of the[mu]-opioid receptor bound to a morphinan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    antagonist (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Crystal structure of the[mu]-opioid receptor bound to a morphinan antagonist Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Crystal structure of the[mu]-opioid receptor bound to a morphinan antagonist Opium is one of the world's oldest drugs, and its derivatives morphine and codeine are among the most used clinical drugs to relieve severe pain. These prototypical opioids produce analgesia as well as many undesirable side effects

  9. Lab hosts Science Bound students for My Brother's Keeper event | The Ames

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Lab hosts Science Bound students for My Brother's Keeper event Ames Laboratory hosted approximately 100 eighth-grade students on Feb. 13 who are participating in the Science Bound program through Iowa State University. The students were from the Marshalltown, Denison and Des Moines school districts. After a welcome from Ames Laboratory Director Adam Schwartz, and a viewing of the Ames Laboratory "I Love Science" video, the students rotated between five stations for

  10. Structure of the [delta]-opioid receptor bound to naltrindole (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Structure of the [delta]-opioid receptor bound to naltrindole Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structure of the [delta]-opioid receptor bound to naltrindole The opioid receptor family comprises three members, the {mu}-, {delta}- and {kappa}-opioid receptors, which respond to classical opioid alkaloids such as morphine and heroin as well as to endogenous peptide ligands like endorphins. They belong to the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily, and

  11. Structure of the human M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor bound to an

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    antagonist (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Structure of the human M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor bound to an antagonist Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structure of the human M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor bound to an antagonist The parasympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system regulates the activity of multiple organ systems. Muscarinic receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate the response to acetylcholine released from parasympathetic

  12. Upper bounds on sparticle masses from naturalness or how to disprove weak

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    scale supersymmetry (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Upper bounds on sparticle masses from naturalness or how to disprove weak scale supersymmetry Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on February 15, 2017 Title: Upper bounds on sparticle masses from naturalness or how to disprove weak scale supersymmetry Authors: Baer, Howard ; Barger, Vernon ; Savoy, Michael Publication Date: 2016-02-16 OSTI Identifier: 1238092 Type: Publisher's Accepted

  13. Attracting students and professionals into math, science, and technology education at the elementary and middle grades: Final report, September 1, 1992--February 28, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flick, L.B.

    1995-12-31

    This report describes the progress of a project to encourage students and professionals to participate in math, science, and technology education at the elementary and middle grades. The topics of the report include documenting activities and procedures for the purposes of evaluation and dissemination of descriptive information, generating case studies of the students going through this program to provide research and evaluation data on the process of attracting technically qualified people into elementary and middle school teaching, establishing a program of mentoring between scientists, engineers, and mathematicians and prospective teachers in the program, and establishing a program of mentoring between master teachers in area schools and prospective teachers.

  14. Minimal time trajectories for two-level quantum systems with two bounded controls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boscain, Ugo; Grnberg, Fredrik; Long, Ruixing; Rabitz, Herschel

    2014-06-15

    In this paper we consider the minimum time population transfer problem for a two level quantum system driven by two external fields with bounded amplitude. The controls are modeled as real functions and we do not use the Rotating Wave Approximation. After projection on the Bloch sphere, we treat the time-optimal control problem with techniques of optimal synthesis on 2D manifolds. Based on the Pontryagin Maximum Principle, we characterize a restricted set of candidate optimal trajectories. Properties on this set, crucial for complete optimal synthesis, are illustrated by numerical simulations. Furthermore, when the two controls have the same bound and this bound is small with respect to the difference of the two energy levels, we get a complete optimal synthesis up to a small neighborhood of the antipodal point of the initial condition.

  15. Bound-state formation for thermal relic dark matter and unitarity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harling, Benedict von; Petraki, Kalliopi E-mail: kpetraki@nikhef.nl

    2014-12-01

    We show that the relic abundance of thermal dark matter annihilating via a long-range interaction, is significantly affected by the formation and decay of dark matter bound states in the early universe, if the dark matter mass is above a few TeV . We determine the coupling required to obtain the observed dark matter density, taking into account both the direct 2-to-2 annihilations and the formation of bound states, and provide an analytical fit. We argue that the unitarity limit on the inelastic cross-section is realized only if dark matter annihilates via a long-range interaction, and we determine the upper bound on the mass of thermal-relic dark matter to be about 197 (139) TeV for (non)-self-conjugate dark matter.

  16. Bound free electron-positron pair production accompanied by giant dipole resonances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senguel, M. Y.; Gueclue, M. C.

    2011-01-15

    At the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), for example, virtual photons produce many particles. At small impact parameters where the colliding nuclei make peripheral collisions, photon fluxes are very large and these are responsible for the multiple photonuclear interactions. Free pair productions, bound free pair productions, and nuclear Coulomb excitations are important examples of such interactions, and these processes play important roles in the beam luminosity at RHIC and LHC. Here we obtained the impact parameter dependence of bound free pair production cross sections and by using this probability we obtained bound free electron-positron pair production with nuclear breakup for heavy ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. We also compared our results to the other calculations.

  17. New bounding and decomposition approaches for MILP investment problems: Multi-area transmission and generation planning under policy constraints

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Munoz, F. D.; Hobbs, B. F.; Watson, J. -P.

    2016-02-01

    A novel two-phase bounding and decomposition approach to compute optimal and near-optimal solutions to large-scale mixed-integer investment planning problems is proposed and it considers a large number of operating subproblems, each of which is a convex optimization. Our motivating application is the planning of power transmission and generation in which policy constraints are designed to incentivize high amounts of intermittent generation in electric power systems. The bounding phase exploits Jensen’s inequality to define a lower bound, which we extend to stochastic programs that use expected-value constraints to enforce policy objectives. The decomposition phase, in which the bounds are tightened, improvesmore » upon the standard Benders’ algorithm by accelerating the convergence of the bounds. The lower bound is tightened by using a Jensen’s inequality-based approach to introduce an auxiliary lower bound into the Benders master problem. Upper bounds for both phases are computed using a sub-sampling approach executed on a parallel computer system. Numerical results show that only the bounding phase is necessary if loose optimality gaps are acceptable. But, the decomposition phase is required to attain optimality gaps. Moreover, use of both phases performs better, in terms of convergence speed, than attempting to solve the problem using just the bounding phase or regular Benders decomposition separately.« less

  18. Structure of DNA-Bound FEN1 Reveals Mechanism of Action

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structure of DNA-Bound FEN1 Reveals Mechanism of Action Structure of DNA-Bound FEN1 Reveals Mechanism of Action Print Tuesday, 24 January 2012 11:30 DNA replication is a critical step in the life of all organisms, insuring that each new cell gets an accurate copy of the genome. Among the legions of proteins required to do this work, the DNA-slicing "flap endonuclease" FEN1 plays a key role. Much of FEN1's structure was solved previously, but the DNA-free structure failed to expose

  19. Structure of the Ebola Virus Glycoprotein Bound to an Antibody from a Human

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Survivor Structure of the Ebola Virus Glycoprotein Bound to an Antibody from a Human Survivor Structure of the Ebola Virus Glycoprotein Bound to an Antibody from a Human Survivor Print Wednesday, 26 November 2008 00:00 Ebolavirus, one of two members of the family of filoviruses, causes a severe hemorrhagic fever with 50-90% human mortality. That no vaccines or treatments are yet available combined with the frequent re-emergence of the virus, its high prevalence among wildlife, and ease of

  20. Preliminary Results on the Experimental Investigation of the Structure Functions of Bound Nucleons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodek, Arie

    2015-09-01

    We present preliminary results on an experimental study of the nuclear modification of the longitudinal (sL) and transverse (sT ) structure functions of nucleons bound in nuclear targets. The origin of these modifications (commonly referred as as the EMC effect) is not fully understood. Our measurements of R= sL=sT for nuclei (RA) and for deuterium (RD) indicate that nuclear modifications of the structure functions of bound nucleons are different for the longitudinal and transverse structure functions, and that contrary to expectation from several theoretical models, RA < RD.

  1. LOWER BOUNDS ON MAGNETIC FIELDS IN INTERGALACTIC VOIDS FROM LONG-TERM

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GeV-TeV LIGHT CURVES OF THE BLAZAR MRK 421 (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect MAGNETIC FIELDS IN INTERGALACTIC VOIDS FROM LONG-TERM GeV-TeV LIGHT CURVES OF THE BLAZAR MRK 421 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: LOWER BOUNDS ON MAGNETIC FIELDS IN INTERGALACTIC VOIDS FROM LONG-TERM GeV-TeV LIGHT CURVES OF THE BLAZAR MRK 421 Lower bounds are derived on the amplitude B of intergalactic magnetic fields (IGMFs) in the region between Galaxy and the blazar Mrk 421, from constraints on the

  2. Upper Bound of 0.28 eV on Neutrino Masses from the Largest Photometric

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Redshift Survey (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Upper Bound of 0.28 eV on Neutrino Masses from the Largest Photometric Redshift Survey Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Upper Bound of 0.28 eV on Neutrino Masses from the Largest Photometric Redshift Survey We present a new limit of (95% CL) on the sum of the neutrino masses assuming a flat {Lambda}CDM cosmology. This relaxes slightly to and when quasinonlinear scales are removed and w{ne}-1, respectively. These are derived from a

  3. Using SU(3) relations to bound the CP asymmetries in B{yields}KKK decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelhard, Guy; Raz, Guy

    2005-12-01

    We consider three-body {delta}s=1 B{yields}f decays with f=KKK. The deviations of -{eta}{sub f}S{sub f} from S{sub {psi}}{sub K{sub S}} and of C{sub f} from zero can be bounded using the approximate SU(3) flavor symmetry of the strong interactions and branching ratios of various {delta}s=0 modes. We present the most promising SU(3) amplitude relations that can be used to obtain these bounds.

  4. Triviality and vacuum stability bounds in the three-loop neutrino mass

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    model (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Triviality and vacuum stability bounds in the three-loop neutrino mass model Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Triviality and vacuum stability bounds in the three-loop neutrino mass model We study theoretical constraints on the parameter space under the conditions from vacuum stability and triviality in the three-loop radiative seesaw model with TeV-scale right-handed neutrinos which are odd under the Z{sub 2} parity. In this model, some of

  5. Two-pion bound state in the sigma channel at finite temperature (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Two-pion bound state in the sigma channel at finite temperature Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Two-pion bound state in the sigma channel at finite temperature We study how we can understand the change of the spectral function and the pole location of the correlation function for sigma at finite temperature, which were previously obtained in the linear sigma model with a resummation technique called optimized perturbation theory. There are two relevant

  6. UPPER BOUND ON THE FIRST STAR FORMATION HISTORY (Journal Article) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect UPPER BOUND ON THE FIRST STAR FORMATION HISTORY Citation Details In-Document Search Title: UPPER BOUND ON THE FIRST STAR FORMATION HISTORY Our understanding of the nature of the extragalactic background light (EBL) has improved with the recent development of gamma-ray observation techniques. An open subject in the context of the EBL is the reionization epoch, which is an important probe of the formation history of first stars, the so-called Population III (Pop III) stars. Although

  7. Semiclassical and quantum field theoretic bounds for traversable Lorentzian stringy wormholes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nandi, Kamal Kanti; Zhang Yuanzhong; Kumar, K.B. Vijaya

    2004-09-15

    A lower bound on the size of a Lorentzian wormhole can be obtained by semiclassically introducing the Planck cutoff on the magnitude of tidal forces (Horowitz-Ross constraint). Also, an upper bound is provided by the quantum field theoretic constraint in the form of the Ford-Roman Quantum Inequality for massless minimally coupled scalar fields. To date, however, exact static solutions belonging to this scalar field theory have not been worked out to verify these bounds. To fill this gap, we examine the wormhole features of two examples from the Einstein frame description of the vacuum low energy string theory in four dimensions which is the same as the minimally coupled scalar field theory. Analyses in this paper support the conclusion of Ford and Roman that wormholes in this theory can have sizes that are indeed only a few order of magnitudes larger than the Planck scale. It is shown that the two types of bounds are also compatible. In the process, we point out a 'wormhole' analog of naked black holes.

  8. Tools for model-independent bounds in direct dark matter searches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cirelli, Marco

    2013-10-01

    We discuss a framework (based on non-relativistic operators) and a self-contained set of numerical tools to derive the bounds from some current direct detection experiments on virtually any arbitrary model of Dark Matter elastically scattering on nuclei.

  9. Bounding the Higgs width at the LHC: complementary results from H→WW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, John M.; Ellis, R. Keith; Williams, Ciaran

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the potential of the process gg → H→ WW to provide bounds on the Higgs width. Recent studies using off-shell H→ ZZ events have shown that Run 1 LHC data can constrain the Higgs width, $\\Gamma_H < (25-45) \\Gamma_{H}^{\\rm SM}$. Using 20 fb-1 of 8 TeV ATLAS data, we estimate a bound on the Higgs boson width from the WW channel between $\\Gamma_H < (100-500) \\Gamma_H^{SM}$. The large spread in limits is due to the range of cuts applied in the existing experimental analysis. The stricter cuts designed to search for the on-shell Higgs boson limit the potential number of off-shell events, weakening the constraints. As some of the cuts are lifted the bounds improve. We show that there is potential in the high transverse mass region to produce upper bounds of the order of $(25-50) \\Gamma_H^{SM}$, depending strongly on the level of systematic uncertainty that can be obtained. Thus, if these systematics can be controlled, a constraint on the Higgs boson width from the H → WW$ decay mode can complement a corresponding limit from H → ZZ.

  10. Some problems in sequencing and scheduling utilizing branch and bound algorithms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gim, B.

    1988-01-01

    This dissertation deals with branch and bound algorithms which are applied to the two-machine flow-shop problem with sparse precedence constraints and the optimal sequencing and scheduling of multiple feedstocks in a batch-type digester problem. The problem studied here is to find a schedule which minimizes the maximum flow time with the requirement that the schedule does not violate a set of sparse precedence constraints. This research provides a branch and bound algorithm which employs a lower bounding rule and is based on an adjustment of the sequence obtained by applying Johnson's algorithm. It is demonstrated that this lower bounding procedure in conjunction with Kurisu's branching rule is effective for the sparse precedence constraints problem case. Biomass to methane production systems have the potential of supplying 25% of the national gas demand. The optimal operation of a batch digester system requires the sequencing and scheduling of all batches from multiple feedstocks during a fixed time horizon. A significant characteristic of these systems is that the feedstock decays in storage before use in the digester system. The operational problem is to determine the time to allocate to each batch of several feedstocks and then sequence the individual batches so as to maximize biogas production for a single batch type digester over a fixed planning horizon. This research provides a branch and bound algorithm for sequencing and a two-step hierarchical dynamic programming procedure for time allocation scheduling. An efficient heuristic algorithm is developed for large problems and demonstrated to yield excellent results.

  11. Two nucleon systems at <math display='inline'>mπ~450MeVmath> from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orginos, Kostas; Parreño, Assumpta; Savage, Martin J.; Beane, Silas R.; Chang, Emmanuel; Detmold, William

    2015-12-23

    Nucleon-nucleon systems are studied with lattice quantum chromodynamics at a pion mass of $m_\\pi\\sim 450~{\\rm MeV}$ in three spatial volumes using $n_f=2+1$ flavors of light quarks. At the quark masses employed in this work, the deuteron binding energy is calculated to be $B_d = 14.4^{+3.2}_{-2.6} ~{\\rm MeV}$, while the dineutron is bound by $B_{nn} = 12.5^{+3.0}_{-5.0}~{\\rm MeV}$. Over the range of energies that are studied, the S-wave scattering phase shifts calculated in the 1S0 and 3S1-3D1 channels are found to be similar to those in nature, and indicate repulsive short-range components of the interactions, consistent with phenomenological nucleon-nucleon interactions. In both channels, the phase shifts are determined at three energies that lie within the radius of convergence of the effective range expansion, allowing for constraints to be placed on the inverse scattering lengths and effective ranges. Thus, the extracted phase shifts allow for matching to nuclear effective field theories, from which low energy counterterms are extracted and issues of convergence are investigated. As part of the analysis, a detailed investigation of the single hadron sector is performed, enabling a precise determination of the violation of the Gell-Mann–Okubo mass relation.

  12. Energy dependence of the optical potential of weakly and tightly bound nuclei as projectiles on a medium-mass target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Figueira, J. M.; Arazi, A.; Carnelli, P.; Heimann, D. Martinez; Negri, A. E.; Pacheco, A. J.; Niello, J. O. Fernandez; Capurro, O. A.; Fimiani, L.; Marti, G. V.; Lubian, J.; Monteiro, D. S.; Gomes, P. R. S.

    2010-02-15

    Angular distributions for the elastic scattering of the weakly bound {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 144}Sm systems were measured with high accuracy at bombarding energies from 85% up to 170% of the Coulomb barrier. An optical model analysis was performed, and the relevant parameters of the real and imaginary parts of the optical potential were extracted. The results are compared with those previously published for the tightly bound {sup 12}C+{sup 144}Sm and {sup 16}O+{sup 144}Sm systems. The usual threshold anomaly observed in the behavior of the potential of tightly bound systems was not observed for either weakly bound system. This absence is attributed to the repulsion due to breakup coupling which cancels the attraction arising from couplings with bound channels.

  13. Entropic uncertainty relations and locking: Tight bounds for mutually unbiased bases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballester, Manuel A.; Wehner, Stephanie

    2007-02-15

    We prove tight entropic uncertainty relations for a large number of mutually unbiased measurements. In particular, we show that a bound derived from the result by Maassen and Uffink [Phys. Rev. Lett. 60, 1103 (1988)] for two such measurements can in fact be tight for up to {radical}(d) measurements in mutually unbiased bases. We then show that using more mutually unbiased bases does not always lead to a better locking effect. We prove that the optimal bound for the accessible information using up to {radical}(d) specific mutually unbiased bases is log d/2, which is the same as can be achieved by using only two bases. Our result indicates that merely using mutually unbiased bases is not sufficient to achieve a strong locking effect and we need to look for additional properties.

  14. Bound states for multiple Dirac-? wells in space-fractional quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tare, Jeffrey D. Esguerra, Jose Perico H.

    2014-01-15

    Using the momentum-space approach, we obtain bound states for multiple Dirac-? wells in the framework of space-fractional quantum mechanics. Introducing first an attractive Dirac-comb potential, i.e., Dirac comb with strength ?g (g > 0), in the space-fractional Schrdinger equation we show that the problem of obtaining eigenenergies of a system with N Dirac-? wells can be reduced to a problem of obtaining the eigenvalues of an N N matrix. As an illustration we use the present matrix formulation to derive expressions satisfied by the bound-state energies of N = 1, 2, 3 delta wells. We also obtain the corresponding wave functions and express them in terms of Fox's H-function.

  15. Fast multiscale Gaussian beam methods for wave equations in bounded convex domains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bao, Gang; Department of Mathematics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 ; Lai, Jun; Qian, Jianliang

    2014-03-15

    Motivated by fast multiscale Gaussian wavepacket transforms and multiscale Gaussian beam methods which were originally designed for pure initial-value problems of wave equations, we develop fast multiscale Gaussian beam methods for initial boundary value problems of wave equations in bounded convex domains in the high frequency regime. To compute the wave propagation in bounded convex domains, we have to take into account reflecting multiscale Gaussian beams, which are accomplished by enforcing reflecting boundary conditions during beam propagation and carrying out suitable reflecting beam summation. To propagate multiscale beams efficiently, we prove that the ratio of the squared magnitude of beam amplitude and the beam width is roughly conserved, and accordingly we propose an effective indicator to identify significant beams. We also prove that the resulting multiscale Gaussian beam methods converge asymptotically. Numerical examples demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the method.

  16. On lower bounds for possible blow-up solutions to the periodic Navier-Stokes equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cortissoz, Jean C. Montero, Julio A. Pinilla, Carlos E.

    2014-03-15

    We show a new lower bound on the H{sup .3/2} (T{sup 3}) norm of a possible blow-up solution to the Navier-Stokes equation, and also comment on the extension of this result to the whole space. This estimate can be seen as a natural limiting result for Leray's blow-up estimates in L{sup p}(R{sup 3}), 3 < p < ?. We also show a lower bound on the blow-up rate of a possible blow-up solution of the Navier-Stokes equation in H{sup .5/2} (T{sup 3}), and give the corresponding extension to the case of the whole space.

  17. Propagation of surface waves on a semi-bounded quantum magnetized collisional plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niknam, A. R.; Taheri Boroujeni, S.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M.

    2013-12-15

    The propagation of surface waves on a semi-bounded quantum plasma in the presence of the external magnetic field and collisional effects is investigated by using quantum magnetohydrodynamics model. A general analytical expression for the dispersion relation of surface waves is obtained by considering the boundary conditions. It is shown that, in some special cases, the obtained dispersion relation reduces to the results reported in previous works. It is also indicated that the quantum, external magnetic field and collisional effects can facilitate the propagation of surface waves on a semi-bounded plasma. In addition, it is found that the growth rate of the surface wave instability is enhanced by increasing the collision frequency and plasmonic parameter.

  18. Structure of the Ebola virus glycoprotein bound to an antibody from a human

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    survivor 8 Structure of the Ebola virus glycoprotein bound to an antibody from a human survivor Ebolavirus: The ebolavirus causes a severe hemorrhagic fever with 50-90% lethality for which no vaccines or treatments are yet available. The more frequent re-emergence of the virus, its high prevalence among wildlife, and ease of importation of the virus make it a significant public health concern. A team of researchers have recently determined the crystal structure of the oligomeric, viral

  19. Summary of Bounding Requirements for the NGNP Demonstration Plant F&ORs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Listed

    2008-06-01

    This report documents bounding functional and operating requirements (F&ORs)for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project to support selection of the nuclear system design and specification of the operating conditions and configuration of NGNP once the nuclear system design is selected. These requirements supplement the detailed F&ORs for NGNP developed in the FY07 NGNP Pre-conceptual design work.

  20. A Branch and Bound Approach for Truss Topology Design Problems with Valid Inequalities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cerveira, Adelaide; Agra, Agostinho; Bastos, Fernando; Varum, Humberto

    2010-09-30

    One of the classical problems in the structural optimization field is the Truss Topology Design Problem (TTDP) which deals with the selection of optimal configuration for structural systems for applications in mechanical, civil, aerospace engineering, among others. In this paper we consider a TTDP where the goal is to find the stiffest truss, under a given load and with a bound on the total volume. The design variables are the cross-section areas of the truss bars that must be chosen from a given finite set. This results in a large-scale non-convex problem with discrete variables. This problem can be formulated as a Semidefinite Programming Problem (SDP problem) with binary variables. We propose a branch and bound algorithm to solve this problem. In this paper it is considered a binary formulation of the problem, to take advantage of its structure, which admits a Knapsack problem as subproblem. Thus, trying to improve the performance of the Branch and Bound, at each step, some valid inequalities for the Knapsack problem are included.

  1. Characterization of a Ras Mutant with Identical GDP- and GTP-Bound Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, B.; Boykevisch, S; Zhao, C; Kunzelmann, S; Bar-Sagi, D; Herrmann, C; Nassar, N

    2009-01-01

    We previously characterized the G60A mutant of Ras and showed that the switch regions of the GTP-bound but not the GDP-bound form of this mutant adopt an 'open conformation' similar to that seen in nucleotide-free Ras. Here, we mutate Lys147 of the conserved {sup 145}SAK{sup 147} motif in the G60A background and characterize the resulting double mutant (DM). We show that RasDM is the first structure of a Ras protein with identical GDP- and GTP-bound structures. Both structures adopt the open conformation of the active form of RasG60A. The increase in the accessible surface area of the nucleotide is consistent with a 4-fold increase in its dissociation rate. Stopped-flow experiments show no major difference in the two-step kinetics of association of GDP or GTP with the wild type, G60A, or RasDM. Addition of Sos fails to accelerate nucleotide exchange. Overexpression of the G60A or double mutant of Ras in COS-1 cells fails to activate Erk and shows a strong dominant negative effect. Our data suggest that flexibility at position 60 is required for proper Sos-catalyzed nucleotide exchange and that structural information is somehow shared among the switch regions and the different nucleotide binding motifs.

  2. Precise determination of the deuteron spin structure at low to moderate <math>Q2math> with CLAS and extraction of the neutron contribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guler, N.; Fersch, R. G.; Kuhn, S. E.; Bosted, P.; Griffioen, K. A.; Keith, C.; Minehart, R.; Prok, Y.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Bltmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crabb, D.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Dupre, R.; Alaoui, A. El; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Forest, T. A.; Garillon, B.; Garon, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Ho, D.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Joosten, S.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; Mayer, M.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; McKinnon, B.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Movsisyan, A.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Net, L. A.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabati, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Simonyan, A.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, S.; Ungaro, M.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.

    2015-11-02

    In this study, we present the final results for the deuteron spin structure functions obtained from the full data set collected with Jefferson Lab's CLAS in 2000-2001. Polarized electrons with energies of 1.6, 2.5, 4.2 and 5.8 GeV were scattered from deuteron (15ND3) targets, dynamically polarized along the beam direction, and detected with CLAS. From the measured double spin asymmetry, the virtual photon absorption asymmetry Ad1 and the polarized structure function gd1 were extracted over a wide kinematic range (0.05 GeV2 < Q2 < 5 GeV2 and 0.9 GeV < W < 3 GeV). We use an unfolding procedure and a parametrization of the corresponding proton results to extract from these data the polarized structure functions An1 and g1n of the (bound) neutron, which are so far unknown in the resonance region, W < 2 GeV. We compare our final results, including several moments of the deuteron and neutron spin structure functions, with various theoretical models and expectations as well as parametrizations of the world data. The unprecedented precision and dense kinematic coverage of these data can aid in future extractions of polarized parton distributions, tests of perturbative QCD predictions for the quark polarization at large x, a better understanding of quark-hadron duality, and more precise values for higher-twist matrix elements in the framework of the Operator Product Expansion.

  3. Application of the bounds-analysis approach to arsenic and gallium antisite defects in gallium arsenide

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wright, A. F.; Modine, N. A.

    2015-01-23

    The As antisite in GaAs (AsGa) has been the subject of numerous experimental and theoretical studies. Recent density-functional-theory (DFT) studies report results in good agreement with experimental data for the +2, +1, and 0 charge states of the stable EL2 structure, the 0 charge state of the metastable EL2* structure, and the activation energy to transform from EL2* to EL2 in the 0 charge state. However, these studies did not report results for EL2* in the -1 charge state. In this paper, we report new DFT results for the +2, +1, 0, and -1 charge states of AsGa, obtained usingmore » a semilocal exchange-correlation functional and interpreted using a bounds-analysis approach. In good agreement with experimental data, we find a -1/0 EL2* level 0.06 eV below the conduction-band edge and an activation energy of 0.05 eV to transform from EL2* to EL2 in the -1 charge state. While the Ga antisite in GaAs (GaAs) has not been studied as extensively as AsGa, experimental studies report three charge states (-2, -1, 0) and two levels (-2/-1, -1/0) close to the valence-band edge. Recent DFT studies report the same charge states, but the levels are found to be well-separated from the valence-band edge. To resolve this disagreement, we performed new DFT calculations for GaAs and interpreted them using a bounds analysis. The analysis identified the -1 and 0 charge states as hole states weakly bound to a highly-localized -2 charge state. Moreover, the -2/-1, -1/0 levels were found to be near the valence-band edge, in good agreement with the experimental data.« less

  4. Industrial cogeneration case study No. 2: American Cyanamid Chemical Company, Bound Brook, New Jersey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Within a project for evaluating the economics of cogeneration for industrial plants with an electrical capacity of 10,000 to 30,000 kW, the American Cyanamid plant at Bound Brook, NJ was selected for study. Built between 1915 and 1920 this power plant was converted in the 1960's from coal-fueling to oil and natural gas. Information is presented on the plant site, fuel usage, generation costs, comparative cost of purchasable electric power, equipment used, performance, and reliability and capital and maintenance costs. (LCL)

  5. Structure of DNA-Bound FEN1 Reveals Mechanism of Action

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structure of DNA-Bound FEN1 Reveals Mechanism of Action Print DNA replication is a critical step in the life of all organisms, insuring that each new cell gets an accurate copy of the genome. Among the legions of proteins required to do this work, the DNA-slicing "flap endonuclease" FEN1 plays a key role. Much of FEN1's structure was solved previously, but the DNA-free structure failed to expose information about the mechanics of how it works. An international team of scientists led by

  6. Structure of DNA-Bound FEN1 Reveals Mechanism of Action

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structure of DNA-Bound FEN1 Reveals Mechanism of Action Print DNA replication is a critical step in the life of all organisms, insuring that each new cell gets an accurate copy of the genome. Among the legions of proteins required to do this work, the DNA-slicing "flap endonuclease" FEN1 plays a key role. Much of FEN1's structure was solved previously, but the DNA-free structure failed to expose information about the mechanics of how it works. An international team of scientists led by

  7. Structure of the Ebola Virus Glycoprotein Bound to an Antibody from a Human

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Survivor Structure of the Ebola Virus Glycoprotein Bound to an Antibody from a Human Survivor Print Ebolavirus, one of two members of the family of filoviruses, causes a severe hemorrhagic fever with 50-90% human mortality. That no vaccines or treatments are yet available combined with the frequent re-emergence of the virus, its high prevalence among wildlife, and ease of importation of the virus make it a significant public health concern. A team of researchers from the Scripps Research

  8. Structure of the Ebola Virus Glycoprotein Bound to an Antibody from a Human

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Survivor Structure of the Ebola Virus Glycoprotein Bound to an Antibody from a Human Survivor Print Ebolavirus, one of two members of the family of filoviruses, causes a severe hemorrhagic fever with 50-90% human mortality. That no vaccines or treatments are yet available combined with the frequent re-emergence of the virus, its high prevalence among wildlife, and ease of importation of the virus make it a significant public health concern. A team of researchers from the Scripps Research

  9. Structure of the Ebola Virus Glycoprotein Bound to an Antibody from a Human

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Survivor Structure of the Ebola Virus Glycoprotein Bound to an Antibody from a Human Survivor Print Ebolavirus, one of two members of the family of filoviruses, causes a severe hemorrhagic fever with 50-90% human mortality. That no vaccines or treatments are yet available combined with the frequent re-emergence of the virus, its high prevalence among wildlife, and ease of importation of the virus make it a significant public health concern. A team of researchers from the Scripps Research

  10. Structure of DNA-Bound FEN1 Reveals Mechanism of Action

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structure of DNA-Bound FEN1 Reveals Mechanism of Action Print DNA replication is a critical step in the life of all organisms, insuring that each new cell gets an accurate copy of the genome. Among the legions of proteins required to do this work, the DNA-slicing "flap endonuclease" FEN1 plays a key role. Much of FEN1's structure was solved previously, but the DNA-free structure failed to expose information about the mechanics of how it works. An international team of scientists led by

  11. Structure of DNA-Bound FEN1 Reveals Mechanism of Action

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structure of DNA-Bound FEN1 Reveals Mechanism of Action Print DNA replication is a critical step in the life of all organisms, insuring that each new cell gets an accurate copy of the genome. Among the legions of proteins required to do this work, the DNA-slicing "flap endonuclease" FEN1 plays a key role. Much of FEN1's structure was solved previously, but the DNA-free structure failed to expose information about the mechanics of how it works. An international team of scientists led by

  12. Structure of the Ebola Virus Glycoprotein Bound to an Antibody from a Human

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Survivor Structure of the Ebola Virus Glycoprotein Bound to an Antibody from a Human Survivor Print Ebolavirus, one of two members of the family of filoviruses, causes a severe hemorrhagic fever with 50-90% human mortality. That no vaccines or treatments are yet available combined with the frequent re-emergence of the virus, its high prevalence among wildlife, and ease of importation of the virus make it a significant public health concern. A team of researchers from the Scripps Research

  13. Quantum localization and bound-state formation in Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franzosi, Roberto; Giampaolo, Salvatore M.; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2010-12-15

    We discuss the possibility of exponential quantum localization in systems of ultracold bosonic atoms with repulsive interactions in open optical lattices without disorder. We show that exponential localization occurs in the maximally excited state of the lowest energy band. We establish the conditions under which the presence of the upper energy bands can be neglected, determine the successive stages and the quantum phase boundaries at which localization occurs, and discuss schemes to detect it experimentally by visibility measurements. The discussed mechanism is a particular type of quantum localization that is intuitively understood in terms of the interplay between nonlinearity and a bounded energy spectrum.

  14. Three-Body Recombination into Deep Bound States in a Bose Gas with Large Scattering Length

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braaten, Eric; Hammer, H.-W.

    2001-10-15

    An effective field theory for the three-body system with large two-body scattering length a is applied to three-body recombination into deep bound states in a Bose gas. The recombination constant {alpha} is calculated to first order in the short-distance interactions that allow the recombination. For a<0 , the dimensionless combination m{alpha}/({Dirac_h}a{sup 4}) is a periodic function of ln|a| that exhibits resonances at values of a that differ by multiplicative factors of 22.7. This dramatic behavior should be observable near a Feshbach resonance when a becomes large and negative.

  15. Gradual Release of Strongly Bound Nitric Oxide from Fe2(NO)2(dobdc) |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Gradual Release of Strongly Bound Nitric Oxide from Fe2(NO)2(dobdc) Previous Next List Bloch, Eric D; Queen, Wendy L; Chavan, Sachin; Wheatley, Paul S.; Zadrozny, Joseph M.; Morris, Russell; Brown, Craig M; Lamberti, Carlo; Bordiga, Silvia; and Long, Jeffrey R, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 137, 3466-3469 (2015) DOI: 10.1021/ja5132243 gradual release Abstract: An iron(II)-based metal-organic framework featuring

  16. Effective-range expansion for two coupled channels and properties of bound states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blokhintsev, L. D.

    2011-07-15

    The S matrix and the scattering-amplitude matrix (F matrix) are considered for the case of two coupled elastic-scattering channels differing by the values of the orbital angular momentum (l{sub 1} and l{sub 2} = l{sub 1} + 2). The matrix elements of the S and F matrices in the absence of Coulomb interaction are expressed in terms of the matrix elements of the matrix K{sup -1} inverse to the reaction K matrix. The elements of the K{sup -1} matrix are written in the form of expansions that are generalizations of the single-channel effective-range expansion. If there is a bound state in the system of colliding particles, then an analytic continuation of these expansions to the region of negative energies makes it possible to obtain both the position of the pole corresponding to this bound state and the residues of scattering amplitudes at this pole, the respective vertex constants and asymptotic normalization coefficients being expressed in terms of these residues. By way of example, the developed formalism is applied to describing triplet neutron-proton scattering.

  17. Structural Diversity in Free and Bound States of Intrinsically Disordered Protein Phosphatase 1 Regulators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsh, J.A.; Allaire, M.; Dancheck, B.; Ragusa, M.J.; Forman-Kay, J.D.; Peti, Wolfgang

    2010-09-08

    Complete folding is not a prerequisite for protein function, as disordered and partially folded states of proteins frequently perform essential biological functions. In order to understand their functions at the molecular level, we utilized diverse experimental measurements to calculate ensemble models of three nonhomologous, intrinsically disordered proteins: I-2, spinophilin, and DARPP-32, which bind to and regulate protein phosphatase 1 (PP1). The models demonstrate that these proteins have dissimilar propensities for secondary and tertiary structure in their unbound forms. Direct comparison of these ensemble models with recently determined PP1 complex structures suggests a significant role for transient, preformed structure in the interactions of these proteins with PP1. Finally, we generated an ensemble model of partially disordered I-2 bound to PP1 that provides insight into the relationship between flexibility and biological function in this dynamic complex.

  18. Upper bound on parity-violating neutron spin rotation in {sup 4}He

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snow, W. M.; Luo, D.; Walbridge, S. B.; Crawford, B. E.; Gan, K.; Micherdzinska, A. M.; Opper, A. K.; Heckel, B. R.; Swanson, H. E.; Sharapov, E. I.; Zhumabekova, V.

    2011-02-15

    We report an upper bound on parity-violating neutron spin rotation in {sup 4}He. This experiment is the most sensitive search for neutron-weak optical activity yet performed and represents a significant advance in precision in comparison to past measurements in heavy nuclei. The experiment was performed at the NG-6 slow-neutron beamline at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Center for Neutron Research. Our result for the neutron spin rotation angle per unit length in {sup 4}He is d{phi}/dz=[+1.7{+-}9.1(stat.){+-}1.4(sys.)]x10{sup -7} rad/m. The statistical uncertainty is smaller than current estimates of the range of possible values of d{phi}/dz in n+{sup 4}He.

  19. Most sub-arcsecond companions of Kepler exoplanet candidate host stars are gravitationally bound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horch, Elliott P.; Howell, Steve B.; Everett, Mark E.; Ciardi, David R. E-mail: steve.b.howell@nasa.gov E-mail: ciardi@ipac.caltech.edu

    2014-11-01

    Using the known detection limits for high-resolution imaging observations and the statistical properties of true binary and line-of-sight companions, we estimate the binary fraction of Kepler exoplanet host stars. Our speckle imaging programs at the WIYN 3.5 m and Gemini North 8.1 m telescopes have observed over 600 Kepler objects of interest and detected 49 stellar companions within ?1 arcsec. Assuming binary stars follow a log-normal period distribution for an effective temperature range of 3000-10,000 K, then the model predicts that the vast majority of detected sub-arcsecond companions are long period (P > 50 yr), gravitationally bound companions. In comparing the model predictions to the number of real detections in both observational programs, we conclude that the overall binary fraction of host stars is similar to the 40%-50% rate observed for field stars.

  20. Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico existing environmental analyses bounding environmental test facilities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Rodney A.; Bailey-White, Brenda E.; Cantwell, Amber

    2009-06-01

    This report identifies current environmental operating parameters for the various test and support facilities at SNL/NM. The intent of this report is solely to provide the limits which bound the facilities' operations. Understanding environmental limits is important to maximizing the capabilities and working within the existing constraints of each facility, and supports the decision-making process in meeting customer requests, cost and schedule planning, modifications to processes, future commitments, and use of resources. Working within environmental limits ensures that mission objectives will be met in a manner that protects human health and the environment. It should be noted that, in addition to adhering to the established limits, other approvals and permits may be required for specific projects.

  1. Bound on quantum computation time: Quantum error correction in a critical environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novais, E.; Mucciolo, Eduardo R.; Baranger, Harold U.

    2010-08-15

    We obtain an upper bound on the time available for quantum computation for a given quantum computer and decohering environment with quantum error correction implemented. First, we derive an explicit quantum evolution operator for the logical qubits and show that it has the same form as that for the physical qubits but with a reduced coupling strength to the environment. Using this evolution operator, we find the trace distance between the real and ideal states of the logical qubits in two cases. For a super-Ohmic bath, the trace distance saturates, while for Ohmic or sub-Ohmic baths, there is a finite time before the trace distance exceeds a value set by the user.

  2. Generation of bound states of pulses in a soliton laser with complex relaxation of a saturable absorber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zolotovskii, I O; Korobko, D A; Okhotnikov, O G; Gumenyuk, R V

    2015-01-31

    A numerical model of a soliton fibre laser with a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM), characterised by the complex dynamics of absorption relaxation, is considered. It is shown that stationary bound states of pulses can be formed in this laser as a result of their interaction via the dispersion-wave field. The stability of stationary bound states of several pulses is analysed. It is shown that an increase in the number of pulses in a stationary bound state leads eventually to its decay and formation of a random bunch. It is found that the bunch stability is caused by the manifestation of nonlinear self-phase modulation, which attracts pulses to the bunch centre. The simulation results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  3. A 1.3-Å Structure of Zinc-bound N-terminal Domain of Calmodulin Elucidates

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Potential Early Ion-binding Step (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect A 1.3-Å Structure of Zinc-bound N-terminal Domain of Calmodulin Elucidates Potential Early Ion-binding Step Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A 1.3-Å Structure of Zinc-bound N-terminal Domain of Calmodulin Elucidates Potential Early Ion-binding Step Authors: Warren, Julia T. ; Guo, Qing ; Tang, Wei-Jen [1] + Show Author Affiliations (UC) Publication Date: 2015-11-02 OSTI Identifier: 1222846 Resource Type: Journal

  4. CIT-7, a crystalline, molecular sieve with pores bounded by 8 and 10-membered rings

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schmidt, Joel E.; Xie, Dan; Rea, Thomas; Davis, Mark E.

    2015-01-23

    A new crystalline molecular sieve, denoted CIT-7, is synthesized using an imidazolium-based diquaternary organic structure directing agent (OSDA). The framework structure is determined from a combination of rotation electron diffraction and synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data. The structure has 10 crystallographically unique tetrahedral atoms (T-atoms) in the unit cell, and can be described as an ordered arrangement of the [425462] mtw building unit and a previously unreported [4452] building unit. The framework contains a 2-dimensional pore system that is bounded by 10 T-atom rings (10-ring, 5.1 Å × 6.2 Å opening) that are connected with oval 8-rings (2.9 Å ×more » 5.5 Å opening) through medium-sized cavities (~7.9 Å) at the channel intersections. CIT-7 can be synthesized over a broad range of compositions including pure-silica and heteroatom, e.g., aluminosilicate and titanosilicate, containing variants.« less

  5. Crystal structure of the FLT3 kinase domain bound to the inhibitor quizartinib (AC220)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zorn, Julie A.; Wang, Qi; Fujimura, Eric; Barros, Tiago; Kuriyan, John; Boggon, Titus J.

    2015-04-02

    More than 30% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients possess activating mutations in the receptor tyrosine kinase FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 or FLT3. A small-molecule inhibitor of FLT3 (known as quizartinib or AC220) that is currently in clinical trials appears promising for the treatment of AML. Here, we report the co-crystal structure of the kinase domain of FLT3 in complex with quizartinib. FLT3 with quizartinib bound adopts an “Abl-like” inactive conformation with the activation loop stabilized in the “DFG-out” orientation and folded back onto the kinase domain. This conformation is similar to that observed for the uncomplexed intracellular domain of FLT3 as well as for related receptor tyrosine kinases, except for a localized induced fit in the activation loop. The co-crystal structure reveals the interactions between quizartinib and the active site of FLT3 that are key for achieving its high potency against both wild-type FLT3 as well as a FLT3 variant observed in many AML patients. This co-complex further provides a structural rationale for quizartinib-resistance mutations.

  6. Attosecond transient absorption probing of electronic superpositions of bound states in neon. Detection of quantum beats

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Beck, Annelise R; Bernhardt, Birgitta; Warrick, Erika R.; Wu, Mengxi; Chen, Shaohao; Gaarde, Mette B.; Schafer, Kenneth J.; Neumark, Daniel M.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2014-11-07

    Electronic wavepackets composed of multiple bound excited states of atomic neon lying between 19.6 and 21.5 eV are launched using an isolated attosecond pulse. Individual quantum beats of the wavepacket are detected by perturbing the induced polarization of the medium with a time-delayed few-femtosecond near-infrared (NIR) pulse via coupling the individual states to multiple neighboring levels. All of the initially excited states are monitored simultaneously in the attosecond transient absorption spectrum, revealing Lorentzian to Fano lineshape spectral changes as well as quantum beats. The most prominent beating of the several that were observed was in the spin–orbit split 3d absorptionmore » features, which has a 40 femtosecond period that corresponds to the spin–orbit splitting of 0.1 eV. The few-level models and multilevel calculations confirm that the observed magnitude of oscillation depends strongly on the spectral bandwidth and tuning of the NIR pulse and on the location of possible coupling states.« less

  7. Pattern selection and super-patterns in the bounded confidence model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben-Naim, E.; Scheel, A.

    2015-10-26

    We study pattern formation in the bounded confidence model of opinion dynamics. In this random process, opinion is quantified by a single variable. Two agents may interact and reach a fair compromise, but only if their difference of opinion falls below a fixed threshold. Starting from a uniform distribution of opinions with compact support, a traveling wave forms and it propagates from the domain boundary into the unstable uniform state. Consequently, the system reaches a steady state with isolated clusters that are separated by distance larger than the interaction range. These clusters form a quasi-periodic pattern where the sizes of the clusters and the separations between them are nearly constant. We obtain analytically the average separation between clusters L. Interestingly, there are also very small quasi-periodic modulations in the size of the clusters. Furthermore, the spatial periods of these modulations are a series of integers that follow from the continued-fraction representation of the irrational average separation L.

  8. Hyperaccretion during tidal disruption events: Weakly bound debris envelopes and jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughlin, Eric R.; Begelman, Mitchell C. E-mail: mitch@jila.colorado.edu

    2014-02-01

    After the destruction of the star during a tidal disruption event (TDE), the cataclysmic encounter between a star and the supermassive black hole (SMBH) of a galaxy, approximately half of the original stellar debris falls back onto the hole at a rate that can initially exceed the Eddington limit by orders of magnitude. We argue that the angular momentum of this matter is too low to allow it to attain a disk-like configuration with accretion proceeding at a mildly super-Eddington rate, the excess energy being carried away by a combination of radiative losses and radially distributed winds. Instead, we propose that the infalling gas traps accretion energy until it inflates into a weakly bound, quasi-spherical structure with gas extending nearly to the poles. We study the structure and evolution of such 'zero-Bernoulli accretion' flows as a model for the super-Eddington phase of TDEs. We argue that such flows cannot stop extremely super-Eddington accretion from occurring, and that once the envelope is maximally inflated, any excess accretion energy escapes through the poles in the form of powerful jets. We compare the predictions of our model to Swift J1644+57, the putative super-Eddington TDE, and show that it can qualitatively reproduce some of its observed features. Similar models, including self-gravity, could be applicable to gamma-ray bursts from collapsars and the growth of SMBH seeds inside quasi-stars.

  9. New bounded skew central difference scheme. Part 2: Application to natural convection in an eccentric annulus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moukalled, F.; Darwish, M.

    1997-01-01

    The bounded skew central difference scheme (NVF SCDS) is used to study numerically the combined effect of vertical ({epsilon}{sub y}) and horizontal ({epsilon}{sub x}) eccentricities on natural convection in an annulus between a heated horizontal cylinder and its square enclosure. Four Rayleigh numbers (Ra = 10{sup 3}, 10{sup 4}, 10{sup 5}, and 10{sup 6}), three aspect ratios (R/L = 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3), and eccentricity values ranging from {minus}0.3 to 0.3 are considered. At constant enclosure aspect ratio, the total heat transfer increases with increasing Rayleigh number. For constant Rayleigh-number values, convection contribution to total heat transfer decreases with increasing values of R/L. For conduction-dominated flows, heat transfer increases with increasing {vert_bar}{epsilon}{sub y}{vert_bar} and/or {vert_bar}{epsilon}{sub x}{vert_bar}. For convection-dominated flows, heat transfer increases with decreasing {epsilon}{sub y} for {epsilon}{sub y} < 0, decreases with increasing {epsilon}{sub y} for {epsilon}{sub y} > 0, and decreases with decreasing {epsilon}{sub x} for {epsilon}{sub x} < 0. For the case when conduction and convection are of equal importance, there is a critical {epsilon}{sub x} for which the total heat transfer is minimum.

  10. Pattern selection and super-patterns in the bounded confidence model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ben-Naim, E.; Scheel, A.

    2015-10-26

    We study pattern formation in the bounded confidence model of opinion dynamics. In this random process, opinion is quantified by a single variable. Two agents may interact and reach a fair compromise, but only if their difference of opinion falls below a fixed threshold. Starting from a uniform distribution of opinions with compact support, a traveling wave forms and it propagates from the domain boundary into the unstable uniform state. Consequently, the system reaches a steady state with isolated clusters that are separated by distance larger than the interaction range. These clusters form a quasi-periodic pattern where the sizes ofmore » the clusters and the separations between them are nearly constant. We obtain analytically the average separation between clusters L. Interestingly, there are also very small quasi-periodic modulations in the size of the clusters. Furthermore, the spatial periods of these modulations are a series of integers that follow from the continued-fraction representation of the irrational average separation L.« less

  11. Crystal structure of the FLT3 kinase domain bound to the inhibitor quizartinib (AC220)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zorn, Julie A.; Wang, Qi; Fujimura, Eric; Barros, Tiago; Kuriyan, John; Boggon, Titus J.

    2015-04-02

    More than 30% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients possess activating mutations in the receptor tyrosine kinase FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 or FLT3. A small-molecule inhibitor of FLT3 (known as quizartinib or AC220) that is currently in clinical trials appears promising for the treatment of AML. Here, we report the co-crystal structure of the kinase domain of FLT3 in complex with quizartinib. FLT3 with quizartinib bound adopts an “Abl-like” inactive conformation with the activation loop stabilized in the “DFG-out” orientation and folded back onto the kinase domain. This conformation is similar to that observed for the uncomplexed intracellular domain ofmore » FLT3 as well as for related receptor tyrosine kinases, except for a localized induced fit in the activation loop. The co-crystal structure reveals the interactions between quizartinib and the active site of FLT3 that are key for achieving its high potency against both wild-type FLT3 as well as a FLT3 variant observed in many AML patients. This co-complex further provides a structural rationale for quizartinib-resistance mutations.« less

  12. Posterior propriety for hierarchical models with log-likelihoods that have norm bounds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Michalak, Sarah E.; Morris, Carl N.

    2015-07-17

    Statisticians often use improper priors to express ignorance or to provide good frequency properties, requiring that posterior propriety be verified. Our paper addresses generalized linear mixed models, GLMMs, when Level I parameters have Normal distributions, with many commonly-used hyperpriors. It provides easy-to-verify sufficient posterior propriety conditions based on dimensions, matrix ranks, and exponentiated norm bounds, ENBs, for the Level I likelihood. Since many familiar likelihoods have ENBs, which is often verifiable via log-concavity and MLE finiteness, our novel use of ENBs permits unification of posterior propriety results and posterior MGF/moment results for many useful Level I distributions, including those commonlymore » used with multilevel generalized linear models, e.g., GLMMs and hierarchical generalized linear models, HGLMs. Furthermore, those who need to verify existence of posterior distributions or of posterior MGFs/moments for a multilevel generalized linear model given a proper or improper multivariate F prior as in Section 1 should find the required results in Sections 1 and 2 and Theorem 3 (GLMMs), Theorem 4 (HGLMs), or Theorem 5 (posterior MGFs/moments).« less

  13. Activation of 200 MW refusegenerated CHP upward regulation effect...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    regulation effect Country Denmark Headquarters Location Thisted, Denmark Coordinates 56.959167, 8.703492 Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","typ...

  14. Upward-facing Lithium Flash Evaporator for NSTX-U

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... The minimal time interval between the evaporation and the start of the discharge will avoid the passivation of the lithium by residual gases and enable the study of the ...

  15. A halo-independent lower bound on the dark matter capture rate in the Sun from a direct detection signal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blennow, Mattias; Herrero-Garcia, Juan; Schwetz, Thomas

    2015-05-21

    We show that a positive signal in a dark matter (DM) direct detection experiment can be used to place a lower bound on the DM capture rate in the Sun, independent of the DM halo. For a given particle physics model and DM mass we obtain a lower bound on the capture rate independent of the local DM density, velocity distribution, galactic escape velocity, as well as the scattering cross section. We illustrate this lower bound on the capture rate by assuming that upcoming direct detection experiments will soon obtain a significant signal. When comparing the lower bound on the capture rate with limits on the high-energy neutrino flux from the Sun from neutrino telescopes, we can place upper limits on the branching fraction of DM annihilation channels leading to neutrinos. With current data from IceCube and Super-Kamiokande non-trivial limits can be obtained for spin-dependent interactions and direct annihilations into neutrinos. In some cases also annihilations into ττ or bb start getting constrained. For spin-independent interactions current constraints are weak, but they may become interesting for data from future neutrino telescopes.

  16. The Conformation of Bound GMPPNP Suggests a Mechanism for Gating the Active Site of the SRP GTPase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Padmanabhan, S.; Freymann, D.

    2010-03-08

    The signal recognition particle (SRP) is a phylogenetically conserved ribonucleoprotein that mediates cotranslational targeting of secreted and membrane proteins to the membrane. Targeting is regulated by GTP binding and hydrolysis events that require direct interaction between structurally homologous 'NG' GTPase domains of the SRP signal recognition subunit and its membrane-associated receptor, SR{alpha}. Structures of both the apo and GDP bound NG domains of the prokaryotic SRP54 homolog, Ffh, and the prokaryotic receptor homolog, FtsY, have been determined. The structural basis for the GTP-dependent interaction between the two proteins, however, remains unknown. We report here two structures of the NG GTPase of Ffh from Thermus aquaticus bound to the nonhydrolyzable GTP analog GMPPNP. Both structures reveal an unexpected binding mode in which the {beta}-phosphate is kinked away from the binding site and magnesium is not bound. Binding of the GTP analog in the canonical conformation found in other GTPase structures is precluded by constriction of the phosphate binding P loop. The structural difference between the Ffh complex and other GTPases suggests a specific conformational change that must accompany movement of the nucleotide from an inactive to an active binding mode. Conserved side chains of the GTPase sequence motifs unique to the SRP subfamily may function to gate formation of the active GTP bound conformation. Exposed hydrophobic residues provide an interaction surface that may allow regulation of the GTP binding conformation, and thus activation of the GTPase, during the association of SRP with its receptor.

  17. Alkyl group substitution by oxime-bound palladium(II) (the Shaw reaction): Alkly group selectivity and deuterium isotope effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, A.P.; Kitching, W.

    1992-08-01

    This report provides information regarding the selectivity of alkyl groups and the nature of the transition state for C-H palladation by oxime-bound palladium(II) (the Shaw reaction). The kinetic deuterium isotope effects are also presented. 21 refs.

  18. Performance Bounds on Micro-Doppler Estimation and Adaptive Waveform Design Using OFDM Signals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sen, Satyabrata; Barhen, Jacob; Glover, Charles Wayne

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the performance of a wideband orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signal in estimating the micro-Doppler frequency of a target having multiple rotating scatterers (e.g., rotor blades of a helicopter, propellers of a submarine). The presence of rotating scatterers introduces Doppler frequency modulation in the received signal by generating sidebands about the transmitted frequencies. This is called the micro-Doppler effects. The use of a frequency-diverse OFDM signal in this context enables us to independently analyze the micro-Doppler characteristics with respect to a set of orthogonal subcarrier frequencies. Therefore, to characterize the accuracy of micro-Doppler frequency estimation, we compute the Cram er-Rao Bound (CRB) on the angular-velocity estimate of the target while considering the scatterer responses as deterministic but unknown nuisance parameters. Additionally, to improve the accuracy of the estimation procedure, we formulate and solve an optimization problem by minimizing the CRB on the angular-velocity estimate with respect to the transmitting OFDM spectral coefficients. We present several numerical examples to demonstrate the CRB variations at different values of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the number of OFDM subcarriers. The CRB values not only decrease with the increase in the SNR values, but also reduce as we increase the number of subcarriers implying the significance of frequency-diverse OFDM waveforms. The improvement in estimation accuracy due to the adaptive waveform design is also numerically analyzed. Interestingly, we find that the relative decrease in the CRBs on the angular-velocity estimate is more pronounced for larger number of OFDM subcarriers.

  19. Bounding the Role of Black Carbon in the Climate System: A Scientific Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond, Tami C.; Doherty, Sarah J.; Fahey, D. W.; Forster, Piers; Berntsen, T.; DeAngelo, B. J.; Flanner, M. G.; Ghan, Steven J.; Karcher, B.; Koch, Dorothy; Kinne, Stefan; Kondo, Yutaka; Quinn, P. K.; Sarofim, Marcus; Schultz, Martin; Schulz, M.; Venkataraman, C.; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Shiqiu; Bellouin, N.; Guttikunda, S. K.; Hopke, P. K.; Jacobson, M. Z.; Kaiser, J. W.; Klimont, Z.; Lohmann, U.; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Shindell, Drew; Storelvmo, Trude; Warren, Stephen G.; Zender, C. S.

    2013-06-06

    Black carbon aerosol plays a unique and important role in Earth’s climate system. Black carbon is a type of carbonaceous material with a unique combination of physical properties. Predominant sources are combustion related; namely, fossil fuels for transportation, solid fuels for industrial and residential uses, and open burning of biomass. Total global emissions of black carbon using bottom-up inventory methods are 7500 Gg yr-1 in the year 2000 with an uncertainty range of 2000 to 29000. This assessment provides an evaluation of black-carbon climate forcing that is comprehensive in its inclusion of all known and relevant processes and that is quantitative in providing best estimates and uncertainties of the main forcing terms: direct solar absorption, influence on liquid, mixed-phase, and ice clouds, and deposition on snow and ice. These effects are calculated with models, but when possible, they are evaluated with both microphysical measurements and field observations. Global atmospheric absorption attributable to black carbon is too low in many models, and should be increased by about about 60%. After this scaling, the best estimate for the industrial-era (1750 to 2005) direct radiative forcing of black carbon is +0.43 W m-2 with 90% uncertainty bounds of (+0.17, +0.68) W m-2. Total direct forcing by all black carbon sources in the present day is estimated as +0.49 (+0.20, +0.76) W m-2. Direct radiative forcing alone does not capture important rapid adjustment mechanisms. A framework is described and used for quantifying climate forcings and their rapid responses and feedbacks. The best estimate of industrial-era (1750 to 2005) climate forcing of black carbon through all forcing mechanisms is +0.77 W m-2 with 90% uncertainty bounds of +-0.06 to +1.53 W m-2. Thus, there is a 96% probability that black carbon emissions, independent of co-emitted species, have a positive forcing and warm the climate. With a value of +0.77 W m-2, black carbon is likely the second most important individual climate-forcing agent in the industrial era, following carbon dioxide. Sources that emit black carbon also emit other short- lived species that may either cool or warm climate. Climate forcings from co-emitted species are estimated and used in the framework described herein. When the principal effects of co- emissions, including cooling agents such as sulfur dioxide, are included in net forcing, energy-related sources (fossil-fuel and biofuel) have a net climate forcing of +0.004 (-0.62 to +0.57) W m-2 during the first year after emission. For a few of these sources, such as diesel engines and possibly residential biofuels, warming is strong enough that eliminating all emissions from these sources would reduce net climate forcing (i.e., produce cooling). When open burning emissions, which emit high levels of organic matter, are included in the total, the best estimate of net industrial-era climate forcing by all black- carbon-rich sources becomes slightly negative (-0.08 W m-2 with 90% uncertainty bounds of -1.23 to +0.81 W m-2). The uncertainties in net climate forcing from black-carbon-rich sources are substantial, largely due to lack of knowledge about cloud interactions with both black carbon and co-emitted organic carbon. In prioritizing potential black-carbon mitigation actions, non-science factors, such as technical feasibility, costs, policy design, and implementation feasibility play important roles. The major sources of black carbon are presently in different stages with regard to the feasibility for near-term mitigation. This assessment, by evaluating the large number and complexity of the associated physical and radiative processes in black-carbon climate forcing, sets a baseline from which to improve future climate forcing estimates.

  20. Collisions induced by halo and weakly bound nuclei around the Coulomb barrier: Results at INFN-LNS Catania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Figuera, Pierpaolo

    2012-10-20

    The study of collisions around the Coulomb barrier induced by halo and/or weakly bound nuclei has been the object of many publications in the last years, since the peculiar structure of such nuclei can strongly affect the reaction dynamics. In this paper we will summarize some results on the above topic obtained by our group at INFN-LNS Catania. Results concerning the study of elastic scattering and different reaction mechanisms in collisions induced by the halo nuclei {sup 11}Be and {sup 6}He and by the weakly bound stable nuclei {sup 6,7}Li on a {sup 64}Zn target, at energies around the Coulomb barrier, will be presented. The conclusions of our studies will be compared with the ones of other authors, in order to show if clear systematic conclusions can be drawn from the different papers published in the literature so far.

  1. A METHODOLOGY FOR DETERMINING THE DOSE RATE FOR BOUNDING MASS LIMITS IN A 9977 PACKAGING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abramczyk, G.; Bellamy, S.; Nathan, S.; Loftin, B.

    2012-05-24

    The Small Gram Quantity (SGQ) concept is based on the understanding that the hazards associated with the shipment of a radioactive material are directly proportional to its mass. This study describes a methodology that estimates the acceptable masses for several neutron and gamma emitting isotopes that can be shipped in a 9977 Package compliant with the Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71 (10CFR71) external radiation level limits. 10CFR71.33 states that a shipping application identifies the radioactive and fissile materials at their maximum quantity and provides an evaluation demonstrating compliance with the external radiation standards. Since rather small amounts of some isotopes emit sufficiently strong radiation to produce a large external dose rate, quantifying of the dose rate for a proposed content is a challenging issue for the SGQ approach. It is essential to quantify external radiation levels from several common gamma and neutron sources that can be safely placed in a specific packaging, to ensure compliance with federal regulations. A methodology was established for determining the dose rate for bounding mass limits for a set of isotopes in the Model 9977 Shipping Package. Calculations were performed to estimate external radiation levels using the MCNP radiation transport code to develop a set of response multipliers (Green's functions) for 'dose per source particle' for each neutron and photon spectral group. The source spectrum from one gram of each isotope was folded with the response multipliers to generate the dose rate per gram of each isotope in the 9977 shipping package and its associated shielded containers. The maximum amount of a single isotope that could be shipped within the regulatory limits for dose rate at the surface was determined. For a package containing a mixture of isotopes, the acceptability for shipment can be determined by a sum of fractions approach. Furthermore, the results of this analysis can be easily extended to additional radioisotopes by simply evaluating the neutron and/or photon spectra of those isotopes and folding the spectral data with the Green's functions provided.

  2. Meson-meson bound state in a 2+1 lattice QCD model with two flavors and strong coupling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faria da Veiga, Paulo A.; O'Carroll, Michael; Neto, Antonio Francisco

    2005-08-01

    We consider the existence of bound states of two mesons in an imaginary-time formulation of lattice QCD. We analyze an SU(3) theory with two flavors in 2+1 dimensions and two-dimensional spin matrices. For a small hopping parameter and a sufficiently large glueball mass, as a preliminary, we show the existence of isoscalar and isovector mesonlike particles that have isolated dispersion curves (upper gap up to near the two-particle threshold {approx}-4ln{kappa}). The corresponding meson masses are equal up to and including O({kappa}{sup 3}) and are asymptotically of order -2ln{kappa}-{kappa}{sup 2}. Considering the zero total isospin sector, we show that there is a meson-meson bound state solution to the Bethe-Salpeter equation in a ladder approximation, below the two-meson threshold, and with binding energy of order b{kappa}{sup 2}{approx_equal}0.02359{kappa}{sup 2}. In the context of the strong coupling expansion in {kappa}, we show that there are two sources of meson-meson attraction. One comes from a quark-antiquark exchange. This is not a meson exchange, as the spin indices are not those of the meson particle, and we refer to this as a quasimeson exchange. The other arises from gauge field correlations of four overlapping bonds, two positively oriented and two of opposite orientation. Although the exchange part gives rise to a space range-one attractive potential, the main mechanism for the formation of the bound state comes from the gauge contribution. In our lattice Bethe-Salpeter equation approach, this mechanism is manifested by an attractive distance-zero energy-dependent potential. We recall that no bound state appeared in the one-flavor case, where the repulsive effect of Pauli exclusion is stronger.

  3. The Structure and Stability of the Monomorphic HLA-G Are Influenced by the Nature of the Bound Peptide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walpole, Nicholas G.; Kjer-Nielsen, Lars; Kostenko, Lyudmila; McCluskey, James; Brooks, Andrew G.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Clements, Craig S.

    2010-03-26

    The highly polymorphic major histocompatibility complex class Ia (MHC-Ia) molecules present a broad array of peptides to the clonotypically diverse {alpha}{beta} T-cell receptors. In contrast, MHC-Ib molecules exhibit limited polymorphism and bind a more restricted peptide repertoire, in keeping with their major role in innate immunity. Nevertheless, some MHC-Ib molecules do play a role in adaptive immunity. While human leukocyte antigen E (HLA-E), the MHC-Ib molecule, binds a very restricted repertoire of peptides, the peptide binding preferences of HLA-G, the class Ib molecule, are less stringent, although the basis by which HLA-G can bind various peptides is unclear. To investigate how HLA-G can accommodate different peptides, we compared the structure of HLA-G bound to three naturally abundant self-peptides (RIIPRHLQL, KGPPAALTL and KLPQAFYIL) and their thermal stabilities. The conformation of HLA-G{sup KGPPAALTL} was very similar to that of the HLA-G{sup RIIPRHLQL} structure. However, the structure of HLA-G{sup KLPQAFYIL} not only differed in the conformation of the bound peptide but also caused a small shift in the {alpha}2 helix of HLA-G. Furthermore, the relative stability of HLA-G was observed to be dependent on the nature of the bound peptide. These peptide-dependent effects on the substructure of the monomorphic HLA-G are likely to impact on its recognition by receptors of both innate and adaptive immune systems.

  4. Crystal Structures of SlyA Protein, a Master Virulence Regulator of Salmonella, in Free and DNA-bound States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolan, Kyle T.; Duguid, Erica M.; He, Chuan

    2011-11-17

    SlyA is a master virulence regulator that controls the transcription of numerous genes in Salmonella enterica. We present here crystal structures of SlyA by itself and bound to a high-affinity DNA operator sequence in the slyA gene. SlyA interacts with DNA through direct recognition of a guanine base by Arg-65, as well as interactions between conserved Arg-86 and the minor groove and a large network of non-base-specific contacts with the sugar phosphate backbone. Our structures, together with an unpublished structure of SlyA bound to the small molecule effector salicylate (Protein Data Bank code 3DEU), reveal that, unlike many other MarR family proteins, SlyA dissociates from DNA without large conformational changes when bound to this effector. We propose that SlyA and other MarR global regulators rely more on indirect readout of DNA sequence to exert control over many genes, in contrast to proteins (such as OhrR) that recognize a single operator.

  5. Bounding the Higgs width at the LHC using full analytic results for $$gg → e^- e^+ \\mu^- \\mu^+$$

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Campbell, John M.; Ellis, R. Keith; Williams, Ciaran

    2014-04-09

    We revisit the hadronic production of the four-lepton final state, e– e+ μ– μ+, through the fusion of initial state gluons. This process is mediated by loops of quarks and we provide first full analytic results for helicity amplitudes that account for both the effects of the quark mass in the loop and off-shell vector bosons. The analytic results have been implemented in the Monte Carlo program MCFM and are both fast, and numerically stable in the region of low Z transverse momentum. We use our results to study the interference between Higgs-mediated and continuum production of four-lepton final states,more » which is necessary in order to obtain accurate theoretical predictions outside the Higgs resonance region. We have confirmed and extended a recent analysis of Caola and Melnikov that proposes to use a measurement of the off-shell region to constrain the total width of the Higgs boson. Using a simple cut-and-count method, existing LHC data should bound the width at the level of 25-45 times the Standard Model expectation. We investigate the power of using a matrix element method to construct a kinematic discriminant to sharpen the constraint. Furthermore, in our analysis the bound on the Higgs width is improved by a factor of about 1.6 using a simple cut on the MEM discriminant, compared to an invariant mass cut μ4l > 300 GeV.« less

  6. THE IMPACT OF BOUND STELLAR ORBITS AND GENERAL RELATIVITY ON THE TEMPORAL BEHAVIOR OF TIDAL DISRUPTION FLARES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dai, Lixin; Escala, Andres; Coppi, Paolo

    2013-09-20

    We have carried out general relativistic particle simulations of stars tidally disrupted by massive black holes. When a star is disrupted in a bound orbit with moderate eccentricity instead of a parabolic orbit, the temporal behavior of the resulting stellar debris changes qualitatively. The debris is initially all bound, returning to pericenter in a short time about the original stellar orbital timescale. The resulting fallback rate can thus be much higher than the Eddington rate. Furthermore, if the star is disrupted close to the hole, in a regime where general relativity is important, the stellar and debris orbits display general relativistic precession. Apsidal precession can make the debris stream cross itself after several orbits, likely leading to fast debris energy dissipation. If the star is disrupted in an inclined orbit around a spinning hole, nodal precession reduces the probability of self-intersection, and circularization may take many dynamical timescales, delaying the onset of flare activity. An examination of the particle dynamics suggests that quasi-periodic flares with short durations, produced when the center of the tidal stream passes pericenter, may occur in the early-time light curve. The late-time light curve may still show power-law behavior which is generic to disk accretion processes. The detection triggers for future surveys should be extended to capture such 'non-standard' short-term flaring activity before the event enters the asymptotic decay phase, as this activity is likely to be more sensitive to physical parameters such as the black hole spin.

  7. Balancing act: Evidence for a strong subdominant <math display='inline'>dmath>-wave pairing channel in <math display='inline'>Ba0.6K0.4Fe2As2math>

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhm, T.; Kemper, A. F.; Moritz, B.; Kretzschmar, F.; Muschler, B.; Eiter, H. -M.; Hackl, R.; Devereaux, T. P.; Scalapino, D. J.; Wen, Hai -Hu

    2014-12-18

    We present detailed measurements of the temperature-dependent Raman spectra of optimally doped Ba0.6K0.4Fe2As2 and analyze the low-temperature spectra based on local-density-approximation band-structure calculations and the subsequent estimation of effective Raman vertices. Experimentally, a narrow, emergent mode appears in the B1g (dx2-y2) Raman spectra only below Tc, well into the superconducting state and at an energy below twice the energy gap on the electron Fermi-surface sheets. The Raman spectra can be reproduced quantitatively with estimates for the magnitude and momentum-space structure of an A1g (s-wave) pairing gap on different Fermi-surface sheets, as well as the identification of the emergent sharp feature as a Bardasis-Schrieffer exciton. Formed as a Cooper-pair bound state in a subdominant dx2-y2 channel, the binding energy of the exciton relative to the gap edge shows that the coupling strength in the subdominant channel is as strong as 60% of that in the dominant s-wave channel. This result suggests that dx2-y2 may be the dominant pairing symmetry in Fe-based superconductors that lack central hole bands.

  8. Bounds imposed on the sheath velocity of a dense plasma focus by conservation laws and ionization stability condition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auluck, S. K. H. E-mail: skauluck@barc.gov.in

    2014-09-15

    Experimental data compiled over five decades of dense plasma focus research are consistent with the snowplow model of sheath propagation, based on the hypothetical balance between magnetic pressure driving the plasma into neutral gas ahead and wind pressure resisting its motion. The resulting sheath velocity, or the numerically proportional drive parameter, is known to be approximately constant for devices optimized for neutron production over 8 decades of capacitor bank energy. This paper shows that the validity of the snowplow hypothesis, with some correction, as well as the non-dependence of sheath velocity on device parameters, have their roots in local conservation laws for mass, momentum, and energy coupled with the ionization stability condition. Both upper and lower bounds on sheath velocity are shown to be related to material constants of the working gas and independent of the device geometry and capacitor bank impedance.

  9. Gas Production From a Cold, Stratigraphically Bounded Hydrate Deposit at the Mount Elbert Site, North Slope, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moridis, G.J.; Silpngarmlert, S.; Reagan, M. T.; Collett, T.S.; Zhang, K.

    2009-09-01

    As part of an effort to identify suitable targets for a planned long-term field test, we investigate by means of numerical simulation the gas production potential from unit D, a stratigraphically bounded (Class 3) permafrost-associated hydrate occurrence penetrated in the ount Elbert well on North Slope, Alaska. This shallow, low-pressure deposit has high porosities, high intrinsic permeabilities and high hydrate saturations. It has a low temperature because of its proximity to the overlying permafrost. The simulation results indicate that vertical ells operating at a constant bottomhole pressure would produce at very low rates for a very long period. Horizontal wells increase gas production by almost two orders of magnitude, but production remains low. Sensitivity analysis indicates that the initial deposit temperature is y the far the most important factor determining production performance (and the most effective criterion for target selection) because it controls the sensible heat available to fuel dissociation.

  10. Potential radiological impacts of upper-bound operational accidents during proposed waste disposal alternatives for Hanford defense waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishima, J.; Sutter, S.L.; Hawley, K.A.; Jenkins, C.E.; Napier, B.A.

    1986-02-01

    The Geologic Disposal Alternative, the In-Place Stabilization and Disposal Alternative, and the Reference Disposal Alternative are being evaluated for disposal of Hanford defense high-level, transuranic, and tank wastes. Environmental impacts associated with disposal of these wastes according to the alternatives listed above include potential doses to the downwind population from operation during the application of the handling and processing techniques comprising each disposal alternative. Scenarios for operational accident and abnormal operational events are postulated, on the basis of the currently available information, for the application of the techniques employed for each waste class for each disposal alternative. From these scenarios, an upper-bound airborne release of radioactive material was postulated for each waste class and disposal alternative. Potential downwind radiologic impacts were calculated from these upper-bound events. In all three alternatives, the single postulated event with the largest calculated radiologic impact for any waste class is an explosion of a mixture of ferri/ferro cyanide precipitates during the mechanical retrieval or microwave drying of the salt cake in single shell waste tanks. The anticipated downwind dose (70-year dose commitment) to the maximally exposed individual is 3 rem with a total population dose of 7000 man-rem. The same individual would receive 7 rem from natural background radiation during the same time period, and the same population would receive 3,000,000 man-rem. Radiological impacts to the public from all other postulated accidents would be less than that from this accident; furthermore, the radiological impacts resulting from this accident would be less than one-half that from the natural background radiation dose.

  11. Crystal structure of product-bound complex of UDP-N-acetyl-D-mannosamine dehydrogenase from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pampa, K.J.; Lokanath, N.K.; Girish, T.U.; Kunishima, N.; Rai, V.R.

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: Determined the structure of UDP-D-ManNAcADH to a resolution of 1.55 . First complex structure of PhUDP-D-ManNAcADH with UDP-D-ManMAcA. The monomeric structure consists of three distinct domains. Cys258 acting as catalytic nucleophilic and Lys204 acts as acid/base catalyst. Oligomeric state plays an important role for the catalytic function. - Abstract: UDP-N-acetyl-D-mannosamine dehydrogenase (UDP-D-ManNAcDH) belongs to UDP-glucose/GDP-mannose dehydrogenase family and catalyzes Uridine-diphospho-N-acetyl-D-mannosamine (UDP-D-ManNAc) to Uridine-diphospho-N-acetyl-D-mannosaminuronic acid (UDP-D-ManNAcA) through twofold oxidation of NAD{sup +}. In order to reveal the structural features of the Pyrococcus horikoshii UDP-D-ManNAcADH, we have determined the crystal structure of the product-bound enzyme by X-ray diffraction to resolution of 1.55 . The protomer folds into three distinct domains; nucleotide binding domain (NBD), substrate binding domain (SBD) and oligomerization domain (OD, involved in the dimerization). The clear electron density of the UDP-D-ManNAcA is observed and the residues binding are identified for the first time. Crystal structures reveal a tight dimeric polymer chains with product-bound in all the structures. The catalytic residues Cys258 and Lys204 are conserved. The Cys258 acts as catalytic nucleophile and Lys204 as acid/base catalyst. The product is directly interacts with residues Arg211, Thr249, Arg244, Gly255, Arg289, Lys319 and Arg398. In addition, the structural parameters responsible for thermostability and oligomerization of the three dimensional structure are analyzed.

  12. Bounding the Higgs width at the LHC using full analytic results for $gg → e^- e^+ \\mu^- \\mu^+$

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, John M.; Ellis, R. Keith; Williams, Ciaran

    2014-04-09

    We revisit the hadronic production of the four-lepton final state, e e+ μ μ+, through the fusion of initial state gluons. This process is mediated by loops of quarks and we provide first full analytic results for helicity amplitudes that account for both the effects of the quark mass in the loop and off-shell vector bosons. The analytic results have been implemented in the Monte Carlo program MCFM and are both fast, and numerically stable in the region of low Z transverse momentum. We use our results to study the interference between Higgs-mediated and continuum production of four-lepton final states, which is necessary in order to obtain accurate theoretical predictions outside the Higgs resonance region. We have confirmed and extended a recent analysis of Caola and Melnikov that proposes to use a measurement of the off-shell region to constrain the total width of the Higgs boson. Using a simple cut-and-count method, existing LHC data should bound the width at the level of 25-45 times the Standard Model expectation. We investigate the power of using a matrix element method to construct a kinematic discriminant to sharpen the constraint. Furthermore, in our analysis the bound on the Higgs width is improved by a factor of about 1.6 using a simple cut on the MEM discriminant, compared to an invariant mass cut μ4l > 300 GeV.

  13. Solving Faddeev equations for a bound state and a continuous spectrum of a three-nucleon system by the method of K-harmonic expansions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kovalchuk, V. I.; Kozlovsky, I. V.; Tartakovsky, V. K.

    2011-05-15

    A method for solving Faddeev equations in configuration space for a bound state and a continuous spectrum of the system of three nucleons was developed on the basis of expansions in K harmonics. Coulomb interaction and particle spins were not taken into account in this study. The method in question was used to describe the triton bound state and differential cross sections for neutron-deuteron scattering at subthreshold incident-neutron energies. The Volkov, Malfliet-Tjon, and Eikemeier-Hackenbroich local nucleon-nucleon potentials were employed in the present calculations.

  14. Charge trapping by anionic quinones electrostatically bound to a highly charged cationic quinone-viologen polymer or a cationic poly(3-viologen-thiophene)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hable, C.T.; Crooks, R.M.; Valentine, J.R.; Giasson, R.; Wrighton, M.S. )

    1993-06-03

    Charge associated with quinone reduction is trapped at low pH in systems composed of sulfonated anthraquinones electrostatically bound to a polymer derived from a monomer consisting of a quinone unit flanked by two viologen units. Each monomer repeat unit carries 6 equiv of positive charge which can be charge compensated by monosulfonated anthraquinone to yield a quinone-viologen ratio of nearly 7:2. At low pH, electrostatic binding is persistent, and the amount of trapped charge is 90% of the theoretical maximum. Some of the electrostatically bound quinine can be replaced with Fe(CN)[sub 6][sup 3[minus

  15. X-ray Crystallographic Analysis of [alpha]-Ketoheterocycle Inhibitors Bound to a Humanized Variant of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mileni, Mauro; Garfunkle, Joie; Ezzili, Cyrine; Kimball, F.Scott; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Boger, Dale L.

    2010-11-03

    Three cocrystal X-ray structures of the {alpha}-ketoheterocycle inhibitors 3-5 bound to a humanized variant of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) are disclosed and comparatively discussed alongside those of 1 (OL-135) and its isomer 2. These five X-ray structures systematically probe each of the three active site regions key to substrate or inhibitor binding: (1) the conformationally mobile acyl chain-binding pocket and membrane access channel responsible for fatty acid amide substrate and inhibitor acyl chain binding, (2) the atypical active site catalytic residues and surrounding oxyanion hole that covalently binds the core of the {alpha}-ketoheterocycle inhibitors captured as deprotonated hemiketals mimicking the tetrahedral intermediate of the enzyme-catalyzed reaction, and (3) the cytosolic port and its uniquely important imbedded ordered water molecules and a newly identified anion binding site. The detailed analysis of their key active site interactions and their implications on the interpretation of the available structure-activity relationships are discussed providing important insights for future design.

  16. Three-dimensional structures of Plasmodium falciparum spermidine synthase with bound inhibitors suggest new strategies for drug design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprenger, Janina; Svensson, Bo; Hlander, Jenny; Carey, Jannette; Persson, Lo; Al-Karadaghi, Salam

    2015-03-01

    In this work, X-ray crystallography was used to examine ligand complexes of spermidine synthase from the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum (PfSpdS). The enzymes of the polyamine-biosynthesis pathway have been proposed to be promising drug targets in the treatment of malaria. Spermidine synthase (SpdS; putrescine aminopropyltransferase) catalyzes the transfer of the aminopropyl moiety from decarboxylated S-adenosylmethionine to putrescine, leading to the formation of spermidine and 5?-methylthioadenosine (MTA). In this work, X-ray crystallography was used to examine ligand complexes of SpdS from the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum (PfSpdS). Five crystal structures were determined of PfSpdS in complex with MTA and the substrate putrescine, with MTA and spermidine, which was obtained as a result of the enzymatic reaction taking place within the crystals, with dcAdoMet and the inhibitor 4-methylaniline, with MTA and 4-aminomethylaniline, and with a compound predicted in earlier in silico screening to bind to the active site of the enzyme, benzimidazol-(2-yl)pentan-1-amine (BIPA). In contrast to the other inhibitors tested, the complex with BIPA was obtained without any ligand bound to the dcAdoMet-binding site of the enzyme. The complexes with the aniline compounds and BIPA revealed a new mode of ligand binding to PfSpdS. The observed binding mode of the ligands, and the interplay between the two substrate-binding sites and the flexible gatekeeper loop, can be used in the design of new approaches in the search for new inhibitors of SpdS.

  17. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of molecular chaperone-like diol dehydratase-reactivating factor in ADP-bound and nucleotide-free forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mori, Koichi; Hieda, Naoki; Yamanishi, Mamoru; Shibata, Naoki; Toraya, Tetsuo

    2005-06-01

    The molecular chaperone-like reactivating factor for adenosylcobalamin (coenzyme B{sub 12}) dependent diol dehydratase was crystallized in ADP-bound and nucleotide-free forms. Preliminary X-ray analysis indicated that crystals are orthorhombic and diffract to 2.0 . Adenosylcobalamin (coenzyme B{sub 12}) dependent diol dehydratase (EC 4.2.1.28) catalyzes the conversion of 1,2-diols and glycerol to the corresponding aldehydes. It undergoes mechanism-based inactivation by glycerol. The diol dehydratase-reactivating factor (DDR) reactivates the inactivated holoenzymes in the presence of adenosylcobalamin, ATP and Mg{sup 2+} by mediating the release of a damaged cofactor. This molecular chaperone-like factor was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized in the ADP-bound and nucleotide-free forms by the sandwich-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals of the ADP-bound form belong to the orthorhombic system, with space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and unit-cell parameters a = 83.26, b = 84.60, c = 280.09 , and diffract to 2.0 . In the absence of nucleotide, DDR crystals were orthorhombic, with space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and unit-cell parameters a = 81.92, b = 85.37, c = 296.99 and diffract to 3.0 . Crystals of both forms were suitable for structural analysis.

  18. Molybdenum Hydride and Dihydride Complexes Bearing Diphosphine Ligands with a Pendant Amine: Formation of Complexes With Bound Amines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Shaoguang; Bullock, R. Morris

    2015-07-06

    CpMo(CO)(PNP)H complexes (PNP = (R2PCH2)2NMe, R = Et or Ph) were synthesized by displacement of two CO ligands of CpMo(CO)3H by the PNP ligand; these complexes were characterized by IR and variable temperature 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopy. CpMo(CO)(PNP)H complexes are formed as mixture of cis and trans-isomers. Both cis-CpMo(CO)(PEtNMePEt)H and trans-CpMo(CO)(PPhNMePPh)H were analyzed by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Electrochemical oxidation of CpMo(CO)(PEtNMePEt)H and CpMo(CO)(PPhNMePPh)H in CH3CN are both irreversible at slow scan rates and quasi-reversible at higher scan rates, with E1/2 = -0.36 V (vs. Cp2Fe+/0) for CpMo(CO)(PEtNMePEt)H and E1/2 = -0.18 V for CpMo(CO)(PPhNMePPh)H. Hydride abstraction from CpMo(CO)(PNP)H with [Ph3C]+[A]- (A = B(C6F5)4 or BArF4; [ArF = 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]) afforded “tuck-in” [CpMo(CO)(κ3-PNP)]+ complexes that feature the amine bound to the metal. Displacement of the κ3 Mo-N bond by CD3CN gives [CpMo(CO)(PNP)(CD3CN)]+. The kinetics of this reaction were studied by NMR spectroscopy, providing the activation parameters ΔH‡ = 22.1 kcal/mol, ΔS‡ = 1.89 cal/(mol·K), Ea = 22.7 kcal/mol. Protonation of CpMo(CO)(PEtNMePEt)H affords [CpMo(CO)(κ2-PEtNMePEt)(H)2]+ as a Mo dihydride complex, which loses H2 to generate [CpMo(CO)(κ3-PEtNMePEt)]+ at room temperature. CpMo(CO)(dppp)H (dppp = 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane) was studied as a Mo diphosphine analogue without a pendant amine, and the product of protonation of this complex gives [CpMo(CO)(dppp)(H)2]+. Our results show that the pendant amine has a strong driving force to form stable “tuck-in” [CpMo(CO)(κ3-PNP)]+ complexes, and also promotes hydrogen elimination from [CpMo(CO)(PNP)(H)2]+ complexes by formation of Mo-N dative bond. We thank the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences for support. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy. We thank Monte Helm, Elliott Hulley and Deanna Miller for help on the crystallography, and Ming Fang for assistance on the electrochemical experiments.

  19. Observation of breakup transfer process for the bound states of {sup 16}O populated from {sup 12}C({sup 6}Li,d) reaction at 20 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adhikari, S.; Basu, C.; Thompson, I. J.; Sugathan, P.; Jhinghan, A.; Golda, K. S.; Babu, A.; Singh, D.; Ray, S.; Mitra, A. K.

    2012-10-20

    The deuteron angular distribution for the {sup 12}C({sup 6}Li,d){sup 16}O* has been measured at 20 MeV populating bound and unbound states of {sup 16}O. Analysis shows a dominance of breakup induced alpha transfer in comparison to a direct alpha transfer process for the bound states. The effect increases as the excitation energy of {sup 16}O decreases, maximizing at the ground state.

  20. Computation Results from a Parametric Study to Determine Bounding Critical Systems of Homogeneously Water-Moderated Mixed Plutonium--Uranium Oxides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shimizu, Y.

    2001-01-11

    This report provides computational results of an extensive study to examine the following: (1) infinite media neutron-multiplication factors; (2) material bucklings; (3) bounding infinite media critical concentrations; (4) bounding finite critical dimensions of water-reflected and homogeneously water-moderated one-dimensional systems (i.e., spheres, cylinders of infinite length, and slabs that are infinite in two dimensions) that were comprised of various proportions and densities of plutonium oxides and uranium oxides, each having various isotopic compositions; and (5) sensitivity coefficients of delta k-eff with respect to critical geometry delta dimensions were determined for each of the three geometries that were studied. The study was undertaken to support the development of a standard that is sponsored by the International Standards Organization (ISO) under Technical Committee 85, Nuclear Energy (TC 85)--Subcommittee 5, Nuclear Fuel Technology (SC 5)--Working Group 8, Standardization of Calculations, Procedures and Practices Related to Criticality Safety (WG 8). The designation and title of the ISO TC 85/SC 5/WG 8 standard working draft is WD 14941, ''Nuclear energy--Fissile materials--Nuclear criticality control and safety of plutonium-uranium oxide fuel mixtures outside of reactors.'' Various ISO member participants performed similar computational studies using their indigenous computational codes to provide comparative results for analysis in the development of the standard.

  1. Optimization Method to Branch and Bound Large SBO State Spaces Under Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment via use of LENDIT Scales and S2R2 Sets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph W. Nielsen; Akira Tokurio; Robert Hiromoto; Jivan Khatry

    2014-06-01

    Traditional Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) methods have been developed and are quite effective in evaluating risk associated with complex systems, but lack the capability to evaluate complex dynamic systems. These time and energy scales associated with the transient may vary as a function of transition time to a different physical state. Dynamic PRA (DPRA) methods provide a more rigorous analysis of complex dynamic systems, while complete, results in issues associated with combinatorial explosion. In order to address the combinatorial complexity arising from the number of possible state configurations and discretization of transition times, a characteristic scaling metric (LENDIT length, energy, number, distribution, information and time) is proposed as a means to describe systems uniformly and thus provide means to describe relational constraints expected in the dynamics of a complex (coupled) systems. Thus when LENDIT is used to characterize four sets state, system, resource and response (S2R2) describing reactor operations (normal and off-normal), LENDIT and S2R2 in combination have the potential to branch and bound the state space investigated by DPRA. In this paper we introduce the concept of LENDIT scales and S2R2 sets applied to a branch-and-bound algorithm and apply the methods to a station black out transient (SBO).

  2. Bounding the marginal cost of producing potable water including the use of seawater desalinization as a backstop potable water production technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooley, James J.

    2014-04-01

    The analysis presented in this technical report should allow for the creation of high, medium, and low cost potable water prices for GCAM. Seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) based desalinization should act as a backstop for the cost of producing potable water (i.e., the literature seems clear that SWRO should establish an upper bound for the plant gate cost of producing potable water). Transporting water over significant distances and having to lift water to higher elevations to reach end-users can also have a significant impact on the cost of producing water. The three potable fresh water scenarios describe in this technical report are: low cost water scenario ($0.10/m3); medium water cost scenario ($1.00/m3); and high water cost scenario ($2.50/m3).

  3. Methods of DNA sequencing by hybridization based on optimizing concentration of matrix-bound oligonucleotide and device for carrying out same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Khrapko, Konstantin R. (Moscow, RU); Khorlin, Alexandr A. (Moscow, RU); Ivanov, Igor B. (Moskovskaya, RU); Ershov, Gennady M. (Moscow, RU); Lysov, Jury P. (Moscow, RU); Florentiev, Vladimir L. (Moscow, RU); Mirzabekov, Andrei D. (Moscow, RU)

    1996-09-03

    A method for sequencing DNA by hybridization that includes the following steps: forming an array of oligonucleotides at such concentrations that either ensure the same dissociation temperature for all fully complementary duplexes or allows hybridization and washing of such duplexes to be conducted at the same temperature; hybridizing said oligonucleotide array with labeled test DNA; washing in duplex dissociation conditions; identifying single-base substitutions in the test DNA by analyzing the distribution of the dissociation temperatures and reconstructing the DNA nucleotide sequence based on the above analysis. A device for carrying out the method comprises a solid substrate and a matrix rigidly bound to the substrate. The matrix contains the oligonucleotide array and consists of a multiplicity of gel portions. Each gel portion contains one oligonucleotide of desired length. The gel portions are separated from one another by interstices and have a thickness not exceeding 30 .mu.m.

  4. Conditions for establishing quasistable double layers in the Earth's auroral upward current region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Main, D. S.; Newman, D. L.; Ergun, R. E.

    2010-12-15

    The strength and stability of simulated double layers at the ionosphere-auroral cavity boundary have been studied as a function of cold ionospheric electron temperature and density. The simulations are performed with an open boundary one-dimensional particle-in- cell (PIC) simulation and are initialized by imposing a density cavity within the simulation domain. The PIC simulation includes H{sup +} and O{sup +} ion beams, a hot H{sup +} background population, cold ionospheric electrons, and a hot electron population. It is shown that a double layer remains quasistable for a variety of initial conditions and plasma parameters. The average potential drop of the double layer is found to increase as the cold electron temperature decreases. However, in terms of cold electron density, the average potential drop of the double layer is found to increase up to some critical cold electron density and decreases above this value. Comparisons with FAST observations are made and agreement is found between simulation results and observations in the shape and width of the double layer. This study helps put a constraint on the plasma conditions in which a DL can be expected to form and remain quasistable.

  5. Energy conversion system involving change in the density of an upwardly moving liquid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Petrick, Michael (Jolliet, IL)

    1989-01-01

    A system for converting thermal energy into electrical energy includes a fluid reservoir, a relatively high boiling point fluid such as lead or a lead alloy within the reservoir, a downcomer defining a vertical fluid flow path communicating at its upper end with the reservoir and an upcomer defining a further vertical fluid flow path communicating at its upper end with the reservoir. A variable area nozzle of rectangular section may terminate the upper end of the upcomer and the lower end of the of the downcomer communicates with the lower end of the upcomer. A mixing chamber is located at the lower end portion of the upcomer and receives a second relatively low boiling point fluid such as air, the mixing chamber serving to introduce the low boiling point fluid into the upcomer so as to produce bubbles causing the resultant two-phase fluid to move at high velocity up the upcomer. Means are provided for introducing heat into the system preferably between the lower end of the downcomer and the lower end of the upcomer. Power generating means are associated with the one of the vertical fluid flow paths one such power generating means being a magneto hydrodynamic electrical generator.

  6. Do Coupled Climate Models Correctly SImulate the Upward Branch of the Deept Ocean Global Conveyor?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarmiento, Jorge L; Downes, Stephanie; Bianchi, Daniele

    2013-01-17

    The large-scale meridional overturning circulation (MOC) connects the deep ocean, a major reservoir of carbon, to the other components of the climate system and must therefore be accurately represented in Earth System Models. Our project aims to address the specific question of the pathways and mechanisms controlling the upwelling branch of the MOC, a subject of significant disagreement between models and observational syntheses, and among general circulation models. Observations of these pathways are limited, particularly in regions of complex hydrography such as the Southern Ocean. As such, we rely on models to examine theories of the overturning circulation, both physically and biogeochemically. This grant focused on a particular aspect of the meridional overturning circulation (MOC) where there is currently significant disagreement between models and observationally based analyses of the MOC, and amongst general circulation models. In particular, the research focused on addressing the following questions: 1. Where does the deep water that sinks in the polar regions rise to the surface? 2. What processes are responsible for this rise? 3. Do state-of-the-art coupled GCMs capture these processes? Our research had three key components: observational synthesis, model development and model analysis. In this final report we outline the key results from these areas of research for the 2007 to 2012 grant period. The research described here was carried out primarily by graduate student, Daniele Bianchi (now a Postdoc at McGill University, Canada), and Postdoc Stephanie Downes (now a Research Fellow at The Australian national University, Australia). Additional support was provided for programmers Jennifer Simeon as well as Rick Slater.

  7. Upward-facing Lithium Flash Evaporator for NSTX-U (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The minimal time interval between the evaporation andmore the start of the discharge will avoid the passivation of the lithium by residual gases and enable the study of the ...

  8. Impact of individual nuclear masses on <math>r>-process abundances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mumpower, M. R.; Surman, R.; Fang, D. -L.; Beard, M.; Möller, P.; Kawano, T.; Aprahamian, A.

    2015-09-15

    We have performed for the first time a comprehensive study of the sensitivity of r-process nucleosynthesis to individual nuclear masses across the chart of nuclides. Using the latest version (2012) of the Finite-Range Droplet Model, we consider mass variations of ±0.5 MeV and propagate each mass change to all affected quantities, including Q values, reaction rates, and branching ratios. We find such mass variations can result in up to an order of magnitude local change in the final abundance pattern produced in an r-process simulation. As a result, we identify key nuclei whose masses have a substantial impact on abundance predictions for hot, cold, and neutron star merger r-process scenarios and could be measured at future radioactive beam facilities.

  9. Further investigation of <math>g> factors for the lead monofluoride ground state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skripnikov, L. V.; Petrov, A. N.; Titov, A. V.; Mawhorter, R. J.; Baum, A. L.; Sears, T. J.; Grabow, J. -U.

    2015-09-15

    We report the results of our theoretical study and analysis of earlier experimental data for the g-factor tensor components of the ground 2II1/2 state of the free PbF radical. These values obtained both within the relativistic coupled-cluster method combined with the generalized relativistic effective core potential approach and with our fit of the experimental data from [R. J. Mawhorter, B. S. Murphy, A. L. Baum, T. J. Sears, T. Yang, P. M. Rupasinghe, C. P. McRaven, N. E. Shafer-Ray, L. D. Alphei, and J.-U. Grabow, Phys. Rev. A 84, 022508 (2011); A. L. Baum, B.A. thesis, Pomona College, 2011]. The obtained results agree very well with each other but contradict the previous fit performed in the cited works. Our final prediction for g factors is G?=0.081(5),G?=0.27(1).

  10. Out of bounds additive manufacturing

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Holshouser, Chris; Newell, Clint; Palas, Sid; Love, Lonnie J.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Lind, Randall F.; Lloyd, Peter D.; Rowe, John C.; Blue, Craig A.; Duty, Chad E.; et al

    2013-03-01

    Lockheed Martin and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working on an additive manufacturing system capable of manufacturing components measured not in terms of inches or feet, but multiple yards in all dimensions with the potential to manufacture parts that are completely unbounded in size.

  11. Out of Bounds Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holshouser, Chris [Lockheed Martin Corporation; Newell, Clint [Lockheed Martin Corporation; Palas, Sid [Lockheed Martin Corporation; Love, Lonnie J [ORNL; Kunc, Vlastimil [ORNL; Lind, Randall F [ORNL; Lloyd, Peter D [ORNL; Rowe, John C [ORNL; Blue, Craig A [ORNL; Duty, Chad E [ORNL; Peter, William H [ORNL; Dehoff, Ryan R [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Lockheed Martin and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working on an additive manufacturing (AM) system capable of manufacturing components measured not in terms of inches or feet, but multiple yards in all dimensions with the potential to manufacture parts that are completely unbounded in size.

  12. CD94-NKG2A Recognition of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-E Bound to an HLA Class I Leader Sequence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrie,E.; Clements, C.; Lin, J.; Sullivan, L.; Johnson, D.; Huyton, T.; Heroux, A.; Hoare, H.; Beddoe, T.; et al

    2008-01-01

    The recognition of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-E by the heterodimeric CD94-NKG2 natural killer (NK) receptor family is a central innate mechanism by which NK cells monitor the expression of other HLA molecules, yet the structural basis of this highly specific interaction is unclear. Here, we describe the crystal structure of CD94-NKG2A in complex with HLA-E bound to a peptide derived from the leader sequence of HLA-G. The CD94 subunit dominated the interaction with HLA-E, whereas the NKG2A subunit was more peripheral to the interface. Moreover, the invariant CD94 subunit dominated the peptide-mediated contacts, albeit with poor surface and chemical complementarity. This unusual binding mode was consistent with mutagenesis data at the CD94-NKG2A-HLA-E interface. There were few conformational changes in either CD94-NKG2A or HLA-E upon ligation, and such a 'lock and key' interaction is typical of innate receptor-ligand interactions. Nevertheless, the structure also provided insight into how this interaction can be modulated by subtle changes in the peptide ligand or by the pairing of CD94 with other members of the NKG2 family. Differences in the docking strategies used by the NKG2D and CD94-NKG2A receptors provided a basis for understanding the promiscuous nature of ligand recognition by NKG2D compared with the fidelity of the CD94-NKG2 receptors.

  13. Crystal Structure of Epiphyas Postvittana Takeout 1 With Bound Ubiquinone Supports a Role As Ligand Carriers for Takeout Proteins in Insects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamiaux, C.; Stanley, D.; Greenwood, D.R.; Baker, E.N.; Newcomb, R.D.

    2009-05-19

    Takeout (To) proteins are found exclusively in insects and have been proposed to have important roles in various aspects of their physiology and behavior. Limited sequence similarity with juvenile hormone-binding proteins (JHBPs), which specifically bind and transport juvenile hormones in Lepidoptera, suggested a role for To proteins in binding hydrophobic ligands. We present the first crystal structure of a To protein, EpTo1 from the light brown apple moth Epiphyas postvittana, solved in-house by the single-wavelength anomalous diffraction technique using sulfur anomalous dispersion, and refined to 1.3 {angstrom} resolution. EpTo1 adopts the unusual {alpha}/{beta}-wrap fold, seen only for JHBP and several mammalian lipid carrier proteins, a scaffold tailored for the binding and/or transport of hydrophobic ligands. EpTo1 has a 45 {angstrom} long, purely hydrophobic, internal tunnel that extends for the full length of the protein and accommodates a bound ligand. The latter was shown by mass spectrometry to be ubiquinone-8 and is probably derived from Escherichia coli. The structure provides the first direct experimental evidence that To proteins are ligand carriers; gives insights into the nature of endogenous ligand(s) of EpTo1; shows, by comparison with JHBP, a basis for different ligand specificities; and suggests a mechanism for the binding/release of ligands.

  14. Analysis of offsite Emergency Planning Zones (EPZs) for the Rocky Flats Plant. Phase 3, Sitewide spectrum-of-accidents and bounding EPZ analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrocchi, A.J.; Zimmerman, G.A.

    1994-03-14

    During Phase 3 of the EPZ project, a sitewide analysis will be performed applying a spectrum-of-accidents approach to both radiological and nonradiological hazardous materials release scenarios. This analysis will include the MCA but will be wider in scope and will produce options for the State of Colorado for establishing a bounding EPZ that is intended to more comprehensively update the interim, preliminary EPZ developed in Phase 2. EG&G will propose use of a hazards assessment methodology that is consistent with the DOE Emergency Management Guide for Hazards Assessments and other methods required by DOE orders. This will include hazards, accident, safety, and risk analyses. Using this methodology, EG&G will develop technical analyses for a spectrum of accidents. The analyses will show the potential effects from the spectrum of accidents on the offsite population together with identification of offsite vulnerable zones and areas of concern. These analyses will incorporate state-of-the-art technology for accident analysis, atmospheric plume dispersion modeling, consequence analysis, and the application of these evaluations to the general public population at risk. The analyses will treat both radiological and nonradiological hazardous materials and mixtures of both released accidentally to the atmosphere. DOE/RFO will submit these results to the State of Colorado for the State`s use in determining offsite emergency planning zones for the Rocky Flats Plant. In addition, the results will be used for internal Rocky Flats Plant emergency planning.

  15. Two-hole bound states from a systematic low-energy effective field theory for magnons and holes in an antiferromagnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruegger, C.; Kaempfer, F.; Moser, M.; Wiese, U.-J.; Pepe, M.

    2006-12-01

    Identifying the correct low-energy effective theory for magnons and holes in an antiferromagnet has remained an open problem for a long time. In analogy to the effective theory for pions and nucleons in QCD, based on a symmetry analysis of Hubbard and t-J-type models, we construct a systematic low-energy effective field theory for magnons and holes located inside pockets centered at lattice momenta ({+-}({pi}/2a),{+-}({pi}/2a)). The effective theory is based on a nonlinear realization of the spontaneously broken spin symmetry and makes model-independent universal predictions for the entire class of lightly doped antiferromagnetic precursors of high-temperature superconductors. The predictions of the effective theory are exact, order by order in a systematic low-energy expansion. We derive the one-magnon exchange potentials between two holes in an otherwise undoped system. Remarkably, in some cases the corresponding two-hole Schroedinger equations can even be solved analytically. The resulting bound states have d-wave characteristics. The ground state wave function of two holes residing in different hole pockets has a d{sub x{sup 2}-y{sup 2}}-like symmetry, while for two holes in the same pocket the symmetry resembles d{sub xy}.

  16. Ayuda:Ecuaciones | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    math> x21+y Subndice <math>CO2<math> CO2 Agrupacin de subndice <math>ai,j> ai,j Fraccin <math>1over2<math> <math>fracxyz> 1over2...

  17. Pseudo-merohedral Twinning and Noncrystallographic Symmetry in Orthorhombic Crystals of SIVmac239 Nef Core Domain Bound to Different-length TCR Fragments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, W.; Sigalov, A; Stern, L

    2010-01-01

    HIV/SIV Nef mediates many cellular processes through interactions with various cytoplasmic and membrane-associated host proteins, including the signalling subunit of the T-cell receptor (TCR{zeta}). Here, the crystallization strategy, methods and refinement procedures used to solve the structures of the core domain of the SIVmac239 isolate of Nef (Nef{sub core}) in complex with two different TCR{zeta} fragments are described. The structure of SIVmac239 Nef{sub core} bound to the longer TCR{zeta} polypeptide (Leu51-Asp93) was determined to 3.7 {angstrom} resolution (R{sub work} = 28.7%) in the tetragonal space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2. The structure of SIVmac239 Nef{sub core} in complex with the shorter TCR{zeta} polypeptide (Ala63-Arg80) was determined to 2.05 {angstrom} resolution (R{sub work} = 17.0%), but only after the detection of nearly perfect pseudo-merohedral crystal twinning and proper assignment of the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}. The reduction in crystal space-group symmetry induced by the truncated TCR{zeta} polypeptide appears to be caused by the rearrangement of crystal-contact hydrogen-bonding networks and the substitution of crystallographic symmetry operations by similar noncrystallographic symmetry (NCS) operations. The combination of NCS rotations that were nearly parallel to the twin operation (k, h, -l) and a and b unit-cell parameters that were nearly identical predisposed the P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} crystal form to pseudo-merohedral twinning.

  18. Molecular Basis for Complement Recognition and Inhibition Determined by Crystallographic Studies of the Staphylococcal Complement Inhibitor (SCIN) Bound to C3c and C3b

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, Brandon L.; Ramyar, Kasra X.; Tzekou, Apostolia; Ricklin, Daniel; McWhorter, William J.; Lambris, John D.; Geisbrecht, Brian V.

    2010-10-22

    The human complement system plays an essential role in innate and adaptive immunity by marking and eliminating microbial intruders. Activation of complement on foreign surfaces results in proteolytic cleavage of complement component 3 (C3) into the potent opsonin C3b, which triggers a variety of immune responses and participates in a self-amplification loop mediated by a multi-protein assembly known as the C3 convertase. The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus has evolved a sophisticated and potent complement evasion strategy, which is predicated upon an arsenal of potent inhibitory proteins. One of these, the staphylococcal complement inhibitor (SCIN), acts at the level of the C3 convertase (C3bBb) and impairs downstream complement function by trapping the convertase in a stable but inactive state. Previously, we have shown that SCIN binds C3b directly and competitively inhibits binding of human factor H and, to a lesser degree, that of factor B to C3b. Here, we report the co-crystal structures of SCIN bound to C3b and C3c at 7.5 and 3.5 {angstrom} limiting resolution, respectively, and show that SCIN binds a critical functional area on C3b. Most significantly, the SCIN binding site sterically occludes the binding sites of both factor H and factor B. Our results give insight into SCIN binding to activated derivatives of C3, explain how SCIN can recognize C3b in the absence of other complement components, and provide a structural basis for the competitive C3b-binding properties of SCIN. In the future, this may suggest templates for the design of novel complement inhibitors based upon the SCIN structure.

  19. The MUC4 membrane-bound mucin regulates esophageal cancer cell proliferation and migration properties: Implication for S100A4 protein

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruyere, Emilie; Jonckheere, Nicolas; Frenois, Frederic; Universite Lille-Nord de France, 1 place de Verdun, 59045 Lille Cedex ; Mariette, Christophe; Universite Lille-Nord de France, 1 place de Verdun, 59045 Lille Cedex; Department of Digestive and Oncological Surgery, University Hospital Claude Huriez, 1 place de Verdun, 59045 Lille Cedex ; Van Seuningen, Isabelle

    2011-09-23

    Highlights: {yields} Loss of MUC4 reduces proliferation of esophageal cancer cells. {yields} MUC4 inhibition impairs migration of esophageal cancer cells but not their invasion. {yields} Loss of MUC4 significantly reduces in vivo tumor growth. {yields} Decrease of S100A4 induced by MUC4 inhibition impairs proliferation and migration. -- Abstract: MUC4 is a membrane-bound mucin known to participate in tumor progression. It has been shown that MUC4 pattern of expression is modified during esophageal carcinogenesis, with a progressive increase from metaplastic lesions to adenocarcinoma. The principal cause of development of esophageal adenocarcinoma is the gastro-esophageal reflux, and MUC4 was previously shown to be upregulated by several bile acids present in reflux. In this report, our aim was thus to determine whether MUC4 plays a role in biological properties of human esophageal cancer cells. For that stable MUC4-deficient cancer cell lines (shMUC4 cells) were established using a shRNA approach. In vitro (proliferation, migration and invasion) and in vivo (tumor growth following subcutaneous xenografts in SCID mice) biological properties of shMUC4 cells were analyzed. Our results show that shMUC4 cells were less proliferative, had decreased migration properties and did not express S100A4 protein when compared with MUC4 expressing cells. Absence of MUC4 did not impair shMUC4 invasiveness. Subcutaneous xenografts showed a significant decrease in tumor size when cells did not express MUC4. Altogether, these data indicate that MUC4 plays a key role in proliferative and migrating properties of esophageal cancer cells as well as is a tumor growth promoter. MUC4 mucin appears thus as a good therapeutic target to slow-down esophageal tumor progression.

  20. Investigation of the relationship between particulate-bound mercury and properties of fly ash in a full-scale 100 MWe pulverized coal combustion boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sen Li; Chin-Min Cheng; Bobby Chen; Yan Cao; Jacob Vervynckt; Amanda Adebambo; Wei-Ping Pan

    2007-12-15

    The properties of fly ash in coal-fired boilers influence the emission of mercury from power plants into the environment. In this study, seven different bituminous coals were burned in a full-scale 100 MWe pulverized coal combustion boiler and the derived fly ash samples were collected from a mechanical hopper (MH) and an electrostatic precipitator hopper (ESP). The mercury content, specific surface area (SSA), unburned carbon, and elemental composition of the fly ash samples were analyzed to evaluate the correlation between the concentration of particulate-bound mercury and the properties of coal and fly ash. For a given coal, it was found that the mercury content in the fly ash collected from the ESP was greater than in the fly ash samples collected from the MHP. This phenomenon may be due to a lower temperature of flue gas at the ESP (about 135{sup o}C) compared to the temperature at the air preheater (about 350{sup o}C). Also, a significantly lower SSA observed in MH ash might also contribute to the observation. A comparison of the fly ash samples generated from seven different coals using statistical methods indicates that the mercury adsorbed on ESP fly ashes has a highly positive correlation with the unburned carbon content, manganese content, and SSA of the fly ash. Sulfur content in coal showed a significant negative correlation with the Hg adsorption. Manganese in fly ash is believed to participate in oxidizing volatile elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) to ionic mercury (Hg{sup 2+}). The oxidized mercury in flue gas can form a complex with the fly ash and then get removed before the flue gas leaves the stack of the boiler.

  1. Structure of the red fluorescent protein from a lancelet (Branchiostoma lanceolatum): a novel GYG chromophore covalently bound to a nearby tyrosine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pletnev, Vladimir Z. Pletneva, Nadya V.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.; Souslova, Ekaterina A.; Fradkov, Arkady F.; Chudakov, Dmitry M.; Chepurnykh, Tatyana; Yampolsky, Ilia V.; Wlodawer, Alexander; Dauter, Zbigniew; Pletnev, Sergei

    2013-09-01

    The crystal structure of the novel red emitting fluorescent protein from lancelet Branchiostoma lanceolatum (Chordata) revealed an unusual five residues cyclic unit comprising Gly58-Tyr59-Gly60 chromophore, the following Phe61 and Tyr62 covalently bound to chromophore Tyr59. A key property of proteins of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) family is their ability to form a chromophore group by post-translational modifications of internal amino acids, e.g. Ser65-Tyr66-Gly67 in GFP from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria (Cnidaria). Numerous structural studies have demonstrated that the green GFP-like chromophore represents the core structure, which can be extended in red-shifted proteins owing to modifications of the protein backbone at the first chromophore-forming position. Here, the three-dimensional structures of green laGFP (?{sub ex}/?{sub em} = 502/511 nm) and red laRFP (?{sub ex}/?{sub em} ? 521/592 nm), which are fluorescent proteins (FPs) from the lancelet Branchiostoma lanceolatum (Chordata), were determined together with the structure of a red variant laRFP-?S83 (deletion of Ser83) with improved folding. Lancelet FPs are evolutionarily distant and share only ?20% sequence identity with cnidarian FPs, which have been extensively characterized and widely used as genetically encoded probes. The structure of red-emitting laRFP revealed three exceptional features that have not been observed in wild-type fluorescent proteins from Cnidaria reported to date: (i) an unusual chromophore-forming sequence Gly58-Tyr59-Gly60, (ii) the presence of Gln211 at the position of the conserved catalytic Glu (Glu222 in Aequorea GFP), which proved to be crucial for chromophore formation, and (iii) the absence of modifications typical of known red chromophores and the presence of an extremely unusual covalent bond between the Tyr59 C{sup ?} atom and the hydroxyl of the proximal Tyr62. The impact of this covalent bond on the red emission and the large Stokes shift (?70 nm) of laRFP was verified by extensive structure-based site-directed mutagenesis.

  2. Influence of vertex coulomb effects on peripheral partial amplitudes for the consecutive transfer of two protons in A(X,Y)B peripheral nuclear reactions induced by light loosely bound (exotic) nuclei at low energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blokhintsev, L. D. [Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation); Mukhamedzhanov, A. M. [Texas A and M University, MS 3366, Cyclotron Institute (United States); Tadzhibaeva, D. Kh.; Yarmukhamedov, R., E-mail: rakhim@inp.u [Uzbek Academy of Sciences, Institute of Nuclear Physics (Uzbekistan)

    2010-07-15

    The amplitude for the consecutive transfer of two protons in A(X, Y)B peripheral nuclear reactions induced by loosely bound light (exotic) nuclei and described by a nonrelativistic square Feynman diagram in which the first transferred proton is loosely bound while the second one in tightly bound is considered. It is shown that the inclusion of three-ray Coulomb vertex effects in the square diagram leads to the appearance of an additional 'Coulomb' singularity in the variable cos {theta} (here, {theta} is the c.m. scattering angle), this singularity being closer to the physical domain, -1 {<=} cos {theta} {<=} 1, than the well-known 'triangle' singularities corresponding to the amplitude of the square diagram in which the internal line is contracted. The asymptotic behavior of the partial-wave amplitudes for l >> 1 that are generated by the aforementioned singularities is found explicitly. A comparative analysis of the resulting partial-wave amplitudes for l >> 1 is performed for specific peripheral nuclear reactions induced by {sup 8}B and {sup 12}N ions at various energies.

  3. User:Nlangle/Math Examples | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1+2+cdots+100 textsum,,5050 +, -, pm, mp, dotplus CO2 text APi,j CH4 + frac2Phi (O2 + 3.76N2) Rightarrow CO2 + 2H2O + frac2Phi 3.76...

  4. New lifetime measurements in <math>Pd109math> and the onset of deformation at <math>N=60math>

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bucher, B.; Mach, H.; Aprahamian, A.; Simpson, G. S.; Rissanen, J.; Ghiţă, D. G.; Olaizola, B.; Kurcewicz, W.; Äystö, J.; Bentley, I.; Eronen, T.; Fraile, L. M.; Jokinen, A.; Karvonen, P.; Moore, I. D.; Penttilä, H.; Reponen, M.; Ruchowska, E.; Saastamoinen, A.; Smith, M. K.; Weber, C.

    2015-12-14

    We measured several new subnanosecond lifetimes in 109Pd using the fast-timing βγ γ (t ) method. Fission fragments of the A = 109 mass chain were produced by bombarding natural uranium with 30 MeV protons at the Jyväskylä Ion Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL) facility. We obtained lifetimes for excited states in 109Pd populated following β decay of 109Rh. The new lifetimes provide some insight into the evolution of nuclear structure in this mass region. In particular, the distinct structure of the two low-lying 7/2+ states occurring systematically across the Pd isotopic chain is supported by the new lifetime measurements. Finally, the available nuclear data indicate a sudden increase in deformation at N = 60 which is related to the strong p-n interaction between πg9/2 and νg7/2 valence nucleons expected in this region.

  5. High School Girls Honored for Math, Science Achievements at Sandia...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rep. Eric Swalwell; Michael Anderson, representing U.S. Rep. Jeff Denham; and Gayle Larson, representing Assemblymember Joan Buchanan. U.S. Rep. Barbara Lee and State Sen. Mark...

  6. Coupled <math display='inline'>ππmath>, <math display='inline'>KK¯math> scattering in <math display='inline'>Pmath>-wave and the <math display='inline'>ρmath> resonance from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, David J.; Briceño, Raúl A.; Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; Thomas, Christopher E.

    2015-11-02

    In this study, we determine elastic and coupled-channel amplitudes for isospin-1 meson-meson scattering in $P$-wave, by calculating correlation functions using lattice QCD with light quark masses such that $m_\\pi = 236$ MeV in a cubic volume of $\\sim (4 \\,\\mathrm{fm})^3$. Variational analyses of large matrices of correlation functions computed using operator constructions resembling $\\pi\\pi$, $K\\overline{K}$ and $q\\bar{q}$, in several moving frames and several lattice irreducible representations, leads to discrete energy spectra from which scattering amplitudes are extracted. In the elastic $\\pi\\pi$ scattering region we obtain a detailed energy-dependence for the phase-shift, corresponding to a $\\rho$ resonance, and we extend the analysis into the coupled-channel $K\\overline{K}$ region for the first time, finding a small coupling between the channels.

  7. Measurement of the structure function of the nearly free neutron using spectator tagging in inelastic <math>H2math> ( <math>e>, <math>e'psmath> ) <math>X> scattering with CLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tkachenko, S.; Baillie, N.; Kuhn, S. E.; Zhang, J.; Arrington, J.; Bosted, P.; Bltmann, S.; Christy, M. E.; Dutta, D.; Ent, R.; Fenker, H.; Griffioen, K. A.; Ispiryan, M.; Kalantarians, N.; Keppel, C. E.; Melnitchouk, W.; Tvaskis, V.; Adhikari, K. P.; Aghasyan, M.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fleming, J. A.; Garillon, B.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Ho, D.; Holtrop, M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jo, H. S.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; King, P. M.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lenisa, P.; Lewis, S.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H.; MacCormick, M.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moutarde, H.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Phillips, J. J.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabati, F.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Senderovich, I.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Simonyan, A.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Strauch, S.; Tang, W.; Ungaro, M.; Vlassov, A. V.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zana, L.; Zonta, I.

    2014-04-24

    In this study, much less is known about neutron structure than that of the proton due to the absence of free neutron targets. Neutron information is usually extracted from data on nuclear targets such as deuterium, requiring corrections for nuclear binding and nucleon off-shell effects. These corrections are model dependent and have significant uncertainties, especially for large values of the Bjorken scaling variable x. As a consequence, the same data can lead to different conclusions, for example, about the behavior of the d quark distribution in the proton at large x.

  8. Separated response functions in exclusive, forward <math>?> electroproduction on deuterium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huber, G. M.; Blok, H. P.; Butuceanu, C.; Gaskell, D.; Horn, T.; Mack, D. J.; Abbott, D.; Aniol, K.; Anklin, H.; Armstrong, C.; Arrington, J.; Assamagan, K.; Avery, S.; Baker, O. K.; Barrett, B.; Beise, E. J.; Bochna, C.; Boeglin, W.; Brash, E. J.; Breuer, H.; Chang, C. C.; Chant, N.; Christy, M. E.; Dunne, J.; Eden, T.; Ent, R.; Fenker, H.; Gibson, E. F.; Gilman, R.; Gustafsson, K.; Hinton, W.; Holt, R. J.; Jackson, H.; Jin, S.; Jones, M. K.; Keppel, C. E.; Kim, P. H.; Kim, W.; King, P. M.; Klein, A.; Koltenuk, D.; Kovaltchouk, V.; Liang, M.; Liu, J.; Lolos, G. J.; Lung, A.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; Matsumura, A.; McKee, D.; Meekins, D.; Mitchell, J.; Miyoshi, T.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Mueller, B.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Okayasu, Y.; Pentchev, L.; Perdrisat, C.; Pitz, D.; Potterveld, D.; Punjabi, V.; Qin, L. M.; Reimer, P. E.; Reinhold, J.; Roche, J.; Roos, P. G.; Sarty, A.; Shin, I. K.; Smith, G. R.; Stepanyan, S.; Tang, L. G.; Tadevosyan, V.; Tvaskis, V.; van der Meer, R. L. J.; Vansyoc, K.; Van Westrum, D.; Vidakovic, S.; Volmer, J.; Vulcan, W.; Warren, G.; Wood, S. A.; Xu, C.; Yan, C.; Zhao, W. -X.; Zheng, X.; Zihlmann, B.

    2015-01-07

    Background: Measurements of forward exclusive meson production at different squared four-momenta of the exchanged virtual photon, Q2, and at different four-momentum transfer, t, can be used to probe QCD's transition from meson-nucleon degrees of freedom at long distances to quark-gluon degrees of freedom at short scales. Ratios of separated response functions in ?? and ?? electroproduction are particularly informative. Ratio for transverse photons may allow this transition to be more easily observed, while the ratio for longitudinal photons provides a crucial verification of the assumed pole dominance, needed for reliable extraction of the pion form factor from electroproduction data. Method: Data were acquired with 2.6-5.2 GeV electron beams and the HMS+SOS spectrometers in Jefferson Lab Hall C, at central Q2 values of 0.6, 1.0, 1.6 GeV2 at W=1.95 GeV, and Q2=2.45 GeV2 at W=2.22 GeV. There was significant coverage in ? And ?, which allowed separation of ?L,T,LT,TT. Results: ?L shows a clear signature of the pion pole, with a sharp rise at small -t. In contrast, ?T is much flatter versus t. The longitudinal/transverse ratios evolve with Q2 and t, and at the highest Q2=2.45 GeV2 show a slight enhancement for ?? Production compared to ??. The ??/??+ ratio for transverse photons exhibits only a small Q2-dependence, following a nearly universal curve with t, with a steep transition to a value of about 0.25, consistent with s-channel quark knockout. The ?TT/?T ratio also drops rapidly with Q2, qualitatively consistent with s-channel helicity conservation. The ??/?? ratio for longitudinal photons indicates a small isoscalar contamination at W=1.95 GeV, consistent with what was observed in our earlier determination of the pion form factor at these kinematics.

  9. Surface state reconstruction in ion-damaged <math>SmB6math>

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wakeham, N.; Wang, Y. Q.; Fisk, Z.; Ronning, F.; Thompson, J. D.

    2015-02-12

    We have used ion-irradiation to damage the (001) surfaces of SmB? single crystals to varying depths, and have measured the resistivity as a function of temperature for each depth of damage. We observe a reduction in the residual resistivity with increasing depth of damage. Our data are consistent with a model in which the surface state is not destroyed by the ion-irradiation, however instead the damaged layer is poorly conducting and the initial surface state is reconstructed below the damage. This behavior is consistent with a surface state that is topologically protected.

  10. Axion hot dark matter bounds after Planck

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archidiacono, Maria; Hannestad, Steen; Mirizzi, Alessandro; Raffelt, Georg; Wong, Yvonne Y.Y. E-mail: sth@phys.au.dk E-mail: raffelt@mpp.mpg.de

    2013-10-01

    We use cosmological observations in the post-Planck era to derive limits on thermally produced cosmological axions. In the early universe such axions contribute to the radiation density and later to the hot dark matter fraction. We find an upper limit m{sub a} < 0.67 eV at 95% C.L. after marginalising over the unknown neutrino masses, using CMB temperature and polarisation data from Planck and WMAP respectively, the halo matter power spectrum extracted from SDSS-DR7, and the local Hubble expansion rate H{sub 0} released by the Carnegie Hubble Program based on a recalibration of the Hubble Space Telescope Key Project sample. Leaving out the local H{sub 0} measurement relaxes the limit somewhat to 0.86 eV, while Planck+WMAP alone constrain the axion mass to 1.01 eV, the first time an upper limit on m{sub a} has been obtained from CMB data alone. Our axion limit is therefore not very sensitive to the tension between the Planck-inferred H{sub 0} and the locally measured value. This is in contrast with the upper limit on the neutrino mass sum, which we find here to range from ? m{sub ?} < 0.27 eV at 95% C.L. combining all of the aforementioned observations, to 0.84 eV from CMB data alone.

  11. The rare crystallographic structure of d(CGCGCG){sub 2}: The natural spermidine molecule bound to the minor groove of left-handed Z-DNA d(CGCGCG){sub 2} at 10 {sup o}C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohishi, Hirofumi . E-mail: ohishi@gly.oups.ac.jp; Tozuka, Yoshitaka; Da-Yang, Zhou; Ishida, Toshimasa; Nakatani, Kazuhiko

    2007-06-22

    Several crystal structure analyses of complexes of synthetic polyamine compounds, including N {sup 1}-(2-(2-aminoethylamino))ethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine PA(222) and N {sup 1}-(2-(2-(2-aminoethylamino)ethylamino)ethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine PA(2222), and left-handed Z-DNA d(CGCGCG){sub 2} have been reported. However, until now, there have been no examples of naturally occurring polyamines bound to the minor groove of the left-handed Z-DNA of d(CGCGCG){sub 2} molecule. We have found that spermidine, a natural polyamine, is connected to the minor groove of left-handed Z-DNA of d(CGCGCG){sub 2} molecule in a crystalline complex grown at 10 {sup o}C. The electron density of the DNA molecule was clear enough to determine that the spermidine was connected in the minor groove of two symmetry related molecules of left-handed Z-DNA d(CGCGCG){sub 2}. This is the first example that a spermidine molecule can form a bridge conformation between two symmetry related molecules of left-handed Z-DNA d(CGCGCG){sub 2} in the minor groove.

  12. Observation of <math display='inline'>D0math> meson nuclear modifications in <math display='inline'>Au+Aumath> collisions at <math display='inline'>sNN=200 GeVmath>

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J.?K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M.?M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C.?D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E.?C.; Averichev, G.?S.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D.?R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.?K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L.?C.; Bordyuzhin, I.?G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A.?V.; Brovko, S.?G.; Bltmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T.?P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Caldern de la Barca Snchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M.?C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.?F.; Chen, J.?H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M.?J.?M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J.?G.; Crawford, H.?J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L.?C.; Debbe, R.?R.; Dedovich, T.?G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A.?A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J.?L.; Draper, J.?E.; Du, C.?M.; Dunkelberger, L.?E.; Dunlop, J.?C.; Efimov, L.?G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K.?S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C.?E.; Gagliardi, C.?A.; Gangadharan, D.?R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D.?S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J.?W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G.?W.; Hofman, D.?J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H.?Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T.?J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W.?W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E.?G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H.?W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z.?H.; Kikola, D.?P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D.?D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A.?F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R.?A.; Lamont, M.?A.?C.; Landgraf, J.?M.; Landry, K.?D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J.?H.; LeVine, M.?J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z.?M.; Lisa, M.?A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W.?J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R.?S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G.?L.; Ma, Y.?G.; Madagodagettige Don, D.?M.?M.?D.; Mahapatra, D.?P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H.?S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T.?S.; Minaev, N.?G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M.?M.; Morozov, D.?A.; Mustafa, M.?K.; Nandi, B.?K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T.?K.; Nelson, J.?M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L.?V.; Noh, S.?Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S.?B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E.?W.; Olvitt, D.?L.; Pachr, M.; Page, B.?S.; Pal, S.?K.; Pan, Y.?X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A.?M.; Pruthi, N.?K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P.?R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R.?L.; Riley, C.?K.; Ritter, H.?G.; Roberts, J.?B.; Rogachevskiy, O.?V.; Romero, J.?L.; Ross, J.?F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N.?R.; Sahu, P.?K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R.?P.; Schmah, A.?M.; Schmidke, W.?B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P.?V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W.?Q.; Shi, S.?S.; Shou, Q.?Y.; Sichtermann, E.?P.; Singaraju, R.?N.; Skoby, M.?J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H.?M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T.?D.?S.; Stevens, J.?R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X.?M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D.?N.; Symons, T.?J.?M.; Szelezniak, M.?A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A.?H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J.?H.; Timmins, A.?R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R.?E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B.?A.; Tsai, O.?D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D.?G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J.?A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G.?M.?S.; Vasiliev, A.?N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbk, F.; Viyogi, Y.?P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.?S.; Wang, X.?L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J.?C.; Westfall, G.?D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S.?W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.?F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.

    2014-09-30

    We report the first measurement of charmed-hadron (D0) production via the hadronic decay channel (D0?K-+?+) in Au+Au collisions at ?sNN=200 GeV with the STAR experiment. The charm production cross section per nucleon-nucleon collision at midrapidity scales with the number of binary collisions, Nbin, from p+p to central Au+Au collisions. The D0 meson yields in central Au+Aucollisions are strongly suppressed compared to those in p+p scaled by Nbin, for transverse momenta pT>3 GeV/c, demonstrating significant energy loss of charm quarks in the hot and dense medium. An enhancement at intermediate pT is also observed. Model calculations including strong charm-medium interactions and coalescence hadronization describe our measurements.

  13. High-<math display='inline'>Tcmath> superconductivity at the interface between the <math display='inline'>CaCuO2math> and <math display='inline'>SrTiO3math> insulating oxides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di Castro, D.; Cantoni, C.; Ridolfi, F.; Aruta, C.; Tebano, A.; Yang, N.; Balestrino, G.

    2015-09-28

    At interfaces between complex oxides it is possible to generate electronic systems with unusual electronic properties, which are not present in the isolated oxides. One important example is the appearance of superconductivity at the interface between insulating oxides, although, until now, with very low Tc. We report the occurrence of high Tc superconductivity in the bilayer CaCuO2/SrTiO3, where both the constituent oxides are insulating. In order to obtain a superconducting state, the CaCuO2/SrTiO3 interface must be realized between the Ca plane of CaCuO2 and the TiO2 plane of SrTiO3. Only in this case can oxygen ions be incorporated in the interface Ca plane, acting as apical oxygen for Cu and providing holes to the CuO2 planes. In addition, a detailed hole doping spatial profile can be obtained by scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron-energy-loss spectroscopy at the O K edge, clearly showing that the (super)conductivity is confined to about 12 CaCuO2 unit cells close to the interface with SrTiO3. The results obtained for the CaCuO2/SrTiO3 interface can be extended to multilayered high Tc cuprates, contributing to explaining the dependence of Tc on the number of CuO2 planes in these systems.

  14. Levels in <math>N12math> via the <math>N14math> (<math>p,tmath>) reaction using the JENSA gas-jet target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chipps, K. A.; Pain, S. D.; Greife, U.; Kozub, R. L.; Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Kontos, A.; Linhardt, L. E.; Matos, M.; Pittman, S. T.; Sachs, A.; Schatz, H.; Schmitt, K. T.; Smith, M. S.; Thompson, P.

    2015-09-25

    As one of a series of physics cases to demonstrate the unique benefit of the new Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics gas-jet target for enabling next-generation transfer reaction studies, the ?N (p, t)N reaction was studied for the first time, using a pure jet of nitrogen, in an attempt to resolve conflicting information on the structure of N. A new level at 4.561-MeV excitation energy in N was found.

  15. Kondo interactions from band reconstruction in <math display='inline'>YbInCu4math>

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarrige, I.; Kotani, A.; Yamaoka, H.; Tsujii, N.; Ishii, K.; Upton, M.; Casa, D.; Kim, J.; Gog, T.; Hancock, J. N.

    2015-03-27

    We combine resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) and model calculations in the Kondo lattice compound YbInCu?, a system characterized by a dramatic increase in Kondo temperature and associated valence fluctuations below a first-order valence transition at T?42 K. In this study, the bulk-sensitive, element-specific, and valence-projected charge excitation spectra reveal an unusual quasi-gap in the Yb-derived state density which drives an instability of the electronic structure and renormalizes the low-energy effective Hamiltonian at the transition. Our results provide long-sought experimental evidence for a link between temperature-driven changes in the low-energy Kondo scale and the higher-energy electronic structure of this system.

  16. Electronic structure basis for the extraordinary magnetoresistance in <math display='inline'>WTe2math>

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pletikosi?, I.; Ali, Mazhar N.; Fedorov, A. V.; Cava, R. J.; Valla, T.

    2014-11-19

    The electronic structure basis of the extremely large magnetoresistance in layered non-magnetic tungsten ditelluride has been investigated by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Hole and electron pockets of approximately the same size were found at the Fermi level, suggesting that carrier compensation should be considered the primary source of the effect. The material exhibits a highly anisotropic, quasi one-dimensional Fermi surface from which the pronounced anisotropy of the magnetoresistance follows. As a result, a change in the Fermi surface with temperature was found and a high-density-of-states band that may take over conduction at higher temperatures and cause the observed turn-on behavior of the magnetoresistance in WTe? was identified.

  17. Comprehensive description of <math display='inline'>J/?math> production in proton-proton collisions at collider energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Yan -Qing; Venugopalan, Raju

    2014-11-04

    We employ a small x Color Glass Condensate + Non-Relativistic QCD (NRQCD) formalism to compute J/? production at low p? in proton-proton collisions at collider energies. Very good agreement is obtained for total cross-sections, rapidity distributions and low momentum p? distributions. Similar agreement is obtained for ?' production. We observe an overlap region in p? where our results match smoothly to those obtained in a next-to-leading order (NLO) collinearly factorized NRQCD formalism. The relative contribution of color singlet and color octet contributions can be quantified in the CGC+NRQCD framework, with the former contributing approximately 10% of the total cross-section.

  18. Improved Measurement of the <math display='inline'>??e?math> Branching Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.; Aoki, M.; Blecher, M.; Britton, D. I.; Bryman, D. A.; vom Bruch, D.; Chen, S.; Comfort, J.; Ding, M.; Doria, L.; Cuen-Rochin, S.; Gumplinger, P.; Hussein, A.; Igarashi, Y.; Ito, S.; Kettell, S. H.; Kurchaninov, L.; Littenberg, L. S.; Malbrunot, C.; Mischke, R. E.; Numao, T.; Protopopescu, D.; Sher, A.; Sullivan, T.; Vavilov, D.; Yamada, K.

    2015-08-01

    A new measurement of the branching ratio Re/?=?(?+ ? e+? + ?+ ? e+??)/?(?+ ? ?+? + ?+??+??) resulted in Rexpe/?=[1.23440.0023(stat)0.0019(syst)] x 10-4. This is in agreement with the standard model prediction and improves the test of electron-muon universality to the level of 0.1%.

  19. Evidence for a new excitation at the interface between a high-<math>Tc> superconductor and a topological insulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zareapour, Parisa; Hayat, Alex; Zhao, Shu Yang F.; Kreshchuk, Michael; Lee, Yong Kiat; Reijnders, Anjan A.; Jain, Achint; Xu, Zhijun; Liu, T. S.; Gu, G. D.; Jia, Shuang; Cava, Robert J.; Burch, Kenneth S.

    2014-12-09

    In this research, high-temperature superconductors exhibit a wide variety of novel excitations. If contacted with a topological insulator, the lifting of spin rotation symmetry in the surface states can lead to the emergence of unconventional superconductivity and novel particles. In pursuit of this possibility, we fabricated high critical-temperature (Tc ~ 85 K) superconductor/topological insulator (Bi?Sr?CaCu?O???/Bi?Te?Se) junctions. Below 75 K, a zero-bias conductance peak (ZBCP) emerges in the differential conductance spectra of this junction. The magnitude of the ZBCP is suppressed at the same rate for magnetic fields applied parallel or perpendicular to the junction. Furthermore, it can still be observed and does not split up to at least 8.5 T. The temperature and magnetic field dependence of the excitation we observe appears to fall outside the known paradigms for a ZBCP.

  20. <math>C60math> -induced Devil's Staircase transformation on a Pb/Si(111) wetting layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lin -Lin; Johnson, Duane D.; Tringides, Michael C.

    2015-12-03

    Density functional theory is used to study structural energetics of Pb vacancy cluster formation on C60/Pb/Si(111) to explain the unusually fast and error-free transformations between the “Devil's Staircase” (DS) phases on the Pb/Si(111) wetting layer at low temperature (~110K). The formation energies of vacancy clusters are calculated in C60/Pb/Si(111) as Pb atoms are progressively ejected from the initial dense Pb wetting layer. Vacancy clusters larger than five Pb atoms are found to be stable with seven being the most stable, while vacancy clusters smaller than five are highly unstable, which agrees well with the observed ejection rate of ~5 Pb atoms per C60. Furthermore, the high energy cost (~0.8 eV) for the small vacancy clusters to form indicates convincingly that the unusually fast transformation observed experimentally between the DS phases, upon C60 adsorption at low temperature, cannot be the result of single-atom random walk diffusion but of correlated multi-atom processes.

  1. Thermal conductivity in <math>large-J> two-dimensional antiferromagnets: Role of phonon scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chernyshev, A. L.; Brenig, Wolfram

    2015-08-05

    Different types of relaxation processes for magnon heat current are discussed, with a particular focus on coupling to three-dimensional phonons. There is thermal conductivity by these in-plane magnetic excitations using two distinct techniques: Boltzmann formalism within the relaxation-time approximation and memory-function approach. Also considered are the scattering of magnons by both acoustic and optical branches of phonons. We demonstrate an accord between the two methods, regarding the asymptotic behavior of the effective relaxation rates.

    It is strongly suggested that scattering from optical or zone-boundary phonons is important for magnon heat current relaxation in a high-temperature window of ?D?T<< J.

  2. Direct observation of quark-hadron duality in the free neutron <math>F2math> structure function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niculescu, I.; Niculescu, G.; Melnitchouk, W.; Arrington, J.; Christy, M. E.; Ent, R.; Griffioen, K. A.; Kalantarians, N.; Keppel, C. E.; Kuhn, S.; Tkachenko, S.; Zhang, J.

    2015-05-21

    Using data from the recent BONuS experiment at Jefferson Lab, which utilized a novel spectator tagging technique to extract the inclusive electron-free neutron scattering cross section, we obtain the first direct observation of quark-hadron duality in the neutron F2 structure function. In addition, the data are used to reconstruct the lowest few (N = 2, 4 and 6) moments of F2 in the three prominent nucleon resonance regions, as well as the moments integrated over the entire resonance region. Comparison with moments computed from global parametrizations of parton distribution functions suggest that quark--hadron duality holds locally for the neutron in the second and third resonance regions down to Q2 ≈ 1 GeV2, with violations possibly up to 20% observed in the first resonance region.

  3. Resonances in Coupled <math display='inline'>πK-ηKmath> Scattering from Quantum Chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; Thomas, Christopher E.; Wilson, David J.

    2014-10-01

    Using first-principles calculation within Quantum Chromodynamics, we are able to reproduce the pattern of experimental strange resonances which appear as complex singularities within coupled πK, ηK scattering amplitudes. We make use of numerical computation within the lattice discretized approach to QCD, extracting the energy dependence of scattering amplitudes through their relation- ship to the discrete spectrum of the theory in a finite-volume, which we map out in unprecedented detail.

  4. Single spin asymmetries of inclusive hadrons produced in electron scattering from a transversely polarized <math>3math> He target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allada, K.; Zhao, Y. X.; Aniol, K.; Annand, J. R. M.; Averett, T.; Benmokhtar, F.; Bertozzi, W.; Bradshaw, P. C.; Bosted, P.; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; Cates, G. D.; Chen, C.; Chen, J. -P.; Chen, W.; Chirapatpimol, K.; Chudakov, E.; Cisbani, E.; Cornejo, J. C.; Cusanno, F.; Dalton, M.; Deconinck, W.; de Jager, C. W.; De Leo, R.; Deng, X.; Deur, A.; Ding, H.; Dolph, P. A. M.; Dutta, C.; Dutta, D.; Fassi, L. El; Frullani, S.; Gao, H.; Garibaldi, F.; Gaskell, D.; Gilad, S.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, O.; Golge, S.; Guo, L.; Hamilton, D.; Hansen, O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, J.; Huang, M.; Ibrahim, H. F.; Iodice, M.; Jiang, X.; Jin, G.; Jones, M. K.; Katich, J.; Kelleher, A.; Kim, W.; Kolarkar, A.; Korsch, W.; LeRose, J. J.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Lindgren, R.; Liyanage, N.; Long, E.; Lu, H. -J.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; Marrone, S.; McNulty, D.; Meziani, Z. -E.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Camacho, C. Muoz; Nanda, S.; Narayan, A.; Nelyubin, V.; Norum, B.; Oh, Y.; Osipenko, M.; Parno, D.; Peng, J. -C.; Phillips, S. K.; Posik, M.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Rakhman, A.; Ransome, R.; Riordan, S.; Saha, A.; Sawatzky, B.; Schulte, E.; Shahinyan, A.; Shabestari, M. H.; irca, S.; Stepanyan, S.; Subedi, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Tang, L. -G.; Tobias, A.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Vilardi, I.; Wang, K.; Wang, Y.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Yan, X.; Yao, H.; Ye, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yuan, L.; Zhan, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. -W.; Zhao, B.; Zheng, X.; Zhu, L.; Zhu, X.; Zong, X.

    2014-04-07

    We report the first measurement of target single-spin asymmetries (AN) in the inclusive hadron production reaction, e + 3He??h+X, using a transversely polarized 3 He target. This experiment was conducted at Jefferson Lab in Hall A using a 5.9-GeV electron beam. Three types of hadrons (?, K and proton) were detected in the transverse hadron momentum range 0.54 < pT < 0.74 GeV/c. The range of xF for pions was -0.29 < xF< -0.23 and for kaons -0.25 < xF<-0.18. The observed asymmetry strongly depends on the type of hadron. A positive asymmetry is observed for ?+ and K+. A negative asymmetry is observed for ?. The magnitudes of the asymmetries follow |A? |<|A? +|<|AK +|. The K and proton asymmetries are consistent with zero within the experimental uncertainties. The ?+ and ? asymmetries measured for the 3He target and extracted for neutrons are opposite in sign with a small increase observed as a function of pT.

  5. Regenerable solid imine sorbents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, McMahan; Champagne, Kenneth J.; Fauth, Daniel; Beckman, Eric

    2013-09-10

    Two new classes of amine-based sorbents are disclosed. The first class comprises new polymer-immobilized tertiary amine sorbents; the second class new polymer-bound amine sorbents. Both classes are tailored to facilitate removal of acid anhydrides, especially carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2), from effluent gases. The amines adsorb acid anhydrides in a 1:1 molar ratio. Both classes of amine sorbents adsorb in the temperature range from about 20.degree. C. upwards to 90.degree. C. and can be regenerated by heating upwards to 100.degree. C.

  6. LOWER BOUNDS ON MAGNETIC FIELDS IN INTERGALACTIC VOIDS FROM LONG...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Noji Higashi, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan) Kobayashi-Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya ...

  7. Comment on ''Improved bounds on entropic uncertainty relations''

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bosyk, G. M.; Portesi, M.; Plastino, A.; Zozor, S.

    2011-11-15

    We provide an analytical proof of the entropic uncertainty relations presented by J. I. de Vicente and J. Sanchez-Ruiz [Phys. Rev. A 77, 042110 (2008)] and also show that the replacement of Eq. (27) by Eq. (29) in that reference introduces solutions that do not take fully into account the constraints of the problem, which in turn lead to some mistakes in their treatment.

  8. Unitarity bounds in the Higgs model including triplet fields...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    fine-tuning because of the imposed global SU(2)sub R symmetry in the Higgs ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY ...

  9. Chirality of weakly bound complexes: The potential energy surfaces...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    2 ; Aquilanti, V. 2 ; Instituto de Fsica, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40210 ... + Show Author Affiliations Instituto de Fsica, Universidade de Braslia, 70910 ...

  10. Briefly Bound to Activate: Transient Binding of a Second Catalytic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Bao, Zhao Qin ; Jacobsen, Douglas M. ; Young, Matthew A. 1 + Show Author Affiliations (Michigan-Med) Publication Date: 2014-10-02 OSTI Identifier: 1031377 Resource Type: ...

  11. Structure of the human M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor bound...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Muscarinic receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate the response to ... function through activation of G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium ...

  12. Lower bound on the electroweak wall velocity from hydrodynamic instability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mégevand, Ariel; Membiela, Federico Agustín; Sánchez, Alejandro D.

    2015-03-27

    The subsonic expansion of bubbles in a strongly first-order electroweak phase transition is a convenient scenario for electroweak baryogenesis. For most extensions of the Standard Model, stationary subsonic solutions (i.e., deflagrations) exist for the propagation of phase transition fronts. However, deflagrations are known to be hydrodynamically unstable for wall velocities below a certain critical value. We calculate this critical velocity for several extensions of the Standard Model and compare with an estimation of the wall velocity. In general, we find a region in parameter space which gives stable deflagrations as well as favorable conditions for electroweak baryogenesis.

  13. Analytical continuation from bound to resonant states in the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Xu, Xu-Dong ; Zhang, Shi-Sheng ; Signoracci, A. J. ; Smith, M. S. ; Li, Z. P. Publication Date: 2015-08-28 OSTI Identifier: 1213285 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript ...

  14. Upper Bound on the First Star Formation History (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (DOE SC) Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: Astrophysics,ASTRO Word Cloud More Like This Full Text preview image File size NAView Full Text View...

  15. Property:BoundingCoordinatesSW | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    -98.55 + Aurora Geothermal Area + 38.301488855308, -119.02164916992 + B Bac-Man Laguna Geothermal Area + 13.016892384898, 123.91971130371 + Bad Blumau Geothermal...

  16. Property:BoundingCoordinatesNE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + 39.7, -98.15 + Aurora Geothermal Area + 38.468856230108, -118.71640625 + B Bac-Man Laguna Geothermal Area + 13.112513717997, 124.00935153418 + Bad Blumau Geothermal...

  17. Structures of potent anticancer compounds bound to tubulin (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Todd O. ; Torres, Jorge Z. 1 + Show Author Affiliations (UCLA) Publication Date: 2015-07-01 OSTI Identifier: 1188824 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation:...

  18. LOWER BOUNDS ON INTERGALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELDS FROM SIMULTANEOUSLY...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    -esup + pairs produced via interactions of primary TeV gamma rays with the cosmic infrared background. Utilizing only simultaneous GeV-TeV light curves observed by VERITAS,...

  19. Bounding gauged skyrmion masses (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    T. ; Zachos, Cosmas K. Publication Date: 2004-09-01 OSTI Identifier: 1151557 Report Number(s): ANL-HEP-PR-04-89 DOE Contract Number: AC02-07CH11359 Resource Type: Journal...

  20. Upper Bound on the First Star Formation History (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Date: 2014-01-09 OSTI Identifier: 1114151 Report Number(s): SLAC-PUB-15885 Journal ID: ISSN 2041--8205; arXiv:1312.6462 DOE Contract Number: AC02-76SF00515 Resource Type: Journal...

  1. Upper Bound on the First Star Formation History (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Date: 2014-11-20 OSTI Identifier: 1165908 Report Number(s): SLAC-PUB-16151 Journal ID: ISSN 2041--8205 DOE Contract Number: AC02-76SF00515 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource...

  2. Bounding the Higgs Width Through Interferometry (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Have feedback or suggestions for a way to improve these results? Save Share this Record Citation Formats MLA APA Chicago Bibtex Export Metadata Endnote Excel CSV XML Save to My ...

  3. Crystal Structures of the Human DNA Repair Protein AGT Bound...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    N. Torrey Pines Rd., La Jolla, California 92037, USA. 2 Department of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania...

  4. Bounding the Higgs Width Through Interferometry (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sponsoring Org: US DOE Office of Science (DOE SC);High Energy Physics (HEP) Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: Experiment-HEP, Phenomenology-HEP,HEPEX...

  5. Structure of adenovirus bound to cellular receptor car

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2004-05-18

    Disclosed is a mutant adenovirus which has a genome comprising one or more mutations in sequences which encode the fiber protein knob domain wherein the mutation causes the encoded viral particle to have significantly weakened binding affinity for CARD1 relative to wild-type adenovirus. Such mutations may be in sequences which encode either the AB loop, or the HI loop of the fiber protein knob domain. Specific residues and mutations are described. Also disclosed is a method for generating a mutant adenovirus which is characterized by a receptor binding affinity or specificity which differs substantially from wild type. In the method, residues of the adenovirus fiber protein knob domain which are predicted to alter D1 binding when mutated, are identified from the crystal structure coordinates of the AD12knob:CAR-D1 complex. A mutation which alters one or more of the identified residues is introduced into the genome of the adenovirus to generate a mutant adenovirus. Whether or not the mutant produced exhibits altered adenovirus-CAR binding properties is then determined.

  6. Structure of adenovirus bound to cellular receptor car

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2007-01-02

    Disclosed is a mutant CAR-DI-binding adenovirus which has a genome comprising one or more mutations in sequences which encode the fiber protein knob domain wherein the mutation causes the encoded viral particle to have a significantly weakened binding affinity for CAR-DI relative to wild-type adenovirus. Such mutations may be in sequences which encode either the AB loop, or the HI loop of the fiber protein knob domain. Specific residues and mutations are described. Also disclosed is a method for generating a mutant adenovirus which is characterized by a receptor binding affinity or specificity which differs substantially from wild type.

  7. GUT-inspired supersymmetric model for <math display="inline"> h ? ? ? math> and the muon <math display="inline"> g - 2 math>

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ajaib, M. Adeel; Gogoladze, Ilia; Shafi, Qaisar

    2015-05-06

    We study a grand unified theories inspired supersymmetric model with nonuniversal gaugino masses that can explain the observed muon g-2 anomaly while simultaneously accommodating an enhancement or suppression in the h??? decay channel. In order to accommodate these observations and mh?125 to 126 GeV, the model requires a spectrum consisting of relatively light sleptons whereas the colored sparticles are heavy. The predicted stau mass range corresponding to R???1.1 is 100 GeV?m??200 GeV. The constraint on the slepton masses, particularly on the smuons, arising from considerations of muon g-2 is somewhat milder. The slepton masses in this case are predicted to lie in the few hundred GeV range. The colored sparticles turn out to be considerably heavier with mg?4.5 TeV and mt??3.5 TeV, which makes it challenging for these to be observed at the 14 TeV LHC.

  8. Multichannel <math display='inline'>0?2math> and <math display='inline'>1?2math> transition amplitudes for arbitrary spin particles in a finite volume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Maxwell; Briceno, Raul

    2015-10-01

    We present a model-independent, non-perturbative relation between finite-volume matrix elements and infinite-volume $\\textbf{0}\\rightarrow\\textbf{2}$ and $\\textbf{1}\\rightarrow\\textbf{2}$ transition amplitudes. Our result accommodates theories in which the final two-particle state is coupled to any number of other two-body channels, with all angular momentum states included. The derivation uses generic, fully relativistic field theory, and is exact up to exponentially suppressed corrections in the lightest particle mass times the box size. This work distinguishes itself from previous studies by accommodating particles with any intrinsic spin. To illustrate the utility of our general result, we discuss how it can be implemented for studies of $N+\\mathcal{J}~\\rightarrow~(N\\pi,N\\eta,N\\eta',\\Sigma K,\\Lambda K)$ transitions, where $\\mathcal{J}$ is a generic external current. The reduction of rotational symmetry, due to the cubic finite volume, manifests in this example through the mixing of S- and P-waves when the system has nonzero total momentum.

  9. Technology in education: A guidebook for developing a science and math education support program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, C.L.

    1992-09-01

    Education is vital to survival and success in an increasingly technical world, and the quality of education is the responsibility of everyone students, teachers, parents, industry, and government. Any technical organization wanting to contribute to that success through its local education system can do so easily and effectively through careful planning. This report details that planning process and includes methods to (1) identify the interests, strengths, and resources of the technical organization; (2) identify the needs of the local education system; (3) interface with local school system administration, principals, and teachers; and (4) develop a unique plan to match the organization`s strengths and resources with the needs of the school system. Following these ``getting started`` activities is the actual program that the Engineering Technology Division implemented in a local elementary school, including the curriculum, topics, and actual lesson plans used by technical personnel in the classroom. Finally, there are enrichment activities for teachers and students, suggestions for measuring the success of an education support program, and an overview of student responses to questions about the overall program.

  10. Technology in education: A guidebook for developing a science and math education support program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, C.L.

    1992-09-01

    Education is vital to survival and success in an increasingly technical world, and the quality of education is the responsibility of everyone students, teachers, parents, industry, and government. Any technical organization wanting to contribute to that success through its local education system can do so easily and effectively through careful planning. This report details that planning process and includes methods to (1) identify the interests, strengths, and resources of the technical organization; (2) identify the needs of the local education system; (3) interface with local school system administration, principals, and teachers; and (4) develop a unique plan to match the organization's strengths and resources with the needs of the school system. Following these getting started'' activities is the actual program that the Engineering Technology Division implemented in a local elementary school, including the curriculum, topics, and actual lesson plans used by technical personnel in the classroom. Finally, there are enrichment activities for teachers and students, suggestions for measuring the success of an education support program, and an overview of student responses to questions about the overall program.

  11. Spin-liquid ground state in the frustrated <math>J1-J2math> zigzag chain system <math>BaTb2O4math>

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aczel, A. A.; Li, L.; Garlea, V. O.; Yan, J. -Q.; Weickert, F.; Zapf, V. S.; Movshovich, R.; Jaime, M.; Baker, P. J.; Keppens, V.; Mandrus, D.

    2015-07-13

    We have investigated polycrystalline samples of the zigzag chain system BaTb2O4 with magnetic susceptibility, heat capacity, neutron powder diffraction, and muon spin relaxation measurements. No magnetic transitions are observed in the bulk measurements, while neutron diffraction reveals low-temperature, short-range, intrachain magnetic correlations between Tb3+ ions. Muon spin relaxation measurements indicate that these correlations are dynamic, as the technique detects no signatures of static magnetism down to 0.095 K. Altogether these findings provide strong evidence for a spin liquid ground state in BaTb2O4.

  12. Search for proton decay via <math display='inline'>p??K+math> using <math display='inline'>260 kilotonyearmath> data of Super-Kamiokande

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abe, K.; Hayato, Y.; Iyogi, K.; Kameda, J.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Nakahata, M.; Nakayama, S.; Wendell, R.?A.; Sekiya, H.; Shiozawa, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Takeda, A.; Takenaga, Y.; Ueno, K.; Yokozawa, T.; Kaji, H.; Kajita, T.; Kaneyuki, K.; Lee, K.?P.; Okumura, K.; McLachlan, T.; Labarga, L.; Kearns, E.; Raaf, J.?L.; Stone, J.?L.; Sulak, L.?R.; Goldhaber, M.; Bays, K.; Carminati, G.; Kropp, W.?R.; Mine, S.; Renshaw, A.; Smy, M.?B.; Sobel, H.?W.; Ganezer, K.?S.; Hill, J.; Keig, W.?E.; Jang, J.?S.; Kim, J.?Y.; Lim, I.?T.; Albert, J.?B.; Scholberg, K.; Walter, C.?W.; Wongjirad, T.; Ishizuka, T.; Tasaka, S.; Learned, J.?G.; Matsuno, S.; Smith, S.?N.; Hasegawa, T.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakamura, K.; Nishikawa, K.; Oyama, Y.; Sakashita, K.; Sekiguchi, T.; Tsukamoto, T.; Suzuki, A.?T.; Takeuchi, Y.; Ieki, K.; Ikeda, M.; Kubo, H.; Minamino, A.; Murakami, A.; Nakaya, T.; Fukuda, Y.; Choi, K.; Itow, Y.; Mitsuka, G.; Miyake, M.; Mijakowski, P.; Hignight, J.; Imber, J.; Jung, C.?K.; Taylor, I.; Yanagisawa, C.; Ishino, H.; Kibayashi, A.; Koshio, Y.; Mori, T.; Sakuda, M.; Takeuchi, J.; Kuno, Y.; Kim, S.?B.; Okazawa, H.; Choi, Y.; Nishijima, K.; Koshiba, M.; Totsuka, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Martens, K.; Marti, Ll.; Obayashi, Y.; Vagins, M.?R.; Chen, S.; Sui, H.; Yang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Connolly, K.; Dziomba, M.; Wilkes, R.?J.

    2014-10-14

    We have searched for proton decay via p??K+ using Super-Kamiokande data from April 1996 to February 2013, 260 kilotonyear exposure in total. No evidence for this proton decay mode is found. A lower limit of the proton lifetime is set to ?/B(p??K+)>5.91033 years at 90% confidence level.

  13. ? and <math>2p2nmath> emission in fast neutron-induced reactions on <math>Ni60math>

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fotiades, N.; Devlin, M.; Haight, R. C.; Nelson, R. O.; Kunieda, S.; Kawano, T.

    2015-06-19

    The cross sections for populating the residual nucleus in the reaction AZX(n,x)A-4Z-2Y exhibit peaks as a function of incident neutron energy corresponding to the (n,n'?) reaction and, at higher energy, to the (n,2p3n) reaction. In addition, the relative magnitudes of these peaks vary with the Z of the target nucleus.

  14. Culturally relevant science: An approach to math science education for Hispanics. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortiz de Montellano, B.

    1996-11-14

    As planned a letter was sent out to 17 teachers who had participated in a Summer 1994 workshop on ``Culturally Relevant Science for Hispanics`` at Michigan State. These teachers were supposed to have spent the intervening time developing lesson plans and curricula. The letter requested a report of any activities undertaken and copies of lesson plans and materials developed by February 1996 with a stipend of $400 for satisfactory reports. It was a disappointment to only get 9 responses and not all of them demonstrating a satisfactory level of activity. Diana Marinez, Dean of Science at Texas A and M University, Corpus Christi, who is the other developer of this curriculum and the author reviewed the submitted materials and chose those showing the most promise to be invited to participate in the Summer Writing Workshop. Spring of 1996 and particularly in May--June, the author wrote a partial first draft of a companion volume for the teacher`s manual which would provide a rationale for doing culturally relevant science, present the cultural and the scientific background that teachers would need in order to be able to teach. One of the goals of this curriculum is that it should be off-the-shelf ready to teach and that teachers would not have to do extra research to encourage its adoption. The outline of the book is appendix 1. The Writing Workshop was held at Texas A and M University, Corpus Christi from July 14 to July 27, 1996. Participating teachers chose topics that they were interested in developing and wrote first drafts. These were distributed to all participants and critiqued by the workshop directors before being rewritten. Some teachers were more productive than others depending on their science background. In total an impressive number of lesson plans were written. These lesson plans are listed in Appendix 3. Appendix 4 is a sample lesson. Work still needs to be done on both the source book and the teachers` manual.

  15. Culturally relevant science: An approach to math science education for hispanics. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montellano, B.O. de

    1996-11-14

    This progress report summarizes results of a teacher workshop. A letter sent to 17 teachers who had participated in the workshop requested a report of any activities undertaken and copies of lesson plans and materials developed. Only nine responses were received, and not all of them demonstrated a satisfactory level of activity. Teachers who submitted materials showing the most promise were invited to participate in the Summer Writing Workshop. A partial first draft of a companion volume for the teacher`s manual was written which provides a rationale for culturally relevant science and presents the cultural and scientific background needed. The outline of the book is presented in Appendix 1. Appendix 2 is a sample chapter from the book.

  16. Multibump solutions for quasilinear elliptic equations with critical growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jiaquan; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Wu, Xian

    2013-12-15

    The current paper is concerned with constructing multibump solutions for a class of quasilinear Schrdinger equations with critical growth. This extends the classical results of Coti Zelati and Rabinowitz [Commun. Pure Appl. Math. 45, 12171269 (1992)] for semilinear equations as well as recent work of Liu, Wang, and Guo [J. Funct. Anal. 262, 40404102 (2012)] for quasilinear problems with subcritical growth. The periodicity of the potentials is used to glue ground state solutions to construct multibump bound state solutions.

  17. Determination of the direct double- <math> β math> -decay <math> Q math> value of <math> Zr 96 math> and atomic masses of <math> Zr 90 - 92 , 94 , 96 math> and <math> Mo 92 , 94 - 98 , 100 math>

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gulyuz, K.; Ariche, J.; Bollen, G.; Bustabad, S.; Eibach, M.; Izzo, C.; Novario, S. J.; Redshaw, M.; Ringle, R.; Sandler, R.; Schwarz, S.; Valverde, A. A.

    2015-05-06

    Experimental searches for neutrinoless double-β decay offer one of the best opportunities to look for physics beyond the standard model. Detecting this decay would confirm the Majorana nature of the neutrino, and a measurement of its half-life can be used to determine the absolute neutrino mass scale. Important to both tasks is an accurate knowledge of the Q value of the double-β decay. The LEBIT Penning trap mass spectrometer was used for the first direct experimental determination of the ⁹⁶Zr double-β decay Q value: Qββ=3355.85(15) keV. This value is nearly 7 keV larger than the 2012 Atomic Mass Evaluation [M. Wang et al., Chin. Phys. C 36, 1603 (2012)] value and one order of magnitude more precise. The 3-σ shift is primarily due to a more accurate measurement of the ⁹⁶Zr atomic mass: m(⁹⁶Zr)=95.90827735(17) u. Using the new Q value, the 2νββ-decay matrix element, |M|, is calculated. Improved determinations of the atomic masses of all other zirconium (90-92,94,96Zr) and molybdenum (92,94-98,100Mo) isotopes using both ¹²C₈ and ⁸⁷Rb as references are also reported.

  18. Middle School Academic Question Resources | U.S. DOE Office of...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    For Math: Math Horizons http:www.mathcs.carleton.edumathhorizons External link Math Counts http:mathcounts.org External link NCES http:nces.ed.govtimsstimss-rindex.asp ...

  19. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    emotional response to math that differentiates the company from other educational game competitors and startups. "In most math games, math is disconnected from the...

  20. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Phase diagram of Josephson junction between<math display'inline'>s<math>and display'inline'>s<math>superconductors in the dirty...

  1. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Phase diagram of Josephson junction between math display inline mi s mi math and math display inline msub mi s mi mo mo msub math superconductors in the dirty limit Koshelev A E...

  2. Preferential Eu Site Occupation and Its Consequences in the Ternary Luminescent Halides<math display='inline'>AB2I5:Eu2+math>( display='inline'>A=LiCsmath>; display='inline'>B=Srmath>, Ba)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, C.  M.; Biswas, Koushik

    2015-07-22

    Several rare-earth-doped, heavy-metal halides have recently been identified as potential next-generation luminescent materials with high efficiency at low cost. AB2I5:Eu2+ (A=Li–Cs; B=Sr, Ba) is one such family of halides. Its members, such as CsBa2I5:Eu2+ and KSr2I5:Eu2+, are currently being investigated as high-performance scintillators with improved sensitivity, light yield, and energy resolution less than 3% at 662 keV. Within the AB2I5 family, our first-principles-based calculations reveal two remarkably different trends in Eu site occupation. The substitutional Eu ions occupy both eightfold-coordinated B1(VIII) and the sevenfold-coordinated B2(VII) sites in the Sr-containing compounds. However, in the Ba-containing crystals, Eu ions strongly prefer the B2(VII)sites. This random versus preferential distribution of Eu affects their electronic properties. The calculations also suggest that in the Ba-containing compounds one can expect the formation of Eu-rich domains. These results provide atomistic insight into recent experimental observations about the concentration and temperature effects in Eu-doped CsBa2I5. We discuss the implications of our results with respect to luminescent properties and applications. We also hypothesize Sr, Ba-mixed quaternary iodides ABaVIIISrVIII5:Eu as scintillators having enhanced homogeneity and electronic properties.

  3. Photo of the Week: Students from Roosevelt Middle School win...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    disciplines, including biology, chemistry, earth science, physics, astronomy and math. ... disciplines, including biology, chemistry, earth science, physics, astronomy and math. ...

  4. Wrapping Up: Our Conversation on Increasing Diversity in STEM...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    While industry demand for science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) professionals ... in science, technology, engineering & math disciplines. | Infographic by Sarah ...

  5. Heavy surface state in a possible topological Kondo insulator: Magnetothermoelectric transport on the (011) plane of <math>SmB6math>

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Yongkang; Chen, Hua; Dai, Jianhui; Xu, Zhu -an; Thompson, J. D.

    2015-02-25

    Motivated by the high sensitivity to Fermi surface topology and scattering mechanisms in magnetothermoelectric transport, we have measured the thermopower and Nernst effect on the (011) plane of the proposed topological Kondo insulator SmB6. These experiments, together with electrical resistivity and Hall effect measurements, suggest that the (011) plane also harbors a metallic surface with an effective mass on the order of 10102 m0. The surface and bulk conductances are well distinguished in these measurements and are categorized into metallic and nondegenerate semiconducting regimes, respectively. As a result, electronic correlations play an important role in enhancing scattering and also contribute to the heavy surface state.

  6. Support Structure Design of the math notation="TeX">$\\hbox{Nb}_{3}\\hbox{Sn}$math> Quadrupole for the High Luminosity LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juchno, M.; Ambrosio, G.; Anerella, M.; Cheng, D.; Felice, H.; Ferracin, P.; Perez, J. C.; Prin, H.; Schmalzle, J.

    2014-10-31

    New low-? quadrupole magnets are being developed within the scope of the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project in collaboration with the US LARP program. The aim of the HLLHC project is to study and implement machine upgrades necessary for increasing the luminosity of the LHC. The new quadrupoles, which are based on the Nb?Sn superconducting technology, will be installed in the LHC Interaction Regions and will have to generate a gradient of 140 T/m in a coil aperture of 150 mm. In this paper, we describe the design of the short model magnet support structure and discuss results of the detailed 3D numerical analysis performed in preparation for the first short model test.

  7. Strangeness suppression of <math display='inline'>qqmath> creation observed in exclusive reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mestayer, M. D.; Park, K.; Adhikari, K. P.; Aghasyan, M.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; DAngelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Alaoui, A. El; Fassi, L. El; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fleming, J. A.; Forest, T. A.; Garillon, B.; Garon, M.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guegan, B.; Guidal, M.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Hattawy, M.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lenisa, P.; Levine, W. I.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moody, C. I.; Moutarde, H.; Movsisyan, A.; Camacho, C. Munoz; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Peng, P.; Phelps, W.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Raue, B. A.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Roy, P.; Sabati, F.; Saini, M. S.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Simonyan, A.; Sokhan, D.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tang, W.; Tian, Ye; Ungaro, M.; Vernarsky, B.; Vlassov, A. V.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.

    2014-10-10

    In this study, we measured the ratios of electroproduction cross sections from a proton target for three exclusive meson-baryon final states: ?K+, p?0, and n?+, with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. Using a simple model of quark hadronization, we extract qq creation probabilities for the first time in exclusive two-body production, in which only a single qq pair is created. We observe a sizable suppression of strange quark-antiquark pairs compared to nonstrange pairs, similar to that seen in high-energy production.

  8. Two-leg <math>SU(2n)math> spin ladder: A low-energy effective field theory approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lecheminant, P.; Tsvelik, A. M.

    2015-05-07

    We present a field-theory analysis of a model of two SU(2n)-invariant magnetic chains coupled by a generic interaction preserving time reversal and inversion symmetry. Contrary to the SU(2)-invariant case the zero-temperature phase diagram of such two-leg spin ladder does not contain topological phases. Thus, only generalized Valence Bond Solid phases are stabilized when n > 1 with different wave vectors and ground-state degeneracies. In particular, we find a phase which is made of a cluster of 2n spins put in an SU(2n) singlet state. For n = 3, this cluster phase is relevant to ?Yb ultracold atoms, with an emergent SU(6) symmetry, loaded in a double-well optical lattice.

  9. Resonant <math display='inline'>?+???+?0math> amplitude from Quantum Chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briceo, Ral A.; Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; Shultz, Christian J.; Thomas, Christopher E.; Wilson, David J.

    2015-12-08

    We present the first ab initio calculation of a radiative transition of a hadronic resonance within Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). We compute the amplitude for $\\pi\\pi \\to \\pi\\gamma^\\star$, as a function of the energy of the $\\pi\\pi$ pair and the virtuality of the photon, in the kinematic regime where $\\pi\\pi$ couples strongly to the unstable $\\rho$ resonance. This exploratory calculation is performed using a lattice discretization of QCD with quark masses corresponding to $m_\\pi \\approx 400$ MeV. As a result, we obtain a description of the energy dependence of the transition amplitude, constrained at 48 kinematic points, that we can analytically continue to the $\\rho$ pole and identify from its residue the $\\rho \\to \\pi\\gamma^\\star$ form-factor.

  10. Search for Long-Lived Particles in<math display='inline'>e+e-math>Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.?P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D.?N.; Kerth, L.?T.; Kolomensky, Yu.?G.; Lee, M.?J.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.?S.; McKenna, J.?A.; So, R.?Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V.?E.; Buzykaev, A.?R.; Druzhinin, V.?P.; Golubev, V.?B.; Kravchenko, E.?A.; Onuchin, A.?P.; Serednyakov, S.?I.; Skovpen, Yu.?I.; Solodov, E.?P.; Todyshev, K.?Yu.; Lankford, A.?J.; Dey, B.; Gary, J.?W.; Long, O.; Campagnari, C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Hong, T.?M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J.?D.; West, C.?A.; Eisner, A.?M.; Lockman, W.?S.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Schumm, B.?A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D.?S.; Cheng, C.?H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K.?T.; Hitlin, D.?G.; Miyashita, T.?S.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F.?C.; Rhrken, M.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B.?T.; Pushpawela, B.?G.; Sokoloff, M.?D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P.?C.; Ford, W.?T.; Gaz, A.; Smith, J.?G.; Wagner, S.?R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W.?H.; Spaan, B.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I.?M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M.?R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H.?M.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Prell, S.; Ahmed, H.; Gritsan, A.?V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A.?M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D.?J.; Wright, D.?M.; Coleman, J.?P.; Fry, J.?R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D.?E.; Payne, D.?J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A.?J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D.?N.; Davis, C.?L.; Denig, A.?G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Schubert, K.?R.; Barlow, R.?J.; Lafferty, G.?D.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D.?A.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Patel, P.?M.; Robertson, S.?H.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D.?J.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C.?P.; LoSecco, J.?M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Feltresi, E.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G.?R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M.?A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J.?J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A.?J.?S.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Pilloni, A.; Piredda, G.; Bnger, C.; Dittrich, S.; Grnberg, O.; Hess, M.; Leddig, T.; Vo, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E.?O.; Wilson, F.?F.; Emery, S.; Vasseur, G.; Aston, D.; Bard, D.?J.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M.?R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G.?P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R.?C.; Fulsom, B.?G.; Graham, M.?T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W.?R.; Kim, P.; Leith, D.?W.?G.?S.; Lindemann, D.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H.?L.; MacFarlane, D.?B.; Muller, D.?R.; Neal, H.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B.?N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A.?A.; Schindler, R.?H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M.?K.; Vavra, J.; Wisniewski, W.?J.; Wulsin, H.?W.; Purohit, M.?V.; White, R.?M.; Wilson, J.?R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S.?J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P.?R.; Puccio, E.?M.?T.; Alam, M.?S.; Ernst, J.?A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D.?R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S.?M.; Ritchie, J.?L.; Schwitters, R.?F.; Wray, B.?C.; Izen, J.?M.; Lou, X.?C.; Bianchi, F.; De Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Villanueva-Perez, P.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Beaulieu, A.; Bernlochner, F.?U.; Choi, H.?H.?F.; King, G.?J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M.?J.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I.?M.; Roney, J.?M.; Sobie, R.?J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T.?J.; Harrison, P.?F.; Latham, T.?E.; Band, H.?R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S.?L.

    2015-04-29

    We present a search for a neutral, long-lived particle L that is produced in e+e- collisions and decays at a significant distance from the e+e- interaction point into various flavor combinations of two oppositely charged tracks. The analysis uses an e+e- data sample with a luminosity of 489.1 fb-1 collected by the BABAR detector at the ? (4S), ? (3S), and ? (2S) resonances and just below the ? (4S). Fitting the two-track mass distribution in search of a signal peak, we do not observe a significant signal, and set 90% confidence level upper limits on the product of the L production cross section, branching fraction, and reconstruction efficiency for six possible two-body L decay modes as a function of the L mass. The efficiency is given for each final state as a function of the mass, lifetime, and transverse momentum of the candidate, allowing application of the upper limits to any production model. In addition, upper limits are provided on the branching fraction B(B?XsL), where Xs is a strange hadronic system.

  11. Pressure-induced collapsed-tetragonal phase in <math>SrCo2As2math>

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jayasekara, W. T.; Kaluarachchi, U. S.; Ueland, B. G.; Pandey, Abhishek; Lee, Y. B.; Taufour, V.; Sapkota, A.; Kothapalli, K.; Sangeetha, N. S.; Fabbris, G.; Veiga, L. S. I.; Feng, Yejun; dos Santos, A. M.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Harmon, B. N.; Canfield, P. C.; Johnston, D. C.; Kreyssig, A.; Goldman, A. I.

    2015-12-08

    We present high-energy x-ray diffraction data under applied pressures up to p = 29GPa, neutron diffraction measurements up to p = 1.1GPa, and electrical resistance measurements up to p = 5.9GPa, on SrCo2As2. Our x-ray diffraction data demonstrate that there is a first-order transition between the tetragonal (T) and collapsed-tetragonal (cT) phases, with an onset above approximately 6 GPa at T = 7K. The pressure for the onset of the cT phase and the range of coexistence between the T and cT phases appears to be nearly temperature independent. The compressibility along the a axis is the same for the T and cT phases, whereas, along the c axis, the cT phase is significantly stiffer, which may be due to the formation of an As-As bond in the cT phase. Our resistivity measurements found no evidence of superconductivity in SrCo2As2 for p ? 5.9 GPa and T ? 1.8 K. The resistivity data also show signatures consistent with a pressure-induced phase transition for p ? 5.5 GPa. Single-crystal neutron diffraction measurements performed up to 1.1 GPa in the T phase found no evidence of stripe-type or A-type antiferromagnetic ordering down to 10 K. Spin-polarized total-energy calculations demonstrate that the cT phase is the stable phase at high pressure with a ca ratio of 2.54. As a result, these calculations indicate that the cT phase of SrCo2As2 should manifest either A-type antiferromagnetic or ferromagnetic order.

  12. Phase transition in bulk single crystals and thin films of <math>VO2math> by nanoscale infrared spectroscopy and imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Mengkun; Sternbach, Aaron J.; Wagner, Martin; Slusar, Tetiana V.; Kong, Tai; Bud'ko, Sergey L.; Kittiwatanakul, Salinporn; Qazilbash, M. M.; McLeod, Alexander; Fei, Zhe; Abreu, Elsa; Zhang, Jingdi; Goldflam, Michael; Dai, Siyuan; Ni, Guang -Xin; Lu, Jiwei; Bechtel, Hans A.; Martin, Michael C.; Raschke, Markus B.; Averitt, Richard D.; Wolf, Stuart A.; Kim, Hyun -Tak; Canfield, Paul C.; Basov, D. N.

    2015-06-29

    We have systematically studied a variety of vanadium dioxide (VO2) crystalline forms, including bulk single crystals and oriented thin films, using infrared (IR) near-field spectroscopic imaging techniques. By measuring the IR spectroscopic responses of electrons and phonons in VO2 with sub-grain-size spatial resolution (~20nm), we show that epitaxial strain in VO2 thin films not only triggers spontaneous local phase separations, but leads to intermediate electronic and lattice states that are intrinsically different from those found in bulk. Generalized rules of strain- and symmetry-dependent mesoscopic phase inhomogeneity are also discussed. Furthermore, these results set the stage for a comprehensive understanding of complex energy landscapes that may not be readily determined by macroscopic approaches.

  13. Superconducting and magnetic properties of <math>Sr3Ir4Sn13math>

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, P. K.; Amato, A.; Khasanov, R.; Luetkens, H.; Wang, Kefeng; Petrovic, C.; Cook, R. M.; Lees, M. R.; Morenzoni, E.

    2014-10-10

    In this research, magnetization and muon spin relaxation or rotation (SR) measurements have been performed to study the superconducting and magnetic properties of Sr?Ir?Sn??. From magnetization measurements the lower and upper critical fields of Sr?Ir?Sn?? are found to be 81(1) Oe and 14.4(2) kOe, respectively. Zero-field SR data show no sign of any magnetic ordering or weak magnetism in Sr?Ir?Sn??. Transverse-field SR measurements in the vortex state provided the temperature dependence of the magnetic penetration depth ?. The dependence of ?? with temperature is consistent with the existence of single s-wave energy gap in the superconducting state of Sr?Ir?Sn?? with a gap value of 0.82(2) meV at absolute zero temperature. The magnetic penetration depth at zero temperature ?(0) is 291(3) nm. The ratio ?(0)/kBTc = 2.1(1) indicates that Sr?Ir?Sn?? should be considered as a strong-coupling superconductor.

  14. 2011 - 02 | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    February 2011 Thu, 02/24/2011 - 2:00pm Jefferson Lab Hosts Upcoming Science Lectures on DNA and Chocolate Thu, 02/24/2011 - 2:00pm Teachers Invited to April 20 Science Activities Night at Jefferson Lab Tue, 02/08/2011 - 2:00pm Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology Wins Feb. 5 Virginia Science Bowl; Warwick High Wins Math and Science Challenges Mon, 02/07/2011 - 11:36am Bound Neutrons Pave Way to Free Ones Wed, 02/02/2011 - 2:00pm NASA Scientist Discusses Nanotube Advances

  15. Structure of active [beta]-arrestin-1 bound to a G-protein-coupled...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Nature; Journal Volume: ... Language: ENGLISH Word Cloud More Like This Full Text Journal Articles DOI: 10.1038nature...

  16. Semiconductor nanocrystals covalently bound to solid inorganic surfaces using self-assembled monolayers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alivisatos, A. Paul (Berkeley, CA); Colvin, Vicki L. (Berkeley, CA)

    1998-01-01

    Methods are described for attaching semiconductor nanocrystals to solid inorganic surfaces, using self-assembled bifunctional organic monolayers as bridge compounds. Two different techniques are presented. One relies on the formation of self-assembled monolayers on these surfaces. When exposed to solutions of nanocrystals, these bridge compounds bind the crystals and anchor them to the surface. The second technique attaches nanocrystals already coated with bridge compounds to the surfaces. Analyses indicate the presence of quantum confined clusters on the surfaces at the nanolayer level. These materials allow electron spectroscopies to be completed on condensed phase clusters, and represent a first step towards synthesis of an organized assembly of clusters. These new products are also disclosed.

  17. Measurement of damping and temperature: Precision bounds in Gaussian dissipative channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monras, Alex; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2011-01-15

    We present a comprehensive analysis of the performance of different classes of Gaussian states in the estimation of Gaussian phase-insensitive dissipative channels. In particular, we investigate the optimal estimation of the damping constant and reservoir temperature. We show that, for two-mode squeezed vacuum probe states, the quantum-limited accuracy of both parameters can be achieved simultaneously. Moreover, we show that for both parameters two-mode squeezed vacuum states are more efficient than coherent, thermal, or single-mode squeezed states. This suggests that at high-energy regimes, two-mode squeezed vacuum states are optimal within the Gaussian setup. This optimality result indicates a stronger form of compatibility for the estimation of the two parameters. Indeed, not only the minimum variance can be achieved at fixed probe states, but also the optimal state is common to both parameters. Additionally, we explore numerically the performance of non-Gaussian states for particular parameter values to find that maximally entangled states within d-dimensional cutoff subspaces (d{<=}6) perform better than any randomly sampled states with similar energy. However, we also find that states with very similar performance and energy exist with much less entanglement than the maximally entangled ones.

  18. Crystal structure of the[mu]-opioid receptor bound to a morphinan...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    to and activating the G-protein-coupled mu-opioid receptor (mu-OR) in the central nervous system. Here we describe the 2.8 angstrom crystal structure of the mouse mu-OR in ...

  19. Universality of the Volume Bound in Slow-Roll Eternal Inflation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Name: Submitted to Journal of High Energy Physics (JHEP); Journal Volume: 2012; Journal Issue: 5 Research Org: SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) Sponsoring Org:...

  20. Structure of DNA-Bound FEN1 Reveals Mechanism of Action

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the template's nucleotides. But before polymerase builds the duplicate strand, an RNA primer must bind to the template acting as a short length of "pseudo-DNA" to whose...

  1. Triviality and vacuum stability bounds in the three-loop neutrino...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in the three-loop neutrino mass model We study theoretical constraints on the parameter ... The requirement of a strongly first order phase transition for successful electroweak ...

  2. Gamma-ray bounds from EAS detectors and heavy decaying dark matter constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esmaili, Arman; Serpico, Pasquale Dario

    2015-10-07

    The very high energy Galactic γ-ray sky is partially opaque in the (0.1–10) PeV energy range. In the light of the recently detected high energy neutrino flux by IceCube, a comparable very high energy γ-ray flux is expected in any scenario with a sizable Galactic contribution to the neutrino flux. Here we elaborate on the peculiar energy and anisotropy features imposed upon these very high energy γ-rays by the absorption on the cosmic microwave background photons and Galactic interstellar light. As a notable application of our considerations, we study the prospects of probing the PeV-scale decaying DM scenario, proposed as a possible source of IceCube neutrinos, by extensive air shower (EAS) cosmic ray experiments. In particular, we show that anisotropy measurements at EAS experiments are already sensitive to τ{sub DM}∼O(10{sup 27}) s and future measurements, using better gamma/hadron separation, can improve the limit significantly.

  3. U-041: Google Chrome Out-of-Bounds Write Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A remote user can create HTML that, when loaded by the target user, will execute arbitrary code on the target user's system.

  4. Upper Bound of 0.28 eV on Neutrino Masses from the Largest Photometric...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    OSTI Identifier: 21410913 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Physical Review Letters; Journal Volume: 105; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: ...

  5. Applicability of Density Functional Theory in Reproducing Accurate Vibrational Spectra of Surface Bound Species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matanovic, Ivana; Atanassov, Plamen; Kiefer, Boris; Garzon, Fernando; Henson, Neil J.

    2014-10-05

    The structural equilibrium parameters, the adsorption energies, and the vibrational frequencies of the nitrogen molecule and the hydrogen atom adsorbed on the (111) surface of rhodium have been investigated using different generalized-gradient approximation (GGA), nonlocal correlation, meta-GGA, and hybrid functionals, namely, Perdew, Burke, and Ernzerhof (PBE), Revised-RPBE, vdW-DF, Tao, Perdew, Staroverov, and Scuseria functional (TPSS), and Heyd, Scuseria, and Ernzerhof (HSE06) functional in the plane wave formalism. Among the five tested functionals, nonlocal vdW-DF and meta-GGA TPSS functionals are most successful in describing energetics of dinitrogen physisorption to the Rh(111) surface, while the PBE functional provides the correct chemisorption energy for the hydrogen atom. It was also found that TPSS functional produces the best vibrational spectra of the nitrogen molecule and the hydrogen atom on rhodium within the harmonic formalism with the error of 22.62 and 21.1% for the NAN stretching and RhAH stretching frequency. Thus, TPSS functional was proposed as a method of choice for obtaining vibrational spectra of low weight adsorbates on metallic surfaces within the harmonic approximation. At the anharmonic level, by decoupling the RhAH and NAN stretching modes from the bulk phonons and by solving one- and two-dimensional Schrodinger equation associated with the RhAH, RhAN, and NAN potential energy we calculated the anharmonic correction for NAN and RhAH stretching modes as 231 cm21 and 277 cm21 at PBE level. Anharmonic vibrational frequencies calculated with the use of the hybrid HSE06 function are in best agreement with available experiments.

  6. Effects of bounded space in the solutions of time-space fractional diffusion equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allami, M. H. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokri, B. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Physics Department, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    By using a recently proposed numerical method, the fractional diffusion equation with memory in a finite domain is solved for different asymmetry parameters and fractional orders. Some scaling laws are revisited in this condition, such as growth rate in a distance from pulse perturbation, the time when the perturbative peak reaches the other points, and advectionlike behavior as a result of asymmetry and memory. Conditions for negativity and instability of solutions are shown. Also up-hill transport and its time-space region are studied.

  7. Surface-Bound Intermediates in Low-Temperature Methanol Synthesis on Copper. Participants and Spectators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Yong; Mei, Donghai; Peden, Charles H.F.; Campbell, Charles T.; Mims, Charles A.

    2015-11-03

    The reactivity of surface adsorbed species present on copper catalysts during methanol synthesis at low temperatures was studied by simultaneous infrared spectroscopy (IR) and mass spectroscopy (MS) measurements during “titration” (transient surface reaction) experiments with isotopic tracing. The results show that adsorbed formate is a major bystander species present on the surface under steady-state methanol synthesis reaction conditions, but it cannot be converted to methanol by reaction with pure H2, nor with H2 plus added water. Formate-containing surface adlayers for these experiments were produced during steady state catalysis in (a) H2:CO2 (with substantial formate coverage) and (b) moist H2:CO (with no IR visible formate species). Both these reaction conditions produce methanol at steady state with relatively high rates. Adlayers containing formate were also produced by (c) formic acid adsorption. Various "titration" gases were used to probe these adlayers at modest temperatures (T = 410-450K) and 6 bar total pressure. Methanol gas (up to ~1% monolayer equivalent) was produced in "titration" from the H2:CO2 catalytic adlayers by H2 plus water, but not by dry hydrogen. The decay in the formate IR features accelerated in the presence of added water vapor. The H2:CO:H2O catalytic adlayer produced similar methanol titration yields in H2 plus water but showed no surface formate features in IR (less than 0.2% monolayer coverage). Finally, formate from formic acid chemisorption produced no methanol under any titration conditions. Even under (H2:CO2) catalytic reaction conditions, isotope tracing showed that pre-adsorbed formate from formic acid did not contribute to the methanol produced. Although non-formate intermediates exist during low temperature methanol synthesis on copper which can be converted to methanol gas by titration with pure H2 plus water in sufficient quantities for that intermediate to be observable by IR, formate itself is only a "spectator" in this reaction and gives no observable methanol upon any titration we performed with H2 or H2 plus water.

  8. Consequences of bounds on longitudinal emittance growth for the design of recirculating linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, J. S.

    2015-05-03

    Recirculating linear accelerators (RLAs) are a cost-effective method for the acceleration of muons for a muon collider in energy ranges from a couple GeV to a few 10s of GeV. Muon beams generally have longitudinal emittances that are large for the RF frequency that is used, and it is important to limit the growth of that longitudinal emittance. This has particular consequences for the arc design of the RLAs. I estimate the longitudinal emittance growth in an RLA arising from the RF nonlinearity. Given an emittance growth limitation and other design parameters, one can then compute the maximum momentum compaction in the arcs. I describe how to obtain an approximate arc design satisfying these requirements based on the deisgn in [1]. Longitudinal dynamics also determine the energy spread in the beam, and this has consequences on the transverse phase advance in the linac. This in turn has consequences for the arc design due to the need to match beta functions. I combine these considerations to discuss design parameters for the acceleration of muons for a collider in an RLA from 5 to 63 GeV.

  9. Determining X-ray source intensity and confidence bounds in crowded fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Primini, F. A.; Kashyap, V. L.

    2014-11-20

    We present a rigorous description of the general problem of aperture photometry in high-energy astrophysics photon-count images, in which the statistical noise model is Poisson, not Gaussian. We compute the full posterior probability density function for the expected source intensity for various cases of interest, including the important cases in which both source and background apertures contain contributions from the source, and when multiple source apertures partially overlap. A Bayesian approach offers the advantages of allowing one to (1) include explicit prior information on source intensities, (2) propagate posterior distributions as priors for future observations, and (3) use Poisson likelihoods, making the treatment valid in the low-counts regime. Elements of this approach have been implemented in the Chandra Source Catalog.

  10. Revisiting the axion bounds from the Galactic white dwarf luminosity function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertolami, M.M. Miller [Max-Planck-Institut fr Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, 85748, Garching (Germany); Melendez, B.E.; Althaus, L.G. [Instituto de Astrofsica de La Plata, UNLP-CONICET, Paseo del Bosque s/n, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Isern, J., E-mail: marcelo@MPA-Garching.MPG.DE, E-mail: brenmele@gmail.com, E-mail: althaus@fcaglp.fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar, E-mail: isern@ieec.cat [Institut de Cincies de l'Espai (CSIC), Facultat de Cincies, Campus UAB, Torre C5-parell, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain)

    2014-10-01

    It has been shown that the shape of the luminosity function of white dwarfs (WDLF) is a powerful tool to check for the possible existence of DFSZ-axions, a proposed but not yet detected type of weakly interacting particles. With the aim of deriving new constraints on the axion mass, we compute in this paper new theoretical WDLFs on the basis of WD evolving models that incorporate the feedback of axions on the thermal structure of the white dwarf. We find that the impact of the axion emission into the neutrino emission can not be neglected at high luminosities M{sub Bol}?<8) and that the axion emission needs to be incorporated self-consistently into the evolution of the white dwarfs when dealing with axion masses larger than m{sub a} cos {sup 2}??>5 meV (i.e. axion-electron coupling constant g{sub ae}?>1.4נ10{sup -13}). We went beyond previous works by including 5 different derivations of the WDLF in our analysis. Then we have performed ?{sup 2}-tests to have a quantitative measure of the agreement between the theoretical WDLFs computed under the assumptions of different axion masses and normalization methods --- and the observed WDLFs of the Galactic disk. While all the WDLF studied in this work disfavour axion masses in the range suggested by asteroseismology m{sub a} cos {sup 2}??>10 meV; g{sub ae}?>2.8נ10{sup -13}) lower axion masses can not be discarded from our current knowledge of the WDLF of the Galactic Disk. A larger set of completely independent derivations of the WDLF of the galactic disk as well as a detailed study of the uncertainties of the theoretical WDLFs is needed before quantitative constraints on the axion-electron coupling constant can be made.

  11. Semiconductor nanocrystals covalently bound to solid inorganic surfaces using self-assembled monolayers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alivisatos, A.P.; Colvin, V.L.

    1998-05-12

    Methods are described for attaching semiconductor nanocrystals to solid inorganic surfaces, using self-assembled bifunctional organic monolayers as bridge compounds. Two different techniques are presented. One relies on the formation of self-assembled monolayers on these surfaces. When exposed to solutions of nanocrystals, these bridge compounds bind the crystals and anchor them to the surface. The second technique attaches nanocrystals already coated with bridge compounds to the surfaces. Analyses indicate the presence of quantum confined clusters on the surfaces at the nanolayer level. These materials allow electron spectroscopies to be completed on condensed phase clusters, and represent a first step towards synthesis of an organized assembly of clusters. These new products are also disclosed. 10 figs.

  12. The New Face of Protein-bound Copper: The Type Zero Copper Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    variant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin 2, Kyle M. Lancaster, under the guidance of Harry B. Gray and John H. Richards at the California Institute of Technology, discovered a...

  13. Structure of Cryptosporidium IMP dehydrogenase bound to an inhibitor with in vivo antiparasitic activity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kim, Youngchang; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Cuny, Gregory D.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2015-04-21

    Inosine 5´-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is a promising target for the treatment of Cryptosporidium infections. Here, the structure of C. parvum IMPDH (CpIMPDH) in complex with inosine 5´-monophosphate (IMP) and P131, an inhibitor with in vivo anticryptosporidial activity, is reported. P131 contains two aromatic groups, one of which interacts with the hypoxanthine ring of IMP, while the second interacts with the aromatic ring of a tyrosine in the adjacent subunit. In addition, the amine and NO2 moieties bind in hydrated cavities, forming water-mediated hydrogen bonds to the protein. The design of compounds to replace these water molecules is a new strategymore » for the further optimization of C. parvum inhibitors for both antiparasitic and antibacterial applications.« less

  14. Crystal Structures of Anthrax Toxin Lethal Factor Bound to an Optimized

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Substrate and Candidate Small Molecule Inhibitors 4 by Thiang Yian Wong, Robert Schwarzenbacher and Robert C. Liddington The Burnham Institute, 10901 N Torrey Pines Rd, La Jolla, CA 92037, U.S.A. Anthrax Toxin, together with its bacterial capsule, is a major virulence factor in Anthrax1. The virulent strain of Bacillus anthracis is an encapsulated gram-positive, rod-shaped, spore-forming bacterium that produces and exports the three Anthrax Toxin proteins, Protective Antigen (PA), Lethal

  15. Structure of DNA-Bound FEN1 Reveals Mechanism of Action

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    50 million times without introducing any errors. But FEN1 is also important in DNA repair, targeting specific repair pathways, which presents different challenges than...

  16. Application of the bounds-analysis approach to arsenic and gallium...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Date: 2015-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 1235253 Report Number(s): SAND2014-17327J Journal ID: ISSN 1098-0121; PRBMDO; 537237 GrantContract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Type: Accepted...

  17. Structure of DNA-Bound FEN1 Reveals Mechanism of Action

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    threads through the arch. Solving FEN1's structure and mechanism required the presence of DNA with a 5' flap. Just as FEN1 moves the template into position so the 5' flap will be...

  18. Studies of light neutron-excess systems from bounds to continuum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ito, Makoto; Otsu, Hideaki

    2012-10-20

    The generalized two-center cluster model (GTCM), which can handle various single particle configurations in general two center systems, is applied to the light neutron-rich system, {sup 12}Be = {alpha}+{alpha}+4N. We discuss the change of the neutrons' configuration around two {alpha}-cores as a variation of an excitation energy. We show that the excess neutrons form various chemical-bondinglike configurations around two {alpha} cores in the unbound region above the {alpha} decay threshold. The possibility of the {alpha} cluster formation in the heavier neutron-excess system, {sup 28}Ne, is also discussed.

  19. Universality of the Volume Bound in Slow-Roll Eternal Inflation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    higher-dimensional operators are included and in the multi-field inflationary case. ... SPACE-TIME; TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER Theory-HEP,HEPTH, GRQC Word Cloud More Like This ...

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: About Sandia: Community Involvement:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Education Programs: DOE Science Bowl Math Night Family Math Night Family Math Night provides an evening of hands-on math activities held at local elementary schools. Students and parents work together on fun math games and activities. Sandia provides all materials and instructions. Availability is limited, so reserve your Family Math Night today! Contact Albuquerque, NM Laurie Bergemann (505) 284-5204 ljberge@sandia.gov

  1. Improved Constraints on Type Ia Supernova Host Galaxy Properties...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Astrophys. ; Smith, Mathew ; Cape Town U. ; Bassett, Bruce ; South African Astron. Observ. Cape Town U., Dept. Math. African Inst. Math. Sci., Cape Town ; Frieman, Joshua A. ; ...

  2. President Obama Announces New Plan to Create STEM Master Teaching...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    create a national Science, Math, Technology, and Engineering (STEM) Master Teacher Corps. ... receive additional resources to mentor math and science teachers, inspire students, ...

  3. Lighting in the Library

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Applicable National Standards National Math Standards: * Standard 1: Mathematics as ... O FFICE OF B UILDING T ECHNOLOGY, S TATE AND C OMMUNITY P ROGRAMS Real life Math and ...

  4. Other Participants 1995 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    , Tallahassee , FL Louisiana School for Math & Science, Natchitoches , LA Lowell High ... , Freemont , CA Mississippi School for Math & Science, Columbus , MS Montrose High ...

  5. Other Participants 2003 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    , Lexington , MA 30. Louisiana School for Math & Science, Natchitoches , LA 31. Lynbrook ... Sacramento , CA 35. Mississippi School for Math & Science, Columbus , MS 36. Montgomery ...

  6. Front and Center: Bringing Marginalized Girls into Focus in STEM...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    technology, engineering, and math (STEM) and career technical education (CTE) careers. ... since 2009, both fourth- and eighth-grade math scores on the National Assessment of ...

  7. National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Engineering and Math disciplines during a recent Graduate Opportunities Conference. ... engineers in the nation. * Native American Math Camp - NNSA partnered with the Los Alamos ...

  8. Mentoring and Educating to Increase Diversity in Science, Tech...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Mentoring and Educating to Increase Diversity in Science, Tech, Engineering and Math Mentoring and Educating to Increase Diversity in Science, Tech, Engineering and Math October ...

  9. Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    November 20, 2014 Partnership aims to spark math, science inspiration in New Mexico ... STEM partners to lead the way in sparking math and scientific inspiration in New Mexico ...

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: About Sandia: Community Involvement...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math Programs Future scientists photo Our science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) programs engage students by linking science to the ...

  11. Secretary of Energy Announces Approval and Funding for Facilities...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    successful Becoming Enthusiastic about Math and Science (BEAMS) educational program, designed to motivate at-risk middle schoolers to continue learning about math and science. ...

  12. Monte Carlo Solution for Uncertainty Propagation in Particle...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Relation: Conference: International Conference on Math. and Comp. Methods Applied ... presentation at the International Conference on Math. and Comp. Methods Applied to Nucl. ...

  13. Energy for Keeps: Electricity and Renewable Energy Teacher Information...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    science, environmental science, physical science, social studies, math, and language arts. ... Language Arts, Ecology, Environmental Science, Government, Math Plan Time Varies by ...

  14. ASC eNews Quarterly Newsletter March 2013 | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Exascale Math Steering Committee for the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) within the Office of Science. Jeff will gather input from the applied math ...

  15. Workshops & Conferences Archive | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    ... D.C. 20009 March 7, 2012 DOE Applied Math Summit (Washington, D.C.) American ... Scale Cross-Cutting Workshops in Applied Math, Computer Science and Architectures - ...

  16. Other Participants 1998 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    School , Lincoln , NE Louisiana School for Math & Science, Natchitoches , LA McCallie ... , Freemont , CA Mississippi School for Math & Science, Columbus , MS Montgomery Blair ...

  17. Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology Wins Feb...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wins Feb. 5 Virginia Science Bowl; Warwick High Wins Math and Science Challenges ... in science, technology, engineering and math among our nation's youth," Tyler said. "It ...

  18. Volunteers Needed to Help With High- and Middle-School Science...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "These events champion an interest in science, math and technology," says Jan Tyler, ... STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) resources outside of the classroom. ...

  19. Located in historic Los Alamos, New Mexico against the backdrop...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Teacher professional development programs ensure that the latest science, math, and ... Teacher Professional Development Programs Math and Science Academy (MSA) The MSA supports ...

  20. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... theory Li, Xiantao, E-mail: xli@math.psu.edu Crack initiation under dynamic ... Math. 37, 69-106 (1979). October 2014 Density Functional Theory Simulation Of ...

  1. Fourteen Teams to Compete in Virginia Middle School Science Bowl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are quizzed on their knowledge of math and a range of science disciplines, ... "These events champion an interest in science, math, engineering and technology among our ...

  2. Former BEAMS student revisits Jefferson Lab; sets goal on career...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab's Becoming Enthusiastic About Math and Science (BEAMS) program are graduating ... have attended this innovative, week-long math and science immersion program developed by ...

  3. Other Participants 2000 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    School , Lincoln , NE Louisiana School for Math & Science, Natchitoches , LA Loveland High ... , Sacramento , CA Mississippi School for Math & Science, Columbus , MS Montgomery Blair ...

  4. U.S. Department of Energy and the Automotive X PRIZE Foundation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    our next generation to pursue careers in math, science and education and engineering, so ... renewable fuels, and the science and math behind energy-efficient vehicle development. ...

  5. Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia Labs, other major employers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Partnership aims to spark math, science inspiration in New Mexico students LOS ALAMOS, ... STEM partners to lead the way in sparking math and scientific inspiration in New Mexico ...

  6. Sandia Energy EC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ustralian-renewable-energy-official-visits-sandiafeed 0 High School Girls Honored for Math, Science Achievements http:energy.sandia.govhigh-school-girls-honored-for-math-scien...

  7. Other Education and Outreach Resources | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    guide to understanding importance of English and maths BBC, Skillswise links to English and math information, including links for related games Skills Workshop, numeracy resources...

  8. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Real time sub math display inline mi mi math ngstrom imaging of reversible and irreversible conformations in rhodium catalysts and graphene Kisielowski Christian Wang Lin Wang...

  9. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Real-time sub-<math display'inline'><math>ngstrom imaging of reversible and irreversible conformations in rhodium catalysts and graphene","Kisielowski, Christian;...

  10. The Holographic Entropy Cone (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Physics (HEP) Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: Math and Math Physics, General Physics, Theory-HEP,HEPTH Word Cloud More Like This Full Text...

  11. Comprehensive amplitude analysis of <math display='inline'>γγπ+π-,π0π0math> and <math display='inline'>K¯Kmath> below 1.5 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dai, Ling-Yun; Pennington, Michael R.

    2014-08-15

    In this paper we perform an amplitude analysis of essentially all published pion and kaon pair production data from two photon collisions below 1.5 GeV. This includes all the high statistics results from Belle, as well as older data from Mark II at SLAC, CELLO at DESY, Crystal Ball at SLAC. The purpose of this analysis is to provide as close to a model-independent determination of the γγ to meson pair amplitudes as possible. Having data with limited angular coverage, typically |cosθ| < 0.6-0.8, and no polarization information for reactions in which spin is an essential complication, the determination of the underlying amplitudes might appear an intractable problem. However, imposing the basic constraints required by analyticity, unitarity, and crossing-symmetry makes up for the experimentally missing information. Above 1.5 GeV multi-meson production channels become important and we have too little information to resolve the amplitudes. Nevertheless, below 1.5 GeV the two photon production of hadron pairs serves as a paradigm for the application of S-matrix techniques. Final state interactions among the meson pairs is critical to this analysis. To fix these, we include the latest ππ → ππ, K⁻K scattering amplitudes given by dispersive analyses, supplemented in the K⁻K threshold region by the recent precision Dalitz plot analysis from BaBar. With these hadronic amplitudes built into unitarity, we can constrain the overall description of γγ → ππ and K⁻K datasets, both integrated and differential cross-sections, including the high statistics charged and neutral pion data from Belle. A region of solutions is found for the γγ → ππ partial waves with both isospin 0 and 2. Since this analysis invokes coupled hadronic channels, even the relatively poor integrated cross-section data on γγ → K⁻K narrows the patch of solutions to essentially a single form. For this we present the complete partial wave amplitudes, show how well they fit all the available data, and give the two photon couplings of scalar and tensor resonances that appear.

  12. CSU Final Report on the Math/CS Institute CACHE: Communication-Avoiding and Communication-Hiding at the Extreme Scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strout, Michelle

    2014-06-10

    The CACHE project entails researching and developing new versions of numerical algorithms that result in data reuse that can be scheduled in a communication avoiding way. Since memory accesses take more time than any computation and require the most power, the focus on turning data reuse into data locality is critical to improving performance and reducing power usage in scientific simulations. This final report summarizes the accomplishments at Colorado State University as part of the CACHE project.

  13. Role of <math display='inline'>Ce4+math> in the scintillation mechanism of codoped <math display='inline'>Gd3Ga3Al2O12:Cemath>

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Yuntao; Meng, Fang; Li, Qi; Koschan, Merry; Melcher, Charles L.

    2014-10-17

    To control the time-response performance of widely used cerium-activated scintillators in cutting-edge medical-imaging devices, such as time-of-flight positron-emission tomography, a comprehensive understanding of the role of Ce valence states, especially stable Ce4+, in the scintillation mechanism is essential. However, despite some progress made recently, an understanding of the physical processes involving Ce4+ is still lacking. The aim of this work is to clarify the role of Ce4+ in scintillators by studying Ca2+ codoped Gd3Ga3Al2O12?Ce?(GGAG?Ce). By using a combination of optical absorption spectra and x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopies, the correlation between Ca2+codoping content and the Ce4+ fraction is seen. The energy-level diagrams of Ce3+ and Ce4+ in the Gd3Ga3Al2O12 host are established by using theoretical and experimental methods, which indicate a higher position of the 5d1 state of Ce4+ in the forbidden gap in comparison to that of Ce3+. Underlying reasons for the decay-time acceleration resulting from Ca2+ codoping are revealed, and the physical processes of the Ce4+-emission model are proposed and further demonstrated by temperature-dependent radioluminescence spectra under x-ray excitation.

  14. Study of <math display='inline'>e+e-?pp?0math> in the vicinity of the <math display='inline'>?(3770)math>

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. ?N.; Ai, X.? C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. ?J.; An, F. ?F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. ?Z.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Ban, Y.; Bennett, J.? V.; Bertani, M.; Bian, J.? M.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Braun, S.; Briere, R.? A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G.? F.; Cetin, S.? A.; Chang, J.? F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H.? S.; Chen, J.? C.; Chen, M.? L.; Chen, S.? J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X.? R.; Chen, Y.? B.; Cheng, H.? P.; Chu, X.? K.; Chu, Y.? P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H.? L.; Dai, J.? P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z.? Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; Ding, W.? M.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L.? Y.; Dong, M. ?Y.; Du, S.? X.; Fan, J.? Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. ?S.; Fang, Y.; Fava, L.; Feng, C. ?Q.; Fu, C. ?D.; Fuks, O.; Gao, Q.; Gao, Y.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W.? X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. ?H.; Gu, Y.? T.; Guan, Y.? H.; Guo, A.? Q.; Guo, L.? B.; Guo, T.; Guo, Y.? P.; Han, Y.? L.; Harris, F.? A.; He, K.? L.; He, M.; He, Z.? Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y.? K.; Hou, Z.? L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H.? M.; Hu, J. ?F.; Hu, T.; Huang, G.? M.; Huang, G. ?S.; Huang, H.? P.; Huang, J.? S.; Huang, L.; Huang, X. ?T.; Huang, Y.; Hussain, T.; Ji, C. ?S.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q.? P.; Ji, X. ?B.; Ji, X.? L.; Jiang, L. ?L.; Jiang, L.? W.; Jiang, X.? S.; Jiao, J.? B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D.? P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. ?L.; Kang, X.? S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Kloss, B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Khn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lai, W.; Lange, J.? S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leyhe, M.; Li, C.? H.; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D.; Li, D.? M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H.? B.; Li, J.? C.; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. ?R.; Li, Q.? J.; Li, T.; Li, W.? D.; Li, W.? G.; Li, X.? L.; Li, X.? N.; Li, X.? Q.; Li, Z.? B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y.? F.; Liang, Y.? T.; Lin, D.? X.; Liu, B.? J.; Liu, C. ?L.; Liu, C.? X.; Liu, F.? H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. ?B.; Liu, H.? H.; Liu, H.? M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J.? P.; Liu, K.; Liu, K.? Y.; Liu, P.? L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S.? B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y.? B.; Liu, Z.? A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X.? C.; Lu, G.? R.; Lu, H.? J.; Lu, H.? L.; Lu, J.? G.; Lu, X.? R.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y.? P.; Luo, C.? L.; Luo, M.? X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X.? L.; Lv, M.; Ma, F.? C.; Ma, H. ?L.; Ma, Q.? M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. ?Y.; Maas, F. ?E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q.? A.; Mao, Y.? J.; Mao, Z.? P.; Messchendorp, J.? G.; Min, J.; Min, T.? J.; Mitchell, R.? E.; Mo, X.? H.; Mo, Y.? J.; Moeini, H.; Morales Morales, C.; Moriya, K.; Muchnoi, N.? Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nikolaev, I. ?B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, X.? Y.; Olsen, S.? L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H.? P.; Peters, K.; Ping, J.? L.; Ping, R.? G.; Poling, R.; Q., N.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C.? F.; Qin, L.? Q.; Qin, X.? S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. ?H.; Qiu, J. ?F.; Rashid, K.? H.; Redmer, C.? F.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X.? D.; Sarantsev, A.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C.? P.; Shen, X.? Y.; Sheng, H.? Y.; Shepherd, M.? R.; Song, W.? M.; Song, X. ?Y.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, G.? X.; Sun, J. ?F.; Sun, S.? S.; Sun, Y.? J.; Sun, Y. ?Z.; Sun, Z. ?J.; Sun, Z.? T.; Tang, C.? J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E.? H.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G.? S.; Wang, B.; Wang, D.; Wang, D.? Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L.? L.; Wang, L. ?S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P.? L.; Wang, Q.? J.; Wang, S.? G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X.? F.; Wang, Y.? D.; Wang, Y.? F.; Wang, Y.? Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. ?G.; Wang, Z.? H.; Wang, Z.? Y.; Wei, D.? H.; Wei, J.? B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. ?P.; Werner, M.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L.? H.; Wu, N.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L.? G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, Z.? J.; Xie, Y.? G.; Xiu, Q.? L.; Xu, G.? F.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. ?J.; Xu, Q.? N.; Xu, X.? P.; Xue, Z.; Yan, L.; Yan, W.? B.; Yan, W.? C.; Yan, Y.? H.; Yang, H.? X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.? X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M.? H.; Yu, B. ?X.; Yu, C. ?X.; Yu, H.? W.; Yu, J.? S.; Yu, S.? P.; Yuan, C. ?Z.; Yuan, W.? L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. ?A.; Zallo, A.; Zang, S.? L.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. ?X.; Zhang, B.? Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. ?B.; Zhang, C.? C.; Zhang, D.? H.; Zhang, H.? H.; Zhang, H.? Y.; Zhang, J.? J.; Zhang, J.? Q.; Zhang, J.? W.; Zhang, J.? Y.; Zhang, J. ?Z.; Zhang, S.? H.; Zhang, X. ?J.; Zhang, X.? Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.? H.; Zhang, Z.? H.; Zhang, Z.? P.; Zhang, Z.? Y.; Zhao, G.

    2014-08-22

    The process e+e-?pp?0 has been studied by analyzing data collected at ?s=3.773 GeV, at s?=3.650 GeV, and during a ?(3770) line shape scan with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII collider. The Born cross section of pp?0 in the vicinity of the ?(3770) is measured, and the Born cross section of ?(3770)?pp?0 is extracted considering interference between resonant and continuum production amplitudes. Two solutions with the same probability and a significance of 1.5? are found. The solutions for the Born cross section of ?(3770)?pp?0 are 33.81.82.1 pb and 0.06+0.10-0.04+0.01-0.01 pb (<0.22 pb at a 90% confidence level). Using the estimated cross section and a constant decay amplitude approximation, the cross section ?(pp??(3770)?0) is calculated for the kinematic situation of the planned PANDA experiment. The maximum cross section corresponding to the two solutions is expected to be less than 0.79 nb at 90% confidence level and 12210 nb at a center-of-mass energy of 5.26 GeV.

  15. Section 31

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    over the intervals. The intervals are The upward and downward fluxes are found by Gaussian quadrature of the radiances. Heating rates are computed from the fluxes. Upward and...

  16. Lattice dynamics of <math>BaFe2X3(X=S,Se)math> compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popovi?, Z. V.; ?epanovi?, M.; Lazarevi?, N.; Opa?i?, M.; Radonji?, M. M.; Tanaskovi?, D.; Lei, Hechang; Petrovic, C.

    2015-02-27

    We present the Raman scattering spectra of the S=2 spin ladder compounds BaFe?X? (X=S,Se) in a temperature range between 20 and 400 K. Although the crystal structures of these two compounds are both orthorhombic and very similar, they are not isostructural. The unit cell of BaFe?S? (BaFe?Se?) is base-centered Cmcm (primitive Pnma), giving 18 (36) modes to be observed in the Raman scattering experiment. We have detected almost all Raman active modes, predicted by factor group analysis, which can be observed from the cleavage planes of these compounds. Assignment of the observed Raman modes of BaFe?S(Se)? is supported by the lattice dynamics calculations. The antiferromagnetic long-range spin ordering in BaFe?Se? below TN=255K leaves a fingerprint both in the A1g and B3g phonon mode linewidth and energy.

  17. Temperature and composition phase diagram in the iron-based ladder compounds <math> Ba 1 - x Cs x Fe 2 Se 3 math>

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawai, Takafumi; Nambu, Yusuke; Ohgushi, Kenya; Du, Fei; Hirata, Yasuyuki; Avdeev, Maxim; Uwatoko, Yoshiya; Sekine, Yurina; Fukazawa, Hiroshi; Ma, Jie; Chi, Songxue; Ueda, Yutaka; Yoshizawa, Hideki; Sato, Taku J.

    2015-05-28

    We investigated the iron-based ladder compounds (Ba,Cs)Fe?Se?. Their parent compounds BaFe?Se? and CsFe?Se? have different space groups, formal valences of Fe, and magnetic structures. Electrical resistivity, specific heat, magnetic susceptibility, x-ray diffraction, and powder neutron diffraction measurements were conducted to obtain a temperature and composition phase diagram of this system. Block magnetism observed in BaFe?Se? is drastically suppressed with Cs doping. In contrast, stripe magnetism observed in CsFe?Se? is not so fragile against Ba doping. A new type of magnetic structure appears in intermediate compositions, which is similar to stripe magnetism of CsFe?Se?, but interladder spin configuration is different. Intermediate compounds show insulating behavior, nevertheless a finite T-linear contribution in specific heat was obtained at low temperatures.

  18. Spin dynamics near a putative antiferromagnetic quantum critical point in Cu-substituted <math>BaFe2As2math> and its relation to high-temperature superconductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, M. G.; Wang, M.; Tucker, G. S.; Valdivia, P. N.; Abernathy, D. L.; Chi, Songxue; Christianson, A. D.; Aczel, A. A.; Hong, T.; Heitmann, T. W.; Ran, S.; Canfield, P. C.; Bourret-Courchesne, E. D.; Kreyssig, A.; Lee, D. H.; Goldman, A. I.; McQueeney, R. J.; Birgeneau, R. J.

    2015-12-02

    We present the results of elastic and inelastic neutron scattering measurements on nonsuperconducting Ba(Fe0.957Cu0.043)2As2, a composition close to a quantum critical point between antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordered and paramagnetic phases. By comparing these results with the spin fluctuations in the low-Cu composition as well as the parent compound BaFe2As2 and superconducting Ba(Fe1xNix)2As2 compounds, we demonstrate that paramagnon-like spin fluctuations are evident in the antiferromagnetically ordered state of Ba(Fe0.957Cu0.043)2As2, which is distinct from the AFM-like spin fluctuations in the superconducting compounds. Our observations suggest that Cu substitution decouples the interaction between quasiparticles and the spin fluctuations. In addition, we show that the spin-spin correlation length ?(T) increases rapidly as the temperature is lowered and find ?/T scaling behavior, the hallmark of quantum criticality, at an antiferromagnetic quantum critical point.

  19. Charged-to-neutral correlation at forward rapidity in Au+Au collisions at <math>sNN=200math> GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bltmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Caldern de la Barca Snchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olvitt, D. L.; Page, B. S.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandacz, A.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simko, M.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2015-03-20

    Event-by-event fluctuations of the ratio of inclusive charged to photon multiplicities at forward rapidity in Au+Au collision at ?sNN=200 GeV have been studied. Dominant contribution to such fluctuations is expected to come from correlated production of charged and neutral pions. We search for evidences of dynamical fluctuations of different physical origins. Observables constructed out of moments of multiplicities are used as measures of fluctuations. Mixed events and model calculations are used as baselines. Results are compared to the dynamical net-charge fluctuations measured in the same acceptance. A non-zero statistically significant signal of dynamical fluctuations is observed in excess to the model prediction when charged particles and photons are measured in the same acceptance. Thus, we find that, unlike dynamical net-charge fluctuation, charge-neutral fluctuation is not dominated by correlation due to particle decay. Results are compared to the expectations based on the generic production mechanism of pions due to isospin symmetry, for which no significant (< 1%) deviation is observed.

  20. Neutron spectroscopic study of crystalline electric field excitations in stoichiometric and lightly stuffed <math>Yb2Ti2O7math>

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaudet, J.; Maharaj, D. D.; Sala, G.; Kermarrec, E.; Ross, K. A.; Dabkowska, H. A.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; Granroth, G. E.; Gaulin, B. D.

    2015-10-27

    Time-of-flight neutron spectroscopy has been used to determine the crystalline electric field Hamiltonian, eigenvalues and eigenvectors appropriate to the J=7/2 Yb3+ ion in the candidate quantum spin ice pyrochlore magnet Yb2Ti2O7. The precise ground state of this exotic, geometrically frustrated magnet is known to be sensitive to weak disorder associated with the growth of single crystals from the melt. Such materials display weak “stuffing,” wherein a small proportion, approximately 2%, of the nonmagnetic Ti4+ sites are occupied by excess Yb3+. We have carried out neutron spectroscopic measurements on a stoichiometric powder sample of Yb2Ti2O7, as well as a crushed single crystal with weak stuffing and an approximate composition of Yb2+xTi2–xO7+y with x = 0.046. All samples display three crystalline electric field transitions out of the ground state, and the ground state doublet itself is identified as primarily composed of mJ = ±1/2, as expected. However, stuffing at low temperatures in Yb2+xTi2–xO7+y induces a similar finite crystalline electric field lifetime as is induced in stoichiometric Yb2Ti2O7 by elevated temperature. In conclusion, an extended strain field exists about each local “stuffed” site, which produces a distribution of random crystalline electric field environments in the lightly stuffed Yb2+xTi2–xO7+y, in addition to producing a small fraction of Yb ions in defective environments with grossly different crystalline electric field eigenvalues and eigenvectors.

  1. Systematic approach for simultaneously correcting the band-gap and<math>p-dmath>separation errors of common cation III-V or II-VI binaries in density functional theory calculations within a local density approximation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jianwei; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2015-07-31

    We propose a systematic approach that can empirically correct three major errors typically found in a density functional theory (DFT) calculation within the local density approximation (LDA) simultaneously for a set of common cation binary semiconductors, such as III-V compounds, (Ga or In)X with X = N,P,As,Sb, and II-VI compounds, (Zn or Cd)X, with X = O,S,Se,Te. By correcting (1) the binary band gaps at high-symmetry points , L, X, (2) the separation of p-and d-orbital-derived valence bands, and (3) conduction band effective masses to experimental values and doing so simultaneously for common cation binaries, the resulting DFT-LDA-based quasi-first-principles method can be used to predict the electronic structure of complex materials involving multiple binaries with comparable accuracy but much less computational cost than a GW level theory. This approach provides an efficient way to evaluate the electronic structures and other material properties of complex systems, much needed for material discovery and design.

  2. Pressure-enhanced superconductivity in <math>Eu3Bi2S4F4math>

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Yongkang; Zhai, Hui -Fei; Zhang, Pan; Xu, Zhu -An; Cao, Guang -Han; Thompson, J. D.

    2014-12-17

    The pressure effect on the newly discovered charge-transferred BiS2-based superconductor, Eu3Bi2S4F4, with a Tc of 1.5 K at ambient pressure, is investigated by transport and magnetic measurements. Accompanied with the enhancement of metallicity under pressures, the onset superconducting transition temperature increases abruptly around 1.0 GPa, reaching ~10.0 K at 2.26 GPa. Alternating current magnetic susceptibility measurements indicate that a new superconducting phase with a higher Tc emerges and dominates at high pressures. In the broad pressure window of 0.68GPa?p?2.00 GPa, the high-Tc phase coexists with the low-Tc phase. Hall effect measurements reveal a significant difference in electronic structures between the two superconducting phases. As a result, our work devotes the effort to establish the commonality of pressure effect on the BiS2-based superconductors, and also uncovers the importance of electron carrier density in the high-Tc phase.

  3. Precision Measurement of the<math display='inline'>(e++e-)math>Flux in Primary Cosmic Rays from 0.5GeV to 1TeV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguilar, M.; Aisa, D.; Alpat, B.; Alvino, A.; Ambrosi, G.; Andeen, K.; Arruda, L.; Attig, N.; Azzarello, P.; Bachlechner, A.; Barao, F.; Barrau, A.; Barrin, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Basara, L.; Battarbee, M.; Battiston, R.; Bazo, J.; Becker, U.; Behlmann, M.; Beischer, B.; Berdugo, J.; Bertucci, B.; Bigongiari, G.; Bindi, V.; Bizzaglia, S.; Bizzarri, M.; Boella, G.; de Boer, W.; Bollweg, K.; Bonnivard, V.; Borgia, B.; Borsini, S.; Boschini, M.?J.; Bourquin, M.; Burger, J.; Cadoux, F.; Cai, X.?D.; Capell, M.; Caroff, S.; Casaus, J.; Cascioli, V.; Castellini, G.; Cernuda, I.; Cervelli, F.; Chae, M.?J.; Chang, Y.?H.; Chen, A.?I.; Chen, H.; Cheng, G.?M.; Chen, H.?S.; Cheng, L.; Chikanian, A.; Chou, H.?Y.; Choumilov, E.; Choutko, V.; Chung, C.?H.; Clark, C.; Clavero, R.; Coignet, G.; Consolandi, C.; Contin, A.; Corti, C.; Coste, B.; Crispoltoni, M.; Cui, Z.; Dai, M.; Delgado, C.; Della Torre, S.; Demirkz, M.?B.; Derome, L.; Di Falco, S.; Di Masso, L.; Dimiccoli, F.; Daz, C.; von Doetinchem, P.; Donnini, F.; Du, W.?J.; Duranti, M.; DUrso, D.; Eline, A.; Eppling, F.?J.; Eronen, T.; Fan, Y.?Y.; Farnesini, L.; Feng, J.; Fiandrini, E.; Fiasson, A.; Finch, E.; Fisher, P.; Galaktionov, Y.; Gallucci, G.; Garca, B.; Garca-Lpez, R.; Gargiulo, C.; Gast, H.; Gebauer, I.; Gervasi, M.; Ghelfi, A.; Gillard, W.; Giovacchini, F.; Goglov, P.; Gong, J.; Goy, C.; Grabski, V.; Grandi, D.; Graziani, M.; Guandalini, C.; Guerri, I.; Guo, K.?H.; Habiby, M.; Haino, S.; Han, K.?C.; He, Z.?H.; Heil, M.; Hoffman, J.; Hsieh, T.?H.; Huang, Z.?C.; Huh, C.; Incagli, M.; Ionica, M.; Jang, W.?Y.; Jinchi, H.; Kanishev, K.; Kim, G.?N.; Kim, K.?S.; Kirn, Th.; Kossakowski, R.; Kounina, O.; Kounine, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Krafczyk, M.?S.; Kunz, S.; La Vacca, G.; Laudi, E.; Laurenti, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, H.?T.; Lee, S.?C.; Leluc, C.; Li, H.?L.; Li, J.?Q.; Li, Q.; Li, Q.; Li, T.?X.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Li, Z.?H.; Li, Z.?Y.; Lim, S.; Lin, C.?H.; Lipari, P.; Lippert, T.; Liu, D.; Liu, H.; Lomtadze, T.; Lu, M.?J.; Lu, Y.?S.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Luo, F.; Luo, J.?Z.; Lv, S.?S.; Majka, R.; Malinin, A.; Ma, C.; Marn, J.; Martin, T.; Martnez, G.; Masi, N.; Maurin, D.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meng, Q.; Mo, D.?C.; Morescalchi, L.; Mott, P.; Mller, M.; Ni, J.?Q.; Nikonov, N.; Nozzoli, F.; Nunes, P.; Obermeier, A.; Oliva, A.; Orcinha, M.; Palmonari, F.; Palomares, C.; Paniccia, M.; Papi, A.; Pauluzzi, M.; Pedreschi, E.; Pensotti, S.; Pereira, R.; Pilo, F.; Piluso, A.; Pizzolotto, C.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Poireau, V.; Postaci, E.; Putze, A.; Quadrani, L.; Qi, X.?M.; Rih, T.; Rancoita, P.?G.; Rapin, D.; Ricol, J.?S.; Rodrguez, I.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rozhkov, A.; Rozza, D.; Sagdeev, R.; Sandweiss, J.; Saouter, P.; Sbarra, C.; Schael, S.; Schmidt, S.?M.; Schuckardt, D.; Schulz von Dratzig, A.; Schwering, G.; Scolieri, G.; Seo, E.?S.; Shan, B.?S.; Shan, Y.?H.; Shi, J.?Y.; Shi, X.?Y.; Shi, Y.?M.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Spada, F.; Spinella, F.; Sun, W.; Sun, W.?H.; Tacconi, M.; Tang, C.?P.; Tang, X.?W.; Tang, Z.?C.; Tao, L.; Tescaro, D.; Ting, Samuel C.?C.; Ting, S.?M.; Tomassetti, N.; Torsti, J.; Trko?lu, C.; Urban, T.; Vagelli, V.; Valente, E.; Vannini, C.; Valtonen, E.; Vaurynovich, S.; Vecchi, M.; Velasco, M.; Vialle, J.?P.; Wang, L.?Q.; Wang, Q.?L.; Wang, R.?S.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.?X.; Weng, Z.?L.; Whitman, K.; Wienkenhver, J.; Wu, H.; Xia, X.; Xie, M.; Xie, S.; Xiong, R.?Q.; Xin, G.?M.; Xu, N.?S.; Xu, W.; Yan, Q.; Yang, J.; Yang, M.; Ye, Q.?H.; Yi, H.; Yu, Y.?J.; Yu, Z.?Q.; Zeissler, S.; Zhang, J.?H.; Zhang, M.?T.; Zhang, X.?B.; Zhang, Z.; Zheng, Z.?M.; Zhuang, H.?L.; Zhukov, V.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, N.; Zuccon, P.; Zurbach, C.

    2014-11-26

    We present a measurement of the cosmic ray (e++e-) flux in the range 0.5 GeV to 1 TeV based on the analysis of 10.6 million (e++e-) events collected by AMS. The statistics and the resolution of AMS provide a precision measurement of the flux. The flux is smooth and reveals new and distinct information. Above 30.2 GeV, the flux can be described by a single power law with a spectral index ?= -3.170 0.008(stat+syst) 0.008(energy scale).

  4. Spatially resolved penetration depth measurements and vortex manipulation in the ferromagnetic superconductor <math>ErNi2B2Cmath>

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wulferding, Dirk; Yang, Ilkyu; Yang, Jinho; Lee, Minkyung; Choi, Hee Cheul; Bud'ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.; Yeom, Han Woong; Kim, Jeehoon

    2015-07-31

    We present a local probe study of the magnetic superconductor ErNi2B2C, using magnetic force microscopy at sub-Kelvin temperatures. ErNi2B2C is an ideal system to explore the effects of concomitant superconductivity and ferromagnetism. At 500 mK, far below the transition to a weakly ferromagnetic state, we directly observe a structured magnetic background on the micrometer scale. We determine spatially resolved absolute values of the magnetic penetration depth ? and study its temperature dependence as the system undergoes magnetic phase transitions from paramagnetic to antiferromagnetic, and to weak ferromagnetic, all within the superconducting regime. We estimate the absolute pinning force of Abrikosov vortices, which shows a position dependence and temperature dependence as well, and discuss the possibility of the purported spontaneous vortex formation.

  5. Search for a Dark Photon in<math display='inline'>e+e-math>Collisions atBaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.?P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D.?N.; Feng, M.; Kerth, L.?T.; Kolomensky, Yu.?G.; Lee, M.?J.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.?S.; McKenna, J.?A.; So, R.?Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V.?E.; Buzykaev, A.?R.; Druzhinin, V.?P.; Golubev, V.?B.; Kravchenko, E.?A.; Onuchin, A.?P.; Serednyakov, S.?I.; Skovpen, Yu.?I.; Solodov, E.?P.; Todyshev, K.?Yu.; Lankford, A.?J.; Mandelkern, M.; Dey, B.; Gary, J.?W.; Long, O.; Campagnari, C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Hong, T.?M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J.?D.; West, C.?A.; Eisner, A.?M.; Lockman, W.?S.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Schumm, B.?A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D.?S.; Cheng, C.?H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K.?T.; Hitlin, D.?G.; Miyashita, T.?S.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F.?C.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B.?T.; Pushpawela, B.?G.; Sokoloff, M.?D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P.?C.; Ford, W.?T.; Gaz, A.; Smith, J.?G.; Wagner, S.?R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W.?H.; Spaan, B.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I.?M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M.?R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H.?M.; Dauncey, P.?D.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Prell, S.; Ahmed, H.; Gritsan, A.?V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A.?M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D.?J.; Wright, D.?M.; Coleman, J.?P.; Fry, J.?R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D.?E.; Payne, D.?J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A.?J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Bougher, J.; Brown, D.?N.; Davis, C.?L.; Denig, A.?G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Schubert, K.?R.; Barlow, R.?J.; Lafferty, G.?D.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D.?A.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Patel, P.?M.; Robertson, S.?H.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D.?J.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C.?P.; LoSecco, J.?M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Feltresi, E.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G.?R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M.?A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J.?J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A.?J.?S.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Pilloni, A.; Piredda, G.; Bnger, C.; Dittrich, S.; Grnberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Hess, M.; Leddig, T.; Vo, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E.?O.; Wilson, F.?F.; Emery, S.; Vasseur, G.; Anulli, F.; Aston, D.; Bard, D.?J.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M.?R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G.?P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R.?C.; Fulsom, B.?G.; Graham, M.?T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W.?R.; Kim, P.; Leith, D.?W.?G.?S.; Lewis, P.; Lindemann, D.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H.?L.; MacFarlane, D.?B.; Muller, D.?R.; Neal, H.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B.?N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A.?A.; Schindler, R.?H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M.?K.; Vavra, J.; Wisniewski, W.?J.; Wulsin, H.?W.; Purohit, M.?V.; White, R.?M.; Wilson, J.?R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S.?J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P.?R.; Puccio, E.?M.?T.; Alam, M.?S.; Ernst, J.?A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D.?R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S.?M.; Ritchie, J.?L.; Ruland, A.?M.; Schwitters, R.?F.; Wray, B.?C.; Izen, J.?M.; Lou, X.?C.; Bianchi, F.; De Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Villanueva-Perez, P.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Beaulieu, A.; Bernlochner, F.?U.; Choi, H.?H.?F.; King, G.?J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M.?J.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I.?M.; Roney, J.?M.; Sobie, R.?J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T.?J.; Harrison, P.?F.; Latham, T.?E.; Band, H.?R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S.?L.

    2014-11-10

    Dark sectors charged under a new Abelian interaction have recently received much attention in the context of dark matter models. These models introduce a light new mediator, the so-called dark photon (A'), connecting the dark sector to the standard model. We present a search for a dark photon in the reaction e+e-??A', A'?e+e-, ?+?- using 514 fb-1 of data collected with the BABAR detector. We observe no statistically significant deviations from the standard model predictions, and we set 90% confidence level upper limits on the mixing strength between the photon and dark photon at the level of10-4-10-3 for dark photon masses in the range 0.0210.2 GeV We further constrain the range of the parameter space favored by interpretations of the discrepancy between the calculated and measured anomalous magnetic moment of the muon.

  6. Radiative return capabilities of a high-energy, high-luminosity<math display='inline'>e+e-math>collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karliner, Marek; Low, Matthew; Rosner, Jonathan L.; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2015-08-14

    An electron-positron collider operating at a center-of-mass energy ECM can collect events at all lower energies through initial-state radiation (ISR or radiative return). We explore the capabilities for radiative return studies by a proposed high-luminosity collider at ECM = 250 or 90 GeV, to fill in gaps left by lower-energy colliders such as PEP, PETRA, TRISTAN, and LEP. These capabilities are compared with those of the lower-energy e+e- colliders as well as hadron colliders such as the Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Some examples of accessible questions in dark photon searches and heavy flavor spectroscopy are given.

  7. Measurements of dielectron production in Au + Au collisions at <math>sNN=200math> GeV from the STAR experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Jung, K.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, Z. M.; Li, Y.; Li, X.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, L.; Ma, R.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; Meehan, K.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M. K.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, X.; Sun, Z.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, N.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A. N.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Webb, J. C.; Webb, G.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Z.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Y. F.; Yang, Q.; Yang, Y.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I. -K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2015-08-24

    We report on measurements of dielectron (e⁺e⁻) production in Au+Au collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 200 GeV per nucleon-nucleon pair using the STAR detector at RHIC. Systematic measurements of the dielectron yield as a function of transverse momentum (pT) and collision centrality show an enhancement compared to a cocktail simulation of hadronic sources in the low invariant-mass region (Mee < 1GeV/c2). This enhancement cannot be reproduced by the ρ-meson vacuum spectral function. In minimum-bias collisions, in the invariant-mass range of 0.30 – 0.76GeV/c², integrated over the full pT acceptance, the enhancement factor is 1.76±0.06(stat.)±0.26(sys.)±0.29(cocktail). The enhancement factor exhibits weak centrality and pT dependence in STAR's accessible kinematic regions, while the excess yield in this invariant-mass region as a function of the number of participating nucleons follows a power-law shape with a power of 1.44±0.10. Models that assume an in-medium broadening of the ρ-meson spectral function consistently describe the observed excess in these measurements. In addition, we report on measurements of ω- and Φ-meson production through their e⁺e⁻ decay channel. These measurements show good agreement with Tsallis blast-wave model predictions, as well as, in the case of the Φ meson, results through its K⁺K⁻ decay channel. In the intermediate invariant-mass region (1.1 < Mee < 3GeV/c²), we investigate the spectral shapes from different collision centralities. Physics implications for possible in-medium modification of charmed hadron production and other physics sources are discussed.

  8. Bound state solution of Dirac equation for 3D harmonics oscillator plus trigonometric scarf noncentral potential using SUSY QM approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cari, C. Suparmi, A.

    2014-09-30

    Dirac equation of 3D harmonics oscillator plus trigonometric Scarf non-central potential for spin symmetric case is solved using supersymmetric quantum mechanics approach. The Dirac equation for exact spin symmetry reduces to Schrodinger like equation. The relativistic energy and wave function for spin symmetric case are simply obtained using SUSY quantum mechanics method and idea of shape invariance.

  9. T cell receptor recognition of a 'super-bulged' major histocompatibility complex class I?bound peptide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tynan, Fleur E.; Burrows, Scott R.; Buckle, Ashley M.; Clements, Craig S.; Borg, Natalie A.; Miles, John J.; Beddoe, Travis; Whisstock, James C.; Wilce, Matthew C.; Silins, Sharon L.; Burrows, Jacqueline M.; Kjer-Nielsen, Lars; Kostenko, Lyudmila; Purcell, Anthony W.; McCluskey, James; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2010-07-20

    Unusually long major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-restricted epitopes are important in immunity, but their 'bulged' conformation represents a potential obstacle to {alpha}{beta} T cell receptor (TCR)-MHC class I docking. To elucidate how such recognition is achieved while still preserving MHC restriction, we have determined here the structure of a TCR in complex with HLA-B*3508 presenting a peptide 13 amino acids in length. This complex was atypical of TCR-peptide-MHC class I interactions, being dominated at the interface by peptide-mediated interactions. The TCR assumed two distinct orientations, swiveling on top of the centrally bulged, rigid peptide such that only limited contacts were made with MHC class I. Although the TCR-peptide recognition resembled an antibody-antigen interaction, the TCR-MHC class I contacts defined a minimal 'generic footprint' of MHC-restriction. Thus our findings simultaneously demonstrate the considerable adaptability of the TCR and the 'shape' of MHC restriction.

  10. Bound on Z{sup '} mass from CDMS II in the dark left-right gauge model II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalil, Shaaban; Lee, Hye-Sung; Ma, Ernest

    2010-03-01

    With the recent possible signal of dark matter from the CDMS II experiment, the Z{sup '} mass of a new version of the dark left-right gauge model (DLRM II) is predicted to be at around a TeV. As such, it has an excellent discovery prognosis at the operating Large Hadron Collider.

  11. Women @ Energy: Alla Zelenyuk | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Growing up in the Ukraine, the daughter of secondary physics and math teachers, Dr. Alla Zelenyuk enjoyed math and science at a young age. Growing up in the Ukraine, the daughter of secondary physics and math teachers, Dr. Alla Zelenyuk enjoyed math and science at a young age. Check out other profiles in the Women @ Energy series and share your favorites on Pinterest. Growing up in the Ukraine, the daughter of secondary physics and math teachers, Dr. Alla Zelenyuk enjoyed math and science at a

  12. Gregory Lecture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Conférence donné par Benoît Mandelbrot, brillant mathématicien et professeur de mathématique à l'Université Yale

  13. Women @ Energy: Kavita Ravi | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    I grew up in India - lot of focus there on starting math early and getting kids proficient in it. This served as a strong foundation through the years. Math was always easier for ...

  14. september | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Brown and Bell Co-Organize DOE Applied Math Workshop Titan Summit Shares OLCF and User ... Brown and Bell Co-Organize DOE Applied Math Workshop Berkeley Lab's Computational ...

  15. Hispanic Heritage Month - Honoring a Heritage and Individual...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Edmonds continued on, starting SMArt (Science, Math and Art) Night at her local elementary school in Pasadena to expose elementary school children to math, science and art and show ...

  16. A Preliminary Report on Research and Development in the FY 1999...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and Math (STEM) I always hear stories about how we can't find enough engineers, we can't find enough computer programmers... And that's why we're emphasizing math and ...

  17. Energy Secretary Chu Announces Montana Schools Win National Student...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    "By engaging America's students at a young age to apply the math and science skills ... "It is absolutely essential that students have a solid foundation in math and science to ...

  18. Gnu Compiler Performance on Edison

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -O3 -ffast-math In addition to the -O3 optimizations, this performs optimizations at the expense of an exact implementation of IEEE or ISO rulesspecifications for math functions. ...

  19. Colorado School Earns Return Trip to National Science Bowl |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    After a full day answering rapid-fire questions in physics, math, astronomy, chemistry, ... Bowl in 1991 as a way to encourage high school students to explore math and science. ...

  20. Women @ Energy: Mayling Wong-Squires | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    I always enjoyed math and science through high school. When I was in college, for two ... One must enjoy math and science, as it is an essential tool to use in engineering. Also, ...

  1. Publisher's Note: "Chiral symmetry restoration at large chemical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    at large chemical potential 2 in strongly coupled SU(N) gauge theories" J. Math. ... at large chemical potential 2 in strongly coupled SU(N) gauge theories" J. Math. ...

  2. Jefferson Lab Website Offers Preparation Help For Virginia Standards...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "The most frequently accessed pages on the website include the Virginia Standards of Learning Science, Math and Technology Practice Tests and our 'Who Wants to Win 1,000,000 Math ...

  3. Women @ Energy: Marge Bardeen | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Elmhurst, Illinois, and was a parent volunteer for many years helping students learn math. ... I always enjoyed math and science. I was the proud owner of a chemistry set, an electric ...

  4. CCSD.DSIP.0910.FINAL

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... in 3rd through 8th grade reading and math, and both grades 5 and 8 increased in ... and recruited participants for the Math and Parent Partnership Training in ...

  5. Strategies For Success | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Forming a National Science Bowl Team If your school doesn't already have a math andor ... come from schools with fun, well-organized math andor science clubs (regardless of size). ...

  6. Jefferson Lab's Education web site hits new high-usage record...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the pages accessed were from our Virginia Standards of Learning (SOL) Science, Math and Technology Practice Tests and our 'Who Wants to Win 1,000,000 Math and Science Quiz.'" ...

  7. Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology from...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    When the "dust" settled at the end of an intense day of science and math questions and ... among several teams that stayed for an afternoon of math and science challenge activities. ...

  8. David Turner to Retire from NERSC User Services Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    after 17 years at NERSC. His love of math, science and computers began when he was ... In 1974, before my senior year of high school, I attended a month-long math camp at ...

  9. JLab's Science Education Website Helps Students Prep for 2006...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "The most frequently accessed pages on our website include the Virginia Standards of Learning Science, Math and Technology Practice Tests and our 'Who Wants to Win 1,000,000 Math ...

  10. Jefferson Lab Website Offers Help For Virginia Standards of Learning...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "The most frequently accessed pages on the website include the Virginia Standards of Learning Science, Math and Technology Practice Tests and our 'Who Wants to Win 1,000,000 Math ...

  11. ORISE: Graduate Student Research Experiences - Folami Alamudun

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Folami Alamudun spent his summer in the Research Alliance Math and Science Program at ... in the U.S. Department of Energy's Research Alliance Math and Science (RAMS) Program. ...

  12. Website Helps Students Prepare For Range of Virginia Standards...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    For the first time, the website now includes high school Biology, in addition to Math 2, ... Virginia Standards of Learning Science, Math and Technology Practice Tests and our 'Who ...

  13. Energy 101: Promoting Energy Education in the Nation's Colleges...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    careers to the fields of energy and STEM (science, technology, engineering and math). ... as well as an energy-based math course for veterans and active duty military personnel. ...

  14. Jefferson Lab's Science Education Website Helps Students Prepare...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    One of the most frequently accessed pages is the "Who Wants to Win 1,000,000 Math and ... Virginia Standards of Learning Science, Math and Technology Practice Tests and our 'Who ...

  15. Jefferson Lab's Science Education Website Helps Students Prepare...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are from the Virginia Standards of Learning Science, Math and Technology Practice Tests we have on our website, and our 'Who Wants to Win 1,000,000 Math and Science Quiz.'" ...

  16. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Group Flows Cycles and math display inline mi c mi math Theorem Folklore Curtright Thomas L Jin Xiang Zachos Cosmas K Not Available American Physical Society None USDOE United...

  17. A numerical study of crack initiation in a bcc iron system based...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    direct numerical results to the dynamic bifurcation theory R. Haberman, SIAM J. Appl. Math. 37, 69-106 (1979). Authors: Li, Xiantao, E-mail: xli@math.psu.edu 1 + Show Author...

  18. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Group Flows, Cycles, and<math display'inline'>c<math>-Theorem Folklore","Curtright, Thomas L.; Jin, Xiang; Zachos, Cosmas K.","2012-03-01T05:00:00Z",1098601,"10.1103...

  19. Measurement of the nuclear multiplicity ratio or image hadronization at CLAS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Daniel, A; Brooks, W K; Hakobyan, H; Adhikari, K P; Adikaram, D; Aghasyan, M; Amarian, M; Anghinolfi, M; Avakian, H; Baghdasryan, H; et al

    2011-11-30

    The influence of cold nuclear matter on lepto-production of hadrons in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering is measured using the CLAS detector in Hall B at Jefferson Lab and a 5.014 GeV electron beam. We report the View the MathML source multiplicity ratios for targets of C, Fe, and Pb relative to deuterium as a function of the fractional virtual photon energy z transferred to the View the MathML source and the transverse momentum squared View the MathML source of the View the MathML source. We find that the multiplicity ratios for View the MathML source are reduced in the nuclearmoremedium at high z and low View the MathML source, with a trend for the View the MathML source transverse momentum to be broadened in the nucleus for large View the MathML source.less

  20. NNSA Corporate CPEP Process NNSA LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL SECURITY...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... commitment activities including Science, Technology Engineering and Math educational outreach and support, economic development support, and augmentation of employee giving. ...

  1. Programming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Programming Programming Compiling Codes There are three compiler suites available on Carver: Portland Group (PGI), Intel, and GCC. The PGI compilers are the default, to provide compatibility with other NERSC platforms. Read More » Using MKL Intel's Math Kernel Library (MKL) is a library of highly optimized, extensively threaded math routines optimized for Intel processors. Core math functions include BLAS, LAPACK, ScaLAPACK, Sparse Solvers, Fast Fourier Transforms, Vector Math, and more. It is

  2. Mentoring and Educating to Increase Diversity in Science, Tech, Engineering

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and Math | Department of Energy Mentoring and Educating to Increase Diversity in Science, Tech, Engineering and Math Mentoring and Educating to Increase Diversity in Science, Tech, Engineering and Math October 12, 2011 - 9:19am Addthis Mentoring and Educating to Increase Diversity in Science, Tech, Engineering and Math Bill Valdez Bill Valdez Director of Workforce Management "The next two decades of global diversity and inclusion will present unprecedented opportunities and

  3. Observation of a new charged charmoniumlike state in<math display='inline'>B0?J/?K-?+math>decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chilikin, K.; Mizuk, R.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D.?M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Aziz, T.; Bakich, A.?M.; Bansal, V.; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bra?ko, M.; Browder, T.?E.; ?ervenkov, D.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B.?G.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Danilov, M.; Doleal, Z.; Drsal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, K.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J.?E.; Ferber, T.; Frost, O.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Ganguly, S.; Garmash, A.; Gillard, R.; Goh, Y.?M.; Golob, B.; Grzymkowska, O.; Haba, J.; Hara, T.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; He, X.?H.; Hou, W.-S.; Huschle, M.; Hyun, H.?J.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, I.; Joo, K.?K.; Julius, T.; Kawasaki, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D.?Y.; Kim, H.?J.; Kim, J.?H.; Kim, M.?J.; Kim, Y.?J.; Kinoshita, K.; Ko, B.?R.; Korpar, S.; Krian, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J.?S.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liu, Y.; Liventsev, D.; Lukin, P.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mohanty, G.?B.; Moll, A.; Mori, T.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nedelkovska, E.; Nisar, N.?K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S.?L.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C.?W.; Park, H.; Pedlar, T.?K.; Petri?, M.; Piilonen, L.?E.; Ribel, E.; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, V.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Seon, O.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C.?P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stari?, M.; Steder, M.; Sumisawa, K.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, U.; Tanida, K.; Tatishvili, G.; Teramoto, Y.; Thorne, F.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Wagner, M.?N.; Wang, C.?H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Wang, X.?L.; Watanabe, Y.; Wehle, S.; Williams, K.?M.; Won, E.; Yamaoka, J.; Yashchenko, S.; Zhang, Z.?P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2014-12-16

    We present the results of an amplitude analysis of B0?J/?K-?+ decays. A new charged charmoniumlike state Zc(4200)+ decaying to J/??+ is observed with a significance of 6.2?. The mass and width of the Zc(4200)+ are 4196+31-29+17-13 MeV/c2 and 370+70-70+70-132 MeV, respectively; the preferred assignment of the quantum numbers is JP=1+. In addition, we find evidence for Zc(4430)+?J/??+. The analysis is based on a 711 fb-1 data sample collected by the Belle detector at the asymmetric-energy e+e- collider KEKB.

  4. Measurement of the target-normal single-spin asymmetry in quasielastic scattering from the reaction <math display='inline'>He3?(e,e')math>

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y. -W.; Long, E.; Mihovilovi?, M.; Jin, G.; Allada, K.; Anderson, B.; Annand, J. R. M.; Averett, T.; Ayerbe-Gayoso, C.; Boeglin, W.; Bradshaw, P.; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; Cates, G. D.; Chen, C.; Chen, J. P.; Chudakov, E.; De Leo, R.; Deng, X.; Deur, A.; Dutta, C.; El Fassi, L.; Flay, D.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Gao, H.; Gilad, S.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, O.; Golge, S.; Gomez, J.; Hansen, O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, J.; Ibrahim, H.; de Jager, C. W.; Jensen, E.; Jiang, X.; John, J. St.; Jones, M.; Kang, H.; Katich, J.; Khanal, H. P.; King, P.; Korsch, W.; LeRose, J.; Lindgren, R.; Lu, H. -J.; Luo, W.; Markowitz, P.; Meziane, M.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Monaghan, P.; Muangma, N.; Nanda, S.; Norum, B. E.; Pan, K.; Parno, D.; Piasetzky, E.; Posik, M.; Punjabi, V.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Qiu, X.; Riordan, S.; Ron, G.; Saha, A.; Sawatzky, B.; Schiavilla, R.; Schoenrock, B.; Shabestari, M.; Shahinyan, A.; irca, S.; Subedi, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Tobias, W. A.; Tireman, W.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Wang, D.; Wang, K.; Wang, Y.; Watson, J.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Ye, Z.; Zhan, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zheng, X.; Zhao, B.; Zhu, L.

    2015-10-22

    We report the first measurement of the target single-spin asymmetry, Ay, in quasi-elastic scattering from the inclusive reaction 3He? (e,e') on a 3He gas target polarized normal to the lepton scattering plane. Assuming time-reversal invariance, this asymmetry is strictly zero for one-photon exchange. A non-zero Ay can arise from the interference between the one- and two-photon exchange processes which is sensitive to the details of the sub-structure of the nucleon. An experiment recently completed at Jefferson Lab yielded asymmetries with high statistical precision at Q2= 0.13, 0.46 and 0.97 GeV2. These measurements demonstrate, for the first time, that the 3He asymmetry is clearly non-zero and negative with a statistical significance of (8-10)?. Using measured proton-to-3He cross-section ratios and the effective polarization approximation, neutron asymmetries of -(1-3)% were obtained. The neutron asymmetry at high Q2 is related to moments of the Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs). Our measured neutron asymmetry at Q2=0.97 GeV2 agrees well with a prediction based on two-photon exchange using a GPD model and in addition provides a new independent constraint on these distributions.

  5. Measurement of the Effective Weak Mixing Angle in<math display='inline'>pp?Z/?*?e+e-math>Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.? M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B.? S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J.? P.; Alexeev, G.? D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. ?V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. ?F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S.? B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P.? C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E.? E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. ?B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C.? P.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Casey, B.? C.?K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K.? M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S.? W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. ?E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. ?J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S.? P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H.? T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. ?F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L.? V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. ?D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V.? N.; Faur, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H.? E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. ?H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garca-Gonzlez, J. ?A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C.? E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. ?D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M.? W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J.? M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. ?P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M.? D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. ?D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J.? L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A.? S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M.? S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A.? W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. ?N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J.? M.; Kozelov, A.? V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. ?A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H.? S.; Lee, S.? W.; Lee, W. ?M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q.? Z.; Lim, J.? K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V.? V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A.? L.; Maciel, A. ?K.?A.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V.? L.; Mansour, J.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. ?L.; Meijer, M.? M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. ?G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N.? K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H.? A.; Negret, J.? P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H.? T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. ?K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Pleier, M. -A.; Podstavkov, V. ?M.; Popov, A.? V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P.? N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M.? P.; Santos, A. ?S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. ?D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. ?A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G.? R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D.? A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V.? V.; Tsai, Y. -T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W.? M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E.? W.; Vasilyev, I.? A.; Verkheev, A. ?Y.; Vertogradov, L. ?S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.

    2015-07-22

    We present a measurement of the fundamental parameter of the standard model, the weak mixing angle sin2??eff which determines the relative strength of weak and electromagnetic interactions, in pp?Z/?*?e+e- events at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV, using data corresponding to 9.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The effective weak mixing angle is extracted from the forward-backward charge asymmetry as a function of the invariant mass around the Z boson pole. The measured value of sin2??eff=0.231470.00047 is the most precise measurement from light quark interactions to date, with a precision close to the best LEP and SLD results.

  6. Electronic structure of the heavy-fermion caged compound <math>Ce3Pd20X6(X=Si,Ge)math> studied by density functional theory and photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamaoka, Hitoshi; Schwier, Eike F.; Arita, Masashi; Shimada, Kenya; Tsujii, Naohito; Jarrige, Ignace; Jiang, Jian; Hayashi, Hirokazu; Iwasawa, Hideaki; Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki; Kitazawa, Hideaki

    2015-03-30

    The electronic structure of Ce₃Pd₂₀X₆ (X = Si, Ge) has been studied using detailed density functional theory (DFT) calculations and high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) measurements. The orbital decomposition of the electronic structure by DFT calculations indicates that Ce atoms at the (8c) site surrounded by 16 Pd atoms have a more localized nature and a tendency to be magnetic. Ce atoms in the (4a) site surrounded by 12 Pd and 6 X atoms, on the other, show only a negligible magnetic moment. In the photoemission valence-band spectra we observe a strong f⁰ (Ce⁴⁺) component with a small fraction of f¹ (Ce³⁺) component. The spectral weight of f¹ component near the Fermi level Ce₃Pd₂₀Si₆ is stronger than that for Ce₃Pd₂₀Ge₆ at the 4d-4f resonance, suggesting stronger c-f hybridization in the former. This may hint to the origin of the large electronic specific coefficient of Ce₃Pd₂₀Si₆ compared to Ce₃Pd₂₀Ge₆.

  7. Structure of Cryptosporidium IMP dehydrogenase bound to an inhibitor with in vivo antiparasitic activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Youngchang; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Cuny, Gregory D.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2015-04-21

    Inosine 5-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is a promising target for the treatment of Cryptosporidium infections. Here, the structure of C. parvum IMPDH (CpIMPDH) in complex with inosine 5-monophosphate (IMP) and P131, an inhibitor with in vivo anticryptosporidial activity, is reported. P131 contains two aromatic groups, one of which interacts with the hypoxanthine ring of IMP, while the second interacts with the aromatic ring of a tyrosine in the adjacent subunit. In addition, the amine and NO2 moieties bind in hydrated cavities, forming water-mediated hydrogen bonds to the protein. The design of compounds to replace these water molecules is a new strategy for the further optimization of C. parvum inhibitors for both antiparasitic and antibacterial applications.

  8. Characterization of Free Surface-Bound and Entrapped Water Environments in Poly(N-Isopropyl Acrylamide) Hydrogels via 1H HRMAS PFG NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alam, Todd Michael; Childress, Kimberly Kay; Pastoor, Kevin; Rice, Charles

    2014-09-19

    We found that different water environments in poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) (PNIPAAm) hydrogels are identified and characterized using 1H high resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Local water environments corresponding to a “free” highly mobile species, along with waters showing restricted dynamics are resolved in these swollen hydro-gels. For photo-initiated polymerized PNIPAAm gels, an additional entrapped water species is observed. Spin–spin R2 relaxation experiments support the argument of reduced mobility in the restricted and entrapped water species. Furthermore, by combining pulse field gradient techniques with HRMAS NMR it is possible to directly measure the self-diffusion rate for these different water environments. The behavior of the heterogeneous water environments through the lower critical solution temperature transition is described.

  9. NUMERICAL MODELING OF THE DISRUPTION OF COMET D/1993 F2 SHOEMAKER-LEVY 9 REPRESENTING THE PROGENITOR BY A GRAVITATIONALLY BOUND ASSEMBLAGE OF RANDOMLY SHAPED POLYHEDRA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Movshovitz, Naor; Asphaug, Erik; Korycansky, Donald

    2012-11-10

    We advance the modeling of rubble-pile solid bodies by re-examining the tidal breakup of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9, an event that occurred during a 1.33 R encounter with Jupiter in 1992 July. Tidal disruption of the comet nucleus led to a chain of sub-nuclei {approx}100-1000 m diameter; these went on to collide with the planet two years later. They were intensively studied prior to and during the collisions, making SL9 the best natural benchmark for physical models of small-body disruption. For the first time in the study of this event, we use numerical codes treating rubble piles as collections of polyhedra. This introduces forces of dilatation and friction, and inelastic response. As in our previous studies we conclude that the progenitor must have been a rubble pile, and we obtain approximately the same pre-breakup diameter ({approx}1.5 km) in our best fits to the data. We find that the inclusion of realistic fragment shapes leads to grain locking and dilatancy, so that even in the absence of friction or other dissipation we find that disruption is overall more difficult than in our spheres-based simulations. We constrain the comet's bulk density at {rho}{sub bulk} {approx} 300-400 kg m{sup -3}, half that of our spheres-based predictions and consistent with recent estimates derived from spacecraft observations.

  10. Probing charge transfer in a novel class of luminescent perovskite-based heterostructures composed of quantum dots bound to RE-activated CaTiO3 phosphors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Crystal S. Lewis; Wong, Stanislaus S.; Liu, Haiqing; Han, Jinkyu; Wang, Lei; Yue, Shiyu; Brennan, Nicholas A.

    2016-01-04

    We report on the synthesis and structural characterization of novel semiconducting heterostructures composed of cadmium selenide (CdSe) quantum dots (QDs) attached onto the surfaces of novel high-surface area, porous rare-earth-ion doped alkaline earth titanate micron-scale spherical motifs, i.e. both Eu-doped and Pr-doped CaTiO3, composed of constituent, component nanoparticles. These unique metal oxide perovskite building blocks were created by a multi-pronged synthetic strategy involving molten salt and hydrothermal protocols. Subsequently, optical characterization of these heterostructures indicated a clear behavioral dependence of charge transfer in these systems upon a number of parameters such as the nature of the dopant, the reaction temperature,more » and particle size. Specifically, 2.7 nm diameter ligand-functionalized CdSe QDs were anchored onto sub-micron sized CaTiO3-based spherical assemblies, prepared by molten salt protocols. We found that both the Pr- and Eu-doped CaTiO3 displayed pronounced PL emissions, with maximum intensities observed using optimized lanthanide concentrations of 0.2 mol% and 6 mol%, respectively. Analogous experiments were performed on Eu-doped BaTiO3 and SrTiO3 motifs, but CaTiO3 still performed as the most effective host material amongst the three perovskite systems tested. Furthermore, the ligand-capped CdSe QD-doped CaTiO3 heterostructures exhibited effective charge transfer between the two individual constituent nanoscale components, an assertion corroborated by the corresponding quenching of their measured PL signals.« less

  11. Bounds on an Anomalous Dijet Resonance in W+ jets Production in pp̄ Collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; et al

    2011-06-30

    We present a study of the dijet invariant mass spectrum in events with two jets produced in association with a W boson in data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.3 fb⁻¹ collected with the D0 detector at s√=1.96 TeV. We find no evidence for anomalous resonant dijet production and derive upper limits on the production cross section of an anomalous dijet resonance recently reported by the CDF Collaboration, investigating the range of dijet invariant mass from 110 to 170 GeV/c². The probability of the D0 data being consistent with the presence of a dijet resonance with 4 pb productionmore »cross section at 145 GeV/c² is 8×10⁻⁶.« less

  12. Bounds on an Anomalous Dijet Resonance in W+ jets Production in pp̄ Collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; et al

    2011-06-30

    We present a study of the dijet invariant mass spectrum in events with two jets produced in association with a W boson in data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.3 fb⁻¹ collected with the D0 detector at s√=1.96 TeV. We find no evidence for anomalous resonant dijet production and derive upper limits on the production cross section of an anomalous dijet resonance recently reported by the CDF Collaboration, investigating the range of dijet invariant mass from 110 to 170 GeV/c². The probability of the D0 data being consistent with the presence of a dijet resonance with 4 pb productionmore » cross section at 145 GeV/c² is 8×10⁻⁶.« less

  13. Partial wave analysis of the reaction p(3.5 GeV) + p → pK+ Λ to search for the "ppK–" bound state

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Agakishiev, G.; Arnold, O.; Belver, D.; Belyaev, A.; Berger-Chen, J. C.; Blanco, A.; Böhmer, M.; Boyard, J. L.; Cabanelas, P.; Chernenko, S.; et al

    2015-01-26

    Employing the Bonn–Gatchina partial wave analysis framework (PWA), we have analyzed HADES data of the reaction p(3.5GeV) + p → pK+Λ. This reaction might contain information about the kaonic cluster “ppK-” (with quantum numbers JP=0- and total isospin I =1/2) via its decay into pΛ. Due to interference effects in our coherent description of the data, a hypothetical K ¯NN (or, specifically “ppK-”) cluster signal need not necessarily show up as a pronounced feature (e.g. a peak) in an invariant mass spectrum like pΛ. Our PWA analysis includes a variety of resonant and non-resonant intermediate states and delivers a goodmore »description of our data (various angular distributions and two-hadron invariant mass spectra) without a contribution of a K ¯NN cluster. At a confidence level of CLs=95% such a cluster cannot contribute more than 2–12% to the total cross section with a pK+ Λ final state, which translates into a production cross-section between 0.7 μb and 4.2 μb, respectively. The range of the upper limit depends on the assumed cluster mass, width and production process.« less

  14. Partial wave analysis of the reaction p(3.5 GeV) + p → pK+ Λ to search for the "ppK–" bound state

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Agakishiev, G.; Arnold, O.; Belver, D.; Belyaev, A.; Berger-Chen, J. C.; Blanco, A.; Böhmer, M.; Boyard, J. L.; Cabanelas, P.; Chernenko, S.; et al

    2015-01-26

    Employing the Bonn–Gatchina partial wave analysis framework (PWA), we have analyzed HADES data of the reaction p(3.5GeV) + p → pK+Λ. This reaction might contain information about the kaonic cluster “ppK-” (with quantum numbers JP=0- and total isospin I =1/2) via its decay into pΛ. Due to interference effects in our coherent description of the data, a hypothetical K ¯NN (or, specifically “ppK-”) cluster signal need not necessarily show up as a pronounced feature (e.g. a peak) in an invariant mass spectrum like pΛ. Our PWA analysis includes a variety of resonant and non-resonant intermediate states and delivers a goodmore » description of our data (various angular distributions and two-hadron invariant mass spectra) without a contribution of a K ¯NN cluster. At a confidence level of CLs=95% such a cluster cannot contribute more than 2–12% to the total cross section with a pK+ Λ final state, which translates into a production cross-section between 0.7 μb and 4.2 μb, respectively. The range of the upper limit depends on the assumed cluster mass, width and production process.« less

  15. Characterization of Free Surface-Bound and Entrapped Water Environments in Poly(N-Isopropyl Acrylamide) Hydrogels via 1H HRMAS PFG NMR Spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Alam, Todd Michael; Childress, Kimberly Kay; Pastoor, Kevin; Rice, Charles

    2014-09-19

    We found that different water environments in poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) (PNIPAAm) hydrogels are identified and characterized using 1H high resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Local water environments corresponding to a “free” highly mobile species, along with waters showing restricted dynamics are resolved in these swollen hydro-gels. For photo-initiated polymerized PNIPAAm gels, an additional entrapped water species is observed. Spin–spin R2 relaxation experiments support the argument of reduced mobility in the restricted and entrapped water species. Furthermore, by combining pulse field gradient techniques with HRMAS NMR it is possible to directly measure the self-diffusion rate for these differentmore » water environments. The behavior of the heterogeneous water environments through the lower critical solution temperature transition is described.« less

  16. Bounds on an Anomalous Dijet Resonance in W+ jets Production in pp? Collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; sman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guo, F.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnston, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kirby, M. H.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Otero y Garzn, G. J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.

    2011-06-30

    We present a study of the dijet invariant mass spectrum in events with two jets produced in association with a W boson in data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.3 fb? collected with the D0 detector at s?=1.96 TeV. We find no evidence for anomalous resonant dijet production and derive upper limits on the production cross section of an anomalous dijet resonance recently reported by the CDF Collaboration, investigating the range of dijet invariant mass from 110 to 170 GeV/c. The probability of the D0 data being consistent with the presence of a dijet resonance with 4 pb production cross section at 145 GeV/c is 810??.

  17. Geophysical features of major structural and lithostratigraphic elements in the southeastern United States: An overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costain, J.K.; Coruh, C. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    In the Alleghany Plateau and Valley and Ridge provinces, the quality of shallow and deep vibroseis reflection seismic data acquired where carbonate rocks do not crop out at the surface is generally excellent for depths up to 10 km. One interpretation of heat flow data from granitoids that are exposed east of the central Piedmont is that heat-producing crust is tectonically truncated at a depth of ca. 8 km. Seismic data over the Blue Ridge (BR) and Inner Piedmont (IP) from northwestern SC to central VA image the upward ramping (to the northwest) of the BR master decollement over a distance of at least 600 km. Strikingly similar seismic signatures near this ramp are interpreted to be from thrust nappes composed of an Early Paleozoic( ) volcanic( ) protolith. Similar signatures but from an apparently less deformed protolith have been obtained from the IP in SC. New reprocessing and interpretation of a regional seismic line in VA indicate that the easternmost extent of Paleozoic shelf strata is not far east of the surface exposure of the BR-IP boundary. Large antiforms have been imaged in central VA, COCORP Lines 5 (Kiokee antiform), and Line 8 (beneath the Coastal Plain). Eastward-dipping reflections have been recorded beneath the Atlantic Coastal Plain from VA to GA. Reflections from Coastal Plain sediments are generally excellent. Faulted sediments of Cretaceous and younger age have been clearly imaged on reflection data in VA and SC. In some cases, these faults are upward continuations of fault-bounded Mesozoic rift basins. In the James River seismic zone, there is a good correlation between hypocenters and the roof of the antiform and structures above that are imaged in seismic reflection sections. In other areas of the southeastern US, the seismicity is more diffuse; however, it suggests that the Hydroseismicity hypothesis might be a viable trigger mechanism for intraplate earthquakes.

  18. ARM - Datastreams - aosccn100

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    um sizebin ( sizebin ) Droplet bin bounds sizebinbounds ( sizebin, bound ) Time offset from midnight time ( time ) Time cell bounds timebounds ( time, bound ) Time offset...

  19. Neutrino physics from the cosmic microwave background and large scale structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazajian, K. N.; Arnold, K.; Austermann, J. E.; Benson, B. A.; Bischoff, C.; Brock, J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Calabrese, E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.

    2015-03-15

    This is a report on the status and prospects of the quantification of neutrino properties through the cosmological neutrino background for the Cosmic Frontier of the Division of Particles and Fields Community Summer Study long-term planning exercise. Experiments planned and underway are prepared to study the cosmological neutrino background in detail via its influence on distance-redshift relations and the growth of structure. The program for the next decade described in this document, including upcoming spectroscopic galaxy surveys eBOSS and DESI and a new Stage-IV CMB polarization experiment CMB-S4, will achieve ? (?m?)(?m?) = 16 meV and ? (Neff)(Neff) = 0.020. Such a mass measurement will produce a high significance detection of non-zero ?m??m?, whose lower bound derived from atmospheric and solar neutrino oscillation data is about 58 meV. If neutrinos have a minimal normal mass hierarchy, this measurement will definitively rule out the inverted neutrino mass hierarchy, shedding light on one of the most puzzling aspects of the Standard Model of particle physics the origin of mass. This precise a measurement of NeffNeff will allow for high sensitivity to any light and dark degrees of freedom produced in the big bang and a precision test of the standard cosmological model prediction that View the MathML sourceNeff=3.046.

  20. Your Horizons Conference April 6

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gets young women involved in math and science at 31st Expanding Your Horizons Conference April 6 March 4, 2010 Teacher conference also planned LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, March 4, 2010-Los Alamos National Laboratory is again cosponsoring the Expanding Your Horizons in Math and Science(tm) Conference to give middle- and high-school girls from Northern New Mexico an opportunity to learn more about careers in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). Also sponsored by Lab management and

  1. Science Academy from Chevron Energy Technology Company

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    receives $25,000 for Math and Science Academy from Chevron Energy Technology Company November 30, 2009 Academy program for teachers is demonstrating improvements in math proficiency scores among students Los Alamos, New Mexico, November 30, 2009-Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) recently accepted a $25,000 contribution from Chevron Energy Technology Company, a Chevron Corporation (NYSE:CVX) subsidiary, to the LANL Foundation to support the Northern New Mexico Math and Science Academy, a

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: About Sandia: Community Involvement:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Education Programs: Science, Technology, Engineering and Math Programs Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math Programs Future scientists photo Our science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) programs engage students by linking science to the real world. We offer three unique programs for American Indian students, African American students, and Hispanic students. The programs get students involved in fun, hands-on science and engineering activities and provide an opportunity to

  3. For your calendar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    For your calendar Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:Mar. 2016 all issues All Issues » submit For your calendar MidSchoolMath, climate change talk, Innovation Summit and Bradbury activities March 1, 2014 New Frontiers in Science talk in August in four locations National math teacher's conference in Santa Fe Contact Community Programs Office Director Kurt Steinhaus Email Editor Linda Anderman Email MidSchoolMath National

  4. Women @ Energy: Elizabeth Cantwell

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Engineering is always looking for interested girls! I recommend that you find a way to stay engaged and good at math. Math is key to every field of engineering. This might mean going beyond merely attending your classes and doing your homework to finding on-line resources, getting tutoring or building a support group of people at school that all help each other with math."

  5. The 7th Annual Women in Power Forum

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Over the last century we have seen dramatic changes in the roles played by women, but women are still underrepresented in many science, technology, engineering and math disciplines.

  6. Women @ Energy: Esther E. Bowen | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    a career helping to protect the world's natural resources and to improve global sustainability, and I realized that science and math are incredibly powerful tools for making...

  7. Biological Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Energy Science Engineering Science Environmental Science Fusion Science Math & Computer Science Nuclear Science Share Your Research NERSC Citations Home Science at...

  8. NERSC HPC Requirements Reviews: Target 2017

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Energy Science Engineering Science Environmental Science Fusion Science Math & Computer Science Nuclear Science Share Your Research NERSC Citations Home Science at...

  9. Workshop Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Energy Science Engineering Science Environmental Science Fusion Science Math & Computer Science Nuclear Science Share Your Research NERSC Citations Home Science at...

  10. NERSC HPC RequirementsReviews: Target 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Energy Science Engineering Science Environmental Science Fusion Science Math & Computer Science Nuclear Science Share Your Research NERSC Citations Home Science at...

  11. Science and Suds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    activities and dynamic speakers to engage kids, families and individuals interested in life-long learning in science, technology, engineering, art and math. For the full...

  12. Department of Energy Announces Funding to Support the Next Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    energy. These programs will increase American economic competitiveness and support job growth by promoting science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education, an...

  13. Microsoft Word - MSA - Theory of Change Logic Model (1).docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    math and science concepts by understanding and organizing facts and information in new ways. * Reflects on how personal understanding has changed over time and recognizes...

  14. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    science, environmental science, physical science, social studies, math, and language arts. Activities provided include The Energy Times, Going for a Spin: Making a Model,...

  15. Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to bring the youth academic enrichment through emphasis on science, math and language arts in addition to honoring tradition.Through the program, which offers Tewa classes in...

  16. Northern New Mexican pueblo preserves cultural history through...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to bring the youth academic enrichment through emphasis on science, math and language arts in addition to honoring tradition. Through the program, which offers Tewa classes in...

  17. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    science, environmental science, physical science, social studies, math, and language arts. Activities provided include The Energy Times, Going for a Spin: Making a Model, Steam...

  18. Energy Department Announces New Investments to Train Next Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    nationwide, and promote education in the areas of science, technology, engineering and math, Secretary of Energy Steven Chu today announced more than 47 million in scholarships, ...

  19. Department of Energy Announces New Partnerships to Support Manufacturi...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to provide students with highly interactive and engaging materials in a variety of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) areas, as well as virtual technician training. ...

  20. B1487(01)Quarks FM.i-xvi

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... attractive force of mat- ter in the universe against the repulsive force of his cosmological constant, which is math- ematically equivalent to vacuum energy (de- scribed above). ...

  1. 2010 Department of Energy Council on Women and Girls First Annual...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Report More Documents & Publications Reports and Publications on Women and Girls in STEM Mentoring to Increase Diversity in Science, Tech, Engineering and Math C3E Connection

  2. ASC eNews (June 2014)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... involve the Mechanical Engineering, Aeronautics and Astronautics, Computer Science and Math Departments at Stanford, and a partnership with the University of Michigan, the ...

  3. Other Participants 2001 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    , Sacramento , CA Mission San Jose High School , Freemont , CA Mississippi School for Math & Science, Columbus , MS Montezuma Cortez High School, Cortez, CO Montgomery Blair High ...

  4. National Geographic Hosts the Energy Department's STEM Mentoring...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    By sharing the excitement of cutting-edge careers in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM), professionals are helping dreams take shape for these young people. The ...

  5. DOE Announces Up to $5 Million to Support the Next Generation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Today's announcement supports the Administration's goal of increasing American economic competitiveness by focusing on science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education ...

  6. Upholding Dr. King's Dream and Inspiring the Next Generation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The kids were also able to meet science, technology, engineering and math professionals who volunteered their time to engage more students in STEM fields. Director Dot Harris, who ...

  7. Energy Department and the NSTA Launch America's Home Energy Education...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Administered by NSTA for the Energy Department, America's Home Energy Education Challenge inspires student interest in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), while ...

  8. Helping STEM Education Take Root: Breaking Ground on a Field...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Improving science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education in the United States can provide a path forward for national defense, economic prosperity and international ...

  9. Investing in the next generation: The Office of Nuclear Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to succeed in our new economy - particularly in science, technology, engineering and math or "STEM." The President also declared that, "the all-of-the-above energy strategy ...

  10. Department of Energy Announces Funding to Support the Next Generation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    These programs will increase American economic competitiveness and support job growth by promoting science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education, an essential part of ...

  11. ORISE: ORISE is accepting applications for the 2015 Mickey Leland...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for the 2015 Mickey Leland Energy Fellowship Program (MLEF), which is a 10-week summer program for students pursuing degrees in science, technology, engineering and math. ...

  12. Extreme Scale Computing, Co-design

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information Science, Computing, Applied Math Extreme Scale Computing, Co-design Extreme Scale Computing, Co-design Computational co-design may facilitate revolutionary designs ...

  13. Other Participants 1992 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    , Lubbock , TX Lyons Township High School , La Grange , IL Mississippi School for Math & Science, Columbus , MS Newnan High School , Newnan , GA Pembroke Hill High School , ...

  14. Extreme Scale Computing, Co-Design

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information Science, Computing, Applied Math Extreme Scale Computing, Co-design Publications Publications Ramon Ravelo, Qi An, Timothy C. Germann, and Brad Lee Holian, ...

  15. Energy Department Awards $6 Million to Universities in Tennessee...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    American manufacturing and developing science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education programs that support the next generation of engineers and manufacturers. ...

  16. Former Tribal Energy Program Intern Guides Tribes Toward a More...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Applying the knowledge and insights she gained from her work at LLNL, her internship, and her science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education, Singer is educating ...

  17. Energy Secretary Moniz Announces New Energy Initiative and Joins...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    agenda for engaging more Americans in energy and science, technology, engineering, and math fields. I will be moderating this conversation, and hope that you can join the event. ...

  18. Energy Department Announces National Champions of Student Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to our clean energy economy," said Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz. "By applying the math and science skills they are learning at school, these students are making a difference, ...

  19. Green is Our Favorite Color: Students Fill in the Lines with...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The activity book includes crosswords, word games, math puzzles and more challenging fun ways to help students, learn, understand, and internalize the principles of energy ...

  20. Student Semi-Finalist Teams Selected to Help Advance Geothermal...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Emphasizing a White House pledge to accelerate science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education, the nationwide student competition selected four student teams based on ...