National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for upstream ambient water

  1. UpStream: Motivating Water Conservation with Low-Cost Water Flow Sensing and Persuasive Displays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulos, Eric

    - another byproduct of excessive water use, which leads to pollution. While reduced water usage in the USUpStream: Motivating Water Conservation with Low-Cost Water Flow Sensing and Persuasive Displays, Pittsburgh, PA, USA {stace, paulos}@cs.cmu.edu ABSTRACT Water is our most precious and most rapidly declining

  2. Censored Regression Trend Analyses for Ambient Water Quality Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smyth, Gordon K.

    Censored Regression Trend Analyses for Ambient Water Quality Data Gordon K. Smyth 1 , Melanie Cox 2 regression; logistic distribution; regression splines; seasonal trends. 1 Introduction Water is a very. A censored regression strat- egy is used to accommodate arbitrary detection limits for the indicator

  3. Mechano-freezing of the ambient water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xi; Zou, Bo; Sun, Chang Q

    2013-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy examination of the 25 deg-C water freezing under compression revealed transition from 1.35 GPa to 0.86 GPa upon ice being formed at continued volume change. The transition is associated with a slight blue shift of the high-frequency phonon (omiga_H ~ 3120 cm-1) and creation of the low-frequency phonons (Omiga_L ~ 200 cm-1). In the liquid and in the solid phase, the increased pressure softens the Omiga_H and stiffens the Omida_L, which indicates the presence of the inter-electron-pair repulsion in both liquid and solid water.

  4. 1. Go on top of the check-dam and survey the water-shed, i.e., the upstream part from which water ows into the storage.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 1. Go on top of the check-dam and survey the water-shed, i.e., the upstream part from which water ows into the storage. 2. What is the storage in the dam (in cu.m.)? 3. What is the length and depth of the dam? What is its structure and cost? How much time did it take to build the dam? 4. Where

  5. Water Power Calculator Temperature and Analog Input/Output Module Ambient Temperature Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark D. McKay

    2011-02-01

    Water Power Calculator Temperature and Analog input/output Module Ambient Temperature Testing A series of three ambient temperature tests were conducted for the Water Power Calculator development using the INL Calibration Laboratory’s Tenney Environmental Chamber. The ambient temperature test results demonstrate that the Moore Industries Temperature Input Modules, Analog Input Module and Analog Output Module, ambient temperature response meet or exceed the manufactures specifications

  6. Water Use Efficiency in Plant Growth and Ambient Carbon Dioxide Level 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Bavel, C. H. M.

    1972-01-01

    Efficiency in Plant Growth and Ambient Carbon Dioxide Level C.H. M. van Bavel Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University ...

  7. Particle Size Distributions of Debris Upstream and Downstream of the Containment Sump Strainer in a Light Water Reactor 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kappes, Matthew Jareb

    2015-07-30

    During a LOCA in a LWR, a containment-sump strainer filters debris, generated from fibrous thermal insulation, from the water collected in the containment sump. The buildup of debris on the strainer and the bypass of debris through the strainer lead...

  8. BIODIVERSITY Comparing latitudinal and upstream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    García-Berthou, Emili

    BIODIVERSITY RESEARCH Comparing latitudinal and upstream­ downstream gradients: life history traits holbrooki) along latitudinal and upstream­downstream river gradients and to assess the effects of age° of latitude in the Mediterranean region and seven sites along the upstream­downstream gradient in three

  9. SBSP Commercial Upstream Incentive Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SBSP Commercial Upstream Incentive Project 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Todd Levin, tlevin@anl.gov, Cathy Milostan, cmilostan@anl.gov Argonne National Laboratory...

  10. Reservoir Management in Mediterranean Climates through the European Water Framework Directive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Reilly, Clare; Silberblatt, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    floods downstream of impoundments by storing water upstream,upstream spawning habitat (Morris & Fan, 1998). Downstream

  11. Upstream swimming in microbiological flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathijssen, Arnold J T M; Yeomans, Julia M; Doostmohammadi, Amin

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between microorganisms and their complex flowing environments are essential in many biological systems. We develop a model for microswimmer dynamics in non-Newtonian Poiseuille flows. We predict that swimmers in shear-thickening (-thinning) fluids migrate upstream more (less) quickly than in Newtonian fluids and demonstrate that viscoelastic normal stress differences reorient swimmers causing them to migrate upstream at the centreline, in contrast to well-known boundary accumulation in quiescent Newtonian fluids. Based on these observations, we suggest a sorting mechanism to select microbes by swimming speed.

  12. Upstream swimming in microbiological flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold J. T. M. Mathijssen; Tyler N. Shendruk; Julia M. Yeomans; Amin Doostmohammadi

    2015-07-03

    Interactions between microorganisms and their complex flowing environments are essential in many biological systems. We develop a model for microswimmer dynamics in non-Newtonian Poiseuille flows. We predict that swimmers in shear-thickening (-thinning) fluids migrate upstream more (less) quickly than in Newtonian fluids and demonstrate that viscoelastic normal stress differences reorient swimmers causing them to migrate upstream at the centreline, in contrast to well-known boundary accumulation in quiescent Newtonian fluids. Based on these observations, we suggest a sorting mechanism to select microbes by swimming speed.

  13. Deserts are water-controlled ecosystems characterized by high ambient temperature (Ta), intense solar radiation,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Jos. B.

    , it can be argued that rates of energy flow through desert ecosystems are controlled by available water dominated by, the availability of water in desert ecosystems. Animals that occupy arid climes face the challenge of meeting their daily energy and water requirements in an environment that, on average, provides

  14. Water adsorption on alpha-Fe2O3(0001) at near ambient conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamamoto, Susumu

    2010-01-01

    Journal of Physical Chemistry Water adsorption on at n e a rR U N N I N G H E A D : Water adsorption on a-Fe O (0001) *investigated hydroxylation and water adsorption on a-Fe O (

  15. Steady state method to determine unsaturated hydraulic conductivity at the ambient water potential

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    HUbbell, Joel M.

    2014-08-19

    The present invention relates to a new laboratory apparatus for measuring the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity at a single water potential. One or more embodiments of the invented apparatus can be used over a wide range of water potential values within the tensiometric range, requires minimal laboratory preparation, and operates unattended for extended periods with minimal supervision. The present invention relates to a new laboratory apparatus for measuring the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity at a single water potential. One or more embodiments of the invented apparatus can be used over a wide range of water potential values within the tensiometric range, requires minimal laboratory preparation, and operates unattended for extended periods with minimal supervision.

  16. Dynamics of particle clouds in ambient currents with application to open-water sediment disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gensheimer, Robert James, III

    2010-01-01

    Open-water sediment disposal is used in many applications around the world, including land reclamation, dredging, and contaminated sediment isolation. Timely examples include the land reclamation campaign currently underway ...

  17. UPSTREAM AND DOWNSTREAM INFLUENCE ON STBLI UNSTEADINESS Upstream and Downstream Influence on the Unsteadiness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martín, Pino

    UPSTREAM AND DOWNSTREAM INFLUENCE ON STBLI UNSTEADINESS 1 Upstream and Downstream Influence the upstream flow and downstream flow with the shock motions. In Section 6, we characterize the separa between the incoming flow and the shock motions, as well as the downstream flow and the shock unsteadiness

  18. RESEARCH ARTICLE Evaluating the effects of upstream lakes and wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and recalculated downstream lake phosphorus concentra- tions. We found that upstream lakes decreased the phosphorusRESEARCH ARTICLE Evaluating the effects of upstream lakes and wetlands on lake phosphorus of these inputs. In addition, the presence, connectivity, and configuration of upstream lakes and wetlands likely

  19. COOPERATIVE GAME THEORY SOLUTION IN AN UPSTREAM-DOWNSTREAM RELATIONSHIP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COOPERATIVE GAME THEORY SOLUTION IN AN UPSTREAM-DOWNSTREAM RELATIONSHIP By Ezio Marchi Paula Andrea THEORY SOLUTION IN AN UPSTREAM-DOWNSTREAM RELATIONSHIP MARCHI, Ezio Instituto de Matemática Aplicada San; and second, an economic element, where we reconsider the upstream-downstream relationship under a cooperative

  20. X-ray Diffraction and Molecular Dynamics Study of Medium-range Order in Ambient and Hot Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Congcong Huang; K. T. Wikfeldt; D. Nordlund; U. Bergmann; T. McQueen; J. Sellberg; L. G. M. Pettersson; A. Nilsson

    2011-07-24

    We have developed x-ray diffraction measurements with high energy-resolution and accuracy to study water structure at three different temperatures (7, 25 and 66 C) under normal pressure. Using a spherically curved Ge crystal an energy resolution better than 15 eV has been achieved which eliminates influence from Compton scattering. The high quality of the data allows a precise oxygen-oxygen pair correlation function (PCF) to be directly derived from the Fourier transform of the experimental data resolving shell structure out to ~12 {\\AA}, i.e. 5 hydration shells. Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using the TIP4P/2005 force-field reproduce excellently the experimental shell-structure in the range 4-12 {\\AA} although less agreement is seen for the first peak in the PCF. The Local Structure Index [J. Chem. Phys. 104, 7671 (1996)] identifies a tetrahedral minority giving the intermediate-range oscillations in the PCF and a disordered majority providing a more featureless background in this range. The current study supports the proposal that the structure of liquid water, even at high temperatures, can be described in terms of a two-state fluctuation model involving local structures related to the high-density and low-density forms of liquid water postulated in the liquid-liquid phase transition hypothesis.

  1. World trends: Improving fortunes restore upstream health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    After a decade of recovery from the oil price collapse of 1986, the global upstream industry appears headed for a period of renewed strength and growth. Underpinning the prosperity is steady unrelenting growth in crude demand. Stronger global crude demand and heavy natural gas usage in the US are driving higher prices. Operators are reacting to better prices with larger drilling programs. Also boosting drilling levels are crude production expansion projects that many countries have underway in response to perceived future demand. Not surprisingly, World Oil`s outlook calls for global drilling to rise 4.5% to 60,273 wells, a second straight annual increase. Better US activity is helping, but so are stronger-than-expected numbers in Canada. Meanwhile, World Oil`s 51st annual survey of governments and operators indicates that global oil production rose 1.4% last year, to 62,774 million bpd. That was not enough, however, to keep up with demand. The paper discusses financial performance, business practices, other factors, and operating outlook. A table lists the 1996 forecasts, estimated wells drilled in 1995, and total wells and footage drilled in 1994 by country. A second table lists global crude and condensate production and wells actually producing in 1995 versus 1994.

  2. Ambient pressure fuel cell system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2000-01-01

    An ambient pressure fuel cell system is provided with a fuel cell stack formed from a plurality of fuel cells having membrane/electrode assemblies (MEAs) that are hydrated with liquid water and bipolar plates with anode and cathode sides for distributing hydrogen fuel gas and water to a first side of each one of the MEAs and air with reactant oxygen gas to a second side of each one of the MEAs. A pump supplies liquid water to the fuel cells. A recirculating system may be used to return unused hydrogen fuel gas to the stack. A near-ambient pressure blower blows air through the fuel cell stack in excess of reaction stoichiometric amounts to react with the hydrogen fuel gas.

  3. Up-Stream Dissolved Oxygen TMDL Project Quality Assurance ProjectPlan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stringfellow, William T.

    2005-05-13

    A quality assurance project plan (QAPP) for the execution of an ecosystem level monitoring and research program examining algal ecology in highly impaired rivers. Procedures for executing both field and laboratory surface water quality and flow analysis are described. The procedures described here are compatible with the California Surface Water Ambient Monitoring program (SWAMP).

  4. Perfil Ambiental de Guatemala

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez-Carr, David

    Perfil Ambiental de Guatemala Informe sobre el estado del ambiente y bases para su evaluación sistemática Guatemala, 2004 UNIVERSIDAD RAFAEL LANDÍVAR Facultad de Ciencias Ambientales y Agrícolas Instituto de Guatemala Informe sobre el estado del ambiente y bases para su evaluación sistemática ISBN: 99922

  5. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Ambient Air Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mulholland, James A.

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Ambient Air Pollution and Cardiovascular Emergency Department Visits Kristi Busico ambient air pollutants and cardiovascular disease (CVD), the roles of the physicochemical components the relation between ambient air pollution and cardiovascular conditions using ambient air quality data

  6. RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT MODELS UNDER AMBIENT CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Magnuson

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this model report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) radionuclide transport model, which evaluates, by means of three-dimensional numerical models, the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids in the UZ, under ambient conditions, from the repository horizon to the water table at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

  7. Numerical Evaluation of the Energy for Upstream Opportunistic Large Array-based Transmissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingram, Mary Ann

    protocols [1]. Even though the network is Ad Hoc in nature, one can optimize energy usage by judicious the upstream behavior of OLACRA-FT, in terms of the energy usage. This upstream routing back to the sink hasNumerical Evaluation of the Energy for Upstream Opportunistic Large Array-based Transmissions R

  8. STEREO observations of upstream and downstream waves at low Mach number shocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    STEREO observations of upstream and downstream waves at low Mach number shocks C. T. Russell,1 L. K; published 13 February 2009. [1] Early theories of upstream and downstream wave formation at laminar (low, propagating upstream along the shock normal. Downstream waves were attributed to nearly perpendicular shocks

  9. Pickup Ions Upstream and Downstream of Shocks G. Gloeckler*,, L. A. Fisk and L. J. Lanzerotti**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pickup Ions Upstream and Downstream of Shocks G. Gloeckler*,, L. A. Fisk and L. J. Lanzerotti from upstream to downstream is relatively small in the case of Jupiter's bow shock. The presence of pre, the reverse shock of a Corotating Interaction Region, and the Jovian bow shock. Upstream ion velocity

  10. Chutes and ladders and other games we play with rivers. I. Simulated effects of upstream passage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jager, Henriette I.

    or downstream passage, was harmful to the metapopulation as a whole. However, upstream passage was beneficial downstream passage). The combi- nation of upstream and downstream passage was most beneficial at dams aboveChutes and ladders and other games we play with rivers. I. Simulated effects of upstream passage

  11. Waves upstream and downstream of interplanetary shocks driven by coronal mass ejections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Waves upstream and downstream of interplanetary shocks driven by coronal mass ejections P. Kajdic,1) waves and higher-frequency (HF, 1 Hz) whistler precursors upstream of these shocks. Downstream of them as in the upstream case. We find that IP shocks with relatively small Mms can excite waves in large regions in front

  12. NIF Ambient Vibration Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noble, C.R.; Hoehler, M.S., S.C. Sommer

    1999-11-29

    LLNL has an ongoing research and development project that includes developing data acquisition systems with remote wireless communication for monitoring the vibrations of large civil engineering structures. In order to establish the capability of performing remote sensing over an extended period of time, the researchers needed to apply this technology to a real structure. The construction of the National Ignition Facility provided an opportunity to test the data acquisition system on a large structure to monitor whether the facility is remaining within the strict ambient vibration guidelines. This document will briefly discuss the NIF ambient vibration requirements and summarize the vibration measurements performed during the Spring and Summer of 1999. In addition, a brief description of the sensors and the data acquisition systems will be provided in Appendix B.

  13. On the origin of the energetic ion events measured upstream of the Earth's bow shock by STEREO,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergen, Universitetet i

    acceleration between upstream scattering centers and the bow shock or downstream and upstream scatteringOn the origin of the energetic ion events measured upstream of the Earth's bow shock by STEREO of the solar cycle the energetic upstream ion events occurred mainly after a corotating interaction region

  14. Short-Term Supply Chain Management in Upstream Natural Gas Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short-Term Supply Chain Management in Upstream Natural Gas Systems by Ajay Selot Submitted Students #12;2 #12;Short-Term Supply Chain Management in Upstream Natural Gas Systems by Ajay Selot of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Chemical Engineering Abstract Natural gas supply chain

  15. Upstream Orographic Enhancement of a Narrow Cold-Frontal Rainband Approaching the Andes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houze Jr., Robert A.

    river'' upstream of the Andes. Model output indicates that low-level convergence enhanced the NCFR where strati- form clouds forming as a result of the upstream orographic ascent of the atmospheric river Geofi´sica, Universidad de Chile, Santiago, Chile. Corresponding author address: Maximiliano Viale

  16. Upstream urbanization exacerbates urban heat island effects Da-Lin Zhang,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Da-Lin

    Upstream urbanization exacerbates urban heat island effects Da-Lin Zhang,1 Yi-Xuan Shou,1; published 19 December 2009. [1] Urban Heat Island (UHI) effects adversely impact weather, air quality find that upstream urbanization exacerbates UHI effects and that meteorological consequences of extra-urban

  17. UpStream: A Storage-centric Load Management System for Real-time Update Streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UpStream: A Storage-centric Load Management System for Real-time Update Streams Alexandru Moga, Switzerland tatbul@inf.ethz.ch ABSTRACT UpStream is a framework for load management over data streams, security monitoring and location tracking systems. Various load management tech- niques have been proposed

  18. Upstream entrainment in numerical simulations of spatially evolving Pradeep C. Babu and Krishnan Mahesha)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahesh, Krishnan

    Upstream entrainment in numerical simulations of spatially evolving round jets Pradeep C. Babu) Direct numerical simulation is used to study the effect of entrainment near the inflow nozzle on spatially evolving round jets. Inflow entrainment is obtained by providing a buffer region upstream

  19. Paper No. 7.01b 1 EARTHQUAKE INDUCED EXCESS PORE WATER PRESSURES IN THE UPPER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    developed only in the upstream and downstream shells which are not consistent with the limited deformation of the upstream and downstream shells of the embankment, which led to unrealistic deformation patterns pore water pressure ratios in the upstream and downstream shells. Beaty (2001) also used FLAC

  20. The Charged Heavy Ion COunter (CHICO) is comprised of two equivalent halves referred to as the upstream and downstream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cline, Douglas

    to as the upstream and downstream detectors (as seen from the particle beam's point of view). Each half consists to wrap around the beampipe upstream of CHICO, and ten downstream to complete the entire system

  1. Ambient aromatic hydrocarbon measurements at Welgegund, South Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    Ambient aromatic hydrocarbon measurements at Welgegund,Ambient aromatic hydrocarbon measurements at Welgegund,Ambient aromatic hydrocarbon measurements at Welgegund,

  2. 46th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, January 710, 2008/Reno, NV Upstream and downstream influence on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martín, Pino

    08544 Statistical analysis of the upstream and downstream flow influence on shock unsteadiness in shock to further study the upstream and downstream flow influence on shock unsteadiness using direct numerical46th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, January 7­10, 2008/Reno, NV Upstream

  3. EFFECT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON WATERSHED RUNOFF FLOW - UPPER COOSA RIVER BASIN UPSTREAM FROM PLANT HAMMOND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, K.

    2011-10-24

    The ability of water managers to maintain adequate supplies in the coming decades depends on future weather conditions, as climate change has the potential to reduce stream flows from their current values due to potentially less precipitation and higher temperatures, and possibly rendering them unable to meet demand. The upper Coosa River basin, located in northwest Georgia, plays an important role in supplying water for industry and domestic use in northern Georgia, and has been involved in water disputes in recent times. The seven-day ten-year low flow (7Q10 flow) is the lowest average flow for seven consecutive days that has an average recurrence interval of 10 years. The 7Q10 flow is statistically derived from the observed historical flow data, and represents the low flow (drought) condition for a basin. The upper Coosa River basin also supplies cooling water for the 935MW coal-fired Hammond plant, which draws about 65% of the 7Q10 flow of the upper Coosa River to dissipate waste heat. The water is drawn through once and returned to the river directly from the generator (i.e., no cooling tower is used). Record low flows in 2007 led to use of portable cooling towers to meet temperature limits. Disruption of the Plant Hammond operation may trigger closure of area industrial facilities (e.g. paper mill). The population in Georgia is expected to double from 9 million to 18 million residents in the next 25 years, mostly in the metropolitan Atlanta area. Therefore, there will be an even greater demand for potable water and for waste assimilation. Climate change in the form of persistent droughts (causing low flows) and high ambient temperatures create regulatory compliance challenges for Plant Hammond operating with a once-through cooling system. Therefore, the Upper Coosa River basin was selected to study the effect of potential future weather change on the watershed runoff flow.

  4. Effects of upstream wake phasing on the performance of transonic compressors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nolan, Sean Patrick Rock

    2009-01-01

    The effect of the upstream wake phase on the work input (i.e., rise in stagnation enthalpy across the blade row) of a transonic rotor is examined computationally and analytically. It is found that the compressor work depends ...

  5. Seasonal variation of upper-level mobile trough development upstream of the Pacific storm track 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myoung, Boksoon

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate seasonal and interannual statistics of troughs associated with the Pacific storm track and quantify the influence of deformation on trough development upstream of the western ...

  6. Upstream Financial Review of the Global Oil and Natural Gas Industry

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2014-01-01

    This analysis focuses on financial and operating trends of the oil and natural gas production business segment, often referred to as upstream operations, of 42 global oil and natural gas producing companies

  7. Influence of a river valley constriction on upstream sedimentation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinnebrew, Quin

    1988-01-01

    is constant, and the channel is wide, then the velocity is proportional to the depth-slope product (D2/s st/2). This quantitative description makes it easy to visualize the control that depth and slope have over the flow velocity. Channels with greater.... Wetted perimeter (P) is the outline of the edge where water and channel surface meet. Cross section (A) is the area of a transverse section of the river. The depth (D) is approximately the same as the hydraulic radius (R), which is the cross sectional...

  8. A combined droplet train and ambient pressure photoemission spectrometer for the investigation of liquid/vapor interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Starr, David E.

    2008-01-01

    ambient conditions the vapor pressure of water or aqueousrange (e.g. , the equilibrium vapor pressure of water at itsUHV conditions due to the vapor pressure of the liquids, but

  9. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Ambient Air Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mulholland, James A.

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Ambient Air Pollution and Respiratory Emergency Department Visits Jennifer L. Peel pollution and respiratory outcomes. More refined assessment has been limited by study size and available air quality data. Methods: Measurements of 5 pollutants (particulate matter PM10 , ozone, nitrogen dioxide NO2

  10. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 7: Regional Groundwater than the unit situations that we saw. Surface water/Groundwater interactions. lakes and streams springs (seepage) Ambient water-table movements Seasonal changes Inteference with other water end-users. Inherent

  11. Research Technician for Experimental Geomechanics Laboratories ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company has an immediate opening for a Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul G.

    Research Technician for Experimental Geomechanics Laboratories ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company has an immediate opening for a Research Technician working in the field of experimental geomechanics

  12. u.s. Fish Wildl. Servo eire. Upstream Passage of Anadromous Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    u.s. Fish Wildl. Servo eire. Upstream Passage of Anadromous Fish hrough Navigation Locks and Use OF THE INTERIOR u.s. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES Circular 352 #12;Cover Photograph.- Brailing fish from haul seine into live car. #12;UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Walter J. Hickel

  13. Langmuir waves upstream of interplanetary shocks: Dependence on shock and plasma parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    waves undergo a mode conversion process and generate electromagnetic radio waves at the plasma frequency fp and 2fp. These radio waves propagate throughout the heliosphere and are used as a re- moteClick Here for Full Article Langmuir waves upstream of interplanetary shocks: Dependence on shock

  14. Impact of Upstream Urbanization on the Urban Heat Island Effects along the WashingtonBaltimore Corridor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Da-Lin

    of Washington, D.C. Results from a coupled ultrahigh-resolution mesoscale­urban canopy model with 2001 National of the urban­bay interaction reveals the importance of horizontal wind direction in determining the intensityImpact of Upstream Urbanization on the Urban Heat Island Effects along the Washington

  15. Ambient Air Quality Criteria (Manitoba, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Manitoba Ambient Air Quality Criteria schedule lists maximum time-based pollutant concentration levels for the protection and preservation of ambient air quality within the Province of Manitoba...

  16. Upstream open loop control of the recirculation area downstream of a backward-facing step

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gautier, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    The flow downstream a backward-facing step is controlled using a pulsed jet placed upstream of the step edge. Experimental velocity fields are computed and used to the recirculation area quantify. The effects of jet amplitude, frequency and duty cycle on this recirculation area are investigated for two Reynolds numbers (Re=2070 and Re=2900). The results of this experimental study demonstrate that upstream actuation can be as efficient as actuation at the step edge when exciting the shear layer at its natural frequency. Moreover it is shown that it is possible to minimize both jet amplitude and duty cycle and still achieve optimal efficiency. With minimal amplitude and a duty-cycle as low as 10\\% the recirculation area is nearly canceled.

  17. C.d.L. in Chimica e per l'Ambiente e per i Materiali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Achilles, Rüdiger

    C.d.L. in Chimica e per l'Ambiente e per i Materiali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti Prova.d.L. in Chimica e per l'Ambiente e per i Materiali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti Prova del 18.d.L. in Chimica e per l'Ambiente e per i Materiali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti Prova del 18

  18. C.d.L. in Chimica e per l'Ambiente e per i Materiali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Achilles, Rüdiger

    C.d.L. in Chimica e per l'Ambiente e per i Materiali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti Prova! e- = #12;C.d.L. in Chimica e per l'Ambiente e per i Materiali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti = #12;C.d.L. in Chimica e per l'Ambiente e per i Materiali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti Prova

  19. Photoelectron Spectroscopy under Ambient Pressure and Temperature Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogletree, D. Frank; Bluhm, Hendrik; Hebenstreit, Eleonore B.; Salmeron, Miquel

    2009-02-27

    We describe the development and applications of novel instrumentation for photoemission spectroscopy of solid or liquid surfaces in the presence of gases under ambient conditions or pressure and temperature. The new instrument overcomes the strong scattering of electrons in gases by the use of an aperture close to the surface followed by a differentially-pumped electrostatic lens system. In addition to the scattering problem, experiments in the presence of condensed water or other liquids require the development of special sample holders to provide localized cooling. We discuss the first two generations of Ambient Pressure PhotoEmission Spectroscopy (APPES) instruments developed at synchrotron light sources (ALS in Berkeley and BESSY in Berlin), with special focus on the Berkeley instruments. Applications to environmental science and catalytic chemical research are illustrated in two examples.

  20. Eco-Efficiency in Practice: Aligning Business and Environmental Interests in the Upstream Oil and Gas Sector 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lukacs, J.; Munroe, V.

    2005-01-01

    , CETAC-WEST (Canadian Environmental Technology Advancement Corporation - West), in mid-2000, introduced a practical approach to eco-efficiency to Western Canada's upstream oil and gas sector. The CETAC-WEST Eco-Efficiency Program, focused primarily...

  1. Exohedral Physisorption of Ambient Moisture Scales Non-monotonically with Fiber Proximity in Aligned Carbon Nanotube Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stein, Itai Y.

    Here we present a study on the presence of physisorbed water on the surface of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in ambient conditions, where the wet CNT array mass can be more than 200% larger than that of dry CNTs, and ...

  2. Diffusion Tubes for Ambient NO2 Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    2 Monitoring: Practical Guidance AEA Energy & Environment iii Foreword Palmes-type diffusion tubesDiffusion Tubes for Ambient NO2 Monitoring: Practical Guidance for Laboratories and Users Report Monitoring: Practical Guidance AEA/ENV/R/2504 ­ Issue 1a Title Diffusion Tubes for Ambient NO2 Monitoring

  3. Ambiente Online.pt Pas: Portugal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    Universidades e politécnicos não dispensam cursos de Ambiente e Energia 2012-08-27 Apesar da crise, que obrigou universidades e politécnicos a ajustarem as suas ofertas à contracção do mercado, o ambiente e a energia são SERVIÇOS DIRECTÓRIO DE EMPRESAS Software de modelação hidráulica para água, saneamento e águas pluviais

  4. BIOTROPICA 32(3): 545548 2000 Estuarine Larval Development and Upstream Post-Larval Migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benstead, Jon

    ´ritu Santo has a low-head dam and water intake (constructed in 1984 for municipal water supply) located

  5. Comparative genomic analysis reveals a distant liver enhancer upstream of the COUP-TFII gene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baroukh, Nadine; Ahituv, Nadav; Chang, Jessie; Shoukry, Malak; Afzal, Veena; Rubin, Edward M.; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2004-08-20

    COUP-TFII is a central nuclear hormone receptor that tightly regulates the expression of numerous target lipid metabolism genes in vertebrates. However, it remains unclear how COUP-TFII itself is transcriptionally controlled since studies with its promoter and upstream region fail to recapitulate the genes liver expression. In an attempt to identify liver enhancers in the vicinity of COUP-TFII, we employed a comparative genomic approach. Initial comparisons between humans and mice of the 3,470kb gene poor region surrounding COUP-TFII revealed 2,023 conserved non-coding elements. To prioritize a subset of these elements for functional studies, we performed further genomic comparisons with the orthologous pufferfish (Fugu rubripes) locus and uncovered two anciently conserved non-coding sequences (CNS) upstream of COUP-TFII (CNS-62kb and CNS-66kb). Testing these two elements using reporter constructs in liver (HepG2) cells revealed that CNS-66kb, but not CNS-62kb, yielded robust in vitro enhancer activity. In addition, an in vivo reporter assay using naked DNA transfer with CNS-66kb linked to luciferase displayed strong reproducible liver expression in adult mice, further supporting its role as a liver enhancer. Together, these studies further support the utility of comparative genomics to uncover gene regulatory sequences based on evolutionary conservation and provide the substrates to better understand the regulation and expression of COUP-TFII.

  6. Identifying emerging smart grid impacts to upstream and midstream natural gas operations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntyre, Annie

    2010-09-01

    The Smart Grid has come to describe a next-generation electrical power system that is typified by the increased use of communications and information technology in the generation, delivery and consumption of electrical energy. Much of the present Smart Grid analysis focuses on utility and consumer interaction. i.e. smart appliances, home automation systems, rate structures, consumer demand response, etc. An identified need is to assess the upstream and midstream operations of natural gas as a result of the smart grid. The nature of Smart Grid, including the demand response and role of information, may require changes in upstream and midstream natural gas operations to ensure availability and efficiency. Utility reliance on natural gas will continue and likely increase, given the backup requirements for intermittent renewable energy sources. Efficient generation and delivery of electricity on Smart Grid could affect how natural gas is utilized. Things that we already know about Smart Grid are: (1) The role of information and data integrity is increasingly important. (2) Smart Grid includes a fully distributed system with two-way communication. (3) Smart Grid, a complex network, may change the way energy is supplied, stored, and in demand. (4) Smart Grid has evolved through consumer driven decisions. (5) Smart Grid and the US critical infrastructure will include many intermittent renewables.

  7. Cosmic ray diffusive acceleration at shock waves with finite upstream and downstream escape boundaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Ostrowski; R. Schlickeiser

    1996-04-18

    In the present paper we discuss the modifications introduced into the first-order Fermi shock acceleration process due to a finite extent of diffusive regions near the shock or due to boundary conditions leading to an increased particle escape upstream and/or downstream the shock. In the considered simple example of the planar shock wave we idealize the escape phenomenon by imposing a particle escape boundary at some distance from the shock. Presence of such a boundary (or boundaries) leads to coupled steepening of the accelerated particle spectrum and decreasing of the acceleration time scale. It allows for a semi-quantitative evaluation and, in some specific cases, also for modelling of the observed steep particle spectra as a result of the first-order Fermi shock acceleration. We also note that the particles close to the upper energy cut-off are younger than the estimate based on the respective acceleration time scale. In Appendix A we present a new time-dependent solution for infinite diffusive regions near the shock allowing for different constant diffusion coefficients upstream and downstream the shock.

  8. Upstream Measurements of Wind Profiles with Doppler Lidar for Improved Wind Energy Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodney Frehlich

    2012-10-30

    New upstream measurements of wind profiles over the altitude range of wind turbines will be produced using a scanning Doppler lidar. These long range high quality measurements will provide improved wind power forecasts for wind energy integration into the power grid. The main goal of the project is to develop the optimal Doppler lidar operating parameters and data processing algorithms for improved wind energy integration by enhancing the wind power forecasts in the 30 to 60 minute time frame, especially for the large wind power ramps. Currently, there is very little upstream data at large wind farms, especially accurate wind profiles over the full height of the turbine blades. The potential of scanning Doppler lidar will be determined by rigorous computer modeling and evaluation of actual Doppler lidar data from the WindTracer system produced by Lockheed Martin Coherent Technologies, Inc. of Louisville, Colorado. Various data products will be investigated for input into numerical weather prediction models and statistically based nowcasting algorithms. Successful implementation of the proposed research will provide the required information for a full cost benefit analysis of the improved forecasts of wind power for energy integration as well as the added benefit of high quality wind and turbulence information for optimal control of the wind turbines at large wind farms.

  9. Full-Scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe; Jennifer Paradis

    2010-06-30

    This document presents and discusses results from Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-06NT42778, 'Full-scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System,' which was conducted over the time-period July 24, 2006 through June 30, 2010. The objective of the project was to demonstrate at full scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in pulverized-coal-fired flue gas. Oxidized mercury is removed downstream in wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and collected with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI, the Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA), who also provided the host site, Great River Energy, Johnson Matthey, Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP), the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), NRG Energy, Ontario Power and Westar. URS Group was the prime contractor and also provided cofunding. The scope of this project included installing and testing a gold-based catalyst upstream of one full-scale wet FGD absorber module (about 200-MW scale) at LCRA's Fayette Power Project (FPP) Unit 3, which fires Powder River Basin coal. Installation of the catalyst involved modifying the ductwork upstream of one of three wet FGD absorbers on Unit 3, Absorber C. The FGD system uses limestone reagent, operates with forced sulfite oxidation, and normally runs with two FGD modules in service and one spare. The full-scale catalyst test was planned for 24 months to provide catalyst life data. Over the test period, data were collected on catalyst pressure drop, elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst module, and mercury capture by the downstream wet FGD absorber. The demonstration period began on May 6, 2008 with plans for the catalyst to remain in service until May 5, 2010. However, because of continual increases in pressure drop across the catalyst and concerns that further increases would adversely affect Unit 3 operations, LCRA decided to end the demonstration early, during a planned unit outage. On October 2, 2009, Unit 3 was taken out of service for a fall outage and the catalyst upstream of Absorber C was removed. This ended the demonstration after approximately 17 months of the planned 24 months of operation. This report discusses reasons for the pressure drop increase and potential measures to mitigate such problems in any future application of this technology. Mercury oxidation and capture measurements were made on Unit 3 four times during the 17-month demonstration. Measurements were performed across the catalyst and Absorber C and 'baseline' measurements were performed across Absorber A or B, which did not have a catalyst upstream. Results are presented in the report from all four sets of measurements during the demonstration period. These results include elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst, mercury capture across Absorber C downstream of the catalyst, baseline mercury capture across Absorber A or B, and mercury re-emissions across both absorbers in service. Also presented in the report are estimates of the average mercury control performance of the oxidation catalyst technology over the 17-month demonstration period and the resulting mercury control costs.

  10. C.d.L. in Chimica e per l'Ambiente e per i Materiali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Achilles, Rüdiger

    C.d.L. in Chimica e per l'Ambiente e per i Materiali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti Prova.d.L. in Chimica e per l'Ambiente e per i Materiali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti Prova del 20 per i Materiali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti Prova del 20/01/2012 Cognome: Nome: Matricola

  11. C.d.L. in Chimica e per l'Ambiente e per i Materiali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Achilles, Rüdiger

    C.d.L. in Chimica e per l'Ambiente e per i Materiali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti Prova, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti Prova del 18/11/2011 Cognome: Nome: Matricola: Scrivere le soluzioni.d.L. in Chimica e per l'Ambiente e per i Materiali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti Prova del 18

  12. MAESTRA EN DESARROLLO Y AMBIENTE Objetivo del programa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vásquez, Carlos

    ) Transformación del ambiente por la actividad humana 3 Desarrollo sustentable 3 Economía ambiental y de los Pobreza, desigualdad y desarrollo humano 3 El Desarrollo humano y sustentable: principios, conocimientos Líneas de investigación Educación, Interpretación y Psicología Ambiental Desarrollo Sustentable y

  13. Evaluation of the Biological Effects of the Northwest Power Conservation Council's Mainstem Amendment on the Fisheries Upstream and Downstream of Libby Dam, Montana, 2007-2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sylvester, Ryan; Stephens, Brian; Tohtz, Joel

    2009-04-03

    A new project began in 2005 to monitor the biological and physical effects of improved operations of Hungry Horse and Libby Dams, Montana, called for by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) Mainstem Amendment. This operating strategy was designed to benefit resident fish impacted by hydropower and flood control operations. Under the new operating guidelines, July through September reservoir drafts will be limited to 10 feet from full pool during the highest 80% of water supply years and 20 feet from full pool during the lowest 20% of water supply (drought) years. Limits were also established on how rapidly discharge from the dams can be increased or decreased depending on the season. The NPCC also directed the federal agencies that operate Libby and Hungry Horse Dams to implement a new flood control strategy (VARQ) and directed Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks to evaluate biological responses to this operating strategy. The Mainstem Amendment operating strategy has not been fully implemented at the Montana dams as of June 2008 but the strategy will be implemented in 2009. This report highlights the monitoring methods used to monitor the effects of the Mainstem Amendment operations on fishes, habitat, and aquatic invertebrates upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. We also present initial assessments of data and the effects of various operating strategies on physical and biological components of the systems upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. Annual electrofishing surveys in the Kootenai River and selected tributaries, along with gill net surveys in the reservoir, are being used to quantify the impacts of dam operations on fish populations upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. Scales and otoliths are being used to determine the age structure and growth of focal species. Annual population estimates and tagging experiments provide estimates of survival and growth in the mainstem Kootenai River and selected tributaries. Radio telemetry will be used to validate an existing Instream Flow Incremental Methodology (IFIM) model developed for the Kootenai River and will also be used to assess the effect of changes in discharge on fish movements and habitat use downstream of Libby Dam. Passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags will be injected into rainbow, bull, and cutthroat trout throughout the mainstem Kootenai River and selected tributaries to provide information on growth, survival, and migration patterns in relation to abiotic and biotic variables. Model simulations (RIVBIO) are used to calculate the effects of dam operations on the wetted perimeter and benthic biomass in the Kootenai River below Libby Dam. Additional models (IFIM) will also be used to evaluate the impacts of dam operations on the amount of available habitat for different life stages of rainbow and bull trout in the Kootenai River.

  14. Chapter 53 Ambient Air Quality (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kentucky Administrative Regulation Chapter 53, entitled Ambient Air Quality, is promulgated under the authority of the Division of Air Quality within the Energy and Environment Cabinet’s Department...

  15. Promising Technology: Heat Pump Water Heaters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A heat pump water heater uses electricity to transfer heat from the ambient air to stored water, as opposed to an electric resistance water heater, which uses electricity to generate the heat directly. This enables the heat pump water heater to be 2 to 3 times as efficient as an electric resistance water heater.

  16. The Inhomogeneous Structure of Water at Ambient Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.Week Day Year(activeInforum LIFT Model U.S. Energy andThe

  17. C.d.L. in Chimica e per l'Ambiente e per i Materiali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Achilles, Rüdiger

    C.d.L. in Chimica e per l'Ambiente e per i Materiali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti Prova Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti Prova del 14/01/2011 Cognome: Nome: Matricola: Scrivere le soluzioni nei e per i Materiali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti Prova del 14/01/2011 Cognome: Nome

  18. C.d.L. in Chimica e per l'Ambiente e per i Materiali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Achilles, Rüdiger

    C.d.L. in Chimica e per l'Ambiente e per i Materiali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti Prova Materiali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti Prova del 03/12/2010 Cognome: Nome: Matricola: Scrivere le, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti Prova del 03/12/2010 Cognome: Nome: Matricola: Scrivere le soluzioni

  19. Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe; Conor Braman; Katherine Dombrowski; Tom Machalek

    2010-12-31

    This document is the final technical report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, 'Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,' which was conducted over the time-period January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2010. The objective of this project has been to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid catalysts and/or fixed-structure mercury sorbents to promote the removal of total mercury and oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, followed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL), EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Energy (now called Luminant), Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP) and Duke Energy. URS Group was the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses fixed-structure sorbents and/or catalysts to promote the removal of total mercury and/or oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury not adsorbed is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project has tested candidate materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. Pilot-scale catalytic oxidation tests have been completed for periods of approximately 14 to19 months at three sites, with an additional round of pilot-scale fixed-structure sorbent tests being conducted at one of those sites. Additionally, pilot-scale wet FGD tests have been conducted downstream of mercury oxidation catalysts at a total of four sites. The sites include the two of three sites from this project and two sites where catalytic oxidation pilot testing was conducted as part of a previous DOE-NETL project. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests were also conducted at a fifth site, but with no catalyst or fixed-structure mercury sorbent upstream. This final report presents and discusses detailed results from all of these efforts, and makes a number of conclusions about what was learned through these efforts.

  20. Received 28 May 2012 | Accepted 9 Nov 2012 | Published 18 Dec 2012 Extracting net current from an upstream neutral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heiblum, Mordehai "Moty"

    and carrying energy without net charge, had been predicted to exist in some of the fractional quantum Hall of upstream chiral neutral modes. These modes, which carry energy without net charge2­10, are at the focus, as expected, with zero net current. In a recent work by Gross et al.7, a few new features of these modes were

  1. The Expro Engineering Sponsorship Programme Expro International Group is an upstream oil and gas sector service company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    The Expro Engineering Sponsorship Programme Expro International Group is an upstream oil and gas and process flow from high-value oil and gas wells, from exploration and appraisal through to mature field for the development and delivery of innovative technologies to meet the needs of the oil and gas industry globally

  2. Upstream Urbanization Exacerbates Urban Heat Island Effects Da-Lin Zhang*, Yi-Xuan Shou, & Russell R. Dickerson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickerson, Russell R.

    1 Upstream Urbanization Exacerbates Urban Heat Island Effects Da-Lin Zhang*, Yi-Xuan Shou, Maryland 20742 Email: dalin@atmos.umd.edu The adverse impacts of urbanization on climate and weather through urban heat island (UHI) effects and greenhouse emissions are issues of growing concern1

  3. INFLUENCE OF ROCKY REACH DAM AND THE TEMPERATURE OF THE OKANOGAN RIVER ON THE UPSTREAM MIGRATION OF SOCKEYE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INFLUENCE OF ROCKY REACH DAM AND THE TEMPERATURE OF THE OKANOGAN RIVER ON THE UPSTREAM MIGRATION Reach Dam, constructed on the Columbia River 7 miles above Wenatchee, Wash.· in 1957-61, has not appreciably increased the time required for adult sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) to mi~rate to Zosel Dam

  4. A DETAILED RESEARCH PLAN TO ASSESS BEHAVIOR OF ADULT SUMMER/FALL CHINOOK UPSTREAM OF WELLS DAM USING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A DETAILED RESEARCH PLAN TO ASSESS BEHAVIOR OF ADULT SUMMER/FALL CHINOOK UPSTREAM OF WELLS DAM-8295 Final Draft April 19, 2004 #12;BioAnalysts, Inc Summer/Fall Chinook Research Plan Chief Joseph Dam Page........................................................................ 11 3.6.3 Chief Joseph Dam Powerhouse

  5. White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, David L.; Kern, J. Chris; Hughes, Michele L.

    2003-12-01

    We report on our progress from April 2001 through March 2002 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam.

  6. White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, David L.; Kern, J. Chris; Hughes, Michele L.

    2004-02-01

    We report on our progress from April 2002 through March 2003 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam.

  7. Projection screen having reduced ambient light scattering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-05-11

    An apparatus and method for improving the contrast between incident projected light and ambient light reflected from a projection screen are described. The efficiency of the projection screen for reflection of the projected light remains high, while permitting the projection screen to be utilized in a brightly lighted room. Light power requirements from the projection system utilized may be reduced.

  8. Robust Speech Recognition Under Noisy Ambient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    6.4.2 Robust Feature Selection and Extraction Methods .................................... 145 6 ..................................................................................................................... 156 ABSTRACT Automatic speech recognition is critical in natural human-centric interfaces for ambient, and a number of commercial speech recognition products (from Nuance, IBM, Microsoft, Nokia, etc

  9. Ambient Telepresence: Colleague Awareness in Smart Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beigl, Michael

    · Building smartness into the things that surround us rather than introducing new smart devices · CollectingAmbient Telepresence: Colleague Awareness in Smart Environments Hans-W. Gellersen and Michael Beigl-located. In this approach, everyday things that people use are augmented with awareness technology, creating a smart

  10. Internal gravity waves in a saturated, moist-neutral atmosphere upstream wave of subsidence in start-up for moist topographic flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muraki, David J.

    Internal gravity waves in a saturated, moist-neutral atmosphere upstream wave of subsidence of subsidence de-saturated, cloud-free air? #12;Desaturation of Cloud-Free, Moist-Neutral Air Primary Cause ( t + Ux ) + x = 0 xx + zz = the upstream propagating wave of subsidence persists . . . #12;A Hierarchy

  11. C.d.L. in Chimica e Tecnologie per l'Ambiente e per i Mate-riali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti 04. 11. 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Achilles, Rüdiger

    C.d.L. in Chimica e Tecnologie per l'Ambiente e per i Mate- riali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia Tecnologie per l'Ambiente e per i Mate- riali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti 04. 11. 2009 1

  12. C.d.L. in Chimica e Tecnologie per l'Ambiente e i Materiali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti 20. 1. 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Achilles, Rüdiger

    C.d.L. in Chimica e Tecnologie per l'Ambiente e i Materiali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti Tecnologie per l'Ambiente e i Materiali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti 20. 1. 2009 1. Calcolare (a

  13. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-05-01

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,'' during the time period January 1, 2003 through March 31, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project cofunders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the sixth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included continued operation of the pilot unit with three catalysts, conducting catalyst activity measurements, and procuring the fourth catalyst, all for the GRE Coal Creek pilot unit site. Laboratory efforts were also conducted to support catalyst selection for the second pilot unit site, at CPS' Spruce Plant. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

  14. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2002-10-04

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period July 1, 2002 through September 30, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates in a stable form with the byproducts from the FGD system. The coprecipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project will test previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, so as to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the fourth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, most of the project efforts were related to completing, installing and starting up the pilot unit, completing laboratory runs to size catalysts, and procuring catalysts for the pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

  15. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-07-01

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,'' during the time-period April 1, 2003 through June 30, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project cofunders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for approximately 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the seventh full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included continued operation of the first pilot unit, conducting catalyst activity measurements, installing sonic horns for on-line catalyst cleaning, and installing the fourth catalyst, all for the GRE Coal Creek site. CPS began installation of the second mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit at their Spruce Plant during the quarter. Laboratory efforts were conducted to support catalyst selection for that second pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

  16. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2002-07-17

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period April 1, 2002 through June 30, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates in a stable form with the byproducts from the FGD system. The co-precipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project will test previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, so as to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the third full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, most of the project efforts were related to constructing the pilot unit and conducting laboratory runs to help size catalysts for the pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these two efforts.

  17. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-01-21

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period October 1, 2002 through December 31, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The co-precipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future fullscale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the fifth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included starting up the pilot unit with three catalysts at the first site, conducting catalyst activity measurements, completing comprehensive flue gas sampling and analyses, and procuring additional catalysts for the pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

  18. Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Ambient Air Quality Standards (Vermont)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ambient air quality standards are based on the national ambient air quality standards. The Vermont standards are classified as primary and secondary standards and judged adequate to protect...

  19. Guia para a Avaliao do Risco Ambiental de Organismos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parrott, Wayne

    . Vários autores. Bibliografia 1. Agricultura 2. Biotecnologia 3. Engenharia genética 4. Organismos : Transgênicos : Engenharia genética : Biotecnologia 660.65 #12;Guia para a Avaliação do Risco Ambiental de Professora Associada de Biotecnologia, Departamento de Meio Ambiente e Desenvolvimento, Universidade Zamorano

  20. Smart Lighting: LED Implementation and Ambient Communication Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agogino, Alice M.

    Smart Lighting: LED Implementation and Ambient Communication Applications by Nicholas Adrian Galano............................................................................................................................................1 LED Implementation..........................................................................................................................2 LED Energy Usage

  1. THE DEVELOPMENT OF NICKEL-FREE AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEELS FOR AMBIENT AND CRYOGENIC APPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddick, Glen T.

    2011-01-01

    OF NICKEL-FREE AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEELS FOR AMBIENT ANDOF NICKEL-FREE AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEELS FOR AMBIENT ANDOF NICKEL-FREE AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEELS FOR AMBIENT AND

  2. Electric Power From Ambient Energy Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeSteese, John G.; Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Schienbein, Lawrence A.

    2000-10-03

    This report summarizes research on opportunities to produce electric power from ambient sources as an alternative to using portable battery packs or hydrocarbon-fueled systems in remote areas. The work was an activity in the Advanced Concepts Project conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Office of Research and Development in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nonproliferation and National Security.

  3. Volatile Organic Compounds in Untreated Ambient Groundwater of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volatile Organic Compounds in Untreated Ambient Groundwater of the United States, 1985-1995 P A U L, ambient groundwater of the conterminous United States was conducted based on samples collected from 2948-chloropropane, which had a reporting level of 1.0 µg/L. Because ambient groundwater was targeted, areas of known

  4. CENTRO INTERUNIVERSITARIO DI TECNOLOGIA E CHIMICA DELL'AMBIENTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Pillo, Gianni

    CENTRO INTERUNIVERSITARIO DI TECNOLOGIA E CHIMICA DELL'AMBIENTE Via Eudossiana, 18 ­ 00184 Roma.I.T.C.A. - Centro Interuniversitario di Tecnologia e Chimica dell'Ambiente intende conferire un incarico per lo settore "Tecnologia e chimica applicate alla tutela dell'ambiente: la bonifica dei siti contaminati

  5. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-10-01

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,'' during the time-period July 1, 2003 through September 30, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project cofunders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for approximately 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the eighth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included continued operation of the first pilot unit at the GRE Coal Creek site with all four catalysts in service and sonic horns installed for on-line catalyst cleaning. During the quarter, a catalyst activity measurement trip and mercury SCEM relative accuracy tests were completed, and catalyst pressure drop was closely monitored with the sonic horns in operation. CPS completed the installation of the second mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit at their Spruce Plant during the quarter, and the four catalysts to be tested in that unit were ordered. The pilot unit was started up with two of the four catalysts in service late in August, and initial catalyst activity results were measured in late September. The other two catalysts will not become available for testing until sometime in October. This technical progress report details these efforts at both sites.

  6. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2002-04-26

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period January 1, 2002 through March 31, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE) and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates in a stable form with the byproducts from the FGD system. The co-precipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project will test previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, so as to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the second full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, most of the project efforts were related to pilot unit design and conducting laboratory runs to help select candidate catalysts. This technical progress report provides an update on these two efforts. A Test Plan for the upcoming pilot-scale evaluations was also prepared and submitted to NETL for review and comment. Since this document was already submitted under separate cover, this information is not repeated here.

  7. Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2006-03-31

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems'', during the time-period January 1 through March 31, 2006. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, and the use of a wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system downstream to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project is being co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory, EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Generation Company LP, the Southern Company, and Duke Energy. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified catalyst materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for approximately 14 months or longer at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests are being conducted periodically at each site to confirm the ability to scrub the catalytically oxidized mercury at high efficiency. This is the ninth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts primarily consisted of operating the catalyst pilot units at the TXU Generation Company LP's Monticello Steam Electric Station and at Georgia Power's Plant Yates. Two catalyst activity measurement trips were made to Plant Yates during the quarter. This Technical Progress Report presents catalyst activity results from the oxidation catalyst pilot unit at Plant Yates and discusses the status of the pilot unit at Monticello.

  8. The North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory deep-water acoustic propagation experiments in the Philippine Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    The North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory deep-water acoustic propagation experiments in the Philippine in the Philippine Sea during 2009­2011 investigated deep-water acoustic propagation and ambient noise of spanning the water column in the deep ocean. The acoustic transmissions and ambient noise were also

  9. Ambient temperature modelling with soft computing techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertini, Ilaria; Ceravolo, Francesco; Citterio, Marco; Di Pietra, Biagio; Margiotta, Francesca; Pizzuti, Stefano; Puglisi, Giovanni; De Felice, Matteo

    2010-07-15

    This paper proposes a hybrid approach based on soft computing techniques in order to estimate monthly and daily ambient temperature. Indeed, we combine the back-propagation (BP) algorithm and the simple Genetic Algorithm (GA) in order to effectively train artificial neural networks (ANN) in such a way that the BP algorithm initialises a few individuals of the GA's population. Experiments concerned monthly temperature estimation of unknown places and daily temperature estimation for thermal load computation. Results have shown remarkable improvements in accuracy compared to traditional methods. (author)

  10. Greenvision Ambiente Spa | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynn County,Solar Jump to: navigation,CapitalGreenvision Ambiente Spa

  11. Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Rhudy

    2006-06-30

    This final report presents and discusses results from a mercury control process development project entitled ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems''. The objective of this project was to demonstrate at pilot scale a mercury control technology that uses solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. Oxidized mercury is removed in downstream wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and leaves with the FGD byproducts. The goal of the project was to achieve 90% oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas and 90% overall mercury capture with the downstream wet FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. Great River Energy (GRE) and City Public Service (now CPS Energy) of San Antonio were also project co-funders and provided host sites. URS Group, Inc. was the prime contractor. Longer-term pilot-scale tests were conducted at two sites to provide catalyst life data. GRE provided the first site, at their Coal Creek Station (CCS), which fires North Dakota lignite, and CPS Energy provided the second site, at their Spruce Plant, which fires Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. Mercury oxidation catalyst testing began at CCS in October 2002 and continued through the end of June 2004, representing nearly 21 months of catalyst operation. An important finding was that, even though the mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit was installed downstream of a high-efficiency ESP, fly ash buildup began to plug flue gas flow through the horizontal catalyst cells. Sonic horns were installed in each catalyst compartment and appeared to limit fly ash buildup. A palladium-based catalyst showed initial elemental mercury oxidation percentages of 95% across the catalyst, declining to 67% after 21 months in service. A carbon-based catalyst began with almost 98% elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst, but declined to 79% oxidation after nearly 13 months in service. The other two catalysts, an SCR-type catalyst (titanium/vanadium) and an experimental fly-ash-based catalyst, were significantly less active. The palladium-based and SCR-type catalysts were effectively regenerated at the end of the long-term test by flowing heated air through the catalyst overnight. The carbon-based catalyst was not observed to regenerate, and no regeneration tests were conducted on the fourth, fly-ash-based catalyst. Preliminary process economics were developed for the palladium and carbon-based catalysts for a scrubbed, North Dakota lignite application. As described above, the pilot-scale results showed the catalysts could not sustain 90% or greater oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas for a period of two years. Consequently, the economics were based on performance criteria in a later DOE NETL solicitation, which required candidate mercury control technologies to achieve at least a 55% increase in mercury capture for plants that fire lignite. These economics show that if the catalysts must be replaced every two years, the catalytic oxidation process can be 30 to 40% less costly than conventional (not chemically treated) activated carbon injection if the plant currently sells their fly ash and would lose those sales with carbon injection. If the plant does not sell their fly ash, activated carbon injection was estimated to be slightly less costly. There was little difference in the estimated cost for palladium versus the carbon-based catalysts. If the palladium-based catalyst can be regenerated to double its life to four years, catalytic oxidation process economics are greatly improved. With regeneration, the catalytic oxidation process shows over a 50% reduction in mercury control cost compared to conventional activated carbon injection for a case where the plant sells its fly ash. At Spruce Plant, mercury oxidation catalyst testing began in September 2003 and continued through the end of April 2005, interrupted only by a

  12. C.d.L. in Chimica e Tecnologie per l'Ambiente e i Materiali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti 5. 11. 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Achilles, Rüdiger

    C.d.L. in Chimica e Tecnologie per l'Ambiente e i Materiali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti anno si liberi nell'ambiente la stessa massa M del 137 Cs. Qual `e la massa totale che verr

  13. Re:Cycle - a Generative Ambient Video Engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bizzocchi, Jim; Ben Youssef, Belgacem; Quan, Brian; Suzuki, Wakiko; Bagheri, Majid; Riecke, Bernhard E.

    2009-01-01

    can be traced in earlier cinematic and video work, and inis the treatment of cinematic time. Ambient artists thrivethe top of the frame). Cinematic time is therefore treated

  14. Ambient Corporation's Reply comments to DOE RFI: Addressing Policy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    communications will play ineneabling utilities to deploy cost-effective long-term smart grid benefits. Ambient Corporation's Reply comments to DOE RFI: Addressing Policy and...

  15. Alternative Refrigerant Evaluation for High-Ambient-Temperature...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Alternative Refrigerant Evaluation for High-Ambient-Temperature Environments: R-22 and R-410A Alternatives for Mini-Split Air Conditioners Alternative Refrigerant Evaluation for...

  16. The Challenges of Ambient Collaboration H. P. Dommel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dommel, Hans-Peter

    in the foreground to help users interface through personal computing portholes, ambient collaboration reverses of such environment must intrinsically embrace planning, logistics, coordination, communication, monitoring

  17. Ambient-pressure silica aerogel films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prakash, S.S. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brinker, C.J. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)]|[Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hurd, A.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Very highly porous (aerogel) silica films with refractive index in the range 1.006--1.05 (equivalent porosity 98.5--88%) were prepared by an ambient-pressure process. It was shown earlier using in situ ellipsometric imaging that the high porosity of these films was mainly attributable to the dilation or `springback` of the film during the final stage of drying. This finding was irrefutably reconfirmed by visually observing a `springback` of >500% using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Ellipsometry and ESEM also established the near cent per cent reversibility of aerogel film deformation during solvent intake and drying. Film thickness profile measurements (near the drying line) for the aerogel, xerogel and pure solvent cases are presented from imaging ellipsometry. The thickness of these films (crack-free) were controlled in the range 0.1-3.5 {mu}m independent of refractive index.

  18. The Ambient Computational Environments Architecture for Reliable, Secure,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    challenge. The ACE - Ambient Computational Environments - architecture aims at high- scale and seamlessThe Ambient Computational Environments Architecture for Reliable, Secure, and Pervasive Computing The University of Kansas #12;Abstract During the past few years, the technology world has become more and more

  19. Ambient Obscurance Baking on the GPU Peter-Pike Sloan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    parameterizations led us away from them due to more complicated workflows. · Since outdoor lighting uses a dynamic frame in a game (right). Our method supports instanced trees and shrubs and the gun lighting changes and Ambient Obscurance are coarse approxi- mations to global illumination from ambient lighting, commonly used

  20. Dirio Digital DIRECTOR: PEDRO CURVELO Ensino | Cincia e Tecnologia | Ambiente

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    ambiente, o clima, a energia, a educação, o desporto e o território. Diário Digital com Lusa Fusão dasDiário Digital DIRECTOR: PEDRO CURVELO Ensino | Ciência e Tecnologia | Ambiente 02-01-2013 às 14

  1. Temporal Variability of Waves at the Proton Cyclotron Frequency Upstream from Mars: Implications for Mars Distant Hydrogen Exosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertucci, Cesar; Chaufray, Jean-Yves; Gomez, Daniel; Mazelle, Christian; Delva, Magda; Modolo, Ronan; Gonzalez-Galindo, Francisco; Brain, David Andrew

    2013-01-01

    We report on the temporal variability of the occurrence of waves at the local proton cyclotron frequency upstream from the Martian bow shock from Mars Global Surveyor observations during the first aerobraking and science phasing orbit periods. Observations at high southern latitudes during minimum-to-mean solar activity show that the wave occurrence rate is significantly higher around perihelion southern summer solstice and lower around the same hemisphere's spring and autumn equinoxes. A similar trend is observed in the hydrogen (H) exospheric density profiles over the Martian South Pole obtained from a model including UV thermospheric heating effects. In spite of the complexity in the ion pick-up and plasma wave generation and evolution processes, these results support the idea that variations in the occurrence of waves could be used to study the temporal evolution of the distant Martian H corona and its coupling with the thermosphere at altitudes currently inaccessible to direct measurements.

  2. Turbid water Clear water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaffe, Jules

    Turbid water Clear water pixel position cameraresponsecameraresponse pixel position ABSTRACT: A new underwater laser scanning system, providing microbathymetric information in coastal waters is described the backscatter component resulting in enhanced performance in turbid waters. The system is expected to provide

  3. Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District: Third Research Category: Water Quality Focus Category: Toxic Substances, Groundwater, Treatment and Pesticides in Soils, Sludges, DNAPLs and Bulk With Na/NH3 at Ambient Temperature, Mississippi Water Resources creasote wood treatment plants and nitrated organic residues from munitions

  4. C.d.L. in Chimica e Tecnologie per l'Ambiente e per i Mate-riali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti 05. 11. 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Achilles, Rüdiger

    C.d.L. in Chimica e Tecnologie per l'Ambiente e per i Mate- riali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia.d.L. in Chimica e Tecnologie per l'Ambiente e per i Mate- riali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti 05. 11

  5. C.d.L. in Chimica e Tecnologie per l'Ambiente e i Materiali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti 20. 1. 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Achilles, Rüdiger

    C.d.L. in Chimica e Tecnologie per l'Ambiente e i Materiali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti.d.L. in Chimica e Tecnologie per l'Ambiente e i Materiali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti 20. 1. 2010 1

  6. Curso experimental en qumica biolgica, ambiental y tecnologas relacionadas Los Institutos de Qumica Avanzada de Catalua (IQAC) y de Diagnstico Ambiental y Estudios del Agua (IDAEA) del

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Química Avanzada de Cataluña (IQAC) y de Diagnóstico Ambiental y Estudios del Agua (IDAEA) del Consejo

  7. An experimental study on the effects of an upstream gate valve on the accuracy of an insertion type flowmeter 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wornyoh, Emmanuel Yao Atsu

    2003-01-01

    Flowmeters measure the consumption of chilled water or hot water in buildings. Depending on the accuracy, cost consideration, and available space, the flowmeter selected could be an insertion type or fixed type such as ...

  8. Large-eddy simulations of structure effects of an upstream elbow main pipe on hot and cold fluids mixing in a vertical tee junction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attinger, Daniel

    in e.g. nuclear power plants. In the present work, the mixing of a hot and a cold fluid streamLarge-eddy simulations of structure effects of an upstream elbow main pipe on hot and cold fluids Fuel Injection Equipment Stock Co., Ltd., Beijing 100166, China c Department of Mechanical Engineering

  9. Street media : ambient messages in an urban space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murthy, Rekha (Rekha S.)

    2005-01-01

    Ambient street media are the media of our everyday lives in cities. Manifested in bits and fragments on the surfaces of the streetscape, these media often escape our notice - tuned out as visual clutter or dismissed as ...

  10. Gua para la Evaluacin de Riesgo Ambiental de Organismos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parrott, Wayne

    Brasil, 2012. Vários autores. Bibliografia 1. Agricultura 2. Biotecnologia 3. Engenharia genética 4 : Transgênicos : Engenharia genética : Biotecnologia 660.65 #12;Guía para la Evaluación de Riesgo Ambiental de

  11. Responses of beef cattle to high ambient temperatures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cartwright, Thomas Campbell

    1954-01-01

    measurement of particulate matter concentration in ambient air Ronald E. Lacey a & William Brock Faulkner a a Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA Accepted author version posted online: 14 Apr... 2015. To cite this article: Ronald E. Lacey & William Brock Faulkner (2015) Uncertainty associated with the gravimetric measurement of particulate matter concentration in ambient air, Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association, 65:7, 887-894, DOI...

  12. AO DO FLUXO DE POT ENCIA EM AMBIENTE VETORIAL USANDO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coutinho, Alvaro L. G. A.

    SOLU ¸ C ~ AO DO FLUXO DE POT â?? ENCIA EM AMBIENTE VETORIAL USANDO O M ' ETODO DO GRADIENTE BI uma redu¸c~ao no custo computacional. O algoritmo foi executado em ambiente com­ putacional vetorial¸c~ao de energia el'etrica, assim como in'umeros problemas em engenharia e ou­ tras ciâ??encias, requer

  13. White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 1998-1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, David L.

    2000-12-01

    The authors report on their progress from April 1998 through March 1999 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW; Report A), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW; Report B), U.S. Geological Survey Biological Resources Division (USGS; Report C), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS; Report D), Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC; Report E), and the University of Idaho (UI; Report F). This is a multi-year study with many objectives requiring more than one year to complete. Therefore, findings from a given year may be part of more significant findings yet to be reported. Highlights of results of our work from April 1998 through March 1999 are given.

  14. Mercury in Fish Collected Upstream and Downstream of Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico: 1991--2004.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.R. Fresquez

    2004-10-15

    Small amounts of mercury (Hg) may exist in some canyon drainage systems within Los Alamos National Laboratory lands as a result of past discharges of untreated effluents. This paper reports on the concentrations of Hg in muscle (fillets) of various types of fish species collected downstream of LANL's influence from 1991 through 2004. The mean Hg concentration in fish from Cochiti reservoir (0.22 {micro}g/g wet weight), which is located downstream of LANL, was similar to fish collected from a reservoir upstream of LANL (Abiquiu) (0.26 {micro}g/g wet weight). Mercury concentrations in fish collected from both reservoirs exhibited significantly (Abiquiu = p < 0.05 and Cochiti = p < 0.10) decreasing trends over time. Predator fish like the northern pike (Esox lucius) contained significantly higher concentrations of Hg (0.39 {micro}g/g wet weight) than bottom-feeding fish like the white sucker (Catostomus commersoni) (0.10 {micro}g/g wet weight).

  15. Water Resources Water Quality and Water Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    Water Resources TD 603 Lecture 1: Water Quality and Water Treatment CTARA Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay 2nd November, 2011 #12;OVERVIEW Water Quality WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TRE OVERVIEW OF THE LECTURE 1. Water Distribution Schemes Hand Pump

  16. d upstream downstream disturbance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    microphone Cm (s) C e (s) Controller (a) m Pmd (s) d Cm (s) Pmu (s) P ed (s) u P eu (s) e C e (s) (b) Figure) #12; y 2 =m Pmd (s) w 1 =d w 2 D 2 C m (s) Pmu (s) z 2 P ed (s) D 1 W 2 W 3 z 3 D 3 w 3 1 0 0005 1 0

  17. Humidity-resistant ambient-temperature solid-electrolyte amperometric sensing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaromb, S.

    1994-06-21

    Apparatus and methods for detecting selected chemical compounds in air or other gas streams at room or ambient temperature includes a liquid-free humidity-resistant amperometric sensor comprising a sensing electrode and a counter and reference electrode separated by a solid electrolyte. The sensing electrode preferably contains a noble metal, such as Pt black. The electrolyte is water-free, non-hygroscopic, and substantially water-insoluble, and has a room temperature ionic conductivity [>=]10[sup [minus]4] (ohm-cm)[sup [minus]1], and preferably [>=]0.01 (ohm-cm)[sup [minus]1]. The conductivity may be due predominantly to Ag[sup +] ions, as in Ag[sub 2]WO[sub 4], or to F[sup [minus

  18. Water Clean Water Clean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    Keep Our Water Clean Keep Our Water Clean Home and garden pesticides and fertilizers are polluting residues wash into gutters, storm drains, and streams by rain,garden watering,or cleaning up drinking water. Follow these tips to keep our rivers, creeks, and oceans clean. What can you do to protect

  19. Water, water everywhere,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eberhard, Marc O.

    1 Water, water everywhere, but is it safe to drink? An Inquiry-based unit investigating the journey of your drinking water from source to tap of drinking water will contain different contaminants, based on surrounding land uses (guided inquiry activity

  20. Water Resources Forests & Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Resources Forests & Water More than half of the nation's freshwater supply originates on forestland. Healthy and sustainable forests can help ensure a continuous supply of clean and abundant water. Not only does forestland provide the cleanest water of any land use, it also helps absorb rainfall

  1. C.d.L. in Chimica e Tecnologie per l'Ambiente e i Materiali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti 19. 12. 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Achilles, Rüdiger

    C.d.L. in Chimica e Tecnologie per l'Ambiente e i Materiali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti e i Materiali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti 19. 12. 2008 1. Calcolare (a) k=1 (- 1 5 )k percentuale cresce [H3O+ ] se il pH si riduce di 0, 01 unit`a di pH? #12;C.d.L. in Chimica e Tecnologie per l'Ambiente

  2. C.d.L. in Chimica e Tecnologie per l'Ambiente e per i Mate-riali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti 09. 12. 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Achilles, Rüdiger

    C.d.L. in Chimica e Tecnologie per l'Ambiente e per i Mate- riali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia e per i Mate- riali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti 09. 12. 2009 1. Dato il numero complesso funzione y = f(x) = - log10 x e il valore log10 e 0, 4.) #12;C.d.L. in Chimica e Tecnologie per l'Ambiente

  3. FLAT FLAME BURNER ANALYSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pagni, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    in Edge Cooled F1at Flame Burners," Combust. Sci. and Tech.Subscripts w water b burner ambient, upstream bondary ufor publication FLAT FLAME BURNER ANALYSES P. J. Pagni, A.

  4. Evolution of the Deep and Bottom Waters of the Scotia Sea, Southern Ocean, during 19952005*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Gregory C.

    Evolution of the Deep and Bottom Waters of the Scotia Sea, Southern Ocean, during 1995 the eastern Scotia Sea occupied in 1995, 1999, and 2005 reveals significant variability in the deep and bottom 1995 and 1999 reversed through to 2005, reflecting changes seen earlier upstream in the Weddell Sea

  5. Investigation of trace amounts of gas on microvave water-cut measurement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jin

    2006-08-16

    In recent years, the upstream oil and gas industry has dealt with some of the most challenging metering applications. One of these is the measurement of water percentage at the point of allocation. It is an essential requirement when test separators...

  6. 3-D Simulations of Protostellar Jets in Stratified Ambient Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elisabete M. de Gouveia Dal Pino; Mark Birkinshaw

    1996-07-25

    We present fully three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of radiative cooling jets propagating into stratified isothermal ambient media with power-law density and pressure distributions. The parameters used are mainly suitable for protostellar jets but results applicable to extragalactic jets are also presented. Comparisons are made with previous simulations of jets through homogeneous media. We find that for radiative cooling jets propagating into regions where the ambient medium has an increasing density (and pressure) gradient, the ambient gas tends to compress the cold, low-pressure cocoon of shocked material that surrounds the beam and destroy the bow shock-like structure at the head. The compressing medium collimates the jet and promotes the development of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities which cause beam focusing, wiggling and the formation of internal traveling shocks, $close$ $to$ $the$ $head$, via pinching along the beam. This remarkably resembles the structure of some observed systems (e.g. Haro 6-5B northern and HH 24G jets). These effects are larger for jets with smaller density ratio between jet and environment $\\eta $ (tested for $\\eta $=1, 3, and 10) and larger Mach number $M_a=v_j/c_a$ (tested for $M_a=$12 and 24, where $v_j$ is the jet velocity and $c_a$ the ambient sound speed). In an ambient medium of decreasing density (and pressure), the beam is poorly collimated and relaxes, becoming faint. This could explain ''invisible'' jet sections, like the gap between the parent source and collimated beam (e.g., in HH30 jet). Although, on average, jets propagating into an increasing (decreasing) density environment are decelerated (accelerated) by the increasing (decreasing) ram pressure of the ambient medium, we find that their propagation velocities have an oscillating pattern.

  7. Observation of neutral sulfuric acid-amine containing clusters in laboratory and ambient measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuang C.; Zhao, J.; Smith, J. N.; Eisele, F. L.; Chen, M.; McMurry, P. H.

    2011-11-02

    Recent ab initio calculations showed that amines can enhance atmospheric sulfuric acid-water nucleation more effectively than ammonia, and this prediction has been substantiated in laboratory measurements. Laboratory studies have also shown that amines can effectively displace ammonia in several types of ammonium clusters. However, the roles of amines in cluster formation and growth at a microscopic molecular scale (from molecular sizes up to 2 nm) have not yet been well understood. Processes that must be understood include the incorporation of amines into sulfuric acid clusters and the formation of organic salts in freshly nucleated particles, which contributes significantly to particle growth rates. We report the first laboratory and ambient measurements of neutral sulfuric acid-amine clusters using the Cluster CIMS, a recently-developed mass spectrometer designed for measuring neutral clusters formed in the atmosphere during nucleation. An experimental technique, which we refer to as Semi-Ambient Signal Amplification (SASA), was employed. Sulfuric acid was added to ambient air, and the concentrations and composition of clusters in this mixture were analyzed by the Cluster CIMS. This experimental approach led to significantly higher cluster concentrations than are normally found in ambient air, thereby increasing signal-to-noise levels and allowing us to study reactions between gas phase species in ambient air and sulfuric acid containing clusters. Mass peaks corresponding to clusters containing four H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} molecules and one amine molecule were clearly observed, with the most abundant sulfuric acid-amine clusters being those containing a C2- or C4-amine (i.e. amines with masses of 45 and 73 amu). Evidence for C3- and C5-amines (i.e. amines with masses of 59 and 87 amu) was also found, but their correlation with sulfuric acid tetramer was not as strong as was observed for the C2- and C4-amines. The formation mechanisms for those sulfuric acid-amine clusters were investigated by varying the residence time in the inlet. It was concluded that the amines react directly with neutral clusters and that ion-induced clustering of sulfuric acid cluster ions with amines was not a dominant process. Results from ambient measurements using the Cluster CIMS without addition of sulfuric acid have shown that the sulfuric acid-amine clusters were reasonably well correlated with sulfuric acid tetramer and consistent with the SASA experiments at the same Boulder sampling site. Also, clusters that contain C2- or C4-amines were more abundant and better correlated with sulfuric acid tetramer than other types of amine containing clusters. However, ambient measurements of sulfuric acid-amine clusters remain difficult and highly uncertain because their concentrations are only slightly above background levels, even during nucleation events.

  8. Electrical characteristics of multilayer MoS{sub 2} transistors at real operating temperatures with different ambient conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwon, Hyuk-Jun; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Jang, Jaewon Subramanian, Vivek; Kim, Sunkook

    2014-10-13

    Atomically thin, two-dimensional (2D) materials with bandgaps have attracted increasing research interest due to their promising electronic properties. Here, we investigate carrier transport and the impact of the operating ambient conditions on back-gated multilayer MoS{sub 2} field-effect transistors with a thickness of ?50?nm at their realistic working temperatures and under different ambient conditions (in air and in a vacuum of ?10{sup ?5}?Torr). Increases in temperature cause increases in I{sub min} (likely due to thermionic emission at defects), and result in decreased I{sub on} at high V{sub G} (likely due to increased phonon scattering). Thus, the I{sub on}/I{sub min} ratio decreases as the temperature increases. Moreover, the ambient effects with working temperatures on field effect mobilities were investigated. The adsorbed oxygen and water created more defect sites or impurities in the MoS{sub 2} channel, which can lead another scattering of the carriers. In air, the adsorbed molecules and phonon scattering caused a reduction of the field effect mobility, significantly. These channel mobility drop-off rates in air and in a vacuum reached 0.12?cm{sup 2}/V s K and 0.07?cm{sup 2}/V s K, respectively; the rate of degradation is steeper in air than in a vacuum due to enhanced phonon mode by the adsorbed oxygen and water molecules.

  9. ATAC: Ambient Temperature-Aware Capping for Power Efficient Datacenters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hsien-Hsin "Sean"

    ATAC: Ambient Temperature-Aware Capping for Power Efficient Datacenters Sungkap Yeo Mohammad M, leehs}@gatech.edu Abstract The emergence of cloud computing has created a demand for more datacenters overhead, small to medium datacenters, which still spend nearly half of their power on cooling, still labor

  10. Improving Boiler Efficiency Modeling Based on Ambient Air Temperature 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, J.; Deng, S.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.; Turner, W. D.

    2002-01-01

    significantly effects boiler efficiency. In the study reported here, the measured performance of a 300,000 lb/h steam boiler was found to show more dependence on ambient air temperature than on boiler load. It also showed an unexplained dependence on the month...

  11. Improving Boiler Efficiency Modeling Based On Ambient Air Temperature 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, J.; Deng, S.; Turner, W. D.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.

    2002-01-01

    significantly effects boiler efficiency. In the study reported here, the measured performance of a 300,000 lb/h steam boiler was found to show more dependence on ambient air temperature than on boiler load. It also showed an unexplained dependence on the month...

  12. 10.2417/1200402.0003 Ambient intelligence for smart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutishauser, Ueli

    10.2417/1200402.0003 Ambient intelligence for smart buildings Ueli Rutishauser, Jonas Trindler, autonomous entity that pursues its own goals (energy consump- tion, security). To fulfill this goal-term knowledge. Motivated by biological systems, we use a two- stage memory process: short-term (STM) and long

  13. Brady 1D seismic velocity model ambient noise prelim

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mellors, Robert J.

    Preliminary 1D seismic velocity model derived from ambient noise correlation. 28 Green's functions filtered between 4-10 Hz for Vp, Vs, and Qs were calculated. 1D model estimated for each path. The final model is a median of the individual models. Resolution is best for the top 1 km. Poorly constrained with increasing depth.

  14. Validating Firewalls in Mobile Ambients Flemming Nielson, Hanne Riis Nielson,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, René Rydhof

    inside what other processes; in particular, we develop a syntax- directed system for specifying that each process admits a least analysis. 1 Introduction The ambient calculus is a calculus of computation was introduced in [5] and a type system for a polyadic vari- ant was presented in [6]. The calculus is molded

  15. Ambient Support by a Personal Coach for Exercising and Rehabilitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treur, Jan

    1 Ambient Support by a Personal Coach for Exercising and Rehabilitation Maarten F. Bobbert1 , Mark the area of exercising and rehabilitation, personal coaching can be a crucial factor for success are hard to perform due to limitations of the person, as in rehabilitation. Only trying the same type

  16. Hybrid Logical Analyses of the Ambient Thomas Bolander1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, René Rydhof

    Hybrid Logical Analyses of the Ambient Calculus Thomas Bolander1 and Ren´e Rydhof Hansen2 1 Science, University of Copenhagen rrhansen@diku.dk Abstract. In this paper, hybrid logic is used of action sequences into account, can be formulated in a natural way. We show that hybrid logic is very well

  17. Accelerated Articles Ambient Molecular Imaging and Depth Profiling of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    , and on different strains of Salmonella typhimurium cells.5 Most recently, DESI-mass spectral fingerprints have)14 employ focused laser radiation for ambient sampling. AP IR- MALDI and LAESI have proved-mail: vertes@gwu.edu. Phone: (202) 994-2717. Fax: (202) 994-5873 (1) Siuzdak, G. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A

  18. Brady 1D seismic velocity model ambient noise prelim

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mellors, Robert J.

    2013-10-25

    Preliminary 1D seismic velocity model derived from ambient noise correlation. 28 Green's functions filtered between 4-10 Hz for Vp, Vs, and Qs were calculated. 1D model estimated for each path. The final model is a median of the individual models. Resolution is best for the top 1 km. Poorly constrained with increasing depth.

  19. Subsurface Ambient Thermoelectric Power for Moles and Penetrators1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    1 Subsurface Ambient Thermoelectric Power for Moles and Penetrators1 Ralph D. Lorenz, Lunar for electrical power generation for planetary exploration applications using thermoelectric conversion of the vehicle. Proof-of-concept experiments are described using off-the-shelf thermoelectric CPU cooling plates

  20. Atmosphere and Ocean: Water (drought topic begins at slide 26)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    water: the `vapor pressure' exerted by H2O molecules increases exponenEally with temperature ( it boils when that vapor pressure equals the ambient pressure: Humans & Nature 23 May 2012 GFD Lab: www.ocean.washington.edu/research/gfd #12;water vapor

  1. National Smart Water Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beaulieu, R A

    2009-07-13

    The United States repeatedly experiences floods along the Midwest's large rivers and droughts in the arid Western States that cause traumatic environmental conditions with huge economic impact. With an integrated approach and solution these problems can be alleviated. Tapping into the Mississippi River and its tributaries, the world's third largest fresh water river system, during flood events will mitigate the damage of flooding and provide a new source of fresh water to the Western States. The trend of increased flooding on the Midwest's large rivers is supported by a growing body of scientific literature. The Colorado River Basin and the western states are experiencing a protracted multi-year drought. Fresh water can be pumped via pipelines from areas of overabundance/flood to areas of drought or high demand. Calculations document 10 to 60 million acre-feet (maf) of fresh water per flood event can be captured from the Midwest's Rivers and pumped via pipelines to the Colorado River and introduced upstream of Lake Powell, Utah, to destinations near Denver, Colorado, and used in areas along the pipelines. Water users of the Colorado River include the cities in southern Nevada, southern California, northern Arizona, Colorado, Utah, Indian Tribes, and Mexico. The proposed start and end points, and routes of the pipelines are documented, including information on right-of-ways necessary for state and federal permits. A National Smart Water Grid{trademark} (NSWG) Project will create thousands of new jobs for construction, operation, and maintenance and save billions in drought and flood damage reparations tax dollars. The socio-economic benefits of NWSG include decreased flooding in the Midwest; increased agriculture, and recreation and tourism; improved national security, transportation, and fishery and wildlife habitats; mitigated regional climate change and global warming such as increased carbon capture; decreased salinity in Colorado River water crossing the US-Mexico border; and decreased eutrophication (excessive plant growth and decay) in the Gulf of Mexico to name a few. The National Smart Water Grid{trademark} will pay for itself in a single major flood event.

  2. Cardiopulmonary Toxicity Induced by Ambient Particulate Matter (BI City Concentrated Ambient Particle Study)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annette Rohr; James Wagner Masako Morishita; Gerald Keeler; Jack Harkema

    2010-06-30

    Alterations in heart rate variability (HRV) have been reported in rodents exposed to concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) from different regions of the United States. The goal of this study was to compare alterations in cardiac function induced by CAPs in two distinct regional atmospheres. AirCARE 1, a mobile laboratory with an EPA/Harvard fine particle (particulate matter <2.5 {micro}m; PM{sub 2.5}) concentrator was located in urban Detroit, MI, where the PM mixture is heavily influenced by motor vehicles, and in Steubenville, OH, where PM is derived primarily from long-range transport and transformation of power plant emissions, as well as from local industrial operations. Each city was studied during both winter and summer months, for a total of four sampling periods. Spontaneously hypertensive rats instrumented for electrocardiogram (ECG) telemetry were exposed to CAPs 8 h/day for 13 consecutive days during each sampling period. Heart rate (HR), and indices of HRV (standard deviation of the average normal-to-normal intervals [SDNN]; square root of the mean squared difference of successive normal-to-normal intervals [rMSSD]), were calculated for 30-minute intervals during exposures. A large suite of PM components, including nitrate, sulfate, elemental and organic carbon, and trace elements, were monitored in CAPs and ambient air. In addition, a unique sampler, the Semi-Continuous Elements in Air Sampler (SEAS) was employed to obtain every-30-minute measurements of trace elements. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) methods were applied to estimate source contributions to PM{sub 2.5}. Mixed modeling techniques were employed to determine associations between pollutants/CAPs components and HR and HRV metrics. Mean CAPs concentrations in Detroit were 518 and 357 {micro}g/m{sup 3} (summer and winter, respectively) and 487 and 252 {micro}g/m{sup 3} in Steubenville. In Detroit, significant reductions in SDNN were observed in the summer in association with cement/lime, iron/steel, and gasoline/diesel factors, while associations with the sludge incineration factor and components were less consistent. In winter, increases in HR were associated with a refinery factor and its components. CAPs-associated HR decreases in winter were linked to sludge incineration, cement/lime, and coal/secondary factors and the majority of their associated components. Specific relationships for increased rMSSD in winter were difficult to determine due to lack of consistency between factors and associated constituents. In Steubenville, we observed significant changes in HR (both increases and decreases), SDNN, and rMSSD in the summer, but not in the winter. We examined associations between individual source factors/PM components and HRV metrics segregated by predominant wind direction (NE or SW). Changes in HR (both increases and decreases) were linked with metal processing, waste incineration, and iron/steel factors along with most of their associated elemental constituents. Reductions in SDNN were associated with metal processing, waste incineration, and mobile source factors and the majority of elements loading onto these factors. There were no consistent associations between changes in rMSSD and source factors/components. Despite the large number of coal-fired power plants in the region, and therefore the large contribution of secondary sulfate to overall PM mass, we did not observe any associations with the coal/secondary factor or with the majority of its associated components. There were several inconsistencies in our results which make definitive conclusions difficult. For example, we observed opposing signs of effect estimates with some components depending on season, and with others depending on wind direction. In addition, our extensive dataset clearly would be subject to issues of multiple comparisons, and the 'true' significant results are unknown. Overall, however, our results suggest that acute changes in cardiac function were most strongly associated with local industrial sources. Results for coal-fired power plant-derived PM were

  3. Remote sensing estimates of supplementary water consumption by arid ecosystems of central Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    Remote sensing estimates of supplementary water consumption by arid ecosystems of central Argentina Nacional de San Luis & CONICET, San Luis, Argentina b Bureau of Economic Geology, Jackson School Ambiental, Centro Regional de Investigaciones Científicas y Tecnológicas, CONICET, Mendoza, Argentina d

  4. A singular thermodynamically consistent temperature at the origin of the anomalous behavior of liquid water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallamace, Francesco

    The density maximum of water dominates the thermodynamics of the system under ambient conditions, is strongly P-dependent, and disappears at a crossover pressure P[subscript cross] ~ 1.8 kbar. We study this variable across ...

  5. Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard in NEPA Evaluations Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard in NEPA Evaluations This...

  6. Effect of the shutdown of a large coal fired power plant on ambient mercury species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yungang

    2014-01-01

    the shutdown of a coal-fired power plant on urban ultrafineof a large coal-fired power plant on ambient mercury speciesof a large coal-fired power plant on ambient mercury species

  7. Uncertainty associated with the gravimetric measurement of particulate matter concentration in ambient air 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lacey, Ronald; Faulkner, William

    2015-01-01

    of the instrument parameters contributed significantly to the overall uncertainty: the uncertainty in the pressure drop measurement across the orifice meter during both calibration and testing and the uncertainty of the airflow standard used during calibration... of the orifice meter. Five environmental parameters occurring during field measurements were considered for their effect on overall uncertainty: ambient TSP concentration, volumetric airflow rate, ambient temperature, ambient pressure, and ambient relative...

  8. AMBIENT PM2.5 SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2001-10-31

    This interim report summarizes detailed findings and conclusions drawn from evaluations of data obtained from the operation of ambient PM{sub 2.5} speciation sites in a geographical area encompassing southeastern Ohio, western Pennsylvania and northwestern West Virginia. The overall goal of this program, called the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), is to better understand the relationship between coal-based power system emissions and ambient air quality in the Upper Ohio River Valley region through the collection of chemically resolved or speciated data. A summary of the sampling activities, sample analyses and the correlation and interpretation of data acquired from February 1999 through March of 2001 are reported. Mass and speciated data from urban and rural sources are compared and seasonal variations in PM{sub 2.5} distribution are also examined. Correlations between meteorological parameters and total PM{sub 2.5} mass are also presented.

  9. AMBIENT PM2.5 SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2002-10-31

    This interim report summarizes detailed findings and conclusions drawn from evaluations of data obtained from the operation of ambient PM{sub 2.5} speciation sites in a geographical area encompassing southeastern Ohio, western Pennsylvania and northwestern West Virginia. The overall goal of this program, called the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), is to better understand the relationship between coal-based power system emissions and ambient air quality in the Upper Ohio River Valley region through the collection of chemically resolved or speciated data. A summary of the sampling activities, sample analyses and the correlation and interpretation of data acquired from February 1999 through March of 2001 are reported. Mass and speciated data from urban and rural sources are compared and seasonal variations in PM{sub 2.5} distribution are also examined. Correlations between meteorological parameters and total PM{sub 2.5} mass are also presented.

  10. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Quality Water Quality We protect water quality through stormwater control measures and an extensive network of monitoring wells and stations encompassing groundwater, surface...

  11. Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; Kwangkook Jeong; Michael Kessen; Christopher Samuelson; Christopher Whitcombe

    2008-09-30

    This project dealt with use of condensing heat exchangers to recover water vapor from flue gas at coal-fired power plants. Pilot-scale heat transfer tests were performed to determine the relationship between flue gas moisture concentration, heat exchanger design and operating conditions, and water vapor condensation rate. The tests also determined the extent to which the condensation processes for water and acid vapors in flue gas can be made to occur separately in different heat transfer sections. The results showed flue gas water vapor condensed in the low temperature region of the heat exchanger system, with water capture efficiencies depending strongly on flue gas moisture content, cooling water inlet temperature, heat exchanger design and flue gas and cooling water flow rates. Sulfuric acid vapor condensed in both the high temperature and low temperature regions of the heat transfer apparatus, while hydrochloric and nitric acid vapors condensed with the water vapor in the low temperature region. Measurements made of flue gas mercury concentrations upstream and downstream of the heat exchangers showed a significant reduction in flue gas mercury concentration within the heat exchangers. A theoretical heat and mass transfer model was developed for predicting rates of heat transfer and water vapor condensation and comparisons were made with pilot scale measurements. Analyses were also carried out to estimate how much flue gas moisture it would be practical to recover from boiler flue gas and the magnitude of the heat rate improvements which could be made by recovering sensible and latent heat from flue gas.

  12. Utilization of the upper Houston Ship Channel by fish and macroinvertebrates with respect to water quality trends 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seiler, Richard Dale

    1994-01-01

    on utilization was evaluated. seine, gillnet and revolving screen collections from two deep-water and six shoreline sampling stations in upper HSC stream segments 1006 (downstream) and 1007 (upstream) during May 1988 through July 1989 yielded 33,042 nektonic...

  13. LINEAMIENTOS PARA IMPLEMENTAR LOS INSTRUMENTOS ECONÓMICOS DE LA LEGISLACIÓN AMBIENTAL DE LA REGIÓN CENTRO OCCIDENTE DE MÉXICO. RESULTADOS DE UNA INVESTIGACION PROSPECTIVA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernandez Aguilar, Gerardo P.; de la Torre, Gabriela Ruiz

    2012-01-01

    distinguen: implementar la contabilidad ambiental a travésde un proyecto de “contabilidad ambiental” donde seo producto final. (Esta contabilidad ambiental sería una

  14. Ambient methods and apparatus for rapid laser trace constituent analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snyder, Stuart C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Partin, Judy K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Grandy, Jon D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jeffery, Charles L. (Blackfoot, ID)

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for measuring trace amounts of constituents in samples by using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser induced fluorescence under ambient conditions. The laser induced fluorescence is performed at a selected wavelength corresponding to an absorption state of a selected trace constituent. The intensity value of the emission decay signal which is generated by the trace constituent is compared to calibrated emission intensity decay values to determine the amount of trace constituent present.

  15. Ambient intelligence and wearable computing: Sensors on the body, in the home,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Diane J.

    Ambient intelligence and wearable computing: Sensors on the body, in the home, and beyond Diane J in wearable com- puting and ambient intelligence. Keywords: Wearable sensors, wearable computing, body area], and intelligent [18]. Ambient intelligence is often associated with intelligent sensors and software em- bedded

  16. coleo explorando o ensino o brasil e o meio ambiente antrtico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    coleção explorando o ensino 10 volume o brasil e o meio ambiente antártico #12;#12;coleção explorando o ensino volume 10 ensino fundamental e ensino médio o brasil e o meio ambiente antártico #12 Dados Internacionais de Catalogação na Publicação (CIP) O Brasil e o meio ambiente antártico : ensino

  17. Identification of dynamic properties from ambient vibration measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrar, C.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); James, G.H. III [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-09-01

    To better understand the dynamic behavior of structures under normal dynamic loads as well as extreme loads such as those caused by seismic events or high winds, it is desirable to measure the dynamic properties (resonant frequencies, mode shapes and modal damping) of these structures. The cross-correlation function between two response measurements made on an ambiently excited structure is shown to have the same form as the system`s impulse response function. Therefore, standard time-domain curve-fitting procedures such as the complex exponential method, which are typically applied to impulse response functions, can now be applied to the cross-correlation functions to estimate the resonant frequencies and modal damping of the structure. A direct comparison of resonant frequencies identified by curve-fitting the cross-correlation functions, using traffic excitation as the ambient vibration source, and modal properties identified by standard forced vibration testing of a highway bridge, after traffic was removed, showed a maximum discrepancy of 3.63%. Similar comparisons for the average modal damping values identified by the two methods showed a 9.82% difference. This experimental verification implies that the proposed method of analyzing ambient vibration data has the potential to accurately assess the dynamic properties of large structures subjected to seismic excitations and small structures that are tested on a shake table.

  18. Ambient temperature cadmium zinc telluride radiation detector and amplifier circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McQuaid, J.H.; Lavietes, A.D.

    1998-05-26

    A low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature signal amplifier for a Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) radiation detector is disclosed. The amplifier can be used within a larger system (e.g., including a multi-channel analyzer) to allow isotopic analysis of radionuclides in the field. In one embodiment, the circuit stages of the low power, low noise amplifier are constructed using integrated circuit (IC) amplifiers , rather than discrete components, and include a very low noise, high gain, high bandwidth dual part preamplification stage, an amplification stage, and an filter stage. The low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables the CZT detector to achieve both the efficiency required to determine the presence of radionuclides and the resolution necessary to perform isotopic analysis to perform nuclear material identification. The present low noise, low power, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables a CZT detector to achieve resolution of less than 3% full width at half maximum at 122 keV for a Cobalt-57 isotope source. By using IC circuits and using only a single 12 volt supply and ground, the novel amplifier provides significant power savings and is well suited for prolonged portable in-field use and does not require heavy, bulky power supply components. 9 figs.

  19. Ambient temperature cadmium zinc telluride radiation detector and amplifier circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McQuaid, James H. (Livermore, CA); Lavietes, Anthony D. (Hayward, CA)

    1998-05-29

    A low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature signal amplifier for a Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) radiation detector. The amplifier can be used within a larger system (e.g., including a multi-channel analyzer) to allow isotopic analysis of radionuclides in the field. In one embodiment, the circuit stages of the low power, low noise amplifier are constructed using integrated circuit (IC) amplifiers , rather than discrete components, and include a very low noise, high gain, high bandwidth dual part preamplification stage, an amplification stage, and an filter stage. The low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables the CZT detector to achieve both the efficiency required to determine the presence of radio nuclides and the resolution necessary to perform isotopic analysis to perform nuclear material identification. The present low noise, low power, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables a CZT detector to achieve resolution of less than 3% full width at half maximum at 122 keV for a Cobalt-57 isotope source. By using IC circuits and using only a single 12 volt supply and ground, the novel amplifier provides significant power savings and is well suited for prolonged portable in-field use and does not require heavy, bulky power supply components.

  20. Investigating Water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard Jr., Ronald A.

    2002-01-02

    This 3-ring binder contains teaching plans for 12 lessons on topics such as "Water in Our Daily Lives," "The Water Cycle," "Amazing Aquifers," "Water and Soil," "Aquatic Ecosystems," and "Water Wise Use." Accompanying each lesson plan are activity...

  1. ORIGINAL PAPER Effects of elevated CO2 and soil water content on phytohormone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Effects of elevated CO2 and soil water content on phytohormone transcript induction the abundance of SA compared with plants grown in ambient CO2. A mild reduction in soil water content had herbivory. When applied in combination, elevated CO2 and reduced soil water content suppressed

  2. Local Structure Analysis in $Ab$ $Initio$ Liquid Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biswajit Santra; Robert A. DiStasio Jr.; Fausto Martelli; Roberto Car

    2015-02-27

    Within the framework of density functional theory, the inclusion of exact exchange and non-local van der Waals/dispersion (vdW) interactions is crucial for predicting a microscopic structure of ambient liquid water that quantitatively agrees with experiment. In this work, we have used the local structure index (LSI) order parameter to analyze the local structure in such highly accurate $ab$ $initio$ liquid water. At ambient conditions, the LSI probability distribution, P($I$), was unimodal with most water molecules characterized by more disordered high-density-like local environments. With thermal excitations removed, the resultant bimodal P($I$) in the inherent potential energy surface (IPES) exhibited a 3:1 ratio between high- and low-density-like molecules, with the latter forming small connected clusters amid the predominant population. By considering the spatial correlations and hydrogen bond network topologies $among$ water molecules with the same LSI identities, we demonstrate that the signatures of the experimentally observed low- (LDA) and high-density (HDA) amorphous phases of ice are present in the IPES of ambient liquid water. Analysis of the LSI autocorrelation function uncovered a persistence time of $\\sim$ 4 ps---a finding consistent with the fact that natural thermal fluctuations are responsible for transitions between these distinct yet transient local aqueous environments in ambient liquid water.

  3. C.d.L. in Chimica e Tecnologie per l'Ambiente e per i Mate-riali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti 10. 11. 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Achilles, Rüdiger

    C.d.L. in Chimica e Tecnologie per l'Ambiente e per i Mate- riali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia. 6. L'energia potenziale V (r) di una molecola biatomica dipende dalla distanza r dei due atomi e pu'equilibrio, D `e l'energia di dissociazione e a `e una costante che controlla la larghezza del potenziale. Per

  4. C.d.L. in Chimica e Tecnologie per l'Ambiente e i Materiali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti 4. 12. 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Achilles, Rüdiger

    C.d.L. in Chimica e Tecnologie per l'Ambiente e i Materiali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti. L'energia potenziale V (r) di una molecola biatomica dipende dalla distanza r dei due atomi e pu'equilibrio, D `e l'energia di dissociazione e a `e una costante che controlla la larghezza del potenziale. Per

  5. Quantification of the upstream-to-downstream influence in the Muskingum method and implications for speedup in parallel computations of river flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Cedric H; Yang, Zong-Liang; Famiglietti, James S

    2013-01-01

    2012b), Continental-scale water and energy ?ux analysis andmodel of land-surface water and energy ?uxes for general-2012a), Continental-scale water and energy ?ux analysis and

  6. Humidity-resistant ambient-temperature solid-electrolyte amperometric sensing apparatus and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaromb, Solomon (9 S 706 William Dr., Hinsdale, IL 60521)

    2001-01-01

    Apparatus and methods for detecting selected chemical compounds in air or other gas streams at room or ambient temperature includes a liquid-free humidity-resistant amperometric sensor comprising a sensing electrode and a counter and reference electrode separated by a solid electrolyte. The sensing electrode preferably contains a noble metal, such as Pt black. The electrolyte is water-free, non-hygroscopic, and substantially water-insoluble, and has a room temperature ionic conductivity .gtoreq.10.sup.-4 (ohm-cm).sup.-1, and preferably .gtoreq.0.01 (ohm-cm).sup.-1. The conductivity may be due predominantly to Ag+ ions, as in Ag.sub.2 WO.sub.4.4AgI, or to F- ions, as in Ce.sub.0.95 Ca.sub.0.05 F.sub.2.95. Electrical contacts serve to connect the electrodes to potentiostating and detecting circuitry which controls the potential of the sensing electrode relative to the reference electrode, detects the signal generated by the sensor, and indicates the detected signal.

  7. Ecogeo Meio Ambiente e Energias Renov veis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:of the NationalDynetekofEcogeo Meio Ambiente e Energias

  8. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01

    LBNL collected water and waste water tariffs in Californiastate. Current water and waste water tariffs for these areaswas based on water and waste water tariffs in California

  9. White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; Annual Progress Report, April 2007 - March 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mallette, Christine [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2009-07-28

    We report on our progress from April 2007 through March 2008 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW; Report A), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW; Report B), Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC; Report C), and Montana State University (MSU; Report D). This is a multi-year study with many objectives requiring more than one year to complete; therefore, findings from a given year may be part of more significant findings yet to be reported.

  10. Water Intoxication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lingampalli, Nithya

    2013-01-01

    2008, May 14). Too much water raises seizure risk in babies.id=4844 9. Schoenly, Lorry. “Water Intoxication and Inmates:article/246650- overview>. 13. Water intoxication alert. (

  11. Room temperature water Leidenfrost droplets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franck Celestini; Thomas Frisch; Yves Pomeau

    2013-08-05

    We experimentally investigate the Leidenfrost effect at pressures ranging from 1 to 0.05 atmospheric pressure. As a direct consequence of the Clausius-Clapeyron phase diagram of water, the droplet temperature can be at ambient temperature in a non-sophisticated lab environment. Furthermore, the lifetime of the Leidenfrost droplet is significantly increased in this low pressure environment. The temperature and pressure dependance of the evaporation rate are successfully tested against a recently proposed model. These results may pave a way to reach efficient Leidenfrost micro-fluidic and milli-fluidic applications.

  12. Structure of water adsorbed on a mica surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Sung-Ho; Sposito, Garrison

    2002-01-29

    Monte Carlo simulations of hydration water on the mica (001) surface under ambient conditions revealed water molecules bound closely to the ditrigonal cavities in the surface, with a lateral distribution of approximately one per cavity, and water molecules interposed between K{sup +} counter ions in a layer situated about 2.5 {angstrom} from a surface O along a direction normal to the (001) plane. The calculated water O density profile was in quantitative agreement with recent X-ray reflectivity measurements indicating strong lateral ordering of the hydration water but liquid-like disorder otherwise.

  13. Water Efficiency

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Water Efficiency Hosted by: FEDERAL UTILITY PARTNERSHIP WORKING GROUP SEMINAR November 5-6, 2014 Cape Canaveral, Florida WATER EFFICIENCY Federal Utility Partnership Working Group...

  14. Performance of an integrated heat pump gas-fired water heater system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torab, H.; Sonntag, R.E.

    1984-08-01

    The unsatisfactory performance of the heat pump water heaters (air-to-water) in colder ambient temperatures is the main obstacle to the expansion of the residential market for this device. On the other hand, the price increase of natural gas in the 1980's encourages retrofitting or replacing the existing gas-fired water heaters. The present study examines the possibility of retrofitting the gas-fired water heater with a heat pump water heater. The result of the investigation on the thermodynamic and economic performance of a water heater system comprised of a heat pump water heater and a gas-fired water heater is presented in this paper.

  15. Spatially Inhomogeneous Bimodal Inherent Structure in Simulated Liquid Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. T. Wikfeldt; A. Nilsson; L. G. M. Pettersson

    2011-06-24

    In the supercooled regime at elevated pressure two forms of liquid water, high-density (HDL) and low-density (LDL), have been proposed to be separated by a coexistence line ending at a critical point, but a connection to ambient conditions has been lacking. Here we perform large-scale molecular dynamics simulations and demonstrate that the underlying potential energy surface gives a strictly bimodal characterization of the molecules at all temperatures as spatially inhomogeneous either LDL- or HDL-like with a 3:1 predominance for HDL at ambient conditions. The Widom line, indicating maximum fluctuations, coincides with a 1:1 distribution. Our results indicate a unified description of liquid water covering supercooled to ambient conditions in agreement with recent x-ray spectroscopy and scattering data.

  16. Effect of ambient conditions and fuel properties on homogeneous charge compression ignition engine operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreae, Morgan M. (Morgan MacKenzie)

    2006-01-01

    Practical application of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) combustion must demonstrate robust responses to variations in environmental conditions. This work examines the impact of ambient conditions and fuel ...

  17. PREPARATIVOS EN MARCHA PARA LA CONFERENCIA SOBRE JUSTICIA AMBIENTAL NACIONAL Y EL PROGRAMA DE CAPACITACIÓN 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    La conferencia regresa a D.C. del 26 al 28 de marzo de 2014 con la celebración de los 20 años de justicia ambiental pasados y futuros.

  18. Hydrogen Confinement in Carbon Nanopores: Extreme Densification at Ambient Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallego, Nidia C [ORNL; He, Lilin [ORNL; Saha, Dipendu [ORNL; Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Melnichenko, Yuri B [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    In-situ small angle neutron scattering (SANS) studies of hydrogen confined in small pores of polyfurfuryl alcohol-derived activated carbon (PFAC) at room-temperature provided for the first time its phase behavior in equilibrium with external H2 at pressures up to 200 bar. The data was used to evaluate the density of the adsorbed fluid, which appears to be a function of both pore size and pressure, and approaches the liquid hydrogen density in narrow nanopores at 200 bar. The surface-molecule interactions responsible for densification of hydrogen within the pores create internal pressures which exceed by a factor of up to ~ 60 the external gas pressures, confirming the benefits of adsorptive over compressive storage. These results can be utilized to guide the development of new carbon adsorbents tailored for maximum hydrogen storage capacities at near ambient temperatures.

  19. Volcanic gas emissions and their effect on ambient air character

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutton, A.J.; Elias, T.

    1994-01-01

    This bibliography was assembled to service an agreement between Department of Energy and the USGS to provide a body of references and useful annotations for understanding background gas emissions from Kilauea volcano. The current East Rift Zone (ERZ) eruption of Kilauea releases as much as 500,000 metric tonnes of SO{sub 2} annually, along with lesser amounts of other chemically and radiatively active species including H{sub 2}S, HCl, and HF. Primary degassing locations on Kilauea are located in the summit caldera and along the middle ERZ. The effects of these emissions on ambient air character are a complex function of chemical reactivity, source geometry and effusivity, and local meteorology. Because of this complexity, we organized the bibliography into three main sections: (1) characterizing gases as they leave the edifice; (2) characterizing gases and chemical reaction products away from degassing sources; and (3) Hawaii Island meteorology.

  20. Characterization of ambient air pollution for stochastic health models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batterman, S.A.

    1981-08-01

    This research is an analysis of various measures of ambient air pollution useful in cross-sectional epidemiological investigations and rick assessments. The Chestnut Ridge area health effects investigation, which includes a cross-sectional study of respiratory symptoms in young children, is used as a case study. Four large coal-fired electric generating power plants are the dominant pollution sources in this area of western Pennsylvania. The air pollution data base includes four years of sulfur dioxide and five years of total suspended particulate concentrations at seventeen monitors. Some 70 different characterizations of pollution are constructed and tested. These include pollutant concentrations at various percentiles and averaging times, exceedence measures which show the amount of time a specified threshold concentration is exceeded, and several dosage measures which transform non-linear dose-response relationships onto pollutant concentrations.

  1. Topographic Effects on Ambient Dose Equivalent Rates from Radiocesium Fallout

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malins, Alex; Machida, Masahiko; Saito, Kimiaki

    2015-01-01

    Land topography can affect air radiation dose rates by locating radiation sources closer to, or further, from detector locations when compared to perfectly flat terrain. Hills and slopes can also shield against the propagation of gamma rays. To understand the possible magnitude of topographic effects on air dose rates, this study presents calculations for ambient dose equivalent rates at a range of heights above the ground for varying land topographies. The geometries considered were angled ground at the intersection of two planar surfaces, which is a model for slopes neighboring flat land, and a simple conical geometry, representing settings from hilltops to valley bottoms. In each case the radiation source was radioactive cesium fallout, and the slope angle was varied systematically to determine the effect of topography on the air dose rate. Under the assumption of homogeneous fallout across the land surface, and for these geometries and detector locations, the dose rates at high altitudes are more strongly...

  2. C.d.L. in Chimica e Tecnologie per l'Ambiente e per i Mate-riali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti 15. 12. 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Achilles, Rüdiger

    C.d.L. in Chimica e Tecnologie per l'Ambiente e per i Mate- riali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia ln 1 x , x > 0; (d) f(x) = 2 cos x + cos 2x. 6. L'energia potenziale V (r) di una molecola biatomica-a(r-r0) )2 , dove r0 `e la distanza all'equilibrio, D `e l'energia di dissociazione e a `e una costante

  3. C.d.L. in Chimica e Tecnologie per l'Ambiente e per i Mate-riali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia, Rifiuti 25. 11. 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Achilles, Rüdiger

    C.d.L. in Chimica e Tecnologie per l'Ambiente e per i Mate- riali, curriculum Ambiente, Energia(x) = 1 + x 2 + 2 x , x = 0; (c) f(x) = x ln 1 x , x > 0; (d) f(x) = 2 cos x + cos 2x. 6. L'energia la funzione di Morse V (r) = D(1 - e-a(r-r0) )2 , dove r0 `e la distanza all'equilibrio, D `e l'energia

  4. Local Structure Analysis in $Ab$ $Initio$ Liquid Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santra, Biswajit; Martelli, Fausto; Car, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Within the framework of density functional theory, the inclusion of exact exchange and non-local van der Waals/dispersion (vdW) interactions is crucial for predicting a microscopic structure of ambient liquid water that quantitatively agrees with experiment. In this work, we have used the local structure index (LSI) order parameter to analyze the local structure in such highly accurate $ab$ $initio$ liquid water. At ambient conditions, the LSI probability distribution, P($I$), was unimodal with most water molecules characterized by more disordered high-density-like local environments. With thermal excitations removed, the resultant bimodal P($I$) in the inherent potential energy surface (IPES) exhibited a 3:1 ratio between high- and low-density-like molecules, with the latter forming small connected clusters amid the predominant population. By considering the spatial correlations and hydrogen bond network topologies $among$ water molecules with the same LSI identities, we demonstrate that the signatures of th...

  5. Adsorption of 2-propanol on ice probed by ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Newberg, John T.; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2015-08-18

    The interaction of 2-propanol with ice was examined via ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS), a surface sensitive technique that probes the adsorbed 2-propanol directly with submonolayer resolution. Isothermal uptake experiments were performed on vapor deposited ice at 227 K in the presence of the equilibrium water vapor pressure of 0.05 Torr and 2-propanol partial pressures ranging from 5 × 10-5 to 2 × 10-3 Torr. The C 1s APXPS spectra of adsorbed 2-propanol showed two characteristic peaks associated with the COH alcohol group and CMe methyl groups in a 1 : 2 ratio, respectively. Coverage increased with 2-propanol partialmore »pressure and followed first order Langmuir kinetics with a Langmuir constant of K = 6.3 × 103 Torr-1. The 1 : 2 ratio of COH : CMe remained constant with increasing coverage, indicating there is no chemical reaction upon adsorption. The observed Langmuir kinetics using APXPS is consistent with previous observations of other small chain alcohols via indirect adsorption methods using, e.g., Knudsen cell and coated wall flow tube reactors.« less

  6. Resource Management and Scheduling in WSNs Powered by Ambient Energy Harvesting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uysal-Biyikoglu, Elif

    periods of time, recently, employing energy harvesting (via ambient energy sources such as solar [2], vibrational [13], [18], wind [30] and thermal energy [29]) to replace/supplement batteries that power WSNs source of the ambient energy is the sun. Solar energy is becoming widely used, due to its high power

  7. Uma Estrategia de Navegac~ao para Rob^os Moveis em Ambientes Interiores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    Uma Estrategia de Navegac~ao para Rob^os Moveis em Ambientes Interiores Raquel Frizera Vassallo~ao UNIVERSIDADE FEDERAL DO ESPIRITO SANTO Vitoria, ES - BRASIL Dezembro de 1998 #12;Uma Estrategia de Navegac Uma Estrategia de Navegac~ao para Rob^os Moveis em Ambientes Interiores. Vitoria] 1998 xiii, 97p., 29

  8. Identifying damage locations under ambient vibrations utilizing vector autoregressive models and Mahalanobis distances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Identifying damage locations under ambient vibrations utilizing vector autoregressive models Keywords: Damage location Ambient vibration Vector Autoregressive model Statistical pattern recognition Bridges Structural health monitoring a b s t r a c t This paper presents a study for identifying damage

  9. Wireless Sensor Networks Powered by Ambient Energy Harvesting (WSN-HEAP) Survey and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihada, Basem

    Wireless Sensor Networks Powered by Ambient Energy Harvesting (WSN-HEAP) ­ Survey and Challenges and Engineering National University of Singapore, Singapore Email: g0601792@nus.edu.sg Abstract--Wireless sensor is to convert the ambient energy from the environment into electricity to power the sensor nodes. While

  10. Is ambient noise tomography across ocean basins possible? Fan-Chi Lin,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Nikolai

    stations located near the Pacific Rim. We concentrate on the period band between 10 sec and 150 sec where-six stations within or adjacent to the Pacific Basin, we show that broad-band ambient noise is observed, which establishes the physical basis for ambient noise tomography across the Pacific. Similar trends

  11. Ambient-RF-Energy-Harvesting Sensor Node with Capacitor-Leakage-Aware Duty Cycle Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tentzeris, Manos

    Ambient-RF-Energy-Harvesting Sensor Node with Capacitor-Leakage-Aware Duty Cycle Control Ryo (WSN) that are solely powered by ambient RF power. Different from all other energy harvesting WSN systems, RF powered systems present a new challenge for the energy management. A WSN node repeatedly

  12. Fermi Surface of Uranium at Ambient Pressure Gregory S. Boebinger, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    Fermi Surface of ­Uranium at Ambient Pressure Gregory S. Boebinger, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory DMR-Award 0654118 DC Field Facility User Program The fermi surface of ­Uranium has been measured surface of alpha-uranium at ambient pressure, Phys. Rev. B Rapid Commun., 80, 241101 (2009). B//c-axis B

  13. Abstract--This paper presents ambient mechanical vibrations as an alternative source for energy harvesting, especially

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Ratnesh

    Abstract--This paper presents ambient mechanical vibrations as an alternative source for energy harvesting, especially beneficial where alternatives such as light, wind, biomass and thermal energy are limited, e.g., powering underground sensors. Transduction of ambient kinetic energy, e.g., the vibrations

  14. Monitoring a Building Using Deconvolution Interferometry. II: Ambient-Vibration Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snieder, Roel

    Monitoring a Building Using Deconvolution Interferometry. II: Ambient- Vibration Analysis by Nori inside a building is a powerful technique for monitoring parameters of the building, such as velocities interferometry to ambient-vibration data, instead of using earthquake data, to monitor a building. The time

  15. Molecular dynamics studies of interfacial water at the alumina surface.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Argyris, Dr. Dimitrios [University of Oklahoma; Ho, Thomas [ORNL; Cole, David [Ohio State University

    2011-01-01

    Interfacial water properties at the alumina surface were investigated via all-atom equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations at ambient temperature. Al-terminated and OH-terminated alumina surfaces were considered to assess the structural and dynamic behavior of the first few hydration layers in contact with the substrates. Density profiles suggest water layering up to {approx}10 {angstrom} from the solid substrate. Planar density distribution data indicate that water molecules in the first interfacial layer are organized in well-defined patterns dictated by the atomic terminations of the alumina surface. Interfacial water exhibits preferential orientation and delayed dynamics compared to bulk water. Water exhibits bulk-like behavior at distances greater than {approx}10 {angstrom} from the substrate. The formation of an extended hydrogen bond network within the first few hydration layers illustrates the significance of water?water interactions on the structural properties at the interface.

  16. Vitrification of high level nuclear waste inside ambient temperature disposal containers using inductive heating: The SMILE system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, J.; Reich, M.; Barletta, R.

    1996-03-01

    A new approach, termed SMILE (Small Module Inductively Loaded Energy), for the vitrification of high level nuclear wastes (HLW) is described. Present vitrification systems liquefy the HLW solids and associated frit material in large high temperature melters. The molten mix is then poured into small ({approximately}1 m{sup 3}) disposal canisters, where it solidifies and cools. SMILE eliminates the separate, large high temperature melter. Instead, the BLW solids and frit melt inside the final disposal containers, using inductive heating. The contents then solidify and cool in place. The SMILE modules and the inductive heating process are designed so that the outer stainless can of the module remains at near ambient temperature during the process cycle. Module dimensions are similar to those of present disposal containers. The can is thermally insulated from the high temperature inner container by a thin layer of refractory alumina firebricks. The inner container is a graphite crucible lined with a dense alumina refractory that holds the HLW and fiit materials. After the SMILE module is loaded with a slurry of HLW and frit solids, an external multi-turn coil is energized with 30-cycle AC current. The enclosing external coil is the primary of a power transformer, with the graphite crucible acting as a single turn ``secondary.`` The induced current in the ``secondary`` heats the graphite, which in turn heats the HLW and frit materials. The first stage of the heating process is carried out at an intermediate temperature to drive off remnant liquid water and water of hydration, which takes about 1 day. The small fill/vent tube to the module is then sealed off and the interior temperature raised to the vitrification range, i.e., {approximately}1200C. Liquefaction is complete after approximately 1 day. The inductive heating then ceases and the module slowly loses heat to the environment, allowing the molten material to solidify and cool down to ambient temperature.

  17. EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER CONSERVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER CONSERVATION Leadership Team Subcommittee: Joan Bradshaw Michael Dukes Pierce Jones Kati Migliaccio #12;Water Conservation - Situation · Florida water supplies are used for agriculture, natural resources, salt water intrusion protection, drinking water, industry

  18. UnB Universidade de Braslia FT/ENC-Faculdade de Tecnologia / Departamento de Engenharia Civil e Ambiental PTARH Programa de Ps-graduao em Tecnologia Ambiental e Recursos Hdricos Edital 01/2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, Rudolf Richard

    UnB ­ Universidade de Brasília FT/ENC- Faculdade de Tecnologia / Departamento de Engenharia Civil e Ambiental PTARH ­ Programa de Pós-graduação em Tecnologia Ambiental e Recursos Hídricos Edital 01/2015 1 UNIVERSIDADE DE BRASÍLIA PROGRAMA DE PÓS-GRADUAÇÃO EM TECNOLOGIA AMBIENTAL E RECURSOS HÍDRICOS EDITAL N°1

  19. Lead acetate induces EGFR activation upstream of SFK and PKC{alpha} linkage to the Ras/Raf-1/ERK signaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, C.-Y.; Wang, Y.-T.; Tzeng, D.-W. [Molecular Carcinogenesis Laboratory, Institute of Biotechnology and Department of Life Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Yang, J.-L. [Molecular Carcinogenesis Laboratory, Institute of Biotechnology and Department of Life Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: jlyang@life.nthu.edu.tw

    2009-03-01

    Lead acetate (Pb), a probable human carcinogen, can activate protein kinase C (PKC) upstream of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2). Yet, it remains unclear whether Pb activation of PKC {yields} ERK1/2 involves receptor/non-receptor tyrosine kinases and the Ras signaling transducer. Here we demonstrate a novel mechanism elicited by Pb for transmitting ERK1/2 signaling in CL3 human non-small-cell lung adenocarcinoma cells. Pb induction of higher steady-state levels of Ras-GTP was essential for increasing phospho-Raf-1{sup S338} and phospho-ERK1/2. Pre-treatment of the cells with a conventional PKC inhibitor Goe6976 or depleting PKC{alpha} using specific small interfering RNA blocked Pb induction of Ras-GTP. Pb also activated cellular tyrosine kinases. Specific pharmacological inhibitors, PD153035 for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and SU6656 for Src family tyrosine kinases (SFK), but not AG1296 for platelet-derived growth factor receptor, could suppress the Pb-induced tyrosine kinases, PKC{alpha}, Ras-GTP, phospho-Raf-1{sup S338} and phospho-ERK1/2. Furthermore, phosphorylation of tyrosines on the EGFR multiple autophosphorylation sites and the conserved SFK autophosphorylation site occurred during exposure of cells to Pb for 1-5 min and 5-30 min, respectively. Intriguingly, Pb activation of EGFR required the intrinsic kinase activity but not dimerization of the receptor. Inhibition of SFK or PKC{alpha} activities did not affect EGFR phosphorylation, while knockdown of EGFR blocked SFK phosphorylation and PKC{alpha} activation following Pb. Together, these results indicate that immediate activation of EGFR in response to Pb is obligatory for activation of SFK and PKC{alpha} and subsequent the Ras-Raf-1-MKK1/2-ERK1/2 signaling cascade.

  20. Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    Bear Snow Vegetation RhinoWater Vegetation Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Rhino Water Rhino Water Ground Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Vegetation Rhino Vegetation Ground Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky

  1. 22 maggio 2012 ore 00.43 LoginMultimedia Lavoro Newsletter HOME > AMBIENTE > ACQUA SEGUICI SU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    inglesi ENERGIA AMBIENTE MOBILITÃ? EVENTI GREENBUILDING #12;Chi siamo Contattaci Mission Comitato22 maggio 2012 ore 00.43 LoginMultimedia Lavoro Newsletter HOME > AMBIENTE > ACQUA SEGUICI SU 4 i corsi d'acqua e i laghi del Regno Unito il Dipartimento dell'Ambiente ha stanziato 28 UE: positivo

  2. COMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR QUARTER 5 SURFACE WATER SPLIT SAMPLES COLLECTED AT THE NUCLEAR FUEL SERVICES SITE ERWIN TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-09-23

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, collected split surface water samples with Nuclear Fuel Services (NFS) representatives on August 21, 2013. Representatives from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation were also in attendance. Samples were collected at four surface water stations, as required in the approved Request for Technical Assistance number 11-018. These stations included Nolichucky River upstream (NRU), Nolichucky River downstream (NRD), Martin Creek upstream (MCU), and Martin Creek downstream (MCD). Both ORAU and NFS performed gross alpha and gross beta analyses, and the comparison of results using the duplicate error ratio (DER), also known as the normalized absolute difference, are tabulated. All DER values were less than 3 and results are consistent with low (e.g., background) concentrations.

  3. Sub-to super-ambient temperature programmable microfabricated gas chromatography column

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinson, Alex L.; Anderson, Lawrence F.

    2004-03-16

    A sub- to super-ambient temperature programmable microfabricated gas chromatography column enables more efficient chemical separation of chemical analytes in a gas mixture by combining a thermoelectric cooler and temperature sensing on the microfabricated column. Sub-ambient temperature programming enables the efficient separation of volatile organic compounds and super-ambient temperature programming enables the elution of less volatile analytes within a reasonable time. The small heat capacity and thermal isolation of the microfabricated column improves the thermal time response and power consumption, both important factors for portable microanalytical systems.

  4. Catalog of publications, Office of Science and Technology (Office of Water, Environmental Protection Agency), 1999 edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-08-01

    This catalog focuses on the following: Introduction to the Office of Science and Technology (OST); Industrial Effluent Limitations and Guidelines (Listed alphabetically by Point Source); Water Quality Standards; Ambient Water Quality Criteria; Biological Quality Criteria; Nutrient Criteria; Equilibrium Partitioning Sediment Guidelines (Sediment Quality Criteria); Drinking Water Criteria; Drinking Water Health Advisories; Water Quality Modeling and Total Maximum Daily Loads Guidance; Analytical Laboratory Methods; Contaminated Sediments; Fish Tissue Quality; Municipal Sewage Sludge; Great Lakes Guidance; Beach Water Quality; Pollution Prevention-IP3 Reports; Videotapes; and Datafiles and Software.

  5. Computerized Waters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2006-01-01

    supply diversions, several hydroelectric plants and numerous environ- mental instream flow requirements. Each of these active permits is included in the datasets. Besides the commission using the WAM/WRAP modeling system in water rights permiting... actions be consistent with relevant regional plans. River authorities, water districts and other water management organizations are beginning to use the WRAP model in operational planning studies to optimize operations of their facilities...

  6. CORSI DI LAUREA IN INGEGNERIA PER L'AMBIENTE E IL TERRITORIO ED INGEGNERIA CIVILE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasquero, Stefano

    CORSI DI LAUREA IN INGEGNERIA PER L'AMBIENTE E IL TERRITORIO ED INGEGNERIA CIVILE Corso di circonferenza. 7) Determinare energia cinetica e energia potenziale di P. L'energia si conserva? Confrontare il

  7. Effect of potential shape and excitation spectrum on power harvested from ambient vibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Jasmine H. (Jasmine Hei)

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there have been experimental developments in energy harvesting from ambient vibrations in small-scale sensing. The ultimate goal is to replace batteries in these sensors. Linear systems have a narrow ...

  8. Joint inversion of receiver function and ambient noise based on Bayesian theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Hilst, Robert D.

    In this study, we present a method for the joint inversion of receiver function and ambient noise based on Bayesian inverse theory (Tarantola, 1987, 2005). The nonlinear inversion method of the complex spectrum ratio of ...

  9. Nitrated and oxygenated derivatives of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the ambient air of two

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Nitrated and oxygenated derivatives of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the ambient air of two;2 Abstract The size distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and PAH derivatives of compounds. Keywords: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; Nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; Oxygenated

  10. Nitrated and oxygenated derivatives of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the ambient air of two

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Nitrated and oxygenated derivatives of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the ambient air of two aromatic hydrocarbons, 17 nitrated PAHs (NPAHs) and 8 oxygenated PAHs (OPAHs) were carried out during hydrocarbons; Nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; Oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

  11. Enhancement of the EUV emission of a metallic capillary discharge operated with argon ambient gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, L. S. Tan, D. Saboohi, S. Yap, S. L. Wong, C. S.

    2014-03-05

    In this work, the metallic capillary discharge is operated with two different ambients: air and argon. In the experiments reported here, the chamber is first evacuated to 10{sup ?5} mbar. The discharge is initiated by the transient hollow cathode effect generated electron beam, with either air ambient or argon ambient at 10{sup ?4} mbar. The bombardment of electron beam at the tip of the stainless steel anode gives rise to a metallic vapor, which is injected into the capillary and initiates the main discharge through the capillary. The EUV emission is measured for different discharge voltages for both conditions and compared. It is found that the metallic capillary discharge with argon ambientis able to produce higher EUV energy compared to that with air ambient.

  12. Imaging in the ocean with ambient noise: the ORB experiments Chad L. Epifanio,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the experiments, including planar panels and cylindrical, polyethylene drums containing wet sand, seawater by the acoustic shadow it casts in the ambient noise field. In the mid-eighties, at the sugges- tion of Allen

  13. Effect of the shutdown of a large coal fired power plant on ambient mercury species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yungang

    2014-01-01

    Effect of the shutdown of a coal-fired power plant on urbanof the shutdown of a large coal-fired power plant on ambientof the shutdown of a large coal-fired power plant on ambient

  14. EL REGADO Y LA EVALUACIN AMBIENTAL ESTRATGICA Oate Rubalcaba, Juan J.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oñate, Juan J.

    las opciones estratégicas de nivel superior al proyecto, limitación que trata de subsanarse con la EAE Cardona, Francisco2 ; Cachón de Mesa, Javier 3 1 Dpto. de Medio Ambiente. Universidad Europea de Madrid

  15. Review paper Seismic interferometry and ambient noise tomography in the British Isles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Review paper Seismic interferometry and ambient noise tomography in the British Isles Heather. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 2. Theory and method of seismic interferometry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 4.2. Seismic interferometry across the Scottish Highlands

  16. Operation of a Joint Utility/Industry Ambient Air Monitoring Program in the Houston Area 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kush, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    UTILITY/INDUSTRY AMBIENT AIR MONITORING PROGRAM IN THE HOUSTON AREA JOHN A. KUSH Senior Environmental Specialist Houston Lighting -& Power Company Houston, Texas ABSTRACT The Houston Regional Monitoring Corporation (HRM) is an association... quality issues, it was recognized a cooperative effort of industry in Houston to implement a comprehensive regional air monitoring program was the most cost effective manner to provide participating firms with accurate ambient air quality measurements...

  17. Economizer control assembly for regulating the volume flow of outdoor ambient air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michaels, D.D. Jr.

    1984-10-23

    An economizer assembly is disclosed wherein a sliding door is utilized for covering an outdoor ambient air opening allowing outdoor ambient air flow into a space to be conditioned. A motor shaft arrangement connected via a rotating drive rod is utilized to slidably displace the door to any position necessary to effectively regulate air flow. The utilization of this economizer control arrangement with a rooftop type air conditioning unit is further disclosed.

  18. Ambient Monitoring for Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, Puget Sound, Washington: Chemical Analyses for 2010 Regional Mussel Watch (AMB02)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandenberger, Jill M.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Suslick, Carolynn R.; Johnston, Robert K.

    2010-10-20

    The Puget Sound Naval Shipyard & Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS&IMF) and Naval Base Kitsap-Bremerton (Shipyard) located in Bremerton, WA are committed to a culture of continuous process improvement for all aspects of Shipyard operations, including reducing the releases of hazardous materials and waste in discharges from the Shipyard. Under the Project ENVVEST Final Project Agreement, a cooperative project among PSNS&IMF, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), and local stakeholders (US Navy, EPA and Ecology 2002) has been helping to improve the environmental quality of the Sinclair and Dyes Inlet Watershed (ENVVEST 2006). An ambient monitoring program for sediment, water, and indigenous mussels began in 2009 to assess the status and trend of ecological resources, assess the effectiveness of cleanup and pollution control measures, and determine if discharges from all sources are protective of beneficial uses including aquatic life. This document presents the 2010 chemical residue data and stable isotopes of carbon (?13C) and nitrogen (?15N) for the regional mussel watch stations located in Sinclair Inlet, Dyes Inlet, Port Orchard Passage, Rich Passage, Agate Passage, Liberty Bay, and Keyport Lagoon. Indigenous bivalves were collected from a small boat and/or from along the shoreline, measured, composited, and analyzed for a suite of trace metals and organic contaminants. The trace metals included silver, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, mercury, nickel, lead, and zinc. The organic contaminants included the list of NOAA Status and Trends 20 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) congeners and suite of parent and methylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). These chemical residue data provide the first year of the biota ambient monitoring.

  19. A high-temperature, ambient-pressure ultra-dry operando reactor cell for Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Köck, Eva-Maria; Kogler, Michaela; Pramsoler, Reinhold; Klötzer, Bernhard; Penner, Simon

    2014-08-15

    The construction of a newly designed high-temperature, high-pressure FT-IR reaction cell for ultra-dry in situ and operando operation is reported. The reaction cell itself as well as the sample holder is fully made of quartz glass, with no hot metal or ceramic parts in the vicinity of the high-temperature zone. Special emphasis was put on chemically absolute water-free and inert experimental conditions, which includes reaction cell and gas-feeding lines. Operation and spectroscopy up to 1273 K is possible, as well as pressures up to ambient conditions. The reaction cell exhibits a very easy and variable construction and can be adjusted to any available FT-IR spectrometer. Its particular strength lies in its possibility to access and study samples under very demanding experimental conditions. This includes studies at very high temperatures, e.g., for solid-oxide fuel cell research or studies where the water content of the reaction mixtures must be exactly adjusted. The latter includes all adsorption studies on oxide surfaces, where the hydroxylation degree is of paramount importance. The capability of the reaction cell will be demonstrated for two selected examples where information and in due course a correlation to other methods can only be achieved using the presented setup.

  20. Water Privatisation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zölls, Elisa

    2011-08-17

    This dissertation deals with the policy issues of large-scale, urban water privatisation projects in the face of uncertainty and variability. The main objective is to evaluate whether a single policy approach, namely privatisation associated...

  1. Grabbing Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reis, Pedro Miguel

    We introduce a novel technique for grabbing water with a flexible solid. This new passive pipetting mechanism was inspired by floating flowers and relies purely on the coupling of the elasticity of thin plates and the ...

  2. Ambient pressure photoelectron spectroscopy: a new tool for surface science and nanotechnology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salmeron, Miquel; Salmeron, Miquel; Schlogl, Robert

    2008-03-12

    Progress in science often follows or parallels the development of new techniques. The optical microscope helped convert medicine and biology from a speculative activity in old times to today's sophisticated scientific disciplines. The telescope changed the study and interpretation of heavens from mythology to science. X-ray diffraction enabled the flourishing of solid state physics and materials science. The technique object of this review, Ambient Pressure Photoelectron Spectroscopy or APPES for short, has also the potential of producing dramatic changes in the study of liquid and solid surfaces, particularly in areas such as atmospheric, environment and catalysis sciences. APPES adds an important missing element to the host of techniques that give fundamental information, i.e., spectroscopy and microscopy, about surfaces in the presence of gases and vapors, as encountered in industrial catalysis and atmospheric environments. APPES brings electron spectroscopy into the realm of techniques that can be used in practical environments. Decades of surface science in ultra high vacuum (UHV) has shown the power of electron spectroscopy in its various manifestations. Their unique property is the extremely short elastic mean free path of electrons as they travel through condensed matter, of the order of a few atomic distances in the energy range from a few eV to a few thousand eV. As a consequence of this the information obtained by analyzing electrons emitted or scattered from a surface refers to the top first few atomic layers, which is what surface science is all about. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), and other such techniques have been used for decades and provided some of the most fundamental knowledge about surface crystallography, composition and electronic structure available today. Unfortunately the high interaction cross section of electrons with matter also prevents them from traveling long distances unscattered in gas environments. Above the millibar pressure range this distance is reduced to less that a millimeter, effectively preventing its use in the most relevant environments, usually between millibars and atmospheric pressures. There is therefore a large gap of several orders of magnitude where information about surfaces is scarce because these powerful electron spectroscopies cannot operate. One characteristic of surfaces in ambient pressure environments is that they are covered by dense layers of molecules, even when their binding energy is weak. Water for example is known to form layers several molecules thick at room temperature in humid environments. Metals readily form oxide films several layers thick in oxygen atmospheres. Dense layers of adsorbed molecules can also be produced in ultra high vacuum, often by the simple and expedient method of cooling the sample to cryogenic temperatures. A large amount of data has been obtained in the past in UHV by surface scientists using this method. While this has provided valuable information it begs the question of whether the structures formed in this manner represent equilibrium structures or metastable ones, kinetically trapped due to high activation energies that cannot be overcome at low temperature. From a thermodynamic point of view is interesting to consider the entropic contribution to the Gibbs free energy, which we can call 'the pressure factor', equal to kT.logP. This factor amounts to a sizeable 0.3 eV difference at room temperature between UHV (<10{sup -8} Pascal) and atmospheric pressures. Such change if free energy can definitely result in changes in surface structure and stability. Entire areas of the phase diagram are out of reach due to the pressure gap. Even when cooling is not necessary, many surface treatments and most chemical reactions necessitate the presence of gases at pressures ranging from millibar to bars. What is the structure and chemical nature of the species formed on the surface in equilibrium with suc

  3. INTRODUCCIN A LOS MODELOS DE REGRESIN LINEAL Los Institutos de Qumica Avanzada de Catalua (IQAC) y del Diagnstico Ambiental y Estudios del Agua (IDAEA) del CSIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) y del Diagnóstico Ambiental y Estudios del Agua (IDAEA) del CSIC ofrecen la posibilidad de aumentar

  4. Water Resources Policy & Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    Water Resources Policy & Economics FOR 4984 Selected Course Topics · Appropriative and riparian water institutions · Incentives for conservation · Water rights for in-stream environmental use · Surface water-groundwater management · Water quality regulations · Water markets · Economic and policy

  5. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01

    24 Figure 7. Comparison of Daily Water Heater28 Figure 8. Monitored Field Efficiency of Tankless Water28 Figure 9. Monitored Lab Efficiency of Tankless Water

  6. A statistical comparison of impact and ambient testing results from the Alamosa Canyon Bridge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doebling, S.W.; Farrar, C.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Cornwell, P. [Rose Hulman Inst. of Tech., Terre Haute, IN (United States)

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, the modal properties of the Alamosa Canyon Bridge obtained using ambient data are compared to those obtained from impact hammer vibration tests. Using ambient sources of excitation to determine the modal characteristics of large civil engineering structures is desirable for several reasons. The forced vibration testing of such structures generally requires a large amount of specialized equipment and trained personnel making the tests quite expensive. Also, an automated health monitoring system for a large civil structure will most likely use ambient excitation. A modal identification procedure based on a statistical Monte Carlo analysis using the Eigensystem Realization Algorithm is used to compute the modal parameters and their statistics. The results show that for most of the measured modes, the differences between the modal frequencies of the ambient and hammer data sets are statistically significant. However, the differences between the corresponding damping ratio results are not statistically significant. Also, one of the modes identified from the hammer test data was not identifiable from the ambient data set.

  7. The culture of marine fish and their use as biological monitors of water quality in ponds receiving heated discharge water from a power station 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linder, Donald Ray

    1974-01-01

    For Individual Fish Tables 1 through 12. Length-Weight and Standard Length-Total Length Relationships for Each Sample Of Fish Tables 1 through 9 173 174 247 332 345 xx LIST OF TABLES Table Page Distribution of experimental fish populations... were periodically sampled to determine growth, survival, snd condi- tion. LITERATURE REVIEW Effects of Power Station Effluents Power stations normaljy discharge water which is 6 to 9 C above ambient water temperature (Davidson and Bradshaw 1967; de...

  8. Update on use of mine pool water for power generation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J. A.; Puder, M. G.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-09-30

    In 2004, nearly 90 percent of the country's electricity was generated at power plants using steam-based systems (EIA 2005). Electricity generation at steam electric plants requires a cooling system to condense the steam. With the exception of a few plants using air-cooled condensers, most U.S. steam electric power plants use water for cooling. Water usage occurs through once-through cooling or as make-up water in a closed-cycle system (generally involving one or more cooling towers). According to a U.S. Geological Survey report, the steam electric power industry withdrew about 136 billion gallons per day of fresh water in 2000 (USGS 2005). This is almost the identical volume withdrawn for irrigation purposes. In addition to fresh water withdrawals, the steam electric power industry withdrew about 60 billion gallons per day of saline water. Many parts of the United States are facing fresh water shortages. Even areas that traditionally have had adequate water supplies are reaching capacity limits. New or expanded steam electric power plants frequently need to turn to non-traditional alternate sources of water for cooling. This report examines one type of alternate water source-groundwater collected in underground pools associated with coal mines (referred to as mine pool water in this report). In 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) funded Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to evaluate the feasibility of using mine pool water in Pennsylvania and West Virginia. That report (Veil et al. 2003) identified six small power plants in northeastern Pennsylvania (the Anthracite region) that had been using mine pool water for over a decade. It also reported on a pilot study underway at Exelon's Limerick Generating Station in southeastern Pennsylvania that involved release of water from a mine located about 70 miles upstream from the plant. The water flowed down the Schuylkill River and augmented the natural flow so that the Limerick plant could withdraw a larger volume of river water. The report also included a description of several other proposed facilities that were planning to use mine pool water. In early 2006, NETL directed Argonne to revisit the sites that had previously been using mine pool water and update the information offered in the previous report. This report describes the status of mine pool water use as of summer 2006. Information was collected by telephone interviews, electronic mail, literature review, and site visits.

  9. Arnold Schwarzenegger WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS;#12;Appendices Appendix A. Multifamily Water Heating Construction Practices, Pricing and Availability Survey Report Appendix B. Multifamily Water Heating Controls Performance Field Report Appendix C. Pipe

  10. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01

    in order to reduce the water and energy wasted in hot waterhot water) and 17% if hot water energy is included. The datafrom the delivered hot water energy of 66% to provide the

  11. Isolation of ambient aerosols of known critical supersaturation: the differential critical supersaturation separator (DSCS) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osborn, Robert John

    2007-09-17

    , excess flow is vented through a tee between both saturators. A 0.22 micrometer polypropylene particle filter (DCP02000T9 Calyx capsule; Osmonics Inc., Westborough, MA) is placed downstream of the flow conditioning tube before flow is split into five... S are compared to determine if there are leaks in the system. The air void immediately above the top bath is continuously recircluated through a filtering system consisting of a regenerative blower upstream of a HEPA-filter (12144 HEPA capsule; Pall Gelman...

  12. Ambient temperature and driving cycle effects on CNG motor vehicle emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gabele, P.; Krapp, K.T.; Ray, W.D.; Snow, R.; Crews, W.; Perry, N.; Lanning, J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes an emissions study of two vans powered by compressed natural gas (CNG). One van was relatively new, while the other had been driven more than 120,000 mi. The purpose of the study was to obtain emissions information which could be used to predict the impact of CNG use on ambient air quality and air toxic concentrations, and to develop a better understanding of the effect of ambient temperature variations on CNG emissions. Using four different driving cycles, emission tests were carried out at 20{degree}F, 75{degree}F, and 105{degree}F. Test results agree with previous findings that document low emissions of nonmethane hydrocarbons from CNG vehicles. Results also confirm the expectation that CNG emissions are not significantly affected by ambient temperature variations, although an increase in formaldehyde emission was noted for the 20{degree}F cold-start tests.

  13. Marketing water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01

    stream_source_info Marketing water savings.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 9143 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Marketing water savings.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 tx H2... are partnering with federal and state agencies and universities to develop new programs or market existing ones. In North Central Texas, the city of McKin- ney and Texas AgriLife Research and Exten- sion Urban Solutions Center at Dallas recently began...

  14. Ambient-atmosphere glow discharge for determination of elemental concentration in solutions in a high-throughput or transient fashion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Webb, Michael R. (Somerville, MA); Hieftje, Gary M. (Bloomington, IN); Andrade, Francisco (Leeds, GB)

    2011-04-19

    An ambient atmosphere glow discharge spectrometer is disclosed having a capillary, two electrodes and a means for recording the atomic emissions.

  15. Critical controls in transcritical shallow-water flow over obstacles Roger H.J. Grimshaw1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    upstream and a depression chock propagating downstream. Classical shock closure conditions are used the obstacle, which has an upstream elevation and a downstream depression, each terminated by upstream. The upstream flow can be characterised as subcritical, supercritical, and transcritical respectively. We review

  16. Effects of Water Content and Alumino-Silicate Sources on the Structure and Properties of Geopolymers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lizcano, Maricela

    2012-10-19

    for 21 days at ambient conditions. In addition, the effects of the initial water content, SiO2/Al2O3 ratio, and alkaline activator (Na or K) on the thermal and mechanical properties of GPs, indicate that the dominant factor controlling thermal...

  17. Grabbing water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. M. Reis; J. Hure; S. Jung; J. W. M. Bush; C. Clanet

    2012-07-16

    We introduce a novel technique for grabbing water with a flexible solid. This new passive pipetting mechanism was inspired by floating flowers and relies purely on the coupling of the elasticity of thin plates and the hydrodynamic forces at the liquid interface. Developing a theoretical model has enabled us to design petal-shaped objects with maximum grabbing capacity.

  18. Summary of DOE/PERF water program review.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J.; Gasper, J.; Puder, M.; Leath, P.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-01-31

    For many years, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has supported and sponsored various types of water research relating to the oil and gas industry through its Office of Fossil Energy and its National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). In early 2005, the Petroleum Environmental Research Forum (PERF) submitted a proposal to DOE for funding an upcoming PERF meeting that would feature water research in the petroleum industry. PERF is a nonprofit organization created in 1986 to provide a stimulus to and a forum for the collection, exchange, and analysis of research information related to the development of technology concerning the petroleum industry, and a mechanism for establishing joint research projects in that field. Additional information on PERF can be accessed at http://www.perf.org. DOE agreed to provide funding to hold a review of its water research program in conjunction with the fall 2005 PERF meeting. Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) was asked to coordinate and host the meeting, which was referred to as the DOE/PERF Water Program Review. The program review was held on November 1-4, 2005, in Annapolis, Maryland, at the Historic Inns of Annapolis. The purpose of the program review was to provide a forum for sharing information, reviewing current programs (especially recent unpublished research), and reviewing industry and regulatory needs regarding water use and reuse issues. PERF and DOE/NETL can use this information to plan for future water-related research projects. The water program review provided a unique opportunity in several ways. First, DOE was able to have all of the contractors currently receiving DOE funds for water research present in one room at the same time. Each contractor described his or her research and was able to learn about the research being conducted by the other researchers. Second, this forum allowed representatives of many large oil and gas companies to hear about the DOE research projects and offer their reactions to DOE and the researchers. Third, most oil and gas meetings focus on either upstream (the exploration and production sector) or downstream (the refining sector) issues. Typically, there is little overlap in content between the two industry sectors. At the program review, attendees with upstream and downstream orientations were able to spend much of their time in joint sessions and could learn more about the other sector.

  19. Water in the West

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fahlund, Andrew; Choy, Min L. Janny; Szeptycki, Leon

    2014-01-01

    faced with the imperative that water is vital to all life onChoy* and Leon Szeptycki Water in the West Keywords: climategreen infrastructure; water; water-energy; water governance;

  20. Enabling better water management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    CASE STUDY Enabling better water management Seasonal Streamflow Forecast Service influencing water decisions Water management decisions made with confidence Using the Bureau's streamflow forecasting, ACTEW Water confidently removed temporary water restrictions after the millennium drought. Millennium drought

  1. Clean Water Act Section 401 Water Quality Certification: A Water...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Clean Water Act Section 401 Water Quality Certification: A Water Quality Protection Tool for States and Tribes Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  2. Clean Water Act Section 401 Water Quality Certification A Water...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Clean Water Act Section 401 Water Quality Certification A Water Quality Protection Tool for States and Tribes Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  3. On the Accuracy of van der Waals Inclusive Density-Functional Theory Exchange-Correlation Functionals for Ice at Ambient and High Pressures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biswajit Santra; Ji?í Klimeš; Alexandre Tkatchenko; Dario Alfè; Ben Slater; Angelos Michaelides; Roberto Car; Matthias Scheffler

    2014-08-14

    Density-functional theory (DFT) has been widely used to study water and ice for at least 20 years. However, the reliability of different DFT exchange-correlation (xc) functionals for water remains a matter of considerable debate. This is particularly true in light of the recent development of DFT based methods that account for van der Waals (vdW) dispersion forces. Here, we report a detailed study with several xc functionals (semi-local, hybrid, and vdW inclusive approaches) on ice Ih and six proton ordered phases of ice. Consistent with our previous study [Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 185701 (2011)] which showed that vdW forces become increasingly important at high pressures, we find here that all vdW inclusive methods considered improve the relative energies and transition pressures of the high-pressure ice phases compared to those obtained with semi-local or hybrid xc functionals. However, we also find that significant discrepancies between experiment and the vdW inclusive approaches remain in the cohesive properties of the various phases, causing certain phases to be absent from the phase diagram. Therefore, room for improvement in the description of water at ambient and high pressures remains and we suggest that because of the stern test the high pressure ice phases pose they should be used in future benchmark studies of simulation methods for water.

  4. Splashing phenomena of room temperature liquid metal droplet striking on the pool of the same liquid under ambient air environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haiyan Li; Shengfu Mei; Lei Wang; Yunxia Gao; Jing Liu

    2013-09-04

    In this article, the fluid dynamics of room temperature liquid metal (RTLM) droplet impacting onto a pool of the same liquid in ambient air was investigated. A series of experiments were conducted in order to disclose the influence of the oxidation effect on the impact dynamics. The droplet shape and impact phenomenology were recorded with the aid of a high-speed digital camera. The impact energy stored in the splash structures was estimated via a theoretical model and several morphological parameters obtained from instantaneous images of the splash. It was observed that the droplet shape and the splashing morphology of RTLM were drastically different from those of water, so was the impact dynamics between room temperature LM pool and high temperature LM pool. The energy analysis disclosed that the height of the jet is highly sensitive to the viscosity of the fluid, which is subjected to the oxidation effect and temperature effect simultaneously, and thus perfectly explained the phenomena. These basic findings are important for the application of RTLM in a series of newly emerging technologies such as liquid metal based spray cooling, ink-jet printed electronics, interface material painting and coating, metallurgy, and 3D packages, etc.

  5. Ambient induced degradation and chemically activated recovery in copper phthalocyanine thin film transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kummel, Andrew C.

    Ambient induced degradation and chemically activated recovery in copper phthalocyanine thin film 2009 The electrical degradation aging of copper phthalocyanine CuPc organic thin film transistors OTFTs of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.3159885 I. INTRODUCTION The recent demand for low cost, versatile electronic de

  6. High-cycle fatigue and durability of polycrystalline silicon thin lms in ambient air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    High-cycle fatigue and durability of polycrystalline silicon thin ®lms in ambient air C. First, silicon-based ®lms are still the dominant structural material for micromachines. Second of MEMS components are critical in this maturing ®eld. The silicon-based ®lms commonly used in micromecha

  7. Earthquake ground motion prediction using the ambient seismic field German A. Prieto1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prieto, Germán A.

    Earthquake ground motion prediction using the ambient seismic field Germa´n A. Prieto1 and Gregory 2008. [1] The waves generated by faulting represent the primary threat posed by most large earthquakes. The effect of complex geological structures, such as sedimentary basins, on earthquake ground motion

  8. Fixed Priority Scheduling Strategies for Ambient Energy-Harvesting Embedded systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Fixed Priority Scheduling Strategies for Ambient Energy-Harvesting Embedded systems Maryline Chetto the capability to harvest energy from the environment. The electrical energy which is available to power these devices changes over time and is limited by the size of the energy storage unit such as battery

  9. Efficient Integration of Web Services in Ambient-aware Sensor Network Applications1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koutsoukos, Xenofon D.

    Efficient Integration of Web Services in Ambient-aware Sensor Network Applications1 Isaac Amundson discovery and access of Web services. Sensor network applications are realized as graphs of modular sensor nodes, as well as a Web service, is used to illustrate the approach. Our results demonstrate

  10. Ambient pressure process for preparing aerogel thin films reliquified sols useful in preparing aerogel thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brinker, Charles Jeffrey (Albuquerque, NM); Prakash, Sai Sivasankaran (Minneapolis, MN)

    1999-01-01

    A method for preparing aerogel thin films by an ambient-pressure, continuous process. The method of this invention obviates the use of an autoclave and is amenable to the formation of thin films by operations such as dip coating. The method is less energy intensive and less dangerous than conventional supercritical aerogel processing techniques.

  11. Oxygen Pathways and Carbon Dioxide Utilization in Methane Partial Oxidation in Ambient Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallinson, Richard

    Oxygen Pathways and Carbon Dioxide Utilization in Methane Partial Oxidation in Ambient Temperature and lower environmental impacts make this the carbon-based fuel of choice well into the twenty-first century chemicals.1 There is additional need for new technologies which can also allow recovery of the many remote

  12. Polymer communication Rapid viscoelastic switching of an ambient temperature range photo-responsive azobenzene side

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of an LCP. Liquid crystal polymers are useful because the photo- induced LC to isotropic phase transitionPolymer communication Rapid viscoelastic switching of an ambient temperature range photo, temperature sweeps measured G' and G" from 80°C to -5°C and identified glass transition temperatures (Tg) at 2

  13. SmartTecO: Context-Based Ambient Sensing and Monitoring for Optimizing Energy Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beigl, Michael

    SmartTecO: Context-Based Ambient Sensing and Monitoring for Optimizing Energy Consumption Yong Ding networks and a context awareness system, the acquired data will be interpreted into different energy the actuation mod- ule a certain context, which allows managing and saving the energy consumption of home

  14. Dynamic Column Extraction for Europium on Media #1 at Ambient Temperature

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Gary Garland

    2015-04-07

    This is a dataset for a 200ppm europium solution sent through a column with 12g of media #1 at pH of 3.2. This column experiment was run at ambient temperature at a flow rate of 2mL/min.

  15. Performance Analysis of Simultaneous Wireless Information and Power Transfer with Ambient RF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Privault, Nicolas

    isotropic wireless power, and reception of the power by converting the harvested RF waves into electricity. INTRODUCTION RF energy harvesting techniques have evolved as a promis- ing and cost-effective solutionPerformance Analysis of Simultaneous Wireless Information and Power Transfer with Ambient RF Energy

  16. Social, Economic, and Ethical Implications of Ambient Intelligence and Ubiquitous Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in information technology never had the explicit goal of changing society, but rather did so as a side effectSocial, Economic, and Ethical Implications of Ambient Intelligence and Ubiquitous Computing° Jürgen." Smart things can explore their environment, communicate with other smart things, and interact

  17. REGLAMENTO GENERAL DE SEGURIDAD E HIGIENE Y EL MEDIO AMBIENTE DE TRABAJO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REGLAMENTO GENERAL DE SEGURIDAD E HIGIENE Y EL MEDIO AMBIENTE DE TRABAJO #12;CENTRO DE INVESTIGACIÓN Y DE ESTUDIOS AVANZADOS DEL I.P.N. REGLAMENTO GENERAL DE SEGURIDAD E HIGIENE Y EL MEDIO AMBIENTEREGLAMENTO GENERAL DE SEGURIDAD E HIGIENE Y EL MEDIO AMBIENTEREGLAMENTO GENERAL DE SEGURIDAD E HIGIENE Y EL

  18. Emission features and expansion dynamics of nanosecond laser ablation plumes at different ambient pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farid, N.; Harilal, S. S. Hassanein, A.; Ding, H.

    2014-01-21

    The influence of ambient pressure on the spectral emission features and expansion dynamics of a plasma plume generated on a metal target has been investigated. The plasma plumes were generated by irradiating Cu targets using 6?ns, 1064?nm pulses from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. The emission and expansion dynamics of the plasma plumes were studied by varying air ambient pressure levels ranging from vacuum to atmospheric pressure. The ambient pressure levels were found to affect both the line intensities and broadening along with the signal to background and signal to noise ratios and the optimum pressure conditions for analytical applications were evaluated. The characteristic plume parameters were estimated using emission spectroscopy means and noticed that the excitation temperature peaked ?300?Torr, while the electron density showed a maximum ?100?Torr. Fast-gated images showed a complex interaction between the plume and background air leading to changes in the plume geometry with pressure as well as time. Surface morphology of irradiated surface showed that the pressure of the ambient gas affects the laser-target coupling significantly.

  19. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION FOR:1 Diurnal variations of ambient particulate wood burning2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    1 SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION FOR:1 Diurnal variations of ambient particulate wood burning2 emissions 616263646566 67686970717273747576 7778798081828384858687888990 919293949596979899100 BBOA wood burning 1² = 0.77 C3H5O2 + vs BBOA r² = 0.93 5 4 3 2 1 0 HOA(µgm -3 ) 706050403020100 NOx (ppb) HOA vs NOx r² = 0

  20. Performance Analysis of Ambient RF Energy Harvesting: A Stochastic Geometry Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Privault, Nicolas

    proposed as a potential solution to provide proactive energy replenishment for wireless devices. This paper aims to analyze the performance of a battery-free wireless sensor powered by ambient RF energy signals into electricity. Therefore, it has recently emerged as an alternative method to operate low

  1. Sorption Capacity of Europium for Media #1 and Media #2 from Solution at Ambient Temperature

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Gary Garland

    2015-03-16

    This dataset shows the capacity for Europium of media #1 and media #2 in a shakertable experiment. The experimental conditions were 150mL of 500ppm Eu solution, 2g of media, pH of 3.2, at ambient temperature.

  2. Configurac~ao do Suporte de Comunicac~ao em Ambientes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodrigues, Luís E.T.

    ¸~ao de protocolos configur´avel, que fornece a comunicac¸~ao em grupo. Este artigo discute o papel do, mudanc¸as din^amicas e efici^encia deste tipo de sistemas, os ambientes MOO (multi-utilizador orientados

  3. LETTER doi:10.1038/nature13883 Passive radiative cooling below ambient air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Shanhui

    Coolingisasignificantend-useofenergygloballyandamajordriver of peak electricity demand. Air conditioning, for example possibilities for energy efficiency. Further, the cold darkness of the Universe can be usedLETTER doi:10.1038/nature13883 Passive radiative cooling below ambient air temperature under direct

  4. Using Ambient Noise Fields for Submarine Team #525 for the Mathematical Contest in Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchener, W. Garrett

    Using Ambient Noise Fields for Submarine Location Team #525 for the Mathematical Contest in Modeling February 12, 1996 1 Restatement of the Problem The world's oceans naturally contain a certain amount of noise that is created by such sources as surface waves, boats passing by, animals that sing

  5. Ocean bottom profiling with ambient noise: A model for the passive fathometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerstoft, Peter

    Ocean bottom profiling with ambient noise: A model for the passive fathometer James Traer, a) Peter generated surface noise, which is often modeled as an infinite sheet of surface noise sources.17 of its response to arbitrary noise fields is required. We use a sim- ple ocean noise model21 with three

  6. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), nitrated PAHs and oxygenated PAHs in ambient air of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), nitrated PAHs and oxygenated PAHs in ambient air + particle phases) of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), 17 nitrated PAHs (NPAHs) and 9 oxygenated when (before or during the sampling) the OPAHs are formed. Keywords: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

  7. Sampling precautions for the measurement of nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ambient air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Sampling precautions for the measurement of nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ambient of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and of their oxidation products, such as nitrated and oxygenated PAHs samplers (cascade impactor and conventional high volume sampler) installed in parallel during several field

  8. Sound production, hearing and possible interception under ambient noise conditions in the topmouth minnow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ladich, Friedrich

    but not during intraspecific interactions. Feeding sounds were short broadband pulses with main energies between and in the presence of natural ambient noise recorded in Lake Neusiedl in eastern Austria, best hearing sensitivities to other parts of Europe together with the herbivorous grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella (Valenciennes

  9. Nombre : ECONOMA DE LA ENERGA Y EL MEDIO AMBIENTE / ENERGY ECONOMICS AND THE ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudnick, Hugh

    Nombre : ECONOMÍA DE LA ENERGÍA Y EL MEDIO AMBIENTE / ENERGY ECONOMICS AND THE ENVIRONMENT Sigla fuentes renovables, tales como: hidroelectricidad, viento, geotermia, desechos y energía solar. En el caso ambientales impulsadas en Chile: la ley de fomento a las energías renovables no convencionales, la normativa

  10. Wireless Sensor Networks Powered by Ambient Energy Harvesting (WSN-HEAP) Survey and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihada, Basem

    Wireless Sensor Networks Powered by Ambient Energy Harvesting (WSN-HEAP) ­ Survey and Challenges networks (WSNs) research has pre- dominantly assumed the use of a portable and limited energy source, viz. batteries, to power sensors. Without energy, a sensor is essentially useless and cannot contribute

  11. Design of an ambient aerosol sampling system for high and medium speed applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irshad, Hammad

    2002-01-01

    Two ambient sampling systems were designed and tested for high speed sampling application for a wind speed range of 4.47 m/s to 26.82 m/s. These systems will be used as inlets for sampling of bioaerosol from air. These systems consist of shrouded...

  12. Effects of Ambient Fine and Coarse Particles On Mortality in Phoenix, Arizona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Effects of Ambient Fine and Coarse Particles On Mortality in Phoenix, Arizona Merlise A. Clyde AND COARSE PARTICLES ON MORTALITY IN PHOENIX, ARIZONA1 Merlise A. Clyde Institute of Statistics and Decision of Washington Running Title: Particulate Pollution and Mortality in Phoenix, AZ Key Words: Bayesian Model

  13. Biomass, Flavonol Levels and Sensory Characteristics of Allium cultivars Grown Hydroponically at Ambient and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paré, Paul W.

    04ICES-136 Biomass, Flavonol Levels and Sensory Characteristics of Allium cultivars Grown growth chambers to evaluate the effect of elevated CO2 (1200 ppm) versus ambient CO2 (400 ppm) on biomass planting (dap). Regardless of cultivar or dap, plants grown at elevated CO2 had greater biomass

  14. Studies of ambient noise in shallow water environments off Mexico and Alaska : : characteristics, metrics and time- synchronization applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerra, Melania

    2013-01-01

    Balaena mysticetus, to seismic exploration in the CanadianBalaena mysticetus, to seismic exploration in the Canadianseismic survey used in offshore oil and gas exploration, and

  15. Method of immobilizing water-soluble bioorganic compounds on a capillary-porous carrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ershov, Gennady Moiseevich (Moscow, RU); Timofeev, Eduard Nikolaevich (Moscow, RU); Ivanov, Igor Borisovich (Moscow, RU); Florentiev, Vladimir Leonidovich (Moscow, RU); Mirzabekov, Andrei Darievich (Moscow, RU)

    1998-01-01

    The method for immobilizing water-soluble bioorganic compounds to capillary-porous carrier comprises application of solutions of water-soluble bioorganic compounds onto a capillary-porous carrier, setting the carrier temperature equal to or below the dew point of the ambient air, keeping the carrier till appearance of water condensate and complete swelling of the carrier, whereupon the carrier surface is coated with a layer of water-immiscible nonluminescent inert oil and is allowed to stand till completion of the chemical reaction of bonding the bioorganic compounds with the carrier.

  16. Genero, Salud y Ambiente en America Latina: Una Propuesta de Analisis y su Pertinencia Para la Red

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin-Kurtzman, Jane R.; Denman Champion, Catalina A.

    2006-01-01

    Contaminación Intramuros. Ponencia presentada en el Primer Taller Internacional de Salud AmbientalContaminación atmosférica en México y sus efectos. Ponencia presentada en el Primer Taller Internacional de Salud Ambientalcontaminación por metales pesados, el trabajo forzosamente se restringe a los temas discutidos en el Primer Taller Internacional de Salud Ambiental

  17. 1014 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MICROWAVE THEORY AND TECHNIQUES, VOL. 52, NO. 3, MARCH 2004 Recycling Ambient Microwave Energy With

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are in wireless powering of industrial sensors and recycling of ambient RF energy. A 64-el- ement dual Ambient Microwave Energy With Broad-Band Rectenna Arrays Joseph A. Hagerty, Student Member, IEEE, Florian] including utility power satellites [5], mechanical actuators for space-based telescopes [6], small dc motor

  18. Cleaner, Safer Water through Water Safety Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CS232615A Cleaner, Safer Water through Water Safety Plans National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH) Global Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Team's Water Safety Plan Assistance 1.5 million deaths occur globally every year due to a lack of clean water, inadequate sanitation, and improper hygiene (1

  19. Ground water provides drinking water, irrigation for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    they join tributaries to the Mississippi River. · The deep ground water divide is the underground boundary Deep ground water divide Racine Kenosha Walworth Waukesha Washington Ozaukee Milwaukee LAKE MICHIGANGround water provides drinking water, irrigation for crops and water for indus- tries. It is also

  20. Parallel passageways: An assessment of salmon migration in the San Gregorio watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alford, Chris

    2008-01-01

    with both the upstream and downstream channel bed surfaces.with areas immediately upstream and downstream. 5.adequate water depth upstream and downstream to support fish

  1. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01

    8 Assess California’s Small Gas Storage Water HeaterAssess California’s Small Gas Storage Water Heater Marketassess California’s small gas storage water heater market.

  2. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two0Photos and Videos/01/2012 Page 1Water Power

  3. The Impact of a Deep-Water Plunging Breaker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ikeda, Christine; Brucker, Kyle A; Drazen, David A; Dommermuth, Douglas G; Fu, Thomas; Fullerton, Anne M; Duncan, James H

    2014-01-01

    The impact of a plunging breaking wave (wavelength approximately 1.3m) on a rigidly mounted rigid cube structure (dimension 0.31m) that is partially submerged is explored through experiments and numerical calculations. The experiments are carried out in a wave tank and the breaker is generated with a mechanical wave maker using a dispersive focusing technique. The water-surface profile upstream of the front face of the cube and in its vertical centerplane is measured using a cinematic laser-induced fluorescence technique. The three-dimensional flow in the wave tank is simulated directly using the Numerical Flow Analysis (NFA) code. The experiments and the calculations are used to explore the details of the wave-impact process and, in particular, the formation of the high-speed vertical jet that is found on the front face of the cube under some impact conditions.

  4. Efficient Water Use & Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Use Goal 4: Efficient Water Use & Management Aware of the arid climate of northern New Mexico, water reduction and conservation remains a primary concern at LANL. Energy...

  5. Saving Water Saves Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Biermayer, Peter

    2006-01-01

    P. Potential Water and Energy Savings from Showerheads,Saving Water Saves Energy James E. McMahon, Camilla Dunhamavailable products. The energy savings associated with water

  6. Water and Energy Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.

    2013-01-01

    paper describing produced water from production of crudeEmerging Issues Paper: Mine Water Pollution. Dep. Environ.40. Vine G. 2010. Cooling water issues and opportunities at

  7. Terrestrial Water Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodell, M; Chambers, D P; Famiglietti, Jay

    2013-01-01

    with Subantarctic Mode Water. J. Geophys. Res. , 116,Global Climate] Stratospheric water vapor [in “State of the18 2. Total column water

  8. Storm Water Analytical Period

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Individual Permit Storm Water Analytical Period Storm Water Analytical Period The Individual Permit authorizes the discharge of storm water associated with historical industrial...

  9. Water in the West

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fahlund, Andrew; Choy, Min L. Janny; Szeptycki, Leon

    2014-01-01

    connections between water and energy, advances in knowledgeimportant nexus between water and energy. The demand fortwo reports on the water and energy nexus highlighting the

  10. Saving Water Saves Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Biermayer, Peter

    2006-01-01

    P. Potential Water and Energy Savings from Showerheads,shorter showers). Water- and energy- conserving activitiesstress imposed on limited water (and energy) supplies from

  11. Dynamic behavior of interfacila water at the silica surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Argyris, Dr. Dimitrios [University of Oklahoma; Cole, David R [ORNL; Striolo, Alberto [Oklahoma University

    2009-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were employed to study the dynamics properties of water at the silica-liquid interface at ambient temperature. Three different degrees of hydroxylation of a crystalline silica surface were used. To assess the water dynamic properties we calculated the residence probability and in-plane mean square displacement as a function of distance from the surface. The data indicate that water molecules at the fully hydroxylated surface remain longer, on average, in the interfacial region than in the other cases. By assessing the dynamics of molecular dipole moment and hydrogen-hydrogen vector an anisotropic reorientation was discovered for interfacial water in contact with any of the surfaces considered. However, the features of the anisotropic reorientation observed for water molecules depend strongly on the relative orientation of interfacial water molecules and their interactions with surface hydroxyl groups. On the partially hydroxylated surface, where water molecules with hydrogen-down and hydrogen-up orientation are both found, those water molecules associated with surface hydroxyl groups remain at the adsorbed locations longer and reorient slower than the other water molecules. A number of equilibrium properties, including density profiles, hydrogen bond networks, charge densities, and dipole moment densities are also reported to explain the dynamics results.

  12. Drinking Water Standards 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

    2006-04-26

    This publication explains the federal safety standards for drinking water provided by public water supply systems. It discusses the legal requirements for public water supplies, the maximum level allowed for contaminants in the water...

  13. Drinking Water Problems: Nitrates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-03-28

    at http://ag.arizona.edu/pubs/water/ az9420.pdf. ?Drinking Water Treatment: Distillation.? Nebraska Cooperative Extension. Available at http://ianrpubs. unl.edu/water/g1493.htm. ?Electrodyalisis.? GE Infrastructure Water & Process Technologies. General...

  14. INTRODUCCIN AL DISEO DE EXPERIMENTOS APLICADO EN LA QUMICA Los Institutos de Qumica Avanzada de Catalua (IQAC) y del Diagnstico Ambiental y Estudios del Agua (IDAEA) del CSIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cataluña (IQAC) y del Diagnóstico Ambiental y Estudios del Agua (IDAEA) del CSIC ofrecen la posibilidad de

  15. Integrated regional water management: Collaboration or water politics as usual?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lubell, Mark N.; Lippert, Lucas

    2010-01-01

    the water quality and waste water elements. At the sameAll water supply, waste water, and flood control agenciesprovide services like waste water treatment and drinking

  16. Water watch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-02-01

    The Hydropower Generation Report provides generation figures for the largest hydropower producers in each of six regions in the US. The report compares, for each month, the amount of hydroelectricity generated (in thousands of megawatt-hours) by each producers in the last two years to the ten-year average for that month. This database is used to figure long-term generation averages and percent of averages. The producers regularly provide current generation data to update the database. This issue of [open quotes]Water Watch[close quotes] focuses on winter snow conditions across the US as of mid-January. In addition, the department provides an outlook of spring flood potential. The information presented is based on data from the US Geological Survey, the National Weather Service, and the Soil Conservation Service.

  17. Measurement of concrete E-modulus evolution since casting: A novel method based on ambient vibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azenha, Miguel, E-mail: miguel.azenha@civil.uminho.p [LABEST - Laboratory for the Concrete Technology and Structural Behaviour, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); ISISE - Institute for Sustainability and Innovation in Structural Engineering, Universidade do Minho, Escola de Engenharia, Campus de Azurem, 4800-058 Guimaraes (Portugal); Magalhaes, Filipe [VIBEST - Laboratory of Vibrations and Structural Monitoring, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Faria, Rui [LABEST - Laboratory for the Concrete Technology and Structural Behaviour, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Cunha, Alvaro [VIBEST - Laboratory of Vibrations and Structural Monitoring, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)

    2010-07-15

    The use of ambient vibration tests to characterize the evolution of E-modulus of concrete right after casting is investigated in this paper. A new methodology is proposed, which starts by casting a concrete cylindrical beam inside a hollow acrylic formwork. This beam is then placed horizontally, simply supported at both extremities, and vertical accelerations resulting from ambient vibration are measured at mid-span. Processing these mid-span acceleration time series using power spectral density functions allows a continuous identification of the first flexural frequency of vibration of the composite beam, which in turn is correlated with the evolutive E-modulus of concrete since casting. Together with experiments conducted with the proposed methodology, a complementary validation campaign for concrete E-modulus determination was undertaken by static loading tests performed on the composite beam, as well as by standard compressive tests of concrete cylinders of the same batch loaded at different ages.

  18. Air Entrainment in Dynamic Wetting: Knudsen Effects and the Influence of Ambient Air Pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprittles, James E

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments on coating flows and liquid drop impact both demonstrate that wetting failures caused by air entrainment can be suppressed by reducing the ambient gas pressure. Here, it is shown that non-equilibrium effects in the gas can account for this behaviour, with ambient pressure reductions increasing the gas' mean free path and hence the Knudsen number $Kn$. These effects first manifest themselves through Maxwell slip at the gas' boundaries so that for sufficiently small $Kn$ they can be incorporated into a continuum model for dynamic wetting flows. The resulting mathematical model contains flow structures on the nano-, micro- and milli-metre scales and is implemented into a computational platform developed specifically for such multiscale phenomena. The coating flow geometry is used to show that for a fixed gas-liquid-solid system (a) the increased Maxwell slip at reduced pressures can substantially delay air entrainment, i.e. increase the `maximum speed of wetting', (b) unbounded maximum speeds ...

  19. Effect of Ambient Design Temperature on Air-Cooled Binary Plant Output

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Wendt; Greg Mines

    2011-10-01

    Air-cooled binary plants are designed to provide a specified level of power production at a particular air temperature. Nominally this air temperature is the annual mean or average air temperature for the plant location. This study investigates the effect that changing the design air temperature has on power generation for an air-cooled binary plant producing power from a resource with a declining production fluid temperature and fluctuating ambient temperatures. This analysis was performed for plants operating both with and without a geothermal fluid outlet temperature limit. Aspen Plus process simulation software was used to develop optimal air-cooled binary plant designs for specific ambient temperatures as well as to rate the performance of the plant designs at off-design operating conditions. Results include calculation of annual and plant lifetime power generation as well as evaluation of plant operating characteristics, such as improved power generation capabilities during summer months when electric power prices are at peak levels.

  20. Water and Energy Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Geothermal . 20 Energy Used for Water Services . 20 Transporting Water 21 Pumping Groundwater. 22 Treating Wastewater 23 Desalination ..

  1. ARM: Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Maria Cadeddu

    2004-02-19

    Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals

  2. ARM: Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Maria Cadeddu

    Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals

  3. Ambient Dose Equivalent measured at the Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia Department of Nuclear Medicine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avila, O. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, AP 18-1027, 11801, DF (Mexico); Torres-Ulloa, C. L. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, AP 18-1027, 11801, DF (Mexico); Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP 70-542, 04510, DF (Mexico); Medina, L. A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP 20-364, 01000, DF (Mexico); Unidad de Investigacion Biomedica en Cancer INCan-UNAM, Av. San Fernando 22 C.P. 14080 (Mexico); Trujillo-Zamudio, F. E. [Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia (INCan), Av. San Fernando 22, C.P. 14080 (Mexico); Gamboa de Buen, I. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP 70-543, 04510 DF (Mexico); Buenfil, A. E.; Brandan, M. E. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP 20-364, 01000, DF (Mexico)

    2010-12-07

    Ambient dose equivalent values were determined in several sites at the Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Departmento de Medicina Nuclear, using TLD-100 and TLD-900 thermoluminescent dosemeters. Additionally, ambient dose equivalent was measured at a corridor outside the hospitalization room for patients treated with {sup 137}Cs brachytherapy. Dosemeter calibration was performed at the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Laboratorio de Metrologia, to known {sup 137}Cs gamma radiation air kerma. Radionuclides considered for this study are {sup 131}I, {sup 18}F, {sup 67}Ga, {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 111}In, {sup 201}Tl and {sup 137}Cs, with main gamma energies between 93 and 662 keV. Dosemeters were placed during a five month period in the nuclear medicine rooms (containing gamma-cameras), injection corridor, patient waiting areas, PET/CT study room, hot lab, waste storage room and corridors next to the hospitalization rooms for patients treated with {sup 131}I and {sup 137}Cs. High dose values were found at the waste storage room, outside corridor of {sup 137}Cs brachytherapy patients and PET/CT area. Ambient dose equivalent rate obtained for the {sup 137}Cs brachytherapy corridor is equal to (18.51{+-}0.02)x10{sup -3} mSv/h. Sites with minimum doses are the gamma camera rooms, having ambient dose equivalent rates equal to (0.05{+-}0.03)x10{sup -3} mSv/h. Recommendations have been given to the Department authorities so that further actions are taken to reduce doses at high dose sites in order to comply with the ALARA principle (as low as reasonably achievable).

  4. Sources and levels of ambient ocean sound near the antarctic peninsula

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dziak, Robert P.; Bohnenstiehl, DelWayne R.; Stafford, Kathleen M.; Matsumoto, Haruyoshi; Park, Minkyu; Lee, Won Sang; Fowler, Matt J.; Lau, Tai-Kwan; Haxel, Joseph H.; Mellinger, David K.; et al

    2015-04-14

    Arrays of hydrophones were deployed within the Bransfield Strait and Scotia Sea (Antarctic Peninsula region) from 2005 to 2009 to record ambient ocean sound at frequencies of up to 125 and 500 Hz. Icequakes, which are broadband, short duration signals derived from fracturing of large free-floating icebergs, are a prominent feature of the ocean soundscape. Icequake activity peaks during austral summer and is minimum during winter, likely following freeze-thaw cycles. Iceberg grounding and rapid disintegration also releases significant acoustic energy, equivalent to large-scale geophysical events. Overall ambient sound levels can be as much as ~10–20 dB higher in the open,more »deep ocean of the Scotia Sea compared to the relatively shallow Bransfield Strait. Noise levels become lowest during the austral winter, as sea-ice cover suppresses wind and wave noise. Ambient noise levels are highest during austral spring and summer, as surface noise, ice cracking and biological activity intensifies. Vocalizations of blue (Balaenoptera musculus) and fin (B. physalus) whales also dominate the long-term spectra records in the 15–28 and 89 Hz bands. Blue whale call energy is a maximum during austral summer-fall in the Drake Passage and Bransfield Strait when ambient noise levels are a maximum and sea-ice cover is a minimum. Fin whale vocalizations were also most common during austral summer-early fall months in both the Bransfield Strait and Scotia Sea. The hydrophone data overall do not show sustained anthropogenic sources (ships and airguns), likely due to low coastal traffic and the typically rough weather and sea conditions of the Southern Ocean.« less

  5. Sources and levels of ambient ocean sound near the antarctic peninsula

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dziak, Robert P. [Oregon State Univ./Cooperative Inst. for Marine Resources Studies/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/Pacific Marine Environmental Lab., Newport, OR (United States); Bohnenstiehl, DelWayne R. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Marine, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences.; Stafford, Kathleen M. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Applied Physics Lab.; Matsumoto, Haruyoshi [Oregon State Univ./Cooperative Inst. for Marine Resources Studies/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/Pacific Marine Environmental Lab., Newport, OR (United States); Park, Minkyu [Korea Polar Research Inst., Incheon (Korea, Republic of). Polar Environmental Research Div.; Lee, Won Sang [Korea Polar Research Inst., Incheon (Korea, Republic of). Polar Environmental Research Div.; Fowler, Matt J. [Oregon State Univ./Cooperative Inst. for Marine Resources Studies/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/Pacific Marine Environmental Lab., Newport, OR (United States); Lau, Tai-Kwan [Oregon State Univ./Cooperative Inst. for Marine Resources Studies/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/Pacific Marine Environmental Lab., Newport, OR (United States); Haxel, Joseph H. [Oregon State Univ./Cooperative Inst. for Marine Resources Studies/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/Pacific Marine Environmental Lab., Newport, OR (United States); Mellinger, David K. [Oregon State Univ./Cooperative Inst. for Marine Resources Studies/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/Pacific Marine Environmental Lab., Newport, OR (United States); Fine, Michael L [Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond, VA (United States)

    2015-04-14

    Arrays of hydrophones were deployed within the Bransfield Strait and Scotia Sea (Antarctic Peninsula region) from 2005 to 2009 to record ambient ocean sound at frequencies of up to 125 and 500 Hz. Icequakes, which are broadband, short duration signals derived from fracturing of large free-floating icebergs, are a prominent feature of the ocean soundscape. Icequake activity peaks during austral summer and is minimum during winter, likely following freeze-thaw cycles. Iceberg grounding and rapid disintegration also releases significant acoustic energy, equivalent to large-scale geophysical events. Overall ambient sound levels can be as much as ~10–20 dB higher in the open, deep ocean of the Scotia Sea compared to the relatively shallow Bransfield Strait. Noise levels become lowest during the austral winter, as sea-ice cover suppresses wind and wave noise. Ambient noise levels are highest during austral spring and summer, as surface noise, ice cracking and biological activity intensifies. Vocalizations of blue (Balaenoptera musculus) and fin (B. physalus) whales also dominate the long-term spectra records in the 15–28 and 89 Hz bands. Blue whale call energy is a maximum during austral summer-fall in the Drake Passage and Bransfield Strait when ambient noise levels are a maximum and sea-ice cover is a minimum. Fin whale vocalizations were also most common during austral summer-early fall months in both the Bransfield Strait and Scotia Sea. The hydrophone data overall do not show sustained anthropogenic sources (ships and airguns), likely due to low coastal traffic and the typically rough weather and sea conditions of the Southern Ocean.

  6. EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER QUALITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER QUALITY Leadership Team Subcommittee: Mark Clark Karl Havens BJ Jarvis Kelly Morgan Ramesh Reddy #12;Water Quality ­ Situation (resources) Florida has extensive and diverse water resources 54,836 miles of rivers and streams 1.8 million acres of lakes, reservoirs

  7. Water Heating | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Public Services Homes Water Heating Water Heating Infographic: Water Heaters 101 Infographic: Water Heaters 101 Everything you need to know about saving money on water...

  8. In situ secondary organic aerosol formation from ambient pine forest air using an oxidation flow reactor

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Palm, B. B.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Ortega, A. M.; Day, D. A.; Kaser, L.; Jud, W.; Karl, T.; Hansel, A.; Hunter, J. F.; Cross, E. S.; et al

    2015-11-04

    Ambient air was oxidized by OH radicals in an oxidation flow reactor (OFR) located in a montane pine forest during the BEACHON-RoMBAS campaign to study biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation and aging. High OH concentrations and short residence times allowed for semi-continuous cycling through a large range of OH exposures ranging from hours to weeks of equivalent (eq.) atmospheric aging. A simple model is derived and used to account for the relative time scales of condensation of low volatility organic compounds (LVOCs) onto particles, condensational loss to the walls, and further reaction to produce volatile, non-condensing fragmentation products. Moremore »SOA production was observed in the OFR at nighttime (average 4 ?g m-3 when LVOC fate corrected) compared to daytime (average 1 ?g m-3 when LVOC fate corrected), with maximum formation observed at 0.4–1.5 eq. days of photochemical aging. SOA formation followed a similar diurnal pattern to monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and toluene + p-cymene concentrations, including a substantial increase just after sunrise at 07:00 LT. Higher photochemical aging (> 10 eq. days) led to a decrease in new SOA formation and a loss of preexisting OA due to heterogeneous oxidation followed by fragmentation and volatilization. When comparing two different commonly used methods of OH production in OFRs (OFR185 and OFR254), similar amounts of SOA formation were observed. We recommend the OFR185 mode for future forest studies. Concurrent gas-phase measurements of air after OH oxidation illustrate the decay of primary VOCs, production of small oxidized organic compounds, and net production at lower ages followed by net consumption of terpenoid oxidation products as photochemical age increased. New particle formation was observed in the reactor after oxidation, especially during times when precursor gas concentrations and SOA formation were largest. Approximately 6 times more SOA was formed in the reactor from OH oxidation than could be explained by the VOCs measured in ambient air. Several recently-developed instruments quantified ambient semi- and intermediate-volatility organic compounds (S/IVOCs) that were not detected by a PTR-TOF-MS. An SOA yield of 24–80 % from those compounds can explain the observed SOA, suggesting that these typically unmeasured S/IVOCs play a substantial role in ambient SOA formation. Our results allow ruling out condensation sticking coefficients much lower than 1. Our measurements help clarify the magnitude of SOA formation in forested environments, and demonstrate methods for interpretation of ambient OFR measurements.« less

  9. Ambient Measurements of the NOx Reservoir Species N2O5 using Cavity Ring-down Spectroscopy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geidosch, Justine Nicole

    2012-10-19

    to the occurrence of asthma. Ozone is formed through reactions of oxidized volatile organic compounds with nitrogen oxides, and the accurate modeling of the process is necessary for smart and effective regulations. Ambient measurements are important to understanding...

  10. PIANO DI RIQUALIFICAZIONE AMBIENTALE E PAESAGGISTICA DEL TERMOVALORIZZATORE DI DESIO TERMOVALORIZZATORE DI DESIO (MI) BRIANZA ENERGIA E AMBIENTE SPA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    TERMOVALORIZZATORE DI DESIO (MI) ­ BRIANZA ENERGIA E AMBIENTE SPA Impianto di costruito negli anni '70 per lo. · Energia elettrica prodotta: 13.000.000 KWh/anno. LAND S.r.l. Landscape Architecture Nature Development

  11. The application of size- resolved hygroscopicity measurements to understand the physical and chemical properties of ambient aerosol 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santarpia, Joshua Lee

    2005-08-29

    -1 THE APPLICATION OF SIZE-RESOLVED HYGROSCOPICITY MEASUREMENTS TO UNDERSTANDING THE PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF AMBIENT AEROSOL A Dissertation by JOSHUA L. SANTARPIA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... OF AMBIENT AEROSOL A Dissertation by JOSHUA L. SANTARPIA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved as to style and content...

  12. Water Basins Civil Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    Water Basins Civil Engineering Objective · Connect the study of water, water cycle, and ecosystems with engineering · Discuss how human impacts can effect our water basins, and how engineers lessen these impacts: · The basic concepts of water basins are why they are important · To use a topographic map · To delineate

  13. Grains, Water Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Grains, Water & Wet Sand Onno Bokhove Introduction Dry Granular Chute Flows: Cantilever Water Waves: Bores Near the Shore Surf Induced Sand Dynamics Discussion Dry Granular Flows, Water Waves & Surf, Water & Wet Sand Onno Bokhove Introduction Dry Granular Chute Flows: Cantilever Water Waves: Bores Near

  14. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 9: Water in Agriculture () January 13, 2010 1 / 14 #12;Water in Agriculture Historically: Biggest consumer of water, in developed kilos of sugar. Though the source of water in all the three cases is usually different. Agriculture

  15. REMOVAL OF ORGANIC POLLUTANTS FROM SUBCRITICAL WATER WITH ACTIVATED CARBON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven B. Hawthorne; Arnaud J. Lagadec

    1999-08-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has demonstrated that controlling the temperature (and to a lesser extent, the pressure) of water can dramatically change its ability to extract organics and inorganics from matrices ranging from soils and sediments to waste sludges and coal. The dielectric constant of water can be changed from about 80 (a very polar solvent) to <5 (similar to a nonpolar organic solvent) by controlling the temperature (from ambient to about 400 C) and pressure (from about 5 to 350 bar). The EERC has shown that hazardous organic pollutants such as pesticides, PACS (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), and PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) can be completely removed from soils, sludges, and sediments at temperatures (250 C) and pressures (<50 atm) that are much milder than typically used for supercritical water processes (temperature >374 C, pressure >221 atm). In addition, the process has been demonstrated to be particularly effective for samples containing very high levels of contaminants (e.g., part per thousand). Current projects include demonstrating the subcritical water remediation process at the pilot scale using an 8-liter system constructed under separate funding during 1997. To date, subcritical water has been shown to be an effective extraction fluid for removing a variety of organic pollutants from soils and sludges contaminated with fossil fuel products and waste products, including PACS from soil (e.g., town gas sites), refining catalysts, and petroleum tank bottom sludges; PCBs from soil and sediments; toxic gasoline components (e.g., benzene) from soil and waste sludge; and phenols from petroleum refinery sludges. The obvious need to clean the wastewater from subcritical water processes led to preliminary experiments with activated carbon placed in line after the extractor. Initial experiments were performed before and after cooling the extractant water (e.g., with water at 200 C and with water cooled to 25 C). Surprisingly, the ability of activated carbon to remove organics from the water is better at a high temperature than at room temperature. These initial results are opposite to those expected from chromatographic theory, since the solubility of the organics is about 100,000-fold higher in the hot water than in ambient water. At present, the physicochemical mechanism accounting for these results is unknown; however, it is possible that the lower surface tension and lower viscosity of subcritical water (compared to water at ambient conditions) greatly increases the available area of the carbon by several orders of magnitude. Regardless of the mechanism involved, the optimal use of activated carbon to clean the wastewater generated from subcritical water remediation will depend on obtaining a better understanding of the controlling parameters. While these investigations focused on the cleanup of wastewater generated from subcritical water remediation, the results also apply to cleanup of any wastewater contaminated with nonpolar and moderately polar organics such as wastewaters from coal and petroleum processing.

  16. Hydraulic Transport Across Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Nanopores: Flow Experiments with Water and n-Hexane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruener, Simon; Greulich, Stefanie; Busch, Mark; Huber, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally explore pressure-driven flow of water and n-hexane across nanoporous silica (Vycor glass monoliths with 7 or 10 nm pore diameters, respectively) as a function of temperature and surface functionalization (native and silanized glass surfaces). Hydraulic flow rates are measured by applying hydrostatic pressures via inert gases (argon and helium, pressurized up to 70 bar) on the upstream side in a capacitor-based membrane permeability setup. For the native, hydrophilic silica walls, the measured hydraulic permeabilities can be quantitatively accounted for by bulk fluidity provided we assume a sticking boundary layer, i.e. a negative velocity slip length of molecular dimensions. The thickness of this boundary layer is discussed with regard to previous capillarity-driven flow experiments (spontaneous imbibition) and with regard to velocity slippage at the pore walls resulting from dissolved gas. Water flow across the silanized, hydrophobic nanopores is blocked up to a hydrostatic pressure of at l...

  17. Household Water Quality Home Water Quality Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Household Water Quality Home Water Quality Problems­ Causes and Treatments Blake Ross, Extension impurities can be corrected if they are a nuisance. Before beginning any treatment plan, have water tested select the most effective and economical treatment method. www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications

  18. Patterned graphene functionalization via mask-free scanning of micro-plasma jet under ambient condition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Dong; Yu, Yao Liu, Lin; Wu, Shu-Qun; Lu, Xin-Pei; Wu, Yue

    2014-03-10

    In this work, a mask-free method is introduced for patterned nitrogen doping of graphene using a micro-plasma jet under ambient condition. Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra indicate that nitrogen atoms are incorporated into the graphene lattice with the two-dimensional spatial distribution precisely controlled in the range of mm down to 10??m. Since the chemistry of the micro-plasma jet can be controlled by the choice of the gas mixture, this direct writing process with micro-plasma jet can be a versatile approach for patterned functionalization of graphene with high spatial resolution. This could have promising applications in graphene-based electronics.

  19. Thermoelectric power source utilizing ambient energy harvesting for remote sensing and transmitting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeSteese, John G

    2010-11-16

    A method and apparatus for providing electrical energy to an electrical device wherein the electrical energy is originally generated from temperature differences in an environment having a first and a second temperature region. A thermoelectric device having a first side and a second side wherein the first side is in communication with a means for transmitting ambient thermal energy collected or rejected in the first temperature region and the second side is in communication with the second temperature region thereby producing a temperature gradient across the thermoelectric device and in turn generating an electrical current.

  20. Characteristics of streamer discharge development between the dielectric-coated sphere-plane electrodes in water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu Taiyun; Yang Lanjun; Jia Zhijie; Zhang Qiaogen [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, 28 West Xianning Road, Xi'an 710049 (China)

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents the characteristics of the streamer discharge development between the dielectric-coated sphere-plane electrodes in water. In order to study the streamer propagation mechanism, the factors such as polarities, water conductivity, and ambient pressure were taken into consideration. Experimental results demonstrate that the water conductivity and amplitude of applied voltage both have a great influence on mean velocity and brightness of the streamer. When the ambient pressure decreases from 0.1 to 0.0065 MPa, the pressure has little influence on the mean velocities of the streamer in both distilled and tap water for fast streamer. The existence of dielectric coating causes a lower initiation voltage of the streamer for negative polarity than that for positive one. Also, the 10% breakdown voltage (U{sub 10%}) is decreased by 20% under the pressure of 0.0065 MPa than that under the pressure of 0.1 MPa in distilled water, while the U{sub 10%} is almost the same under different pressures in tap water. Based on the analysis of the discharge images and current waveforms as well as the above experimental results, it can be concluded that the streamer propagation is composed of the generation of the microbubbles and the discharge in the bubbles. For subsonic streamer, the generation of the bubbles is more likely a thermal process, whereas for supersonic streamer, the ionization and dissociation of water molecules in high electric field are involved in the bubble generation process.

  1. Review: Globalization of Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennant, Matthew Aaron

    2009-01-01

    Review: Globalization of Water: Sharing the Planet’sAshok K. Globalization of Water: Sharing the Planet’s140) liters of virtual water (p. 15). This is one of the

  2. RETORT WATER PARTICULATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    layer of retort water from the filter surface, (3) crystaldeep layer of retort water from the filter surface, from C02distilled water before placing the filter RETORT OPERATING

  3. Lawn Water Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAfee, James

    2006-06-26

    Water is a limited resource in Texas. This booklet explains how homeowners can establish a water management program for a home lawn that both maintains a healthy sod and also conserves water. The publication discusses soil types, grass varieties...

  4. Saving Water Saves Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Biermayer, Peter

    2006-01-01

    H. , Groves D. California Water 2030: An Efficient Future,Preemption of California’s Water Conservation Standards for2Epdf Biermayer P. Potential Water and Energy Savings from

  5. Landscape Plants: Fertilizing & Watering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    Landscape Plants: Fertilizing & Watering Landscape Plants: Fertilizing & Watering Prevent runoff and shrubs, either through directly killing plants or making them more prone to disease. Fertilizer runoff into storm drains pollutes waterways. Maintain plant health and protect water quality by fertilizing

  6. Water Conservation Tips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Martha

    2008-01-01

    Gardener Water Conservation Tips fo r t h e UCSC Farm &aware of the need to use water responsibly, whether or notcut landscape and garden water needs. Here we share some of

  7. Water and Energy Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.

    2013-01-01

    2009. Thirsty Energy: Water and Energy in the 21st Century.Summary Points 1. Water and energy are strongly dependent onof bioenergy increases water and energy interdependence. 3.

  8. Water holding capacities of fly ashes: Effect of size fractionation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkar, A.; Rano, R.

    2007-07-01

    Water holding capacities of fly ashes from different thermal power plants in Eastern India have been compared. Moreover, the effect of size fractionation (sieving) on the water holding capacities has also been determined. The desorption rate of water held by the fly ash fractions at ambient temperature (25-30{sup o}C) has been investigated. The effect of mixing various size fractions of fly ash in increasing the water holding capacities of fly ash has been studied. It is observed that the fly ash obtained from a thermal power plant working on stoker-fired combustor has the highest water holding capacity, followed by the one that works on pulverized fuel combustor. Fly ash collected from super thermal power plant has the least water holding capacity (40.7%). The coarser size fractions of fly ashes in general have higher water holding capacities than the finer ones. An attempt has been made to correlate the results obtained, with the potential use in agriculture.

  9. Carbon and Water Resource Management for Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendrickson, Thomas Peter

    2013-01-01

    4 April, 2013. (4) 2010 Water Use Survey Summary Estimates –State Totals; Texas Water Development Board: Austin, TX,indicators for urban water systems. Urban Water. 2004, 4,

  10. Water Efficiency Goal Guidance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) issued water efficiency goal guidance in Federal Agency Implementation of Water Efficiency and Management Provisions of Executive Order 13514. This...

  11. Drinking Water Problems: Copper 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2006-01-25

    High levels of copper in drinking water can cause health problems. This publication explains the effects of copper in water and methods of removing it. 4 pp....

  12. Irrigation Water Quality Salinity Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and industrial waste water can impact water quality. In most irrigation situations, the primary water qual- ity

  13. Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Climate, ambient air quality, and noise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lombardi, D.A.; Blasing, T.J.; Easterly, C.E.; Reed, R.M.; Hamilton, C.B.

    1995-03-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive background scientific data and related information on climate, ambient air quality, and ambient noise levels collected during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The US Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice withdrawing its Notice of Intent to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The report presents a general description of the climate add air quality for the islands of Hawaii (henceforth referred to as Hawaii), Maui and Oahu. It also presents a literature review as baseline information on the health effects of sulfide. The scientific background data and related information is being made available for use by others in conducting future scientific research in these areas. This report describes the environmental resources present in the areas studied (i.e., the affected environment) and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts.

  14. Environmental Resources of Selected Areas of Hawaii: Climate, Ambient Air Quality, and Noise (DRAFT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lombardi, D.A.; Blasing, T.J.; Easterly, C.E.; Hamilton, C.B.

    1994-06-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive background scientific data and related information on climate, ambient air quality, and ambient noise levels collected during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The US Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice in the Federal Register on May 17, 1994 withdrawing its Notice of Intent of February 14, 1992, to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The report presents a general description of the climate and air quality for the islands of Hawaii (henceforth referred to as Hawaii), Maui, and Oahu. It also presents a literature review as baseline information on the health effects of hydrogen sulfide. the scientific background data and related information is being made available for use by others in conducting future scientific research in these areas. This report describes the environmental resources present in the areas studied (i.e., the affected environment) and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts.

  15. Influence of the ambient solar wind flow on the propagation behavior of interplanetary CMEs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Temmer, Manuela; Möstl, Christian; Veronig, Astrid M; Vrsnak, Bojan; Odstrcil, Dusan

    2011-01-01

    We study three CME/ICME events (2008 June 1-6, 2009 February 13-18, 2010 April 3-5) tracked from Sun to 1 AU in remote-sensing observations of STEREO Heliospheric Imagers and in situ plasma and magnetic field measurements. We focus on the ICME propagation in IP space that is governed by two forces, the propelling Lorentz force and the drag force. We address the question at which heliospheric distance range the drag becomes dominant and the CME gets adjusted to the solar wind flow. To this aim we analyze speed differences between ICMEs and the ambient solar wind flow as function of distance. The evolution of the ambient solar wind flow is derived from ENLIL 3D MHD model runs using different solar wind models, namely Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) and MHD-Around-A-Sphere (MAS). Comparing the measured CME kinematics with the solar wind models we find that the CME speed gets adjusted to the solar wind speed at very different heliospheric distances in the three events under study: from below 30 Rs, to beyond 1 AU, depend...

  16. A spacecraft's own ambient environment: The role of simulation-based research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ketsdever, Andrew D.; Gimelshein, Sergey

    2014-12-09

    Spacecraft contamination has long been a subject of study in the rarefied gas dynamics community. Professor Mikhail Ivanov coined the term a spacecraft's 'own ambient environment' to describe the effects of natural and satellite driven processes on the conditions encountered by a spacecraft in orbit. Outgassing, thruster firings, and gas and liquid dumps all contribute to the spacecraft's contamination environment. Rarefied gas dynamic modeling techniques, such as Direct Simulation Monte Carlo, are well suited to investigate these spacebased environments. However, many advances were necessary to fully characterize the extent of this problem. A better understanding of modeling flows over large pressure ranges, for example hybrid continuum and rarefied numerical schemes, were required. Two-phase flow modeling under rarefied conditions was necessary. And the ability to model plasma flows for a new era of propulsion systems was also required. Through the work of Professor Ivanov and his team, we now have a better understanding of processes that create a spacecraft's own ambient environment and are able to better characterize these environments. Advances in numerical simulation have also spurred on the development of experimental facilities to study these effects. The relationship between numerical results and experimental advances will be explored in this manuscript.

  17. On-road evaluation of advanced hybrid electric vehicles over a wide range of ambient temperatures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, R.; Duoba, M. J.; Bocci, D.; Lohse-Busch, H.

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEV's) have become a production viable and effective mode of efficient transportation. HEV's can provide increased fuel economy over convention technology vehicle, but these advantages can be affected dramatically by wide variations in operating temperatures. The majority of data measured for benchmarking HEV technologies is generated from ambient test cell temperatures at 22 C. To investigate cold and hot temperature affects on HEV operation and efficiency, an on-road evaluation protocol is defined and conducted over a six month study at widely varying temperatures. Two test vehicles, the 2007 Toyota Camry HEV and 2005 Ford Escape HEV, were driven on a pre-defined urban driving route in ambient temperatures ranging from -14 C to 31 C. Results from the on-road evaluation were also compared and correlated to dynamometer testing of the same drive cycle. Results from this on-road evaluation show the battery power control limits and engine operation dramatically change with temperature. These changes decrease fuel economy by more than two times at -14 C as compared to 25 C. The two vehicles control battery temperature in different manners. The Escape HEV uses the air conditioning system to provide cool air to the batteries at high temperatures and is therefore able to maintain battery temperature to less than 33 C. The Camry HEV uses cabin air to cool the batteries. The observed maximum battery temperature was 44 C.

  18. CO{sub 2} Capture by Sub-ambient Membrane Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulkarni, S.; Hasse, D.; Sanders, E.; Chaubey, T.

    2012-11-30

    The main objective of the project was to develop a CO{sub 2} capture process based on sub-ambient temperature operation of a hollow fiber membrane. The program aims to reach the eventual DOE program goal of > 90% CO{sub 2} capture from existing PC fired power plants with < 35% increase in the cost of electricity. The project involves closed-loop testing of commercial fiber bundles under simulated process conditions to test the mechanical integrity and operability of membrane module structural component under sub ambient temperature. A commercial MEDAL 12” bundle exhibited excellent mechanical integrity for 2 months. However, selectivity was ~25% lower than expected at sub-ambient conditions. This could be attributed to a small feed to permeate leak or bundle non-ideality. To investigate further, and due to compressor flow limitations, the 12” bundle was replaced with a 6” bundle to conduct tests with lower permeate/feed ratios, as originally planned. The commercial 6” bundle was used for both parametric testing as well as long-term stability testing at sub-ambient conditions. Parametric studies were carried out both near the start and end of the long-term test. The parametric studies characterized membrane performance over a broad range of feed conditions: temperature (-25°C to -45°C), pressure (160 psig to 200 psig), and CO{sub 2} feed concentration (18% to 12%). Performance of the membrane bundle was markedly better at lower temperature (-45ºC), higher pressure (200 psig) and higher CO{sub 2} feed concentration (18%). The long-term test was conducted at these experimentally determined “optimum” feed conditions. Membrane performance was stable over 8 months at sub-ambient temperature operation. The experimentally measured high performance of the membrane bundle at sub-ambient operating conditions provides justification for interest in sub-ambient membrane processing of flue gas. In a parallel activity, the impact of contaminants (100 ppm SOx and NOx) on membrane performance was tested in the laboratory with membrane minipermeators. NO permeance is intermediate between CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}; while both SO{sub 2} and NO{sub 2} are more permeable than CO{sub 2} at cold condition. This implies that SO{sub 2} and NO{sub 2} will be efficiently removed with CO{sub 2} into the membrane permeate in the proposed cold membrane process. Calculations were performed by Air Liquide Engineering (ALE) to estimate capture costs based on the proposed sub-ambient temperature membrane process for 90% CO{sub 2} capture from an air- fired coal power plant delivering 550 MW net electricity. Membrane performance in the process simulation was defined by the final parametric test results. This analysis involved refining the process simulation model, obtaining relevant capital cost estimates and using these to estimate a 20-year levelized cost of electricity (LCOE). A sensitivity analysis shows CO{sub 2} capture specific energy requirements of 216-242 kwh/T CO{sub 2} captured. The LCOE estimating methodology followed DOE/NETL study 2010/1397. This analysis indicates increases in LCOE between 48% and 53%. For most equipment, the budgetary capital cost estimates are expected to be valid within ± 20%. The most significant capital costs are due to the (i) feed compression and associated gas pretreatment and (ii) membrane system. For both items, there is a realistic chance for cost reductions in the immediate future (0-5 years) as well as long term reductions. The process continues to hold promise with anticipated cost reductions in compression and membrane operations. In particular, membrane costs could be reduced significantly by increased production volume (economy of scale) as well as optimization of bundle size and configuration for this application. PFD definition for a potential field test has been completed through (i) simulation work at DRTC, (ii) discussions with compressor manufacturers and (iii) a field visit to t e NCCC, Wilsonville, AL. The PC4 facility at the NCCC is a suitable site for a 0.1 MW scale test.

  19. Acoustic-wave sensor for ambient monitoring of a photoresist-stripping agent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, K.B.; Hoyt, A.E.; Frye, G.C.

    1998-08-18

    The acoustic-wave sensor is disclosed. The acoustic-wave sensor is designed for ambient or vapor-phase monitoring of a photoresist-stripping agent such as N-methylpyrrolidinone (NMP), ethoxyethylpropionate (EEP) or the like. The acoustic-wave sensor comprises an acoustic-wave device such as a surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) device, a flexural-plate-wave (FPW) device, an acoustic-plate-mode (APM) device, or a thickness-shear-mode (TSM) device (also termed a quartz crystal microbalance or QCM) having a sensing region on a surface thereof. The sensing region includes a sensing film for sorbing a quantity of the photoresist-stripping agent, thereby altering or shifting a frequency of oscillation of an acoustic wave propagating through the sensing region for indicating an ambient concentration of the agent. According to preferred embodiments of the invention, the acoustic-wave device is a SAW device; and the sensing film comprises poly(vinylacetate), poly(N-vinylpyrrolidinone), or poly(vinylphenol). 3 figs.

  20. Acoustic-wave sensor for ambient monitoring of a photoresist-stripping agent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Kent B. (Los Lunas, NM); Hoyt, Andrea E. (Albuquerque, NM); Frye, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM)

    1998-01-01

    The acoustic-wave sensor. The acoustic-wave sensor is designed for ambient or vapor-phase monitoring of a photoresist-stripping agent such as N-methylpyrrolidinone (NMP), ethoxyethylpropionate (EEP) or the like. The acoustic-wave sensor comprises an acoustic-wave device such as a surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) device, a flexural-plate-wave (FPW) device, an acoustic-plate-mode (APM) device, or a thickness-shear-mode (TSM) device (also termed a quartz crystal microbalance or QCM) having a sensing region on a surface thereof. The sensing region includes a sensing film for sorbing a quantity of the photoresist-stripping agent, thereby altering or shifting a frequency of oscillation of an acoustic wave propagating through the sensing region for indicating an ambient concentration of the agent. According to preferred embodiments of the invention, the acoustic-wave device is a SAW device; and the sensing film comprises poly(vinylacetate), poly(N-vinylpyrrolidinone), or poly(vinylphenol).

  1. Survey of ambient electromagnetic and radio-frequency interference levels in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kercel, S.W.; Moore, M.R.; Blakeman, E.D.; Ewing, P.D.; Wood, R.T.

    1996-11-01

    This document reports the results of a survey of ambient electromagnetic conditions in representative nuclear power plants. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research engaged the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to perform these measurements to characterize the electromagnetic interference (EMI) and radio-frequency interference (RFI) levels that can be expected in nuclear power plant environments. This survey is the first of its kind, being based on long-term unattended observations. The data presented in this report were measured at eight different nuclear units and required 14 months to collect. A representative sampling of power plant conditions (reactor type, operating mode, site location) monitored over extended observation periods (up to 5 weeks) were selected to more completely determine the characteristic electromagnetic environment for nuclear power plants. Radiated electric fields were measured over the frequency range of 5 MHz to 8 GHz. Radiated magnetic fields and conducted EMI events were measured over the frequency range of 305 Hz to 5 MHz. Highest strength observations of the electromagnetic ambient environment across all measurement conditions at each site provide frequency-dependent profiles for EMI/RFI levels in nuclear power plants.

  2. Water-heating dehumidifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tomlinson, John J. (Knoxville, TN)

    2006-04-18

    A water-heating dehumidifier includes a refrigerant loop including a compressor, at least one condenser, an expansion device and an evaporator including an evaporator fan. The condenser includes a water inlet and a water outlet for flowing water therethrough or proximate thereto, or is affixed to the tank or immersed into the tank to effect water heating without flowing water. The immersed condenser design includes a self-insulated capillary tube expansion device for simplicity and high efficiency. In a water heating mode air is drawn by the evaporator fan across the evaporator to produce cooled and dehumidified air and heat taken from the air is absorbed by the refrigerant at the evaporator and is pumped to the condenser, where water is heated. When the tank of water heater is full of hot water or a humidistat set point is reached, the water-heating dehumidifier can switch to run as a dehumidifier.

  3. Enhancing Drinking Water Supply by Better Understanding Surface Water Ground Water Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    Enhancing Drinking Water Supply by Better Understanding Surface Water ­ Ground Water Interaction Primary Investigators Thomas Boving Anne Veeger Patricia Logan #12;Enhancing Drinking Water Supply by Better Understanding Surface Water ­ Ground Water Interaction Thomas Boving, Anne Veeger & Patricia Logan

  4. Conjunctive management of groundwater and surface water resources in the San Joaquin Valley of California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    1992-01-01

    The San Joaquin-Tulare Conjunctive Use Model (SANTUCM) was developed to evaluate possible long-term scenarios for long term management of drainage and drainage related problems in the western San Joaquin Valley of California. The unique aspect of the conjunctive use model is its coupling of a surface water delivery operations model with a regional groundwater model. A salinity model has been added to utilize surface water model output and allow assessment of compliance with State Water Resources Control Board water quality objectives for the San Joaquin River. The results of scenario runs, performed to data, using the SANTUCM model show table lowering and consequent drainage reduction can be achieved through a combination of source control, land retirement and regional groundwater pumping. The model also shows that water transfers within the existing distribution system are technically feasible and might allow additional releases to be made from Friant Dam for water quality maintenance in the San Joaquin River. However, upstream of Mendota Pool, considerable stream losses to the aquifer are anticipated, amounting to as much as 70% of in-stream flow.

  5. Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Transcritical shallow-water flow past

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    wave amplitudes for the upstream and downstream undular bores, the speeds of the undular bores edges is with the upstream and downstream waves that may be generated for flow over a one-dimensional localized obstacle lee waves are found downstream, together with transients propagating both upstream and downstream

  6. Swimming Upstream: Tobacco Policy Making in Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tung, Gregory MPH; Glantz, Stanton A. Ph.D.

    2008-01-01

    32 THE MASTER SETTLEMENT AGREEMENT INsigned the Master Settlement Agreement (MSA) with the fivein the Master Settlement Agreement. Also, during this time

  7. Small Buildings Small Portfolio Commercial Upstream Incentive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and operation-to address region-specific challenges, such as regulatory constraints and energy pricing dynamics. By collaborating with regional energy partners and building on...

  8. Upstream -- SW92-03&

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O09 This page intentionally left

  9. Upstream -- SW92-03&

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O09 This page intentionally

  10. Alan Farquharson, SVP Reservoir Engineering Economics! Upstream

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1 Table 1.10 CoolingNotes

  11. DNA waves and water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Montagnier; J. Aissa; E. Del Giudice; C. Lavallee; A. Tedeschi; G. Vitiello

    2010-12-23

    Some bacterial and viral DNA sequences have been found to induce low frequency electromagnetic waves in high aqueous dilutions. This phenomenon appears to be triggered by the ambient electromagnetic background of very low frequency. We discuss this phenomenon in the framework of quantum field theory. A scheme able to account for the observations is proposed. The reported phenomenon could allow to develop highly sensitive detection systems for chronic bacterial and viral infections.

  12. WaterSense Program: Methodology for National Water Savings Analysis Model Indoor Residential Water Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Fixtures Market Overview: Water Savings Potential forNew Jersey. American Water Works Association ResearchResidential End Uses of Water (REUWS). 1999. American Water

  13. Irrigation Water Quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFarland, Mark L.; Lemon, Robert G.; Stichler, Charles

    2002-04-11

    Irrigation water quality is determined by the total amounts of salts and the types of salts the water contains. In this publication you'll learn why well water can be salty, what problems salty water can cause, what tests should be done...

  14. Landscape Design & Water Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    drainage lines to allow water to filter into surrounding soils. Install gravel sumps or other percolationLandscape Design & Water Quality Landscape Design & Water Quality Create a landscape design that reduces pesticide and fertilizer runoff and conserves water. Good plant choices, proper site preparation

  15. Drinking Water Problems: Corrosion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    valves and other water control surfaces, creating leaks inside and outside of valves and faucetsDrinking Water Problems: Corrosion Mark L. McFarland, Tony L. Provin, and Diane E. Boellstorff* Professor and Extension Water Quality Coordinator, Professor and Extension Water Testing Laboratory Director

  16. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 8: Wells () August 28, 2012 project, utilizing enhanced ground-water. Water lifted from storage, to accumulate overnight from aquifer. Water from shallow aquifer, of about 7-8m thickness. accounts for about 30% of irrigation Unique

  17. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 2: Water cycle, stocks and flows () July 28, 2013 1 / 30 #12;The basic movement of water source: USGS. () July 28, 2013 2 / 30 #12, humidity and air flow. Formation of liquid-water in the Atmosphere-Cloud-Formation Coming Down Rain

  18. Water Waves Roger Grimshaw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Waves Roger Grimshaw May 7, 2003 Abstract A short review of the theory of weakly nonlinear water waves, prepared for the forthcoming Encyclopedia of Nonlinear Science 1 Introduction Water waves nonlinear waves. Throughout the theory is based on the traditional assumptions that water is inviscid

  19. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 5: Aquifer () August 16 above and below the ground, which affect the water balance. surface features affect infiltration parameters related to water: Porosity, specific yield n, Sy : the maximum volume fraction of water

  20. Vadose zone water fluxmeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Faybishenko, Boris A.

    2005-10-25

    A Vadose Zone Water Fluxmeter (WFM) or Direct Measurement WFM provides direct measurement of unsaturated water flow in the vadose zone. The fluxmeter is a cylindrical device that fits in a borehole or can be installed near the surface, or in pits, or in pile structures. The fluxmeter is primarily a combination of tensiometers and a porous element or plate in a water cell that is used for water injection or extraction under field conditions. The same water pressure measured outside and inside of the soil sheltered by the lower cylinder of the fluxmeter indicates that the water flux through the lower cylinder is similar to the water flux in the surrounding soil. The fluxmeter provides direct measurement of the water flow rate in the unsaturated soils and then determines the water flux, i.e. the water flow rate per unit area.

  1. SUSTAINABLE URBAN WATER MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Suman

    consumption Vehicle production 0.77 0.59 0.79 0.32 4.35 0.44 12.25 2.45 3.85 0.97 (Source: Harto, C; et al% Mining; 1% Decentralized Water Production (LID) Decentralized Energy Production Urban Farming #12;Water Footprint of Agricultural Products #12;`Water for Energy' and `Energy for Water' in US Water for Energy

  2. Water Management Best Practices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, W.

    2011-01-01

    Municipal Manufacturing Mining Steam Electric Agriculture New Codes & Standards Green Certification& Labeling Programs ? Green Restaurants, Hotels, etc. ? Green Guide for Health Care ? LEED ? GBI ? EPA Water Sense ? EPA Energy Star US Green... of Assistance ? Texas Water Development Board ? www.twdb.state.tx.us ? California Urban Water Conservation Council ? www.cuwcc.org ? Alliance for Water Efficiency www.allianceforwaterefficiency.org ? EPA Water Sense and Energy Star Programs ? www...

  3. Ground water and energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    This national workshop on ground water and energy was conceived by the US Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Assessments. Generally, OEA needed to know what data are available on ground water, what information is still needed, and how DOE can best utilize what has already been learned. The workshop focussed on three areas: (1) ground water supply; (2) conflicts and barriers to ground water use; and (3) alternatives or solutions to the various issues relating to ground water. (ACR)

  4. Innovative Water Reuse 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaber, F. H.

    2011-01-01

    . Introduction 2. Water conservation indoors 1. Retrofit practices 2. Cooling towers 3. Education 3. Water conservation outdoors 1. Landscape practices 2. Irrigation 3. Rainwater harvesting 4.Greywater 4. Stormwater management 1.Rain... ? Plant selection ? Irrigation practices What Can We Do? (cont?d) ? Water Conservation ? New buildings ? Greywater reuse ? Efficient water towers ? A/C Condensate reuse Bathroom ? Faucet Aerators ? Aerators mix air and water together...

  5. COMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR QUARTER 2 SURFACE WATER SPLIT SAMPLES COLLECTED AT THE NUCLEAR FUEL SERVICES SITE, ERWIN, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-01-21

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, collected split surface water samples with Nuclear Fuel Services (NFS) representatives on November 15, 2012. Representatives from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation were also in attendance. Samples were collected at four surface water stations, as required in the approved Request for Technical Assistance number 11-018. These stations included Nolichucky River upstream (NRU), Nolichucky River downstream (NRD), Martin Creek upstream (MCU), and Martin Creek downstream (MCD). Both ORAU and NFS performed gross alpha and gross beta analyses, and the results are compared using the duplicate error ratio (DER), also known as the normalized absolute difference. A DER {<=} 3 indicates that, at a 99% confidence interval, split sample results do not differ significantly when compared to their respective one standard deviation (sigma) uncertainty (ANSI N42.22). The NFS split sample report does not specify the confidence level of reported uncertainties (NFS 2012). Therefore, standard two sigma reporting is assumed and uncertainty values were divided by 1.96. In conclusion, all DER values were less than 3 and results are consistent with low (e.g., background) concentrations.

  6. Effect of metal Additions on the Hydrogen Uptake of Microporous Carbon at Near-Ambient Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Contescu, Cristian I; Gallego, Nidia C; Bhat, Vinay V

    2010-01-01

    Enhancing the hydrogen sorption capacity of microporous carbon materials at near-ambient temperature continue to be a challenge and the subject of intense research. Physisorption alone on microporous carbons is not strong enough to provide the desired levels of hydrogen uptake. Modifying carbons with small amounts of metals has been proven effective to increase the amounts adsorbed. However, very different mechanisms may be involved when the promoters are transition metals or alkali metals. In this presentation we compare the effect of additions of palladium and/or alkali metals on the hydrogen uptake of microporous carbons, in an attempt to differentiate between the possible mechanisms leading to enhanced hydrogen capacity and fast kinetics.

  7. Reactor water cleanup system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, D.M.; Taft, W.E.

    1994-12-20

    A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling. 1 figure.

  8. Reactor water cleanup system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA); Taft, William E. (Los Gatos, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling.

  9. Overheating in Hot Water- and Steam-Heated Multifamily Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dentz, J.; Varshney, K.; Henderson, H.

    2013-10-01

    Apartment temperature data have been collected from the archives of companies that provide energy management systems (EMS) to multifamily buildings in the Northeast U.S. The data have been analyzed from more than 100 apartments in eighteen buildings where EMS systems were already installed to quantify the degree of overheating. This research attempts to answer the question, 'What is the magnitude of apartment overheating in multifamily buildings with central hot water or steam heat?' This report provides valuable information to researchers, utility program managers and building owners interested in controlling heating energy waste and improving resident comfort. Apartment temperature data were analyzed for deviation from a 70 degrees F desired setpoint and for variation by heating system type, apartment floor level and ambient conditions. The data shows that overheating is significant in these multifamily buildings with both hot water and steam heating systems.

  10. Freeing up Water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2006-01-01

    Freeing up Water Story by Kathy Wythe Freeing up Water Brush control efforts yield water tx H2O | pg. 15 For 10 years during the 1990s drought, H. R.Wardlaw, a West Texas rancher, watchedand waited. He watched as the Middle Concho River and Rocky... and Water Conservation Board and designed to increase water yield by removing or controlling water-con- suming plants such as mesquite, cedar and saltcedar. In 2004, just as he finished excavating cedar, aerially spraying mesquite and hand spraying...

  11. Tracing coalbed natural gas-coproduced water using stable isotopes of carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, S.; Frost, C.D. [University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. for Renewable Resources

    2008-03-15

    Recovery of hydrocarbons commonly is associated with coproduction of water. This water may be put to beneficial use or may be reinjected into subsurface aquifers. In either case, it would be helpful to establish a fingerprint for that coproduced water so that it may be tracked following discharge on the surface or reintroduction to geologic reservoirs. This study explores the potential of using {delta}{sup 13}C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of coalbed natural gas (CBNG) - coproduced water as a fingerprint of its origin and to trace its fate once it is disposed on the surface. Our initial results for water samples coproduced with CBNG from the Powder River Basin show that this water has strongly positive {delta}{sup 13}C(DIC) (12 parts per thousand to 22 parts per thousand) that is readily distinguished from the negative {delta}{sup 13}C of most surface and ground water (-8 parts per thousand to -11 parts per thousand). Furthermore, the DIC concentrations in coproduced water samples are also high (more than 100 mg C/L) compared to the 20 to 50 mg C/L in ambient surface and ground water of the region. The distinctively high {delta}{sup 13}C and DIC concentrations allow us to identify surface and ground water that have incorporated CBNG-coproduced water. Accordingly, we suggest that the {delta}{sup 13}C(DIC) and DIC concentrations of water can be used for long-term monitoring of infiltration of CBNG-coproduced water into ground water and streams. Our results also show that the {delta} {sup 13}C (DIC) of CBNG-coproduced water from two different coal zones are distinct leading to the possibility of using {delta}{sup 13}C(DIC) to distinguish water produced from different coal zones.

  12. Water produced at the University of Iowa Water treatment plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neiman, Maurine

    Water produced at the University of Iowa Water treatment plant meets or surpasses all federal and state drinking-water standards at this time. For information about the University of Iowa water supply, call us at 319-335-5168 Water Source The University of Iowa Water Plants' primary source of water

  13. Water Scarcity and Energy: Water and Power Efficiency of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Christopher

    ) #12;Water Scarcity = Power Scarcity Lower water availability Lower hydro power availabilityWater Scarcity and Energy: Water and Power Efficiency of Recycled Water Arizona Hydrological and Population Growth · Types of Reuse · Water Efficiency of Reuse · Power Efficiency of Reuse #12;Water Scarcity

  14. Walking on water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bush, John W. M.

    The ingenious methods employed by insects and spiders to move across a water surface rely on microphysics that is of little use to larger water walkers but of considerable interest to the microfluidics community.

  15. Federal Water Use Indices

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides water use indices as a guide for Federal agencies. Note that each is a rough estimate of water usage at different types of sites. Your site may vary considerably.

  16. Water Tower - 14 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    Previous studies using tertiary amines to extract water from reagent-grade carboxylate salts (calcium acetate, propionate, and butyrate) have shown selectivity for water and not for the carboxylate salts. These results ...

  17. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Building Numerical Models () August of surface flow of water and infiltration which may include time to flow, movement of solids etc. () August

  18. A gathering of water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horowitz, Naomi Leah, 1970-

    2005-01-01

    The act of immersion is a powerful catalyst for the affirmation or transformation of identity. How we place ourselves in water expresses cultural valuations of our bodies, water, and social relations, as well as categories ...

  19. Water Conservation Tips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Martha

    2008-01-01

    Water Needs breath. Adding compost to sandy soils helps thesoil retain water longer—the compost acts like a sponge,from applications of compost and other organic matter. For

  20. Water & Energy Conservation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    Poornima Group of Colleges, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India #12;Executive Summary This document for Poornima Group's conservation efforts over the next eight years. PGC currently maintains an unsustainable method of water use Environmental Crisis Poornima Group of Colleges Water

  1. What's In My Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provin, Tony; Pitt, John L.

    2003-04-21

    You can learn about the quality of your water by sending a sample to a laboratory for analysis. This publication will help you understand the lab report by explaining the properties, components and contaminants often found in water. It describes...

  2. Drinking Water Problems: Benzene 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2009-04-16

    , chlorine, radon and some metals. A typical water softener will not remove benzene from water. Home granular activated carbon systems are usu- ally simple. The activated charcoal is packaged in filter cartridges that are inserted into a purification...

  3. Drinking Water Problems: MTBE 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-08-28

    organic compounds, pesticides and benzene, and can also re- move some metals, chlorine and radon. A typical water softener will not remove MTBE from water. Home granular activated carbon filtering systems are usually simple. The activated charcoal...

  4. Drinking Water Problems: Arsenic 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Dozier, Monty

    2005-12-02

    High levels of arsenic in drinking water can poison and even kill people. This publication explains the symptoms of arsenic poisoning and common treatment methods for removing arsenic from your water supply....

  5. Indian Water 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Indian Water is a call to help plan a national water summit. This strategic session consist of a facilitated dialog with tribal leaders on important opportunities, challenges and tactics, which...

  6. Design of a new reactor-like high temperature near ambient pressure scanning tunneling microscope for catalysis studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tao, Franklin Feng; Nguyen, Luan; Zhang, Shiran

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present the design of a new reactor-like high-temperature near ambient pressure scanning tunneling microscope (HT-NAP-STM) for catalysis studies. This HT-NAP-STM was designed for exploration of structures of catalyst surfaces at atomic...

  7. Comparison of Ambient Radon Concentrations in Air in the Northern Mojave Desert from Continuous and Integrating Instruments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David S. Shafer; David McGraw; Lynn H. Karr; Greg McCurdy; Tammy L. Kluesner; Karen J. Gray; Jeffrey Tappen

    2010-05-18

    As part of a program to characterize and baseline environmental parameters, ambient radon-222 (Rn) monitoring was conducted in the rural community of Amargosa Valley, NV, the closest community to Yucca Mountain. Passive integrating and continuous Rn monitoring instruments were deployed adjacent to the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) station in Amargosa Valley. The CEMP station provided real-time ambient gamma exposure and meteorological data used to correct the integrated Rn measurements, verified the meteorological data collected by the continuous Rn monitoring instrument, and for provided instrumentation for evaluating the relationships between meteorological conditions and Rn concentrations. Hourly Rn concentrations in air measured by the continuous Rn monitoring instrument (AlphaGUARD®) were compared to the average hourly values for the integrating Rn measurements (E-PERM®) by dividing the total Rn measurements by the number of hours the instruments were deployed. The results of the comparison indicated that average hourly ambient Rn concentrations as measured by both methods ranged from 0.2 to 0.4 pico-curies per liter of air. Ambient Rn values for the AlphaGUARD exhibited diurnal variations. When Rn concentrations were compared with measurements of temperature (T), barometric pressure, and relative humidity, the correlation (inversely) was highest with T, albeit weakly.

  8. Long-Term Trends in California Mobile Source Emissions and Ambient Concentrations of Black Carbon and Organic Aerosol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Allen

    mobile source emissions of BC and OA (primary + secondary). Over time, as on-road engine emissions haveLong-Term Trends in California Mobile Source Emissions and Ambient Concentrations of Black Carbon, Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720-1710, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: A fuel

  9. O COMPOST... Oficina de Medioambiente (OMA-UDC). Vicerreitorado de Infraestruturas e Xestin Ambiental. Universidade da Corua

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraguela, Basilio B.

    O COMPOST... Oficina de Medioambiente (OMA-UDC). Vicerreitorado de Infraestruturas e Xestión Ambiental. Universidade da Coruña O COMPOST, A COMPOSTAXE E OS SOLOS Contidos: O COMPOST A MATERIA ORGÁNICA O COMPOSTEIRO A COMPOSTAXE BENEFICIOS DO COMPOST GUÍA DA COMPOSTAXE DOMÉSTICA O COMPOST A palabra

  10. Study of the Effects of Ambient Conditions Upon the Performance of Fan Powered, Infrared Natural Gas Burners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark Atlanta University

    2002-12-02

    The objective of this investigation was to characterize the operation of a fan-powered, infrared burner (IR burner) at various gas compositions and ambient conditions, develop numerical model to simulate the burner performances, and provide design guidelines for appliances containing PIR burners for satisfactory performance.

  11. Speciation of ambient fine organic carbon particles and source apportionment of PM2.5 in Indian cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Mei

    2007; published 7 August 2007. [1] Fine particle organic carbon in Delhi, Mumbai, Kolkata­36% in Mumbai, 37­57% in Kolkata, and 28% in Chandigarh. These figures can be compared to the biomass combustion contributions to ambient PM2.5 of 7­20% for Delhi, 7­20% for Mumbai, 13­18% for Kolkata, and 8% for Chandigarh

  12. Measurement of ozone in ambient air with microsensors : on-site campaign Isabelle ZDANEVITCH*. Nicolas MOSER**, Caroline CHARPENTIER*, Alexis MOQUET*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Measurement of ozone in ambient air with microsensors : on-site campaign Isabelle ZDANEVITCH, Switzerland E-mail : Isabelle.Zdanevitch(a),iner is.fr (corresponding author) ABSTRACT Ozone is actually one by continuous monitors but a better information on ozone levels would be given by a denser monitoring network

  13. Abstract--Although microsystems can replenish batteries and energize modules with ambient energy without having to store

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rincon-Mora, Gabriel A.

    1 Abstract-- Although microsystems can replenish batteries and energize modules with ambient energy, photovoltaic, dc- sourced, low-voltage starter, switched-inductor dc­dc converter. I. ENERGIZING WIRELESS, the starter energizes and drains an inductor LX in alternating cycles from the input vH into CST. When CST

  14. Supplementary Figures Figure S1. Ambient seismic noise levels in dB relative to velocity power at two stations,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Jennifer M.

    Supplementary Figures Figure S1. Ambient seismic noise levels in dB relative to velocity power at two stations, HFN3 and BFN1, (Figure 1B). Both stations have three components (East, North, Vertical; or ENZ) but different types of instruments (EP, HH). The drop in power at frequencies less than 2 Hz

  15. O Uso de uma Arquitetura Baseada em Componentes para Incrementar um Servio do Ambiente AulaNet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbosa, Alberto

    O Uso de uma Arquitetura Baseada em Componentes para Incrementar um Serviço do Ambiente Aula de ensino-aprendizagem AulaNet. Palavras-chave: Componentes de colaboração, arquitetura componentizada, aprendizagem colaborativa. 1. Introdução Um groupware envolve aspectos multidisciplinares em sua

  16. Fracture and Fatigue Behavior at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures of Alumina Bonded with Copper/Niobium/Copper Interlayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    Fracture and Fatigue Behavior at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures of Alumina Bonded with Copper and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 Interfacial fracture toughness and cyclic temperatures, and assessed in terms of interfacial chemistry and microstructure. The mean interfacial fracture

  17. Filippo, D., Raposo, A., Endler, M. & Fuks, H. Ambientes Colaborativos de Realidade Virtual e Aumentada. in: Realidade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbosa, Alberto

    as particularidades das tecnologias de RV e RA quando aplicados a diferentes cenários de colaboração. No campo das pessoas com o apoio de computadores. Groupware (sistema ou ambiente colaborativo) é a tecnologia baseada Aplicações 171 lado, apresentar o que as tecnologias de RV e RA podem agregar aos sistemas colaborativos de

  18. Water and Energy Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Hydroelectricity for agriculture and hydroelectricity. Large volumes of waterElectricity Production Hydroelectricity The most common type

  19. Water in the West

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fahlund, Andrew; Choy, Min L. Janny; Szeptycki, Leon

    2014-01-01

    hydraulic fracturing (or fracking) fluids, and limited waterEngelder, “Natural gas: Should fracking stop? ” Nature 477 (

  20. Technology in water conservation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finch, Dr. Calvin

    2013-01-01

    ?? percent to ?? percent. Water reuse systems treat wastewater by various technologies including ?ltering, bioremediation and ozone exposure. ?ese technologies can involve billions of gallons of wastewater ? such as in a municipal recycling e... Column by Dr. Calvin Finch, Water Conservation and Technology Center director WAT E R CONSERVATION & TECHNOLOGY CENTER Securing Our Water Future It is not unusual for individuals to describe water conservation as a behavioral exercise and urge...

  1. Water and Energy Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.

    2013-01-01

    into a water source—thermal pollution—has also led to theimpacts from this thermal pollution, including the

  2. Plugging Abandoned Water Wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2002-02-28

    is abandoned without proper plugging, upward flow of salty water from the deeper aquifer may cause contamination of the shallow, fresh water aquifer. Also, any pollu- tants that occur in one zone can migrate to another zone through a well. Unplugged abandoned... wells may deplete pres- sure within an aquifer. Pressure in artesian aquifers decreases as water discharges at land surface or to less pressurized aquifers. Eventually a drop in pres- sure causes flowing wells to stop flowing and the water level...

  3. Water Transport Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory Studies Water Transport Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory Studies Part of a 100 million fuel cell award announced by DOE...

  4. Integrated regional water management: Collaboration or water politics as usual?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lubell, Mark N.; Lippert, Lucas

    2010-01-01

    patterns, and implications." Water Policy 2 (3):175-99.A. K. 2004. "Integrated water resources management: areassessment." Water International 29 (2):248-56. Blomquist,

  5. Review: Water, Peace, and War: Confronting the Global Water Crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tans, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Review: Water, War, and Peace:Confronting the Global Water Crisis By Brahma ChellaneyUSA Chellaney, Brahma. Water, Peace, and War: Confronting

  6. STORM WATER Residential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    STORM WATER QUALITY HOTLINE UCSC Residential Car Washing http THAT MAY CAUSE ENVIRONMENTAL HARM TO THE STORM WATER QUALITY HOTLINE: (831) 459-2553. LIKE US ON FACEBOOK AT UCSC STORM WATER MANAGEMENT PROGRAM! DID YOU KNOW? PRACTICAL SOLUTIONS > USE A COMMERCIAL CAR WASH

  7. Water treatment method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, F.S.; Silver, G.L.

    1991-04-30

    A method is described for reducing the concentration of any undesirable metals dissolved in contaminated water, such as waste water. The method involves uniformly reacting the contaminated water with an excess amount of solid particulate calcium sulfite to insolubilize the undesirable metal ions, followed by removal thereof and of the unreacted calcium sulfite.

  8. California's Water Energy Relationship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION California's Water ­ Energy Relationship Prepared in Support The California's Water-Energy Relationship report is the product of contributions by many California Energy, Lorraine White and Zhiqin Zhang. Staff would also like to thank the members of the Water-Energy Working

  9. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 6: Mathematics, z). velocity vx (x, y, z, t) : in the x-direction. vx = Kx h/x saturated/water- table. Continuity Equation What is vx x + vy y + vz z ? It is the rate of accumulation of water at the point (x, y

  10. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 1: A Perspective () July 20, 2012 1 / 17 #12;Outline Two parts: The technical side to water. -M. Sohoni The basic hydrological cycle. The societal side to water. -N. C. Narayanan () July 20, 2012 2 / 17 #12;Texts Applied Hydrogeology, by C. W

  11. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 4: Groundwater () December in dried sample. Saturation: When these voids are fully filled with water. Specific Yield Sy : the ration of the colume of water that drains from a rock owing to gravity, to the total rock volumne. 00000000

  12. WATER ADVISORY PARTNERSHIP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    COCONINO PLATEAU WATER ADVISORY COUNCIL& WATERSHED PARTNERSHIP 3624 E. Mesquite St. Gilbe~t, Arizona 85296" 1832 Participants: Arizona Department of Environmental Quality Arizona Department of Water City ofFlagstaff City of Page City of Sedona City of Williams Coconino County Doney Park Water Company

  13. Water Resources Research Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District of Columbia, University of the

    Water Resources Research Center WASHINGTON, DISTRICT Of COLUMBIA #12;ASSESSMENT OF THE STATE OF THE ART AND DEVELOPMENT OF PROPOSED IMPROVEMENTS IN RECREATION BENEFIT, VALUATION FOR WATER RESOURCES PLANNING conducted by Robert C. Waters Vassilios Moustakis Department of Engineering Administration School

  14. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 10: Minor Structures for Ground and Surface Water () March 23, 2010 1 / 31 #12;Classification by Purpose We may classify the velocity of water-flow (ii) increasing the infiltration coefficient (iii) explicit groundwater recharge

  15. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Analysis Framework for the 2009 / 16 #12;Vol II and Vol III Vol. II 1 Annexure I, Chap. 1: Bulk-water and tariffs-Principles. 2 Annexure I, Chap. 2: International Case Studies. 3 Annexure II: Report on water conservation technologies

  16. Saving Water Saves Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMahon, James E.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Biermayer, Peter

    2006-06-15

    Hot water use in households, for showers and baths as wellas for washing clothes and dishes, is a major driver of household energyconsumption. Other household uses of water (such as irrigatinglandscaping) require additional energy in other sectors to transport andtreat the water before use, and to treat wastewater. In California, 19percent of total electricity for all sectors combined and 32 percent ofnatural gas consumption is related to water. There is a criticalinterdependence between energy and water systems: thermal power plantsrequire cooling water, and water pumping and treatment require energy.Energy efficiency can be increased by a number of means, includingmore-efficient appliances (e.g., clothes washers or dishwashers that useless total water and less heated water), water-conserving plumbingfixtures and fittings (e.g., showerheads, faucets, toilets) and changesin consumer behavior (e.g., lower temperature set points for storagewater heaters, shorter showers). Water- and energy-conserving activitiescan help offset the stress imposed on limited water (and energy) suppliesfrom increasing population in some areas, particularly in drought years,or increased consumption (e.g., some new shower systems) as a result ofincreased wealth. This paper explores the connections between householdwater use and energy, and suggests options for increased efficiencies inboth individual technologies and systems. Studies indicate that urbanwater use can be reduced cost-effectively by up to 30 percent withcommercially available products. The energy savings associated with watersavings may represent a large additional and largely untappedcost-effective opportunity.

  17. Addressing Water Contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loewith, Robbie

    Addressing Water Contamination without Using Chemicals For more information contact WIPO at: World challenge Farmers and gardeners apply pesticides to their crops. Contaminated waters are released when-off contaminates local water supplies and pollutes the environment. As a consequence a range of pesticides may

  18. Water treatment method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Frank S. (Farmersville, OH); Silver, Gary L. (Centerville, OH)

    1991-04-30

    A method for reducing the concentration of any undesirable metals dissolved in contaminated water, such as waste water. The method involves uniformly reacting the contaminated water with an excess amount of solid particulate calcium sulfite to insolubilize the undesirable metal ions, followed by removal thereof and of the unreacted calcium sulfite.

  19. Ambient to high temperature fracture toughness and fatigue-crack propagation behavior in a Mo12Si8.5B (at.%) intermetallic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    , the structural use of molybdenum silicides is severely limited by their low ductility and poor fracture toughness at ambient temperatures. In an attempt to enhance the ductility and fracture toughness of these alloys, oneAmbient to high temperature fracture toughness and fatigue-crack propagation behavior in a Mo­12Si

  20. Regional water planning Milind Sohoni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    LOCATE: - Villages - Peri-urban area - Farmland - Roads - Stream - Small dam (KT bandhara) - Waste water for irrigation Percolation Fresh water supply Domestic and industrial use Waste water treatment Waste water Discharge waste water recycle Treat and discharge untreated Run-off #12;Urban water cycle DRINKING WATER

  1. What's your water footprint? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    stream_source_info What's your water footprint.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 6622 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name What's your water footprint.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859...-1 tx H2O | pg. 21 What?s your water footprint? When it comes to your water use, do you tread lightly or are you an H2O Sasquatch? How much water do you think you consume every day? You might initially consider the length of your daily shower...

  2. Reconstruction of stratified steady water waves from pressure readings on the ocean bed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Robin Ming

    2015-01-01

    Consider a two-dimensional stratified solitary wave propagating through a body of water that is bounded below by an impermeable ocean bed. In this work, we study how such a wave can be reconstructed from data consisting of the wave speed, upstream and downstream density profile, and the trace of the pressure on the bed. First, we prove that this data uniquely determines the wave, both in the (real) analytic and Sobolev regimes. Second, for waves that consist of multiple layers of constant density immiscible fluids, we provide an exact formula describing each of the interfaces in terms of the data. Finally, for continuously stratified fluids, we detail a reconstruction scheme based on approximation by layer-wise constant density flows.

  3. Reconstruction of stratified steady water waves from pressure readings on the ocean bed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robin Ming Chen; Samuel Walsh

    2015-02-26

    Consider a two-dimensional stratified solitary wave propagating through a body of water that is bounded below by an impermeable ocean bed. In this work, we study how such a wave can be reconstructed from data consisting of the wave speed, upstream and downstream density profile, and the trace of the pressure on the bed. First, we prove that this data uniquely determines the wave, both in the (real) analytic and Sobolev regimes. Second, for waves that consist of multiple layers of constant density immiscible fluids, we provide an exact formula describing each of the interfaces in terms of the data. Finally, for continuously stratified fluids, we detail a reconstruction scheme based on approximation by layer-wise constant density flows.

  4. Gas Water Heater Energy Losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biermayer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    including delivered hot water and energy losses. Waterand 17% if hot water energy is included. INTRODUCTION Thedrawn, determines the hot water energy output. The current

  5. Planning Water Use in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisenstein, William; Kondolf, G. Mathias

    2008-01-01

    the University of Maryland Water Policy Collaborative, 2006.FURTH ER READ ING California Department of Water Resources.California Water Plan Update 2005: A Framework for Action.

  6. Super recycled water: quenching computers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Super recycled water: quenching computers Super recycled water: quenching computers New facility and methods support conserving water and creating recycled products. Using reverse...

  7. Groundwater and Terrestrial Water Storage, 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodell, M; Chambers, D P; Famiglietti, J S

    2011-01-01

    2003: Tracking fresh water from space. Science, 301, 1485–2007: Mea- suring surface water from space. Rev. Geophys. ,2011:, Stratospheric water vapor trends over Boulder, Colo-

  8. Mitigation, Adaptation, Uncertainty -- Growing Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felsen, Martin; Dunn, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    Growing Water Martin Felsen andSarah Dunn The Growing Water project addresses a report fromin the world will face water shortages by 2025, a situation

  9. Toxoplasma gondii Oocysts in Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wainwright, Katlyn E.

    2008-01-01

    M. Pavlo. 2005. Do iodine water purification tablets provideof Toxoplasma gondii in water from wells located on farms.Toxoplasma gondii oocysts in water. App. Environ. Micro. 73,

  10. Geothermal Water Use: Life Cycle Water Consumption, Water Resource Assessment, and Water Policy Framework

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Schroeder, Jenna N.

    2014-06-10

    This report examines life cycle water consumption for various geothermal technologies to better understand factors that affect water consumption across the life cycle (e.g., power plant cooling, belowground fluid losses) and to assess the potential water challenges that future geothermal power generation projects may face. Previous reports in this series quantified the life cycle freshwater requirements of geothermal power-generating systems, explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids, and assessed future water demand by geothermal power plants according to growth projections for the industry. This report seeks to extend those analyses by including EGS flash, both as part of the life cycle analysis and water resource assessment. A regional water resource assessment based upon the life cycle results is also presented. Finally, the legal framework of water with respect to geothermal resources in the states with active geothermal development is also analyzed.

  11. Geothermal Water Use: Life Cycle Water Consumption, Water Resource Assessment, and Water Policy Framework

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Schroeder, Jenna N.

    This report examines life cycle water consumption for various geothermal technologies to better understand factors that affect water consumption across the life cycle (e.g., power plant cooling, belowground fluid losses) and to assess the potential water challenges that future geothermal power generation projects may face. Previous reports in this series quantified the life cycle freshwater requirements of geothermal power-generating systems, explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids, and assessed future water demand by geothermal power plants according to growth projections for the industry. This report seeks to extend those analyses by including EGS flash, both as part of the life cycle analysis and water resource assessment. A regional water resource assessment based upon the life cycle results is also presented. Finally, the legal framework of water with respect to geothermal resources in the states with active geothermal development is also analyzed.

  12. The adsorption of water on Cu2O and Al2O3 thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Xingyi; Herranz, Tirma; Weis, Christoph; Bluhm, Hendrik; Salmeron, Miquel

    2008-06-27

    The initial stages of water condensation, approximately 6 molecular layers, on two oxide surfaces, Cu{sub 2}O and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, have been investigated by using ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy at relative humidity values (RH) from 0 to >90%. Water adsorbs first dissociatively on oxygen vacancies producing adsorbed hydroxyl groups in a stoichiometric reaction: O{sub lattic} + vacancies + H{sub 2}O = 2OH. The reaction is completed at {approx}1% RH and is followed by adsorption of molecular water. The thickness of the water film grows with increasing RH. The first monolayer is completed at {approx}15% RH on both oxides and is followed by a second layer at 35-40% RH. At 90% RH, about 6 layers of H{sub 2}O film have been formed on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  13. Continuous Commissioning of a Central Chilled Water & Hot Water System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, S.; Turner, W. D.; Batten, T.; Liu, M.

    2000-01-01

    A central chilled water / hot water system provides cooling / heating energy from central utility plants to multiple customers (buildings) through campus distribution loops. To effectively transport the chilled water and hot water to the buildings...

  14. Heat Pump Water Heater Durabliltiy Testing - Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, VAND.

    2004-05-29

    Ten heat pump water heaters (HPWH) were placed in an environmentally controlled test facility and run through a durability test program of approximately 7300 duty cycles (actual cycles accumulated ranged from 6640 to 8324 for the ten units). Five of the units were upgraded integral types (HPWH mounted on storage tank, no pump) from the same manufacturer as those tested in our first durability program in 2001 (Baxter and Linkous, 2002). The other five were ''add-on'' type units (HPWH with circulation pump plumbed to a separate storage tank) from another manufacturer. This durability test was designed to represent approximately 7-10 years of normal operation to meet the hot water needs of a residence. The integral units operated without incident apart from two control board failures. Both of these were caused by inadvertent exposure to very hot and humid (>135 F dry bulb and >120 F dew point) conditions that occurred due to a test loop failure. It is not likely that any residential water heater would be installed where such conditions were expected so these failures are not considered a long-term reliability concern. Two of the integral HPWHs featured a condensate management system (CMS) option that effectively eliminated any need for an evaporator condensate drain, but imposed significant efficiency penalties when operating in high humidity ambient conditions. The add-on units experienced no operational failures (breakdowns with loss of hot water production) during the course of the testing. However, their control systems exhibited some performance degradation under the high temperature, high humidity test conditions--HPWHs would shut off with tank water temperatures 15-20 F lower than when operating under moderate ambient conditions. One unit developed a refrigerant leak during the test program and lost about 50% of its charge resulting in reduced efficiency. Efficiency measurements on all the integral units and four of the add-on units showed significantly higher efficiencies than conventional electric water heaters (EWH). DOE Simulated Use Tests conducted prior to starting the durability testing resulted in energy factors (EF) of about 2.3 for the integral design and 1.4 for the add-on design compared to the minimum value of 0.86 prescribed for EWHs. Based on the experience from this and the previous durability testing, there is no evidence that strongly suggests that any of the HPWHs suffered significant performance degradation after undergoing over 7000 water heat cycles.

  15. Water Data Report: An Annotated Bibliography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunham Whitehead, Camilla; Melody, Moya

    2007-01-01

    Table 5: Public supply water withdrawals, 2000. water withdrawals, 2000. water withdrawals, 2000.

  16. On the comparison of energy sources: feasibility of radio frequency and ambient light harvesting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korotkevich, Alexander O; Lavrova, Olga; Coutsias, Evangelos

    2015-01-01

    With growing interest in multi source energy harvesting including integrated microchips we propose a comparison of radio frequency (RF) and solar energy sources in a typical city. Harvesting devices for RF and solar energy will be competing for space of a compact micro or nano device as well as for orientation with respect to the energy source. This is why it is important to investigate importance of every source of energy and make a decision whether it will be worthwhile to include such harvesters. We considered theoretically possible irradiance by RF signal in different situations, typical for the modern urban environment and compared it with ambient solar energy sources available through the night, including moon light. Our estimations show that solar light energy dominates by far margin practically all the time, even during the night, if there is a full moon in the absence of clouds. At the same time, in the closed compartments or at the new moon RF harvesting can be beneficial as a source of "free" energ...

  17. Ambient air pollution exposure and the incidence of related health effects among racial/ethnic minorities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieves, L.A.; Wernette, D.R.

    1997-02-01

    Differences among racial and ethnic groups in morbidity and mortality rates for diseases, including diseases with environmental causes, have been extensively documented. However, documenting the linkages between environmental contaminants, individual exposures, and disease incidence has been hindered by difficulties in measuring exposure for the population in general and for minority populations in particular. After briefly discussing research findings on associations of common air pollutants with disease incidence, the authors summarize recent studies of radial/ethnic subgroup differences in incidence of these diseases in the US. They then present evidence of both historic and current patterns of disproportionate minority group exposure to air pollution as measured by residence in areas where ambient air quality standards are violated. The current indications of disproportionate potential exposures of minority and low-income populations to air pollutants represent the continuation of a historical trend. The evidence of linkage between disproportionate exposure to air pollution of racial/ethnic minorities and low-income groups and their higher rates of some air pollution-related diseases is largely circumstantial. Differences in disease incidence and mortality rates among racial/ethnic groups are discussed for respiratory diseases, cancers, and lead poisoning. Pollutants of concern include CO, Pb, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, and particulates.

  18. Air Gaps, Size Effect, and Corner-Turning in Ambient LX-17

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souers, P C; Hernandez, A; Cabacungan, C; Fried, L; Garza, R; Glaesemann, K; Lauderbach, L; Liao, S; Vitello, P

    2008-02-05

    Various ambient measurements are presented for LX-17. The size (diameter) effect has been measured with copper and Lucite confinement, where the failure radii are 4.0 and 6.5 mm, respectively. The air well corner-turn has been measured with an LX-07 booster, and the dead-zone results are comparable to the previous TATB-boosted work. Four double cylinders have been fired, and dead zones appear in all cases. The steel-backed samples are faster than the Lucite-backed samples by 0.6 {micro}s. Bare LX-07 and LX-17 of 12.7 mm-radius were fired with air gaps. Long acceptor regions were used to truly determine if detonation occurred or not. The LX-07 crossed at 10 mm with a slight time delay. Steady state LX-17 crossed at 3.5 mm gap but failed to cross at 4.0 mm. LX-17 with a 12.7 mm run after the booster crossed a 1.5 mm gap but failed to cross 2.5 mm. Timing delays were measured where the detonation crossed the gaps. The Tarantula model is introduced as embedded in 0 reactive flow JWL++ and Linked Cheetah V4, mostly at 4 zones/mm. Tarantula has four pressure regions: off, initiation, failure and detonation. The physical basis of the input parameters is considered.

  19. Electromechanical Wave Green's Function Estimation from Ambient Electrical Grid Frequency Noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Backhaus, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Many electrical grid transients can be described by the propagation of electromechanical (EM) waves that couple oscillations of power flows over transmission lines and the inertia of synchronous generators. These EM waves can take several forms: large-scale standing waves forming inter-area modes, localized oscillations of single or multi-machine modes, or traveling waves that spread quasi-circularly from major grid disturbances. The propagation speed and damping of these EM waves are potentially a powerful tool for assessing grid stability, e.g. small signal or rotor angle stability, however, EM wave properties have been mostly extracted from post-event analysis of major grid disturbances. Using a small set of data from the FNET sensor network, we show how the spatially resolved Green's function for EM wave propagation can be extracted from ambient frequency noise without the need for a major disturbance. If applied to an entire interconnection, an EM-wave Green's function map will enable a model-independent...

  20. Pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms of school children exposed to ambient air pollution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Yoon Shin; Ko, Ung Ring

    1996-12-31

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the health effect of air pollution on pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms of Korean school children between 7 and 10 years of age during November 1995-January 1996. A standard respiratory symptom questionnaire was administered and spirometry was performed to examine pulmonary function of 121 children in an urban polluted area, Seoul, and of 119 children in non-polluted area, Sokcho, respectively. There was significant difference in the level of pulmonary function [forced expiratory volume in second (FEV{sub 1.0}) and forced vital capacity (FVC)] between exposed groups to polluted area and non-polluted area. Parental smoking was significantly related to respiratory symptoms of cough, phlegm, and the level of pulmonary function. The observed changes in FEV{sub 1.0} and FVC seemed to relate to home cooking fuel, not to respiratory symptoms. The additional longitudinal work that carefully monitors ambient and indoor air pollution and health effects data should be conducted to confirm these results.

  1. Research on ambient temperature passive magnetic bearings at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Post, R.F.; Ryitov, D.D.` Smith, J.R.; Tung, L.S.

    1997-04-01

    Research performed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on the equilibrium and stability of a new class of ambient-temperature passive bearing systems is described. The basic concepts involved are: (1) Stability of the rotating system is only achieved in the rotating state. That is, disengaging mechanical systems are used to insure stable levitation at rest (when Earnshaw`s theorem applies). (2) Stable levitation by passive magnetic elements can be achieved if the vector sum of the force derivatives of the several elements of the system is net negative (i.e. restoring) for axial, transverse, and tilt-type perturbations from equilibrium. To satisfy the requirements of (2) using only permanent magnet elements we have employed periodic ``Halbach arrays.`` These interact with passive inductive loaded circuits and act as stabilizers, with the primary forces arising from axially symmetric permanent-magnet elements. Stabilizers and other elements needed to create compact passive magnetic bearing systems have been constructed. Novel passive means for stabilizing classes of rotor-dynamic instabilities in such systems have also been investigated.

  2. West Basin Municipal Water District, California; Water/Sewer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Exhibit D #12;Summary: West Basin Municipal Water District, California; Water/Sewer Primary Credi90023!! #12;Sttmma1·y: West Basin Municipal Water District, California; Water/Sewer Credit Profile US$16.STANDARDANDPOORS.COM/RATJNGSDJRECT MAY31 2013 2 I126639 I 301008236 #12;Summary: West Basin Municipal Water District, California; Water/Sewer

  3. SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jiuyong "John"

    SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse #12;2 The SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse was established in 2004 as a joint venture between the South Australian Water Corporation and the University of South Australia (UniSA), adding significant expertise to the water research capability in South

  4. SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jiuyong "John"

    SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse #12;' Our Mission The SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse aims to advance the science and technology of sustainable water management through fundamental and applied research. Our Vision To be Australia's leading research centre for water reuse

  5. WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    103 WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA December 29, 2000 #12;Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA December 29, 2000 #12;105 WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT [As Amended Through P.L. 106­580, Dec. 29, 2000 planning of water and related land resources, through the establishment of a water resources council

  6. Water Management at UBC Okanagan Part 2: Water Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Management at UBC Okanagan Part 2: Water Features UBC Okanagan 2007 Angele Clarke A SEEDS and Objectives 2 Methods 3 The Symbolic and Cultural Values of Water 3 Landscape Aesthetics Relationship to Water 5 UBC-Okanagan Campus Landscape and Water Features 8 Water Features and the Built Environment Campus

  7. IWA Balkan Young Water Professionals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Psarrakos, Panayiotis

    Networks Industrial Waste Treatment and Disposal River Basins Management Legislation in the Water those associated with cross-border water management issues, which require experience exchange among 2015 - Thessaloniki, Greece Topics Water Management (Water Loss ­ Mitigation Methods and Technologies

  8. UC Sustainable Water Systems Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    , or lubricating equipment. Purified Water: Water that is free of impurities such as microorganisms, particulate consumption because it contains objectionable pollution, contamination minerals or infective agents, including water quality standards for human consumption. Reclaimed or Recycled Water: Wastewater treated

  9. Water Heating | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Water Heating Water Heating September 2, 2015 - 11:07am Addthis Low-flow fixtures will help you reduce your hot water use and save money on your water heating bills. | Photo...

  10. Mitigation, Adaptation, Uncertainty -- Growing Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felsen, Martin; Dunn, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    system for harvesting and returning clean water to Lakeharvesting for landscape and species health, and surface water and

  11. TRIMOLECULAR REACTIONS OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE WITH WATER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westbrook, M.; Becnel, J.; Garrison, S.

    2010-02-25

    The hydrolysis reaction of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) is a key step in the synthesis of uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) powder for nuclear fuels. Mechanisms for the hydrolysis reactions are studied here with density functional theory and the Stuttgart small-core scalar relativistic pseudopotential and associated basis set for uranium. The reaction of a single UF{sub 6} molecule with a water molecule in the gas phase has been previously predicted to proceed over a relatively sizeable barrier of 78.2 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}, indicating this reaction is only feasible at elevated temperatures. Given the observed formation of a second morphology for the UO{sub 2} product coupled with the observations of rapid, spontaneous hydrolysis at ambient conditions, an alternate reaction pathway must exist. In the present work, two trimolecular hydrolysis mechanisms are studied with density functional theory: (1) the reaction between two UF{sub 6} molecules and one water molecule, and (2) the reaction of two water molecules with a single UF{sub 6} molecule. The predicted reaction of two UF{sub 6} molecules with one water molecule displays an interesting 'fluorine-shuttle' mechanism, a significant energy barrier of 69.0 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1} to the formation of UF{sub 5}OH, and an enthalpy of reaction ({Delta}H{sub 298}) of +17.9 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}. The reaction of a single UF{sub 6} molecule with two water molecules displays a 'proton-shuttle' mechanism, and is more favorable, having a slightly lower computed energy barrier of 58.9 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1} and an exothermic enthalpy of reaction ({Delta}H{sub 298}) of -13.9 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}. The exothermic nature of the overall UF{sub 6} + 2 {center_dot} H{sub 2}O trimolecular reaction and the lowering of the barrier height with respect to the bimolecular reaction are encouraging; however, the sizable energy barrier indicates further study of the UF{sub 6} hydrolysis reaction mechanism is warranted to resolve the remaining discrepancies between the predicted mechanisms and experimental observations.

  12. Water's Hydrogen Bond Strength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaplin, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Water is necessary both for the evolution of life and its continuance. It possesses particular properties that cannot be found in other materials and that are required for life-giving processes. These properties are brought about by the hydrogen bonded environment particularly evident in liquid water. Each liquid water molecule is involved in about four hydrogen bonds with strengths considerably less than covalent bonds but considerably greater than the natural thermal energy. These hydrogen bonds are roughly tetrahedrally arranged such that when strongly formed the local clustering expands, decreasing the density. Such low density structuring naturally occurs at low and supercooled temperatures and gives rise to many physical and chemical properties that evidence the particular uniqueness of liquid water. If aqueous hydrogen bonds were actually somewhat stronger then water would behave similar to a glass, whereas if they were weaker then water would be a gas and only exist as a liquid at sub-zero temperature...

  13. Arsenic removal from water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Robert C. (Edgewood, NM); Anderson, D. Richard (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-07-24

    Methods for removing arsenic from water by addition of inexpensive and commonly available magnesium oxide, magnesium hydroxide, calcium oxide, or calcium hydroxide to the water. The hydroxide has a strong chemical affinity for arsenic and rapidly adsorbs arsenic, even in the presence of carbonate in the water. Simple and commercially available mechanical methods for removal of magnesium hydroxide particles with adsorbed arsenic from drinking water can be used, including filtration, dissolved air flotation, vortex separation, or centrifugal separation. A method for continuous removal of arsenic from water is provided. Also provided is a method for concentrating arsenic in a water sample to facilitate quantification of arsenic, by means of magnesium or calcium hydroxide adsorption.

  14. Impact of drought on U.S. steam electric power plant cooling water intakes and related water resource management issues.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimmell, T. A.; Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-04-03

    This report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Existing Plants Research Program, which has an energy-water research effort that focuses on water use at power plants. This study complements their overall research effort by evaluating water availability at power plants under drought conditions. While there are a number of competing demands on water uses, particularly during drought conditions, this report focuses solely on impacts to the U.S. steam electric power plant fleet. Included are both fossil-fuel and nuclear power plants. One plant examined also uses biomass as a fuel. The purpose of this project is to estimate the impact on generation capacity of a drop in water level at U.S. steam electric power plants due to climatic or other conditions. While, as indicated above, the temperature of the water can impact decisions to halt or curtail power plant operations, this report specifically examines impacts as a result of a drop in water levels below power plant submerged cooling water intakes. Impacts due to the combined effects of excessive temperatures of the returned cooling water and elevated temperatures of receiving waters (due to high ambient temperatures associated with drought) may be examined in a subsequent study. For this study, the sources of cooling water used by the U.S. steam electric power plant fleet were examined. This effort entailed development of a database of power plants and cooling water intake locations and depths for those plants that use surface water as a source of cooling water. Development of the database and its general characteristics are described in Chapter 2 of this report. Examination of the database gives an indication of how low water levels can drop before cooling water intakes cease to function. Water level drops are evaluated against a number of different power plant characteristics, such as the nature of the water source (river vs. lake or reservoir) and type of plant (nuclear vs. fossil fuel). This is accomplished in Chapter 3. In Chapter 4, the nature of any compacts or agreements that give priority to users (i.e., which users must stop withdrawing water first) is examined. This is examined on a regional or watershed basis, specifically for western water rights, and also as a function of federal and state water management programs. Chapter 5 presents the findings and conclusions of this study. In addition to the above, a related intent of this study is to conduct preliminary modeling of how lowered surface water levels could affect generating capacity and other factors at different regional power plants. If utility managers are forced to take some units out of service or reduce plant outputs, the fuel mix at the remaining plants and the resulting carbon dioxide emissions may change. Electricity costs and other factors may also be impacted. Argonne has conducted some modeling based on the information presented in the database described in Chapter 2 of this report. A separate report of the modeling effort has been prepared (Poch et al. 2009). In addition to the U.S. steam electric power plant fleet, this modeling also includes an evaluation of power production of hydroelectric facilities. The focus of this modeling is on those power plants located in the western United States.

  15. Impact Of Standing Bleed Water On Saltstone Placement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cozzi, A. D.; Pickenheim, B. R.

    2012-09-28

    The amount of water present during placement and subsequent curing of saltstone has the potential to impact several properties important for grout quality. An active drain water system can remove residual standing water and expose the surface of the placed saltstone to air. Oxidation of the saltstone may result in an increase in the leachability of redox sensitive elements. A dry surface can lead to cracking, causing an increase in hydraulic conductivity. An inactive drain water system can allow standing water that generates unnecessary hydrostatic head on the vault walls. Standing water that cannot be removed via the drain system will be available for potential incorporation into subsequent grout placements. The objective of this work is to study the impact of standing water on grout quality pertaining to disposal units. A series of saltstone mixes were prepared, and cured at ambient temperature to evaluate the impact of standing water on saltstone placement. The samples were managed to control drying effects on leachability by either exposing or capping the samples. The water to premix ratio was varied to represent a range of processing conditions. Samples were analyzed for density, leachability, and hydraulic conductivity. A monolith of each composition was cut into four sections to analyze the homogeneity of the sample with respect to vertical position within the sample. The density of each section was measured by two methods, helium pycnometry and by ASTM 642-06. The results show a trend of increasing density with increasing depth in the samples. This effect is more pronounced with the inclusion of excess bleed water and indicative of increased settling. The leachability of the eight different samples was analyzed by ANS/ANSI 16.1 method. These results indicate that drying of the saltstone during curing leads to decreased Leachability Indices (indicative of more release) for potassium, sodium, rhenium, nitrite, and nitrate. This may be caused by shrinkage cracking in the samples creating additional pathways for contaminant release. There was no noticeable effect on leachability by changing the water to premix ratio or by including excess bleed water. There was no detectable chromium release in any of the samples. Chromium and rhenium were added in equal amounts to determine whether rhenium might be an acceptable surrogate for chromium, a hazardous material. This testing shows no correlation between the behavior of the two elements, as chromium is not released at detectable levels and rhenium is released at a comparable rate to nitrate, the most prevalent and mobile species in saltstone.

  16. WATER QUALITY MODELING OF THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    WATER QUALITY MODELING OF THE STATE OF OHIO COMPONENT OF THE OHIO RIVER BASIN WATER QUALITY TRADING PROGRAM #12;Water Quality Modeling of the State of Ohio Component of the Ohio River Basin Water Quality Trading Program #12;2 Water Quality Modeling of the State of Ohio Component of the Ohio River Basin Water

  17. Selecting a new water heater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-01

    This fact sheet describes the types of water heaters available (storage water heaters, demand water heaters, heat pump water heaters, tankless coil and indirect water heaters, and solar water heaters). The criteria for selection are discussed. These are capacity, efficiency rating, and cost. A resource list is provided for further information.

  18. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 3: Watershed and Maps () July 23, 2013 1 / 18 #12;Domain Decomposition p1 p2 p3 p5 p4 surface water A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 salinity ingress water table q W(q) W(p2) The watershed W (x) of a point x is W (x) = {all points y from where

  19. The Mystery of Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nilsson, Anders

    2005-11-21

    Water is essential for our existence on this planet - critical to countless physical, biological, geological and chemical processes - it has defied scientific understanding. Exhibiting peculiar properties such as increased density upon melting and high surface tension, water is one of the most intriguing problems in condensed matter and chemical physics. Current research at SSRL, however, is illuminating the nature of H-bonding, presenting exciting new avenues of research and challenging existing models of water's structure.

  20. Surface Water Quality Standards 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    Standards Team. This advisory group, with representation from water asso- ciations, the agricultural industry, engineering firms, environmental organizations, consumer groups and government entities, is working with TCEQ staff to review and possibly...SURFACE WATER QUALITY STANDARDS AAs part of the ongoing program to manage Texaswater quality, the Texas Commission onEnvironmental Quality (TCEQ) is currently review- ing the Texas Surface Water Quality Standards, including the standards...

  1. Cooling water distribution system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Richard (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1994-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using an interconnected series of radial guide elements, a plurality of circumferential collector elements and collector boxes to collect and feed the cooling water into distribution channels extending along the curved surface of the steel containment vessel. The cooling water is uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weirs in the distribution channels.

  2. Sandia Energy - Water Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, a backward--bent duct buoy (BBDB) oscillating water column wave energy converter design. The team from HMRC included Tom Walsh, Brian Holmes, Florent Thiebaut, Neil...

  3. Sandia Energy - Water Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Systems Analysis, Systems Engineering, Water Power WEC-Sim Code Development Meeting at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory...

  4. Water and Energy Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear plants use steam turbines, and cooling water asmajority is used for steam-driven turbines, which generatedelectricity using steam engines, gas turbines, or Stirling

  5. Alkali Soils, Irrigation Waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1910-01-01

    ............................................................................ Chloride of soda.. 101 This is an escellcnt water. WATER OF COLORADO RIVER, NEAB SEARON, TEXAS. TPater soluble solids, 1.245 parts per million. MISCELLANEOUS WATERS. The follomirlg ai~alyses give the amount of alkaline salts pre IRIETGITTON WATERS.- S....4LTS IN PARTS PER MILLION . Alkaline Alkaline Alkaline Carbonate Sulphate Chloride I I i 1. 895 ' 1. 558 180 21 112 302 ' 1. 964 703 775 6. 237 F . 934 . 2. 909 635 2. 124 1. 785 951 523 150 1. 788 1. 947 4. 031 1. 698 201...

  6. Cooperating for Cleaner Water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2006-01-01

    . This TMDL plan will budget how much bacteria pollution from point sources (like wastewater treatment facilities) and nonpoint sources (runoff from land) can occur in a single day and still maintain water quality standards. Kerry Niemann, TCEQ project... of water on its 303(d) list (a list of water segments that do not meet water quality standards) and to develop a TMDL for each pollutant that impairs any segment, according to TCEQ docu- ments. TCEQ has adopted 63 TMDLs with EPA approving 60 of those...

  7. Residential Absorption Water Heater

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Absorption Water Heater 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Kyle Gluesenkamp, gluesenkampk@ornl.gov Oak Ridge National Laboratory Project Summary Timeline:...

  8. Forecasting Water Quality & Biodiversity

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Forecasting Water Quality & Biodiversity March 25, 2015 Cross-cutting Sustainability Platform Review Principle Investigator: Dr. Henriette I. Jager Organization: Oak Ridge National...

  9. Calculation of Ambient (H*(10)) and Personal (Hp(10)) Dose Equivalent from a 252Cf Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Traub, Richard J.

    2010-03-26

    The purpose of this calculation is to calculate the neutron dose factors for the Sr-Cf-3000 neutron source that is located in the 318 low scatter room (LSR). The dose factors were based on the dose conversion factors published in ICRP-21 Appendix 6, and the Ambient dose equivalent (H*(10)) and Personal dose equivalent (Hp(10)) dose factors published in ICRP Publication 74.

  10. The effect of standard ambient conditions used for the determination of road load to predict vehicle fuel economy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Love, Michael Lee

    1982-01-01

    THE EFFECT OF STANDARD AN1BIENT CONDITIONS USED FOR THE DETERMINATION OF ROAD LOAD TO PREDICT VEHICLE FUEL ECONOMY A Thesis by Michael Lee Love Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 198Z Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering THE EFFECT OF STANDARD AMBIENT CONDITIONS USED FOR THE DETERMINATION OF ROAD LOAD TO PREDICT VEHICLE FUEL ECONOMY A Thesis by Michael Lee Love Approved...

  11. Local thermal resonance control of GaInP photonic crystal membrane cavities using ambient gas cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sokolov, Sergei; Yüce, Emre; Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaelle; De Rossi, Alfredo; Mosk, Allard P

    2015-01-01

    We perform a spatially dependent tuning of a GaInP photonic crystal cavity using a continuous wave violet laser. Local tuning is obtained by laser heating of the photonic crystal membrane. The cavity resonance shift is measured for different pump positions and for two ambient gases: helium and nitrogen. The use of high-conducting gas in combination with low-conducting semiconductor leads to a resonance control with a spatial resolution better than 4 microns.

  12. Air Gaps, Size Effect, and Corner-Turning in Ambient LX-17

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souers, P C; Hernandez, A; Cabacungen, C; Fried, L; Garza, R; Glaesemann, K; Lauderbach, L; Liao, S; Vitello, P

    2007-05-30

    Various ambient measurements are presented for LX-17. The size (diameter) effect has been measured with copper and Lucite confinement, where the failure radii are 4.0 and 6.5 mm, respectively. The air well corner-turn has been measured with an LX-07 booster, and the dead-zone results are comparable to the previous TATB-boosted work. Four double cylinders have been fired, and dead zones appear in all cases. The steel-backed samples are faster than the Lucite-backed samples by 0.6 {micro}s. Bare LX-07 and LX-17 of 12.7 mm-radius were fired with air gaps. Long acceptor regions were used to truly determine if detonation occurred or not. The LX-07 crossed at 10 mm with a slight time delay. Steady state LX-17 crossed at 3.5 mm gap but failed to cross at 4.0 mm. LX-17 with a 12.7 mm run after the booster crossed a 1.5 mm gap but failed to cross 2.5 mm. Timing delays were measured where the detonation crossed the gaps. The Tarantula model is introduced as embedded in the Linked Cheetah V4.0 reactive flow code at 4 zones/mm. Tarantula has four pressure regions: off, initiation, failure and detonation. A report card of 25 tests run with the same settings on LX-17 is shown, possibly the most extensive simultaneous calibration yet tried with an explosive. The physical basis of some of the input parameters is considered.

  13. Effects of ambient ozone on respiratory function and symptoms in Mexico City schoolchildren

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castillejos, M.; Gold, D.R.; Dockery, D.; Tosteson, T.; Baum, T.; Speizer, F.E. )

    1992-02-01

    The effects of ambient ozone (O3) on respiratory function and acute respiratory symptoms were evaluated in 143 7- to 9-yr-old schoolchildren followed longitudinally at 1- to 2-wk intervals over a period of 6 months at three schools in Pedregal, Mexico City. The maximum O3 level exceeded the World Health Organization guideline of 80 ppb and the U.S. standard of 120 ppb in every week. For an increase from lowest to highest in the mean O3 level during the 48 hr before spirometry (53 ppb), logistic regression estimated relative odds of 1.7 for a child reporting cough/phlegm on the day of spirometry. For the full population, the mean O3 level during the hour before spirometry, not adjusted for temperature and humidity, predicted a significant decrement in FVC but not in FEV1 or FEF25-75. In contrast, the mean O3 level during the previous 24-, 48-, and 168-h periods predicted significant decrements in FEV1 and FEF25-75 but not in FVC. Ozone was consistently associated with a greater decrement in lung function for the 15 children with chronic phlegm as compared with the children without chronic cough, chronic phlegm, or wheeze. Ozone in the previous 24-, 48-, and 168-h periods predicted decrements in FEV1 for children of mothers who were current or former smokers, but not for children of mothers who were never smokers. Many of these effects were reduced in multiple regression analyses including temperature and humidity, as temperature and O3 were highly correlated.

  14. Experience-dependent modulation of C. elegans behavior by ambient oxygen.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolgemuth, Charles

    carried by the wind, water, or an animal. Foxtail grasses employ a spikelet or cluster of spikelets with a song title that we should cast our fates to the wind. As animals, though, we are typically not so trusting of the benevolence of Nature and, instead, decide where we want to go and expend energy to move

  15. Water Waves and Integrability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossen I. Ivanov

    2007-07-12

    The Euler's equations describe the motion of inviscid fluid. In the case of shallow water, when a perturbative asymtotic expansion of the Euler's equations is taken (to a certain order of smallness of the scale parameters), relations to certain integrable equations emerge. Some recent results concerning the use of integrable equation in modeling the motion of shallow water waves are reviewed in this contribution.

  16. WATER TEMPERATURE RECORDS FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ? WATER TEMPERATURE RECORDS FROM CALIFORNIA'S CENTRAL VALLEY 1939-1948 Marine Biological i STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE #12;#12;a WATER TEMPERATURE RECORDS FROM arid to avoid delay in publication. Washington D. CWATER TEMPERATURE RECORDS FROM

  17. Purge water management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cardoso-Neto, J.E.; Williams, D.W.

    1995-01-01

    A purge water management system is described for effectively eliminating the production of purge water when obtaining a groundwater sample from a monitoring well. In its preferred embodiment, the purge water management system comprises an expandable container, a transportation system, and a return system. The purge water management system is connected to a wellhead sampling configuration, typically permanently installed at the well site. A pump, positioned with the monitoring well, pumps groundwater through the transportation system into the expandable container, which expands in direct proportion with volume of groundwater introduced, usually three or four well volumes, yet prevents the groundwater from coming into contact with the oxygen in the air. After this quantity of groundwater has been removed from the well, a sample is taken from a sampling port, after which the groundwater in the expandable container can be returned to the monitoring well through the return system. The purge water management system prevents the purge water from coming in contact with the outside environment, especially oxygen, which might cause the constituents of the groundwater to oxidize. Therefore, by introducing the purge water back into the monitoring well, the necessity of dealing with the purge water as a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is eliminated.

  18. Purge water management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cardoso-Neto, Joao E. (North Augusta, SC); Williams, Daniel W. (Aiken, SC)

    1996-01-01

    A purge water management system for effectively eliminating the production of purge water when obtaining a groundwater sample from a monitoring well. In its preferred embodiment, the purge water management system comprises an expandable container, a transportation system, and a return system. The purge water management system is connected to a wellhead sampling configuration, typically permanently installed at the well site. A pump, positioned with the monitoring well, pumps groundwater through the transportation system into the expandable container, which expands in direct proportion with volume of groundwater introduced, usually three or four well volumes, yet prevents the groundwater from coming into contact with the oxygen in the air. After this quantity of groundwater has been removed from the well, a sample is taken from a sampling port, after which the groundwater in the expandable container can be returned to the monitoring well through the return system. The purge water management system prevents the purge water from coming in contact with the outside environment, especially oxygen, which might cause the constituents of the groundwater to oxidize. Therefore, by introducing the purge water back into the monitoring well, the necessity of dealing with the purge water as a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is eliminated.

  19. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soerens, Thomas

    Arkan- sas in order to determine the effect of local manganese, phosphate, pyrite, lead-zinc and uranium mineralization on the groundwater chemistry. Most of this study (75 springs) was concentrated in the Batesville .,.:;, Water Quality. 18 Comparison of Water Chemistry. 27 Geochemical Exploration. 30 Four Minera 1i zed Areas

  20. Achievements and Outlook 2012 SA Water Centre for Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayer, Wolfgang

    Achievements and Outlook 2012 SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse #12;Contents Our Breaking News 35 SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse University of South Australia Mawson Lakes Campus Mawson Lakes SA 5095 Telephone: +61 (08) 8302 3338 Fax: +61 (08) 8302 3386 Web: unisa.edu.au/water