Sample records for upper plate basins

  1. Hydrology and Glaciers in the Upper Indus Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Winston

    Examines the state of the science associated with the snow and ice hydrology in the Upper Indus Basin (IUB), reviewing the literature and data available on the present and projected role of glaciers, snow fields, and stream ...

  2. Upper mantle structure beneath the Caribbean-South American plate boundary from surface wave tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Fenglin

    Upper mantle structure beneath the Caribbean-South American plate boundary from surface wave velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle of the Caribbean-South American boundary region American continental lithosphere, the Venezuelan archipelago, and the Caribbean oceanic lithosphere

  3. Terry sandstone member of the Pierre Shale, Upper Cretaceous, Spindle field, Denver Basin, Colorado 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helsley, Robert James

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TERRY SANDSTONE MEMBER OF THE PIERRE SHALE, UPPER CRETACEOUS, SPINDLE FIELD, DENVER BASIN, COLORADO A Thesis by ROBERT JAMES HELSLEY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1985 Major Subject: Geology TERRY SANDSTONE MEMBER OF THE PIERRE SHALE, UPPER CRETACEOUS, SPINDLE FIELD, DENVER BASIN, COLORADO A Thesis by ROBERT JAMES HELSLEY Approved as to style and content by: R. R. Berg...

  4. Stochastic Models Applied to Operation of Reservoirs in the Upper Colorado River Basin in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, R. A.; O'Connor, G. E.; Curry, G. L.; Helm, J. C.

    TR-47 1973 Stochastic Models Applied to Operation of Reservoirs in the Upper Colorado River Basin in Texas R.A. Clark G.E. O?Connor G.L. Curry J.C. Helm Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A...

  5. Natural Arsenic in Groundwater and Alkaline Lakes at the upper Paraguay basin, Pantanal, Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Natural Arsenic in Groundwater and Alkaline Lakes at the upper Paraguay basin, Pantanal, Brazil L, Brazil d Université de Provence, Aix Marseille 1, France e Departamento de Geografia, Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso do Sul, Três Lagoas, Brazil f Laboratoire de Géomophologie Appliquée, Université de

  6. A Groundwater Dynamic Simulation Model: Application to the Upper San Pedro Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    A Groundwater Dynamic Simulation Model: Application to the Upper San Pedro Basin Report Prepared by using tools such as tracers to determine groundwater travel times and this dynamic simulation modeling Initiative Fund, Water Sustainability Graduate Fellowship Program 2004/2005 #12;2 Introduction Located

  7. Genetic and Phenotypic Catalog of Native Resident Trout of the Interior Columbia River Basin; Populations of the Upper Yakima Basin, 1997-1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trotter, Patrick C. (Fishery Science Consultant, Seattle, WA); McMillan, Bill; Gayeski, Nick (Washington Trout, Duvall, WA)

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to photo-document upper Columbia Basin native resident trout populations in Washington, and to ascertain their species or subspecies identity and relative genetic purity using a nonlethal DNA technique.

  8. EFFECT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON WATERSHED RUNOFF FLOW - UPPER COOSA RIVER BASIN UPSTREAM FROM PLANT HAMMOND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, K.

    2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability of water managers to maintain adequate supplies in the coming decades depends on future weather conditions, as climate change has the potential to reduce stream flows from their current values due to potentially less precipitation and higher temperatures, and possibly rendering them unable to meet demand. The upper Coosa River basin, located in northwest Georgia, plays an important role in supplying water for industry and domestic use in northern Georgia, and has been involved in water disputes in recent times. The seven-day ten-year low flow (7Q10 flow) is the lowest average flow for seven consecutive days that has an average recurrence interval of 10 years. The 7Q10 flow is statistically derived from the observed historical flow data, and represents the low flow (drought) condition for a basin. The upper Coosa River basin also supplies cooling water for the 935MW coal-fired Hammond plant, which draws about 65% of the 7Q10 flow of the upper Coosa River to dissipate waste heat. The water is drawn through once and returned to the river directly from the generator (i.e., no cooling tower is used). Record low flows in 2007 led to use of portable cooling towers to meet temperature limits. Disruption of the Plant Hammond operation may trigger closure of area industrial facilities (e.g. paper mill). The population in Georgia is expected to double from 9 million to 18 million residents in the next 25 years, mostly in the metropolitan Atlanta area. Therefore, there will be an even greater demand for potable water and for waste assimilation. Climate change in the form of persistent droughts (causing low flows) and high ambient temperatures create regulatory compliance challenges for Plant Hammond operating with a once-through cooling system. Therefore, the Upper Coosa River basin was selected to study the effect of potential future weather change on the watershed runoff flow.

  9. Depositional environment of upper cretaceous Lewis sandstones, Sand Wash Basin, Colorado 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reinarts, Mary Susan

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    areas, Moffat County, Colorado. Structure contours are top of Mesaverde. Contour interval is 1, 000 ft ( 305 m). Modified from Whi tley (1962) Generalized subsurface section of the Upper Cretaceous formations in the Sand Wash basin depicting gross... Correlation section parallel to depositional dip, North Craig field area, showing inclined time- stratigraphic units in the Lewis shale which con- tain thick sandstone intervals. Location of section shown in Fig. 23 Strike correlation section, North Craig...

  10. Petroleum geology of Carter sandstone (upper Mississippian), Black Warrior Basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bearden, B.L.; Mancini, E.A.

    1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of combination petroleum traps makes the Black Warrior basin of northwestern Alabama an attractive area for continued hydrocarbon exploration. More than 1,500 wells have been drilled, and more than 90 separate petroleum pools have been discovered. The primary hydrocarbon reservoirs are Upper Mississippian sandstones. The Carter sandstone is the most productive petroleum reservoir in the basin. Productivity of the Carter sandstone is directly related to its environment of deposition. The Carter accumulated within a high constructive elongate to lobate delta, which prograded into the basin from the northwest to the southeast. Carter bar-finger and distal-bar lithofacies constitute the primary hydrocarbon reservoirs. Primary porosity in the Carter sandstone has been reduced by quartz overgrowths and calcite cementation. Petroleum traps in the Carter sandstone in central Fayette and Lamar Counties, Alabama, are primarily stratigraphic and combination (structural-stratigraphic) traps. The potential is excellent for future development of hydrocarbon reservoirs in the Upper Mississippian Carter sandstone. Frontier regions south and east of the known productive limits of the Black Warrior basin are ideal areas for continued exploration.

  11. ARCHAEOLOGY, LATE-QUATERNARY LANDSCAPE EVOLUTION, AND ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE IN THE UPPER DRIFTWOOD CREEK BASIN, BARBER COUNTY, KANSAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kessler, Nicholas Victor

    2010-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This study focused on valley fills in the upper Driftwood Creek basin, a 3rd order drainage network in south-central Kansas to determine the geologic potential for stratified cultural material and to reconstruct a record of Late...

  12. A normal-faulting seismic sequence triggered by the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake: Wholesale stress regime changes in the upper plate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kato, Aitaro

    : Wholesale stress regime changes in the upper plate Aitaro Kato*1 , Shin'ichi Sakai1 , and Kazushige Obara1 1

  13. Stratigraphy and Reservoir-analog Modeling of Upper Miocene Shallow-water and Deep-water Carbonate Deposits: Agua Amarga Basin, Southeast Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dvoretsky, Rachel Ana

    2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This study documents the basin-wide stratigraphic characterization and 3-D reservoir-analog modeling of upper Miocene carbonate deposits in the Agua Amarga basin, southeast Spain. Paleotopography and relative fluctuations in sea level were primary...

  14. Sequence stratigraphic and sedimentologic analysis of the Permian San Andres Formation (upper Leonardian-lower Guadalupian), Northwest Shelf, Permian Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beserra, Troy Brett

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SEQUENCE STRATIGRAPHIC AND SEDIMENTOLOGIC ANALYSIS OF THE PERMIAN SAN ANDRES FORMATION (UPPER LEONARDIAN-LOWER GUADALUPIAN), NORTHWEST SHELF, PERMIAN BASIN A Thesis by TROY BRETT BESERRA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A...&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1994 Major Subject: Geology SEQUENCE STRATIGRAPHIC AND SEDIMENTOLOGIC ANALYSIS OF THE PERMIAN SAN ANDRES FORMATION (UPPER LEONARDIAN-LOWER GUADALUPIANl...

  15. Towards application of a climate-index for Case study in the Citarum upper river basin Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    Indonesia Ramon van Bruggen De Bilt, 2013 | Internal report; IR-2013-06 #12;#12;Towards application of a climate-index for dengue incidence Case study in the Citarum upper river basin Indonesia Master Thesis during this work and for their warm welcome during my stay in Indonesia. At last my thanks go

  16. Stratigraphic cross sections of Upper Cretaceous rocks across San Juan basin, northwestern New Mexico and southwestern Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molenaar, C.M.; Baird, J.K. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Upper Cretaceous rocks of the San Juan basin, which are as much as 6,500 ft (1,980 m) thick, comprise a classic sequence of intertonguing marine and nonmarine facies. Geophysical logs from closely spaced drill holes throughout most of the basin provide data for detailed correlations of the rock units, which can be made by using numerous time marker beds within the marine shale sections. These marker beds provide a time framework for construction of cross sections that show (1) diachronism and stratigraphic rise of shoreface sandstone bodies associated with the four major transgressions and regressions of the Western Interior seaway within the basin, (2) shelf to very low-angle slope (< 0.25{degree}) to basinal topography, (3) Coniacian (basal Niobrara) unconformity, (4) low-amplitude paleostructural features, and (5) low-relief differential compaction features associated with lateral heterogeneities in sand-shale sections.

  17. Seismogenic zone input: the upper plate contribution in Costa Rica. Structural analysis of the Osa Mlange.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royal Holloway, University of London

    transformations, or fluid pressure changes is leading to the locking and onset of earthquakes with depth along drilling experiment designed to reach the seismogenic portion of the plate boundary. Recent drilling has

  18. Diagenesis of the sandflat and mudflat facies of the upper Queen Formation, Midland basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mckone, C.J.; Malicse, A.; Mazzullo, J.M. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station (United States))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The upper Queen Formation (Permian, Guadalupian) of the Midland basin, Texas, consists of cyclically interbedded clastics and evaporites that were deposited in a fluvial-dominated continental sabkha environment. Fluvial sandflat deposits, consisting of thin units (0.2-5.0 m) of very fine grained arkosic sandstones constitute reservoir horizons, whereas 0.1-1.3 m thick units of coarse siltstones and evaporites of playa-mudflat deposits are nonproductive. This study addresses the diagenetic histories of the reservoir and nonreservoir clastics. The primary porosity of the clastics was first reduced by pore-filling hematitic smectite clay, anhydrite, and dolomite during an early diagenetic phase. Subsequent dissolution of the anhydrite and dolomite by acidic pore-waters created high porosities (mean = 15%) and permeabilities (mean = 70 md) in the sandflat deposits, porosities which were only slightly occluded by later dissolution and reprecipitation of grain-lining smectite. Pore-water movement and subsequent hydrocarbon migration were both controlled by the coarser grain size and lower clay-matrix and silt content of these sandflat deposits. In contrast, the finer grain size and higher clay-matrix and silt content prevented similar dissolution of cements within the mudflat facies, which have significantly lower porosities (mean{lt}10%) and permeabilities (mean{lt}0.1 md). Fluids and gases used in enhanced recovery techniques will follow pathways created by dissolution of anhydrite and dolomite cements within the sandflat facies. However, caution must be used with fluids that can cause swelling of the grain-lining smectite.

  19. Origin of gaseous hydrocarbons from Upper Cretaceous and Tertiary strata in the Piceance basin, western Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, David Jonathan

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by the Douglas Creek arch. The Piceance basin contains commercial quantities of both liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons in Tertiary-age oil shales and in tight Cretaceous-age sandstone reservoirs (Rice, 1993). Iles and Williams Fork strata deeper in the basin...

  20. A depositional model in the Arabian Intrashelf basin: The Upper Jurassic Hanifa reservoir of Abqaiq field, Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, D.L. (Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abqaiq field is a northeast-trending anticline approximately 60 km long and 12 km wide and contains several reservoirs. The 100 m thick Hanifa Reservoir interval consists of interlayered peloidal packstone and wackestone with subordinate dolomite and anhydrite. During an Upper Jurassic relative sea level lowstand, paleotopography within the Arabian Intrashelf basin localized fine-grained packstone into isolated mounds over the Abqaiq South Dome area, while muddier facies were being deposited over the North Nose. The Abqaiq Hanifa carbonate mound was zoned using sequence stratigraphy as a conceptual framework to ensure that chronostratigraphic relationships were honored, and that the subsequent computer model would therefore accurately reflect spatial porosity continuity within the reservoir. The Hanifa Reservoir was subdivided into five widely correlative zones that approximate separate parasequences, each beginning with tight mudstone-wackestone and grading upward into porous wackestone-packstone. Sequence stratigraphy interpretations are based on regional wireline log correlations combined with core descriptions and show the Abqaiq Hanifa to be time equivalent to only the upper few meters of the Hanifa Reservoir in fields to the north. In addition to reservoir modeling utility, these two general intrashelf basin settings have potential for stratigraphic traps. Wherever reservoir-quality rock can be found, proximity to the Hanifa/Hadriya source rocks-the source for much of Saudi Arabia's vast reserves-makes the Hanifa a favorable exploration target.

  1. Norphlet Formation (Upper Jurassic) sand erg: depositional model for northeastern De Soto salt basin, eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kemmer, D.A.; Reagan, R.L.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Available well control, seismic reflection geometries, and seismic modeling suggest the interpretation of a Norphlet Formation (Upper Jurassic) sand erg in the northeastern De Soto salt basin. Ranging in thickness from less than 100 ft to nearly 1000 ft, the Norphlet erg encompasses an area of approximately 700 mi/sup 2/. Separated from the major gas accumulation in the Norphlet in the Mobile Bay area by the offshore extension of the Pensacola arch, the Norphlet erg appears to be oriented transverse to the axis of the De Soto salt basin. Seismic signatures for the Smackover carbonate, Norphlet sand, and Louann Salt intervals are investigated using synthetic seismograms generated from six wells in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. General characteristics about the reflection coefficients from the major units in the interval are noted. The reflection coefficient information and synthetic seismograms are used to interpret seismic data on a regional basis. Two-dimensional, vertical-incidence, ray-trace modeling of the seismic data is done to aid the interpretation on a detailed basis. Interpreted Norphlet sandstone thicknesses and Louann Salt structures are combined to support the Norphlet Formation sand erg hypothesis.

  2. Depositional environment of upper cretaceous Lewis sandstones, Sand Wash Basin, Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reinarts, Mary Susan

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the three types of turbidite channels. After Berg (1978) 44 47 49 50 LIST OF FIGURES - Continued Figure Page lg Idealized depositional model for turbi dite constructional channels. After Berg (1978) 51 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 Regional... (1962) from turbidity current deposits . Bouma 's complete turbi di te is defined as follows: pelitic shale upper unit of parallel laminae D current ripple unit lower unit of parallel laminae 8 massive graded unit In terms of flow regime...

  3. Role of halite in the evolution of sandstone porosity, upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation, Mississippi salt basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schenk, C.J.; Schmoker, J.W. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of petrographic point-count data, cement paragenesis, and scanning electron microscopy examination of pores has shown that poikilitic halite cement in sandstones of the Norphlet Formation in a core from Wayne County, Mississippi, formed following cementation by quartz, feldspar, dolomite, and anhydrite. Intergranular volume ranges from 26 to 42%, averaging 35%, indicating that an average of 10% of the rock volume was lost to compaction, and a further 10-15%, was lost to cementation prior to halite cementation, assuming a depositional porosity of about 45%. Most halite occurs as intergranular cement, but some halite is present as intragranular cement within framework feldspars and lithic fragments. Halite is easily removed from a sandstone during coring, slabbing, and thin-section preparation techniques that do not use oil-based fluids and muds, so the amount of porosity in these samples that is a product of artificial removal of halite is unknown. Although the present and former distribution of halite is poorly known, natural halite dissolution could have produced about 20% secondary porosity in the Norphlet Formation at depth in this part of the Mississippi Salt basin.

  4. Application of the ELOHA Framework to Regulated Rivers in the Upper Tennessee River Basin: A Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL; Orth, Dr. Donald J [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Dolloff, Dr. Charles A [USDA Forest Service, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences, Virginia Tech; Mathews, David C [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order for habitat restoration in regulated rivers to be effective at large scales, broadly applicable frameworks are needed that provide measurable objectives and contexts for management. The Ecological Limits of Hydrologic Alteration (ELOHA) framework was created as a template to assess hydrologic alterations, develop relationships between altered streamflow and ecology, and establish environmental flow standards. We tested the utility of ELOHA in informing flow restoration applications for fish and riparian communities in regulated rivers in the Upper Tennessee River Basin (UTRB). We followed the steps of ELOHA to generate flow alteration-ecological response relationships and then determined whether those relationships could predict fish and riparian responses to flow restoration in the Cheoah River, a regulated system within the UTRB. Although ELOHA provided a robust template to construct hydrologic information and predict hydrology for ungaged locations, our results do not support the assertion that over-generalized univariate relationships between flow and ecology can produce results sufficient to guide management in regulated rivers. After constructing multivariate models, we successfully developed predictive relationships between flow alterations and fish/riparian responses. In accordance with model predictions, riparian encroachment displayed consistent decreases with increases in flow magnitude in the Cheoah River; however, fish richness did not increase as predicted four years post- restoration. Our results suggest that altered temperature and substrate and the current disturbance regime may have reduced opportunities for fish species colonization. Our case study highlights the need for interdisciplinary science in defining environmental flows for regulated rivers and the need for adaptive management approaches once flows are restored.

  5. Crack-arrest behavior in SEN wide plates of low-upper-shelf base metal tested under nonisothermal conditions: WP-2 series

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naus, D.J.; Keeney-Walker, J.; Bass, B.R.; Robinson, G.C. Jr.; Iskander, S.K.; Alexander, D.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Fields, R.J.; deWit, R.; Low, S.R. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Schwartz, C.W. [Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Johansson, I.B. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory under the sponsorship of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission is conducting analytical and experimental studies aimed at understanding the circumstances that would initiate the growth of an existing crack in a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and the conditions leading to arrest of a propagating crack. Objectives of these studies are to determine (1) if the material will exhibit crack-arrest behavior when the driving force on a crack exceeds the ASME limit, (2) the relationship between K{sub Ia} and temperature, and (3) the interaction of fracture modes (arrest, stable crack growth, unstable crack growth, and tensile instability) when arrest occurs at high temperatures. In meeting these objectives, crack-arrest data are being developed over an expanded temperature range through tests involving large thermally shocked cylinders, pressurized thermally shocked vessels, and wide-plate specimens. The wide-plate specimens provide the opportunity for a significant number of data points to be obtained at relatively affordable costs. These tests are designed to provide fracture-toughness measurements approaching or above the onset of the Charpy upper-shelf regime in a rising toughness region and with an increasing driving force. This document discusses test methodology and results. 23 refs., 92 figs., 25 tabs.

  6. Separating snow, clean and debris covered ice in the Upper Indus Basin, Hindukush-Karakoram-Himalayas, using Landsat images between 1998 and 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan,Asif,; Naz, Bibi S.; Bowling,Laura C.

    1 Separating snow, clean and debris covered ice in the Upper 1 Indus Basin, Hindukush-Karakoram-Himalayas, using Landsat 2 images between 1998-2002 3 Asif Khan1,*, Bibi S. Naz2,3 and, Laura C. Bowling2 4 1Department of Engineering... and 2002 were selected at the end of 172 the melting season (i.e. July, August and September), however, to cover the whole UIB an image 173 8 from 2009 has also been included. Furthermore, to maintain consistency in the identification of 174 glacier...

  7. Nonassociated gas resources in low-permeability sandstone reservoirs, lower tertiary Wasatch Formation, and upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group, Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fouch, T.D.; Schmoker, J.W.; Boone, L.E.; Wandrey, C.J.; Crovelli, R.A.; Butler, W.C.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Geological Survey recognizes six major plays for nonassociated gas in Tertiary and Upper Cretaceous low-permeability strata of the Uinta Basin, Utah. For purposes of this study, plays without gas/water contacts are separated from those with such contacts. Continuous-saturation accumulations are essentially single fields, so large in areal extent and so heterogeneous that their development cannot be properly modeled as field growth. Fields developed in gas-saturated plays are not restricted to structural or stratigraphic traps and they are developed in any structural position where permeability conduits occur such as that provided by natural open fractures. Other fields in the basin have gas/water contacts and the rocks are water-bearing away from structural culmination`s. The plays can be assigned to two groups. Group 1 plays are those in which gas/water contacts are rare to absent and the strata are gas saturated. Group 2 plays contain reservoirs in which both gas-saturated strata and rocks with gas/water contacts seem to coexist. Most units in the basin that have received a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) designation as tight are in the main producing areas and are within Group 1 plays. Some rocks in Group 2 plays may not meet FERC requirements as tight reservoirs. However, we suggest that in the Uinta Basin that the extent of low-permeability rocks, and therefore resources, extends well beyond the limits of current FERC designated boundaries for tight reservoirs. Potential additions to gas reserves from gas-saturated tight reservoirs in the Tertiary Wasatch Formation and Cretaceous Mesaverde Group in the Uinta Basin, Utah is 10 TCF. If the potential additions to reserves in strata in which both gas-saturated and free water-bearing rocks exist are added to those of Group 1 plays, the volume is 13 TCF.

  8. Characteristics of the upper crust and magma chambers along the spreading centers of the Lau back-arc basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dingler, Allison Maria Jacobs

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    G. , 1990. Origin of petrology and geochemistry of submarinerate, morphology, and petrology. Upper crustal refractione.g. , morphology, petrology, seismicity, and hydrothermal

  9. Hydrodynamic potential of upper cretaceous Mesaverde group and Dakota formation, San Juan Basin, northwestern New Mexico and southwestern Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dougless, Thomas Clay

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wells near the present site of the New Mexico Public Service power plants in 1912-13; (6) Mesa Verde Oil Company drilled two wells near Flora Vista in 1918-19; and the T. E. Williams Syndicate drilled the the deepest test to date (3, 900 ft) 5 miles... sandstones (Deischl, 1973). The central basin Dakota discovery well was drilled in 1947 in the Angel Peak area south of Bloomfield, New Mexico (Matheny, 1964). Development of the Dakota reserves within the basin was initially very slow due to a lack...

  10. Reservoir characterization of the upper Merecure and lower Oficina Formations sands in the Leona Este Field, Eastern Venezuela Basin 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flores Millan, Maria Carolina

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The "S5", "T" and "U1" sands, traditionally described as part of the lower section of the "Oficina" Formation, and the "U2" sand, as part of the upper interval of the "Merecure" Formation, contain the largest oil remaining ...

  11. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and n-alkanes in sediments of the Upper Scheldt River Basin: contamination levels and source apportionment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Author manuscript, published in "Journal of Environmental Monitoring 11, 5 (2009) 1086-1093" DOI : 10 and Antwerp. Anthropogenic activities including textile and chemical industries, transport, coal mining, paper) has been developing an integrated and coordinated water management plan for the whole river basin

  12. Evidence for an allocyclic origin of marine strata bounding the Upper Carboniferous Mary Lee coal zone, Warrior Basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gastaldo, R.A. (Auburn Univ., AL (United States). Dept. of Geology); Demko, T.M. (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Geosciences)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Black Warrior Basin, a triangular foreland basin of Carboniferous age, is located at the southern end of the Appalachian orogen. A southwestward wedge of Mississippian and Lower Pennsylvanian sedimentary rocks occurs in the basin. The generally accepted model for basin-fill involves the progradation of a single delta, or multiple deltas (the Pottsville Formation), over an offshore carbonate bank (the Bangor Limestone). The Pottsville Formation is typical of Euramerican Carboniferous strata and is composed of the cyclical alternation of marine and terrestrial facies. The deposition of marine facies overlying terrestrial facies has been interpreted to have been the result of delta lobe switching and the compaction of underlying sediments, hence, autocyclic processes. Sedimentological features associated with the marine strata bounding the Mary Lee coal zone, the informal Jagger bedrock sandstone below and the Morris Shale above, are not indicative of circumstances generated by autocyclic processes. Rather, the marine strata highlight features resulting from allocyclic processes. The Jagger bedrock sandstone is a thick (> 15 m) sublitharenite interpreted as representing subtidal, shore-parallel bars. It is a sandstone body that was stranded on the shoreline during regional regression. The terrestrial coal-bearing strata are truncated by an erosional surface, marking the base of the Morris Shale. This ravinement surface is overlain by a ravinement bed representing a substrate developed by regional transgressive erosion that was subsequently colonized by open-marine macroinvertebrates. The ravinement bed is interpreted as a condensed section that accumulated under maximum water depth. Both of these features are indicative of development in response to extrinsic causes rather than intrinsic ones.

  13. Reservoir characterization of the upper Merecure and lower Oficina Formations sands in the Leona Este Field, Eastern Venezuela Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flores Millan, Maria Carolina

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The "S5", "T" and "U1" sands, traditionally described as part of the lower section of the "Oficina" Formation, and the "U2" sand, as part of the upper interval of the "Merecure" Formation, contain the largest oil remaining reserves of the Leona Este...

  14. Fluvial facies architecture in small-scale river systems in the Upper Dupi Tila Formation, northeast Bengal Basin, Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulp, Mark

    Fluvial facies architecture in small-scale river systems in the Upper Dupi Tila Formation small-scale fining-upward cycles (average 4.5 m thick). Facies architectural elements include channel. Understanding of facies architecture and sand body geometry of this Formation is crucial in examining the issue

  15. River Basin Commissions (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation establishes river basin commissions, for the Kankakee, Maumee, St. Joseph, and Upper Wabash Rivers. The commissions facilitate and foster cooperative planning and coordinated...

  16. Depositional environment of the Caballos Formation, San Francisco field, Neiva sub-basin, Upper Magdalena Valley, Colombia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sneider, John Scott

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ft. Both the sandstones are capped by marine shales. The Caballos Formation was deposited during a world- wide transgression, and rests nonconformably on Jurassic volcanics. The Lower Caballos is composed of braided stream deposits.... The Middle Caballos consists of shale and sandy shale deposited in restricted to open- marine and bay environments. The Upper Caballos was deposited in a fluvial-deltaic environment, and individual sandstone units, which are separated by shale, have a...

  17. Depositional environment of the Caballos Formation, San Francisco field, Neiva sub-basin, Upper Magdalena Valley, Colombia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sneider, John Scott

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ft. Both the sandstones are capped by marine shales. The Caballos Formation was deposited during a world- wide transgression, and rests nonconformably on Jurassic volcanics. The Lower Caballos is composed of braided stream deposits.... The Middle Caballos consists of shale and sandy shale deposited in restricted to open- marine and bay environments. The Upper Caballos was deposited in a fluvial-deltaic environment, and individual sandstone units, which are separated by shale, have a...

  18. Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocial Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearsons, Todd N.; James, Brenda B.; Johnson, Christopher L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines some of the factors that can influence the success of supplementation, which is currently being tested in the Yakima Basin using upper Yakima stock of spring chinook salmon. Supplementation success in the Yakima Basin is defined relative to four topic areas: natural production, genetics, ecological interactions, and harvest (Busack et al. 1997). The success of spring chinook salmon supplementation in the Yakima Basin is dependent, in part, upon fish culture practices and favorable physical and biological conditions in the natural environment (Busack et al. 1997). Shortfalls in either of these two topics (i.e., failure in culturing many fish that have high long-term fitness or environmental conditions that constrain spring chinook salmon production) will cause supplementation success to be limited. For example, inadvertent selection or propagation of spring chinook that residualize or precocially mature may hinder supplementation success. Spring chinook salmon that residualize (do not migrate during the normal migration period) may have lower survival rates than migrants and, additionally, may interact with wild fish and cause unacceptable impacts to non-target taxa. Large numbers of precocials (nonanadromous spawners) may increase competition for females and significantly skew ratios of offspring sired by nonanadromous males, which could result in more nonanadromous spring chinook in future generations. Conditions in the natural environment may also limit the success of spring chinook supplementation. For example, intra or interspecific competition may constrain spring chinook salmon production. Spring chinook salmon juveniles may compete with each other for food or space or compete with other species that have similar ecological requirements. Monitoring of spring chinook salmon residuals, precocials, prey abundance, carrying capacity, and competition will help researchers interpret why supplementation is working or not working (Busack et al. 1997). Monitoring ecological interactions will be accomplished using interactions indices. Interactions indices will be used to index the availability of prey and competition for food and space. The tasks described below represent various subject areas of juvenile spring chinook salmon monitoring but are treated together because they can be accomplished using similar methods and are therefore more cost efficient than if treated separately. Three areas of investigation we pursued in this work were: (1) strong interactor monitoring (competition index and prey index), (2) carrying capacity monitoring (microhabitat monitoring); (3) residual and precocial salmon monitoring (abundance). This report is organized into three chapters to represent these three areas of investigation. Data were collected during the summer and fall, 2002 in index sections of the upper Yakima Basin (Figure 1). Hatchery reared spring chinook salmon were first released during the spring of 1999. The monitoring plan for the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project calls for the continued monitoring of the variables covered in this report. All findings in this report should be considered preliminary and subject to further revision as more data and analytical results become available.

  19. Regional porosity trends of the Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation in southwestern Alabama and vicinity, with comparisons to formations of other basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmoker, J.W.; Schenk, C.J. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandstone porosity of the Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation in southwestern Alabama and vicinity decreases systematically as depth and thermal maturity increase over a wide range. Median porosity is about 25% where equivalent vitrinite reflectance (R[sub o]) is slightly over 0.7% in the northern part of the study area (Clarke County, Mississippi). Median porosity is reduced to 8% where R[sub o] approaches 2.7% in the southern part of the study area (state waters of Mobile Bay). Porosity of the cemented, tight zone at the top of the Norphlet in downdip locations is roughly 10% lower than porosities of facies underlying the tight zone, but nevertheless is slightly above the norm for other sandstones at similar R[sub o] levels. Porosity of dune facies is consistently 2-5% higher than that of interdune facies, other factors being equal. Our data show 3-6% higher porosity in chlorite-dominated intervals relative to intervals where illite is the dominant clay mineral. Norphlet porosity has little or no correlation with position relative to the present-day hydrocarbon-water contact. Based on comparisons at similar R[sub o] levels, median (50th-percentile) Norphlet porosity exceeds porosities of [open quotes]typical[close quotes] sandstones in other basins by more than a factor of two throughout the study area. Even the lower (10th-percentile) Norphlet porosities are higher than median porosities of sandstones in general. 48 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocial Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin, 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, Brenda B.; Pearsons, Todd N.; McMichael, Geoffrey A. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Select ecological interactions and spring chinook salmon residual/precocial abundance were monitored in 1998 as part of the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project's supplementation monitoring program. Monitoring these variables is part of an effort to help evaluate the factors that contribute to, or limit supplementation success. The ecological interactions that were monitored were prey consumption, competition for food, and competition for space. The abundance of spring chinook salmon life-history forms that have the potential to be influenced by supplementation and that have important ecological and genetic roles were monitored (residuals and precocials). Residual spring chinook salmon do not migrate to the ocean during the normal emigration period and continue to rear in freshwater. Precocials are those salmon that precocially mature in freshwater. The purpose of sampling during 1998 was to collect baseline data one year prior to the release of hatchery spring chinook salmon which occurred during the spring of 1999. All sampling that the authors report on here was conducted in upper Yakima River during summer and fall 1998. The stomach fullness of juvenile spring chinook salmon during the summer and fall averaged 12%. The food competition index suggested that mountain whitefish (0.59), rainbow trout (0.55), and redside shiner (0.55) were competing for food with spring chinook salmon. The space competition index suggested that rainbow trout (0.31) and redside shiner (0.39) were competing for space with spring chinook salmon but mountain whitefish (0.05) were not. Age-0 spring chinook salmon selected a fairly narrow range of microhabitat parameters in the summer and fall relative to what was available. Mean focal depths and velocities for age 0 spring chinook salmon during the summer were 0.5 m {+-} 0.2 m and 0.26 m/s {+-} 0.19 m/s, and during the fall 0.5 m {+-} 0.2 m and 0.24 m/s {+-} 0.18 m/s. Among potential competitors, age 1+ rainbow trout exhibited the greatest degree of microhabitat overlap with spring chinook salmon. Abundance of naturally occurring spring chinook salmon residuals (age 1+ during the summer) was low (< 0.007/m), representing less than 2% of the naturally produced spring chinook salmon (age 0+ and age 1+ during the summer). Abundance of naturally occurring spring chinook salmon that complete their life cycle in freshwater was high relative to anadromous adults. The authors observed an average of 9.5 precocially mature spring chinook salmon on redds with anadromous adults. In addition, 87% of the redds with anadromous adults present also had precocial males attending. All findings in this report should be considered preliminary and subject to further revision as more data and analytical results become available.

  1. Nuclear reactor alignment plate configuration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Altman, David A; Forsyth, David R; Smith, Richard E; Singleton, Norman R

    2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An alignment plate that is attached to a core barrel of a pressurized water reactor and fits within slots within a top plate of a lower core shroud and upper core plate to maintain lateral alignment of the reactor internals. The alignment plate is connected to the core barrel through two vertically-spaced dowel pins that extend from the outside surface of the core barrel through a reinforcement pad and into corresponding holes in the alignment plate. Additionally, threaded fasteners are inserted around the perimeter of the reinforcement pad and into the alignment plate to further secure the alignment plate to the core barrel. A fillet weld also is deposited around the perimeter of the reinforcement pad. To accomodate thermal growth between the alignment plate and the core barrel, a gap is left above, below and at both sides of one of the dowel pins in the alignment plate holes through with the dowel pins pass.

  2. Distribution of stress in the oceanic lithosphere beneath the Lau-Havre Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Altman, Larry Wayne

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . If the material injected into the basin floor came from the upper edge of the down-going slab, then it should be andesitic in composition just like the rocks of the volcanic frontal arc which are thought to have the same source. The CI CI CI Cl I I I I... arcs. In this theory, the Benioff zones do not delineate great thrust faults in the classical sense, but rather, they reflect underthrusting or subduction of lithospheric plates into the mantle beneath the arcs. The Origin of Marginal Basins...

  3. Horizontal Plate Plate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football Highdefault Sign InData inmaxHorizontal Plate Plate

  4. Diagenesis and petrophysics of the Upper Cretaceous, Pictured Cliffs Formation of the San Juan Basin, North West New Mexico and South West Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goberdhan, Helene C

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with the zone of maximum hydrocarbon production. This is the best reservoir in the Pictured Cliffs sandstones. Petrophysical rock type 3 forms a "diagenetic seal" to the north of the basin. Production "hot spots" may exists in zone 3, in sandstones with higher...

  5. active single basin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    subsidence histories of the Aquitaine Basin (Fig.8c) record a minor ac- celeration in subsidence. The shortening of the Australian plate adjacent to the basin is small (from 2...

  6. annecy basin eastern: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    subsidence histories of the Aquitaine Basin (Fig.8c) record a minor ac- celeration in subsidence. The shortening of the Australian plate adjacent to the basin is small (from 2...

  7. Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocious Male Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearsons, Todd N.; Johnson, Christopher L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); James, Brenda B. (Cascade Aquatics, Ellensburg, WA)

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines some of the factors that can influence the success of supplementation, which is currently being tested in the Yakima Basin using upper Yakima stock of spring chinook salmon. Supplementation success in the Yakima Basin is defined relative to four topic areas: natural production, genetics, ecological interactions, and harvest (Busack et al. 1997). The success of spring chinook salmon supplementation in the Yakima Basin is dependent, in part, upon fish culture practices and favorable physical and biological conditions in the natural environment (Busack et al. 1997; James et al. 1999; Pearsons et al., 2003; Pearsons et al. 2004). Shortfalls in either of these two topics (i.e., failure in culturing many fish that have high long-term fitness or environmental conditions that constrain spring chinook salmon production) will cause supplementation success to be limited. For example, inadvertent selection or propagation of spring chinook that residualize or precocially mature may hinder supplementation success. Spring chinook salmon that residualize (do not migrate during the normal migration period) may have lower survival rates than migrants and, additionally, may interact with wild fish and cause unacceptable impacts to non-target taxa. Large numbers of precocials (nonanadromous spawners) may increase competition for females and significantly skew ratios of offspring sired by nonanadromous males, which could result in more nonanadromous spring chinook in future generations. Conditions in the natural environment may also limit the success of spring chinook supplementation. For example, intra or interspecific competition may constrain spring chinook salmon production. Spring chinook salmon juveniles may compete with each other for food or space or compete with other species that have similar ecological requirements. Monitoring of spring chinook salmon residuals, precocials, prey abundance, carrying capacity, and competition will help researchers interpret why supplementation is working or not working (Busack et al. 1997). Monitoring ecological interactions will be accomplished using interactions indices. Interactions indices will be used to index the availability of prey and competition for food and space. The tasks described below represent various subject areas of juvenile spring chinook salmon monitoring but are treated together because they can be accomplished using similar methods and are therefore more cost efficient than if treated separately. Topics of investigation we pursued in this work were: (1) strong interactor monitoring (competition index and prey index), (2) carrying capacity monitoring (microhabitat monitoring); (3) residual and precocious male salmon monitoring (abundance); (4) performance of growth modulation in reducing precocious males during spawning; (5) incidence of predation by residualized chinook salmon; and (6) benefits of salmon carcasses to juvenile salmonids. This report is organized into six chapters to represent these topics of investigation. Data were collected during the summer and fall, 2004 in index sections of the upper Yakima Basin (Figure 1). Previous results on the topics in this report were reported in James et al. (1999), and Pearsons et al. (2003; 2004). Hatchery-reared spring chinook salmon were first released during the spring of 1999. The monitoring plan for the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project calls for the continued monitoring of the variables covered in this report. All findings in this report should be considered preliminary and subject to further revision as more data and analytical results become available.

  8. Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocial Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation Report 5 of 7, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearsons, Todd N.; Johnson, Christopher L.; James, Brenda B. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines some of the factors that can influence the success of supplementation, which is currently being tested in the Yakima Basin using upper Yakima stock of spring chinook salmon. Supplementation success in the Yakima Basin is defined relative to four topic areas: natural production, genetics, ecological interactions, and harvest (Busack et al. 1997). The success of spring chinook salmon supplementation in the Yakima Basin is dependent, in part, upon fish culture practices and favorable physical and biological conditions in the natural environment (Busack et al. 1997; James et al. 1999; Pearsons et al., 2003). Shortfalls in either of these two topics (i.e., failure in culturing many fish that have high long-term fitness or environmental conditions that constrain spring chinook salmon production) will cause supplementation success to be limited. For example, inadvertent selection or propagation of spring chinook that residualize or precocially mature may hinder supplementation success. Spring chinook salmon that residualize (do not migrate during the normal migration period) may have lower survival rates than migrants and, additionally, may interact with wild fish and cause unacceptable impacts to non-target taxa. Large numbers of precocials (nonanadromous spawners) may increase competition for females and significantly skew ratios of offspring sired by nonanadromous males, which could result in more nonanadromous spring chinook in future generations. Conditions in the natural environment may also limit the success of spring chinook supplementation. For example, intra or interspecific competition may constrain spring chinook salmon production. Spring chinook salmon juveniles may compete with each other for food or space or compete with other species that have similar ecological requirements. Monitoring of spring chinook salmon residuals, precocials, prey abundance, carrying capacity, and competition will help researchers interpret why supplementation is working or not working (Busack et al. 1997). Monitoring ecological interactions will be accomplished using interactions indices. Interactions indices will be used to index the availability of prey and competition for food and space. The tasks described below represent various subject areas of juvenile spring chinook salmon monitoring but are treated together because they can be accomplished using similar methods and are therefore more cost efficient than if treated separately. Three areas of investigation we pursued in this work were: (1) strong interactor monitoring (competition index and prey index), (2) carrying capacity monitoring (microhabitat monitoring); (3) residual and precocial salmon monitoring (abundance). This report is organized into three chapters to represent these three areas of investigation. Data were collected during the summer and fall, 2003 in index sections of the upper Yakima Basin (Figure 1). Previous results on the topics in this report were reported in James et al. (1999), and Pearsons et al. (2003). Hatchery-reared spring chinook salmon were first released during the spring of 1999. The monitoring plan for the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project calls for the continued monitoring of the variables covered in this report. All findings in this report should be considered preliminary and subject to further revision as more data and analytical results become available.

  9. Subsidence in the Michigan basin produced ~5 km of sedimentation over a period of more

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ABSTRACT Subsidence in the Michigan basin produced ~5 km of sedimentation over a period of more a plate tectonic framework for the his- tory of the Michigan basin. INTRODUCTION The Michigan basin of the Michigan basin has led to numerous proposals for basin subsidence mechanisms, including thermal contraction

  10. Cenozoic basin development in Hispaniola

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, P.; Burke, K.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four distinct generations of Cenozoic basins have developed in Hispaniola (Haiti and Dominican Republic) as a result of collisional or strike-slip interactions between the North America and Caribbean plates. First generation basins formed when the north-facing Hispaniola arc collided with the Bahama platform in the middle Eocene; because of large post-Eocene vertical movements, these basins are preserved locally in widely separated areas but contain several kilometers of arc and ophiolite-derived clastic marine sediments, probably deposited in thrust-loaded, flexure-type basins. Second generation basins, of which only one is exposed at the surface, formed during west-northwesterly strike-slip displacement of southern Cuba and northern Hispaniola relative to central Hispaniola during the middle to late Oligocene; deposition occurred along a 5-km (3-mi) wide fault-angle depression and consisted of about 2 km (1 mi) of submarine fan deposits. Third generation basins developed during post-Oligocene convergent strike-slip displacement across a restraining bend formed in central Hispaniola; the southern 2 basins are fairly symmetrical, thrust-bounded ramp valleys, and the third is an asymmetrical fault-angle basin. Fourth generation basins are pull-aparts formed during post-Miocene divergent strike-slip motion along a fault zone across southern Hispaniola. As in other Caribbean areas, good source rocks are present in all generations of basins, but suitable reservoir rocks are scarce. Proven reservoirs are late Neogene shallow marine and fluvial sandstones in third generation basins.

  11. analogs permian basin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Reservoir-analog Modeling of Upper Miocene Shallow-water and Deep-water Carbonate Deposits: Agua Amarga Basin, Southeast Spain. Open Access Theses and Dissertations...

  12. Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project: Short Project Overview of Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation in the Upper Yakima Basin; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Policy/Technical Involvement and Planning, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fast, David E.; Bosch, William J.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is on schedule to ascertain whether new artificial production techniques can be used to increase harvest and natural production of spring Chinook salmon while maintaining the long-term genetic fitness of the fish population being supplemented and keeping adverse genetic and ecological interactions with non-target species or stocks within acceptable limits. The Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility (CESRF) collected its first spring chinook brood stock in 1997, released its first fish in 1999, and age-4 adults have been returning since 2001. In these initial years of CESRF operation, recruitment of hatchery origin fish has exceeded that of fish spawning in the natural environment, but early indications are that hatchery origin fish are not as successful at spawning in the natural environment as natural origin fish when competition is relatively high. When competition is reduced, hatchery fish produced similar numbers of progeny as their wild counterparts. Most demographic variables are similar between natural and hatchery origin fish, however hatchery origin fish were smaller-at-age than natural origin fish. Long-term fitness of the target population is being evaluated by a large-scale test of domestication. Slight changes in predation vulnerability and competitive dominance, caused by domestication, were documented. Distribution of spawners has increased as a result of acclimation site location and salmon homing fidelity. Semi-natural rearing and predator avoidance training have not resulted in significant increases in survival of hatchery fish. However, growth manipulations in the hatchery appear to be reducing the number of precocious males produced by the YKFP and consequently increasing the number of migrants. Genetic impacts to non-target populations appear to be low because of the low stray rates of YKFP fish. Ecological impacts to valued non-target taxa were within containment objectives or impacts that were outside of containment objectives were not caused by supplementation activities. Some fish and bird piscivores have been estimated to consume large numbers of salmonids in the Yakima Basin. Natural production of Chinook salmon in the upper Yakima Basin appears to be density dependent under current conditions and may constrain the benefits of supplementation. However, such constraints (if they exist) could be countered by YKFP habitat actions that have resulted in: the protection of over 900 acres of prime floodplain habitat, reconnection and screening of over 15 miles of tributary habitat, substantial water savings through irrigation improvements, and restoration of over 80 acres of floodplain and side channels. Harvest opportunities for tribal and non-tribal fishers have also been enhanced, but are variable among years. The YKFP is still in the early stages of evaluation, and as such the data and findings presented in this report should be considered preliminary until further data is collected and analyses completed. Nonetheless, the YKFP has produced significant findings, and produced methodologies that can be used to evaluate and improve supplementation. A summary table of topical area performance is presented.

  13. Electroless copper plating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McHenry, M.R.

    1998-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An optimized electroless copper plating technique is described suitable for plating electroless copper upon ceramics. 12 figs.

  14. Mississippian facies relationships, eastern Anadarko basin, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peace, H.W. (Oryx Energy, Inc., Midland, TX (United States)); Forgotson, J.M. (Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman (United States))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mississippian strata in the eastern Anadarko basin record a gradual deepening of the basin. Late and post-Mississippian tectonism (Wichita and Arbuckle orogenies) fragmented the single large basin into the series of paired basins and uplifts recognized in the southern half of Oklahoma today. Lower Mississippian isopach and facies trends (Sycamore and Caney Formations) indicate that basinal strike in the study area (southeastern Anadarko basin) was predominantly east-west. Depositional environment interpretations made for Lower Mississippian strata suggest that the basin was partially sediment starved and exhibited a low shelf-to-basin gradient. Upper Mississippian isopach and facies trends suggest that basinal strike within the study area shifted from dominantly east-west to dominantly northwest-southeast due to Late Mississippian and Early Pennsylvanian uplift along the Nemaha ridge. Within the study area, the Chester Formation, composed of gray to dove-gray shales with interbedded limestones deposited on a carbonate shelf, thins depositionally into the basin and is thinnest at its facies boundary with the Springer Group and the upper portion of the Caney Formation. As basin subsidence rates accelerated, the southern edge of the Chester carbonate shelf was progressively drowned, causing a backstepping of the Chester Formation calcareous shale and carbonate facies. Springer Group sands and black shales transgressed northward over the drowned Chester Formation shelf.

  15. License Plate 1 License Plate 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Diane

    License Plate 1 License Plate 2 License Plate 3 License Plate 4 Single Vehicle $254 Multi Vehicle $264 ( up to 4 vehicles) Annual Decal Valid: 09/01/12 - 08/31/13 Fall /Spring Decal (Pick date range , then Single or Multi Vehicle) Multi Vehicles $200 (up to 4 vehicles) Select date range Valid 9/1/12 - 5

  16. Natural Salt Pollution and Water Supply Reliability in the Brazos River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.; Karama, Awes S.; Saleh, Ishtiaque; Ganze, C. Keith

    The Brazos River Basin is representative of several major river basins in the Southwestern United States in regard to natural salt pollution. Geologic formations underlying portions of the upper watersheds of the Brazos, Colorado, Pecos, Canadian...

  17. Negotiating nature : expertise and environment in the Klamath River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buchanan, Nicholas Seong Chul

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    "Negotiating Nature" explores resource management in action and the intertwined roles of law and science in environmental conflicts in the Upper Klamath River Basin in southern Oregon. I follow disputes over the management ...

  18. Earth's Decelerating Tectonic Plates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forte, A M; Moucha, R; Rowley, D B; Quere, S; Mitrovica, J X; Simmons, N A; Grand, S P

    2008-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Space geodetic and oceanic magnetic anomaly constraints on tectonic plate motions are employed to determine a new global map of present-day rates of change of plate velocities. This map shows that Earth's largest plate, the Pacific, is presently decelerating along with several other plates in the Pacific and Indo-Atlantic hemispheres. These plate decelerations contribute to an overall, globally averaged slowdown in tectonic plate speeds. The map of plate decelerations provides new and unique constraints on the dynamics of time-dependent convection in Earth's mantle. We employ a recently developed convection model constrained by seismic, geodynamic and mineral physics data to show that time-dependent changes in mantle buoyancy forces can explain the deceleration of the major plates in the Pacific and Indo-Atlantic hemispheres.

  19. Geology of Alabama's Black Warrior Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, E.A.; Bearden, B.L.; Holmes, J.W.; Shepard, B.K.

    1983-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Black Warrior basin of northwestern Alabama continues to be an exciting area for oil and gas exploration. Several potential pay zones and a variety of petroleum traps in the basin resulted in a large number of successful test wells, helping to make the basin one of the more attractive areas for continued exploration in the US. The Upper Mississippian sandstone reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin are the primary exploration targets, with the Carter and Lewis sandstones being the most prolific producers. These sanstones exhibit considerable lateral and vertical variability and no apparent regional trends for porosity and permeability development. Determining the depositional environments of the Carter and Lewis sandstones should enhance petroleum exploration in the basin by helping to identify reservoir geometry, areal extent, and quality. To date, the Carter sandstones has produced more than 700,000 bbl of oil and 100 billion CR of gas; the Lewis sandstone, over 5000 bbl of oil and 12 billion CF of gas.

  20. Upper internals arrangement for a pressurized water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singleton, Norman R; Altman, David A; Yu, Ching; Rex, James A; Forsyth, David R

    2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In a pressurized water reactor with all of the in-core instrumentation gaining access to the core through the reactor head, each fuel assembly in which the instrumentation is introduced is aligned with an upper internals instrumentation guide-way. In the elevations above the upper internals upper support assembly, the instrumentation is protected and aligned by upper mounted instrumentation columns that are part of the instrumentation guide-way and extend from the upper support assembly towards the reactor head in hue with a corresponding head penetration. The upper mounted instrumentation columns are supported laterally at one end by an upper guide tube and at the other end by the upper support plate.

  1. Nitrided Metallic Bipolar Plates

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    nitrided surface treatment. In this approach, an electrically-conductive and corrosion-resistant chromium-nitride surface layer is formed on the bipolar plate component by...

  2. Surface preparation and plating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dini, J.W.; Waldrop, F.B.; Reno, R.W.

    1982-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter covers electroplating and electroless nickel plating since coatings of this type play an important role in diamond turning technology. Items to be discussed include preparation of substrates prior to coating, plating defects such as pits and nodules and their influence on optics, the influence of stress in coatings, plating details for copper, gold, silver, and electroless nickel, and the importance of additives and their influence on grain size and structure of deposits. Some comments are made on future challenges that could be presented to the plating community to further improve the quality of coatings applied for diamond turning purposes. 60 references, 8 figures, 9 tables.

  3. Improved age control on early Homo fossils from the upper Burgi Member at Koobi Fora, Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Improved age control on early Homo fossils from the upper Burgi Member at Koobi Fora, Kenya in Areas 105 and 131 on the Karari Ridge in the eastern Turkana Basin (Kenya). We identify the base

  4. Improved age control on early Homo fossils from the upper Burgi Member at Koobi Fora, Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Improved age control on early Homo fossils from the upper Burgi Member at Koobi Fora, Kenya in Areas 105 and 131 on the Karari Ridge in the eastern Turkana Basin (Kenya). We identify the base

  5. Dose reduction improvements in storage basins of spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Fan-Hsiung F.

    1997-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Spent nuclear fuel in storage basins at the Hanford Site has corroded and contaminated basin water, which has leaked into the soil; the fuel also had deposited a layer of radioactive sludge on basin floors. The SNF is to be removed from the basins to protect the nearby Columbia River. Because the radiation level is high, measures have been taken to reduce the background dose rate to as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) to prevent radiation doses from becoming the limiting factor for removal of the SW in the basins to long-term dry storage. All activities of the SNF Project require application of ALARA principles for the workers. On the basis of these principles dose reduction improvements have been made by first identifying radiological sources. Principal radiological sources in the basin are basin walls, basin water, recirculation piping and equipment. Dose reduction activities focus on cleaning and coating basin walls to permit raising the water level, hydrolasing piping, and placing lead plates. In addition, the transfer bay floor will be refinished to make decontamination easier and reduce worker exposures in the radiation field. The background dose rates in the basin will be estimated before each task commences and after it is completed; these dose reduction data will provide the basis for cost benefit analysis.

  6. Basin analysis in the Illinois basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leighton, M.W. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (USA)); Haney, D. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington (USA)); Hester, N. (Indiana Geological Survey, Bloomington (USA))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In April 1989, the Illinois State Geological Survey and the Indiana and Kentucky Geological surveys formed the Illinois Basin Consortium (IBC) for the purpose of advancing the geologic understanding of the Illinois basin and of developing basin-wide studies for the assessment and wise development of the Illinois basin energy, mineral, and water resources. Cooperative efforts include work on the AAPG Interior Cratonic Sag Basin volume, Springfield coal study, Paducah CUSMAP study in cooperation with the US Geological Survey, Illinois Basin Cross Section Project, Geologic Society of America Coal Division field trip and workshop on Lower Pennsylvanian geology, workshops in basin analysis, and the Tri-State Committee on correlations in the Pennsylvanian System of the Illinois Basin. A network of 16 regional surface to basement cross sections portraying the structural and stratigraphic framework of the total sedimentary section of the entire basin is in preparation. Based on more than 140 of the deepest wells with wireline logs, the sections will show formation boundaries and gross lithofacies of the entire stratigraphic column. A set of basin-wide maps shows structure, thickness, and coal quality of the economically important Springfield coal seam. These maps were generated from recently joined computerized databases of the three member surveys of IBC. A unified stratigraphic nomenclature of the Pennsylvanian System is being developed, including seven new members and seven new formation names. The goal is to simplify, standardize, and gradually improve the stratigraphic terminology to be used in the Illinois basin.

  7. Simulating Sustainability: Conjunctive Land and Water Management in the Upper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    a series of micro-basins that function similarly to a multi-reservoir river system for water management arrangements for water management, and integration of geospatial information into "sustainability scenariosSimulating Sustainability: Conjunctive Land and Water Management in the Upper Santa Cruz River

  8. Geochemical and rheological constraints on the dynamics of the oceanic upper mantle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Jessica Mendelsohn

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I provide constraints on mantle convection through observations of the rheology and composition of the oceanic upper mantle. Convection cannot be directly observed, yet is a fundamental part of the plate tectonic cycle. ...

  9. Aperture-based antihydrogen gravity experiment: Parallel plate geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocha, J. R.; Hedlof, R. M.; Ordonez, C. A. [Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytical model and a Monte Carlo simulation are presented of an experiment that could be used to determine the direction of the acceleration of antihydrogen due to gravity. The experiment would rely on methods developed by existing antihydrogen research collaborations. The configuration consists of two circular, parallel plates that have an axis of symmetry directed away from the center of the earth. The plates are separated by a small vertical distance, and include one or more pairs of circular barriers that protrude from the upper and lower plates, thereby forming an aperture between the plates. Antihydrogen annihilations that occur just beyond each barrier, within a “shadow” region, are asymmetric on the upper plate relative to the lower plate. The probability for such annihilations is determined for a point, line and spheroidal source of antihydrogen. The production of 100,000 antiatoms is predicted to be necessary for the aperture-based experiment to indicate the direction of free fall acceleration of antimatter, provided that antihydrogen is produced within a sufficiently small antiproton plasma at a temperature of 4 K.

  10. Gravity modeling of the Song Hong basin: an insight into its crustal structure and implication for the formation of the basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Vu Giang

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3-D gravity inversion and rift stretching models are used in the Song Hong basin to determine the general configuration of the upper mantle and the mechanism for its formation in the region. The basin approximately 200 km wide by 600 km in length...

  11. Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

    2006-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Phase 1 (Concept Development) of the project has been data compilation; determination of the tectonic, depositional, burial, and thermal maturation histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin; basin modeling (geohistory, thermal maturation, hydrocarbon expulsion); petroleum system identification; comparative basin evaluation; and resource assessment. Existing information on the North Louisiana Salt Basin has been evaluated, an electronic database has been developed, and regional cross sections have been prepared. Structure, isopach and formation lithology maps have been constructed, and burial history, thermal maturation history, and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been prepared. Seismic data, cross sections, subsurface maps and burial history, thermal maturation history, and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been used in evaluating the tectonic, depositional, burial and thermal maturation histories of the basin. Oil and gas reservoirs have been found to be associated with salt-supported anticlinal and domal features (salt pillows, turtle structures and piercement domes); with normal faulting associated with the northern basin margin and listric down-to-the-basin faults (state-line fault complex) and faulted salt features; and with combination structural and stratigraphic features (Sabine and Monroe Uplifts) and monoclinal features with lithologic variations. Petroleum reservoirs include Upper Jurassic and Cretaceous fluvial-deltaic sandstone facies; shoreline, marine bar and shallow shelf sandstone facies; and carbonate shoal, shelf and reef facies. Cretaceous unconformities significantly contribute to the hydrocarbon trapping mechanism capacity in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. The chief petroleum source rock in this basin is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone beds. The generation of hydrocarbons from Smackover lime mudstone was initiated during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary. Hydrocarbon expulsion commenced during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary with peak expulsion occurring during the Early to Late Cretaceous. The geohistory of the North Louisiana Salt Basin is comparable to the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin with the major difference being the elevated heat flow the strata in the North Louisiana Salt Basin experienced in the Cretaceous due primarily to reactivation of upward movement, igneous activity, and erosion associated with the Monroe and Sabine Uplifts. Potential undiscovered reservoirs in the North Louisiana Salt Basin are Triassic Eagle Mills sandstone and deeply buried Upper Jurassic sandstone and limestone. Potential underdeveloped reservoirs include Lower Cretaceous sandstone and limestone and Upper Cretaceous sandstone.

  12. Sedimentation and tectonics in the southern Bida Basin, Nigeria: depositional response to varying tectonic context

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braide, S.P. (Federal Univ. of Technology, Minna (Nigeria))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Upper Cretaceous Bida basin of central Nigeria is sandwiched between the Precambrian schist belts of the Northern Nigerian massif and the West African craton. Of interest is the southern part of the basin, which developed in continental settings, because the facies architecture of the sedimentary fill suggests a close relation between sedimentation dynamics and basin margin tectonics. This relationship is significant to an understanding of the basin's origin, which has been controversial. A simple sag and rift origin has been suggested, and consequently dominated the negative thinking on the hydrocarbon prospects of the basin which were considered poor. This detailed study of the facies indicates rapid basin-wide changes from various alluvial fan facies through flood-basin and deltaic facies to lacustrine facies. Paleogeographic reconstruction suggests lacustrine environments were widespread and elongate. Lacustrine environments occurred at the basin's axis and close to the margins. This suggests the depocenter must have migrated during the basin's depositional history and subsided rapidly to accommodate the 3.5-km-thick sedimentary fill. Although distinguishing pull-apart basins from rift basins, based solely on sedimentologic grounds, may be difficult, the temporal migration of the depocenter, as well as the basin architecture of upward coarsening cyclicity, show a strong tectonic and structural overprint that suggests a tectonic framework for the Southern Bida basin similar in origin to a pull-apart basin.

  13. Nitrided Metallic Bipolar Plates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brady, Michael P [ORNL; Tortorelli, Peter F [ORNL; Pihl, Josh A [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL; Vitek, John Michael [ORNL; Wang, Heli [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Turner, John [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Wilson, Mahlon [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Garzon, Fernando [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Rockward, Tommy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Connors, Dan [GenCell Corp; Rakowski, Jim [Allegheny Ludlum; Gervasio, Don [Arizona State University

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives are: (1) Develop and optimize stainless steel alloys amenable to formation of a protective Cr-nitride surface by gas nitridation, at a sufficiently low cost to meet DOE targets and with sufficient ductility to permit manufacture by stamping. (2) Demonstrate capability of nitridation to yield high-quality stainless steel bipolar plates from thin stamped alloy foils (no significant stamped foil warping or embrittlement). (3) Demonstrate single-cell fuel cell performance of stamped and nitrided alloy foils equivalent to that of machined graphite plates of the same flow-field design ({approx}750-1,000 h, cyclic conditions, to include quantification of metal ion contamination of the membrane electrode assembly [MEA] and contact resistance increase attributable to the bipolar plates). (4) Demonstrate potential for adoption in automotive fuel cell stacks. Thin stamped metallic bipolar plates offer the potential for (1) significantly lower cost than currently-used machined graphite bipolar plates, (2) reduced weight/volume, and (3) better performance and amenability to high volume manufacture than developmental polymer/carbon fiber and graphite composite bipolar plates. However, most metals exhibit inadequate corrosion resistance in proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) environments. This behavior leads to high electrical resistance due to the formation of surface oxides and/or contamination of the MEA by metallic ions, both of which can significantly degrade fuel cell performance. Metal nitrides offer electrical conductivities up to an order of magnitude greater than that of graphite and are highly corrosion resistant. Unfortunately, most conventional coating methods (for metal nitrides) are too expensive for PEMFC stack commercialization or tend to leave pinhole defects, which result in accelerated local corrosion and unacceptable performance.

  14. Plating under reduced pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dini, J.W.; Beat, T.G.; Cowden, W.C. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Ryan, L.E.; Hewitt, W.B. (TRW, Inc., Redondo Beach, CA (United States))

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plating under reduced pressure was evaluated for both electroless nickel and electrodeposited copper systems. The objective was to reduce pitting of these coatings thereby further enhancing their usage for diamond turning applications. Cursory experiments with electroless nickel showed reduced porosity when deposition was done at around 500 torr. Detailed experiments with electrodeposited copper at around 100 torr provided similar results. Scanning tunneling microscopy was effectively used to show the improvement in the copper deposits plated under reduced pressure. Benefits included reduced surface roughness and finer and denser grain structure.

  15. BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard; Ronald K. Zimmerman

    2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been data compilation and the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin and basin modeling and petroleum system identification. In the first nine (9) months of Year 2, the research focus was on the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories, and during the remainder of the year the emphasis has basin modeling and petroleum system identification. Existing information on the North Louisiana Salt Basin has been evaluated, an electronic database has been developed, regional cross sections have been prepared, structure and isopach maps have been constructed, and burial history, thermal maturation history and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been prepared. Seismic data, cross sections, subsurface maps and related profiles have been used in evaluating the tectonic, depositional, burial and thermal maturation histories of the basin. Oil and gas reservoirs have been found to be associated with salt-supported anticlinal and domal features (salt pillows, turtle structures and piercement domes); with normal faulting associated with the northern basin margin and listric down-to-the-basin faults (state-line fault complex) and faulted salt features; and with combination structural and stratigraphic features (Sabine and Monroe Uplifts) and monoclinal features with lithologic variations. Petroleum reservoirs are mainly Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous fluvial-deltaic sandstone facies and Lower Cretaceous and Upper Cretaceous shoreline, marine bar and shallow shelf sandstone facies. Cretaceous unconformities significantly contribute to the hydrocarbon trapping mechanism capacity in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. The chief petroleum source rock in this basin is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone beds. The generation of hydrocarbons from Smackover lime mudstone was initiated during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary. Hydrocarbon expulsion commenced during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary with peak expulsion occurring mainly during the Late Cretaceous.

  16. Characterization of the Upper Arkansas Basin, Chafee County, Colorado |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png El CER es una instituciónBy Shear-WaveOpen Energy

  17. Characterization of the Upper Arkansas Basin, Chaffee County, Colorado |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png El CER es una instituciónBy Shear-WaveOpen EnergyOpen

  18. Characterization of the upper Arkansas Basin, Chaffee County, Colorado |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png El CER es una instituciónBy Shear-WaveOpen EnergyOpenOpen

  19. Resistivity sections, Upper Arkansas River Basin, Colorado | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation,Maze - Making the PathInformation Log

  20. Water Basins Civil Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    Water Basins Civil Engineering Objective · Connect the study of water, water cycle, and ecosystems with engineering · Discuss how human impacts can effect our water basins, and how engineers lessen these impacts: · The basic concepts of water basins are why they are important · To use a topographic map · To delineate

  1. Sequence stratigraphy of the upper San Andres and Grayburg formations, Waddell Field, Crane County, Texas: implications for hydrocarbon reservoir distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinsonnault, Scott Michael

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The upper San Andres and Grayburg formations (Guadalupian) were deposited on carbonate platforms around the Permian Basin region and are extensive hydrocarbon reservoirs in the region. The Waddell Field (East Waddell Ranch) on the eastern margin...

  2. INL HIP Plate Fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. H. Park; C. R. Clark; J. F. Jue

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document outlines the process used to bond monolithic fuel plates by Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP). This method was developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program. These foils have been used in a number of irradiation experiments in support of the United States Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) program.

  3. P-wave re ections in 3-D model of coal basin with boulders (has been accepted for poster presentation at EAGE conference, Leipzig 1998)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    P-wave re ections in 3-D model of coal basin with boulders (has been accepted for poster to the computation of re ections in 3-D model of coal basin with four boulders located in the upper bed of the coal. Tselentis, pers. comm.). The model is composed of a low velocity layer, upper bed, four boulders, coal seam

  4. Microchannel plate streak camera

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, C.L.

    1984-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved streak camera in which a microchannel plate electron multiplier is used in place of or in combination with the photocathode used in prior streak cameras. The improved streak camera is far more sensitive to photons (uv to gamma-rays) than the conventional x-ray streak camera which uses a photocathode. The improved streak camera offers gamma-ray detection with high temporal resolution. It also offers low-energy x-ray detection without attenuation inside the cathode. Using the microchannel plate in the improved camera has resulted in a time resolution of about 150 ps, and has provided a sensitivity sufficient for 1000 keV x-rays.

  5. Microchannel plate streak camera

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, C.L.

    1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved streak camera in which a microchannel plate electron multiplier is used in place of or in combination with the photocathode used in prior streak cameras is disclosed. The improved streak camera is far more sensitive to photons (UV to gamma-rays) than the conventional x-ray streak camera which uses a photocathode. The improved streak camera offers gamma-ray detection with high temporal resolution. It also offers low-energy x-ray detection without attenuation inside the cathode. Using the microchannel plate in the improved camera has resulted in a time resolution of about 150 ps, and has provided a sensitivity sufficient for 1,000 KeV x-rays. 3 figs.

  6. Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup The Upper Los Alamos Canyon Project involves cleaning up hazardous materials left over from some of the Laboratory's earliest activities. Contact...

  7. Structural evolution and petroleum productivity of the Baltic basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulmishek, G.F. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Baltic basin is an oval depression located in the western part of the Russian craton; it occupies the eastern Baltic Sea and adjacent onshore areas. The basin contains more than 5,000 m of sedimentary rocks ranging from latest Proterozoic to Tertiary in age. These rocks consist of four tectonostratigraphic sequences deposited during major tectonic episodes of basin evolution. Principal unconformities separate the sequences. The basin is underlain by a rift probably filled with Upper Proterozoic rocks. Vendian and Lower Cambrian rocks (Baikalian sequence) form two northeast-trending depressions. The principal stage of the basin development was during deposition of a thick Middle Cambrian-Lower Devonian (Caledonian) sequence. This stage was terminated by the most intense deformations in the basin history. The Middle Devonian-Carboniferous (Hercynian) and Permian-Tertiary (Kimmerian-Alpine) tectonic and depositional cycles only slightly modified the basin geometry and left intact the main structural framework of underlying rocks. The petroleum productivity of the basin is related to the Caledonian tectonostratigraphic sequence that contains both source rocks and reservoirs. However, maturation of source rocks, migration of oil, and formation of fields took place mostly during deposition of the Hercynian sequence.

  8. Paleogeographic and paleotectonic development of Laramide basins of SW Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldstrand, P.M. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Initial Laramide-style deformation in SW Utah began in latest Cretaceous (late Campanian or Maastrichtian) time during deposition of the conglomeratic Canaan Peak Formation (TKcp) which thins onto a broad arch located on the northern Paunsaugunt Plateau (Paunsaugunt upwarp). This NNE-SSW trending upward affected sediment dispersal patterns during the early Paleocene and was the southern basin margin for braided fluvial sediments of the Grand Castle Formation (Tgc). These sediments were shed SE, from the inactive Sevier highlands, as far east as the Table Cliff Plateau. Laramide deformation increased during the late( ) Paleocene, after deposition of the Tgc, with the formation of at least two closed basins. During the late( ) Paleocene, the Johns Valley and Upper Valley anticlines, and Circle Cliff Uplift developed with sediment being shed to the SE, E, and SW into the Pine Hollow basin. During initial development of the Pine Hollow basin, the underlying TKcp and Tgc were reworked into the basal Pine Hollow Formation. Small alluvial fans bounded the basin, grading laterally into low-energy fluvial, playa mudflat, and ephemeral lacustrine environments. The basal Claron Formation represents a broad, closed basin that initially developed during the later Paleocene to the SW of the Pine Hollow basin. The Claron basin was bordered by low relief uplands, fluvial floodplains, and calcrete paleosols to the north and moderate relief uplands to the west and east. Shallow lacustrine deposition occurred to the south. Lacustrine onlap of Laramide structures by middle Eocene suggests cessation of Laramide deformation by this time.

  9. Platte River Basin Flow Information Web-based Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Platte River Basin Flow Information Web-based Resources Gary Stone, Extension Educator, University://www.wrds.uwyo.edu/wrds/nrcs/snowprec/snowprec.html - the University of Wyoming Water Resources Data System - scroll down to the Upper and Lower North Platte River. Seminoe is the first reservoir on the North Platte River in central Wyoming. Glendo is the second

  10. Fuel cell end plate structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guthrie, Robin J. (East Hartford, CT); Katz, Murray (Newington, CT); Schroll, Craig R. (Glastonbury, CT)

    1991-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The end plates (16) of a fuel cell stack (12) are formed of a thin membrane. Pressure plates (20) exert compressive load through insulation layers (22, 26) to the membrane. Electrical contact between the end plates (16) and electrodes (50, 58) is maintained without deleterious making and breaking of electrical contacts during thermal transients. The thin end plate (16) under compressive load will not distort with a temperature difference across its thickness. Pressure plate (20) experiences a low thermal transient because it is insulated from the cell. The impact on the end plate of any slight deflection created in the pressure plate by temperature difference is minimized by the resilient pressure pad, in the form of insulation, therebetween.

  11. Hot Plate Station

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football Highdefault Sign InData inmaxHorizontalHot Plate

  12. Channel plate for DNA sequencing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Douthart, R.J.; Crowell, S.L.

    1998-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is a channel plate that facilitates data compaction in DNA sequencing. The channel plate has a length, a width and a thickness, and further has a plurality of channels that are parallel. Each channel has a depth partially through the thickness of the channel plate. Additionally an interface edge permits electrical communication across an interface through a buffer to a deposition membrane surface. 15 figs.

  13. Laser-driven flyer plate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paisley, Dennis L. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for producing high velocity flyer plates involving placing a layer of dielectric material between a first metal foil and a second metal foil. With laser irradiation through an optical substrate, the first metal foil forms a plasma in the area of the irradiation, between the substrate and the solid portion of the first metal foil. When the pressure between the substrate and the foil reaches the stress limit of the dielectric, the dielectric will break away and launch the flyer plate out of the second metal foil. The mass of the flyer plate is controlled, as no portion of the flyer plate is transformed into a plasma.

  14. Carbon-assisted flyer plates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stahl, David B. (Los Alamos, NM); Paisley, Dennis L. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser driven flyer plate utilizing an optical fiber connected to a laser. The end of the optical fiber has a layer of carbon and a metal layer deposited onto it. The carbon layer provides the laser induced plasma which is superior to the plasma produced from most metals. The carbon layer plasma is capable of providing a flatter flyer plate, converting more of the laser energy to driving plasma, promoting a higher flyer plate acceleration, and providing a more uniform pulse behind the plate. In another embodiment, the laser is in optical communication with a substrate onto which a layer of carbon and a layer of metal have been deposited.

  15. K Basin safety analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porten, D.R.; Crowe, R.D.

    1994-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this accident safety analysis is to document in detail, analyses whose results were reported in summary form in the K Basins Safety Analysis Report WHC-SD-SNF-SAR-001. The safety analysis addressed the potential for release of radioactive and non-radioactive hazardous material located in the K Basins and their supporting facilities. The safety analysis covers the hazards associated with normal K Basin fuel storage and handling operations, fuel encapsulation, sludge encapsulation, and canister clean-up and disposal. After a review of the Criticality Safety Evaluation of the K Basin activities, the following postulated events were evaluated: Crane failure and casks dropped into loadout pit; Design basis earthquake; Hypothetical loss of basin water accident analysis; Combustion of uranium fuel following dryout; Crane failure and cask dropped onto floor of transfer area; Spent ion exchange shipment for burial; Hydrogen deflagration in ion exchange modules and filters; Release of Chlorine; Power availability and reliability; and Ashfall.

  16. Crustal rifting and subsidence of Sirte basin, Libya: a mature hydrocarbon Province

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gumati, Y.; Schamel, S.; Nairn, A.E.M.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The complex rifting and subsidence history of the Sirte basin serves as an instructive case study of the tectonic evolution of an intercratonic extensional basin. The Sirte basin formed by collapse of the Sirte arch in the mid-Cretaceous. Marine sediments accumulated following initial crustal arching and rifting as the basin was flooded from the north. Upper Cretaceous strata lie unconformably on igneous and metamorphic rocks of the Precambrian basement complex, Cambrian-Ordovician Gargaf Group, or the pre-Cretaceous continental Nubian Sandstone. The most rapid subsidence and accumulation of basinal strata occurred in the early Cenozoic; however, the basin has been relatively stable since the Oligocene. The basin is floored by a northwest-southeast-trending mosaic of narrow horsts and grabens, an important structural characteristic that distinguishes it from the adjacent intracratonic Kufra, Murzuk, and Ghadames basins. The details of basin subsidence, sediment accumulation rates, and facies variations have been reconstructed for the northern Sirte basin from a suite of approximately 100 well logs and numerous seismic lines. Subsidence-rate maps for short time intervals from the mid-Cretaceous through the Eocene show a continual shifting of the loci of maximum and minimum subsidence. The nonsteady character of basin subsidence may reflect a periodicity of movement on the major basement-rooted growth faults bounding the underlying horsts and grabens.

  17. Results of irradiated cladding tests and clad plate experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haggag, F.M.; Iskander, S.K.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two aspects critical to the fracture behavior of three-wire stainless steel cladding were investigated by the Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program: (1) radiation effects on cladding strength and toughness, and (2) the response of mechanically loaded, flawed structures in the presence of cladding (clad plate experiments). Postirradiation testing results show that, in the test temperature range from /minus/125 to 288/degree/C, the yield strength increased, and ductility insignificantly increased, while there was almost no change in ultimate tensile strength. All cladding exhibited ductile-to-brittle transition behavior during Charpy impact testing. Radiation damage decreased the Charpy upper-shelf energy by 15 to 20% and resulted in up to 28/degree/C shifts of the Charpy impact transition temperature. Results of irradiated 12.5-mm-thick compact specimens (0.5TCS) show consistent decreases in the ductile fracture toughness, J/sub Ic/, and the tearing modulus. Results from clad plate tests have shown that (1) a tough surface layer composed of cladding and/or heat-affected zone has arrested running flaws under conditions where unclad plates have ruptured, and (2) the residual load-bearing capacity of clad plates with large subclad flaws significantly exceeded that of an unclad plate. 13 figs., 1 tab.

  18. California Basin Studies (CaBS). Final contract report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorsline, D.S.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The California Continental Borderland`s present configuration dates from about 4 to 5 X 10{sup 6} years Before Present (B.P.) and is the most recent of several configurations of the southern California margin that have evolved after the North America Plate over-rode the East Pacific Rise about 30 X 10{sup 6} years ago. The present morphology is a series of two to three northwest-southeast trending rows of depressions separated by banks and insular ridges. Two inner basins, Santa Monica and San Pedro, have been the site for the Department of Energy-funded California Basin Study (CaBS) Santa Monica and San Pedro Basins contain post-Miocene sediment thicknesses of about 2.5 and 1.5 km respectively. During the Holocene (past 10,000 years) about 10-12 m have accumulated. The sediment entered the basin by one or a combination of processes including particle infall (mainly as bioaggregates) from surface waters, from nepheloid plumes (surface, mid-depths and near-bottom), from turbidity currents, mass movements, and to a very minor degree direct precipitation. In Santa Monica Basin, during the last century, particle infall and nepheloid plume transport have been the most common processes. The former dominates in the central basin floor in water depths from 900 to 945 m. where a characteristic silt-clay with a typical mean diameter of about 0.006 mm, phi standard deviation.

  19. Metal vapor arc ion plating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bertram, L.A.; Fisher, R.W.; Mattox, D.M.; Zanner, F.J.

    1986-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for ion plating are described. The apparatus uses more negative than a first electrode voltage in a vacuum arc remelt system to attract low energy ions from the anode electrode to the article to be plated. 2 figs.

  20. Trace fossils of Fort Hays Limestone Member of Niobrara Chalk (Upper Cretaceous), west-central Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, R. W.

    1970-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS PALEONTOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTIONS ARTICLE 53 (CRETACEOUS 2) TRACE FOSSILS OF FORT HAYS LIMESTONE MEMBER OF NIOBRARA CHALK (UPPER CRETACEOUS), WEST-CENTRAL KANSAS ROBERT W. FREY University of Georgia Marine Institute, Sapelo... Figures, 10 Plates, 4 Tables TRACE FOSSILS OF FORT HAYS LIMESTONE MEMBER OF NIOBRARA CHALK (UPPER CRETACEOUS), WEST-CENTRAL KANSAS' ROBERT W. FREY University of Georgia Marine Institute, Sapelo Island, Georgia CONTENTS PAGE PAGE ABSTRACT 5 Thalassinoides...

  1. K Basin Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PECH, S.H.

    2000-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Final Safety Analysis Report. This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  2. K Basins Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WEBB, R.H.

    1999-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Safety Analysis Report (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, Rev.4). This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  3. High loading uranium fuel plate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wiencek, Thomas C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Domagala, Robert F. (Indian Head Park, IL); Thresh, Henry R. (Palos Heights, IL)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two embodiments of a high uranium fuel plate are disclosed which contain a meat comprising structured uranium compound confined between a pair of diffusion bonded ductile metal cladding plates uniformly covering the meat, the meat having a uniform high fuel loading comprising a content of uranium compound greater than about 45 Vol. % at a porosity not greater than about 10 Vol. %. In a first embodiment, the meat is a plurality of parallel wires of uranium compound. In a second embodiment, the meat is a dispersion compact containing uranium compound. The fuel plates are fabricated by a hot isostatic pressing process.

  4. FY04 Inspection Results for Wet Uruguay Fuel in L-Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VORMELKER, PHILIP

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2004 visual inspection of four Uruguay nuclear fuel assemblies stored in L-Basin was completed. This was the third inspection of this wet stored fuel since its arrival in the summer of 1998. Visual inspection photographs of the fuel from the previous and the recent inspections were compared and no evidence of significant corrosion was found on the individual fuel plate photographs. Fuel plates that showed areas of pitting in the cladding during the original receipt inspection were also identified during the 2004 inspection. However, a few pits were found on the non-fuel aluminum clamping plates that were not visible during the original and 2001 inspections.

  5. Distribution of Permo-Carboniferous clastics of Greater Arabian basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Laboun, A.A.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strikingly correlative sequences of sediments composed of sandstones, siltstones, shales, and thin argillaceous carbonate beds are present, practically everywhere, underlying the Late Permian carbonates in the Greater Arabian basin. The Greater Arabian basin as defined here occupies the broad Arabian Shelf that borders the Arabian shield. This basin is composed of several smaller basins. These clastics are exposed as thin bands and scattered small exposures in several localities around the margins of the basin. The Permo-Carboniferous clastics are represented by the Unayzah Formation of Arabia, the Doubayat Group of Syria, the Hazro Formation of southeast Turkey, the Ga'arah Formation of Iraq, the Faraghan Formation of southwest Iran, and the Haushi Group of Oman. A Late Carboniferous-Early Permian age is assigned to these clastics because they contain fossil plants and palynomorphs. These sediments represent time-transgressive fluctuating sea deposits following a phase of regional emergence, erosion, and structural disturbance which preceded the Permian transgression. The basal contact of these clastics is marked by a well-pronounced angular unconformity with various older units, ranging in age from early Carboniferous to late Precambrian. This regional unconformity is probably related to the Hercynian movements. The upper contact is conformable with the Permian carbonates. The porous sandstones of the Permo-Carboniferous sediments are important hydrocarbon exploration targets. These reservoir rocks sometimes overlie mature source rocks and are capped by shales, marls, and tight carbonates. Significant quantities of hydrocarbons are contained in these reservoirs in different parts of the Greater Arabian basin.

  6. E.2. Electronic Appendix -Food Web Elements of the Fraser River Upper River (above rkm 210)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 E.2. Electronic Appendix - Food Web Elements of the Fraser River Basin Upper River (above rkm 210) Food webs: Microbenthic algae (periphyton), detritus from riparian vegetation and littoral insects tributaries. Collector-gatherers (invertebrates feeding on fine particulate organic material) are the most

  7. Thermal maturity of the Upper Triassic-Middle Jurassic Shemshak Group (Alborz Range, Northern Iran)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Iran) based on organic petrography, geochemistry and basin modelling: implications for source rock1 Thermal maturity of the Upper Triassic-Middle Jurassic Shemshak Group (Alborz Range, Northern Iran. Organic matter (OM) has been investigated using Rock-Eval pyrolysis, elemental analysis

  8. FY 2007 Progress Report for Upper Columbia United Tribes' Regional Coordination.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michel, D.R.

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of activities conducted over the fiscal year 2007 contract period to fulfill requirements to coordinate Upper Columbia United Tribes (UCUT) interests within the Columbia River Basin. This coordination was specific to the implementation of portions of the Integrated Fish and Wildlife Program within the purview of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council and Bonneville Power Administration.

  9. Carbon-assisted flyer plates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stahl, D.B.; Paisley, D.L.

    1994-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser driven flyer plate is described utilizing an optical fiber connected to a laser. The end of the optical fiber has a layer of carbon and a metal layer deposited onto it. The carbon layer provides the laser induced plasma which is superior to the plasma produced from most metals. The carbon layer plasma is capable of providing a flatter flyer plate, converting more of the laser energy to driving plasma, promoting a higher flyer plate acceleration, and providing a more uniform pulse behind the plate. In another embodiment, the laser is in optical communication with a substrate onto which a layer of carbon and a layer of metal have been deposited. 2 figures.

  10. Hydrocarbon habitat of the west Netherlands basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Jager, J. (Nederlandse Aardolie Maatschappij, Assen (Netherlands)); Doyle, M. (Petroleum Development Oman, Muscat (Oman)); Grantham, P. (KSEPL/Shell Research, Rijswijk (Netherlands)); Mabillard, J. (Shell Nigeria, Port Harcourt (Nigeria))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The complex West Netherlands Basin contains oil and gas in Triassic and Upper Jurassic to Cretaceous clastic reservoir sequences. The understanding has always been that the Carboniferous coal measures have generated only gas and the Jurassic marine Posidonia Shale only oil. However, detailed geochemical analyses show that both source rocks have generated oil and gas. Geochemical fingerprinting established a correlation of the hydrocarbons with the main source rocks. The occurrence of these different hydrocarbons is consistent with migration routes. Map-based charge modeling shows that the main phase of hydrocarbon generation occurred prior to the Late Cretaceous inversion of the West Netherlands Basin. However, along the southwest flank of the basin and in lows between the inversion highs, significant charge continued during the Tertiary. Biodegradation of oils in Jurassic and Cretaceous reservoirs occurred during the earliest Tertiary, but only in reservoirs that were at that time at temperatures of less then 70 to 80[degrees]C, where bacteria could survive. This study shows that also in a mature hydrocarbon province an integrated hydrocarbon habitat study with modern analyses and state-of-the-art technology can lead to a much improved understanding of the distribution of oil and gas in the subsurface. The results of this study will allow a better risk assessment for remaining prospects, and an improved prediction of the type of trapped hydrocarbons in terms of gas, oil, and biodegraded oil.

  11. Depositional environments of Pennsylvanian Upper Strawn Group in McCulloch and San Saba Counties, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamieson, W.H. Jr.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Upper Strawn Group (Desmoinesean) represents a transition to fluvial facies from progradational deltaic facies. The lower part of the upper Strawn is composed mostly of horizontally bedded, fine-grained sandstones and shales of a distal delta-front origin. These sandstones and shales exhibit foreset bed dips of up to 15/sup 0/. In addition to the dipping foreset beds, the delta-front facies on occasion contain small listric normal faults, resulting from periodic higher rates of sedimentation. The middle parts of the upper Strawn consist predominantly of massive, fine to medium-grained, mature sandstones which represent distributary-mouth-bar deposits, as well as other proximal delta-front deposits such as distributary channels. The upper part of the upper Strawn consists of fluvial trough cross-bedded sandstones and chert-pebble conglomerates. These overlie the deltaic facies and indicate the final stages of upper Strawn deposition. The upper Strawn is overlain by the Adams Branch limestone and shales which represent marine transgression and subsequent shallow-marine deposition. The upper Strawn Group in McCulloch and San Saba Counties, Texas, represents continued filling of the Fort Worth basin during Desmoinesean time. The upper Strawn overlies the lower Strawn, an older, deeper water facies, in most parts of the study area. The upper Strawn overlies the Atokan age Marble Falls Limestone in an isolated section of the study area due to its position there on the Concho arch.

  12. Evolution of Extensional Basins and Basin and Range Topography...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Evolution of Extensional Basins and Basin and Range Topography West of Death Valley California...

  13. Geology, exploration status of Uruguay's sedimentary basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goso, C.; Santa Ana, H. de (Administracion Nacional de Combustibles, Alcohol y Portland (Uruguay))

    1994-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This article attempts to present the geological characteristics and tectonic and sedimentary evolution of Uruguayan basins and the extent to which they have been explored. Uruguay is on the Atlantic coast of South America. The country covers about 318,000 sq km, including offshore and onshore territories corresponding to more than 65% of the various sedimentary basins. Four basins underlie the country: the Norte basin, the Santa Lucia basin, the offshore Punta del Este basin, and the offshore-onshore Pelotas-Merin basin. The Norte basin is a Paleozoic basin while the others are Mesozoic basins. Each basin has been explored to a different extent, as this paper explains.

  14. Rating curves and estimation of average water depth at the upper Negro River based on satellite altimeter data and modeled discharges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Rating curves and estimation of average water depth at the upper Negro River based on satellite for 21 ``virtual gauge stations'' located at the upper Negro River (Amazon Basin, Brazil). A virtual station can be defined as any crossing of water body surface (i.e., large rivers) by radar altimeter

  15. Plates for vacuum thermal fusion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davidson, James C. (Livermore, CA); Balch, Joseph W. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for effectively bonding arbitrary size or shape substrates. The process incorporates vacuum pull down techniques to ensure uniform surface contact during the bonding process. The essence of the process for bonding substrates, such as glass, plastic, or alloys, etc., which have a moderate melting point with a gradual softening point curve, involves the application of an active vacuum source to evacuate interstices between the substrates while at the same time providing a positive force to hold the parts to be bonded in contact. This enables increasing the temperature of the bonding process to ensure that the softening point has been reached and small void areas are filled and come in contact with the opposing substrate. The process is most effective where at least one of the two plates or substrates contain channels or grooves that can be used to apply vacuum between the plates or substrates during the thermal bonding cycle. Also, it is beneficial to provide a vacuum groove or channel near the perimeter of the plates or substrates to ensure bonding of the perimeter of the plates or substrates and reduce the unbonded regions inside the interior region of the plates or substrates.

  16. Influence of anticlinal growth on upper Miocene turbidite deposits, Elk Hills field, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, S.A. (Bechtel Petroleum Operations, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)); McJannet, G.S. (Dept. of Energy, Tupman, CA (United States))

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Growth of subsea anticlines during deposition of the upper Miocene 24Z and 26R sandstones at Elk Hills caused the development of several sinuous, lenticular sand bodies. later structural growth enhanced the trap characteristics of these sandstones. Both sandstones are in the uppermost portion of the Elk Hills Shale Member of the Monterey Formation and contain channel-fill and overbank deposits of sand-rich turbidite systems. At the onset of turbidite deposition, low relief subsea anticlines separated broad basins which progressively deepened to the northeast. Channel-fill deposits of coarse-grained sand generally followed the axes of these northwest-southeast-trending basins. At several sites, channel-fill deposits also spilled north across anticlinal axes into the next lower basins. Wide bands of overbank sand and mud were deposited at sand body edges on the flat basin floors. Midway through turbidite deposition, a period of anticlinal growth substantially raised subsea relief. Channel-fill deposits continued in narrower basins but passed north into deeper basin only around well-defined sites at the anticlines' downplunge termini. Narrow basin shapes and higher anticline relief prevented significant overbank deposition. With Pliocene to Holocene uplift of the late Miocene structural trends, stratigraphic mounding of the north-directed channel-fill deposits helped create structural domes at 24Z, 2B and Northwest Stevens pools. In sand bodies lacking significant overbank deposits prevented oil entrapment in sand bodies deposited at times of low anticlinal relief.

  17. Next Generation Bipolar Plates for Automotive PEM Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orest Adrianowycz; Julian Norley; David J. Stuart; David Flaherty; Ryan Wayne; Warren Williams; Roger Tietze; Yen-Loan H. Nguyen; Tom Zawodzinski; Patrick Pietrasz

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a successful U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) funded two-year $2.9 MM program lead by GrafTech International Inc. (GrafTech) are reported and summarized. The program goal was to develop the next generation of high temperature proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell bipolar plates for use in transportation fuel cell applications operating at temperatures up to 120 °C. The bipolar plate composite developed during the program is based on GrafTech’s GRAFCELL? resin impregnated flexible graphite technology and makes use of a high temperature Huntsman Advanced Materials resin system which extends the upper use temperature of the composite to the DoE target. High temperature performance of the new composite is achieved with the added benefit of improvements in strength, modulus, and dimensional stability over the incumbent resin systems. Other physical properties, including thermal and electrical conductivity of the new composite are identical to or not adversely affected by the new resin system. Using the new bipolar plate composite system, machined plates were fabricated and tested in high temperature single-cell fuel cells operating at 120 °C for over 1100 hours by Case Western Reserve University. Final verification of performance was done on embossed full-size plates which were fabricated and glued into bipolar plates by GrafTech. Stack testing was done on a 10-cell full-sized stack under a simulated drive cycle protocol by Ballard Power Systems. Freeze-thaw performance was conducted by Ballard on a separate 5-cell stack and shown to be within specification. A third stack was assembled and shipped to Argonne National Laboratory for independent performance verification. Manufacturing cost estimate for the production of the new bipolar plate composite at current and high volume production scenarios was performed by Directed Technologies Inc. (DTI). The production cost estimates were consistent with previous DoE cost estimates performed by DTI for the DoE on metal plates. The final result of DTI’s analysis for the high volume manufacturing scenario ($6.85 /kW) came in slightly above the DoE target of $3 to $5/kW. This estimate was derived using a “Best Case Scenario” for many of the production process steps and raw material costs with projections to high volumes. Some of the process improvements assumed in this “Best Case Scenario” including high speed high impact forming and solvent-less resins, have not yet been implemented, but have a high probability of potential success.

  18. Upper Jurassic carbonate/evaporite shelf, south Alabama and west Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, B.R.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The association of Upper Jurassic carbonates and evaporites in south Alabama and west Florida defines a brining upward and inward sequence that is indicative of deposition on an increasingly evaporitic marine shelf. Structural features that bound this evaporitic shelf were the Pensacola arch, the South Mississippi platform, and the State Line flexure. Paleo-drainage of the surrounding highlands also affected shelf salinities as fresh waters were funneled into the Covington and Manila Embayments. During the Late Jurassic, marine carbonates and evaporites of the Smackover and Lower Haynesville (Buckner) Formations were deposited over Middle Jurassic Norphlet clastics that accumulated in arid continental and marginal-marine environments. Initially, Smackover carbonate deposition was pervasive across the shallow shelf. Later, as a result of increasing water salinities, contemporaneous precipitation of central-shelf evaporites and basin-edge carbonates occurred. Maximum restriction of the basin and the culmination of subaqueous deposition resulted in the formation of a basin-wide lower Haynesville salt unit. The overlying upper Haynesville strata represents a shift to subaerial environments. Application of a shelf-basin evaporite model explains the spatial and temporal lithologic relationships observed within the study area. Onlap of evaporites over porous carbonates, due to brining-upward processes, suggest that large-scale stratigraphic traps exist within the Smackover Formation in a sparsely explored part of the basin.

  19. Corrosion resistant metallic bipolar plate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brady, Michael P. (Oak Ridge, TN); Schneibel, Joachim H. (Knoxville, TN); Pint, Bruce A. (Knoxville, TN); Maziasz, Philip J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A corrosion resistant, electrically conductive component such as a bipolar plate for a PEM fuel cell includes 20 55% Cr, balance base metal such as Ni, Fe, or Co, the component having thereon a substantially external, continuous layer of chromium nitride.

  20. Upper Jurassic depositional systems and hydrocarbon potential of southeast Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meendsen, F.C.; Moore, C.H.; Heydari, E.; Sassen, R.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Upper Jurassic sedimentation in southeast Mississippi was controlled by eustatic sea level fluctuations and locally modified by salt tectonism and basement structure. This study, using conventional core data and geophysical logs, indicates that a stable carbonate platform developed along the updip margin of the Mississippi interior salt basin. The basin was partially barred from the main Gulf of Mexico water mass by the Wiggins uplift, and became evaporitic during the Late Jurassic. Moldic, intercrystalline, and vuggy dolomite porosity is developed on the crests of intermediate and high-amplitude salt highs and on the Wiggins uplift. Jurassic source rocks are lower Smackover laminated lime mudstones. Migration into adjacent reservoirs postdated formation of porosity and the growth of salt anticlines, the most common trap type. A large potential Norphlet-Smackover gas play extends along the southern flank of the Wiggins uplift. Salt anticlines within the interior basin remain viable targets. Small oil discoveries should continue in stratigraphic traps, subtle salt structures, and basement blocks on the platform.

  1. Structural deformation in the offshore Santa Maria basin, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willingham, C.R. (Explorametrics, Carpinteria, CA (United States)); Heck, R.G. (R.G. Heck and Associates, Carpinteria, CA (United States)); Rietman, J.M. (Rietman Consultants, Santa Ana, CA (United States))

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors divide the offshore Santa Maria basin into the southern, central, and northern provinces based on the pattern, style, and timing of late Cenozoic deformation. From their analyses of over 2,000 km of CDP seismic data and offshore well data they prepared time structure contour maps for three basin-wide unconformities: top of basement, top of Miocene, and the unconformity between early and late Pliocene chronostratigraphic units. Isochron maps were constructed between these horizons and between the early/late Pliocene unconformity and the sea floor to evaluate timing of the deformation. All maps were converted to depth and isopach values based on a three-dimensional velocity model. The regional structure contour and isopach maps show that the offshore Santa Maria basin is characterized by localized crustal shortening orthogonal to the Pacific/North America plate margin and indications of post-Miocene to recent lateral slip along the eastern basin boundary, the San Simeon/Hosgri fault system.

  2. Draft Inventory Upper Snake Province

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Draft Inventory Upper Snake Province Submitted To The Northwest Power and Conservation Council Portland, Oregon Prepared by December 2004 #12;BOI043620012.DOC/KG ii Contents Section Page Inventory

  3. Interaction of Groundwater and Surface Water in the Williston and Powder River Structural Basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    , Rapid City, SD 57702, email: jbednar@usgs.gov Groundwater availability in the Lower Tertiary and Upper in parts of Montana and Wyoming. Both structural basins are in the forefront of energy development associated with measuring streamflow, only fall estimates of base flow were used in the study. A net balance

  4. No quantum friction between uniformly moving plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. G. Philbin; U. Leonhardt

    2009-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Casimir forces between two plates moving parallel to each other are found by calculating the vacuum electromagnetic stress tensor. The perpendicular force between the plates is modified by the motion but there is no lateral force on the plates. Electromagnetic vacuum fluctuations do not therefore give rise to "quantum friction" in this case, contrary to previous assertions. The result shows that the Casimir-Polder force on a particle moving at constant speed parallel to a plate also has no lateral component.

  5. CNEA Fresh Fuel Plate Characterization Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Keiser; F. Rice

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterization summary report outlining the findings of the fresh fuel examinations of the plates received from CNEA.

  6. Flow and Plate Motion in Compressor Valves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Twente, Universiteit

    Flow and Plate Motion in Compressor Valves #12;Flow and Plate Motion in Compressor Valves R.A. Habing Cover Image: 4-stage reciprocating compressor system, Courtesy of Ariel Corporation Thesis.A. Habing, Enschede, The Netherlands #12;FLOW AND PLATE MOTION IN COMPRESSOR VALVES PROEFSCHRIFT ter

  7. 2011 Vibrations -1 VIBRATION OF PLATES & BARS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glashausser, Charles

    of plates of different shapes using Chladni patterns. APPARATUS: Function generator in FFTSCOPE, long and short flat bars, Chladni plates, salt, salt trays INTRODUCTION he equations of vibrational motion. The solutions become very complicated for the free boundary condition at the perimeter of the plate. The Chladni

  8. Apparatus and method for controlling plating uniformity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hachman Jr., John T.; Kelly, James J.; West, Alan C.

    2004-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of an insulating shield for improving the current distribution in an electrochemical plating bath is disclosed. Numerical analysis is used to evaluate the influence of shield shape and position on plating uniformity. Simulation results are compared to experimental data for nickel deposition from a nickel--sulfamate bath. The shield is shown to improve the average current density at a plating surface.

  9. Electroless metal plating of plastics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krause, Lawrence J. (Chicago, IL)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Process for plating main group metals on aromatic polymers is carried out by the use of a nonaqueous solution of a salt of an alkali metal in a positive valence state and a main group metal in a negative valence state with contact between the solution and polymer providing a redox reaction causing the deposition of the main group metal and the reduction of the polymer. Products from the process exhibit useful decorative and electrical properties.

  10. Electroless metal plating of plastics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krause, L.J.

    1982-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Process for plating main group metals on aromatic polymers is carried out by the use of a nonaqueous solution of a salt of an alkali metal in a positive valence state and a main group metal in a negative valence state with contact between the solution and polymer providing a redox reaction causing the deposition of the main group metal and the reduction of the polymer. Products from the process exhibit useful decorative and electrical properties.

  11. Electroless metal plating of plastics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krause, Lawrence J. (Chicago, IL)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Process for plating main group metals on aromatic polymers is carried out by the use of a nonaqueous solution of a salt of an alkali metal in a positive valence state and a main group metal in a negative valence state with contact between the solution and polymer providing a redox reaction causing the deposition of the main group metal and the reduction of the polymer. Products from the process exhibit useful decorative and electrical properties.

  12. Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rappahannock River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the...

  13. Susquehanna River Basin Compact (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation enables the state's entrance into the Susquehanna River Basin Compact, which provides for the conservation, development, and administration of the water resources of the...

  14. Separator plate for a fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Petri, Randy J. (Crete, IL); Meek, John (Downers Grove, IL); Bachta, Robert P. (Chicago, IL); Marianowski, Leonard G. (Mount Prospect, IL)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A separator plate for a fuel cell comprising an anode current collector, a cathode current collector and a main plate, the main plate disposed between the anode current collector and the cathode current collector. The anode current collector forms a flattened peripheral wet seal structure and manifold wet seal structure on the anode side of the separator plate and the cathode current collector forms a flattened peripheral wet seal structure and manifold wet seal structure on the cathode side of the separator plate. In this manner, the number of components required to manufacture and assemble a fuel cell stack is reduced.

  15. Separator plate for a fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Petri, R.J.; Meek, J.; Bachta, R.P.; Marianowski, L.G.

    1996-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A separator plate is described for a fuel cell comprising an anode current collector, a cathode current collector and a main plate, the main plate disposed between the anode current collector and the cathode current collector. The anode current collector forms a flattened peripheral wet seal structure and manifold wet seal structure on the anode side of the separator plate and the cathode current collector forms a flattened peripheral wet seal structure and manifold wet seal structure on the cathode side of the separator plate. In this manner, the number of components required to manufacture and assemble a fuel cell stack is reduced. 9 figs.

  16. Application of Advanced Reservoir Characterization, Simulation, and Production Optimization Strategies to Maximize Recovery in Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin), Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutton, Shirley P.; Flanders, William A.

    2001-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this Class III project was demonstrate that reservoir characterization and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by CO2 flood can increase production from slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico. Phase 1 of the project, reservoir characterization, focused on Geraldine Ford and East Ford fields, which are Delaware Mountain Group fields that produce from the upper Bell Canyon Formation (Ramsey sandstone). The demonstration phase of the project was a CO2 flood conducted in East Ford field, which is operated by Orla Petco, Inc., as the East Ford unit.

  17. Application of Advanced Reservoir Characterization, Simulation, and Production Optimization Strategies to Maximize Recovery in Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin), Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutton, Shirley P.; Flanders, William A.; Mendez, Daniel L.

    2001-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this Class 3 project was demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstone's of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost effective way to recover oil more economically through geologically based field development. This project was focused on East Ford field, a Delaware Mountain Group field that produced from the upper Bell Canyon Formation (Ramsey sandstone). The field, discovered in 9160, is operated by Oral Petco, Inc., as the East Ford unit. A CO2 flood was being conducted in the unit, and this flood is the Phase 2 demonstration for the project.

  18. Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard

    2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for the first six months of Year 2 of the project has been petroleum system characterization. Understanding the burial and thermal maturation histories of the strata in the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas is important in petroleum system characterization. The underburden and overburden rocks in these basins and subbasins are a product of their rift-related geohistory. Petroleum source rock analysis and thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling indicate that an effective regional petroleum source rock in the onshore interior salt basins, the North Louisiana Salt Basin, Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin, was the Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone. The Upper Cretaceous Tuscaloosa shale was an effective local petroleum source rock in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and a possible local source bed in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. Hydrocarbon generation and expulsion was initiated in the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin. Hydrocarbon generation and expulsion was initiated in the Late Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin. Reservoir rocks include Jurassic, Cretaceous and Tertiary siliciclastic and carbonate strata. Seal rocks include Jurassic, Cretaceous and Tertiary anhydrite and shale beds. Petroleum traps include structural and combination traps.

  19. Mechanical characteristics of folds in Upper Cretaceous strata in the Disturbed Belt of northwestern Montana 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Pat Kader

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -shape. The trough in S3 (see unit 23, Plate 2) is hi. ghly fractured in the sandstone and shows considerable flowage in the shale. From the air, it is readily apparent that these folds of the upper Two Medicine are much smaller in lateral extent along strike than... Formation (mostly shale), the Virgelle Sandstone, and the Two Medi. cine Formation (mostly shale), Montana Group, Upper Cretaceous. The Virgelle Sand- stone, about 54 meters thick, lies between the shales and behaved as the most competent member...

  20. An early history of pure shear in the upper plate of the raft river

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: Energy Resources Jump to:Almo,TransmissionOperations atmetamorphic

  1. Advanced Chemistry Basins Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanco, Mario; Cathles, Lawrence; Manhardt, Paul; Meulbroek, Peter; Tang, Yongchun

    2003-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to: (1) Develop a database of additional and better maturity indicators for paleo-heat flow calibration; (2) Develop maturation models capable of predicting the chemical composition of hydrocarbons produced by a specific kerogen as a function of maturity, heating rate, etc.; assemble a compositional kinetic database of representative kerogens; (3) Develop a 4 phase equation of state-flash model that can define the physical properties (viscosity, density, etc.) of the products of kerogen maturation, and phase transitions that occur along secondary migration pathways; (4) Build a conventional basin model and incorporate new maturity indicators and data bases in a user-friendly way; (5) Develop an algorithm which combines the volume change and viscosities of the compositional maturation model to predict the chemistry of the hydrocarbons that will be expelled from the kerogen to the secondary migration pathways; (6) Develop an algorithm that predicts the flow of hydrocarbons along secondary migration pathways, accounts for mixing of miscible hydrocarbon components along the pathway, and calculates the phase fractionation that will occur as the hydrocarbons move upward down the geothermal and fluid pressure gradients in the basin; and (7) Integrate the above components into a functional model implemented on a PC or low cost workstation.

  2. Origin and geochemical evolution of the Michigan basin brine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, T.P.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical and isotopic data were collected on 126 oil field brine samples and were used to investigate the origin and geochemical evolution of water in 8 geologic formations in the Michigan basin. Two groups of brine are found in the basin, the Na-Ca-Cl brine in the upper Devonian formations, and Ca-Na-Cl brine from the lower Devonian and Silurian aged formations. Water in the upper Devonian Berea, Traverse, and Dundee formations originated from seawater concentrated into halite facies. This brine evolved by halite precipitation, dolomitization, aluminosilicate reactions, and the removal of SO{sub 4} by bacterial action or by CaSO{sub 4} precipitation. The stable isotopic composition (D, O) is thought to represent dilution of evapo-concentrated seawater by meteoric water. Water in the lower Devonian Richfield, Detroit River Group, and Niagara-Salina formations is very saline Ca-Na-Cl brine. Cl/Br suggest it originated from seawater concentrated through the halite and into the MgSO{sub 4} salt facies, with an origin linked to the Silurian and Devonian salt deposits. Dolomitization and halite precipitation increased the Ca/Na, aluminosilicate reactions removed K, and bacterial action or CaSO{sub 4} precipitation removed SO{sub 4} from this brine. Water chemistry in the Ordovician Trenton-Black River formations indicates dilution of evapo-concentrated seawater by fresh or seawater. Possible saline end-members include Ordovician seawater, present-day upper Devonian brine, or Ca-Cl brine from the deeper areas in the basin.

  3. RESERVES IN WESTERN BASINS PART IV: WIND RIVER BASIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Caldwell

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vast quantities of natural gas are entrapped within various tight formations in the Rocky Mountain area. This report seeks to quantify what proportion of that resource can be considered recoverable under today's technological and economic conditions and discusses factors controlling recovery. The ultimate goal of this project is to encourage development of tight gas reserves by industry through reducing the technical and economic risks of locating, drilling and completing commercial tight gas wells. This report is the fourth in a series and focuses on the Wind River Basin located in west central Wyoming. The first three reports presented analyses of the tight gas reserves and resources in the Greater Green River Basin (Scotia, 1993), Piceance Basin (Scotia, 1995) and the Uinta Basin (Scotia, 1995). Since each report is a stand-alone document, duplication of language will exist where common aspects are discussed. This study, and the previous three, describe basin-centered gas deposits (Masters, 1979) which contain vast quantities of natural gas entrapped in low permeability (tight), overpressured sandstones occupying a central basin location. Such deposits are generally continuous and are not conventionally trapped by a structural or stratigraphic seal. Rather, the tight character of the reservoirs prevents rapid migration of the gas, and where rates of gas generation exceed rates of escape, an overpressured basin-centered gas deposit results (Spencer, 1987). Since the temperature is a primary controlling factor for the onset and rate of gas generation, these deposits exist in the deeper, central parts of a basin where temperatures generally exceed 200 F and drill depths exceed 8,000 feet. The abbreviation OPT (overpressured tight) is used when referring to sandstone reservoirs that comprise the basin-centered gas deposit. Because the gas resources trapped in this setting are so large, they represent an important source of future gas supply, prompting studies to understand and quantify the resource itself and to develop technologies that will permit commercial exploitation. This study is a contribution to that process.

  4. Jurassic sequence stratigraphy in the Mississippi interior salt basin of Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, E.A. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (USA) Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (USA)); Tew, B.H.; Mink, R.M. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (USA))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three depositional sequences associated with cycles of eustatic sea-level change and coastal onlap can be identified in the Mississippi Interior Salt basin of Alabama. In the Mississippi Interior Salt basin, the lower depositional sequence is bounded by a basal unconformity and an upper Type 2 unconformity in the Callovian. This sequence includes Louann evaporites, Pine Hill anhydrites and shales, and Norphlet eolian sandstones. The middle depositional sequence reflects relative sea-level rise in the late Callovian. This sequence includes Norphlet marine sandstones and lower Smackover packstones and mudstones, middle Smackover mudstones and upper Smackover grainstones and anhydrites. The sequence has an upper Type 2 unconformity indicating relative sea-level fall in the Oxfordian. The upper depositional sequence reflects relative sea-level rise in the late Oxfordian. This sequence includes lower Haynesville evaporites and clastics (transgressive deposits), middle Haynesville carbonate mudstones and shales (condensed section), and upper Haynesville updip continental sandstones and downdip shales, limestones, and anhydrites (progradational highstand regressive deposits). The sequence has an upper Type 1 unconformity indicating abrupt sea-level fall in the late Kimmeridgian. In these depositional sequences, progradational highstand regressive deposits are the principal petroleum reservoirs. Condensed section deposits have the potential to be source rocks if subjected to proper burial conditions; however, only the lower and middle Smackover mudstones were deposited and buried under conditions favorable for hydrocarbon generation and preservation. An understanding of sequence stratigraphy can serve as an aid to identifying potential hydrocarbon exploration targets.

  5. Rapidly Moving Divertor Plates In A Tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Zweben

    2011-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    It may be possible to replace conventional actively cooled tokamak divertor plates with a set of rapidly moving, passively cooled divertor plates on rails. These plates would absorb the plasma heat flux with their thermal inertia for ~10-30 sec, and would then be removed from the vessel for processing. When outside the tokamak, these plates could be cooled, cleaned, recoated, inspected, and then returned to the vessel in an automated loop. This scheme could provide nearoptimal divertor surfaces at all times, and avoid the need to stop machine operation for repair of damaged or eroded plates. We describe various possible divertor plate designs and access geometries, and discuss an initial design for a movable and removable divertor module for NSTX-U.

  6. The analysis of orthogonally stiffened plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Virgil O'Neal

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Symmetrical Loading on a Plate Element 2. General Loading on a Plate Element 3. Repeating Element of General Configuration 4. Longitudinal Ribbing 5. Longitudinal and Lateral Ribbing 6. Skewed Ribbing 60 60 61 61 62 e 62 7. Idealised and Actual Rib... of ribbing shown in figure 3, which includes as special cases, plates with longitudinal or lateral ribbing (figure 4), longitudinal and lateral ribbing (figure 5), or skewed 10 ribbing (figure 6). The basis of the analysi. s in this report...

  7. K-Basins design guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roe, N.R.; Mills, W.C.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the design guidelines is to enable SNF and K Basin personnel to complete fuel and sludge removal, and basin water mitigation by providing engineering guidance for equipment design for the fuel basin, facility modifications (upgrades), remote tools, and new processes. It is not intended to be a purchase order reference for vendors. The document identifies materials, methods, and components that work at K Basins; it also Provides design input and a technical review process to facilitate project interfaces with operations in K Basins. This document is intended to compliment other engineering documentation used at K Basins and throughout the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. Significant provisions, which are incorporated, include portions of the following: General Design Criteria (DOE 1989), Standard Engineering Practices (WHC-CM-6-1), Engineering Practices Guidelines (WHC 1994b), Hanford Plant Standards (DOE-RL 1989), Safety Analysis Manual (WHC-CM-4-46), and Radiological Design Guide (WHC 1994f). Documents (requirements) essential to the engineering design projects at K Basins are referenced in the guidelines.

  8. Zirconium Plate Measuring Instrument (ZPMI) Design Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Davies; J. H. Jackson

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the design of a device intended to measure radiation-induced strain in zirconium plate specimens as a function of neutron fluence.

  9. Fuel cell cooler-humidifier plate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vitale, Nicholas G. (Albany, NY); Jones, Daniel O. (Glenville, NY)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cooler-humidifier plate for use in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell stack assembly is provided. The cooler-humidifier plate combines functions of cooling and humidification within the fuel cell stack assembly, thereby providing a more compact structure, simpler manifolding, and reduced reject heat from the fuel cell. Coolant on the cooler side of the plate removes heat generated within the fuel cell assembly. Heat is also removed by the humidifier side of the plate for use in evaporating the humidification water. On the humidifier side of the plate, evaporating water humidifies reactant gas flowing over a moistened wick. After exiting the humidifier side of the plate, humidified reactant gas provides needed moisture to the proton exchange membranes used in the fuel cell stack assembly. The invention also provides a fuel cell plate that maximizes structural support within the fuel cell by ensuring that the ribs that form the boundaries of channels on one side of the plate have ends at locations that substantially correspond to the locations of ribs on the opposite side of the plate.

  10. Operational Performance of Sedimentation Basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bleything, Matthew D.

    2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    and sludge pumps and clog pipes. (Lee, 2007) Composition of grit varies widely, with moisture content ranging from 13 to 63 percent, and volatile content ranging from 1 to 56 percent. The specific gravity of clean grit particles may be as high as 2... for unobstructed flow of the inlet water into the basin when the basin was almost full to capacity with sediment. The outlet of the sediment basin is an oil/water separator. This is for oil leaks and spills from the plant island. The design called...

  11. AGU Monograph, Plate Boundary Zones, in press. Page 1 Crustal Block Rotations and Plate Coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCaffrey, Robert

    AGU Monograph, Plate Boundary Zones, in press. Page 1 Crustal Block Rotations and Plate Coupling that considering both block rotations and fault locking significantly improves the fit to the data over models by locking on #12;AGU Monograph, Plate Boundary Zones, in press. Page 2 block-bounding faults and apply

  12. The potential pyrophoricity of BMI-SPEC and aluminum plate spent fuels retrieved from underwater storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebner, M.A.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Physical/chemical factors in U metal and hydride combustion, particularly pyrophoricity in ambient environment, were evaluated for BMI-SPEC and UAl{sub x} plate fuels. Some metal fuels may be highly reactive (spontaneously igniting in air) due to high specific surface area, high decay heat, or a high U hydride content from corrosion during underwater storage. However, for the BMI-SPEC and the aluminum plate fuels, this reactivity is too low to present a realistic threat of uncontrolled spontaneous combustion at ambient conditions. While residual U hydride is expected in these corroded fuels, the hydride levels are expected to be too low and the configuration too unfavorable to ignite the fuel meat when the fuels are retrieved from the basin and dried. Furthermore the composition and microstructure of the UAl{sub x} fuels further mitigate that risk.

  13. Rivanna River Basin Commission (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rivanna River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the Rivanna River...

  14. Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

    2005-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been petroleum system characterization and modeling. Understanding the burial, thermal maturation, and hydrocarbon expulsion histories of the strata in the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas is important in hydrocarbon resource assessment. The underburden and overburden rocks in these basins and subbasins are a product of their rift-related geohistory. Petroleum source rock analysis and initial thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling indicated that an effective regional petroleum source rock in the onshore interior salt basins and subbasins, the North Louisiana Salt Basin, Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin, was Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone. The initial modeling also indicated that hydrocarbon generation and expulsion were initiated in the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and that hydrocarbon generation and expulsion were initiated in the Late Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin. Refined thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling and additional petroleum source rock analysis have confirmed that the major source rock in the onshore interior salt basins and subbasins is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone. Hydrocarbon generation and expulsion were initiated in the Early to Late Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary.

  15. Whole Earth Structure and Plate Tectonics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whole Earth Structure and Plate Tectonics Earth Structure (2nd Edition), 2004 W.W. Norton & Co, New York Slide show by Ben van der Pluijm © WW Norton; unless noted otherwise #12;© EarthStructure (2nd ed evolution of Earth: from continental drift (early 1900's) to sea-floor spreading (early 1960's) to plate

  16. Evacuated flat-plate solar collectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whittemore, P.G.

    1981-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A structural support system is disclosed for use in an evacuated, flat-plate, solar collector to eliminate the problem of stress fractures in a glass cover plate. Nonlinearly spaced supports are used within the collector to dampen vibrations in the glass cover and to prevent overdeflection before buckling or stress fractures occur.

  17. Reference Phase of Fresnel Zone Plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. W. Webb

    2003-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The standard zone plate assumes that the shortest ray connecting a radiation source and a detection point has a phase of 0 deg thereby defining a reference phase. Here we examine the experimental consequences of varying this reference phase from 0 deg to 360 deg. It is concluded that reference phase is an intrinsic and useful property of zone plates.

  18. Vacuum fusion bonding of glass plates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swierkowski, Steve P. (Livermore, CA); Davidson, James C. (Livermore, CA); Balch, Joseph W. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved apparatus and method for vacuum fusion bonding of large, patterned glass plates. One or both glass plates are patterned with etched features such as microstructure capillaries and a vacuum pumpout moat, with one plate having at least one hole therethrough for communication with a vacuum pumpout fixture. High accuracy alignment of the plates is accomplished by a temporary clamping fixture until the start of the fusion bonding heat cycle. A complete, void-free fusion bond of seamless, full-strength quality is obtained through the plates; because the glass is heated well into its softening point and because of a large, distributed force that is developed that presses the two plates together from the difference in pressure between the furnace ambient (high pressure) and the channeling and microstructures in the plates (low pressure) due to the vacuum drawn. The apparatus and method may be used to fabricate microcapillary arrays for chemical electrophoresis; for example, any apparatus using a network of microfluidic channels embedded between plates of glass or similar moderate melting point substrates with a gradual softening point curve, or for assembly of glass-based substrates onto larger substrates, such as in flat panel display systems.

  19. Vacuum fusion bonding of glass plates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swierkowski, Steve P. (Livermore, CA); Davidson, James C. (Livermore, CA); Balch, Joseph W. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved apparatus and method for vacuum fusion bonding of large, patterned glass plates. One or both glass plates are patterned with etched features such as microstructure capillaries and a vacuum pumpout moat, with one plate having at least one hole therethrough for communication with a vacuum pumpout fixture. High accuracy alignment of the plates is accomplished by a temporary clamping fixture until the start of the fusion bonding heat cycle. A complete, void-free fusion bond of seamless, full-strength quality is obtained through the plates; because the glass is heated well into its softening point and because of a large, distributed force that is developed that presses the two plates together from the difference in pressure between the furnace ambient (high pressure) and the channeling and microstructures in the plates (low pressure) due to the vacuum drawn. The apparatus and method may be used to fabricate microcapillary arrays for chemical electrophoresis; for example, any apparatus using a network of microfluidic channels embedded between plates of glass or similar moderate melting point substrates with a gradual softening point curve, or for assembly of glass-based substrates onto larger substrates, such as in flat panel display systems.

  20. Extending the Upper Temperature Limit for Life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    ) un- der N2-CO2 (80:20) in sealed culture tubes that con- tained formate (10 mM) as the electron donor that permit strain 121 to grow at such high temperatures are unknown. It is gen- erally assumed that the upperExtending the Upper Temperature Limit for Life Kazem Kashefi and Derek R. Lovley* The upper

  1. Dry Creek salt dome, Mississippi Interior Salt basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montgomery, S.L.; Ericksen, R.L.

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent drilling of salt dome flanks in the Mississippi Salt basin has resulted in important new discoveries and the opening of a frontier play. This play is focused on gas/condensate reserves in several Cretaceous formations, most notably the Upper Cretaceous Eutaw and lower Tuscaloosa intervals and Lower Cretaceous Paluxy and Hosston formations. As many as eight domes have been drilled thus far; sandstones in the upper Hosston Formation comprise the primary target. Production has been as high as 3-5 Mcf and 500-1200 bbl of condensate per day, with estimated ultimate reserves in the range of 0.2 to 1.5 MBOE (million barrels oil equivalent) per well. As typified by discovery at Dry Creek salt dome, traps are related to faulting, unconformities, and updip loss of permeability. Previous drilling at Dry Creek, and in the basin generally, avoided the flank areas of most domes, due to geologic models that predicted latestage (Tertiary) piercement and breached accumulations. Recent data from Dry Creek and other productive domes suggest that growth was episodic and that piercement of Tertiary strata did not affect deeper reservoirs charged with hydrocarbons in the Late Cretaceous.

  2. Greater Green River basin well-site selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frohne, K.H. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Boswell, R. [EG and G Washington Analytical Services Center, Inc., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent estimates of the natural gas resources of Cretaceous low-permeability reservoirs of the Greater Green River basin indicate that as much as 5000 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of gas may be in place (Law and others 1989). Of this total, Law and others (1989) attributed approximately 80 percent to the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group and Lewis Shale. Unfortunately, present economic conditions render the drilling of many vertical wells unprofitable. Consequently, a three-well demonstration program, jointly sponsored by the US DOE/METC and the Gas Research Institute, was designed to test the profitability of this resource using state-of-the-art directional drilling and completion techniques. DOE/METC studied the geologic and engineering characteristics of ``tight`` gas reservoirs in the eastern portion of the Greater Green River basin in order to identify specific locations that displayed the greatest potential for a successful field demonstration. This area encompasses the Rocks Springs Uplift, Wamsutter Arch, and the Washakie and Red Desert (or Great Divide) basins of southwestern Wyoming. The work was divided into three phases. Phase 1 consisted of a regional geologic reconnaissance of 14 gas-producing areas encompassing 98 separate gas fields. In Phase 2, the top four areas were analyzed in greater detail, and the area containing the most favorable conditions was selected for the identification of specific test sites. In Phase 3, target horizons were selected for each project area, and specific placement locations were selected and prioritized.

  3. Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrinceton PlasmaAfternoon TalksDigitalRevisionof EnergyUpper Los

  4. The effect of periodic unsteady wakes on boundary layer transition and heat transfer on a curved plate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Lance Cole

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    generator cross section looking upstream: l. Upper wall, 2. Lower wall, 3. Side wall, 4 Timing belt pulley, 5. Rotating disk, 6. 2. 0 mm diameter cylindrical rod. Test Section: 1. Traversing system, 2. Nozzle, 3. Wake generator, 4. Electric motor, 5...-dimensional mean velocity at different s/s. locations on the heat transfer plate for 0= 0. 0 (0 rods). 39 41 43 Figure 13. Figure 14. Figure 15. Figure 16. Non-dimensional mean velocity at different s/s, locations on the heat transfer plate for Q= 1. 033...

  5. Selective Electroless Nickel Plating of Particle Arrays on Polyelectrolyte Multilayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Ilsoon

    Selective Electroless Nickel Plating of Particle Arrays on Polyelectrolyte Multilayers Ilsoon Lee Received June 30, 2003. Revised Manuscript Received September 25, 2003 Selective electroless nickel plating and particles. Selectively nickel-plated surfaces were characterized with optical microscopy, X

  6. Undrained behavior of plate anchors subjected to general loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Ming

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents a method for predicting the undrained behavior of plate anchors, including out-of-plane loading of simple plates and performance of suction embedded plate anchors (SEPLA). Three dimensional finite element models are used...

  7. Sedimentation in Michigan basin during earliest Salina: evidence for an excursion from eustacy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cercone, K.R.

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A basal A-1 evaporite member of the Upper Silurian Salina Group, a marine evaporite sequence, appears to record a time of lowered sea level in the Michigan basin. Indicators of shallow sabkha deposition, such as nodular anhydrite and nonplanar stromatolites, occur in parts of the A-1 evaporite. This unit also contains scattered nodules of borate, a nonmarine evaporite, and the bittern salt sylvite. The petrologic evidence for lowered sea level is supported by studies showing that Middle Silurian reefal buildups within the Michigan basin were subaerially exposed during or immediately prior to A-1 evaporite deposition. However, other studies concluded that carbonate platforms in Indiana and Illinois continued to host flourishing Silurian reef communities throughout A-1 evaporite deposition, under conditions of high global sea levels. The conflicting evidence can be resolved only by postulating that the Michigan basin became isolated from surrounding epeiric seas during A-1 evaporite deposition. Tidal and peritidal carbonates - the Greenfield, Limberlost, Sugar Run, and Engadine dolomites - were deposited at the edge of the Michigan basin during this time. These units could have served both as sills and as shorelines that separated open epeiric seas from a partly desiccated basin. Evaporating brines, pooled below sea level in the basin, could have been replenished by seawater and meteoric water flowing through shallow inlets or seeping into the basin through the subsurface. Basin isolation may have been enhanced by minor eustatic fluctuations in sea level and by the constraints on shallow-water circulation in epeiric seas. Therefore, in analogy to the Miocene desiccation of the Mediterranean, the large apparent drop in sea level recorded by the A-1 evaporite would have been a local rather than a eustatic change.

  8. Fiber optic mounted laser driven flyer plates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paisley, Dennis L. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser driven flyer plate where the flyer plate is deposited directly onto the squared end of an optical fiber. The plasma generated by a laser pulse drives the flyer plate toward a target. In another embodiment, a first metal layer is deposited onto the squared end of an optical fiber, followed by a layer of a dielectric material and a second metal layer. The laser pulse generates a plasma in the first metal layer, but the plasma is kept away from the second metal layer by the dielectric layer until the pressure reaches the point where shearing occurs.

  9. automatic license plate readers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to causalism, building on Frankfurts concept of guidance. Ezio Di Nucci 151 Lesson 3. Plate Tectonics Overview Geosciences Websites Summary: Lesson 3. Plate Tectonics...

  10. Production design for plate products in the steel industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    We describe an optimization tool for a multistage production process for ... plates. The problem we solve yields a production design (or plan) for rectangular plate.

  11. Fuel storage basin seismic analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanjilal, S.K.; Winkel, B.V.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 105-KE and 105-KW Fuel Storage Basins were constructed more than 35 years ago as repositories for irradiated fuel from the K East and K West Reactors. Currently, the basins contain irradiated fuel from the N Reactor. To continue to use the basins as desired, seismic adequacy in accordance with current US Department of Energy facility requirements must be demonstrated. The 105-KE and 105-KW Basins are reinforced concrete, belowground reservoirs with a 16-ft water depth. The entire water retention boundary, which currently includes a portion of the adjacent reactor buildings, must be qualified for the Hanford Site design basis earthquake. The reactor building interface joints are sealed against leakage with rubber water stops. Demonstration of the seismic adequacy of these interface joints was initially identified as a key issue in the seismic qualification effort. The issue of water leakage through seismicly induced cracks was also investigated. This issue, coupled with the relatively complex geometry of the basins, dictated a need for three-dimensional modeling. A three-dimensional soil/structure interaction model was developed with the SASSI computer code. The development of three-dimensional models of the interfacing structures using the ANSYS code was also found to be necessary. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Delaware River Basin Commission (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) is a federal-interstate compact government agency that was formed by concurrent legislation enacted in 1961 by the United States and the four basin states...

  13. Depositional history of the Mississippian Ullin and Fort Payne Formations in the Illinois Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lasemi, Z.; Treworgy, J.D.; Norby, R.D. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field and subsurface data suggest that the mid-Mississippian Ullin Limestone in the Illinois Basin is composed of coalesced Waulsortian-type mounds and porous bryozoan-dominated buildups. Waulsortian mounds in the basin contain a lime mudstone to wackestone core that is flanked and capped by in situ porous bryozoan bafflestone or transported crinoidal-bryozoan packstone and grainstone. The mound core facies appear to be most common in the lower part of the Ullin and is thicker in a deeper outer-ramp setting. Shoreward and up-section (upper part of the outer-ramp through mid-ramp setting), the core facies is generally thinner, while the flanking and capping facies are thicker. Isopachous maps of the Ullin and Fort Payne suggest the presence of several large areas of thick carbonate buildups (Ullin) surrounded by a deep-water, sub-oxic environment (Fort Payne) in the Illinois Basin. Progradation of these buildups and associated facies resulted in a shallower ramp setting during deposition of the upper Ullin. Storm-generated carbonate sandwaves became widespread on this ramp. Sandwaves were mobile and for the most part unfavorable sites for further development of thick mud mounds and/or in situ bryozoan buildups. However, isolated mounds and flanking buildups are present in the upper part of the Ullin, and, together with the sandwaves, formed an irregular topography that led to the development of oolitic grainstone shoals during deposition of the overlying Salem Limestone.

  14. Basin width control of faulting in the Naryn Basin, south central Kyrgyzstan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bookhagen, Bodo

    Basin width control of faulting in the Naryn Basin, south central Kyrgyzstan Joseph K. Goode,1 the controls on this intramontane basin deformation, we study the Naryn Basin of south central Kyrgyzstan central Kyrgyzstan, Tectonics, 30, TC6009, doi:10.1029/2011TC002910. 1. Introduction [2] Deformation

  15. Characterization of Tri-lab Tantalum Plate.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchheit, Thomas E.; Cerreta, Ellen K.; Deibler, Lisa Anne; Chen, Shu-Rong; Michael, Joseph R.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a detailed characterization Tri-lab Tantalum (Ta) plate jointly purchased from HCStark Inc. by Sandia, Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. Data in this report was compiled from series of material and properties characterization experiments carried out at Sandia (SNL) and Los Alamos (LANL) Laboratories through a leveraged effort funded by the C2 campaign. Results include microstructure characterization detailing the crystallographic texture of the material and an increase in grain size near the end of the rolled plate. Mechanical properties evaluations include, compression cylinder, sub-scale tension specimen, micohardness and instrumented indentation testing. The plate was found to have vastly superior uniformity when compare with previously characterized wrought Ta material. Small but measurable variations in microstructure and properties were noted at the end, and at the top and bottom edges of the plate.

  16. Fresnel phase plates as reconfigurable microfluidic lenses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsikata, Sedina, 1981-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, Fresnel phase plates were tested as reconfigurable lenses. The lenses were constructed from a Fresnel pattern which was transferred to a silicon substrate via photolithography. A layer of PDMS was spin-coated ...

  17. Plate subrotations Marco Cuffaro,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doglioni, Carlo

    to compute relative motion of two plates not sharing a margin. [3] Relative motions are important contemporaneous rotation about its axis, or as a car that starts swinging while traveling. [8] In this paper, we

  18. Thin Plates 4.1 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Qinghua

    and in [14] for post-buckling analysis of thin plates. Alternatively, Jin et al. [5] developed a set experiences essentially a lateral displacement w (in-plane displacements u and v are also experienced because

  19. Composite bipolar plate for electrochemical cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM); Busick, Deanna N. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A bipolar separator plate for fuel cells consists of a molded mixture of a vinyl ester resin and graphite powder. The plate serves as a current collector and may contain fluid flow fields for the distribution of reactant gases. The material is inexpensive, electrically conductive, lightweight, strong, corrosion resistant, easily mass produced, and relatively impermeable to hydrogen gas. The addition of certain fiber reinforcements and other additives can improve the properties of the composite material without significantly increasing its overall cost.

  20. Lighting system with heat distribution face plate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arik, Mehmet; Weaver, Stanton Earl; Stecher, Thomas Elliot; Kuenzler, Glenn Howard; Wolfe, Jr., Charles Franklin; Li, Ri

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Lighting systems having a light source and a thermal management system are provided. The thermal management system includes synthetic jet devices, a heat sink and a heat distribution face plate. The synthetic jet devices are arranged in parallel to one and other and are configured to actively cool the lighting system. The heat distribution face plate is configured to radially transfer heat from the light source into the ambient air.

  1. Corrosion test cell for bipolar plates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weisbrod, Kirk R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A corrosion test cell for evaluating corrosion resistance in fuel cell bipolar plates is described. The cell has a transparent or translucent cell body having a pair of identical cell body members that seal against opposite sides of a bipolar plate. The cell includes an anode chamber and an cathode chamber, each on opposite sides of the plate. Each chamber contains a pair of mesh platinum current collectors and a catalyst layer pressed between current collectors and the plate. Each chamber is filled with an electrolyte solution that is replenished with fluid from a much larger electrolyte reservoir. The cell includes gas inlets to each chamber for hydrogen gas and air. As the gases flow into a chamber, they pass along the platinum mesh, through the catalyst layer, and to the bipolar plate. The gas exits the chamber through passageways that provide fluid communication between the anode and cathode chambers and the reservoir, and exits the test cell through an exit port in the reservoir. The flow of gas into the cell produces a constant flow of fresh electrolyte into each chamber. Openings in each cell body is member allow electrodes to enter the cell body and contact the electrolyte in the reservoir therein. During operation, while hydrogen gas is passed into one chamber and air into the other chamber, the cell resistance is measured, which is used to evaluate the corrosion properties of the bipolar plate.

  2. The Climate of the South Platte Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Climate of the South Platte Basin Colorado Climate Center http://climate.atmos.colostate.edu #12;Key Features of the Climate of the South Platte Basin #12;Temperature Cold winters Hot summers #12;Precipitation Monthly Average Precipitation for Selected Sites in the South Platte Basin 0.00 0

  3. Geological Modeling of Dahomey and Liberian Basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gbadamosi, Hakeem B.

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this thesis is to study two Basins of the Gulf of Guinea (GoG), namely the Dahomey and the Liberian Basins. These Basins are located in the northern part of the GoG, where oil and gas exploration has significantly increased...

  4. Supplementary information on K-Basin sludges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MAKENAS, B.J.

    1999-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Three previous documents in this series have been published covering the analysis of: K East Basin Floor and Pit Sludge, K East Basin Canister Sludge, and K West Basin Canister Sludge. Since their publication, additional data have been acquired and analyses performed. It is the purpose of this volume to summarize the additional insights gained in the interim time period.

  5. Three-dimensional braid-plain architecture, Bulgo Formation, Sydney basin, Australia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, S.A.; Glasford, J.L.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Triassic Bulgo Formation of the Sydney basin was deposited by a basin-wide braid-plain system. Detailed outcrop analysis of facies relationships and correlation with subsurface data allow for recognition of three-dimensional facies architecture and paleogeography reconstruction. The Lachlan foldbelt was the primary source for the Bulgo Formation. Three outcrop sites in varying proximity to the source area were examined: (1) Blue Mountains, (2) Burragorrang Walls, and (3) Royal National Park. Proximal deposits of the Blue Mountains consist of two members. Both the lower and upper Bulgo are coarse-grained, tabular sandstone sheets. They are separated by a paleosoil horizon which is the only criterion for separation. Medial deposits at Burrangorang Walls can be distinguished on the basis of shale content. The lower Bulgo remains a coarse-grained, tabular sandstone sheet. The upper Bulgo is also a coarse-grained, tabular sandstone sheet. The upper Bulgo is also a coarse-grained, tabular sandstone sheet. The upper Bulgo is also a coarse-grained sandstone sheet but contains a significant proportion of interchannel shale deposits and mud plugs. Distal deposits of the Royal National Park are characterized by a similar coarse-grained lower member which was deposited by a large braid-plain system where smaller braided systems coalesced into a basin-wide tabular sandstone sheet. However, the upper Bulgo member shows a further downdip evolution to a fine-grained sandstone sheet deposited by small, interconnected braided streams which were separated by numerous flood-plain and paludal deposits. This upsection and lateral evolution reflects waning sediment supply and denudation of the Lachlan foldbelt source area.

  6. A Preliminary Look at the Crust and Upper Mantle of North Africa Using Libyan Seismic Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasyanos, M

    2005-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, LLNL has been developing methods to jointly invert both surface wave dispersion data and teleseismic receiver functions. The technique holds great promise in accurately estimating seismic structure, including important tectonic parameters such as basin thickness, crustal thickness, upper mantle velocity, etc. We proposed applying this method to some recently available data from several Libyan stations, as we believe the technique has not been applied to any stations in Libya. The technique holds the promise of improving our understanding of the crust and upper mantle in Libya and North Africa. We recently requested seismic data from stations GHAR (Gharyan) and MARJ (Al Marj) in Libya for about 20 events. The events were large events at regional distances suitable for making dispersion measurements. An example of waveforms recorded at the two stations from an earthquake in Italy is shown in Figure 1. The paths traverse the Ionian Sea. Notice the slow short period group velocities of the surface waves across the Mediterranean, particularly to the easternmost station MARJ. However, because of data availability, signal-to-noise ratio, etc. we were unable to make measurements for every one of these events at both stations. Figure 2 shows a map of paths for 20 sec Rayleigh waves in the eastern Mediterranean region. Paths measured at the two Libyan stations are shown in green. Rayleigh wave dispersion measurements at 20 sec period are sensitive to velocities in the upper 20 km or so, and reveal sediment thickness, crustal velocity, and crustal thickness. Tomographic inversions reveal the sharp group velocity contrast between regions with deep sedimentary basins and those without. Figure 3, the result of an inversion made before adding the new dispersion measurements, shows slow group velocities in the Black Sea, Adriatic Sea, and Eastern Mediterranean. In general, these features correspond well with the sediment thickness model from Laske, shown in Figure 4. Details in and around the Sirt (Sirte) Basin in northern Libya, however, are poorly defined.

  7. Biological Survey of the Upper Purgatoire Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biological Survey of the Upper Purgatoire Watershed Las Animas County, CO John Carney Colorado ...............................................................................................................9 Management Urgency Ranks ........................................................................................................10 POTENTIAL CONSERVATION SITE PLANNING BOUNDARIES........................................12 Off

  8. Upper Cumberland EMC- Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Upper Cumberland Electric Membership Corporation (UCEMC), in collaboration with the Tennessee Valley Authority, offers incentives for its customers to purchase and install energy efficient...

  9. STEEL PLATE SHEAR WALL BUILDINGS: DESIGN REQUIREMENTS AND RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruneau, Michel

    , University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260. #12;plate shear wall design and use of light-gage cold form platesSTEEL PLATE SHEAR WALL BUILDINGS: DESIGN REQUIREMENTS AND RESEARCH Michel Bruneau, P.E. 1 Dr areas. This paper provides an overview of the current state-of-the-art in steel plate shear wall design

  10. Origin of gaseous hydrocarbons from Upper Cretaceous and Tertiary strata in the Piceance basin, western Colorado 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, David Jonathan

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , as abundant coals are found between 2450 and 2630 m. Only three thin coalbeds occur within the Coal Ridge Group between 1950 and 2450 m, so gases from this interval were probably derived from interbedded shales. Core and cuttings samples were also collected...

  11. Food web architecture in natural and impounded rivers of the Upper Parana drainage basin, Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoeinghaus, David Joseph

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Freshwater ecosystems are some of the most threatened on the planet. Efforts to conserve, restore, or otherwise manage large rivers and the services they provide are hindered by limited understanding of the functional dynamics of these systems...

  12. Abundance of the Louisiana Black Bear in the Upper Atchafalaya River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    125 PSB Arkansas Background/Justification the `Delta' · Mississippi River Alluvial Valley of being captured not realistic! M d l t l thi ti Behavior Model -trap happy/shy Heterogeneity Model -age

  13. Prevailing climatic trends and runoff response from Hindukush-Karakoram-Himalaya, upper Indus basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasson, Shabeh ul; Lucarini, Valerio

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze trends in maximum, minimum and mean temperatures (Tx, Tn, and Tavg, respectively), diurnal temperature range (DTR) and precipitation from 18 stations (1250-4500 m asl) for their overlapping period of record (1995-2012), and separately, from six stations of their long term record (1961-2012). We apply Mann-Kendall test on serially independent time series to assess existence of a trend while true slope is estimated using Sen s slope method. Further, we statistically assess the spatial scale (field) significance of local climatic trends within ten identified sub-regions of UIB and analyze whether the spatially significant (field significant) climatic trends qualitatively agree with a trend in discharge out of corresponding sub-region. Over the recent period (1995-2012), we find a well agreed and mostly field significant cooling (warming) during monsoon season i.e. July-October (March-May and November), which is higher in magnitude relative to long term trends (1961-2012). We also find ... The observed...

  14. Terry sandstone member of the Pierre Shale, Upper Cretaceous, Spindle field, Denver Basin, Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helsley, Robert James

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    9 ll 2. 1 13. 2 aLong axis measurement, o = standard deviation Dz ? monocrystalline and polycrystalline quartz, F = feldspar, Rx = rock fragments including detrital chert, Mx = matrix, and 0th - other minerals, primarily mi cas and glauconite...) intervals through the total section, and additional samples were taken in some beds. Thin sections with clear epoxy were prepared from each sample. One representative slide each of the coarsest and finest samples were selected for analysis first. At I mm...

  15. Genetic classification of petroleum basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demaison, G.; Huizinga, B.J.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rather than relying on a descriptive geologic approach, this genetic classification is based on the universal laws that control processes of petroleum formation, migration, and entrapment. Petroleum basins or systems are defined as dynamic petroleum-generating and concentrating physico-chemical systems functioning on a geologic space and time scale. A petroleum system results from the combination of a generative subsystem (or hydrocarbon kitchen), essentially controlled by chemical processes, and a migration-entrapment subsystem, controlled by physical processes. The generative subsystem provides a certain supply of petroleum to the basin during a given geologic time span. The migration-entrapment subsystem receives petroleum and distributes it in a manner that can lead either to dispersion and loss or to concentration of the regional charge into economic accumulations. The authors classification scheme for petroleum basins rests on a simple working nomenclature consisting of the following qualifiers: (1) charge factor: undercharged, normally charged, or supercharged, (2) migration drainage factor: vertically drained or laterally drained, and (3) entrapment factor: low impedance or high impedance. Examples chosen from an extensive roster of documented petroleum basins are reviewed to explain the proposed classification.

  16. The Statistical Upper Mantle Assemblage Anders Meibom*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Don L.

    Mantle Assemblage', which forms as the result of long-term plate tectonic recycling of sedimentary-3] and noble gases [4] has led to the notion that the source region for "normal" MORB (N-MORB), referred

  17. Microporous microchannel plates and method of manufacturing same

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beetz, C.P. Jr.; Boerstler, R.W.; Steinbeck, J.; Winn, D.R.

    2000-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A microchannel plate and method of manufacturing same is provided. The microchannel plate includes a plate consisting of an anodized material and a plurality of channels which are formed during the anodization of the material and extend between the two sides of the plate. Electrodes are also disposed on each side of the plate for generating an electrical field within the channels. Preferably, the material is alumina and the channels are activated such that the channel walls are conductive and highly secondary emissive.

  18. Microporous microchannel plates and method of manufacturing same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beetz, Jr., Charles P. (New Milford, CT); Boerstler, Robert W. (Woodbury, CT); Steinbeck, John (Fitzwilliam, NH); Winn, David R. (Wilton, CT)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microchannel plate and method of manufacturing same is provided. The microchannel plate includes a plate consisting of an anodized material and a plurality of channels which are formed during the anodization of the material and extend between the two sides of the plate. Electrodes are also disposed on each side of the plate for generating an electrical field within the channels. Preferably, the material is alumina and the channels are activated such that the channel walls are conductive and highly secondary emissive.

  19. Rotary sequencing valve with flexible port plate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wagner, Glenn Paul

    2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Rotary sequencing valve comprising a rotor having a rotor face rotatable about an axis perpendicular to the rotor face, wherein the rotor face has a plurality of openings, one or more of which are disposed at a selected radial distance from the axis, and wherein the rotor includes at least one passage connecting at least one pair of the plurality of openings. The valve includes a flexible port plate having a first side and a second side, wherein the first side faces the rotor and engages the rotor such that the flexible port plate can be rotated coaxially by the rotor and can move axially with respect to the rotor, wherein the flexible port plate has a plurality of ports between the first and second sides, which ports are aligned with the openings in the rotor face. The valve also includes a stator having a stator face disposed coaxially with the rotor and the flexible port plate, wherein the second side of the flexible port plate is in sealable, slidable rotary contact with the stator face, wherein the stator face has a plurality of openings, some of which are disposed at the selected radial distance from the axis, and wherein the plurality of openings extend as passages through the stator. The valve may be used in pressure or temperature swing adsorption systems.

  20. Recovery process for electroless plating baths

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, R.W.; Neff, W.A.

    1992-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for removing, from spent electroless metal plating bath solutions, accumulated byproducts and counter-ions that have deleterious effects on plating. The solution, or a portion thereof, is passed through a selected cation exchange resin bed in hydrogen form, the resin selected from strong acid cation exchangers and combinations of intermediate acid cation exchangers with strong acid cation exchangers. Sodium and nickel ions are sorbed in the selected cation exchanger, with little removal of other constituents. The remaining solution is subjected to sulfate removal through precipitation of calcium sulfate hemihydrate using, sequentially, CaO and then CaCO[sub 3]. Phosphite removal from the solution is accomplished by the addition of MgO to form magnesium phosphite trihydrate. The washed precipitates of these steps can be safely discarded in nontoxic land fills, or used in various chemical industries. Finally, any remaining solution can be concentrated, adjusted for pH, and be ready for reuse. The plating metal can be removed from the exchanger with sulfuric acid or with the filtrate from the magnesium phosphite precipitation forming a sulfate of the plating metal for reuse. The process is illustrated as applied to processing electroless nickel plating baths. 18 figs.

  1. Recovery process for electroless plating baths

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Roger W. (Farragut, TN); Neff, Wayne A. (Knoxville, TN)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing, from spent electroless metal plating bath solutions, accumulated byproducts and counter-ions that have deleterious effects on plating. The solution, or a portion thereof, is passed through a selected cation exchange resin bed in hydrogen form, the resin selected from strong acid cation exchangers and combinations of intermediate acid cation exchangers with strong acid cation exchangers. Sodium and nickel ions are sorbed in the selected cation exchanger, with little removal of other constituents. The remaining solution is subjected to sulfate removal through precipitation of calcium sulfate hemihydrate using, sequentially, CaO and then CaCO.sub.3. Phosphite removal from the solution is accomplished by the addition of MgO to form magnesium phosphite trihydrate. The washed precipitates of these steps can be safely discarded in nontoxic land fills, or used in various chemical industries. Finally, any remaining solution can be concentrated, adjusted for pH, and be ready for reuse. The plating metal can be removed from the exchanger with sulfuric acid or with the filtrate from the magnesium phosphite precipitation forming a sulfate of the plating metal for reuse. The process is illustrated as applied to processing electroless nickel plating baths.

  2. Performance evaluation of the R6R018 fuel plate using PLATE code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pavel G. Medvedev; Hakan Ozaltun

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents results of performance evaluation of the R6R018 fuel plate using PLATE code. R6R018 is a U-7Mo dispersion type mini-plate with Al-3.5Si matrix irradiated in the RERTR-9B experiment. The design of this plate is prototypical of the planned LEONIDAS irradiation test. Therefore, a detailed performance analysis of this plate is important to confirm acceptable behavior in pile, and to provide baseline and justification for further analysis and testing. Specific results presented in the paper include fuel temperature history, growth of the interaction layer between the U-Mo and the matrix, swelling, growth of the corrosion layer, and degradation of thermal conductivity. The methodology of the analysis will be discussed including the newly developed capability to account for the formation of the interaction layer during fuel fabrication.

  3. Highly conductive composites for fuel cell flow field plates and bipolar plates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jang, Bor Z; Zhamu, Aruna; Song, Lulu

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides a fuel cell flow field plate or bipolar plate having flow channels on faces of the plate, comprising an electrically conductive polymer composite. The composite is composed of (A) at least 50% by weight of a conductive filler, comprising at least 5% by weight reinforcement fibers, expanded graphite platelets, graphitic nano-fibers, and/or carbon nano-tubes; (B) polymer matrix material at 1 to 49.9% by weight; and (C) a polymer binder at 0.1 to 10% by weight; wherein the sum of the conductive filler weight %, polymer matrix weight % and polymer binder weight % equals 100% and the bulk electrical conductivity of the flow field or bipolar plate is at least 100 S/cm. The invention also provides a continuous process for cost-effective mass production of the conductive composite-based flow field or bipolar plate.

  4. Computer modeling and simulation of Black Warrior Basin formation: Annual report for the 1987--1988 SOMED (School of Mines and Energy Development) project year

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Visscher, P.B.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computer simulations have been performed, aimed at achieving a better understanding of the geological and physical processes involved in the formation of sedimentary basins in general and the Black Warrior basin of Alabama and Mississippi in particular. Microscopic-level computer modeling of sandstone porosity reduction has been done, elucidating the detailed small-scale dynamics which lead to the geological phenomenon of pressure solution. A new technique has been developed for 1D burial and thermal modeling of sedimentary basins based on stratigraphic data from test wells. It is significantly faster than previous methods, and can be used in interactive menu-oriented program requiring relatively little learning time or prior computer experience. This allows a geologist to rapidly determine the results of various different hypotheses about basin formation, providing insight which may help determine which is correct. A program has also been written to simulate tectonic-plate collisions and rifting processes using viscoelastic hydrodynamics.

  5. THE ADVANCED CHEMISTRY BASINS PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Goddard; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang; Lawrence Cathles III

    2004-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In the next decades, oil exploration by majors and independents will increasingly be in remote, inaccessible areas, or in areas where there has been extensive shallow exploration but deeper exploration potential may remain; areas where the collection of data is expensive, difficult, or even impossible, and where the most efficient use of existing data can drive the economics of the target. The ability to read hydrocarbon chemistry in terms of subsurface migration processes by relating it to the evolution of the basin and fluid migration is perhaps the single technological capability that could most improve our ability to explore effectively because it would allow us to use a vast store of existing or easily collected chemical data to determine the major migration pathways in a basin and to determine if there is deep exploration potential. To this end a the DOE funded a joint effort between California Institute of Technology, Cornell University, and GeoGroup Inc. to assemble a representative set of maturity and maturation kinetic models and develop an advanced basin model able to predict the chemistry of hydrocarbons in a basin from this input data. The four year project is now completed and has produced set of public domain maturity indicator and maturation kinetic data set, an oil chemistry and flash calculation tool operable under Excel, and a user friendly, graphically intuitive basin model that uses this data and flash tool, operates on a PC, and simulates hydrocarbon generation and migration and the chemical changes that can occur during migration (such as phase separation and gas washing). The DOE Advanced Chemistry Basin Model includes a number of new methods that represent advances over current technology. The model is built around the concept of handling arbitrarily detailed chemical composition of fluids in a robust finite-element 2-D grid. There are three themes on which the model focuses: chemical kinetic and equilibrium reaction parameters, chemical phase equilibrium, and physical flow through porous media. The chemical kinetic scheme includes thermal indicators including vitrinite, sterane ratios, hopane ratios, and diamonoids; and a user-modifiable reaction network for primary and secondary maturation. Also provided is a database of type-specific kerogen maturation schemes. The phase equilibrium scheme includes modules for primary and secondary migration, multi-phase equilibrium (flash) calculations, and viscosity predictions.

  6. Coal stratigraphy of deeper part of Black Warrior basin in Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, W.A.; Womack, S.H.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Warrior coal field of Alabama is stratigraphically in the upper part of the Lower Pennsylvanian Pottsville Formation and structurally in the eastern part of the Black Warrior foreland basin. The productive coal beds extend southwestward from the mining area downdip into the deeper part of the Black Warrior structural basin. Because the deep part of the basin is beyond the limits of conventional coal exploration, study of the stratigraphy of coal beds must rely on data from petroleum wells. Relative abundance of coal can be stated in terms of numbers of beds, but because of the limitations of the available data, thicknesses of coals presently are not accurately determined. The lower sandstone-rich coal-poor part of the Pottsville has been interpreted as barrier sediments in the mining area. To the southwest in the deeper Black Warrior basin, coal beds are more numerous within the sandstone-dominated sequence. The coal-productive upper Pottsville is informally divided into coal groups each of which includes several coal beds. The Black Creek, Mary Lee, and Utley coal groups are associated with northeast-trending delta-distributary sandstones. The areas of most numerous coals also trend northeastward and are laterally adjacent to relatively thick distributary sandstones, suggesting coal accumulation in backswamp environments. The most numerous coals in the Pratt coal group are in an area that trends northwestward parallel with and southwest of a northwest-trending linear sandstone, suggesting coal accumulation in a back-barrier environment. Equivalents of the Cobb, Gwin, and Brookwood coal groups contain little coal in the deep part of the Black Warrior basin.

  7. Ponderomotive phase plate for transmission electron microscopes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reed, Bryan W. (Livermore, CA)

    2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A ponderomotive phase plate system and method for controllably producing highly tunable phase contrast transfer functions in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) for high resolution and biological phase contrast imaging. The system and method includes a laser source and a beam transport system to produce a focused laser crossover as a phase plate, so that a ponderomotive potential of the focused laser crossover produces a scattering-angle-dependent phase shift in the electrons of the post-sample electron beam corresponding to a desired phase contrast transfer function.

  8. Cascade impactor and jet plate for same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dahlin, Robert S.; Farthing, William E.; Landham Jr., Edward C.

    2004-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A sampling system and method for sampling particulate matter from a high-temperature, high-pressure gas stream. A cyclone sampler for use at high temperatures and pressures, and having threadless sacrificial connectors is disclosed. Also disclosed is an improved cascade impactor including jet plates with integral spacers, and alignment features provided for aligning the jet plates with their associated collection substrates. An activated bauxite alkali collector is disclosed, and includes an alumina liner. The sampling system can be operated remotely or locally, and can be permanently installed or configured as a portable system.

  9. Quality assurance in small plating shops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNabb, W.J. (Electroless Nickel Plating of Louisiana, Hammond, LA (United States))

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential for electroless nickel coatings in oilfield and petrochemical applications is quite high. The greatest obstacle to their use has been a reputation for poor quality due to a lack of quality control in many plating shops. To overcome this, electroless nickel shops should not only have a quality control program in their operation, but must also document its use and success. This article describes how a plating shoe can develop the necessary procedures, manuals, and paperwork trail to offer quality assurance and to satisfy customers.

  10. Application of advanced reservoir characterization, simulation, and production optimization strategies to maximize recovery in slope and basin clastic reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin), Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutton, Shirley P.; Flanders, William A.; Zirczy, Helena H.

    2000-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this Class 3 project was to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through strategic placement of infill wells and geologically based field development. Phase 1 of the project, reservoir characterization, was completed this year, and Phase 2 began. The project is focused on East Ford field, a representative Delaware Mountain Group field that produces from the upper Bell Canyon Formation (Ramsey sandstone). The field, discovered in 1960, is operated by Oral Petco, Inc., as the East Ford unit. A CO{sub 2} flood is being conducted in the unit, and this flood is the Phase 2 demonstration for the project.

  11. Silurian of Illinois basin - a carbonate ramp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coburn, G.W.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Silurian of the Illinois basin has classically been defined as a shelf-basin sequence. According to the shelf-basin model, the Illinois basin is a deep-water basin in the extreme southern part (southern Illinois-Tennessee), with a slope in the south (Illinois-Indiana) and a shelf extending from central Illinois and Indiana northeast to the Michigan basin. Reef buildups are in a continuous trend along the shelf break. However, the author proposes that the silurian of the Illinois basin represents a carbonate ramp. The down-ramp position is located in southern Illinois and grades into deeper water environments south of Illinois. In this environment, reef buildups would form in the late Alexandrian of early St. Clair, and would begin in the down-ramp position. Therefore, using the new model, reef buildups are expected throughout the basin, rather than being confined to an imaginary shelf break. This model would facilitate exploration in southern Illinois, Indiana, and western Kentucky for reefal hydrocarbon deposits. A ramp model is indicated for the Illinois basin because: (1) the basin lacks a shelf-slope break; (2) the facies sequence is compatible with a ramp environment and incompatible with a shelf-slope environment; (3) discontinuous reef trends are typical of a ramp environment; and (4) facies changes and slope are gradual, extending over hundreds of miles as expected in a ramp environment. Modern carbonate models border on ocean basins. However, the Illinois basin is a cratonic basin, which may have affected the depositional environments. How much that environment differed from present-day models is unknown.

  12. Sequence stratigraphy of middle and upper Jurassic strata of Southwestern Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wade, W.J.; Moore, C.H. Jr. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Middle and Upper Jurassic systems tracts of southwestern Alabama differ from those of the western Gulf rim, showing: (1) profound influence of antecedent topography; (2) low early subsidence rates; and (3) greater clastic influx from adjacent uplands. Werner Anhydrite and Louann Salt represent the earliest marine incursion onto the Gulf rim following initial rifting; they onlap upper Paleozoic basement and garben-filling Eagle Mills red beds. Because basin-wide evaporative drawdowns overprint even higher order eustatic sea level changes, transgressive systems tracts (TST) and highstand systems tracts (HST) are indistinguishable. Anhydrite and shale caps accumulated via interstratal halite dissolution. Oxfordian Norphlet siliciclastics form a continental lowstand systems tract as illustrated by abrupt contact with underlying marine evaporites without intervening progradational marginal marine facies. Marine-reworked uppermost Norphlet sandstone marks the base of a subsequent TST, which includes overstepping lower Smackover lithofacies (laminated mudstone, algal-laminated mudstone, and pellet wackestone). The upper Smackover HST is characterized by formation of rimmed shelves upon which algal mounds and aggrading ooid grainstone parasequences accumulated. Shallow lagoonal carbonate and evaporite saltern deposition occurred behind ooid shoals; fine-grained siliciclastics accumulated in updip areas. Equivalents of Smackover A, Smackover B, Bossier, and Gilmer sequences are largely masked by influx of Haynesville and Cotton Valley continental clastics. Lack of biostratigraphic data, a consequence of restricted fauna, precludes useful age assignments for these sequences in Alabama. Middle and Upper Jurassic systems tracts of southwestern Alabama are regionally atypical and cannot serve as a model for Gulf-wide sequences.

  13. Fabrication of nickel microbump on aluminum using electroless nickel plating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watanabe, H.; Honma, H. [Kanto Gakuin Univ., Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fabrication of nickel microbumps on an aluminum electrode using a nickel displacement and a direct nickel plating process was investigated. Electroless nickel plating reaction with hypophosphite as a reducing agent was not initiated on the aluminum substrate, because aluminum does not have catalytic action on the oxidation of hypophosphite. Accordingly, nickel was initially deposited on the aluminum using nickel displacement plating for the initiation of the electroless plating. Nickel bumps on the aluminum electrode were fabricated by treatment of the nickel displacement plating followed by electroless nickel plating. Nickel microbumps also can be formed on the aluminum electrode without the displacement plating process. Activation of the aluminum surface is an indispensable process to initiate electroless nickel plating. Uniform bumps 20 {micro}m wide and 15 {micro}m high with good configuration were obtained by direct nickel plating after being activated with dimethyl amine borane.

  14. CLEAR LAKE BASIN 2000 PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LAKE COUNTY SANITATION DISTRICT

    2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The following is a final report for the Clear Lake Basin 2000 project. All of the major project construction work was complete and this phase generally included final details and testing. Most of the work was electrical. Erosion control activities were underway to prepare for the rainy season. System testing including pump stations, electrical and computer control systems was conducted. Most of the project focus from November onward was completing punch list items.

  15. Ground Turkey and Potato Plate Ingredients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Ground Turkey and Potato Plate Ingredients: 1 onion 1/2 pound ground turkey 1 cup ketchup, low, brown ground turkey and onion together over medium heat 8 to 10 minutes or until turkey is no longer. Return turkey to skillet. 3. Add ketchup to skillet; cover and simmer over medium-low heat 10 minutes. 4

  16. Bending Energy of Rods and Plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    descriptors DUH HFFHQWULFLW\\ VSKHULFLW\\ 3$ SHULPHWHU VTXDUHG GLYLGHG E\\ WLPHV area) and bending energy185 Chapter 9 Bending Energy of Rods and Plates Integrated curvature and bending energy of a closed curvature/energy values over a chain-code description of the contour (as in binary length estimators). We

  17. Metallic Bipolar Plates with Composite Coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that is available in sheet form For corrosion resistance, apply a coating that is a composite of two materials: ­ Filler to provide electrical conductivity · Candidate Materials: graphite, carbon black, TiB2 and CaB6Metallic Bipolar Plates with Composite Coatings Jennifer Mawdsley Argonne National Laboratory Fuel

  18. Brazed bipolar plates for PEM fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neutzler, J.K.

    1998-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid-cooled, bipolar plate separating adjacent cells of a PEM fuel cell comprises corrosion-resistant metal sheets brazed together so as to provide a passage between the sheets through which a dielectric coolant flows. The brazement comprises a metal which is substantially insoluble in the coolant. 6 figs.

  19. Titanium carbide bipolar plate for electrochemical devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    LaConti, Anthony B. (Lynnfield, MA); Griffith, Arthur E. (Lynn, MA); Cropley, Cecelia C. (Acton, MA); Kosek, John A. (Danvers, MA)

    2000-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A corrosion resistant, electrically conductive, non-porous bipolar plate is made from titanium carbide for use in an eletrochemical device. The process involves blending titanium carbide powder with a suitable binder material, and molding the mixture, at an elevated temperature and pressure.

  20. Spectral characterization of storage phosphor imaging plates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deresch, A.; Jechow, M.; Gollwitzer, C. [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing Unter den Eichen 87, 12205 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents attenuation and sensitivity measurements of radiographic imaging plates (IPs) with quasimonoenergetic X-rays in the 8–60 kiloelectronvolt range. The measurements are used to validate theoretical predictions. A short overview of the theoretical model is given. The model can be used to describe the sensitivity of different detector types to a wide range of X-ray energies.

  1. Metalization of lipid vesicles via electroless plating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrar, W.T.; O'Brien, D.F.; Warshawsky, A.; Voycheck, C.L.

    1988-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The encapsulation of metallic particles and metallic oxides within lipid vesicles has recently been of interest for applications such as catalysis, water splitting, and magnetic control of spin coupling. In this communication the authors introduce the concept and practice of the deposition of metal on vesicles by using electroless plating techniques. Coordination of low valent transition metals to organic functional groups on the surface of the bilayer membrane provides a means of binding metal atoms to vesicles. Chemical reduction produced zero valent atoms which serve as sites for further metal deposition by the chemical reduction techniques of electroless plating. Specifically, this procedure involved the binding of a small amount of tetrachloropalladate to the vesicle bilayer, reduction of the palladium(II) to palladium(0), followed by the deposition of much larger amounts of metal from an electroless plating solution. Electroless plating solutions were used for the deposition of palladium, nickel, cobalt, or copper metal onto the catalytic palladium centers. Since the metallic particles were associated with the vesicles, colloids were formed that were stable in water for much longer periods than the control metal particles formed in water alone. If the vesicles were composed in part of unsaturated lipids, with the olefinic groups on the hydrocarbon chains, the initial evidence suggests the transition metal was directed into the bilayer, rather than staying on the surface.

  2. Reserves in western basins: Part 1, Greater Green River basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study characterizes an extremely large gas resource located in low permeability, overpressured sandstone reservoirs located below 8,000 feet drill depth in the Greater Green River basin, Wyoming. Total in place resource is estimated at 1,968 Tcf. Via application of geologic, engineering and economic criteria, the portion of this resource potentially recoverable as reserves is estimated. Those volumes estimated include probable, possible and potential categories and total 33 Tcf as a mean estimate of recoverable gas for all plays considered in the basin. Five plays (formations) were included in this study and each was separately analyzed in terms of its overpressured, tight gas resource, established productive characteristics and future reserves potential based on a constant $2/Mcf wellhead gas price scenario. A scheme has been developed to break the overall resource estimate down into components that can be considered as differing technical and economic challenges that must be overcome in order to exploit such resources: in other words, to convert those resources to economically recoverable reserves. Total recoverable reserves estimates of 33 Tcf do not include the existing production from overpressured tight reservoirs in the basin. These have estimated ultimate recovery of approximately 1.6 Tcf, or a per well average recovery of 2.3 Bcf. Due to the fact that considerable pay thicknesses can be present, wells can be economic despite limited drainage areas. It is typical for significant bypassed gas to be present at inter-well locations because drainage areas are commonly less than regulatory well spacing requirements.

  3. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain, Final Report and Topical Reports 5-8 on Smackover Petroleum system and Underdevelopment Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, Ernest A.; Puckett, T. Markham; Parcell, William C.; Llinas, Juan Carlos; Kopaska-Merkel, David C.; Townsend, Roger N.

    2002-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Smackover Formation, a major hydrocarbon-producing horizon in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin (MISB), conformably overlies the Norphlet Formation and is conformably overlain by the Buckner Anhydrite Member of the Haynesville Formation. The Norphlet-Smackover contact can be either gradational or abrupt. The thickness and lithofacies distribution of the Smackover Formation were controlled by the configuration of incipient paleotopography. The Smackover Formation has been subdivided into three informal members, referred to as the lower, middle and upper members.

  4. Demonstration of 12 nm resolution Fresnel zone plate lens based soft x-ray microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao, W.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of 12 nm Resolution Fresnel Zone Plate Lens based Soft X-raynanofabrication process for Fresnel zone plate lenses. Theoptical performance of Fresnel zone plate lens based imaging

  5. Preliminary Measurements From A New Flat Plate Facility For Aerodynamic Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. M. McEligot; D. W. Nigg; E. J. Walsh; D. Hernon; M.R.D. Davies

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper details the design and preliminary measurements used in the characterisation of a new flat plate research facility. The facility is designed specifically to aid in the understanding of entropy generation throughout the boundary layer with special attention given to non-equilibrium flows. Hot-wire measurements were obtained downstream of two turbulence generating grids. The turbulence intensity, integral and dissipation length scale ranges measured are 1.6%-7%, 5mm-17mm and 0.7mm-7mm, respectively. These values compared well to existing correlations. The flow downstream of both grids was found to be homogenous and isotropic. Flow visualisation is employed to determine aerodynamic parameters such as flow 2-dimensionality and the effect of the flap angle on preventing separation at the leading edge. The flow was found to be 2-dimensional over all measurement planes. The non-dimensional pressure distribution of a modern turbine blade suction surface is simulated on the flat plate through the use of a variable upper wall. The Reynolds number range based on wetted plate length and inlet velocity is 70,000-4,000,000.

  6. Flat plate puncture test convergence study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snow, Spencer (Idaho National Laboratories); Ammerman, Douglas James; Molitoris, David (Westinghouse); Tso, Chi-Fung (ARUP); Yaksh, Mike (NAC International)

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ASME Task Group on Computational Mechanics for Explicit Dynamics is investigating the types of finite element models needed to accurately solve various problems that occur frequently in cask design. One type of problem is the 1-meter impact onto a puncture spike. The work described in this paper considers this impact for a relatively thin-walled shell, represented as a flat plate. The effects of mesh refinement, friction coefficient, material models, and finite element code will be discussed. The actual punch, as defined in the transport regulations, is 15 cm in diameter with a corner radius of no more than 6 mm. The punch used in the initial part of this study has the same diameter, but has a corner radius of 25 mm. This more rounded punch was used to allow convergence of the solution with a coarser mesh. A future task will be to investigate the effect of having a punch with a smaller corner radius. The 25-cm thick type 304 stainless steel plate that represents the cask wall is 1 meter in diameter and has added mass on the edge to represent the remainder of the cask. The amount of added mass to use was calculated using Nelm's equation, an empirically derived relationship between weight, wall thickness, and ultimate strength that prevents punch through. The outer edge of the plate is restrained so that it can only move in the direction parallel to the axis of the punch. Results that are compared include the deflection at the edge of the plate, the deflection at the center of the plate, the plastic strains at radius r=50 cm and r=100 cm , and qualitatively, the distribution of plastic strains. The strains of interest are those on the surface of the plate, not the integration point strains. Because cask designers are using analyses of this type to determine if shell will puncture, a failure theory, including the effect of the tri-axial nature of the stress state, is also discussed. The results of this study will help to determine what constitutes an adequate finite element model for analyzing the puncture hypothetical accident.

  7. Timing and Tectonic implications of basin inversion in the Nam Con Son Basin and adjacent areas, southern South China Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Christopher Charles

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nam Con Son (NCS) Basin, located offshore of SE Vietnam, is one of several Tertiary rift basins that formed during initial Eocene(?)-Oligocene rifting. Following cessation of rifting at the end of Oligocene time, these basins were subjected...

  8. Geochemical studies of crude oil generation, migration, and destruction in Mississippi salt basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sassen, R.; Moore, C.H.; Nunn, J.A.; Meendsen, F.C.; Heydari, E.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main source for crude oil in the Mississippi salt basin is the laminated lime mudstone facies of the lower Smackover. Crude oil generation and migration commenced at a level of thermal maturity equivalent to about 0.55% vitrinite reflectance. Short-range lateral migration of crude oil was focused on upper Smackover and Norphlet reservoirs, but vertical migration also charged some overlying Cotton Valley, Rodessa, lower Tuscaloosa, and Eutaw reservoirs. Following migration from the lower Smackover, thermal maturity history of reservoir rocks controls the preservation of crude oil, gas condensate, and methane. Slow thermal cracking of crude oil occurred in deep upper Smackover reservoirs, resulting in formation of gas condensate and precipitation of solid bitumen. The maximum thermal maturity for preservation of condensate is equivalent to about 1.3% vitrinite reflectance. Only methane, pyrobitumen, and nonhydrocarbon gases, including hydrogen sulfide, persist at higher levels of thermal maturity. Early destruction of methane in deep upper Smackover reservoirs near the Wiggins arch is driven by thermochemical sulfate reduction. Lesser availability of sulfate in Norphlet reservoirs could account for methane preservation at higher levels of thermal maturity. One basic geochemical strategy for further exploration of the Mississippi salt basin is to focus exploration effort on traps with reservoirs in the thermal maturity window for hydrocarbon preservation. Another strategy is to avoid drilling traps with overmature reservoir rocks.

  9. Facies analysis and petroleum potential of Smackover Formation, western and northern areas, East Texas basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hancharik, J.M.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Smackover Formation (Upper Jurassic) in northeast Texas is a transgressive-regressive carbonate sequence which has been extensively dolomitized. The Smackover Formation is subdivided informally into a lower and upper member based on distinctive lithologic characteristics. The lower member, which rests conformably on the fluvial-deltaic sandstones of the Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation, contains a laminated, organic carbonate mudstone facies that grades into an overlying locally fossiliferous, pelletalmicritic facies. The upper member of the Smackover Formation consists mainly of broken skeletal debris and pelletal allochems in a micritic matrix. The sediments are better winnowed and better sorted upward in the sequence. Interbedded with and overlying the skeletal-pelletal facies is a clean well-sorted dolomitized oolitic-grainstone facies. This upper-most informal member marks the beginning of a progradational sequence which lasts throughout the remainder of Smackover deposition and continues through deposition of the evaporities and red beds of the overlying Buckner Formation. Most of the Smackover production in northeast Texas occurs along the Mexia-Talco fault zone in the deeper gentle salt-related anticlines and salt-graben systems. Reservoir rocks are primarily leached and dolomitized oolitic grainstones and dolomite. Laminated organic carbonate mudstones which characterize the lower, transgressive phase of the Smackover Formation provide an excellent source rock for petroleum. Exploration targets for the Smackover Formation are the areas were dolomitized oolitic and skeletal grainstones occur on top of structurally high areas such as over salt ridges or swells in the deeper portions of the basin.

  10. CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A...

  11. area sichuan basin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    area has been extensively unknown authors 59 outside the Pachitea River Basin, Peru CiteSeer Summary: At a superficial look, the Pachitea river basin gives the impression...

  12. area tarim basin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    area has been extensively unknown authors 65 outside the Pachitea River Basin, Peru CiteSeer Summary: At a superficial look, the Pachitea river basin gives the impression...

  13. area groundwater basin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    concerning aspects of petroleum geochemistry in the basin, especially in determining source rock(s) in the western part of this basin. It has been speculated that Ngimbang...

  14. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration...

  15. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration...

  16. SCALE-UP OF CARBON /CARBON BIPOLAR PLATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scale-up of Carbon/Carbon Bipolar Plates · Project Objectives ­ Build and demonstrate a pilot facility#12;SCALE-UP OF CARBON /CARBON BIPOLAR PLATES Quarterly Report to the Department of Energy, May 19 #12;DOE PROGRAM OBJECTIVES Scale-up of Carbon/Carbon Bipolar Plates · Phase I ­ Technology Development

  17. Diffraction theory for azimuthally structured Fresnel zone plate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jahns, Jürgen

    Diffraction theory for azimuthally structured Fresnel zone plate Thordis Vierke and Jürgen Jahns A conventional Fresnel zone plate (FZP) consists of concentric rings with an alternating binary transmission of zero and one. In an azimuthally structured Fresnel zone plate (aFZP), the light transmission

  18. Comprehensive focusing analysis of various Fresnel zone plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jahns, Jürgen

    Comprehensive focusing analysis of various Fresnel zone plates Qing Cao and Ju¨rgen Jahns Optische and the linear superposition principle, of the focusing performances of various Fresnel zone plates. Many similarity between Fresnel zone plates and multilevel diffractive lenses, most of the obtained results

  19. Modified Fresnel zone plates that produce sharp Gaussian focal spots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jahns, Jürgen

    Modified Fresnel zone plates that produce sharp Gaussian focal spots Qing Cao and Ju¨rgen Jahns Fresnel zone plate that can produce an approximate Gaussian focal spot is proposed for the focusing of 7.7 nm can be produced by a modified Fresnel zone plate with a minimum structure size of 30 nm

  20. area upper engadine: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Niles; Adam Pease 2001-01-01 18 An Upper Bound on Overflow Probability in Transient Source Systems Engineering Websites Summary: An Upper Bound on Overflow Probability in...

  1. Kinetics of the smectite to illite transformation in the Denver Basin: Clay mineral, K-Ar data, and mathematical model results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliot, W.C.; Aronson, J.L.; Matisoff, G. (Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)); Gautier, D.L. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clay mineral data, potassium-argon (K-Ar) ages, and mathematical model simulations indicate the important kinetic factors controlling the smectite to illite transformation (illitization) in Upper Cretaceous Mowry and Niobrara core and outcrop bentonites from the Denver basin. The data also provide additional information on the thermal history of the basin. Data show that both the percentages of illite layers and the K-Ar ages of mixed layer illite-smectite (I/S) increase with increasing depths of burial, and this trend was simulated mathematically employing a very simplified burial model with a fifth-order overall kinetic expression for the information of illite. For most of the basin, the data is compatible with I/S having been formed in response to increased temperature from progressive burial, because the oldest K-Ar ages of I/S are from the deepest buried I/S along the basin axis. In addition, these data qualitatively suggest that I/S even as small as <0.1 {mu}m retains radiogenic argon under Denver basin burial temperatures. I/S separated from drill core bentonites from the Watenberg gas field, astride the basin axis and known to have been subjected to an anomalously high temperature history, are the most illitic and among the oldest measured from core in this study. The ages of illitization (about 60 Ma) are coincident with the Laramide time of structural development of the basin and uplift of the Front Range. The reconstructions of the burial history, and the modeling of the timing and extent of illitization, suggest that the area of the Wattenberg as field was an upper Cretaceous depocenter, an area of relatively deeper burial along the basin axis.

  2. Wave turbulence served up on a plate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pablo Cobelli; Philippe Petitjeans; Agnes Maurel; Vincent Pagneux; Nicolas Mordant

    2009-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Wave turbulence in a thin elastic plate is experimentally investigated. By using a Fourier transform profilometry technique, the deformation field of the plate surface is measured simultaneously in time and space. This enables us to compute the wavevector-frequency Fourier ($\\mathbf k, \\omega$) spectrum of the full space-time deformation velocity. In the 3D ($\\mathbf k, \\omega$) space, we show that the energy of the motion is concentrated on a 2D surface that represents a nonlinear dispersion relation. This nonlinear dispersion relation is close to the linear dispersion relation. This validates the usual wavenumber-frequency change of variables used in many experimental studies of wave turbulence. The deviation from the linear dispersion, which increases with the input power of the forcing, is attributed to weak non linear effects. Our technique opens the way for many new extensive quantitative comparisons between theory and experiments of wave turbulence.

  3. urricane activity in the Atlantic basin increased

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with levels in the 1970s and 1980s. For example, the accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) index in the Atlantic of disturbances. Bottom: annual number (Aug­Oct) of North Atlantic basin hurricanes (1980­2005). See figures 2, is a crucial question for the future outlook of hurricane activity in the basin. It is difficult to distinguish

  4. The State of the Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Council to serve as a comprehensive planning agency for energy policy and fish and wildlife policy in the Columbia River Basin and to inform the public about energy and fish and wildlife issues and involve Energy, Fish, Wildlife: The State of the Columbia River Basin, 2013

  5. 6, 839877, 2006 Mexico City basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    emitters of air pollutants leading to negative health effects and environmental degradation. The rate altitude basin with air pollutant concentrations above the health limits most days of the year. A mesoscale-dimensional wind patterns in25 the basin and found that the sea-breeze transports the polluted air mass up the moun

  6. Oil migration pattern in the Sirte Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roohi, M.; Aburawi, R.M. [Waha Oil Co., Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sirte Basin is an asymmetrical cratonic basin, situated in the north-central part of Libya. It covers an area of over 350,000km{sup 2} and is one of the most prolific oil-producing basins in the world. Sirte Basin is divided into large NW-SE trending sub-parallel platforms and troughs bounded by deep seated syndepositional normal faults. A very unique combination of thick sediments with rich source rocks in the troughs vs. thinner sediments with prolific reservoir rocks on the platforms accounts for the productivity of the basin. Analysis of oil migration pattern in the Sirte Basin will certainly help to discover the remaining reserves, and this can only be achieved if the important parameter of structural configuration of the basin at the time of oil migration is known. The present paper is an attempt to analyse the time of oil migration, to define the structural picture of the 4 Basin during the time of migration and to delineate the most probable connecting routes between the hydrocarbon kitchens and the oil fields.

  7. Sedimentary basins of the late Mesozoic extensional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Cari

    17 Sedimentary basins of the late Mesozoic extensional domain of China and Mongolia S.A. Graham,* T Mongolia was extended during the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous. As noted by various authors (Li et al in southern Mongolia (Lamb and Badarch, 1997), a crushed late Paleozoic flysch basin along the China­Mongolia

  8. Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation; 1992-1993 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Pendleton, OR)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the activities of the Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project from September 30, 1992 to September 29, 1993. Examinations of historical flow and water temperature records and current physical habitat, indicate that the streams in the Umatilla River Basin vary in condition from extremely poor to good. Reduced flows and high water temperatures prevented salmonid production in the lower Umatilla River below river mile 75 during the summer and early fall. This was also true in the lower reaches of many tributaries. Isolated springs provided limited refuges in the mid Umatilla River and lower Meacham Creek. Suitable habitat for salmonids was found in the upper reaches of the mainstem and tributaries.

  9. Vibrations of circular steel plates with damping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheth, Prafulchandra Naginlal

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    distributed. Usually, the prime objection to vibrations produced by machines is their effect on humans. These are high frequency vibrations that produce troublesome noise. Low frequency vibrations are often trans- mitted and these may damage nearby... materials used with fans, motors, engines, presses, turbines and similar machines. Byars (1)* studied vibrations of a circular plate on three supports for node patterns, amplitudes and frequencies. Ballentine (2) investigated the vibrations of circular...

  10. Characterizing detonator output using dynamic witness plates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Michael John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Adrian, Ronald J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sub-microsecond, time-resolved micro-particle-image velocimetry (PIV) system is developed to investigate the output of explosive detonators. Detonator output is directed into a transparent solid that serves as a dynamic witness plate and instantaneous shock and material velocities are measured in a two-dimensional plane cutting through the shock wave as it propagates through the solid. For the case of unloaded initiators (e.g. exploding bridge wires, exploding foil initiators, etc.) the witness plate serves as a surrogate for the explosive material that would normally be detonated. The velocity-field measurements quantify the velocity of the shocked material and visualize the geometry of the shocked region. Furthermore, the time-evolution of the velocity-field can be measured at intervals as small as 10 ns using the PIV system. Current experimental results of unloaded exploding bridge wire output in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) witness plates demonstrate 20 MHz velocity-field sampling just 300 ns after initiation of the wire.

  11. Ordovician platform, slope, and basin facies in subsurface of southern North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alberstadt, L.P.; Colvin, G.; Sauve, J.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ordovician carbonates of the Nashville dome and Ozark dome regions have long been considered typical shelf deposits. In the subsurface to the south, in the Black Warrior basin, Mississippi Embayment, and Arkoma basin, these shelf carbonate units changed facies. The most significant change is the occurrence of a thick limestone unit characterized by a faunal and floral assemblage of Nuia, Girvanella (isolated long strands), Sphaerocodium, a delicate stacked-chambered organism (.algal), and sponge spicules and sponge mudstone clumps. In ascending order, the complete Ordovician sequence consists of: a lower dolostone, the Nuia-sponge limestone, a dolostone, and a limestone. The upper part of this four-fold sequence changes character westward into the Arkoma basin. The lower two units maintain their character for long distances along depositional strike and occur in parts of the Appalachians as far north as Newfoundland, and on the opposite side of the continent in Nevada. The Nuia-sponge assemblage is a distinctive petrographic marker and seems to be a persistent Ordovician rock and fossil assemblage of widespread occurrence. In Nevada, it occurs on the surface where it is associated with slump and slide features that suggest that it is an outer shelf or upper slope deposit. Coeval carbonates in the Ouachita Mountains are different and show indications of being deep water (basinal). Biostratigraphic evidence indicates that the succession in the subsurface is continuous; the regional Lower Ordovician-Middle Ordovician unconformity is absent. The Lower Ordovician-Middle Ordovician boundary falls near the top of the Nuia-sponge mudstone unit and not at the top of the underlying thick dolostone unit.

  12. VENTURA BASIN LOS ANGELES BASIN CENTRAL COASTAL BASIN W Y T

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalTheE. Great Basin Oil and Gas Fields 2004VENTURA

  13. Particle Transport in Parallel-Plate Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rader, D.J.; Geller, A.S.

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A major cause of semiconductor yield degradation is contaminant particles that deposit on wafers while they reside in processing tools during integrated circuit manufacturing. This report presents numerical models for assessing particle transport and deposition in a parallel-plate geometry characteristic of a wide range of single-wafer processing tools: uniform downward flow exiting a perforated-plate showerhead separated by a gap from a circular wafer resting on a parallel susceptor. Particles are assumed to originate either upstream of the showerhead or from a specified position between the plates. The physical mechanisms controlling particle deposition and transport (inertia, diffusion, fluid drag, and external forces) are reviewed, with an emphasis on conditions encountered in semiconductor process tools (i.e., sub-atmospheric pressures and submicron particles). Isothermal flow is assumed, although small temperature differences are allowed to drive particle thermophoresis. Numerical solutions of the flow field are presented which agree with an analytic, creeping-flow expression for Re < 4. Deposition is quantified by use of a particle collection efficiency, which is defined as the fraction of particles in the reactor that deposit on the wafer. Analytic expressions for collection efficiency are presented for the limiting case where external forces control deposition (i.e., neglecting particle diffusion and inertia). Deposition from simultaneous particle diffusion and external forces is analyzed by an Eulerian formulation; for creeping flow and particles released from a planar trap, the analysis yields an analytic, integral expression for particle deposition based on process and particle properties. Deposition from simultaneous particle inertia and external forces is analyzed by a Lagrangian formulation, which can describe inertia-enhanced deposition resulting from particle acceleration in the showerhead. An approximate analytic expression is derived for particle velocity at the showerhead exit as a function of showerhead geometry, flow rate, and gas and particle properties. The particle showerhead-exit velocity is next used as an initial condition for particle transport between the plates to determine whether the particle deposits on the wafer, as a function of shower-head-exit particle velocity, the plate separation, flow rate, and gas and particle properties. Based on the numerical analysis, recommendations of best practices are presented that should help tool operators and designers reduce particle deposition in real tools. These guidelines are not intended to replace detailed calculations, but to provide the user with a general feel for inherently-clean practices.

  14. Casimir interaction energies for magneto-electric ?-function plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimball A. Milton; Prachi Parashar; Martin Schaden; K. V. Shajesh

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present boundary conditions for the electromagnetic fields on a \\delta-function plate, having both electric and magnetic properties, sandwiched between two magneto-electric semi-infinite half spaces. The optical properties for an isolated \\delta-function plate are shown to be independent of the longitudinal material properties of the plate. The Casimir-Polder energy between an isotropically polarizable atom and a magneto-electric \\delta-function plate is attractive for a purely electric \\delta-function plate, repulsive for a purely magnetic \\delta-function plate, and vanishes for the simultaneous perfect conductor limit of both electric and magnetic properties of the \\delta-function plate. The interaction energy between two identical \\delta-function plates is always attractive. It can be attractive or repulsive when the plates have electric and magnetic properties interchanged and reproduces Boyer's result for the interaction energy between perfectly conducting electric and magnetic plates. The change in the Casimir-Polder energy in the presence of a \\delta-function plate on a magneto-electric substrate is substantial when the substrate is a weak dielectric.

  15. Upper Snake Provincial Assessment May 2004 APPENDIX 4-1--UPPER SNAKE PROVINCE PROJECT INVENTORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Upper Snake Provincial Assessment May 2004 1 APPENDIX 4-1--UPPER SNAKE PROVINCE PROJECT INVENTORY The purpose of the project inventory is to provide a generalized picture of the types of fish and wildlife team participants through the project inventory website or through direct submission. Additional

  16. Materials selection for the US INTOR divertor collector plate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattas, R.F.; Misra, B.; Smith, D.L.; Morgan, G.D.; Delaney, M.; Gold, R.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The divertor collector plate in the INTOR reactor will be subjected to high heat, particle, and neutron fluxes, making it the most severely damaged torus component. The collector plate is composed of a protection plate, which is directly exposed to the particle flux, and a heat sink which provides support for the protection plate and carries the water coolant. The high-Z refractory metals have been considered for use as the protection plate material, and austenitic stainless steels and copper alloys have been considered as the heat sink material. Tungsten and Type 316 stainless steels have been selected for the protection plate and heat sink, respectively. The protection plate has a sputtering lifetime of 1.75 y at a 50% duty factor, while the heat sink is expected to last the lifetime of the reactor.

  17. A novel plating process for microencapsulating metal hydrides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Law, H.H.; Vyas, B.; Zahurak, S.M.; Kammlott, G.W. [AT and T Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One approach to increasing the lifetime of the metal hydride electrode has been the use of conventional electroless plating to produce a coating of copper or nickel on the surface of the metal hydride powders. In this paper, a novel method for microencapsulating the active electrode powders is presented. This new plating technique takes advantage of the reducing power of hydrogen already stored inside the metal hydride to plate a variety of metals onto metal hydride materials. This method greatly simplifies electroless plating for these powders, eliminating the need for stabilizers and additives typically required for conventional electroless plating solutions. Metals that can be electrolessly plated with stored hydrogen have been identified based on thermodynamic considerations. Experimentally, micrometers thick coatings of copper, silver, and nickel have been plated on several metal hydrides.

  18. Anadronous Fish Habitat Enhancement for the Middle Fork and Upper Salmon River, 1988 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, John ( US Forest Service, Intermountain Region, Boise, ID)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wild and natural salmon and steelhead populations in the Middle Fork and Upper Salmon River are at a critical low. Habitat enhancement through decreasing sediment loads, increasing vegetative cover, removing passage barriers, and providing habitat diversity is imperative to the survival of these specially adapted fish, until passage problems over the Columbia River dams are solved. Personnel from the Boise and Sawtooth National Forests completed all construction work planned for 1988. In Bear Valley, 1573 feet of juniper revetment was constructed at eleven sites, cattle were excluded from 1291 feet of streambanks to prevent bank breakdown, and a small ephemeral gully was filled with juniper trees. Work in the Upper Salmon Drainage consisted of constructing nine rock sills/weirs, two rock deflectors, placing riprap along forty feet of streambank, construction of 2.1 miles of fence on private lands, and opening up the original Valley Creek channel to provide spring chinook passage to the upper watershed. A detailed stream survey of anadromous fish habitat covering 72.0 miles of streams in the Middle Fork Sub-basin was completed.

  19. Upper Mahiao Binary GEPP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtleCooperativeCROSS-VALIDATION OF SWERA'sUpperUpperMahiao

  20. K Basin Sludge Conditioning Process Testing Project Results from Test 4, ''Acid Digestion of Mixed-Bed Ion Exchange Resin''

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pool, K.H.; Delegard, C.H.; Schmidt, A.J.; Thornton, B.M.; Silvers, K.L.

    1999-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 73 m{sup 3} of heterogeneous solid material, ''sludge,'' (upper bound estimate, Packer 1997) have accumulated at the bottom of the K Basins in the 100 K Area of the Hanford Site. This sludge is a mixture of spent fuel element corrosion products, ion exchange materials (organic and inorganic), graphite-based gasket materials, iron and aluminum metal corrosion products, sand, and debris (Makenas et al. 1996, 1997). In addition, small amounts of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been found. Ultimately, it is planned to transfer the K Basins sludge to the Hanford double shell tanks (DSTs). The Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel (HSNF) project has conducted a number of evaluations to examine technology and processing alternatives to pretreat K Basin sludge to meet storage and disposal requirements. From these evaluations, chemical pretreatment has been selected to address criticality issues, reactivity, and the destruction or removal of PCBs before the K Basin sludge can be transferred to the DSTs. Chemical pretreatment, referred to as the K Basin sludge conditioning process, includes nitric acid dissolution of the sludge (with removal of acid insoluble solids), neutrons absorber addition, neutralization, and reprecipitation. Laboratory testing is being conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide data necessary to develop the sludge conditioning process.

  1. Evaluation of Ion Exchange Materials in K Basin Floor Sludge and Potential Solvents for PCB Extraction from Ion Exchange Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, A.J.; Klinger, G.S.; Bredt, P.R.

    1999-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 73 m{sup 3} of heterogeneous solid material, ''sludge,'' (upper bound estimate, Packer 1997) have accumulated at the bottom of the K Basins in the 100 K Area of the Hanford Site. This sludge is a mixture of spent fuel element corrosion products, ion exchange materials (organic and inorganic), graphite-based gasket materials, iron and aluminum metal corrosion products, sand, and debris (Makenas et al. 1996, 1997). In addition, small amounts of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been found. These small amounts are significant from a regulatory standpoint. Ultimately, it is planned to transfer the K Basins sludge to the Hanford double shell tanks (DSTs). Chemical pretreatment is required to address criticality issues and the destruction or removal of PCBs before the K Basin sludge can be transferred to the DSTs. Eleven technologies have been evaluated (Papp 1997) as potential pretreatment methods. Based on the evaluations and engineering studies and limited testing, Fluor Daniel Hanford recommended solvent washing of the K Basin sludge, followed by nitric acid dissolution and, potentially, peroxide addition (FDH 1997). The solvent washing (extraction) and peroxide addition would be used to facilitate PCB removal and destruction. Following solvent extraction, the PCBs could be distilled and concentrated for disposal as a low-level waste. The purpose of the work reported here was to continue investigating solvent extraction, first by better identifying the ion exchange materials in the actual sludge samples and then evaluating various solvents for removing the PCBs or possibly dissolving the resins. This report documents some of the process knowledge on ion exchange materials used and spilled in the K Basins and describes the materials identified from wet sieving KE Basin floor and canister sludge and the results of other analyses. Several photographs are included to compare materials and illustrate material behavior. A summary of previous tests on solvent extraction of PCB surrogates from simulant K Basin sludge is also given.

  2. Sedimentological characterization of the C2' sequence, Block Lamar field, Maracaibo basin, Venezuela

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavo, F.B.; Gonzales, C. (INTEVEP, S.A., Caracas (Venezuela))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Through the study of 2,109 ft of core from the Block V-Lamar field, central Maracaibo basin, Venezuela, the environments of deposition were established. The studied interval corresponds to the informal C2 sands of the Misoa Formation (Eocene). Seven different lithofacies were identified and later grouped into three sedimentary units deposited in a general, fluvial-dominated deltaic environment. The organization of the different lithofacies along with palynological data permitted the assignment of lower delta plain, upper delta plain, and, again, lower delta plain for the sedimentary units. The main subenvironments encountered include amalgamated distributary channel bars and related interdistributary bays. The distributary channels are thicker in the upper delta plain unit owing to a higher degree of stacking. Furthermore, sandstone thickness decreases in a southwest-northwest sense which indicates the direction of regression. This can be documented also with petrophysical characteristics of the reservoir reflected as a continuous decrease in porosity from 25 to 18%.

  3. Mid-Continent basin: a reappraisal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, J.R.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the largest unevaluated basins in the Mid-Continent is the Salina basin in Kansas and its extension into eastern Nebraska. The purpose of this study is to update all older data, reconstruct new maps, and reappraise the potential for further exploration. The last comprehensive publications on the area were in 1948 and 1956. The Salina basin includes 12,700 mi/sup 2/ (33,000 km/sup 2/) in north-central Kansas, and approximately 7000 mi/sup 2/ (18,000 km/sup 2/) in east-central Nebraska. The basin is delineated by the zero isopach of Mississippian rocks bordering the basin. The Central Kansas uplift borders the basin on the southwest and Nemaha ridge on the east; the southern limit is an ill-defined saddle in the vicinity of T17S. Boundaries of the Nebraska basin are less well defined, but the axis of the basin trends directly north from the Kansas border along the boundary of Ts10 and 11W, to 41/sup 0/N lat., and then bifurcates to the northwest toward the Siouxiana arch and northeast for an unknown distance. Conventional structure maps have been constructed on several horizons, and a series of cross sections depicts anomalous structures. Recent gravity, magnetic, and seismic reflection profiling also provide information on basement tectonics which may influence structures in the younger sediments. Basement depth ranges from 600 ft (180 m) on the northeast Nemaha ridge boundary of the basin, to a depth of 4750 ft (1450 m) or -3000 ft (-915 m) below sea-level datum in Jewell County; therefore, there may be an approximate total of 10,000 mi/sup 3/ (42,000 km/sup 3/ of sediments for future exploration.

  4. Stochastic bifurcation and fractal and chaos control of a giant magnetostrictive film-shape memory alloy composite cantilever plate subjected to in-plane harmonic and stochastic excitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Zhiwen, E-mail: zhuzhiwentju@163.com [Department of Mechanics, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory of Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos Control, Tianjin 300072 (China); Zhang, Qingxin, E-mail: zqxfirst@163.com; Xu, Jia, E-mail: xujia-ld@163.com [Department of Mechanics, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Stochastic bifurcation and fractal and chaos control of a giant magnetostrictive film–shape memory alloy (GMF–SMA) composite cantilever plate subjected to in-plane harmonic and stochastic excitation were studied. Van der Pol items were improved to interpret the hysteretic phenomena of both GMF and SMA, and the nonlinear dynamic model of a GMF–SMA composite cantilever plate subjected to in-plane harmonic and stochastic excitation was developed. The probability density function of the dynamic response of the system was obtained, and the conditions of stochastic Hopf bifurcation were analyzed. The conditions of noise-induced chaotic response were obtained in the stochastic Melnikov integral method, and the fractal boundary of the safe basin of the system was provided. Finally, the chaos control strategy was proposed in the stochastic dynamic programming method. Numerical simulation shows that stochastic Hopf bifurcation and chaos appear in the parameter variation process. The boundary of the safe basin of the system has fractal characteristics, and its area decreases when the noise intensifies. The system reliability was improved through stochastic optimal control, and the safe basin area of the system increased.

  5. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  6. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  7. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  8. The Upper Atmosphere of HD17156b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. T. Koskinen; A. D. Aylward; S. Miller

    2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    HD17156b is a newly-found transiting extrasolar giant planet (EGP) that orbits its G-type host star in a highly eccentric orbit (e~0.67) with an orbital semi-major axis of 0.16 AU. Its period, 21.2 Earth days, is the longest among the known transiting planets. The atmosphere of the planet undergoes a 27-fold variation in stellar irradiation during each orbit, making it an interesting subject for atmospheric modelling. We have used a three-dimensional model of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere for extrasolar gas giants in order to simulate the progress of HD17156b along its eccentric orbit. Here we present the results of these simulations and discuss the stability, circulation, and composition in its upper atmosphere. Contrary to the well-known transiting planet HD209458b, we find that the atmosphere of HD17156b is unlikely to escape hydrodynamically at any point along the orbit, even if the upper atmosphere is almost entirely composed of atomic hydrogen and H+, and infrared cooling by H3+ ions is negligible. The nature of the upper atmosphere is sensitive to to the composition of the thermosphere, and in particular to the mixing ratio of H2, as the availability of H2 regulates radiative cooling. In light of different simulations we make specific predictions about the thermosphere-ionosphere system of HD17156b that can potentially be verified by observations.

  9. Upper bounds for Steklov eigenvalues on surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girouard, Alexandre

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We give explicit isoperimetric upper bounds for all Steklov eigenvalues of a compact orientable surface with boundary, in terms of the genus, the length of the boundary, and the number of boundary components. Our estimates generalize a recent result of Fraser-Schoen, as well as the classical inequalites obtained by Hersch-Payne-Schiffer, whose approach is used in the present paper.

  10. POSTGRADUATE Upper Level, Otto Beit Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarrett, Thomas H.

    FUNDING YOUR POSTGRADUATE STUDIES AT UCT Upper Level, Otto Beit Building University Avenue North, the Postgraduate Funding Office and Postgraduate Centre were established at the University of Cape Town to provide apply for funding from both the University and from as many other sources of support as possible

  11. Draft Management Plan Upper Snake Province

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .......................................................................................4-5 Consistency with Idaho's Water Quality Management Plan...........................4-5 303(dDraft Management Plan Upper Snake Province Submitted To The Northwest Power and Conservation Quality Anti-Degradation Policy (39-3603) ............................................4-8 ESA and CWA

  12. Aspects of electroless nickel plating on molybdenum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mikkola, R.D.; Daugherty, C.E.; Harris, G.E.; Neff, W.A.; Owens, W.W.

    1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for depositing an adherent coating of an electroless nickel-phosphorus alloy on molybdenum was developed. The required pretreatment processes included an anodic etch in a chromic acid-nitric acid solution, an anodic etch in a phosphonic acid solution, and an oxide stripping step in a chromic acid-nitric acid solution. Initiation of the electroless nickel plating was accomplished through a series of strikes in the nickel bath. Scale up from laboratory parts to large components involved optimization of parameters such as pretreat time, current density, anode to cathode ratio and strike time.

  13. Death of a carbonate basin: The Niagara-Salina transition in the Michigan basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leibold, A.W.; Howell, P.D. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The A-O Carbonate in the Michigan basin comprises a sequence of laminated calcite/anhydrite layers intercalated with bedded halite at the transition between normal marine Niagaran carbonates and lower Salina Group evaporites. The carbonate/anhydrite interbeds represent freshing events during initial evaporative concentration of the Michigan basin. Recent drilling in the Michigan basin delineates two distinct regions of A-O Carbonate development: a 5 to 10 m thick sequence of six 'laminites' found throughout most of the western and northern basin and a 10 to 25 m thick sequence in the southeastern basin containing both thicker 'laminates' and thicker salt interbeds. Additionally, potash deposits of the overlying A-1 evaporite unit are restricted to the northern and western basin regions. The distribution of evaporite facies in these two regions is adequately explained by a source of basin recharge in the southeast-perhaps the 'Clinton Inlet' of earlier workers. This situation suggest either that: (1) the source of basin recharge is alternately supplying preconcentrated brine and more normal marine water, or (2) that the basin received at least two distinct sources of water during A-O deposition.

  14. Erosion potential from Missoula floods in the Pasco Basin, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig, R.G.; Hanson, J.P.

    1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Localities within the Pasco Basin preserve evidence of Missoula floods. Deposits are 46% sand-sized, 36% gravel-sized, and 18% finer than sand-sized. Mean thickness is 39 meters. High water marks at Wallula Gap require a discharge of approximately 12.5 Mcms. At Sentinel Gap, the slope-area method shows that the high water marks require a discharge of 34.6 Mcms. Since this discharge greatly exceeds any estimated for Missoula floods, there must have been backwater ponding from Wallula Gap. Projecting the slope of the water surface at the upper end of Wallula Gap to the downstream cross section at Gable Mountain leads to a discharge of 9.5 Mcms at Sentinel Gap. The HEC-6 steady state code and four sediment transport equations were applied. Assuming sand-sized particles, DuBoys function estimated 4 to 9 meters of scour. Yang's equation estimated 3 to 4 meters of scour. These are a minimum. A hydrograph synthesized for the boundaries of the Pasco Basin shows the maxima of the flood would occur after 90 h at Sentinel Gap, and at 114 h at Wallula Gap. The 200 areas will remain inundated for four days and six hours. With a quasi-dynamic sediment transport computation, HEC-6 scour estimates range from 0.61 meters to 0.915 meters. This is a minimum amount and erosion is highly variable suggesting reworking of sediment. The Meyer-Peter Meuller equations show less than 1 meter of net scour in the 200 areas. More extensive erosion was achieved during particular time steps of this analysis suggesting that sediment re-working would occur.

  15. Multiple oil families in the west Siberian basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, K.E.; Huizinga, B.J.; Lee, C.Y. [Chevron Overseas Petroleum Inc., San Ramon, CA (United States); Kontorovich, A.Eh. [Siberian Scientific Research Institute for Geology, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Moldowan, J.M. [Chevron Petroleum Technology Company, Richmond, CA (United States)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two major oil families are identified in the West Siberian basin. Twenty-six of 32 analyzed oils occur in Jurassic and cretaceous reservoirs and are derived from anoxic marine Upper Jurassic Bazhenov source rock. These oils are widely distributed both north and immediately south of the Ob River, and their biomarker ratios indicate a wide range of source rock thermal maturity from early to middle oil window (Van-Egan, Russkoye, Samotlor, Sovninsko-Sovyet, Olyenye, Ozynornoye, and Kogolym), to peak oil window (Srednekhulym, Yem-Yegov, Vostochno-Surgut, Khokhryakov, Fedorov, and Urengoi), to late oil window (Salym). Some of these oils have been mildly (e.g., Fedorov 75) to heavily (e.g., Russkoye) biodegraded in the reservoir. The Bazhenov-sourced oils show different compositions that support regional variations of organic facies in the source rock. Six nonbiodegraded, highly mature oils show geochemical characteristics that suggest they were derived from clastic-rich lacustrine or nearshore marine source rocks dominated by terrigenous higher plant input like those in the Lower to Middle Jurassic Tyumen Formation, although no correlation was observed between the oils and single rock sample (Yem-Yegov 15) from the formation. The six oils occur in the Tyumen (Taitym, Geologiche, and Cheremshan) and fractured basement/Paleozoic (Gerasimov, Yagyl Yakh, and Verchnekombar) reservoirs in positions readily accessible to any oil migrating from the Tyumen source rock. For example, at the Gerasimov locations, the Tyumen Formation lies unconformably on weathered basement-Paleozoic reservoir rocks. Most of the probable Tyumen-sourced oils are from south of the Ob River, but the occurrence of Geologiche oil to the north suggests that related oils may be widespread in the basin.

  16. Assessment of undiscovered carboniferous coal-bed gas resources of the Appalachian Basin and Black Warrior Basin Provinces, 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milici, R.C.; Hatch, J.R.

    2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Coalbed methane (CBM) occurs in coal beds of Mississippian and Pennsylvanian (Carboniferous) age in the Appalachian basin, which extends almost continuously from New York to Alabama. In general, the basin includes three structural subbasins: the Dunkard basin in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and northern West Virginia; the Pocahontas basin in southern West Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southwestern Virginia; and the Black Warrior basin in Alabama and Mississippi. For assessment purposes, the Appalachian basin was divided into two assessment provinces: the Appalachian Basin Province from New York to Alabama, and the Black Warrior Basin Province in Alabama and Mississippi. By far, most of the coalbed methane produced in the entire Appalachian basin has come from the Black Warrior Basin Province. 8 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  17. Numerical analysis of laminar fluid flow and heat transfer in a parallel plate channel with normally in-line positioned plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMath, John Grady

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    numbers or thicker plates produced larger zones of recirculation. An increase in plate thickness caused a, significant increase in pressure drop without an appreciable increase in heat transfer Pang et al. (1990) used a, rrays of plates which were...

  18. CORE-BASED INTEGRATED SEDIMENTOLOGIC, STRATIGRAPHIC, AND GEOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE OIL SHALE BEARING GREEN RIVER FORMATION, UINTA BASIN, UTAH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lauren P. Birgenheier; Michael D. Vanden Berg,

    2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated detailed sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical study of Utah's Green River Formation has found that Lake Uinta evolved in three phases (1) a freshwater rising lake phase below the Mahogany zone, (2) an anoxic deep lake phase above the base of the Mahogany zone and (3) a hypersaline lake phase within the middle and upper R-8. This long term lake evolution was driven by tectonic basin development and the balance of sediment and water fill with the neighboring basins, as postulated by models developed from the Greater Green River Basin by Carroll and Bohacs (1999). Early Eocene abrupt global-warming events may have had significant control on deposition through the amount of sediment production and deposition rates, such that lean zones below the Mahogany zone record hyperthermal events and rich zones record periods between hyperthermals. This type of climatic control on short-term and long-term lake evolution and deposition has been previously overlooked. This geologic history contains key points relevant to oil shale development and engineering design including: (1) Stratigraphic changes in oil shale quality and composition are systematic and can be related to spatial and temporal changes in the depositional environment and basin dynamics. (2) The inorganic mineral matrix of oil shale units changes significantly from clay mineral/dolomite dominated to calcite above the base of the Mahogany zone. This variation may result in significant differences in pyrolysis products and geomechanical properties relevant to development and should be incorporated into engineering experiments. (3) This study includes a region in the Uinta Basin that would be highly prospective for application of in-situ production techniques. Stratigraphic targets for in-situ recovery techniques should extend above and below the Mahogany zone and include the upper R-6 and lower R-8.

  19. C6 plate puncture testing report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vangoethem, Douglas J.; Cordova, Theresa Elena; Reu, Phillip L.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are numerous scenarios where critical systems could be subject to penetration by projectiles or fixed objects (e.g., collision, natural disaster, act of terrorism, etc.). It is desired to use computational models to examine these scenarios and make risk-informed decisions; however, modeling of material failure is an active area of research, and new models must be validated with experimental data. The purpose of this report is to document the experimental work performed from FY07 through FY08 on the Campaign Six Plate Puncture project. The goal of this project was to acquire experimental data on the puncture and penetration of metal plates for use in model validation. Of particular interest is the PLH failure model also known as the multilinear line segment model. A significant amount of data that will be useful for the verification and validation of computational models of ductile failure were collected during this project were collected and documented herein; however, much more work remains to be performed, collecting additional experimental data that will further the task of model verification.

  20. Elastocapillary coalescence of plates and pillars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhiyan Wei; Tobias Schneider; Jungchul Kim; Ho-Young Kim; Joanna Aizenberg; L. Mahadevan

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    When a fluid-immersed array of lamellae or filaments that is attached to a substrate is dried, evaporation leads to the formation of menisci on the tips of the plates or pillars that bring them together. Similarly, when hair dries it clumps together due to capillary forces induced by the liquid menisci between the flexible hairs. Building on prior experimental observations, we use a combination of theory and computation to understand the nature of this instability and its evolution in both the two-dimensional and three-dimensional setting of the problem. For the case of lamellae, we explicitly derive the interaction torques based on the relevant physical parameters. A Bloch-wave analysis for our periodic mechanical system captures the critical volume of the liquid and the 2-plate-collapse eigenmode at the onset of instability. We study the evolution of clusters and their arrest using numerical simulations to explain the hierarchical cluster formation and characterize the sensitive dependence of the final structures on the initial perturbations. We then generalize our analysis to treat the problem of pillar collapse in 3D, where the fluid domain is completely connected and the interface is a surface with the uniform mean curvature. Our theory and simulations capture the salient features of both previous experimental observations and our own in terms of the key parameters that can be used to control the kinetics of the process.

  1. Progress Update: H4 Basin Concrete Pour

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Recovery Act funded project in the H area basin. A concrete ditch built longer than half a mile to prevent contaminated water from expanding and to reduce the footprint on the environment.

  2. September 2012 BASIN RESEARCH AND ENERGY GEOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    September 2012 BASIN RESEARCH AND ENERGY GEOLOGY STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK at BINGHAMTON research programs in geochemistry, sedimentary geology, or Earth surface processes with the potential the position, visit the Geological Sciences and Environmental Studies website (www.geology

  3. River Basins Advisory Commissions (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Catawba/Wateree and Yadkin/Pee Dee River Basins Advisory Commissions are permanent public bodies jointly established by North and South Carolina. The commissions are responsible for assessing...

  4. Flathead Basin Commission Act of 1983 (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act establishes the Flathead Basin Commission, the purpose of which is to protect the Flathead Lake aquatic environment, its waters, and surrounding lands and natural resources. The Commission...

  5. Petroleum potential of the Libyan sedimentary basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammuda, O.S.; Sbeta, A.M.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contrary to prevailing opinion, all Libyan sedimentary basins and the Al-Jabal Al-Akhdar platform contain prolific petroleum accumulations with very high prospectivity. A systematic review of the types of traps and pays in this central part of the southern Mediterranean province reveals great variability in reservoir and source rock characteristics. The reservoir rocks are of almost all geologic ages. The thick source rock sequences also vary in nature and organic content. The organic-rich facies have accumulated in intracratonic and passive margin basins or in marginal seas. Most of the oil discovered thus far in these basins is found in large structural traps. Future discoveries of stratigraphic traps or small structural traps will require intensified efforts and detailed studies using up-to-date multidisciplinary techniques in sedimentary tectonics, biostratigraphic facies analysis, and geochemical prospecting in order to develop a better understanding of these basins, thus improving their prospectivity.

  6. K-Basins S/RIDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, D.J.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) is a list of the Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES{ampersand}H) and Safeguards and Security (SAS) standards/requirements applicable to the K Basins facility.

  7. The Uinta Basin Case Robert J. Bayer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    Overburden Tailings Oil Shale Mining Open Pit Underground Ex situ extraction Ex situ thermal conversion EIS for Oil Sands and Oil Shale Ongoing concerns with Basin-wide air quality Wildlife and wildlife

  8. K-Basins S/RIDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, D.J.

    1995-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Standards/Requirements Identification Document(S/RID) is a list of the Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES&H) and Safeguards and Security (SAS) standards/requirements applicable to the K Basins facility

  9. Catalytic bipolar interconnection plate for use in a fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lessing, P.A.

    1996-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A bipolar interconnection plate is described for use between adjacent fuel cell units in a stacked fuel cell assembly. Each plate is manufactured from an intermetallic composition, examples of which include NiAl or Ni{sub 3}Al which can catalyze steam reforming of hydrocarbons. Distributed within the intermetallic structure of the plate is a ceramic filler composition. The plate includes a first side with gas flow channels therein and a second side with fuel flow channels therein. A protective coating is applied to the first side, with exemplary coatings including strontium-doped or calcium-doped lanthanum chromite. To produce the plate, Ni and Al powders are combined with the filler composition, compressed at a pressure of about 10,000--30,000 psi, and heated to about 600--1000 C. The coating is then applied to the first side of the completed plate using liquid injection plasma deposition or other deposition techniques. 6 figs.

  10. Adapter plate assembly for adjustable mounting of objects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blackburn, R.S.

    1986-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An adapter plate and two locking discs are together affixed to an optic table with machine screws or bolts threaded into a fixed array of internally threaded holes provided in the table surface. The adapter plate preferably has two, and preferably parallel, elongated locating slots each freely receiving a portion of one of the locking discs for secure affixation of the adapter plate to the optic table. A plurality of threaded apertures provided in the adapter plate are available to attach optical mounts or other devices onto the adapter plate in an orientation not limited by the disposition of the array of threaded holes in the table surface. An axially aligned but radially offset hole through each locking disc receives a screw that tightens onto the table, such that prior to tightening of the screw the locking disc may rotate and translate within each locating slot of the adapter plate for maximum flexibility of the orientation thereof.

  11. Adapter plate assembly for adjustable mounting of objects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blackburn, Robert S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An adapter plate and two locking discs are together affixed to an optic table with machine screws or bolts threaded into a fixed array of internally threaded holes provided in the table surface. The adapter plate preferably has two, and preferably parallel, elongated locating slots each freely receiving a portion of one of the locking discs for secure affixation of the adapter plate to the optic table. A plurality of threaded apertures provided in the adapter plate are available to attach optical mounts or other devices onto the adapter plate in an orientation not limited by the disposition of the array of threaded holes in the table surface. An axially aligned but radially offset hole through each locking disc receives a screw that tightens onto the table, such that prior to tightening of the screw the locking disc may rotate and translate within each locating slot of the adapter plate for maximum flexibility of the orientation thereof.

  12. Late devonian carbon isotope stratigraphy and sea level fluctuations, Canning Basin, Western Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, N P; Sumner, Dawn Y.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reef, Canning Basin, Western Australia. Palaeontology 43,the Canning Basin, Western Australia. In: Loucks, R.G. ,Canning Basin, Western Australia. Ph.D Thesis, University of

  13. Calibration and equivalency analysis of image plate scanners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, G. Jackson, E-mail: williams270@llnl.gov; Maddox, Brian R.; Chen, Hui [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Kojima, Sadaoki [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada-oka, 2-6, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Millecchia, Matthew [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A universal procedure was developed to calibrate image plate scanners using radioisotope sources. Techniques to calibrate scanners and sources, as well as cross-calibrate scanner models, are described to convert image plate dosage into physical units. This allows for the direct comparison of quantitative data between any facility and scanner. An empirical relation was also derived to establish sensitivity response settings for arbitrary gain settings. In practice, these methods may be extended to any image plate scanning system.

  14. The Whitehorse Trough is an early Mesozoic marine sedimentary basin, which extends from southern Yukon to Dease Lake in British Columbia. This paper outlines the stratigraphy and structure, and characterises the overall petroleum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Stephen T.

    pyrolysis data indicate that potential source rocks in the Inklin Formation are gas-prone, and, along. Strata within the central Whitehorse Trough include carbonate rocks of the Upper Triassic Sinwa Formation levels of organic maturation along the northeastern flank of the basin are favourable and structural

  15. Production design for plate products in the steel industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanjeeb Dash

    2007-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Apr 5, 2007 ... Abstract: We describe an optimization tool for a multistage production process for rectangular steel plates. The problem we solve yields a ...

  16. The driving force of plate tectonics evaluated in spherical coordinates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donahue, John Michael

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to interaction with the Pacific plate that is large compared to the slab-pull of the relatively young subducting lithosphere. TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER Page I INTRODUCTION Plate models. Slab-pull and Ridge~ush. 1 2 5 II METHOD III DATA . 18... Discussion. The Nance Plate The Juan de Fuc a Plate. IV DISCUSSION . 18 . 19 . 24 . 29 REFERENCES. APPENDIX. . 34 . 39 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page 1 Thermal boundary model with cooling from above. 2 The ridge-push model boundary conditions...

  17. Structural analysis of late Neogene deformation in the central offshore Santa Maria Basin, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, D.H.; Hall, N.T.; Hamilton, D.H. (Earth Sciences Associates, Palo Alto, CA (USA)); Heck, R.G. (R.G. Heck and Associates, Carpinteria, CA (USA))

    1991-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Structural analysis of the Queenie structure, a topographically prominent, southwest vergent asymmetric fold located 35 km west of Point Sal, constrains the timing and nature of late Neogene deformation in a transect across the central offshore Santa Maria Basin. Analysis of post-Miocene sediments mantling the fold indicates that the Queenie structure was formed in a relatively brief episode of NE-SW directed shortening between 5 and 3 Ma, apparently in response to the onset of compression normal to the North American/Pacific plate boundary. Retrodeformation of depth-corrected cross sections constructed from an extensive set of common depth point seismic data demonstrates that the Queenie structure overprints a Miocene extensional basin and is a fault propagation fold that formed as compression changed the normal slip on the basin margin shear zone to reverse slip. Geometric constraints and seismic data suggest that the controlling shear zone dips moderately (30{degrees} to 50{degrees}) to the northeast and is essentially nonlistric to the base of the brittle crust at a depth of about 12 km. Structural analysis of cross sections further shows that average total post-Miocene NE-SW shortening across the Queenie structure is about 3% (0.39 km across the 130km-wide zone of folding) and that related shortening across the 40-km-wide central reach of the offshore Santa Maria Basin between the Hosgri fault and the Santa Lucia Bank fault during the same period is roughly 1-2% (0.4-0.8 km). High-resolution seismic reflection data show small folds in post-early/late Pliocene sediments on the southwestern flank of the Queenie structure. These folds exhibit minor coaxial deformation along the flank of the structure, suggesting that very low rates of tectonic folding (of the order of 0.005 mm shortening per year) may continue to the present.

  18. Disposal of produced waters: Undergrown injection option in the Black Warrior Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortiz, I.; Weller, T.F.; Anthony, R.V. (United Energy Development Consultants, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Dziewulski, D. (BioIndustrial Technologies, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Lorenzen, J. (ResTech, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Frantz, J.H. Jr. (S.A. Holditch Associates, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States))

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disposal of large volumes of water produced simultaneously with coal-bed methane is a costly, environmentally sensitive problem. Underground injection into deeper, naturally fractured, low-porosity formations is feasible provided that the total dissolved solids level of these formation waters comply with Environmental Protection Agency guidelines. Greater fracture density in proximity to structures formed by Appalachian and Ouachita tectonism, along with a higher total dissolved solids level in both the production and injection formation waters, occurs in the eastern, southern, and northern margins of the coal-bed methane (CBM) area of the Black Warrior basin in Alabama. Injection permeability is developed where fractures intersect formations with suitable lithologies and thickness. Initial results indicate that the lower Pottsville sands, which thicken to the south, have the highest initial injection potential, although these sands appear dirty and tight on the logs. Normal faulting and matrix porosity, in addition to fracturing, may increase permeability in this formation. In the shallower, northern edge of the CBM area, thin-bedded Mississippian sands with high porosity, such as the Hartzelle, may be present. Injection potential also occurs in the fractured Devonian chert and silecous carbonate lithologies in the Upper Silurian where they thicken to the southwest, and in sandy carbonate lithologies in the undifferentiated Silurian and Ordovician at the eastern margin of the overthrust. The Cambrian-Ordovician Knox Formation has injection potential in a 6-mi wide zone at the eastern margin of the basin, where the upper Knox is dolomitized below the unconformity.

  19. Geochemical evaluation of oils and source rocks from the Western Siberian basin, U. S. S. R

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, K.E.; Huizinga, B.J. (Chevron Overseas Petroleum, Inc., San Ramon, CA (United States)); Moldowan, J.M. (Chevron Oil Field Research Co., Richmond, CA (United States)); Kontorovich, A.E.; Stasova, O. (Siberian Scientific Research Institute for Geology, Geophysics and Mineral Resources, Novobsibirsk (Russian Federation)); Demaison, G.J.

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the Western Siberian basin is among the most prolific in the world, there has been disagreement among Soviet geoscientists on the origin of the petroleum within this basin. Screening geochemical analyses were used to select several oils and potential source rocks for a preliminary study using detailed biomarker and supporting geochemistry. Possible sources for this petroleum include rocks of Middle Jurassic, Upper Jurassic, and Lower Cretaceous age. Results indicate that most of the analyzed Western Siberian oils, occurring in reservoirs from Middle Jurassic to Late Cretaceous in age, are derived from the Upper Jurassic Bazhenov Formation. The locations of the samples in the study generally correspond to the distribution of the most effective oil-generative parts of the Bazhenov Formation. Analyses show that the Bazhenov rock samples contain abundant marine algal and bacterial organic matter, preserved under anoxic depositional conditions. Biomarkers show that thermal maturities of the samples range from the early to late oil-generative window and that some are biodegraded. For example, the Salym No. 114 oil, which flowed directly from the Bazhenov Formation, shows a maturity equivalent to the late oil window. The Van-Egan no. 110 oil shows maturity equivalent to the early oil window and is biodegraded. This oil shows preferential microbial conversion of lower homologs of the 17{alpha}, 21{beta}(H)-hopanes to 25-nor-17{alpha}(H)-hopanes.

  20. Pattern Alteration: Upper Arm Sleeve Width

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    in the upper arm are unbecoming and may form excess vertical folds (Fig. 2). The Personal Measurement Chart (line 10) shows how much to alter. Figure 1. Tight sleeve Figure 2. Loose sleeve 2... ................................................................................................................................................................................. Figure 3. Tissue paper Figure 4. Sleeve Sleeve Figure 5. Sleeve Sleeve Figure 6. Figure 7. Sleeve Figure 8. Spread Lap Spread Lap Cut away Tissue Tissue Basic and raglan style garments 1. Trace the cutting line of the set-in sleeve cap on tissue...

  1. Carboniferous clastic-wedge stratigraphy, sedimentology, and foreland basin evolution: Black Warrior basin, Alabama and Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hines, R.A.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carboniferous clastic-wedge stratigraphy and sedimentology in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama and Mississippi indicate deposition in an evolving foreland basin flanking the Appalachian-Ouachita fold-thrust belt. The strata reflect specific responses to foreland basin subsidence, orogenic activity, sediment supply, and dispersal systems. Definition of the regional stratigraphy of the clastic wedge provides for interpretation of the foreland basin subsidence history by enabling quantitative reconstruction of regional compaction and subsidence profiles. Comparison of the interpreted subsidence history with model profiles of foreland basin subsidence (predicted from loading and flexure of continental lithosphere) allows evaluation of mechanical models in terms of observed clastic-wedge sedimentology and stratigraphy. Mechanical modeling of foreland basin subsidence predicts formation of a flexural bulge that migrates cratonward ahead of the subsiding foreland basin during loading. In the Black Warrior basin, local stratigraphic thins, pinch-outs, and areas of marine-reworked sediments suggest migration of the flexural bulge. Comparison of flexural bulge migration with thermal maturation history allows evaluation of timing of stratigraphic trapping mechanisms with respect to onset of hydrocarbon generation.

  2. The effects of plate thickness and perforation diameter on the supporting vapor velocity for a perforated plate fractionating column

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cottle, John Ernest

    1948-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the question. Other difficulties encountered. in the use of large packed columns are the tendeno1es of the liquid to channel through the paoking and. of the packing to break down under high operating temperatures. Hubble cap plate columns are the most...- oulty in a perforated. plate column than in any other types' and. should oleaning 'be necessary it could, be aocomplished much more easily. It is also believed that high plate efficienoies could be o'btained with per- i'orated plates 'beoause...

  3. Reservoir heterogeneity in Carter Sandstone, North Blowhorn Creek oil unit and vicinity, Black Warrior Basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugler, R.L.; Pashin, J.C.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents accomplishments made in completing Task 3 of this project which involves development of criteria for recognizing reservoir heterogeneity in the Black Warrior basin. The report focuses on characterization of the Upper Mississippian Carter sandstone reservoir in North Blowhorn Creek and adjacent oil units in Lamar County, Alabama. This oil unit has produced more than 60 percent of total oil extracted from the Black Warrior basin of Alabama. The Carter sandstone in North Blowhorn Creek oil unit is typical of the most productive Carter oil reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama. The first part of the report synthesizes data derived from geophysical well logs and cores from North Blowhorn Creek oil unit to develop a depositional model for the Carter sandstone reservoir. The second part of the report describes the detrital and diagenetic character of Carter sandstone utilizing data from petrographic and scanning electron microscopes and the electron microprobe. The third part synthesizes porosity and pore-throat-size-distribution data determined by high-pressure mercury porosimetry and commercial core analyses with results of the sedimentologic and petrographic studies. The final section of the report discusses reservoir heterogeneity within the context of the five-fold classification of Moore and Kugler (1990).

  4. Influence of Transcontinental arch on Cretaceous listric-normal faulting, west flank, Denver basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, T.L.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic studies along the west flank of the Denver basin near Boulder and Greeley, Colorado illustrate the interrelationship between shallow listric-normal faulting in the Cretaceous and deeper basement-controlled faulting. Deeper fault systems, primarily associated with the Transcontinental arch, control the styles and causative mechanisms of listric-normal faulting that developed in the Cretaceous. Three major stratigraphic levels of listric-normal faulting occur in the Boulder-Greeley area. These tectonic sensitive intervals are present in the following Cretaceous formations: Laramie-Fox Hills-upper Pierre, middle Pierre Hygiene zone, and the Niobrara-Carlile-Greenhorn. Documentation of the listric-normal fault style reveals a Wattenberg high, a horst block or positive feature of the greater Transcontinental arch, was active in the east Boulder-Greeley area during Cretaceous time. Paleotectonic events associated with the Wattenberg high are traced through analysis of the listric-normal fault systems that occur in the area. These styles are important to recognize because of their stratigraphic and structural influence on Cretaceous petroleum reservoir systems in the Denver basin. Similar styles of listric-normal faulting occur in the Cretaceous in many Rocky Mountain foreland basins.

  5. Perspective on plating for precision finishing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dini, J.W.

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is intended as an overview on platings for precision finishing operations. After a brief review of the two processes (polishing and precision machining) by which a coating on a part can be converted to a precision surface, the coatings which work successfully in these applications will be discussed. Then adhesion and stress aspects of deposits will be covered. Electroless nickel, which is a particularly attractive coating for precision finishing applications, will be discussed in some detail, from its early years as the Kanigen'' process to the present. Since microstructural changes in deposits are important for precision parts, this aspect will be covered for electroless nickel, copper and silver deposits. Lastly, some words will be directed at potential future electrodeposited coatings including nickel-phosphorus alloys, and various silver alloys. 41 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Jurassic sequence stratigraphy in Mississippi interior salt basin: an aid to petroleum exploration in eastern Gulf of Mexico area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, E.A.; Mink, R.M.; Tew, B.H.

    1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An understanding of sequence stratigraphy of Jurassic units in onshore basins can serve as an aid to identify potential petroleum reservoir and source rocks in the eastern Gulf of Mexico area. Three depositional sequences associated with cycles of eustatic sea level change and coastal onlap have been identified in the Mississippi Interior Salt basin. Three depositional sequences probably correspond to the J2.4, J3.1, and J3.2 sequences of Vail et al for Callovian through Kimmeridgian strata. In the Mississippi Interior salt basin, the lower depositional sequence is bounded by a basal type 2 unconformity and an upper type 2 unconformity in the Callovian. This sequence includes Louann evaporites (transgressive), Pine Hill anhydrites and shales (condensed section), and Norphlet eolian sandstones (highstand regressive). The middle depositional sequence reflects relative sea level rise in the late Callovian. This sequence includes Norphlet marine sandstones and lower Smackover packstones and mudstones (transgressive), middle Smackover mudstones (condensed section), and upper Smackover grainstones and anhydrites (highstand regressive).

  7. Sub-Seafloor Carbon Dioxide Storage Potential on the Juan de Fuca Plate, Western North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerry Fairley; Robert Podgorney

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Juan de Fuca plate, off the western coast of North America, has been suggested as a site for geological sequestration of waste carbon dioxide because of its many attractive characteristics (high permeability, large storage capacity, reactive rock types). Here we model CO2 injection into fractured basalts comprising the upper several hundred meters of the sub-seafloor basalt reservoir, overlain with low-permeability sediments and a large saline water column, to examine the feasibility of this reservoir for CO2 storage. Our simulations indicate that the sub-seafloor basalts of the Juan de Fuca plate may be an excellent CO2 storage candidate, as multiple trapping mechanisms (hydrodynamic, density inversions, and mineralization) act to keep the CO2 isolated from terrestrial environments. Questions remain about the lateral extent and connectivity of the high permeability basalts; however, the lack of wells or boreholes and thick sediment cover maximize storage potential while minimizing potential leakage pathways. Although promising, more study is needed to determine the economic viability of this option.

  8. Geothermal Casimir phenomena for the sphere-plate and cylinder-plate configurations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Alexej

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the nontrivial interplay between geometry and temperature in the Casimir effect for the sphere-plate and cylinder-plate configurations. At low temperature, the thermal contribution to the Casimir force is dominated by this interplay, implying that standard approximation techniques such as the PFA are inapplicable even in the limit of small surface separation. Thermal fluctuations on scales of the thermal wavelength lead to a delocalization of the thermal force density at low temperatures. As a consequence, the temperature dependence strongly differs from naive expectations. Most prominently, thermal forces can develop non-monotonic behavior below a critical temperature. We perform a comprehensive study of such geothermal phenomena in these Casimir geometries, using analytical and numerical worldline techniques for Dirichlet scalar fluctuations.

  9. Geothermal Casimir phenomena for the sphere-plate and cylinder-plate configurations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexej Weber; Holger Gies

    2010-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the nontrivial interplay between geometry and temperature in the Casimir effect for the sphere-plate and cylinder-plate configurations. At low temperature, the thermal contribution to the Casimir force is dominated by this interplay, implying that standard approximation techniques such as the PFA are inapplicable even in the limit of small surface separation. Thermal fluctuations on scales of the thermal wavelength lead to a delocalization of the thermal force density at low temperatures. As a consequence, the temperature dependence strongly differs from naive expectations. Most prominently, thermal forces can develop non-monotonic behavior below a critical temperature. We perform a comprehensive study of such geothermal phenomena in these Casimir geometries, using analytical and numerical worldline techniques for Dirichlet scalar fluctuations.

  10. An Integrated Geophysical Analysis Of The Upper Crust Of The...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Of The Upper Crust Of The Southern Kenya Rift Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: An Integrated Geophysical Analysis Of The Upper...

  11. Vacuum fusion bonded glass plates having microstructures thereon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swierkowski, Steve P. (Livermore, CA); Davidson, James C. (Livermore, CA); Balch, Joseph W. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved apparatus and method for vacuum fusion bonding of large, patterned glass plates. One or both glass plates are patterned with etched features such as microstructure capillaries and a vacuum pumpout moat, with one plate having at least one hole therethrough for communication with a vacuum pumpout fixture. High accuracy alignment of the plates is accomplished by a temporary clamping fixture until the start of the fusion bonding heat cycle. A complete, void-free fusion bond of seamless, full-strength quality is obtained through the plates; because the glass is heated well into its softening point and because of a large, distributed force that is developed that presses the two plates together from the difference in pressure between the furnace ambient (high pressure) and the channeling and microstructures in the plates (low pressure) due to the vacuum drawn. The apparatus and method may be used to fabricate microcapillary arrays for chemical electrophoresis; for example, any apparatus using a network of microfluidic channels embedded between plates of glass or similar moderate melting point substrates with a gradual softening point curve, or for assembly of glass-based substrates onto larger substrates, such as in flat panel display systems.

  12. Denaturing Urea PAGE -Large Gel Preparation of Glass Plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aris, John P.

    tube. Mix. Pour ~2.5 mls on inside surface of long glass plate. Spread and polish with Kimwipes. Repeat gel solution down middle of glass plates with 25 ml pipette. Do not trap bubbles in gel. Adjust flow rate with tilt of gel. Place gel close to horizontal (top end slightly elevated). Insert comb. Do

  13. Quantitative Imaging of Corrosion in Plates by Eddy Current Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santosa, Fadil

    Quantitative Imaging of Corrosion in Plates by Eddy Current Methods Bruno Luong \\Lambda and Fadil the problem of determining material loss due to cor­ rosion in a plate. Eddy current data are collected on one the relationship between eddy current loop impedance change with the loss profile. In this context, we show

  14. Dynamic optimization of a plate reactor start-up

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of a plate reactor #12;Safety conditions for ignition and conversion Avoid regions in the state-space, where reactor #12;Details of the NMPC implementation Cost function = tp t0 (x(t), u(t), ¯u(t), r(t))dt =1 + 1 2Dynamic optimization of a plate reactor start-up Staffan Haugwitz, Per Hagander and John Bagterp

  15. STATIC ANALYSIS OF SANDWICH PLATES BY FINITE ELEMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    STATIC ANALYSIS OF SANDWICH PLATES BY FINITE ELEMENTS V. MANET, W.-S. HAN AND A. VAUTRIN ´Ecole des continuity at hal-00663233,version1-26Jan2012 #12;Static analysis of sandwich plates by finite elements 3 and are presented in this paper. 2. Hybrid sandwich finite elements In this section, we present the development

  16. Heterogeneous cavitation in liquid helium 4 near a glass plate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caupin, Frédéric

    Heterogeneous cavitation in liquid helium 4 near a glass plate X. Chavanne, S. Balibar and F wave to study cavitation, i.e. the nucleation of bubbles, in liquid helium 4 near a clean glass plate and threshold pressures in the range 0 to -3 bar, significantly less negative than for homogeneous cavitation

  17. GLOBAL PLATE MOTION FRAMES: TOWARD A UNIFIED MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Dietmar

    , transform faults, and seafloor spreading, cementing the plate tectonic paradigm. However, so and the mapping of reconstructed large igneous provinces to core­mantle boundary topography, we argue shell of the Earth, and their past movements may be traced using geological data. Plate tectonics

  18. Structural and stratigraphic evolution of Shira Mountains, central Ucayali Basin, Peru? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez Alvarez, Jaime Orlando

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ucayali Basin is a Peruvian sub-Andean basin that initially formed during the extensive tectonics of the Early Paleozoic. Originally, the Ucayali Basin was part of a larger basin that extended east of the current ...

  19. Modified Streamflows 1990 Level of Irrigation : Missouri, Colorado, Peace and Slave River Basin, 1928-1989.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.G. Crook Company; United States. Bonneville Power Administration

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents data for monthly mean streamflows adjusted for storage change, evaporation, and irrigation, for the years 1928-1990, for the Colorado River Basin, the Missouri River Basin, the Peace River Basin, and the Slave River Basin.

  20. Early Tertiary subsidence and sedimentary facies - northern Sirte Basin, Libya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gumati, Y.D.; Kanes, W.H.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The subsidence curves and subsidence rate curves for the Sirte basin, constructed from the stratigraphic record, show that subsidence was continuous throughout Late Cretaceous and Tertiary times, reaching a maximum during the Paleocene and Eocene, when a major reactivation of faults occurred. Shales and carbonates were deposited during all of the Late Cretaceous and Tertiary. Abrupt lateral facies changes occur from the platform areas toward the deeper troughs along with steep downdip thickening. These conditions were probably assisted by contemporaneous faulting along structurally weak hinge lines where the dominant structural elements are normal step faults. The absence of upper Paleozoic and lower Mesozoic sediments suggests that the area was domed, faulted, and eroded during the late Mesozoic. As a result of crustal extension during the Paleocene, a marked lithologic and structural change occurred. The Heira Shale succeeded the Kalash Limestone in the Marada trough. Reactivation of the earlier faults, accompanied by an increase in the sediment supply from the south, caused these lower Paleocene shales to cover the entire area, with the exception of the old highs where carbonate deposition continued. An intercalation of shales and carbonates provides a sensitive indicator of change of depth and sediment type.

  1. Early Tertiary subsidence and sedimentary facies - Northern Sirte Basin, Libya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gumati, Y.D.; Kanes, W.H.

    1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The subsidence curves and subsidence rate curves for the Sirte basin, constructed from the stratigraphic record, show that subsidence was continuous throughout Late Cretaceous and Tertiary times, reaching a maximum during the Paleocene and Eocene, when a major reactivation of faults occurred. Shales and carbonates were deposited during all of the Late Cretaceous and Tertiary. Abrupt lateral facies changes occur from the platform areas toward the deeper troughs along with steep downdip thickening. The absence of upper Paleozoic and lower Mesozoic sediments suggests that the area was domed, faulted, and eroded during the late Mesozoic. As a result of crustal extension during the Paleocene, a marked lithologic and structural change occurred. The Heira Shale succeeded the Kalash Limestone in the Marada trough. Reactivation of the earlier faults, accompanied by an increase in the sediment supply from the south, caused these lower Paleocene shales to cover the entire area, with the exception of the old highs where carbonate deposition continued. An intercalation of shales and carbonates provides a sensitive indicator of change of depth and sediment type. 14 figures.

  2. Impact of graphene coating on the atom-plate interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. L. Klimchitskaya; V. M. Mostepanenko

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the recently proposed quantum electrodynamical formalism, we calculate the Casimir-Polder free energies and forces between the ground state atoms of Rb, Na, Cs and He${}^{\\ast}$ and the plates made of Au, Si, sapphire and fused silica coated with a graphene sheet. It is shown that the graphene coating has no effect on the Casimir-Polder interaction for metallic plates, but influences significantly for plates made of dielectric materials. The influence of graphene coating increases with decreasing static dielectric permittivity of the plate material and the characteristic frequency of an atomic dynamic polarizability. Simple analytic expressions for the classical limit of the Casimir-Polder free energy and force between an atom and a graphene-coated plate are obtained. From the comparison with the results of numerical computations, the application region of these expressions is determined.

  3. Geochemical Prospecting of Hydrocarbons in Frontier Basins of India* By

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Kumar; D. J. Patil; G. Kalpana; C. Vishnu Vardhan

    India has 26 sedimentary basins with a basinal area of approximately 1.8x 10 6 km 2 (excluding deep waters), out of which seven are producing basins and two have proven potential. Exploration efforts in other basins, called “frontier basins ” are in progress. These basins are characterized by varied geology, age, tectonics, and depositional environments. Hydrocarbon shows in many of these basins are known, and in few basins oil and gas have flowed in commercial /non-commercial quantities. Within the framework of India Hydrocarbon Vision – 2025 and New Exploration Licensing Policy, there is a continuous increase in area under active exploration. The asset management concept with multi-disciplinary teams has created a demand for synergic application of risk-reduction technologies, including surface geochemical surveys. National Geophysical Research Institute (NGRI), Hyderabad, India has initiated/planned surface geochemical surveys composed of gas chromatographic and carbon isotopic analyses in few of the frontier basins of India. The adsorbed soil gas data in one of the basins (Saurashtra basin, Gujarat) has shown varied concentrations of CH4 to C4H10. The C1 concentration varies between 3 to 766 ppb and ??C2+, 1 to 543 ppb. This basin has thin soil cover and the Mesozoic sediments (probable source rocks) are overlain by thick cover of Deccan Traps. The scope and perspective of geochemical surveys in frontier basins of India are presented here.

  4. Sedimentology, petrology, and gas potential of the Brallier Formation: upper Devonian turbidite facies of the Central and Southern Appalachians

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundegard, P.D.; Samuels, N.D.; Pryor, W.A.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Upper Devonian Brallier Formation of the central and southern Appalachian basin is a regressive sequence of siltstone turbidites interbedded with mudstones, claystones, and shales. It reaches 1000 meters in thickness and overlies basinal mudrocks and underlies deltaic sandstones and mudrocks. Facies and paleocurrent analyses indicate differences between the depositional system of the Brallier Formation and those of modern submarine fans and ancient Alpine flysch-type sequences. The Brallier system is of finer grain size and lower flow intensity. In addition, the stratigraphic transition from turbidites to deltaic sediments is gradual and differs in its facies succession from the deposits of the proximal parts of modern submarine fans. Such features as massive and pebbly sandstones, conglomerates, debris flows, and massive slump structures are absent from this transition. Paleocurrents are uniformly to the west at right angles to basin isopach, which is atypical of ancient turbidite systems. This suggests that turbidity currents had multiple point sources. The petrography and paleocurrents of the Brallier Formation indicate an eastern source of sedimentary and low-grade metasedimentary rocks with modern relief and rainfall. The depositional system of the Brallier Formation is interpreted as a series of small ephemeral turbidite lobes of low flow intensity which coalesced in time to produce a laterally extensive wedge. The lobes were fed by deltas rather than submarine canyons or upper fan channel systems. This study shows that the present-day turbidite facies model, based mainly on modern submarine fans and ancient Alpine flysch-type sequences, does not adequately describe prodeltaic turbidite systems such as the Brallier Formation. Thickly bedded siltstone bundles are common features of the Brallier Formation and are probably its best gas reservoir facies, especially when fracture porosity is well developed.

  5. Sedimentary parameters of upper Barataria Bay, Louisiana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegert, Rudolf B

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SEDIMENTARY PARAMETERS OF UPPER BARATARIA BAY, LOUISIANA A Thesis Rudolf Bernhardt Siegert Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural snd Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the reGulremente for the d. agree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1961 Ma)or Sub)ect GeologP SEDYIKNTARY PARAI'ZTEHS OF DT'PBR BARATARIA BAY, LOUISIANA A Thesis By Rudolf Bernhardt Siegert Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of C 'tice Bea of Department or Student Advisor...

  6. Tectonic Evolution of the Contaya Arch Ucyali Basin, Peru 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navarro Zelasco, Luis

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Contaya arch is an elongated topographic high that divides the Huallaga, Maranon and Ucayali basins in the Peruvian Amazonian plain. Its position well into the foreland basin and well inland from the main Andean thrust ...

  7. annapolis basin area: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    geology of the Bengal Basin in relation to the regional tectonic framework and basin-fill history Geosciences Websites Summary: ; and this was followed by an increase in the...

  8. CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2...

  9. Tectonic Evolution of the Contaya Arch Ucyali Basin, Peru

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navarro Zelasco, Luis

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Contaya arch is an elongated topographic high that divides the Huallaga, Maranon and Ucayali basins in the Peruvian Amazonian plain. Its position well into the foreland basin and well inland from the main Andean thrust belt has proven...

  10. Improved Basin Analog System to Characterize Unconventional Gas Resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Wenyan 1983-

    2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    , the BASIN software is combined with PRISE in the UGRA system to estimate unconventional resource potential in frontier basins. The PRISE software contains information about the resources (conventional gas, conventional oil, shale gas, coalbed methane...

  11. K West basin isolation barrier leak rate test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitehurst, R.; McCracken, K.; Papenfuss, J.N.

    1994-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document establishes the procedure for performing the acceptance test on the two isolation barriers being installed in K West basin. This acceptance test procedure shall be used to: First establish a basin water loss rate prior to installation of the two isolation barriers between the main basin and the discharge chute in K-Basin West. Second, perform an acceptance test to verify an acceptable leakage rate through the barrier seals.

  12. Evolution of extensional basins and basin and range topography west of Death Valley, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hodges, K. V.; McKenna, L. W.; Stock, J.; Knapp, J.; Page, L.; Sternlof, K.; Silverberg, D.; Wust, G.; Walker, J. Douglas

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TECTONICS, VOL. 8, NO. 3, PAGES 453-467, JUNE 1989 EVOLUTION OF EXTENSIONAL BASINS AND BASIN AND RANGE TOPOGRAPHY WEST OF DEATH VALLEY, CALIFORNIA K.V. Hodges, L.W. McKenna, J. Stock , J. Knapp, L. Page, K. Sternlof, D. Silverberg, G. Wrist 2... of the extensional riders in this area indicates that the sole fault dips less than 15øNW beneath the Nova Formation [Hodges et al., 1989]. Detailed mapping of the structurally lowest portions of the Nova Basin south of Panamint Butte (Figure 2; K.V. Hodges...

  13. Effect of polyurea on dynamic response and fracture resistance of steel plates under impulsive loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amini, Mahmoud Reza

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the dynamic response of steel plates, 2006 SEM AnnualPenetration protection of steel plates with polyurea layer,the post-failure motion of steel plates subjected to blast

  14. Simplified vibratory characterization of alluvial basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semblat, Jean-François; Duval, Anne-Marie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the analysis of seismic wave amplification, modal methods are interesting tools to study the modal properties of geological structures. Modal approaches mainly lead to information on such parameters as fundamental frequencies and eigenmodes of alluvial basins. For a specific alluvial deposit in Nice (France), a simplified modal approach involving the Rayleigh method is considered. This approach assumes a set of admissible shape functions for the eigenmodes and allows a fast estimation of the fundamental frequency of the basin. The agreement between modal numerical results and experimental ones is satisfactory. The simplified modal method then appears as an efficient mean for the global vibratory characterization of geological structures towards resonance.

  15. Atlas of major Appalachian basin gas plays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aminian, K.; Avary, K.L.; Baranoski, M.T.; Flaherty, K.; Humphreys, M.; Smosna, R.A.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This regional study of gas reservoirs in the Appalachian basin has four main objectives: to organize all of the -as reservoirs in the Appalachian basin into unique plays based on common age, lithology, trap type and other geologic similarities; to write, illustrate and publish an atlas of major gas plays; to prepare and submit a digital data base of geologic, engineering and reservoir parameters for each gas field; and technology transfer to the oil and gas industry during the preparation of the atlas and data base.

  16. Perforated plates for cryogenic regenerators and method of fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hendricks, J.B.

    1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Perforated plates having very small holes with a uniform diameter throughout the plate thickness are prepared by a [open quotes]wire drawing[close quotes] process in which a billet of sacrificial metal is disposed in an extrusion can of the plate metal, and the can is extruded and restacked repeatedly, converting the billet to a wire of the desired hole diameter. At final size, the rod is then sliced into wafers, and the wires are removed by selective etching. This process is useful for plate metals of interest for high performance regenerator applications, in particular, copper, niobium, molybdenum, erbium, and other rare earth metals. Er[sub 3]Ni, which has uniquely favorable thermophysical properties for such applications, may be incorporated in regions of the plates by providing extrusion cans containing erbium and nickel metals in a stacked array with extrusion cans of the plate metal, which may be copper. The array is heated to convert the erbium and nickel metals to Er[sub 3]Ni. Perforated plates having two sizes of perforations, one of which is small enough for storage of helium, are also disclosed. 10 figures.

  17. Perforated plates for cryogenic regenerators and method of fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hendricks, John B. (Huntsville, AL)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Perforated plates (10) having very small holes (14) with a uniform diameter throughout the plate thickness are prepared by a "wire drawing" process in which a billet of sacrificial metal is disposed in an extrusion can of the plate metal, and the can is extruded and restacked repeatedly, converting the billet to a wire of the desired hole diameter. At final size, the rod is then sliced into wafers, and the wires are removed by selective etching. This process is useful for plate metals of interest for high performance regenerator applications, in particular, copper, niobium, molybdenum, erbium, and other rare earth metals. Er.sub.3 Ni, which has uniquely favorable thermophysical properties for such applications, may be incorporated in regions of the plates by providing extrusion cans (20) containing erbium and nickel metals in a stacked array (53) with extrusion cans of the plate metal, which may be copper. The array is heated to convert the erbium and nickel metals to Er.sub.3 Ni. Perforated plates having two sizes of perforations (38, 42), one of which is small enough for storage of helium, are also disclosed.

  18. Regenerate metal-plating baths to cut waste and save

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During electrode-based metal plating of equipment components, the formation of an electrical field causes metal deposits to be thicker at edges and seams, and thinner on flat surfaces. And, electrode-based methods consume large amounts of energy. Electroless-nickel (EN) -- or autocatalytic -- plating systems were pioneered in the 1940s to solve these problems. EN plating produces a more uniform coating, irrespective of the complexity of the part, and it consumes less electricity, since to electric current is required during plating. Plating in an EN system results from a chemical reaction between nickel in the bath and the substrate of the equipment component. The downside of electroless plating, however, is the limited life of the nickel bath, and the large volume of metal waste produced by bath disposal. Ionsep Corp. (Wilmington, Del.) has developed an electrodialytic system that continuously reforms the EN plating baths, to give them longer life. Its patented system has been successfully laboratory tested in a 1-ft{sup 2} cell, and the firm recently won a $250,000 grant from the US Dept. of Energy (Washington, D.C.) and Environmental Protection Agency (Washington, D.C.), to design and engineer a commercial-scale version of the system.

  19. NE Pacific Basin --Tagging Data Kate Myers, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean B: NE Pacific Basin --Tagging Data Kate Myers, Ph.D. Principal Investigator, High Seas Salmon ocean tagging research on Columbia River salmon and steelhead migrating in the NE Pacific Basin R. Basin in 1995-2004. Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Pacific Biological Station, Nanaimo, B

  20. ASSESSMENT OF LIVESTOCK WINTERING AREAS IN BRIDGE CREEK BASIN, 1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;ASSESSMENT OF LIVESTOCK WINTERING AREAS IN BRIDGE CREEK BASIN, 1996 DOE FRAP 1996-03 Prepared-96.............................................. 22 LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1. Bridge Creek basin livestock wintering area back assessment, 1996 quality in the Bridge Creek basin are assessed. These sites had been inspected in the winter and spring

  1. Modeling thermal convection in supradetachment basins: example from western Norway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andersen, Torgeir Bjørge

    Modeling thermal convection in supradetachment basins: example from western Norway A. SOUCHE*, M. DABROWSKI AND T. B. ANDERSEN Physics of Geological Processes (PGP), University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway basins of western Norway are examples of supradetachment basins that formed in the hanging wall

  2. Exploring Geophyte Use in the Northern Great Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    Wild Onion & Balsamroot Gambel Oak Pinyon Pine Salina Wild Rye Sunflower Seed Great Basin Rye IndianExploring Geophyte Use in the Northern Great Basin: nutrient content, handling costs, effects of human settlement, subsistence, and sociopolitical change in Basin/Plateau #12;Problems Geophytes

  3. Onshore and offshore basins of northeast Libya: Their origin and hydrocarbon potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shegewi, O.M.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive data base of more than 3000 km of seismic lines, gravity and magnetic data, more than 30 subsurface well logs, and surface geology data were utilized to examine and interpret the sedimentary and tectonic history of the onshore and offshore parts of Northeast Libya and their hydrocarbon potential. The Dernah-Tobruk and Benghazi offshore basins form the northern parts of the study area. The Cyrenaica Stable Platform represents the southern parts. The Sirual Trough stretches E-W and opens into the Antelat Trough in the west. Between these elements is the uplifted areas of the Al Jabal Al Akhdar. Six principal tectonic phases were responsible for the formation and development of these structural elements: the pre-Mesozoic phase, the Triassic-Jurassic rifting phase, the Neocomian and the Aptian-Albian renewed rifting phases, the Late Cretaceous-Paleocene uplifting phase; and the Eocene-Middle Oligocene rifting phase. Oceanic crust of probable Aptian-Albian age is evident on the seismic lines north of the master fault marking the southern boundary of the rift separating the north African plate and Apulia. The western boundary of the Dernah High displayed clearly NE-SW strike-slip movement of these trajectories. Oceanic crust is also present west of the Dernah High. Positive gravity and magnetic anomalies traverse parallel to the boundary of this oceanic plate Mesogea. The prerequisites for commercial hydrocarbon production are present in abundance. Reservoirs ranging in age from Paleozoic clastics in the Cyrenaica Stable Platform to Mesozoic and Tertiary carbonates throughout the rest of the region. Several deep sites for the generation of hydrocarbons were also present, including the rifted northern parts of the Dernah-Tobruk basin, the Antelat Trough and the Cyrenaica Passive Margin. The Cretaceous and Tertiary section in the study area contain several potential seal rocks. Several potential trap types are also present.

  4. BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project is basin modeling and petroleum system identification, comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. In the first six (6) months of Year 3, the research focus is on basin modeling and petroleum system identification and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

  5. OxfordRoadOxfordRoadOxfordRoad UpperBrookStreetUpperBrookStreet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lane Platt Lane UpperLloydStreet HartLane Claremont Road Mauldeth RoadMauldeth Road West Albert Road Coupland Chapel 43. Roby URC 44. Quadria Jilamia Islamic Centre 45. Platt Lane Methodist Church 46. Holy Trinity, Platt Church of England 47. Platt Fields Park, open space with a lake. 48. Allen Hall 49. The Islah

  6. Conductivity fuel cell collector plate and method of fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Braun, James C. (Juno Beach, FL)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method of manufacturing a PEM fuel cell collector plate is disclosed. During molding a highly conductive polymer composite is formed having a relatively high polymer concentration along its external surfaces. After molding the polymer rich layer is removed from the land areas by machining, grinding or similar process. This layer removal results in increased overall conductivity of the molded collector plate. The polymer rich surface remains in the collector plate channels, providing increased mechanical strength and other benefits to the channels. The improved method also permits greater mold cavity thickness providing a number of advantages during the molding process.

  7. Curved plate damper test and simulations with snubbers, through- flow, and flexible plate effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gadangi, Ravindra Kumar

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fects of variation of snubber porosity 4. 4 Effects of variation of LN2 supply pressure 4. 5 EfFects of variation of damper plate thickness 4. 6 EfFects of variation of' frequency Page 15 38 39 53 55 70 70 72 74 4. 7 Comparison of damping... Page 2. 2 2. 3 2. 4 2, 5 2. 6 2. 7 2. 8 2. 9 2. 10 2. 11 2. 12 2. 13 2. 14 2. 15 2. 16 2. 17 3. 1 3. 4 3. 5 3. 6 Photo of the damper rig Rotor shaft with dimensions and probe locations Rotor-damper-bearing assembly Section...

  8. Sublithospheric small-scale convection and its implications for the residual topography at old ocean basins and the plate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong, Shijie

    heating accounts for >$60% of the total heat output, the trapped heat may provide sufficient heat supply

  9. Oxidation studies of CrAlON nanolayered coatings on steel plates...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    coatings on steel plates. Abstract: The requirements of low cost and high-temperature corrosion resistance for bipolar interconnect plates in solid oxide fuel cell stacks have...

  10. Basin analog approach answers characterization challenges of unconventional gas potential in frontier basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Kalwant

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    To continue increasing the energy supply to meet global demand in the coming decades, the energy industry needs creative thinking that leads to the development of new energy sources. Unconventional gas resources, especially those in frontier basins...

  11. Basin Approach to Address Bacterial Impairments in Basins 15, 16, and 17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory, L.; Brown, M.; Hein, K.; Skow, K.; Engling, A.; Wagner, K.; Berthold, A.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ), the population throughout the Matagorda Bay watershed are generally rural with dispersed cities. In Basin 15 the two major cities are El Campo and Palacios with a total basin population of 58,682. This produces a population density of approximately 61... between 2010 and 2050 with the exception of Lavaca and Fayette counties. The cities of Palacios, El Campo, Flatonia, Schulenburg, Shiner, Hallettsville, Yoakum, Edna, Victoria, and Port Lavaca, all located within the Matagorda Bay watershed...

  12. Atmospheric dispersion in mountain valleys and basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allwine, K.J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of the research is to further characterize and understand dispersion in valley and basin atmospheres. A secondary, and related goal, is to identify and understand the dominant physical processes governing this dispersion. This has been accomplished through a review of the current literature, and analyses of recently collected data from two field experiments. This work should contribute to an improved understanding of material transport in the atmospheric boundary layer. It was found that dispersion in a freely draining valley (Brush Creek valley, CO) atmosphere is much greater than in an enclosed basin (Roanoke, VA) atmosphere primarily because of the greater wind speeds moving past the release point and the greater turbulence levels. The development of a cold air pool in the Roanoke basin is the dominant process governing nighttime dispersion in the basin, while the nighttime dispersion in the Brush Creek valley is dominated by turbulent diffusion and plume confinement between the valley sidewalls. The interaction between valley flows and above ridgetops flows is investigated. A ventilation rate'' of material transport between the valley and above ridgetop flows is determined. This is important in regional air pollution modeling and global climate modeling. A simple model of dispersion in valleys, applicable through a diurnal cycle, is proposed.

  13. Atmospheric dispersion in mountain valleys and basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allwine, K.J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of the research is to further characterize and understand dispersion in valley and basin atmospheres. A secondary, and related goal, is to identify and understand the dominant physical processes governing this dispersion. This has been accomplished through a review of the current literature, and analyses of recently collected data from two field experiments. This work should contribute to an improved understanding of material transport in the atmospheric boundary layer. It was found that dispersion in a freely draining valley (Brush Creek valley, CO) atmosphere is much greater than in an enclosed basin (Roanoke, VA) atmosphere primarily because of the greater wind speeds moving past the release point and the greater turbulence levels. The development of a cold air pool in the Roanoke basin is the dominant process governing nighttime dispersion in the basin, while the nighttime dispersion in the Brush Creek valley is dominated by turbulent diffusion and plume confinement between the valley sidewalls. The interaction between valley flows and above ridgetops flows is investigated. A ``ventilation rate`` of material transport between the valley and above ridgetop flows is determined. This is important in regional air pollution modeling and global climate modeling. A simple model of dispersion in valleys, applicable through a diurnal cycle, is proposed.

  14. Summary status of K Basins sludge characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, R.B.

    1995-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of activities are underway as part of the Spent Nuclear Fuels Project (SNFP) related to the processing and disposing of sludge in the 105-K Basins (K Basins). Efforts to rigorously define data requirements for these activities are being made using the Data Quality Objectives (DQO) process. Summaries of current sludge characterization data are required to both help support this DQO process and to allow continued progress with on-going engineering activities (e.g., evaluations of disposal alternatives). This document provides the status of K Basins sludge characterization data currently available to the Nuclear Fuel Evaluations group. This group is tasked by the SNFP to help develop and maintain the characterization baseline for the K Basins. The specific objectives of this document are to: (1) provide a current summary (and set of references) of sludge characterization data for use by SNFP initiatives, to avoid unnecessary duplication of effort and to support on-going initiatives; (2) submit these data to an open forum for review and comment, and identify additional sources of significant data that may be available; (3) provide a summary of current data to use as part of the basis to develop requirements for additional sludge characterization data through the DQO process; (4) provide an overview of the intended activities that will be used to develop and maintain the sludge characterization baseline.

  15. Introduction THE PALEOPROTEROZOIC Thelon basin, Northwest Territo-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiatt, Eric E.

    Geological Evolution and Exploration Geochemistry of the Boomerang Lake Unconformity-type Uranium Prospect a prospective target for uranium exploration. The potential of the western Thelon basin at Boomerang Lake, remains underexplored for uncon- formity-related uranium deposits despite geological similari- ties

  16. Understanding nuclei in the upper sd - shell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkar, M. Saha; Bisoi, Abhijit; Ray, Sudatta [Nuclear Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700064 (India); Kshetri, Ritesh [Nuclear Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700064, India and Sidho-Kanho-Birsha University, Purulia - 723101 (India); Sarkar, S. [Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Shibpur, Howrah - 711103 (India)

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclei in the upper-sd shell usually exhibit characteristics of spherical single particle excitations. In the recent years, employment of sophisticated techniques of gamma spectroscopy has led to observation of high spin states of several nuclei near A ? 40. In a few of them multiparticle, multihole rotational states coexist with states of single particle nature. We have studied a few nuclei in this mass region experimentally, using various campaigns of the Indian National Gamma Array setup. We have compared and combined our empirical observations with the large-scale shell model results to interpret the structure of these nuclei. Indication of population of states of large deformation has been found in our data. This gives us an opportunity to investigate the interplay of single particle and collective degrees of freedom in this mass region.

  17. Sedimentological evolution of the Emine and Kamchia basins, eastern Bulgaria 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suttill, Hannah L.

    2009-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Mountain belts are inherently asymmetric, defined by the sense of plate subduction. The resultant orogen can be divided into peripheral and retro-arc wedges with the retro-wedge overlying the overthrust plate. Modelling ...

  18. anchor plates: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    influence and the alignment is determined by the structure of the interface between the brush and the pure solvent instead. Harald Lange; Friederike Schmid 2002-05-15 40 Plate...

  19. Nonlinear analysis of smart composite plate and shell structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Seung Joon

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical formulations, analytical solutions, and finite element solutions for laminated composite plate and shell structures with smart material laminae are presented in the study. A unified third-order shear deformation theory is formulated...

  20. DAMAGE ASSESSMENT OF COMPOSITE PLATE STRUCTURES WITH UNCERTAINTY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    DAMAGE ASSESSMENT OF COMPOSITE PLATE STRUCTURES WITH UNCERTAINTY Chandrashekhar M.* , Ranjan Uncertainties associated with a structural model and measured vibration data may lead to unreliable damage that material uncertainties in composite structures cause considerable problem in damage assessment which can

  1. Method for regeneration of electroless nickel plating solution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eisenmann, Erhard T. (5423 Vista Sandia, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electroless nickel(EN)/hypophosphite plating bath is provided employing acetic acid/acetate as a buffer and which is, as a result, capable of perpetual regeneration while avoiding the production of hazardous waste. A regeneration process is provided to process the spent EN plating bath solution. A concentrated starter and replenishment solution is provided for ease of operation of the plating bath. The regeneration process employs a chelating ion exchange system to remove nickel cations from spent EN plating solution. Phosphites are then removed from the solution by precipitation. The nickel cations are removed from the ion exchange system by elution with hypophosphorous acid and the nickel concentration of the eluate adjusted by addition of nickel salt. The treated solution and adjusted eluate are combined, stabilizer added, and the volume of resulting solution reduced by evaporation to form the bath starter and replenishing solution.

  2. Method for regeneration of electroless nickel plating solution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eisenmann, E.T.

    1997-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An electroless nickel(EN)/hypophosphite plating bath is provided employing acetic acid/acetate as a buffer and which is, as a result, capable of perpetual regeneration while avoiding the production of hazardous waste. A regeneration process is provided to process the spent EN plating bath solution. A concentrated starter and replenishment solution is provided for ease of operation of the plating bath. The regeneration process employs a chelating ion exchange system to remove nickel cations from spent EN plating solution. Phosphites are then removed from the solution by precipitation. The nickel cations are removed from the ion exchange system by elution with hypophosphorus acid and the nickel concentration of the eluate adjusted by addition of nickel salt. The treated solution and adjusted eluate are combined, stabilizer added, and the volume of resulting solution reduced by evaporation to form the bath starter and replenishing solution. 1 fig.

  3. Next Generation Bipolar Plates for Automotive PEM Fuel Cells

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Bipolar Plates for Automotive PEM Fuel Cells (Topic 4) GrafTech International, Ltd. * Funding DOE Cost Share Recipient Cost Share TOTAL 2,325,943 581,486 2,907,429 80% 20% 100%...

  4. Melt generation in the Earth's mantle at Convergent Plate Margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Till, Christy B

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The five geologic studies presented in this thesis document how the recycling of tectonic plates at subduction zones has a profound effect on the melting behavior of the Earth's mantle. Two experimental studies (Chapters ...

  5. Impact perforation of monolithic polyethylene plates: projectile nose shape dependence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohagheghian, I.; McShane, G. J.; Stronge, W. J.

    2015-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    . The perforation mechanisms and energy absorption of these PE plates are contrasted with those of thin aluminium alloy targets that have the same total mass. UHMWPE outperforms these metallic targets for all three projectile nose shapes. Finally, the influence...

  6. Lance water injection tests adjacent to the 281-3H retention basin at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freifeld, B.; Myer, L.; Moridis, G.; Cook, P.; James, A.; Pellerin, L.; Pruess, K.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pilot-scale field demonstration of waste isolation using viscous- liquid containment barriers has been planned for the 281-3H retention basin at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC. The 281-3H basin is a shallow retention/seepage basin contaminated mainly by radionuclides. The viscous-liquid containment barrier utilizes the permeation of liquid grout to either entomb the contaminants within a monolithic grout structure or to isolate the waste by drastically reducing the permeability, of the soils around the plume. A clear understanding of the hydrogeologic setting of the retention basin is necessary for proper design of the viscous liquid barrier. To aid in the understanding of the hydrogeology of the 281-3H retention basin, and to obtain critical parameters necessary for grout injection design, a series of tests were undertaken in a region immediately adjacent to the basin. The objectives of the LWIT were: 1. To evaluate the general performance of the Lance Injection Technique for grout emplacement at the site, including the range and upper limits of injection pressures, the flow rates applicable for site conditions, as well as the mechanical forces needed for lance penetration. 2. To obtain detailed information on the injectability of the soils immediately adjacent to the H-area retention basin. 3. To identify any high permeability zones suitable for injection and evaluate their spatial distribution. 4. To perform ground penetrating radar (GPR) to gain information on the structure of the soil column and to compare the results with LWIT data. This report will focus on results pertinent to these objectives.

  7. Mixed water phreatic dolomitization of Jurassic oolites in the Upper Smackover Member, East Texas Basin: petrologic and isotopic evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowers, Keith Douglas

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the dolomitized zones, while not readily apparent in thin section, can often be seen in core samples by wetting the slabbed core and liberally applying dilute hydrochloric acid. As shown by the plot of standard deviation and mean size in Figure 6, sorting... in all of the proposed methods for dolomite f'ormation appear only to be the presence of fluids saturated with respect to dolomite, and a mechanism to move sufficient amounts of these magnesium-rich fluids through the rocks. 65 Two mechanisms...

  8. Characteristics of the upper crust and magma chambers along the spreading centers of the Lau back-arc basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dingler, Allison Maria Jacobs

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    locations we create a vehicle to quickly recognize potential geo-hazardouslocation of the 25 most populated cities in the world, we can identify the most potentially geo-hazardous

  9. Using a water balance model to analyze the implications of potential irrigation development in the Upper Blue Nile Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain Figueroa, Anjuli

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More than 200 rivers in the world cross at least one political border. Any development project including hydropower or irrigation that is implemented in a trans-boundary river is in essence a claim on the resource. Managing ...

  10. Insights into the structure of the upper mantle beneath the Murray Basin from 3D teleseismic tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rawlinson, Nick

    tomography studies have been carried out in western Victoria (Graeber et al. 2002) and northern Tasmania

  11. Highly conductive, multi-layer composite precursor composition to fuel cell flow field plate or bipolar plate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jang, Bor Z. (Centerville, OH); Zhamu, Aruna (Centerville, OH); Guo, Jiusheng (Centerville, OH)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides a moldable, multiple-layer composite composition, which is a precursor to an electrically conductive composite flow field plate or bipolar plate. In one preferred embodiment, the composition comprises a plurality of conductive sheets and a plurality of mixture layers of a curable resin and conductive fillers, wherein (A) each conductive sheet is attached to at least one resin-filler mixture layer; (B) at least one of the conductive sheets comprises flexible graphite; and (C) at least one resin-filler mixture layer comprises a thermosetting resin and conductive fillers with the fillers being present in a sufficient quantity to render the resulting flow field plate or bipolar plate electrically conductive with a conductivity no less than 100 S/cm and thickness-direction areal conductivity no less than 200 S/cm.sup.2.

  12. Crust and Upper Mantle P Wave Velocity Structure Beneath Valles...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Crust and Upper Mantle P Wave Velocity Structure Beneath Valles Caldera, New Mexico- Results from the Jemez Teleseismic Tomography Experiment Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  13. Upper crustal structure of an obliquely extending orogen, central...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    eastern California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Upper crustal structure of an obliquely extending orogen, central...

  14. Retrovirus Infection Protocol Day 1 Plate packaging cells with construct at 50-75% confluence. After plating replace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoubridge, Eric

    , depending on the viral titer, the virus stock with medium. Add polybrene to a final concentration of 4ug/mL from 4mg/mL stock (kept at 4o C). For a 6-well or 60mm plate use 1mL, for a 100mm plate use 4m infected with PA317-hygro use hygromycin B at 100 units/ml. Selection will usually take from 7-10 days

  15. Petrology, geochemistry, and palynology of Joggins Formation (Westphalian A) coals, Cumberland basin, Nova Scotia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C. [Univ. of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, Lexington, KY (United States); Calder, J.H. [Nova Scotia Dept. of Natural Resources, Halifax (Canada); Cortland, F.E. [Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington, KY (United States)] [and others

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Five Westphalian A coals were collected from the Joggins Formation section exposed along Chignecto Bay at Joggins, Nova Scotia. Several of the coal beds along the bay were mined beginning in the early 17th century. There has been little detailed investigation of the coal beds of this classic section. The lowermost coal, the Upper Coal 29 (Fundy), is a high-vitrinite coal with a spore assemblage dominated by arboreous lycopod spores with tree ferns subdominant. The upper portions of the coal bed have the highest ratio of well-preserved to poorly-preserved telinite of any of the coals investigated. Coal 19 (Forty Brine) has 88% total vitrinite but, unlike the Fundy coal bed, the telinite has a poor preservation ratio and half of the total vitrinite population comprises gelocollinite and vitrodetrinite. The latter coal bed is directly overlain by a basin-wide limestone bed. The Lower Kimberly (Coal 15) shows good preservation of vitrinite with relatively abundant telinite among the total vitrinite. The Upper Kimberly, which underlies the tetrapod-bearing lycopsid trees found by Lyell and Dawson in 1852, exhibits an upward decrease in arboreous lycopod spores and an increase in the tree fern spore Punctatisporites minutus. The megaspore record is similarly dominated by Lagenicularugosa paralycopodites and tree fern spores. Telinite preservation increases upwards in the Upper Kimberly but overall is well below the preservation ratio of the Fundy coal bed. The coals are all high sulfur, up to 13.7% total sulfur for the lower lithotype of the Fundy coal bed. The Kimberly coals are not only high in total and pyritic sulfur, but also have high concentrations of chalcophile elements.

  16. Synthesis and Characterization of Nonbanded U-Nb Plate Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. E. Hackenberg, R. M Aikin, Jr., J. A. Balog, B. L. Bingham, R. Casey, A. Casteel, I. Cordova, R. Forsyth, F. G. Garcia, D. Guidry, D. L. Hammon, W. L. Hults, D. R. Korzekwa, A. M. Kelly, M. W. Kolby, K. A. Lao, J. C. Lashley, M. F. Lopez, R. McCabe, D. E. Nye, P. A. Papin, S. W. Quintana, J. L. Smith, D. F. Teter, D. J. Thoma, T. Tucker, P. K. Tubesing, R. R. Trujillo, C. J. Vigil, and H. M. Volz

    2007-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the synthesis and characterization of four plates, two each of U-5.5Nb and U-7.5Nb (nominal wt%) for aging studies described elsewhere. The plates were induction melted and cast into graphite molds that were unheated and {approx}0.5 inches thick to maximize the cooling rate and minimize large length-scale Nb segregation (banding). Microstructural images and electron microprobe traces observed after various processing stages, including casting, hot rolling, and homogenizing are documented. The as-cast microsegregation assumed the form of an isotropic cellular structure, with an amplitude of 3-15 wt% Nb and 40-50 micron-length scales. Subsequent thermomechanical processing was shown to be sufficient to attain Nb compositional homogeneity on local scales of hundreds of microns. The results of chemical analysis and other characterization methods are given. The principal impurity elements (of the 40+ elements measured) were carbon, boron, oxygen, tantalum, and iron. In all four plates, after homogenization, the Nb distribution across the entire plate cross-section showed minima at the plate faces and a broad maximum in the center, the differential being 0.5-0.7 wt% in U-7.5Nb and 0.2-0.5 wt% in U-5.5Nb. None of the impurity elements showed statistically significant variations between the center 50% of the plate volume vs the outer 25%. These plates were considered nonbanded and compositionally homogeneous for their proposed use because the required tensile, metallographic, and dilatometer specimens could be extracted from the fairly homogeneous center portion of the plate cross-section. Characterization of the phases and their transition temperatures by x-ray diffraction and dilatometry in rapidly quenched specimens from the final product confirmed that the microstructure of this plate material was suitable for the intended aging studies. The as-quenched tensile response from multiple specimens taken from each plate showed some variability, especially in the ultimate tensile strength and elongation to failure. In general, U-5.5Nb has higher strength and less ductility than U-7.5Nb, though both alloys exhibited the double yield behavior characteristic of banded U-6Nb.

  17. Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGowan, Vance

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an agreement to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In July of 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the intergovernmental contract, and on March 1, 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of 'The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project' is to create, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is on private lands and therefore requires that considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance of, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. This project calls for passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian exclosure fencing as the primary method to restore degraded streams to a normative condition. Active remediation techniques using plantings, off-site water developments, site-specific instream structures, or whole channel alterations are also utilized where applicable. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and local watershed councils. Work undertaken during 2002 included: (1) Implementing 1 new fencing project in the Wallowa subbasin that will protect an additional 0.95 miles of stream and 22.9 acres of habitat; (2) Conducting instream work activities in 3 streams to enhance habitat and/or restore natural channel dimensions, patterns or profiles; (3) Planting 31,733 plants along 3.7 stream miles, (4) Establishing 71 new photopoints and retaking 254 existing photopoint pictures; (5) Monitoring stream temperatures at 12 locations on 6 streams; (6) Completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 100.5 miles of project fences. Since initiation of the project in 1984 over 68.7 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams and 1,933 acres of habitat have been protected, enhanced and maintained.

  18. An elastic plate model for interseismic deformation in subduction Ravi V. S. Kanda1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the subducting and overriding plates, as well as zero net steady state vertical offset between the two plates, 1983]. The BSM accomplishes this zero net strain in the overriding plate by parameterizing interseismic case of zero plate thickness, thereby providing an alternative motivation for the BSM. The ESPM also

  19. Ultrasonic measurement of the residual stresses in patch welded steel plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Junghans, Paul Gerard

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , structural steel plates. The two 1.2 in (48 in.) square plates were patch welded in the center to create a residual stress field; and subsequently, one of the plates was stress relieved. The LCR travel-time measurements on the plates not only differentiated...

  20. Ultrasonic measurement of the residual stresses in patch welded steel plates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Junghans, Paul Gerard

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , structural steel plates. The two 1.2 in (48 in.) square plates were patch welded in the center to create a residual stress field; and subsequently, one of the plates was stress relieved. The LCR travel-time measurements on the plates not only differentiated...

  1. The response of clamped sandwich plates with metallic foam cores to simulated blast loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleck, Norman A.

    projectiles. The sandwich plates comprise AISI 304 stainless steel face sheets and aluminium alloy metal foam

  2. Nanofocusing of soft X-ray laser pulses with Fresnel zone plate and its applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    x Nanofocusing of soft X-ray laser pulses with Fresnel zone plate and its applications 699220056 #12;#12;i keep the faith #12;ii 200 0.16 (Fresnel zone plate) X 100.3 ................................................ 37 40 #12;1 1.1 NA X X (Fresnel zone plate) X (Fresnel zone plate) X #12;2 1

  3. Apparatus for tensile testing plate-type ceramic specimens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, K.C.

    1993-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus is described for gripping a plate-type tensile specimen having generally T-shaped end regions in a dynamic tension fatigue testing apparatus comprising an annular housing having an open-ended elongated cavity therein, a plurality of hydraulic piston means supported by the housing in a spaced array about the cavity, and a specimen-supporting plate means overlying the piston means at one end of the elongated cavity and displaceable by said piston means in a longitudinal direction with respect to the longitudinal axis of the cavity, said apparatus for gripping a flat plate-type tensile specimen comprising: a pair of elongated pull rods each having oppositely disposed first and second end regions; a pair of mounting means carried by said plate means with each mounting means for pivotally attaching the first end region of each of said pull rods in a central region of said plate means for supporting said pair of elongated pull rods in a side-by-side relationship along a common longitudinal centerline within said cavity; recess means in the second end region of each of said pull rods in adjacently disposed surface regions thereof with said recess means facing one another and each adapted to receive one side of one of the generally T-shaped end regions of the plate-type tensile specimen; and load-bearing means positionable in each of said recess means and adapted to bear against a shoulder on each side of the generally T-shaped end region of the plate-type tensile specimen when a tensile loading is applied thereon.

  4. Paleotopographic control of basal Chesterian sedimentation in the black warrior basin of Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pashin, J.C.; Rindsberg, A.K. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the start of the Chesterian (Upper Mississippian), the Ouachita orogeny began along the southwestern edge of the Alabama promontory. The orogeny ended the upwelling circulation system of the Fort Payne-Tuscumbia carbonate ramp that persisted from the Osagian to the Meramecian. These events established the Black Warrior foreland basin, where carbonate and siliciclastic sedimentation were controlled by flexural tectonism and sea level variation. These factors governed deposition of the petroleum source rocks and reservoir rocks that account for most of the conventional hydrocarbon resources in the basin. The Lewis interval is a thin (<100 ft), widespread veneer of carbonate and siliciclastic rocks that forms the base of the Chesterian Series in Alabama and contains significant gas, oil, and asphalt resources. Although thin, the Lewis interval is heterogeneous and represents a spectrum of marginal- and open-marine environments, suggesting that depositional topography affected facies distribution. To test the effect of paleotopography on sedimentation, data from wells, outcrops, and cores were analyzed to model the relationship between the Fort Payne Tuscumbia ramp and the Lewis interval. Sandstone bodies in the Lewis interval typically are elongate parallel to strike of the Fort Payne-Tuscumbia ramp. Along the lower ramp, siliciclastic and carbonate sedimentation took place exclusively in open-marine environments and sand was deposited in sand waves and patches by storms. Topographic irregularity was especially pronounced on the upper ramp and gave rise to complex facies patterns. Exposure, reworking, and beach formation took place on topographic highs, whereas storm-driven marine sedimentation prevailed in topographic lows. Although inception of the Ouachita orogeny in the Alabama promontory had a marked effect on marine circulation, facies distribution in the basal part of the Chesterian Series was dominated by the ramp topography developed prior to orogenesis.

  5. Geology and oil production of the Ervay (Phosphoria) reservoirs, eastern Big Horn Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coalson, E.B. (Bass Enterprises Production, Co., Denver, CO (USA)); Inden, R.F. (LSSI, Denver, CO (USA))

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ervay consists of carbonate ramp sediments deposited under conditions of varying sea level. On the east flank of the Bighorn Basin, the Ervay displays two major, regionally correlative, shallowing-upward cycles that vary in lithofacies across the basin. West of this area, the Ervay contains four regional cycles. Within each cycle, lithofacies tracts lie subparallel to northwest-trending Permian uplifts. From southwest to northeast, the lithofacies are open-marine limestones, restricted-subtidal dolomites, peritidal (island) dolomites, and lagoon/salina deposits. Each Ervay lithofacies displays characteristic ranges in matrix permeability. The most permeable reservoirs are lower-intertidal dolomite boundstones containing well-connected laminoid-fenestral pores. As a result, lower matrix permeabilities are seen in upper-intertidal to supratidal dolomites containing poorly-connected irregular fenestral pores and vugs. Restricted-subtidal dolomites contain mainly small intercrystalline pores and poorly-connected vugs and molds, and therefore also display poor reservoir quality. Vertical tectonic macrofractures probably make a significant contribution to primary production in relatively few wells, while negatively affecting secondary recovery. Microfractures, on the other hand, may be important to primary production throughout the study area. Thus, the major factors determining Ervay Member producibility are stratigraphic and diagenetic, even though may traps are structural. In the Cottonwood Creek area, many wells with thick sequences of lower-intertidal rocks produce more than 250,000 BO, irrespective of whether or not they are structurally high. By contrast, upper-intertidal, restricted-subtidal, and fractured reservoirs generally produce fewer than 100,000 BO per well.

  6. Geothermal fluid genesis in the Great Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, T.; Buchanan, P.K.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Early theories concerning geothermal recharge in the Great Basin implied recharge was by recent precipitation. Physical, chemical, and isotopic differences between thermal and non-thermal fluids and global paleoclimatic indicators suggest that recharge occurred during the late Pleistocene. Polar region isotopic studies demonstrate that a depletion in stable light-isotopes of precipitation existed during the late Pleistocene due to the colder, wetter climate. Isotopic analysis of calcite veins and packrat midden megafossils confirm the depletion event occurred in the Great Basin. Isotopic analysis of non-thermal springs is utilized as a proxy for local recent precipitation. Contoured plots of deuterium concentrations from non-thermal and thermal water show a regional, systematic variation. Subtracting contoured plots of non-thermal water from plots of thermal water reveals that thermal waters on a regional scale are generally isotopically more depleted. Isolated areas where thermal water is more enriched than non-thermal water correspond to locations of pluvial Lakes Lahontan and Bonneville, suggesting isotopically enriched lake water contributed to fluid recharge. These anomalous waters also contain high concentrations of sodium chloride, boron, and other dissolved species suggestive of evaporative enrichment. Carbon-age date and isotopic data from Great Basin thermal waters correlate with the polar paleoclimate studies. Recharge occurred along range bounding faults. 151 refs., 62 figs., 15 tabs.

  7. Exploration trends of the Sirte Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aburawi, R.M. [Waha Oil Co., Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wave of intense exploration activity in the Sirte Basin began after the discovery of oil in 1958, and an enormous quantity of hydrocarbon was found in less than ten years. The oil discovery rate has been gradually declining since its peak in the 1960`s, and it is now becoming increasingly difficult and more expensive to find a new reserve. This paper is an attempt to discuss briefly the past exploration cycle, to indicate the present position and to predict the future trend of our activities in the Sirte Basin. The past exploration activities in the Sirte Basin were concentrated along the particular geological trends where the possibilities of finding more reserves are now drastically reduced. Therefore, for the future healthy exploration activities, new ideas are needed to bring about some new favourable areas under further investigation. A new cycle of exploration success will emerge if our exploratory efforts are purposely directed towards the stratigraphic, stratrigraphic/structural traps and subtle type traps, along the migrational pathways and deep plays in the potential oil generative areas.

  8. Upper bounds for multiphase composites in any dimension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luis Silvestre

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove a rigorous upper bound for the effective conductivity of an isotropic composite made of several isotropic components in any dimension. This upper bound coincides with the Hashin Shtrikman bound when the volume ratio of all phases but any two vanish.

  9. Genetic and Phenotype [Phenotypic] Catalog of Native Resident Trout of the interior Columbia River Basin : FY-99 Report : Populations of the Pend Oreille, Kettle, and Sanpoil River Basins of Colville National Forest.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trotter, Patrick C.

    2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power Planning Council specifies the recovery and preservation of population health of native resident fishes of the Columbia River Basin. Among the native resident species of concern are interior rainbow trout of the Columbia River redband subspecies Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri 1 and westslope cutthroat trout O. clarki lewisi. The westslope cutthroat trout has been petitioned for listing under the U. S. Endangered Species Act (American Wildlands et al. 1997). Before at-risk populations can be protected, their presence and status must be established. Where introgression from introduced species is a concern, as in the case of both westslope cutthroat trout and redband rainbow trout, genetic issues must be addressed as well. As is true with native trout elsewhere in the western United States (Behnke 1992), most of the remaining pure populations of these species in the Columbia River Basin are in relatively remote headwater reaches. The objective of this project is to photo-document upper Columbia Basin native resident trout populations in Washington, and to ascertain their species or subspecies identity and relative genetic purity using a nonlethal DNA technique. FY-99 was year two of a five-year project in which we conducted field visits to remote locations to seek out and catalog these populations. In FY-99 we worked in collaboration with the Colville National Forest and Kalispel Indian Tribe to catalog populations in the northeastern corner of Washington State.

  10. Undrilled shallow giant trap in Denver basin, Colorado: mountain-front thrust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacob, A.F.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Along the southwestern margin of the Denver basin, Precambrian rocks have been upthrusted at least 15,000 ft (4600 m) in the Front Range and 8000 to 10,000 ft (2400 to 3000 m) or more in the Wet Mountains. Below the Precambrian, the precise configuration of the strata and the faults is unknown because there are no available seismic or drilling data, but reasonable interpretations can be made by analogy with other similar areas. Important reservoirs in the basin are the Permian Lyons Sandstone, the Lower Cretaceous J and D sandstones, and the Upper Cretaceous Codell Sandstone, Niobrara Formation, and Pierre Shale. Directly overlying the J are the major hydrocarbon-source rocks in the basin. Black shale is interstratified with the Lyons Sandstone in at least one drill hole in front of the upthrust. All source rocks probably reached maturity in late Cretaceous time and still are generating today. Below the Precambrian, simple upfolding permits an oil column as much as 5000 ft (1500 m) high, or more, the J, and as much as 4000 ft (1200 m) high, or more, in the Lyons, assuming a fault dip of 70/sup 0/ at depth; lower fault dips permit higher oil columns. Clayey fault gouge, breccia, and minute faulting, in a zone that is in many places hundreds of feet wide at the fault, should be a good hydrocarbon seal, like a cork in a tilted 5000-ft (1500 m) high bottle. If the strata roll over to the west to form a large anticline below the Precambrian, a different kind of trap of very large dimensions would be present. Any kind of trap can extend a combined north-south distance of nearly 65 mi (105 km). Even if roll over is absent and the fault dips steeply, drilling depths to most traps are likely to be only several thousand feet.

  11. Low Cost PEM Fuel Cell Metal Bipolar Plates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Conghua [TreadStone Technologies, Inc.

    2013-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Bipolar plate is an important component in fuel cell stacks and accounts for more than 75% of stack weight and volume. The technology development of metal bipolar plates can effectively reduce the fuel cells stack weight and volume over 50%. The challenge is the metal plate corrosion protection at low cost for the broad commercial applications. This project is aimed to develop innovative technological solutions to overcome the corrosion barrier of low cost metal plates. The feasibility of has been demonstrated and patented (US Patent 7,309,540). The plan is to further reduce the cost, and scale up the technology. The project is built on three pillars: 1) robust experimental evidence demonstrating the feasibility of our technology, 2) a team that consists of industrial leaders in fuel cell stack application, design, and manufactures; 3) a low-risk, significant-milestone driven program that proves the feasibility of meeting program objectives The implementation of this project will reduce the fuel cell stack metal bipolar separator plate cost which accounts 15-21% of the overall stack cost. It will contribute to the market adoption of fuel cell technologies. In addition, this corrosion protection technology can be used similar energy devices, such as batteries and electrolyzers. Therefore, the success of the project will be benefit in broad markets.

  12. Hardgrove grindability study of Powder River Basin and Appalachian coal components in the blend to a midwestern power station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Padgett, P.L.; Hower, J.C. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Five coals representing four distinct coal sources blended at a midwestern power station were subjected to detailed analysis of their Hardgrove grindability. The coals are: a low-sulfur, high volatile A bituminous Upper Elkhorn No. 3 coal (Pike County, KY); a medium-sulfur, high volatile A bituminous Pittsburgh coal (southwestern PA); a low-sulfur, subbituminous Wyodak coal from two mines in the eastern Powder River Basin (Campbell County, WY). The feed and all samples processed in the Hardgrove grindability test procedure were analyzed for their maceral and microlithotype content. The high-vitrinite Pittsburgh coal and the relatively more petrographically complex Upper Elkhorn No. 3 coal exhibit differing behavior in grindability. The Pittsburgh raw feed, 16x30 mesh fraction (HGI test fraction), and the {minus}30 mesh fraction (HGI reject) are relatively similar petrographically, suggesting that the HGI test fraction is reasonably representative of the whole feed. The eastern Kentucky coal is not as representative of the whole feed, the HGI test fraction having lower vitrinite than the rejected {minus}30 mesh fraction. The Powder River Basin coals are high vitrinite and show behavior similar to the Pittsburgh coal.

  13. Risk assessment of drain valve failure in the K-West basin south loadout pit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MORGAN, R.G.

    1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The drain valve located in the bottom of the K-West Basin South Loadout Pit (SLOP) could provide an additional leak path from the K Basins if the drain valve were damaged during construction, installation, or operation of the cask loading system. For the K-West Basin SLOP the immersion pail support structure (IPSS) has already been installed, but the immersion pail has not been installed in the IPSS. The objective of this analysis is to evaluate the risk of damaging the drain valve during the remaining installation activities or operation of the cask loading system. Valve damage, as used in this analysis, does not necessarily imply large amounts of the water will be released quickly from the basin, rather valve damage implies that the valve's integrity has been compromised. The analysis process is a risk-based uncertainty analysis where best engineering judgement is used to represent each variable in the analysis. The uncertainty associated with each variable is represented by a probability distribution. The uncertainty is propagated through the analysis by Monte Carlo convolution techniques. The corresponding results are developed as a probability distribution and the risk is expressed in terms of the corresponding complementary cumulative distribution function (''risk curve''). The total risk is the area under the ''risk curve''. The risk of potentially dropping a cask into or on the IPSS and damaging the drain valve is approximately 1 x 10{sup -4} to 2 x 10{sup -5} per year. The risk of objects falling behind the IPSS and damaging the valve is 3 x 10{sup -2} to 6 x 10{sup -3} per year. Both risks are expressed as drain value failure frequencies. The risk of objects falling behind the IPSS and damaging the valve can be significantly reduced by an impact limiter and/or installing a gating or plate over the area bounded by the back of the IPSS and the wall of the SLOP. With either of these actions there is a 90 percent confidence that the frequency of drain valve failure would be less than 1 x 10{sup -6} per year.

  14. HETEROGENEOUS SHALLOW-SHELF CARBONATE BUILDUPS IN THE PARADOX BASIN, UTAH AND COLORADO: TARGETS FOR INCREASED OIL PRODUCTION AND RESERVES USING HORIZONTAL DRILLING TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David E. Eby; Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.; Kevin McClure; Craig D. Morgan

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to 10 wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field and a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will not be recovered from these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Several fields in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado are being evaluated as candidates for horizontal drilling and enhanced oil recovery from existing vertical wells based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling case studies. Geological characterization on a local scale is focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible reservoir compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative cores, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells. The results of these studies can be applied to similar fields elsewhere in the Paradox Basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent region. This report covers research activities for the second half of the third project year (October 6, 2002, through April 5, 2003). The primary work included describing and mapping regional facies of the upper Ismay and lower Desert Creek zones of the Paradox Formation in the Blanding sub-basin, Utah. Regional cross sections show the development of ''clean carbonate'' packages that contain all of the productive reservoir facies. These clean carbonates abruptly change laterally into thick anhydrite packages that filled several small intra-shelf basins in the upper Ismay zone. Examination of upper Ismay cores identified seven depositional facies: open marine, middle shelf, inner shelf/tidal flat, bryozoan mounds, phylloid-algal mounds, quartz sand dunes, and anhydritic salinas. Lower Desert Creek facies include open marine, middle shelf, protomounds/collapse breccia, and phylloid-algal mounds. Mapping the upper Ismay zone facies delineates very prospective reservoir trends that contain porous, productive buildups around the anhydrite-filled intra-shelf basins. Facies and reservoir controls imposed by the anhydritic intra-shelf basins should be considered when selecting the optimal location and orientation of any horizontal drilling from known phylloidalgal reservoirs to undrained reserves, as well as identifying new exploration trends. Although intra-shelf basins are not present in the lower Desert Creek zone of the Blanding sub-basin, drilling horizontally along linear shoreline trends could also encounter previously undrilled, porous intervals and buildups. Technology transfer activities consisted of a technical presentation at a Class II Review conference sponsored by the National Energy Technology Laboratory at the Center for Energy and Economic Diversification in Odessa, Texas. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

  15. Onset of basin development in the Black Warrior Basin: Evidence from echinoderm biostratigraphy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waters, J.A. (West Georgia Coll., Carrollton, GA (United States). Dept. of Geology); Maples, C.G. (Kansas Geological Survey, Lawrence, KS (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many echinoderm taxa have limited temporal ranges and are potentially significant regional index fossils. Echinoderm endemism and size have limited the utility of echinoderms in biostratigraphy, but in particular situations, echinoderm biostratigraphy has provided the key to timing of geological events. One example is the timing of the onset of basin development in the Black Warrior Basin (BWB), a major Carboniferous foreland basin in Alabama and Mississippi. Physical stratigraphy indicates that basinal development in the BWB began some time during or after deposition of the Tuscumbia Limestone (TL). The TL was deposited on a broad carbonate platform on the southern passive margin of North America. In the BWB, the TL is overlain by the Pride Mountain Formation (PMF), which is a mixed siliciclastic/carbonate unit that prograded into the basin from the west. Northeast of the BWB, on the Warrior platform, the TL is Monteagle Limestone and the PMF have been difficult owing to the lack of biostratigraphic acuity in rocks of this age, which has resulted in mistaken time stratigraphic relationships between the units. The authors have collected echinoderms in the basal limestones in the PMF, which indicates a Gasperian age for all but the lowest 30 cm of the PMF. The Genevievian apparently was a time of nondeposition in the BWB because this lowermost 30 cm of PMF is temporally equivalent to tens of meters of carbonates rocks in the Monteagle Limestone on the Warrior platform. Therefore, the onset of foreland basin development in the BWB can be constrained to early during the Genevievian Stage.

  16. K basins interim remedial action health and safety plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DAY, P.T.

    1999-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The K Basins Interim Remedial Action Health and Safety Plan addresses the requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), as they apply to the CERCLA work that will take place at the K East and K West Basins. The provisions of this plan become effective on the date the US Environmental Protection Agency issues the Record of Decision for the K Basins Interim Remedial Action, currently planned in late August 1999.

  17. Water Clarity Simulant for K East Basin Filtration Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a simulant formulation intended to mimic the behavior of the suspended solids in the K East (KE) Basin fuel storage pool. The simulant will be used to evaluate alternative filtration apparatus to improve Basin water clarity and to possibly replace the existing sandfilter. The simulant was formulated based on the simulant objectives, the key identified parameters important to filtration, the composition and character of the KE Basin suspended sludge particles, and consideration of properties of surrogate materials.

  18. NATURAL GAS RESOURCES IN DEEP SEDIMENTARY BASINS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thaddeus S. Dyman; Troy Cook; Robert A. Crovelli; Allison A. Henry; Timothy C. Hester; Ronald C. Johnson; Michael D. Lewan; Vito F. Nuccio; James W. Schmoker; Dennis B. Riggin; Christopher J. Schenk

    2002-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    From a geological perspective, deep natural gas resources are generally defined as resources occurring in reservoirs at or below 15,000 feet, whereas ultra-deep gas occurs below 25,000 feet. From an operational point of view, ''deep'' is often thought of in a relative sense based on the geologic and engineering knowledge of gas (and oil) resources in a particular area. Deep gas can be found in either conventionally-trapped or unconventional basin-center accumulations that are essentially large single fields having spatial dimensions often exceeding those of conventional fields. Exploration for deep conventional and unconventional basin-center natural gas resources deserves special attention because these resources are widespread and occur in diverse geologic environments. In 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated that 939 TCF of technically recoverable natural gas remained to be discovered or was part of reserve appreciation from known fields in the onshore areas and State waters of the United. Of this USGS resource, nearly 114 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of technically-recoverable gas remains to be discovered from deep sedimentary basins. Worldwide estimates of deep gas are also high. The U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000 Project recently estimated a world mean undiscovered conventional gas resource outside the U.S. of 844 Tcf below 4.5 km (about 15,000 feet). Less is known about the origins of deep gas than about the origins of gas at shallower depths because fewer wells have been drilled into the deeper portions of many basins. Some of the many factors contributing to the origin of deep gas include the thermal stability of methane, the role of water and non-hydrocarbon gases in natural gas generation, porosity loss with increasing thermal maturity, the kinetics of deep gas generation, thermal cracking of oil to gas, and source rock potential based on thermal maturity and kerogen type. Recent experimental simulations using laboratory pyrolysis methods have provided much information on the origins of deep gas. Technologic problems are one of the greatest challenges to deep drilling. Problems associated with overcoming hostile drilling environments (e.g. high temperatures and pressures, and acid gases such as CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) for successful well completion, present the greatest obstacles to drilling, evaluating, and developing deep gas fields. Even though the overall success ratio for deep wells is about 50 percent, a lack of geological and geophysical information such as reservoir quality, trap development, and gas composition continues to be a major barrier to deep gas exploration. Results of recent finding-cost studies by depth interval for the onshore U.S. indicate that, on average, deep wells cost nearly 10 times more to drill than shallow wells, but well costs and gas recoveries vary widely among different gas plays in different basins. Based on an analysis of natural gas assessments, many topical areas hold significant promise for future exploration and development. One such area involves re-evaluating and assessing hypothetical unconventional basin-center gas plays. Poorly-understood basin-center gas plays could contain significant deep undiscovered technically-recoverable gas resources.

  19. Fuel cell repeater unit including frame and separator plate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yamanis, Jean; Hawkes, Justin R; Chiapetta, Jr., Louis; Bird, Connie E; Sun, Ellen Y; Croteau, Paul F

    2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An example fuel cell repeater includes a separator plate and a frame establishing at least a portion of a flow path that is operative to communicate fuel to or from at least one fuel cell held by the frame relative to the separator plate. The flow path has a perimeter and any fuel within the perimeter flow across the at least one fuel cell in a first direction. The separator plate, the frame, or both establish at least one conduit positioned outside the flow path perimeter. The conduit is outside of the flow path perimeter and is configured to direct flow in a second, different direction. The conduit is fluidly coupled with the flow path.

  20. Laser-based characterization of nuclear fuel plates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, James A.; Cottle, Dave L.; Rabin, Barry H. [Idaho National Laboratory, Fuel Performance and Design, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, Idaho, 83415-6188 (United States)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Ensuring the integrity of fuel-clad and clad-clad bonding in nuclear fuels is important for safe reactor operation and assessment of fuel performance, yet the measurement of bond strengths in actual fuels has proved challenging. The laser shockwave technique (LST) originally developed to characterize structural adhesion in composites is being employed to characterize interface strength in a new type of plate fuel being developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large-amplitude acoustic waves and is well suited for application to both fresh and irradiated nuclear-fuel plates. This paper will report on initial characterization results obtained from fresh fuel plates manufactured by different processes, including hot isostatic pressing, friction stir welding, and hot rolling.

  1. Global coupling at 660 km is proposed to explain plate tectonics and the generation of the earth's magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jozsef Garai

    2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of low viscosity layers in the mantle is supported by line of geological and geophysical observations. Recent high pressure and temperature investigations indicated that partial carbonate melt should exist at the bottom of the lithosphere and at 660 km. The presence of few percent carbonate melt reduces the viscosity by several order of magnitude. The globally existing 660 km very low viscosity layer allows the development of differential rotation between the upper and lower mantle. This differential rotation between the 660 km outer shell and the rest of the earth offers a plausible explanation for plate tectonics and for the generation of the earth's magnetic field. Simple dynamo model is proposed, which able to reproduce all of the features of the contemporary and, within reasonable uncertainty, the paleomagnetic field. The model is also consistent with geological and geophysical observations.

  2. INTEGRATED BASIN ANALYSIS OF THE MARCELLUS FORMATION IN THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slingerland, Rudy

    . of the Appalachian Basin requires accurate knowledge of their sedimentological, geochemical, and geomechanical performance is to first quantitatively relate gas content and geomechanical and petrophysical rock

  3. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding...

  4. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration...

  5. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References J. W. Pritchett...

  6. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details...

  7. atlantic basin etude: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rifian Corridor Utrecht, Universiteit 7 Prediction of Seasonal Atlantic Basin Accumulated Cyclone Energy from 1 July PHILIP J. KLOTZBACH Geosciences Websites Summary: Prediction of...

  8. athabasca basin western: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Von P. 9 Modeling thermal convection in supradetachment basins: example from western Norway Geosciences Websites Summary: . DABROWSKI AND T. B. ANDERSEN Physics of Geological...

  9. appalachian basin exploration: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Mobile Pb-isotopes in Proterozoic sedimentary basins as guides for exploration of uranium deposits Geosciences Websites Summary: Mobile Pb-isotopes in Proterozoic sedimentary...

  10. athabasca basin canada: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (more) Stewart, Paul C. 2015-01-01 2 The Dispersion of Radon Above Deeply Buried Uranium Ore: Millennium Deposit, Athabasca Basin, SK , K Hattori1 Geosciences Websites...

  11. alluvial basin numerical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Boyer, Edmond 487 Mobile Pb-isotopes in Proterozoic sedimentary basins as guides for exploration of uranium deposits Geosciences Websites Summary: Mobile Pb-isotopes in Proterozoic...

  12. artesian basins: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Topic Index 181 Mobile Pb-isotopes in Proterozoic sedimentary basins as guides for exploration of uranium deposits Geosciences Websites Summary: Mobile Pb-isotopes in Proterozoic...

  13. anoxic basin mariager: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Boyer, Edmond 215 Mobile Pb-isotopes in Proterozoic sedimentary basins as guides for exploration of uranium deposits Geosciences Websites Summary: Mobile Pb-isotopes in Proterozoic...

  14. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range...

  15. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Nw Basin & Range Region (Blackwell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range...

  16. Great Basin College Direct Use Geothermal Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, John

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final technical report for the Great Basin College Direct Use Geothermal Demonstration Project, outlining the technical aspects of the User Group System.

  17. atacama basin northern: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tucker 2007-02-02 44 BIOSTRATIGRAPHY, EASTERN ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: of selected Tertiary coal beds...

  18. Independent Oversight Review, Hanford K Basin and Cold Vacuum...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    August 2012 Review of Hanford K Basin and Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Found Fuel Multi-Canister Overpack Operations This report provides the results of an independent oversight...

  19. appalachian basin gas: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the Danis A. Wiloso; Eddy A. Subroto; Eddy Hermanto 2009-01-01 102 Depositional environment and reservoir morphology of Canyon sandstones, Central Midland Basin, Texas Texas...

  20. Lithium In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications For Geothermal Energy And Lithium Resources Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

  1. Numerical Modeling of Transient Basin and Range Extensional Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    behavior of basin and range extensionalgeothermal systems, and particularly, the evolution ofthe system temperature with time. Each modelconsists of two mountain ranges (1 km...

  2. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    David Blackwell, Gary Oppliger (2005) A Map Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin, Usa- Recognition Of Multiple Geothermal Environments Additional References Retrieved from...

  3. Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    David Blackwell, Gary Oppliger (2005) A Map Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin, Usa- Recognition Of Multiple Geothermal Environments Additional References Retrieved from...

  4. Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Nash...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Of A Tectonic Geomorphology Study For Geothermal Exploration In The Great Basin, Usa Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGeographic...

  5. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    David Blackwell, Gary Oppliger (2005) A Map Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin, Usa- Recognition Of Multiple Geothermal Environments Additional References Retrieved from...

  6. Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    David Blackwell, Gary Oppliger (2005) A Map Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin, Usa- Recognition Of Multiple Geothermal Environments Additional References Retrieved from...

  7. Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Of A Tectonic Geomorphology Study For Geothermal Exploration In The Great Basin, Usa Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGeographic...

  8. COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana (fig. PQ-1) is considered to be "clean coal." For the location

  9. Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Blewittl, Mark F. Coolbaugh, Don Sawatzky, William Holt, James Davis, Richard A. Bennett (2003) Targeting Of Potential Geothermal Resources In The Great Basin From Regional...

  10. Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Blewitt...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Blewittl, Mark F. Coolbaugh, Don Sawatzky, William Holt, James Davis, Richard A. Bennett (2003) Targeting Of Potential Geothermal Resources In The Great Basin From Regional...

  11. M-Area basin closure, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMullin, S.R.; Horvath, J.G.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    M-Area, on the Savannah River Site, processes raw materials and manufactures fuel and target rods for reactor use. Effluent from these processes were discharged into the M-Area settling basin and Lost Lake, a natural wetland. The closure of this basin began in 1988 and included the removal and stabilization of basin fluids, excavation of all contaminated soils from affected areas and Lost Lake, and placement of all materials in the bottom of the emptied basin. These materials were covered with a RCRA style cap, employing redundant barriers of kaolin clay and geosynthetic material. Restoration of excavated uplands and wetlands is currently underway.

  12. M-Area basin closure, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMullin, S.R.; Horvath, J.G.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M-Area, on the Savannah River Site, processes raw materials and manufactures fuel and target rods for reactor use. Effluent from these processes were discharged into the M-Area settling basin and Lost Lake, a natural wetland. The closure of this basin began in 1988 and included the removal and stabilization of basin fluids, excavation of all contaminated soils from affected areas and Lost Lake, and placement of all materials in the bottom of the emptied basin. These materials were covered with a RCRA style cap, employing redundant barriers of kaolin clay and geosynthetic material. Restoration of excavated uplands and wetlands is currently underway.

  13. Cold test data for equipment acceptance into 105-KE Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Packer, M.J.

    1994-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides acceptance testing of equipment to be installed in the 105-KE Basin for pumping sludge to support the discharge chute barrier doors installation.

  14. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding...

  15. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Northern Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration...

  16. ALUMINUM DISTRIBUTIONSIN THE EURASIAN BASIN OF THE ARCTIC OCEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    ALUMINUM DISTRIBUTIONSIN THE EURASIAN BASIN OF THE ARCTIC OCEAN A THESISSUBMITTEDTO THE GRADUATE Section(1994)cruiseswere analyzed for their aluminum (Al) content; these two data setswere then combined

  17. Variable Crustal Thickness In The Western Great Basin- A Compilation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Crustal Thickness In The Western Great Basin- A Compilation Of Old And New Refraction Data Abstract Utilizing commercial mine blasts and local earthquakes, as well as a dense...

  18. GEOCHEMICAL MODELING OF F AREA SEEPAGE BASIN COMPOSITION AND VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Millings, M.; Denham, M.; Looney, B.

    2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    From the 1950s through 1989, the F Area Seepage Basins at the Savannah River Site (SRS) received low level radioactive wastes resulting from processing nuclear materials. Discharges of process wastes to the F Area Seepage Basins followed by subsequent mixing processes within the basins and eventual infiltration into the subsurface resulted in contamination of the underlying vadose zone and downgradient groundwater. For simulating contaminant behavior and subsurface transport, a quantitative understanding of the interrelated discharge-mixing-infiltration system along with the resulting chemistry of fluids entering the subsurface is needed. An example of this need emerged as the F Area Seepage Basins was selected as a key case study demonstration site for the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Program. This modeling evaluation explored the importance of the wide variability in bulk wastewater chemistry as it propagated through the basins. The results are intended to generally improve and refine the conceptualization of infiltration of chemical wastes from seepage basins receiving variable waste streams and to specifically support the ASCEM case study model for the F Area Seepage Basins. Specific goals of this work included: (1) develop a technically-based 'charge-balanced' nominal source term chemistry for water infiltrating into the subsurface during basin operations, (2) estimate the nature of short term and long term variability in infiltrating water to support scenario development for uncertainty quantification (i.e., UQ analysis), (3) identify key geochemical factors that control overall basin water chemistry and the projected variability/stability, and (4) link wastewater chemistry to the subsurface based on monitoring well data. Results from this study provide data and understanding that can be used in further modeling efforts of the F Area groundwater plume. As identified in this study, key geochemical factors affecting basin chemistry and variability included: (1) the nature or chemistry of the waste streams, (2) the open system of the basins, and (3) duration of discharge of the waste stream types. Mixing models of the archetype waste streams indicated that the overall basin system would likely remain acidic much of the time. Only an extended periods of predominantly alkaline waste discharge (e.g., >70% alkaline waste) would dramatically alter the average pH of wastewater entering the basins. Short term and long term variability were evaluated by performing multiple stepwise modeling runs to calculate the oscillation of bulk chemistry in the basins in response to short term variations in waste stream chemistry. Short term (1/2 month and 1 month) oscillations in the waste stream types only affected the chemistry in Basin 1; little variation was observed in Basin 2 and 3. As the largest basin, Basin 3 is considered the primary source to the groundwater. Modeling showed that the fluctuation in chemistry of the waste streams is not directly representative of the source term to the groundwater (i.e. Basin 3). The sequence of receiving basins and the large volume of water in Basin 3 'smooth' or nullify the short term variability in waste stream composition. As part of this study, a technically-based 'charge-balanced' nominal source term chemistry was developed for Basin 3 for a narrow range of pH (2.7 to 3.4). An example is also provided of how these data could be used to quantify uncertainty over the long term variations in waste stream chemistry and hence, Basin 3 chemistry.

  19. Scale-up of Carbon/Carbon Bipolar Plates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David P. Haack

    2009-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was focused upon developing a unique material technology for use in PEM fuel cell bipolar plates. The carbon/carbon composite material developed in this program is uniquely suited for use in fuel cell systems, as it is lightweight, highly conductive and corrosion resistant. The project further focused upon developing the manufacturing methodology to cost-effectively produce this material for use in commercial fuel cell systems. United Technology Fuel Cells Corp., a leading fuel cell developer was a subcontractor to the project was interested in the performance and low-cost potential of the material. The accomplishments of the program included the development and testing of a low-cost, fully molded, net-shape carbon-carbon bipolar plate. The process to cost-effectively manufacture these carbon-carbon bipolar plates was focused on extensively in this program. Key areas for cost-reduction that received attention in this program was net-shape molding of the detailed flow structures according to end-user design. Correlations between feature detail and process parameters were formed so that mold tooling could be accurately designed to meet a variety of flow field dimensions. A cost model was developed that predicted the cost of manufacture for the product in near-term volumes and long-term volumes (10+ million units per year). Because the roduct uses lowcost raw materials in quantities that are less than competitive tech, it was found that the cost of the product in high volume can be less than with other plate echnologies, and can meet the DOE goal of $4/kW for transportation applications. The excellent performance of the all-carbon plate in net shape was verified in fuel cell testing. Performance equivalent to much higher cost, fully machined graphite plates was found.

  20. Multi-well sample plate cover penetration system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beer, Neil Reginald (Pleasanton, CA)

    2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for penetrating a cover over a multi-well sample plate containing at least one individual sample well includes a cutting head, a cutter extending from the cutting head, and a robot. The cutting head is connected to the robot wherein the robot moves the cutting head and cutter so that the cutter penetrates the cover over the multi-well sample plate providing access to the individual sample well. When the cutting head is moved downward the foil is pierced by the cutter that splits, opens, and folds the foil inward toward the well. The well is then open for sample aspiration but has been protected from cross contamination.

  1. Fuel cell collector plate and method of fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Braun, James C. (Juno Beach, FL); Zabriskie, Jr., John E. (Port St. Lucie, FL); Neutzler, Jay K. (Palm Beach Gardens, FL); Fuchs, Michel (Boynton Beach, FL); Gustafson, Robert C. (Palm Beach Gardens, FL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved molding composition is provided for compression molding or injection molding a current collector plate for a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell. The molding composition is comprised of a polymer resin combined with a low surface area, highly-conductive carbon and/or graphite powder filler. The low viscosity of the thermoplastic resin combined with the reduced filler particle surface area provide a moldable composition which can be fabricated into a current collector plate having improved current collecting capacity vis-a-vis comparable fluoropolymer molding compositions.

  2. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    1998-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective is to provide a comprehensive geologic analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin.

  3. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    1998-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective is to provide a comprehensive geologic analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin.

  4. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    1997-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective is to provide a comprehensive geologic analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin.

  5. Western gas sands project. Quarterly basin activities report, April 1-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of drilling and testing operations in the four primary study areas of the WESP for this period. Greater Green River Basin, Northern Great Plains Province, Piceance Basin, and Uinta Basin. (DLC)

  6. Western Gas Sands Project. Quarterly basin activities report, January 1-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of drilling and testing activities in the four primary study areas of the WGSP: Greater Green River Basin, Northern Great Plains Province, Uinta Basin, and Piceance Basin. (DLC)

  7. Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

    2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project is basin modeling and petroleum system identification, comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. In the first six (6) months of Year 3, the research focus is on basin modeling and petroleum system identification and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule. The principal objectives of the project are to develop through basin analysis and modeling the concept that petroleum systems acting in a basin can be identified through basin modeling and to demonstrate that the information and analysis resulting from characterizing and modeling of these petroleum systems in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin can be used in providing a more reliable and advanced approach for targeting stratigraphic traps and specific reservoir facies within a geologic system and in providing a refined assessment of undiscovered and underdeveloped reservoirs and associated oil and gas resources.

  8. Receiver Functions and Tomography Study along the Monterey Micro-Plate and Isabella Anomaly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cox, Paul Aiken

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    geology of the Santa Maria Basin Assessment Province, California for the 1987 national assessment of undiscovered oil

  9. Statistical Confirmation of a Stellar Upper Mass Limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Oey; C. J. Clarke

    2005-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the expectation value for the maximum stellar mass (m_max) in an ensemble of N stars, as a function of the IMF upper-mass cutoff (m_up) and N. We statistically demonstrate that the upper IMF of the local massive star census observed thus far in the Milky Way and Magellanic Clouds clearly exhibits a universal upper mass cutoff around 120 - 200 M_sun for a Salpeter IMF, although the result is more ambiguous for a steeper IMF.

  10. Sandstone-carbonate cycles in Tensleep Formation, eastern Bighorn basin and western Powder River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rittersbacher, D.J.; Wheeler, D.M.; Horne, J.C.

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Outcrop and core study of the Tensleep Formation in the eastern Bighorn basin and western Powder River basin has revealed cyclic deposits of eolian sandstone and marine carbonate. These cycles, several meters to tens of meters thick, represent the rise and fall of sea level on the Wyoming shelf during Pennsylvanian and Early Permian time. Falling sea level was marked by development of a sharp scour surface at the base of each cycle and progradation of eolian dunes over an exposed, shallow carbonate shelf. Subsequent sea level rise resulted in the reworking of eolian sand through wave activity and burrowing organisms. Subtidal carbonates overlies the reworked eolian sands and are sandy at the base, grading upward into fossiliferous dolomite mudstones to wackestones. The sharp scour surface, normally present directly on the subtidal carbonates, indicates that erosion eliminated any regressive marine deposits by deflation to the ground-water table during shoreline progradation or by deflation related to abrupt drop in sea level. Relative sea level changes on the low-relief Wyoming shelf affected large areas during Tensleep deposition. This resulted in widespread sandstone-carbonate cycles that provide the basis for regional correlations of the Tensleep Formation throughout the eastern Bighorn basin and western Powder River basin.

  11. 8 River Basin Closure and Institutional Change in Mexico's LermaChapala Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Christopher

    for irrigation expansion, and the drilling of new wells and the construction of new dams has been prohibited. Moreover, water pollution is serious, with significant wastewater reuse for irrigation within the basin. Lastly, water is being transferred from agriculture to the urban and industrial sectors, without due

  12. Effects of axial plate heat conduction on the thermal performance of a laminar counterflow flat plate heat exchanger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demko, Jonathan Alexander

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THEN THE CENTERLINE TEHPERATUBES EY USING THZ ENERGY EQUATION AIONG THE CENTERLINE FINALLY E VAL HAT I THE FLO W FIELD EPS= 1, OD-04 DO 999 K=1, 850 REST=0 ~ 0 DO DO 70 J=1rM TH {N, J)= (4 DU?TH (8-1, J) -TH(8-2 ~ J) ) /3 DO DO 60 I= 2, 8L TH (I, M) = (DY2... thermal conductivity ratios of the plate to the fluid, dimensionless plate thicknesses, Reynolds and Prandtl numbers. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would like to express my thanks to all those who gave me support while I was working toward this goal. Dr. Louis...

  13. Famennian microbial reef facies, Napier and Oscar Ranges, Canning Basin, western Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, N P; Sumner, Dawn Y.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geol. Rundsch. , Western Australia: Geologic Maps of theof the Canning basin, Western Australia. West. Aust. Geol.the Canning Basin, Western Australia. In: Stromatolites (Ed.

  14. National emission standards for hazardous air pollutants application for approval to stabilize the 105N Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 105N Basin (basin) Stabilization will place the basin in a radiologically and environmentally safe condition so that it can be decommissioned at a later date. The basin stabilization objectives are to inspect for Special Nuclear Material (SNM) (i.e., fuel assemblies and fuel pieces), remove the water from the basin and associated pits, and stabilize the basin surface. The stabilization will involve removal of basin hardware, removal of basin sediments, draining of basin water, and cleaning and stabilizing basin surfaces-to prevent resuspension of radioactive emissions to the air. These activities will be conducted in accordance with all applicable regulations. The basin is in the 105N Building, which is located in the 100N Area. The 100N Area is located in the Northern portion of the Hanford Site approximately 35 miles northwest of the city of Richland, Washington. The basin is a reinforced unlined concrete structure 150 feet long, 50 feet wide, and 24 feet deep. The basin is segregated into seven areas sharing a common pool of water; the Discharge/Viewing (``D``) Pit, the fuel segregation pit (including a water tunnel that connects the ``D`` pit and segregation pit), two storage basins designated as North Basin and South Basin, two cask load-out pits, and a fuel examination area. The North Basin floor is entirely covered and the South Basin is partly covered by a modular array of cubicles formed by boron concrete posts and boron concrete panels.

  15. San Juan Basin EC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:RoscommonSBYSalton SeaBasin EC Jump to: navigation, search NEPA

  16. Sediment Basin Flume | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey JumpAir Jump to:ScottsSearchSt. Louis, MissouriBasin

  17. Great Basin Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska: EnergyGratingsGreat Basin Geothermal

  18. Denver Basin Map | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE Facility DatabaseMichigan: Energy ResourcesDenair,DennisDenver Basin Map

  19. Damping Estimation of Plates for Statistical Energy Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vatti, Kranthi

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .R.D.M. algorithm. Statistical Energy Analysis (S.E.A.), which is a natural extension of the Power Input Method, is used to evaluate coupling loss factors for two sets of plates, one set joined along a line and the other set joined at a point. Two alternative...

  20. Nondestructive Evaluation of Plates Using Eddy Current Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nondestructive Evaluation of Plates Using Eddy Current Methods David C. Dobson Department in structures using eddy current methods is investigated. The goal of this work is to assess the extent to which a conductivity anomaly from eddy current data is quite unstable, and a method based on leastsquares principle

  1. Nondestructive Evaluation of Plates Using Eddy Current Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santosa, Fadil

    Nondestructive Evaluation of Plates Using Eddy Current Methods David C. Dobson \\Lambda Department in structures using eddy current methods is investigated. The goal of this work is to assess the extent to which anomaly from eddy current data is quite unstable, and a method based on leastsquares principle would fail

  2. Nondestructive Evaluation of Plates Using Eddy Current Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, David C.

    Nondestructive Evaluation of Plates Using Eddy Current Methods David C. Dobson Department in structures using eddy current methods is investigated. The goal of this work is to assess the extent to which anomaly from eddy current data is quite unstable, and a method based on leastsquares principle would fail

  3. Krypton adsorption on (0001) graphite pre-plated with cyclohexane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    91 Krypton adsorption on (0001) graphite pre-plated with cyclohexane A. Razafitianamaharavo (1), N étudiée par volumétrie entre 71 et 83 K. L'adsorption de krypton, fortement inhibée par la présence du physisorbed has been studied between 71 and 83 K by means of classical volumetric methods. Krypton adsorption

  4. Nitrided Metallic Bipolar Plates M.P. Brady (project lead)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nitrided Metallic Bipolar Plates M.P. Brady (project lead) P. F. Tortorelli Oak Ridge National - $2480 K · ORNL (Lead) · Allegheny Ludlum · Funding for Year 2 · Arizona State University - $2050 K wt.% ­ pre-oxidation key to protective surface nitride formation ­ V segregation into Cr-oxide makes

  5. anterior locking plates: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    acq(A)2; rel(A)3; acq(C)10; rel(C)11; Q : acq(B)6; rel(B)7; acq(D)14; rel(D)15 Mller-Olm, Markus 277 MICROPLATES OptiPlates (white and black) Biology and Medicine Websites...

  6. Lab 4: Plate Tectonics Locating Geologic Hazards Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Po

    1 Lab 4: Plate Tectonics ­ Locating Geologic Hazards Introduction The likelihood of major geologic hazards associated with the lithosphere, such as earthquakes and volcanoes, is not uniform around provides a ready explanation for the distribution of these types of geologic hazards. It is useful

  7. GUIDED WAVES IN LAYERED PLATE WITH DELAMINATIONS Fabrizio Ricci, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ) techniques. Among the various existing techniques, guided wave methods provide a good compromise in termsGUIDED WAVES IN LAYERED PLATE WITH DELAMINATIONS 1 Fabrizio Ricci, 2 Ajit K. Mal, 1 Ernesto Monaco) models are used for more practical cases, for which the geometric and material complexities of actual

  8. Numerical simulation of fracture mode transition in ductile plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Liang

    Fracture mode of ductile solids can vary depending on the history of stress state the material experienced. For example, ductile plates under remote in-plane loading are often found to rupture in mode I or mixed mode I/III. ...

  9. RECORD OF DESIGNATED SUBSTANCE ASSESSMENT SUBSTANCE: LEAD (plates and Gamma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Michael

    RECORD OF DESIGNATED SUBSTANCE ASSESSMENT SUBSTANCE: LEAD (plates and Gamma Source holder) DATE Direct / Indirect Per Month / Year Lead Mechanical Indirect No change Engineering CONCLUSIONS Read the plant? Product Title: Lead Type of Container: none Size of Container: not applicable 2. Is this form

  10. Distributed Roughness Receptivity in a Flat Plate Boundary Layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuester, Matthew Scott

    2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    for the three different unit Reynolds num- ber test conditions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 3.4 Spanwise uniformity of boundary layer integral quantities at x = 870 mm for low unit Reynolds number test condition... with the distributed roughness configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 3.5 Differential pressure across the flat plate leading edge. . . . . . . . . . 25 3.6 Roughness patch (k = 1 mm), before windowing . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 3...

  11. Film cooling on a flat plate: investigating density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grizzle, Joshua Peter Fletcher

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study is an investigation of two specific effects on turbine blade film cooling. The effect of coolant to mainstream density ratio and upstream steps was studied. The studies were conducted on two flat plates with 4mm cylindrical film cooling...

  12. DAMAGE LOCALIZATION IN PLATES USING DLVs Dionisio Bernal1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernal, Dionisio

    DAMAGE LOCALIZATION IN PLATES USING DLVs Dionisio Bernal1 and Ariel Levy2 Department of Civil Associate Professor, 2 Graduate Student ABSTRACT The performance of a technique to localize damage based on the computation of load vectors that create stress fields that bypass the damaged region is investigated

  13. Optical processing furnace with quartz muffle and diffuser plate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, Bhushan L. (Denver, CO)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical furnace for annealing a process wafer comprising a source of optical energy, a quartz muffle having a door to hold the wafer for processing, and a quartz diffuser plate to diffuse the light impinging on the quartz muffle; a feedback system with a light sensor located in the wall of the muffle is also provided for controlling the source of optical energy.

  14. Static Analysis of Sandwich Plates by Hybrid Finite Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Static Analysis of Sandwich Plates by Hybrid Finite Elements V. Manet and W.-S. Han Materials analysis tool. The subject of the present work concerns the development of hybrid sandwich finite elements into acount. The present work concerns the development of hybrid sandwich finite elements mod- elling

  15. Enhanced radiative heat transfer between nanostructured gold plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Guérout; J. Lussange; F. S. S. Rosa; J. -P. Hugonin; D. A. R. Dalvit; J. -J. Greffet; A. Lambrecht; S. Reynaud

    2012-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the radiative heat transfer between nanostructured gold plates in the framework of the scattering theory. We predict an enhancement of the heat transfer as we increase the depth of the corrugations while keeping the distance of closest approach fixed. We interpret this effect in terms of the evolution of plasmonic and guided modes as a function of the grating's geometry.

  16. Application of Advanced Reservoir Characterization, Simulation, and Production Optimization Strategies to Maximize Recovery in Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew G. Cole; George B. Asquith; Jose I. Guzman; Mark D. Barton; Mohammad A. Malik; Shirley P. Dutton; Sigrid J. Clift

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this Class III project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of clastic reservoirs in basinal sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost-effective way to recover more of the original oil in place by strategic infill-well placement and geologically based enhanced oil recovery. The study focused on the Ford Geraldine unit, which produces from the upper Bell Canyon Formation (Ramsey sandstone). Reservoirs in this and other Delaware Mountain Group fields have low producibility (average recovery <14 percent of the original oil in place) because of a high degree of vertical and lateral heterogeneity caused by depositional processes and post-depositional diagenetic modification. Outcrop analogs were studied to better interpret the depositional processes that formed the reservoirs at the Ford Geraldine unit and to determine the dimensions of reservoir sandstone bodies. Facies relationships and bedding architecture within a single genetic unit exposed in outcrop in Culberson County, Texas, suggest that the sandstones were deposited in a system of channels and levees with attached lobes that initially prograded basinward, aggraded, and then turned around and stepped back toward the shelf. Channel sandstones are 10 to 60 ft thick and 300 to 3,000 ft wide. The flanking levees have a wedge-shaped geometry and are composed of interbedded sandstone and siltstone; thickness varies from 3 to 20 ft and length from several hundred to several thousands of feet. The lobe sandstones are broad lens-shaped bodies; thicknesses range up to 30 ft with aspect ratios (width/thickness) of 100 to 10,000. Lobe sandstones may be interstratified with laminated siltstones.

  17. Genetic stratigraphic sequence analysis in terrestrial aggrading basin: sequence stratigraphy of Narrabeen Group, Sydney basin, Australia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, S.A.; Galloway, W.E.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of event/sequence stratigraphy concepts over the past 15 years has been one of the most significant contributions to systematic stratigraphic analyses of sedimentary basins. Most of these approaches, however, have not been applied to terrestrial aggradational settings but rather were developed in marginal basin settings where progradational and transgressive units are important components of the sequence framework. The principal objective of sequence definition is the identification of genetic stratigraphic units that share a common paleogeographic, climatic, and tectonic origin. Thus, the basic premise of sequence stratigraphy should be useful in the delineation of the depositional framework for any basin. Criteria were devised to identify three genetic stratigraphic sequences within the Triassic Narrabeen Group of the Sydney basin, an aggrading basin with a terrestrial fill. Individual sequences were chosen to emphasize significant changes in tectonic and climatic conditions, as reflected in the distinguishing characteristics of depositional style, sediment composition, and paleodrainage trends. The Munmorah sequence is characterized by lithic sandstone deposits of an extensive alluvial plain sourced by the New England foldbelt to the northeast. The overlying Bulgo sequence is distinguished by changes in sediment transport direction, lithology, and depositional style. The western Lachlan foldbelt emerged as a source of a quartz-rich braid-plain system. The Bald Hill sequence lies above the Bulgo and consists of sandstones and kaolinitic claystones that were deposited in extensive, highly oxidized alluvial plains that were dissected by numerous small streams. The distinctive mineralogy and depositional style of the Bald Hill deposits suggest climatic and tectonic changes in the Lachlan foldbelt source area.

  18. Plate-Based Fuel Processing System Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlos Faz; Helen Liu; Jacques Nicole; David Yee

    2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    On-board reforming of liquid fuels into hydrogen is an enabling technology that could accelerate consumer usage of fuel cell powered vehicles. The technology would leverage the convenience of the existing gasoline fueling infrastructure while taking advantage of the fuel cell efficiency and low emissions. Commercial acceptance of on-board reforming faces several obstacles that include: (1) startup time, (2) transient response, and (3) system complexity (size, weight and cost). These obstacles are being addressed in a variety of projects through development, integration and optimization of existing fuel processing system designs. In this project, CESI investigated steam reforming (SR), water-gas-shift (WGS) and preferential oxidation (PrOx) catalysts while developing plate reactor designs and hardware where the catalytic function is integrated into a primary surface heat exchanger. The plate reactor approach has several advantages. The separation of the reforming and combustion streams permits the reforming reaction to be conducted at a higher pressure than the combustion reaction, thereby avoiding costly gas compression for combustion. The separation of the two streams also prevents the dilution of the reformate stream by the combustion air. The advantages of the plate reactor are not limited to steam reforming applications. In a WGS or PrOx reaction, the non-catalytic side of the plate would act as a heat exchanger to remove the heat generated by the exothermic WGS or PrOx reactions. This would maintain the catalyst under nearly isothermal conditions whereby the catalyst would operate at its optimal temperature. Furthermore, the plate design approach results in a low pressure drop, rapid transient capable and attrition-resistant reactor. These qualities are valued in any application, be it on-board or stationary fuel processing, since they reduce parasitic losses, increase over-all system efficiency and help perpetuate catalyst durability. In this program, CESI took the initial steam reforming plate-reactor concept and advanced it towards an integrated fuel processing system. A substantial amount of modeling was performed to guide the catalyst development and prototype hardware design and fabrication efforts. The plate-reactor mechanical design was studied in detail to establish design guidelines which would help the plate reactor survive the stresses of repeated thermal cycles (from start-ups and shut-downs). Integrated system performance modeling was performed to predict system efficiencies and determine the parameters with the most significant impact on efficiency. In conjunction with the modeling effort, a significant effort was directed towards catalyst development. CESI developed a highly active, sulfur tolerant, coke resistant, precious metal based reforming catalyst. CESI also developed its own non-precious metal based water-gas shift catalyst and demonstrated the catalysts durability over several thousands of hours of testing. CESI also developed a unique preferential oxidation catalyst capable of reducing 1% CO to < 10 ppm CO over a 35 C operating window through a single pass plate-based reactor. Finally, CESI combined the modeling results and steam reforming catalyst development efforts into prototype hardware. The first generation 3kW(e) prototype was fabricated from existing heat-exchanger plates to expedite the fabrication process. This prototype demonstrated steady state operation ranging from 5 to 100% load conditions. The prototype also demonstrated a 20:1 turndown ratio, 10:1 load transient operation and rapid start-up capability.

  19. Geochemistry of selected oils and rocks from the central portion of the West Siberian basin, Russia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, K.E.; Huizinga, B.J. (Chevron Overseas Petroleum Inc., San Ramon, CA (United States)); Kontorovich, A.Eh.; Andrusevich, V.E. (Inst. of Geology, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)); Moldowan, J.M. (Chevron Petroleum Technology Co., Richmond, CA (United States)); Demaison, G.J. (Petroscience Inc., Walnut Creek, CA (United States)); Stasova, O.F. (NPO SIBGEO, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation))

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Six analyzed oils, produced from Middle jurassic to Upper Cretaceous strata in the Middle Ob region of the West Siberian basin, show biomarker and stable carbon isotope compositions indicating an origin from the Upper Jurassic Bazhenov Formation. The chemical compositions of these oils are representative of more than 85% of the reserves in West Siberia (Kontorovich et al., 1975). Bazhenov-sourced oil in Cenomanian strata in the Van-Egan field underwent biodegradation in the reservoir, resulting in a low API gravity, an altered homohopane distribution, and the appearance of 25-norhopanes without alteration of the steranes. High API gravity oil from the Salym field has surpassed the peak of the oil window, consistent with abnormally high temperatures and pressures in the Bazhenov source rock from which it is produced. The remaining oils are very similar, including samples from Valanginian and Bathonian-Callovian intervals in a sequence of stacked reservoirs in the Fedorov field. Bazhenov rock samples from the study area contain abundant oil-prone, marine organic matter preserved under anoxic conditions. While the Upper Jurassic Vasyugan Formation shows lower oil-regenerative potential than the Bazhenov Formation, it cannot be excluded as a source rock because insufficient sample was available for biomarker analysis. Core from the Lower to Middle Jurassic Tyumen Formation in the YemYegov 15 well was compared with the oils because it is thermally mature and shows TOC and HI values, indicating slightly more favorable oil-generative characteristics than the average for the formation (2.75 wt. % for 270 samples; 95 mg HC/g TOC for 25 samples). The core contains terrigenous, gas-prone organic matter that shows no relationship with the analyzed oils. 59 refs., 15 figs., 8 tabs.

  20. Analysis of Ignition Testing on K-West Basin Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Abrefah; F.H. Huang; W.M. Gerry; W.J. Gray; S.C. Marschman; T.A. Thornton

    1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 2100 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) discharged from the N-Reactor have been stored underwater at the K-Basins in the 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The spent fuel has been stored in the K-East Basin since 1975 and in the K-West Basin since 1981. Some of the SNF elements in these basins have corroded because of various breaches in the Zircaloy cladding that occurred during fuel discharge operations and/or subsequent handling and storage in the basins. Consequently, radioactive material in the fuel has been released into the basin water, and water has leaked from the K-East Basin into the soil below. To protect the Columbia River, which is only 380 m from the basins, the SNF is scheduled to be removed and transported for interim dry storage in the 200 East Area, in the central portion of the Site. However, before being shipped, the corroded fuel elements will be loaded into Multi-Canister OverPacks and conditioned. The conditioning process will be selected based on the Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) (WHC 1995), which was prepared on the basis of the dry storage concept developed by the Independent Technical Assessment (ITA) team (ITA 1994).

  1. Oil and gas shows in the Salina basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newell, K.D.; Lambert, M.; Berendsen, P.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book presents data from drillers' records and other information on the Salina basin wells in north-central Kansas. A listing that includes well name, operator, location, completion date, depth intervals, and formation name for each well is included. A map showing oil and gas fields in the surrounding area and wells drilled within the basin is offered.

  2. Economic Impact PermianBasin'sOil&GasIndustry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yuanlin

    of Petroleum Evaluation Engineers (SPEE) parameters for evaluating Resource Plays 53 Appendix C: Detailed Play to traditional economic impacts, this report includes a petroleum engineering-based analysis that providesEconomic Impact PermianBasin'sOil&GasIndustry #12;The Economic Impact of the Permian Basin's Oil

  3. Origin Basin Destination State STB EIA STB EIA Northern Appalachian...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    20.69 19.60 -5.3% 74.23 26.4% 4,845 31.9% 97.7% Northern Appalachian Basin Michigan 13.74 16.13 17.4% 99.82 16.2% 840 32.1% 100.0% Northern Appalachian Basin New...

  4. Origin Basin Destination State STB EIA STB EIA Northern Appalachian...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    19.73 19.64 -0.4% 81.15 24.2% 4,650 24.8% 99.3% Northern Appalachian Basin Michigan W 14.02 W 76.22 18.4% 713 W 100.0% Northern Appalachian Basin New Hampshire W...

  5. PALEOZOIC TRACE FOSSILS FROM THE KUFRA BASIN, LIBYA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benton, Michael

    PALEOZOIC TRACE FOSSILS FROM THE KUFRA BASIN, LIBYA BRIAN R. TURNER AND MICHAEL J. BENTONPaleozoicsuccessionin the southeastern part ofthe Kufra Basin, Libya, comprises a sequence of sedimentary facies up to 250 m thick THEK u m BASINin southeast Libya (Figure 1)occupiesan area of about 400,000km2and is filled

  6. Seismic stratigraphy and structure of the Progreso Basin, Ecuador

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goyes Arroyo, Patricio

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , but magnetic data indicate that basement is about 10 lun deep in the progress Basin and about 3 km deep in neighboring Santa Elena Basin. AKNOWLEDGMENTS I would like to thank the Instituto Oceanogra fico de la Armada del Ecuador for providing funding of my...

  7. Dynamic management of water transfer between two interconnected river basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Dynamic management of water transfer between two interconnected river basins Francisco Cabo Katrin cause environmental damage in the donor basin. The recipient faces a trade-off between paying the price of the irrigated soil, or demand for water for highly productive activities like tourism), then the existence

  8. Upper bounds on minimum distance of nonbinary quantum stabilizer codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Santosh

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The most popular class of quantum error correcting codes is stabilizer codes. Binary quantum stabilizer codes have been well studied, and Calderbank, Rains, Shor and Sloane (July 1998) have constructed a table of upper bounds on the minimum distance...

  9. Characterization of Sea Turtle Nesting on the Upper Texas Coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Christi Lynn

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Nearly annual record Kemp’s ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys kempii) nesting activity on the upper Texas coast (UTC; defined as beaches from Sabine Pass to Matagorda Peninsula), where scientifically verifiable nesting commenced in 2002, has occurred...

  10. Improvable upper bounds to the piezoelectric polaron ground state energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Soldatov

    2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    It was shown that an infinite sequence of improving non-increasing upper bounds to the ground state energy (GSE) of a slow-moving piezoeletric polaron can be devised.

  11. Floristic study of the Upper Frio River, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swihart, Theresa Irene

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Vascular plant collections and field data compiled during a one and a half year period for the upper Frio River, Texas, produced a flora that comprises 78 families, 223 genera and 319 species. Vascular plants were collected ...

  12. Normal and lateral Casimir forces between deformed plates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emig, Thorsten; Hanke, Andreas; Golestanian, Ramin; Kardar, Mehran [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Strasse 77, D-50937 Cologne (Germany); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, Zanjan 45195-159 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics, P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Physics Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Casimir force between macroscopic bodies depends strongly on their shape and orientation. To study this geometry dependence in the case of two deformed metal plates, we use a path-integral quantization of the electromagnetic field which properly treats the many-body nature of the interaction, going beyond the commonly used pairwise summation (PWS) of van der Waals forces. For arbitrary deformations we provide an analytical result for the deformation induced change in the Casimir energy, which is exact to second order in the deformation amplitude. For the specific case of sinusoidally corrugated plates, we calculate both the normal and the lateral Casimir forces. The deformation induced change in the Casimir interaction of a flat and a corrugated plate shows an interesting crossover as a function of the ratio of the mean plate distance H to the corrugation length {lambda}: For {lambda}<>H. The amplitude of the lateral force between two corrugated plates which are out of registry is shown to have a maximum at an optimal wavelength of {lambda}{approx_equal}2.5 H. With increasing H/{lambda} > or approx. 0.3 the PWS approach becomes a progressively worse description of the lateral force due to many-body effects. These results may be of relevance for the design and operation of novel microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and other nanoscale devices.

  13. Flexural interpretation of Mississippian stratigraphy in the Black Warrior basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ettensohn, F.R. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Geological Science); Pashin, J.C. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States))

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interpretation of Mississippian rocks in the Black Warrior basin and adjacent parts of the Appalachian basin using basic viscoelastic flexural models suggests that this sequence of rocks is largely a response to deformational loading and relaxation accompany early phases of Ouachita orogeny. A Kinderhook-Valmeyer unconformity atop the Maury Shale apparently represents an initial tectophase of Ouachita orogeny too distant to affect the basin otherwise. However, a Valmeyer-Chesterian unconformity atop the Tuscumbia, along which the Genevievian Stage is absent or condensed, indicates that a second Ouachita tectophase had become localized along the southwest part of alabama promontory, close enough to generate the Black Warrior foreland basin, fill it with a flexural sequence of sediments, and alter sedimentation patterns in nearby parts of the Appalachian basin.

  14. Radioactive air emissions notice of construction for the 105N Basin Stabilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coenenberg, E.T. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 105N Basin (basin) Stabilization will place the basin in a radiologically and environmentally safe condition so that it can be decommissioned at a later date. The basin is in the 105N Building, which is located in the 100N Area. The 100N Area is located in the Northern portion of the Hanford Site approximately 35 miles northwest of the city of Richland, Washington. The basin stabilization objectives are to inspect for Special Nuclear Material (SNM) (i.e., fuel assemblies and fuel pieces), remove the water from the basin and associated pits, and stabilize the basin surface. The stabilization will involve removal of basin hardware, removal of basin sediments, draining of basin water, and cleaning and stabilizing basin surfaces to prevent resuspension of radioactive emissions to the air. These activities will be conducted in accordance with all applicable regulations.

  15. Laminated exfoliated graphite composite-metal compositions for fuel cell flow field plate or bipolar plate applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrically conductive laminate composition for fuel cell flow field plate or bipolar plate applications. The laminate composition comprises at least a thin metal sheet having two opposed exterior surfaces and a first exfoliated graphite composite sheet bonded to the first of the two exterior surfaces of the metal sheet wherein the exfoliated graphite composite sheet comprises: (a) expanded or exfoliated graphite and (b) a binder or matrix material to bond the expanded graphite for forming a cohered sheet, wherein the binder or matrix material is between 3% and 60% by weight based on the total weight of the first exfoliated graphite composite sheet. Preferably, the first exfoliated graphite composite sheet further comprises particles of non-expandable graphite or carbon in the amount of between 3% and 60% by weight based on the total weight of the non-expandable particles and the expanded graphite. Further preferably, the laminate comprises a second exfoliated graphite composite sheet bonded to the second surface of the metal sheet to form a three-layer laminate. Surface flow channels and other desired geometric features can be built onto the exterior surfaces of the laminate to form a flow field plate or bipolar plate. The resulting laminate has an exceptionally high thickness-direction conductivity and excellent resistance to gas permeation.

  16. Exploratory shaft conceptual design report: Paradox Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This conceptual design report summarizes the conceptualized design for an exploratory shaft facility at a representative site in the Paradox Basin located in the southeastern part of Utah. Conceptualized designs for other possible locations (Permian Basin in Texas and Gulf Interior Region salt domes in Louisiana and Mississippi) are summarized in separate reports. The purpose of the exploratory shaft facility is to provide access to the reference repository horizon to permit in situ testing of the salt. The in-situ testing is necessary to verify repository salt design parameters, evaluate isotropy and homogeneity of the salt, and provide a demonstration of the constructability and confirmation of the design to gain access to the repository. The fundamental purpose of this conceptual design report is to assure the feasibility of the exploratory shaft project and to develop a reliable cost estimate and realistic schedule. Because a site has not been selected and site-specific subsurface data are not available, it has been necessary to make certain assumptions in order to develop a conceptual design for an exploratory shaft facility in salt. As more definitive information becomes available to support the design process, adjustments in the projected schedule and estimated costs will be required.

  17. Exploratory shaft conceptual design report: Permian Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This conceptual design report summarizes the conceptualized design for an exploratory shaft facility at a representative site in the Permian Basin locatd in the western part of Texas. Conceptualized designs for other possible locations (Paradox Basin in Utah and Gulf Interior Region salt domes in Louisiana and Mississippi) are summarized in separate reports. The purpose of the exploratory shaft facility is to provide access to the reference repository horizon to permit in situ testing of the salt. The in situ testing is necessary to verify repository salt design parameters, evaluate isotropy and homogeneity of the salt, and provide a demonstration of the constructability and confirmation of the design to gain access to the repository. The fundamental purpose of this conceptual design report is to assure the feasibility of the exploratory shaft project and to develop a reliable cost estimate and realistic schedule. Because a site has not been selected and site-specific subsurface data are not available, it has been necessary to make certain assumptions in order to develop a conceptual design for an exploratory shaft facility in salt. As more definitive information becomes available to support the design process, adjustments in the projected schedule and estimated costs will be required.

  18. Baroclinic tides in an axially symmetric basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dever, Edward Paul

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    stratification can be described using only the lowest inodes and exhibit much more realistic behavior. Baroclinic tide generation is confined to the upper slope and the magnitudes of baroclinic tidal currents compare well with observed values. In contrast... to previous ray tracing models, the present model does not generate beams of baroclinic tidal energy. This agrees with most measurements and is probably an effect of the generation region. For the bathymetry and stratification chosen for this model...

  19. Geology, volcanology and geochemistry Drainage pattern and regional morphostructure at Melka Kunture (Upper Awash, Ethiopia) ........................83

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    at Melka Kunture (Upper Awash, Ethiopia) ........................83 Guillaume Bardin, Jean-Paul Raynal, Guy Kieffer Volcanic markers in coarse alluvium at Melka Kunture (Upper Awash, Ethiopia (Upper Awash, Ethiopia) ....................................................103 Gérard Poupeau, Guy

  20. Tectonic setting and origin of the Black Warrior basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, W.A.; Whiting, B.M. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Black Warrior basin has a triangular outline that is framed by the Ouachita thrust belt on the southwest, the Appalachian thrust belt on the southeast, and the North American craton on the north. The stratigraphy of the Black Warrior basin includes two distinct parts: a Cambrian-Mississippian passive-margin carbonate-shelf succession, and a Mississippian-Pennsylvanian clastic succession, the lower (Mississippian) part of which grades northeastward into a carbonate-shelf facies. The provenance and dispersal system of the Mississippian-Pennsylvanian clastic deposits have been interpreted in four different ways, each of which has significantly different implications for origin of the basin: (1) Ouachita orogenic source and northeastward prograding; (2) Alabama Appalachian orogenic source and northwestward prograding; (3) Georgia-tennessee Appalachian orogenic source and westward prograding; and (4) cratonic source and southward prograding. Subsidence history determined from calculations of decompacted thickness indicates that (1) the Black Warrior basin is an orogenic foreland basin related primarily to the Ouachita thrust load on the southwest; (2) later emplacement of the Alabama Appalachian thrust belt modified the southeastern side of the Ouachita-related Black Warrior foreland basin; and (3) a separate foreland basin, representing the southern end of the Appalachian foreland basin, formed in response to the Georgia-Tennessee Appalachian thrust load. The previously used criteria do not necessarily support a unique interpretation, but synthesizing these data with subsidence history leads to the conclusion that the Black Warrior basin is a tectonically driven, orogenic foreland basin dominated by Ouachita thrusting and modified by Appalachian thrusting.