Sample records for upper marlboro md

  1. Upper Marlboro, Maryland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtleCooperativeCROSS-VALIDATION OF

  2. Marlboro, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther,JemezMissouri: EnergyMarlboro, New York: Energy Resources

  3. Construction Guide: Energy Efficient, Durable Walls

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Labs | Upper Marlboro, Md High Performance Walls || CZ 3-5 2 INTRODUCTION Low market penetration of energy efficient walls Construction Guide - energy efficient,...

  4. MD user's manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Correll, S.

    1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MD is the S-1 Mark IIA machine debugger. It is the hardware equivalent of a software symbolic debugger. It consists of a user-level program which executes on a VAX computer running Berkeley UNIX and a device driver which resides within the UNIX kernel. It communicates with the S-1 Mark IIA through a front-end interface attached to the UNIBUS of the VAX. The first section of this report describes MD's user interface and command set. The second section describes the virtual machine interface through which MD and the UNIX device driver communicate.

  5. Susan P. Taylor, MD Shorewood, Wisconsin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noxapater, Mississippi Corey W. Gilliland, MD Mesa, Arizona Jeanne V. Hamel, MD Elk Grove, California Steven Manhattan, Kansas Dean Afif Shoucair, DO Frankfort, Illinois John Mitchell Simson, MD Albuquerque, New

  6. Steve Nelson, MD Backes, PhD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean Steve Nelson, MD Associate Dean for Research Wayne Backes, PhD Associate Dean for Fiscal Gregory, PhD Assistant Dean of VA Affairs Paul Rosenfeld, MD Basic Science Department Heads (6) Clinical, MD Director of Basic Sciences Curriculum Michael Levitzky, PhD Assistant Dean at Children's Hospital

  7. Abington Abington Pediatrics* 360 Brockton Avenue, Suite 102, MA 02351 Yara Fernandez, MD 781-792-1999 781-792-1990 Laurie Massey, MD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mootha, Vamsi K.

    Andrea Reilly, MD Milton Pediatric Associates - MGH 10 Hawthorne Place, Suite 110, MA 02114 JonathanCullough, MD Rebecca Niloff, MD Cara O'Reilly, MD Scott Paul, MD Jonathon Brenner, MD John Robinson, MD Heidi-643-8120 Elizabeth Turnock, MD Pediatric Group Practice 55 Fruit Street, YAW 6D, MA 02114 Ronald Benz, MD 617

  8. Marlboro Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu an Group JumpNew Hampshire:Marin EnergyChoice

  9. Editorial John Hickner, MD, MSc Editor-in-Chief

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alford, Simon

    Health Care, Overland Park, Kan kEVin PEtErSon, MD, MPH University of Minnesota, St. Paul goutHAM rAo, MD

  10. Harvesting graphics power for MD simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. van Meel; A. Arnold; D. Frenkel; S. F. Portegies Zwart; R. G. Belleman

    2007-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss an implementation of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on a graphic processing unit (GPU) in the NVIDIA CUDA language. We tested our code on a modern GPU, the NVIDIA GeForce 8800 GTX. Results for two MD algorithms suitable for short-ranged and long-ranged interactions, and a congruential shift random number generator are presented. The performance of the GPU's is compared to their main processor counterpart. We achieve speedups of up to 80, 40 and 150 fold, respectively. With newest generation of GPU's one can run standard MD simulations at 10^7 flops/$.

  11. Lessons Learned Tracy Glauser, M.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lessons Learned Tracy Glauser, M.D. Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center #12;Overview 1. Lessons Learned a. NeuroNEXT Executive Committee b. NINDS clinical trials (NSD-K) study section c. PI

  12. Babar K. Rao, M.D., Clinical Associate Professor and Acting Chair Donald J. Baker, M.D., Clinical Assistant Professor (Camden)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garfunkel, Eric

    Hametz, M.D., Clinical Assistant Professor Stanley N. Katz, M.D., Clinical Assistant Professor Steven. Lathrop, M.D., Clinical Associate Professor Lawrence S. Meyers, M.D., Clinical Associate Professor Sandy S

  13. Practical Attacks on Digital Signatures Using MD5 Message Digest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    schemes based on MD5 message digest on an example using GPG. Keywords: collision, hash function, MD5 1 on digital signatures on an example using GPG (section 5) and finally an exam- ple of real-world attack

  14. Poster Presentations Marcella Alsan, MD, MPH, PhD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    15 Poster Presentations Marcella Alsan, MD, MPH, PhD The direct and indirect effects of mass vaccination: Evidence from the 1985 Turkish campaign Michele Barry, MD; Stephen Luby, MD; Nancy Federspiel, PhD Global Health Fellows and Scholars Consortium Cynthia M. Castro, PhD; Abby C. King, PhD; Marcia Stefanick

  15. Free Energy Calculation in MD Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Steven O.

    Free Energy Calculation in MD Simulation #12;Basic Thermodynamics Helmoholtz free energy A = U ­ TS + i Ni dA = wrev (reversible, const N V T) eq (22.9) McQuarrie & Simon Gibbs free energy G = U;Implication of Free Energy A B Keq = [A]/[B] Keq = exp (-G0 /RT) G0 = -RT ln Keq G = G0 + RT ln Q G > 0

  16. Net Zero Residential Test Facility Gaithersburg, MD Solar Photovoltaic Panels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    1 Net Zero Residential Test Facility Gaithersburg, MD Solar Photovoltaic Panels Solar Thermal;NZERTF Gaithersburg, MD 3 Objectives Demonstrate Net-Zero Energy for a home similar in nature: · Demonstrate Net-Zero Energy Usage · Measure All Building Loads (Sensible and Latent) · Operate Dedicated

  17. Serial Intraoperative MR Imaging of Brain Shift Arya Nabavi, M.D.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serial Intraoperative MR Imaging of Brain Shift Arya Nabavi, M.D.1 , Peter McL. Black, M.D. Ph.D.1 , David T. Gering, M.S.4 , Carl-Fredrik Westin, Ph.D3 , Vivek Mehta, M.D.1 , Richard S. Pergolizzi Jr., M, M.D., Ph.D.2 , William M. Wells III, Ph.D4 ., Ron Kikinis, M.D.3 , Ferenc A. Jolesz, M.D.3 1

  18. The Centre for Blood Research Jos Lpez, MD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strynadka, Natalie

    The Centre for Blood Research José López, MD Executive Vice-President of Research Puget Sound Blood for Blood Research Von Willebrand factor (VWF) is the largest protein in the blood and involved in both

  19. Why are MD simulated protein folding times wrong? Dmitry Nerukh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nerukh, Dmitry

    Why are MD simulated protein folding times wrong? Dmitry Nerukh Unilever Centre for Molecular.ac.uk The question of significant deviations of protein folding times simulated using molecular dynamics from

  20. Marlboro County, South Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther,JemezMissouri: Energy

  1. Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup The Upper Los Alamos Canyon Project involves cleaning up hazardous materials left over from some of the Laboratory's earliest activities. Contact...

  2. Einstein M.D. Program 20132014 applicant guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emmons, Scott

    Einstein M.D. Program 2013­2014 applicant guide O F Y E S H I V A U N I V E R S I T Y Albert Einstein College of Medicine #12;2 Welcome Explore how Einstein can give you the skills to develop, learning opportunities and experiences that create the unique educational environment at Einstein

  3. Einstein M.D. Program 20112012 applicant guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jenny, Andreas

    Einstein M.D. Program 2011­2012 applicant guide O F Y E S H I V A U N I V E R S I T Y Albert Einstein College of Medicine #12;2 Welcome Explore how Einstein can give you the skills to develop, learning opportunities and experiences that create the unique educational environment at Einstein

  4. LSUHSC NO Leadership Program Director, Augusto Ochoa, MD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D: Project 8 Yan Cui, PhD: COBRE Graduate Mentor Internal Advisory Committee Joseph Moerschbaecher, III: Jonna Ellis Promising Junior Investigators Project 2: Jovanny Zabaleta, PhD Project 3: Paulo Rodriguez, PhD Project 4: Timothy Foster, PhD Project 5: John Schieffelin, MD Tulane University Project 6

  5. Diabetes A Growing Epidemic Michael McKee, MD, MPH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Steven A.

    Diabetes ­ A Growing Epidemic Michael McKee, MD, MPH March 28, 2013 #12;Goals Diabetes Introduction Types of Diabetes Testing Prevention Treatments #12;In Memory of Benno Houver Bernd "Benno" Houver (1973-2013) #12;Diabetes Info 25.8 million people in the USA (8.3%) have diabetes ~25% of people with diabetes do

  6. End-to-End Rate-Distortion Optimized MD Mode Selection for Multiple Description Video Coding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apostolopoulos, John G.

    Multiple description (MD) video coding can be used to reduce the detrimental effects caused by transmission over lossy packet networks. A number of approaches have been proposed for MD coding, where each provides a different ...

  7. COMMISSION ON HEALTH SCIENCE, EDUCATION, AND P. Roy Vagelos, M.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xiaodong

    Johnson & Johnson Barbara Bell Coleman Chairperson Amelior Foundation Norman H. Edelman, M.D. Vice Princeton University Steven A. Schroeder, M.D. President and CEO The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Harold and Dentistry of New Jersey Samuel O. Thier, M.D. President and CEO Partners HealthCare System, Inc. #12

  8. Asbestos-related diseases in automobile mechanics Jacques Ameille, MD1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Asbestos-related diseases in automobile mechanics Jacques Ameille, MD1 , Nicole Rosenberg, MD2-related diseases in automobile mechanics Corresponding author Jacques Ameille, MD, Unité de pathologie plaques, automobile mechanics, HRCT inserm-00671970,version1-20Feb2012 Author manuscript, published

  9. Einstein M.D. Program 20142015 APPLICANT GUIDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emmons, Scott

    Einstein M.D. Program 2014­2015 APPLICANT GUIDE O F Y E S H I V A U N I V E R S I T Y Albert Einstein College of Medicine #12;2 Welcome Explore how Einstein can give you the skills to develop at Einstein. There are 183 students in the first- year class. 8,193 applicants applied for entrance and 1

  10. Microscopic dynamical description of proton-induced fission with the Constrained Molecular Dynamics (CoMD) Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Vonta; G. A. Souliotis; M. Veselsky; A. Bonasera

    2015-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The microscopic description of nuclear fission still remains a topic of intense basic research. Un- derstanding nuclear fission, apart from a theoretical point of view, is of practical importance for energy production and the transmutation of nuclear waste. In nuclear astrophysics, fission sets the upper limit to the nucleosynthesis of heavy elements via the r-process. In this work we initiated a systematic study of intermediate energy proton-induced fission using the Constrained Molecu- lar Dynamics (CoMD) code. The CoMD code implements an effective interaction with a nuclear matter compressibility of K=200 (soft EOS) with several forms of the density dependence of the nucleon-nucleon symmetry potential. Moreover, a constraint is imposed in the phase-space occu- pation for each nucleon restoring the Pauli principle at each time step of the collision. A proper choice of the surface parameter of the effective interaction has been made to describe fission. In this work, we present results of fission calculations for proton-induced reactions on : a) 232 Th at 27 and 63 MeV, b) 235 U at 10, 30, 60 and 100 MeV, and c) 238 U at 100 and 660 MeV. The calculated observables include fission-fragment mass distributions, total fission energies, neutron multiplicities and fission times. These observables are compared to available experimental data. We show that the microscopic CoMD code is able to describe the complicated many-body dynamics of the fission process at intermediate and high energy and give a reasonable estimate of the fission time scale. Sensitivity of the results to the density dependence of the nucleon symmetry potential (and, thus, the nuclear symmetry energy) is found. Further improvements of the code are necessary to achieve a satisfactory description of low energy fission in which shell effects play a dominant role.

  11. Brain-Computer Interfaces in Medicine Jerry J. Shih, MD; Dean J. Krusienski, PhD; and Jonathan R. Wolpaw, MD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nehorai, Arye

    Brain-Computer Interfaces in Medicine Jerry J. Shih, MD; Dean J. Krusienski, PhD; and Jonathan R. Wolpaw, MD Abstract Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) acquire brain signals, analyze them, and translate, electrocorticographic, and other brain signals for increasingly complex control of cursors, robotic arms, prostheses

  12. UC Davis-LLNL Scientific Advisory Committee Timothy Albertson, MD, PhD, Vice Chair, Internal Medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carmichael, Owen

    UC Davis-LLNL Scientific Advisory Committee Timothy Albertson, MD, PhD, Vice Chair, Internal Berglund, MD, PhD, CTSC Program Director Stuart Cohen, MD, Head of Infection Control, UCDMC Jeffrey Elias, PhD, Manager, Grant Coordination **Captain** Hernando Garzon, MD, Emergency Medicine, Kaiser Jeffrey

  13. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Johns Hopkins University - MD 02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizonaBuffaloJohns Hopkins University - MD 02 FUSRAP

  14. Draft Inventory Upper Snake Province

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Draft Inventory Upper Snake Province Submitted To The Northwest Power and Conservation Council Portland, Oregon Prepared by December 2004 #12;BOI043620012.DOC/KG ii Contents Section Page Inventory

  15. DFT-MD approach to TiO2/liquid interface systems for photocatalysis and dye-sensitised solar cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katsumoto, Shingo

    DFT-MD approach to TiO2/liquid interface systems for photocatalysis and dye-sensitised solar cell- namics (MD) analysis of TiO2/solution in- terfaces related to photocatalysis and dye- sensitized solar

  16. Name Role Contact Thomas G Keens, M.D., C.I.P. Chair, Committee on Clinical Investigations tkeens@chla.usc.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valero-Cuevas, Francisco

    @chla.usc.edu (323) 3612265 Alan B. Lewis, M.D. Vice Chair, Committee on Clinical Investigations alewis Deirdre Anglin, MD ViceChair, IRB Email: anglin@usc.edu Phone: (323) 2232340 Robert Larsen, MD Vice

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Cummins MD & HD Accessory Hybridization CRADA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Cummins MD &...

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Cummins MD & HD Accessory Hybridization CRADA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Cummins MD &...

  19. Andrea E. Reid, M.D., M.P.H. INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodrich, Lisa V.

    to practice State: District of Columbia License No: MD038392 Initial Date: 01/01/2011 Renewal/Expiration Date Providence, RI 02912 9/1980-6/1984 ScB with Honors, Psychology Medical Education: Harvard Medical School 25

  20. Intelligent Mobile Health Monitoring System (IMHMS) Rifat Shahriyar, Md. Faizul Bari, Gourab Kundu, Sheikh Iqbal Ahamed,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boutaba, Raouf

    , Sheikh Iqbal Ahamed, Md. Mostofa Akbar Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Bangladesh.com, sheikh.ahamed@mu.edu, mostofa@cse.buet.ac.bd Abstract. Health monitoring is repeatedly mentioned as one

  1. Catharine Whiteside, MD PhD Vice Provost, Relations with Health Care Institutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zandstra, Peter W.

    Catharine Whiteside, MD PhD Dean Vice Provost, Relations with Health Care Institutions Office. Professor Andrews received her PhD from the University of Toronto and completed further training

  2. PuReMD-GPU: A reactive molecular dynamics simulation package for GPUs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kylasa, S.B., E-mail: skylasa@purdue.edu [Department of Elec. and Comp. Eng., Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Aktulga, H.M., E-mail: hmaktulga@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Rd, MS 50F-1650, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Grama, A.Y., E-mail: ayg@cs.purdue.edu [Department of Computer Science, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an efficient and highly accurate GP-GPU implementation of our community code, PuReMD, for reactive molecular dynamics simulations using the ReaxFF force field. PuReMD and its incorporation into LAMMPS (Reax/C) is used by a large number of research groups worldwide for simulating diverse systems ranging from biomembranes to explosives (RDX) at atomistic level of detail. The sub-femtosecond time-steps associated with ReaxFF strongly motivate significant improvements to per-timestep simulation time through effective use of GPUs. This paper presents, in detail, the design and implementation of PuReMD-GPU, which enables ReaxFF simulations on GPUs, as well as various performance optimization techniques we developed to obtain high performance on state-of-the-art hardware. Comprehensive experiments on model systems (bulk water and amorphous silica) are presented to quantify the performance improvements achieved by PuReMD-GPU and to verify its accuracy. In particular, our experiments show up to 16× improvement in runtime compared to our highly optimized CPU-only single-core ReaxFF implementation. PuReMD-GPU is a unique production code, and is currently available on request from the authors.

  3. Extending the Upper Temperature Limit for Life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    ) un- der N2-CO2 (80:20) in sealed culture tubes that con- tained formate (10 mM) as the electron donor that permit strain 121 to grow at such high temperatures are unknown. It is gen- erally assumed that the upperExtending the Upper Temperature Limit for Life Kazem Kashefi and Derek R. Lovley* The upper

  4. Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrinceton PlasmaAfternoon TalksDigitalRevisionof EnergyUpper Los

  5. HIV-1 Tat membrane interactions probed using X-ray and neutron scattering, CD spectroscopy and MD simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagle, John F.

    HIV-1 Tat membrane interactions probed using X-ray and neutron scattering, CD spectroscopy and MD translocation, were provided by wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) and neutron scattering. CD spectroscopy for Neutron Research, 100 Bureau Drive, Stop 6102, Gaithersburg, MD 20899, United States d CHESS, Cornell

  6. California Health eQuality Advisory Committee Kenneth W. Kizer, M.D., M.P.H. -Chair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    States, Inc. Thomas Williams, Dr.P.H., M.B.A. President and Chief Executive Officer Integrated Healthcare. Scott, M.D., M.P.H., Ex officio Chief Medical Information Officer California Department of Health CareCalifornia Health eQuality Advisory Committee Kenneth W. Kizer, M.D., M.P.H. - Chair Distinguished

  7. MARYLAND BIOTECHNOLOGY CENTER JOINS HOPKINS, UNIVERSITY OF MD IN AWARDING 2013 BIOMARYLAND LIFE PRIZE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, David J.

    PRIZE $50,000 grants help further research, bring new discoveries to commercial market BALTIMORE, MD will use the funding to develop technology that will aid in the safer delivery of radiation therapy to continue his research on a safer way to deliver radiation therapy." "This is a fantastic opportunity

  8. HOPKINS, UNIVERSITY OF MD, BALTIMORE FACULTY RESEARCHERS WIN 2014 BIOMARYLAND LIFE PRIZES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, David J.

    ,000 grants help further research, bring new discoveries to commercial market BALTIMORE, MD (February 19, 2014 for her development of a blood test for the early detection of pancreatic cancer. #12;The LIFE prize the funding to develop technology that will aid in the safer delivery of radiation therapy. Previous winners

  9. Ira Helfand, MD International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    Ira Helfand, MD International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War Physicians for Social Responsibility NUCLEAR FAMINE: A BILLION PEOPLE AT RISK Global Impacts of Limited Nuclear War on Agriculture of studies have shown that a limited, regional nuclear war between India and Pakistan would cause significant

  10. Water adsorption on stepped ZnO surfaces from MD simulation David Raymand a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Water adsorption on stepped ZnO surfaces from MD simulation David Raymand a , Adri C.T. van Duin b Keywords: Zinc oxide Water Solid­gas interfaces Construction and use of effective interatomic interactions force-field for use in molecular dynamics simulations of the ZnO­ water system. The force

  11. Hot Water DJ: Saving Energy by Pre-mixing Hot Water Md Anindya Prodhan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitehouse, Kamin

    Hot Water DJ: Saving Energy by Pre-mixing Hot Water Md Anindya Prodhan Department of Computer University of Virginia whitehouse@virginia.edu Abstract After space heating and cooling, water heating consumption. Current water heating systems waste up to 20% of their energy due to poor insulation in pipes

  12. Corbicula Active (ABM) Biomonitoring and Passive (POM) Chlordane Monitoring in the Anacostia River Watershed (MD).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District of Columbia, University of the

    in the Anacostia River Watershed (MD). Final Report to the DC Water Resources Research Center Dr. Harriette L hydrocarbons (PAHs), 28 polychlorinated biphenyl congeners (PCBs), 6 Aroclors, 21 pesticides, and five metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb) plus technical chlordane, percent water and percent lipid. This ABM study

  13. CityBizList US Green Building Council -MD Celebrating Move to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CityBizList US Green Building Council - MD Celebrating Move to Hunt Valley Share Email this Article Baltimore County Executive Jim Smith will join the U.S. Green Building Council Maryland to celebrate Horst, Senior Vice President, U.S. Green Building Council. Horst has served as chair of USGBC's LEED

  14. Vendor Location PHS Assurance# A&G Pharmaceutical, Inc. MD A4404-01

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    BioScience Labs MD A3467-01 Alpha Genesis, Inc. SC A3645-01 Antibody Research Corporation MO A4489. On the BPA Program website open the current 'BPA Commodity List' and use the 'animal services', 'biological materials' or 'blood/blood products' tabs to search for these vendors. If a vendor is listed, the purchaser

  15. A coupled RISM/MD or MC simulation methodology for solvation free energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truong, Thanh N.

    A coupled RISM/MD or MC simulation methodology for solvation free energies Holly Freedman, Thanh N methods for determination of solvation free energies. We employ the RISM formulation of solvation free-netted chain equations. We apply this approach to determining free energies of solvation for several small

  16. Limbic System Page 1 of 10 Srdjan D. Antic, M.D. Limbic system Emotional Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    function. NMDA-dependent long-term potentiation is a cellular mechanism responsible for fear conditioning.M. is the most studied patient with Urbach-Wiethe disease. After a battery of tests, which included spiders Srdjan D. Antic, M.D. 3 as well as an appetitive (positive) conditioning. Individuals with larger

  17. The Centre for Blood Research Athan Kuliopulos, MD, PhD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strynadka, Natalie

    The Centre for Blood Research Athan Kuliopulos, MD, PhD Director, Hemostasis & Thrombosis coating blood vessel walls rupture and expose collagen, platelets spring into action to form a blood clot, according to the researchers. Compared to other diseases, blood clotting has been very well understood

  18. Advanced age remains an Achilles heel for liver resections. Laurent Sulpice, MD1,3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and Karim Boudjema, MD, PhD1,3 1- Service de Chirurgie Hépatobiliaire et Digestive. Centre Hospitalier, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Université de Rennes 1, Rennes, France Email : laurent in surgical techniques, perioperative management and postoperative care, LR has become increasingly common

  19. EMC/FDTD/MD FOR MULTIPHYSICS CHARACTERIZATION OF SEMICONDUCTORS AT THZ FREQUENCIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knezevic, Irena

    EMC/FDTD/MD FOR MULTIPHYSICS CHARACTERIZATION OF SEMICONDUCTORS AT THZ FREQUENCIES by Keely Willis.1 Ensemble Monte Carlo (EMC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 2.2 Finite difference) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 3 EMC/FDTD for 2D analysis of materials with low carrier density . . . . . . . . . 22 3.1 EMC

  20. A survey on vehicular cloud computing Md Whaiduzzaman a,n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melbourne, University of

    A survey on vehicular cloud computing Md Whaiduzzaman a,n , Mehdi Sookhak a , Abdullah Gani a , Rajkumar Buyya b a Mobile Cloud Computing Research Lab, Faculty of Computer Science & Information control Intelligent transportation systems Cloud computing Vehicular cloud computing a b s t r a c

  1. Five-Year MD Enrichment Program Application/Plan University of Connecticut School of Medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Five-Year MD Enrichment Program Application/Plan University of Connecticut School of Medicine Full_________________________________ Proposed graduation date_________________________ Outline of enrichment plan: (specify date)____________ Please detail on a month-to- month basis your enrichment program (Be specific): Academic Year

  2. Biological Survey of the Upper Purgatoire Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biological Survey of the Upper Purgatoire Watershed Las Animas County, CO John Carney Colorado ...............................................................................................................9 Management Urgency Ranks ........................................................................................................10 POTENTIAL CONSERVATION SITE PLANNING BOUNDARIES........................................12 Off

  3. Upper Cumberland EMC- Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Upper Cumberland Electric Membership Corporation (UCEMC), in collaboration with the Tennessee Valley Authority, offers incentives for its customers to purchase and install energy efficient...

  4. MD 715

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:Administration SandiaAdministration NewsAdministrator6 Page. S

  5. area upper engadine: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Niles; Adam Pease 2001-01-01 18 An Upper Bound on Overflow Probability in Transient Source Systems Engineering Websites Summary: An Upper Bound on Overflow Probability in...

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Max Zuckerman and Sons Inc - MD 04

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizonaBuffaloJohns0-04Maryland DisposalInc - MD

  7. Upper Snake Provincial Assessment May 2004 APPENDIX 4-1--UPPER SNAKE PROVINCE PROJECT INVENTORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Upper Snake Provincial Assessment May 2004 1 APPENDIX 4-1--UPPER SNAKE PROVINCE PROJECT INVENTORY The purpose of the project inventory is to provide a generalized picture of the types of fish and wildlife team participants through the project inventory website or through direct submission. Additional

  8. Diagenesis of the sandflat and mudflat facies of the upper Queen Formation, Midland basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mckone, C.J.; Malicse, A.; Mazzullo, J.M. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station (United States))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The upper Queen Formation (Permian, Guadalupian) of the Midland basin, Texas, consists of cyclically interbedded clastics and evaporites that were deposited in a fluvial-dominated continental sabkha environment. Fluvial sandflat deposits, consisting of thin units (0.2-5.0 m) of very fine grained arkosic sandstones constitute reservoir horizons, whereas 0.1-1.3 m thick units of coarse siltstones and evaporites of playa-mudflat deposits are nonproductive. This study addresses the diagenetic histories of the reservoir and nonreservoir clastics. The primary porosity of the clastics was first reduced by pore-filling hematitic smectite clay, anhydrite, and dolomite during an early diagenetic phase. Subsequent dissolution of the anhydrite and dolomite by acidic pore-waters created high porosities (mean = 15%) and permeabilities (mean = 70 md) in the sandflat deposits, porosities which were only slightly occluded by later dissolution and reprecipitation of grain-lining smectite. Pore-water movement and subsequent hydrocarbon migration were both controlled by the coarser grain size and lower clay-matrix and silt content of these sandflat deposits. In contrast, the finer grain size and higher clay-matrix and silt content prevented similar dissolution of cements within the mudflat facies, which have significantly lower porosities (mean{lt}10%) and permeabilities (mean{lt}0.1 md). Fluids and gases used in enhanced recovery techniques will follow pathways created by dissolution of anhydrite and dolomite cements within the sandflat facies. However, caution must be used with fluids that can cause swelling of the grain-lining smectite.

  9. Upper Mahiao Binary GEPP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtleCooperativeCROSS-VALIDATION OF SWERA'sUpperUpperMahiao

  10. The Upper Atmosphere of HD17156b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. T. Koskinen; A. D. Aylward; S. Miller

    2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    HD17156b is a newly-found transiting extrasolar giant planet (EGP) that orbits its G-type host star in a highly eccentric orbit (e~0.67) with an orbital semi-major axis of 0.16 AU. Its period, 21.2 Earth days, is the longest among the known transiting planets. The atmosphere of the planet undergoes a 27-fold variation in stellar irradiation during each orbit, making it an interesting subject for atmospheric modelling. We have used a three-dimensional model of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere for extrasolar gas giants in order to simulate the progress of HD17156b along its eccentric orbit. Here we present the results of these simulations and discuss the stability, circulation, and composition in its upper atmosphere. Contrary to the well-known transiting planet HD209458b, we find that the atmosphere of HD17156b is unlikely to escape hydrodynamically at any point along the orbit, even if the upper atmosphere is almost entirely composed of atomic hydrogen and H+, and infrared cooling by H3+ ions is negligible. The nature of the upper atmosphere is sensitive to to the composition of the thermosphere, and in particular to the mixing ratio of H2, as the availability of H2 regulates radiative cooling. In light of different simulations we make specific predictions about the thermosphere-ionosphere system of HD17156b that can potentially be verified by observations.

  11. Upper bounds for Steklov eigenvalues on surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girouard, Alexandre

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We give explicit isoperimetric upper bounds for all Steklov eigenvalues of a compact orientable surface with boundary, in terms of the genus, the length of the boundary, and the number of boundary components. Our estimates generalize a recent result of Fraser-Schoen, as well as the classical inequalites obtained by Hersch-Payne-Schiffer, whose approach is used in the present paper.

  12. POSTGRADUATE Upper Level, Otto Beit Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarrett, Thomas H.

    FUNDING YOUR POSTGRADUATE STUDIES AT UCT Upper Level, Otto Beit Building University Avenue North, the Postgraduate Funding Office and Postgraduate Centre were established at the University of Cape Town to provide apply for funding from both the University and from as many other sources of support as possible

  13. Draft Management Plan Upper Snake Province

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .......................................................................................4-5 Consistency with Idaho's Water Quality Management Plan...........................4-5 303(dDraft Management Plan Upper Snake Province Submitted To The Northwest Power and Conservation Quality Anti-Degradation Policy (39-3603) ............................................4-8 ESA and CWA

  14. Pattern Alteration: Upper Arm Sleeve Width

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    in the upper arm are unbecoming and may form excess vertical folds (Fig. 2). The Personal Measurement Chart (line 10) shows how much to alter. Figure 1. Tight sleeve Figure 2. Loose sleeve 2... ................................................................................................................................................................................. Figure 3. Tissue paper Figure 4. Sleeve Sleeve Figure 5. Sleeve Sleeve Figure 6. Figure 7. Sleeve Figure 8. Spread Lap Spread Lap Cut away Tissue Tissue Basic and raglan style garments 1. Trace the cutting line of the set-in sleeve cap on tissue...

  15. The evaluation within the development and deployment of IMS LD-based didactic materials: The MD2 + runtime adaptation approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The evaluation within the development and deployment of IMS LD-based didactic materials: The MD2 in the didactic materials creation since it allows developers to check if the features of created material satisfy]. They have been applied to asses IMS LD based didactic material in conjunction with the experience provided

  16. FRAppE: Detecting Malicious Facebook Applications Md Sazzadur Rahman, Ting-Kai Huang, Harsha V. Madhyastha, and Michalis Faloutsos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madhyastha, Harsha V.

    FRAppE: Detecting Malicious Facebook Applications Md Sazzadur Rahman, Ting-Kai Huang, Harsha V for the popularity and addictiveness of Facebook. Unfortu- nately, hackers have realized the potential of using apps and campaigns. In this paper, we ask the question: given a Facebook application, can we determine

  17. Alamethicin in lipid bilayers: Combined use of X-ray scattering and MD simulations Jianjun Pan a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagle, John F.

    Alamethicin in lipid bilayers: Combined use of X-ray scattering and MD simulations Jianjun Pan of Biological Sciences, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA d Canadian Neutron Beam Centre:1PC with varying amounts of alamethicin (Alm). We combine the use of X-ray diffuse scattering

  18. Lung mast cells are a source of secreted phospholipases A2 Massimo Triggiani, MD, PhD,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelb, Michael

    Lung mast cells are a source of secreted phospholipases A2 Massimo Triggiani, MD, PhD,a Giorgio and to examine the expression and release of sPLA2s from primary human lung mast cells (HLMCs). Methods: sPLA2 of asthmatic patients. (J Allergy Clin Immunol 2009;124:558-65.) Key words: Lung mast cells, secreted

  19. Second Order Co-occurrence PMI for Determining the Semantic Similarity of Md. Aminul Islam and Diana Inkpen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inkpen, Diana

    Second Order Co-occurrence PMI for Determining the Semantic Similarity of Words Md. Aminul Islam for calculating the semantic similarity of two target words. Our method, called Second Order Co-occurrence PMI (SOC-PMI), uses Pointwise Mutual Information to sort lists of important neighbor words of the two

  20. Survival in Academy AwardWinning Actors and Actresses Donald A. Redelmeier, MD, and Sheldon M. Singh, BSc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Nancy

    Survival in Academy Award­Winning Actors and Actresses Donald A. Redelmeier, MD, and Sheldon M in status from winning an academy award is associated with long-term mortality among actors and actresses. Design: Retrospective cohort analysis. Setting: Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Participants

  1. Surface Tensions in NaCl-Water-Air Systems from MD Simulations Ranjit Bahadur, Lynn M. Russell,*, and Saman Alavi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Lynn

    Surface Tensions in NaCl-Water-Air Systems from MD Simulations Ranjit Bahadur, Lynn M. Russell, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6, Canada ReceiVed: July 9, 2007; In Final Form: July 30, 2007 Surface tensions to the surface tension, while the energy-integral and test area methods provide direct estimates. At 1 atm

  2. An Integrated Geophysical Analysis Of The Upper Crust Of The...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Of The Upper Crust Of The Southern Kenya Rift Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: An Integrated Geophysical Analysis Of The Upper...

  3. Upper internals arrangement for a pressurized water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singleton, Norman R; Altman, David A; Yu, Ching; Rex, James A; Forsyth, David R

    2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In a pressurized water reactor with all of the in-core instrumentation gaining access to the core through the reactor head, each fuel assembly in which the instrumentation is introduced is aligned with an upper internals instrumentation guide-way. In the elevations above the upper internals upper support assembly, the instrumentation is protected and aligned by upper mounted instrumentation columns that are part of the instrumentation guide-way and extend from the upper support assembly towards the reactor head in hue with a corresponding head penetration. The upper mounted instrumentation columns are supported laterally at one end by an upper guide tube and at the other end by the upper support plate.

  4. Sedimentary parameters of upper Barataria Bay, Louisiana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegert, Rudolf B

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SEDIMENTARY PARAMETERS OF UPPER BARATARIA BAY, LOUISIANA A Thesis Rudolf Bernhardt Siegert Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural snd Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the reGulremente for the d. agree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1961 Ma)or Sub)ect GeologP SEDYIKNTARY PARAI'ZTEHS OF DT'PBR BARATARIA BAY, LOUISIANA A Thesis By Rudolf Bernhardt Siegert Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of C 'tice Bea of Department or Student Advisor...

  5. Coupling MD Simulations and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy to Study Ions in Solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marcos, E. Sanchez; Beret, E. C.; Martinez, J. M.; Pappalardo, R. R. [University of Seville, Dept. of Physical Chemistry (Spain); Ayala, R.; Munoz-Paez, A. [University of Seville, CSIC-ICMSE. Dept. of Inorganic Chemistry (Spain)

    2007-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure of ionic solutions is a key-point in understanding physicochemical properties of electrolyte solutions. Among the reduced number of experimental techniques which can supply direct information on the ion environment, X-ray Absorption techniques (XAS) have gained importance during the last decades although they are not free of difficulties associated to the data analysis leading to provide reliable structures. Computer simulations of ions in solution is a theoretical alternative to provide information on the solvation structure. Thus, the use of computational chemistry can increase the understanding of these systems although an accurate description of ionic solvation phenomena represents nowadays a significant challenge to theoretical chemistry. We present: (a) the assignment of features in the XANES spectrum to well defined structural motif in the ion environment, (b) MD-based evaluation of EXAFS parameters used in the fitting procedure to make easier the structural resolution, and (c) the use of the agreement between experimental and simulated XANES spectra to help in the choice of a given intermolecular potential for Computer Simulations. Chemical problems examined are: (a) the identification of the second hydration shell in dilute aqueous solutions of highly-charged cations, such as Cr{sup 3+}, Rh{sup 3+}, Ir{sup 3+}, (b) the invisibility by XAS of certain structures characterized by Computer Simulations but exhibiting high dynamical behavior and (c) the solvation of Br{sup -} in acetonitrile.

  6. OxfordRoadOxfordRoadOxfordRoad UpperBrookStreetUpperBrookStreet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lane Platt Lane UpperLloydStreet HartLane Claremont Road Mauldeth RoadMauldeth Road West Albert Road Coupland Chapel 43. Roby URC 44. Quadria Jilamia Islamic Centre 45. Platt Lane Methodist Church 46. Holy Trinity, Platt Church of England 47. Platt Fields Park, open space with a lake. 48. Allen Hall 49. The Islah

  7. Kinetic energy deficit in the symmetric fission of /sup 259/Md. [Light particle emission in /sup 256/Fm fission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulet, E.K.; Wild, J.F.; Lougheed, R.W.; Baisden, P.A.; Dougan, R.J.; Mustafa, M.G.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fragment energies of about 725 coincidence events have now been observed in the spontaneous fission (SF) decay of 105-min /sup 259/Md since its discovery in 1977. The fission of /sup 259/Md is characterized by a symmetric mass distribution, similar to those of /sup 258/Fm and /sup 259/Fm, but with a broad total kinetic energy (anti TKE) distribution which peaks at about 195 MeV, in contrast to those of /sup 258/Fm and /sup 259/Fm, for which the anti TKE is about 240 MeV. This kinetic energy deficit, approx. 40 MeV, has been postulated to be due to the emission of hydrogen-like particles by /sup 259/Md at the scission point in a large fraction of the fissions, leaving the residual fissioning nucleus with 100 protons. The residual nucleus would then be able to divide into two ultrastable tin-like fission fragments, but with less kinetic energy than that observed in the SF of /sup 258/Fm and /sup 259/Fm, because of binding-energy losses and a reduction in the Coulomb repulsion of the major fragments. To test this hypothesis, counter-telescope experiments aimed at detecting and identifying these light particles were performed. In 439 SF events 3 + 3 protons of the appropriate energy were observed, too few to account for the kinetic energy deficit in the fission of /sup 259/Md. There seems to be no explanation for this problem within the framework of current fission theory. These results are discussed along with preliminary measurements of light-particle emission in the SF of /sup 256/Fm. 5 figures.

  8. Understanding nuclei in the upper sd - shell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkar, M. Saha; Bisoi, Abhijit; Ray, Sudatta [Nuclear Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700064 (India); Kshetri, Ritesh [Nuclear Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700064, India and Sidho-Kanho-Birsha University, Purulia - 723101 (India); Sarkar, S. [Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Shibpur, Howrah - 711103 (India)

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclei in the upper-sd shell usually exhibit characteristics of spherical single particle excitations. In the recent years, employment of sophisticated techniques of gamma spectroscopy has led to observation of high spin states of several nuclei near A ? 40. In a few of them multiparticle, multihole rotational states coexist with states of single particle nature. We have studied a few nuclei in this mass region experimentally, using various campaigns of the Indian National Gamma Array setup. We have compared and combined our empirical observations with the large-scale shell model results to interpret the structure of these nuclei. Indication of population of states of large deformation has been found in our data. This gives us an opportunity to investigate the interplay of single particle and collective degrees of freedom in this mass region.

  9. portal: Libraries and the Academy, Vol. 9, No. 2 (2009), pp. 273286. Copyright 2009 by The Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD 21218.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oakleaf, Megan

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by The Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD 21218. INFORMATION STANDARDS Guiding Questions the information literacy assessments that best fit their needs. #12;Guiding Questions forAssessing Information

  10. Crust and Upper Mantle P Wave Velocity Structure Beneath Valles...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Crust and Upper Mantle P Wave Velocity Structure Beneath Valles Caldera, New Mexico- Results from the Jemez Teleseismic Tomography Experiment Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  11. Upper crustal structure of an obliquely extending orogen, central...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    eastern California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Upper crustal structure of an obliquely extending orogen, central...

  12. Slump dominated upper slope reservoir facies, Intra Qua Iboe (Pliocene), Edop Field, offshore Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shanmugam, G. [Mobil Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (United States); Hermance, W.E.; Olaifa, J.O. [Mobil Producing Nigeria, Lagos (Nigeria)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An integration of sedimentologic and 3D seismic data provides a basis for unraveling complex depositional processes and sand distribution of the Intra Qua Iboe (IQI) reservoir (Pliocene), Edop Field, offshore Nigeria. Nearly 3,000 feet of conventional core was examined in interpreting slump/slide/debris flow, bottom current, turbidity current, pelagic/hemipelagic, wave and tide dominated facies. The IQI was deposited on an upper slope in close proximity to the shelf edge. Through time, as the shelf edge migrated seaward, deposition began with a turbidite channel dominated slope system (IQI 1 and 2) and progressed through a slump/debris flow dominated slope system (IQI 3, the principal reservoir) to a tide and wave dominated, collapsed shelf-edge deltaic system (IQI 4). Using seismic time slices and corresponding depositional facies in the core, a sandy {open_quotes}fairway{open_quotes} has been delineated in the IQI 3. Because of differences in stacking patterns of sandy and muddy slump intervals, seismic facies show: (1) both sheet-like and mounded external forms (geometries), and (2) parallel/continuous as well as chaotic/hummocky internal reflections. In wireline logs, slump facies exhibits blocky, coarsening-up, fining-up, and serrated motifs. In the absence of conventional core, slump facies may be misinterpreted and even miscorrelated because seismic facies and log motifs of slumps and debris flows tend to mimic properties of turbidite fan deposits. The slump dominated reservoir facies is composed of unconsolidated fine-grained sand. Thickness of individual units varies from 1 to 34 feet, but amalgamated intervals reach a thickness of up to 70 feet and apparently form connected sand bodies. Porosity commonly ranges from 20 to 35%. Horizontal permeability commonly ranges from 1,000 to 3,000 md.

  13. Upper bounds for multiphase composites in any dimension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luis Silvestre

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove a rigorous upper bound for the effective conductivity of an isotropic composite made of several isotropic components in any dimension. This upper bound coincides with the Hashin Shtrikman bound when the volume ratio of all phases but any two vanish.

  14. Statistical Confirmation of a Stellar Upper Mass Limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Oey; C. J. Clarke

    2005-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the expectation value for the maximum stellar mass (m_max) in an ensemble of N stars, as a function of the IMF upper-mass cutoff (m_up) and N. We statistically demonstrate that the upper IMF of the local massive star census observed thus far in the Milky Way and Magellanic Clouds clearly exhibits a universal upper mass cutoff around 120 - 200 M_sun for a Salpeter IMF, although the result is more ambiguous for a steeper IMF.

  15. Upper bounds on minimum distance of nonbinary quantum stabilizer codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Santosh

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The most popular class of quantum error correcting codes is stabilizer codes. Binary quantum stabilizer codes have been well studied, and Calderbank, Rains, Shor and Sloane (July 1998) have constructed a table of upper bounds on the minimum distance...

  16. Characterization of Sea Turtle Nesting on the Upper Texas Coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Christi Lynn

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Nearly annual record Kemp’s ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys kempii) nesting activity on the upper Texas coast (UTC; defined as beaches from Sabine Pass to Matagorda Peninsula), where scientifically verifiable nesting commenced in 2002, has occurred...

  17. Improvable upper bounds to the piezoelectric polaron ground state energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Soldatov

    2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    It was shown that an infinite sequence of improving non-increasing upper bounds to the ground state energy (GSE) of a slow-moving piezoeletric polaron can be devised.

  18. Hydrology and Glaciers in the Upper Indus Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Winston

    Examines the state of the science associated with the snow and ice hydrology in the Upper Indus Basin (IUB), reviewing the literature and data available on the present and projected role of glaciers, snow fields, and stream ...

  19. Floristic study of the Upper Frio River, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swihart, Theresa Irene

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Vascular plant collections and field data compiled during a one and a half year period for the upper Frio River, Texas, produced a flora that comprises 78 families, 223 genera and 319 species. Vascular plants were collected ...

  20. Recognition and delineation of Paleokarst zones by the use of wireline logs in the bitumen-saturated upper Devonian Grosmont formation of Northeastern Alberta, Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dembicki, E.A.; Machel, H.G. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Upper Devonian Grosmont Formation in northeastern Alberta, Canada, is a shallow-marine carbonate platform complex that was subaerially exposed for hundreds of millions of years between the Mississippian(?) and Cretaceous. During this lengthy exposure period, an extensive karst system developed that is characterized by an irregular erosional surface, meter-size (several feet) dissolution cavities, collapse breccias, sinkholes, paleosols, and fractures. The karsted Grosmont Formation, which contains giant reserves of bitumen, sub-crops beneath Cretaceous clastic sediments of the giant Athabasca tar sands deposit. The paleokarst in the Grosmont Formation can be recognized on wireline logs in relatively nonargillaceous carbonate intervals (<30 API units on the gamma-ray log) as excursions of the caliper log, off-scale neutron-density porosity readings, and severe cycle skipping of the acoustic log. The paleokarst is more prevalent in the upper units of the Grosmont Formation, and the effects of karstification decrease toward stratigraphically older and deeper units. The paleokarst usually occurs within 35 m (115 ft) of the erosional surface. The reservoir properties of the Grosmont Formation (e.g., thickness, porosity, permeability, and seal effectiveness) are significantly influenced by karstification. Depending upon the location, karstification has either benefited or degraded the reservoir characteristics. Benefits include porosity values greater than 40% (up to 100% in caverns) and permeability values of 30,000 md in severely fractured intervals. Detrimental reservoir characteristics include erosion, porosity and permeability reduction, and seal ineffectiveness.

  1. Geology, volcanology and geochemistry Drainage pattern and regional morphostructure at Melka Kunture (Upper Awash, Ethiopia) ........................83

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    at Melka Kunture (Upper Awash, Ethiopia) ........................83 Guillaume Bardin, Jean-Paul Raynal, Guy Kieffer Volcanic markers in coarse alluvium at Melka Kunture (Upper Awash, Ethiopia (Upper Awash, Ethiopia) ....................................................103 Gérard Poupeau, Guy

  2. acute non-variceal upper: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    upper layer model Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: Evaluation 65 Chapter 4 OSI Upper Layer Architecture and Model: Evaluation In this chapter the...

  3. Directions to the River's Edge Catering & Conference Center, Naval Air Station Patuxent River For mapping GPS program reference, Lexington Park, MD is the town just outside the base gates. Physical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    Rev 0310 Directions to the River's Edge Catering & Conference Center, Naval Air Station Patuxent. Physical address is 46870 Tate Road ­ Bldg 2815, Patuxent River, MD. 20670. REC&C (301) 342-6210. From River For mapping GPS program reference, Lexington Park, MD is the town just outside the base gates

  4. Advances in modeling gradual solar energetic particle events q Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanahuja, Blai

    Advances in modeling gradual solar energetic particle events q D. Lario * Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723, USA Received 19 October 2002; accepted 8 July 2005 Abstract Solar energetic particles pose one of the most serious hazards

  5. Upper tropospheric jet streams over North America during summer 1988

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landers, David Edward

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    UPPER TROPOSPHERIC JET STREAMS OVER NORTH AMERICA DURING SUMMER 1988 A Thesis by DAVID EDWARD LANDERS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfuillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1991 Ma j or Sub j ect: Meteorology UPPER TROPOSPHERIC JET STREAMS OVER NORTH AMERICA SUMMER 1988 A Thesis by DAVID EDWARD LANDERS Approved as to style and Content by: Dusan Djuric (Co-Chairman) James P. McGuirk (Co...

  6. Szlenk Index, Upper Estimates, and Embedding in Banach Spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Causey, Ryan Michael

    2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    and the topology of the space. But Enflo's famous example of a Banach space failing the approximation property [8] is also a Banach space failing to have either a Schauder basis or a finite dimensional decomposition. For this reason, one often wishes to determine... subsequential U upper tree estimates, then X embeds into Y . 8 (ii) If U, V are as in Theorem 1.2, then there exists a reflexive Banach space Z with FDD F satisfying subsequential V lower and subsequential U upper block estimates in Z such that if X ? REFL...

  7. Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtleCooperativeCROSS-VALIDATION OF SWERA'sUpperUpper Hot

  8. Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtleCooperativeCROSS-VALIDATION OF SWERA'sUpperUpper

  9. MODELING THE FATE AND TRANSPORT OF ATRAZINE IN THE UPPER CHESAPEAKE BAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frei, Allan

    for agrochemicals in the Upper Chesapeake Bay. Keywords: Chesapeake Bay, hydrodynamic model, atrazine, photolysis

  10. Upper Oceanic Energy Response to Tropical Cyclone Passage JOHN A. KNAFF AND MARK DEMARIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubert, Wayne H.

    Upper Oceanic Energy Response to Tropical Cyclone Passage JOHN A. KNAFF AND MARK DEMARIA NOAA is investigated using a 6-yr daily record of data-driven analyses of two measures of upper ocean energy content information and the upper ocean response. Upper oceanic energy decreases in these metrics are shown to persist

  11. Upper Snake Provincial Assessment May 2004 6. Participants and Affiliations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the Upper Snake Provincial Assessment Idaho Department of Fish and Game: Gregg Servheen Jon Beals Lance Chad Colter Shoshone-Bannock Tribes Larry Dickerson US Fish and Wildlife Service John Fred Shoshone-Bannock Tribes Jim Fredericks Idaho Fish and Game Dan Garren Idaho Fish and Game Lauri Hanauska-Brown Idaho Fish

  12. Transdichotomous algorithms without multiplication some upper and lower bounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brodnik, Andrej "Andy"

    Trans­dichotomous algorithms without multiplication ­ some upper and lower bounds Andrej Brodnik 1 that on a RAM with addition, subtraction, bitwise Boolean operations and shifts, but no multiplication; 1g w of w­bit bit strings (or numbers between 0 and 2 w \\Gamma 1). An increasingly popular

  13. Upper Midwest Food, Fuel and Fiber Network Tour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2nd Annual Upper Midwest Food, Fuel and Fiber Network Tour Aug. 31 ­ Sept. 2, 2010 #12;Tuesday Dept. of Ag & Biological Engineering 9:30 a.m. Horizon Wind Energy Farm ­ (Construction vs. Finished Phases) http://www.horizonwind.com/home/ Gary Freymiller, WISER & Peter Park, Horizon Wind Energy 11:00 a

  14. Tracking and Modifying Upper-body Human Motion Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zordan, Victor

    of humanlike characters affect the believability, aesthetic, and impact of an animation or virtual environment the dynamics of the animated character. Figure 1 shows a human actor and two animated characters tracking hisTracking and Modifying Upper-body Human Motion Data with Dynamic Simulation Victor B. Zordan

  15. Upper Limits from Counting Experiments with Multiple Pipelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick J. Sutton

    2010-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In counting experiments, one can set an upper limit on the rate of a Poisson process based on a count of the number of events observed due to the process. In some experiments, one makes several counts of the number of events, using different instruments, different event detection algorithms, or observations over multiple time intervals. We demonstrate how to generalize the classical frequentist upper limit calculation to the case where multiple counts of events are made over one or more time intervals using several (not necessarily independent) procedures. We show how different choices of the rank ordering of possible outcomes in the space of counts correspond to applying different levels of significance to the various measurements. We propose an ordering that is matched to the sensitivity of the different measurement procedures and show that in typical cases it gives stronger upper limits than other choices. As an example, we show how this method can be applied to searches for gravitational-wave bursts, where multiple burst-detection algorithms analyse the same data set, and demonstrate how a single combined upper limit can be set on the gravitational-wave burst rate.

  16. Detection of upper mantle flow associated with the African Superplume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrad, Clint

    with warm, less dense material, the African seismic anomaly has been ascribed to a long-lived thermal upwelling from the lower mantle. Such a large-scale upwelling should also affect the regional horizontal flow field in the upper mantle. To test this model, we compare seismic anisotropy inferred from shear-wave

  17. Architecture of the upper Sego Sandstone, Book Cliffs, Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkhead, Stanley Scott

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    ................................................................................................................... 22 SEDIMENTOLOGY.................................................................................................... 26 Marine Shale with Wavy Sandstones............................................................... 26 Highly... surfaces. The cross-section defines an 8.5 kilometer section that begins in Sego Canyon outside of Thompson Springs, Figure 12-Bedding diagram of major facies transitions with sedimentary logs overlain. SEDIMENTOLOGY Upper Sego Sandstone deposits can...

  18. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Acupuncture for Upper-Extremity Rehabilitation in Chronic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaechter, Judith D.

    , and improvement trends in UE motor function (P .09) and digit ROM (P .06). Conclusions: Based on ITT analyses, we Sham-Controlled Study Peter M. Wayne, PhD, David E. Krebs, PhD, Eric A. Macklin, PhD, Rosa Schnyer, Lic. Acupuncture for upper- extremity rehabilitation in chronic stroke: a randomized sham- controlled study. Arch

  19. Simulating Sustainability: Conjunctive Land and Water Management in the Upper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    a series of micro-basins that function similarly to a multi-reservoir river system for water management arrangements for water management, and integration of geospatial information into "sustainability scenariosSimulating Sustainability: Conjunctive Land and Water Management in the Upper Santa Cruz River

  20. Upper mantle flow beneath the Hangay dome, central Mongolia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Déverchère, Jacques

    Upper mantle flow beneath the Hangay dome, central Mongolia Acknowledgements This work, A., Amarjargal, S. and Déverchère, J., 2003. GPS measurements of crustal deformation in the Baikal-Mongolia., 2002. Mantle structure and rifting processes in the Baikal-Mongolia region: geophysical data

  1. LARGE ABUNDANCES OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN TITAN'S UPPER ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez-Puertas, M.; Funke, B.; Garcia-Comas, M. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (CSIC), E-18080 Granada (Spain); Dinelli, B. M. [ISAC-CNR, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Adriani, A.; D'Aversa, E. [IAPS-INAF, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Moriconi, M. L. [ISAC-CNR, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Boersma, C.; Allamandola, L. J., E-mail: puertas@iaa.es [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035-1000 (United States)

    2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we analyze the strong unidentified emission near 3.28 {mu}m in Titan's upper daytime atmosphere recently discovered by Dinelli et al. We have studied it by using the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), after absorbing UV solar radiation, are able to emit strongly near 3.3 {mu}m. By using current models for the redistribution of the absorbed UV energy, we have explained the observed spectral feature and have derived the vertical distribution of PAH abundances in Titan's upper atmosphere. PAHs have been found to be present in large concentrations, about (2-3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} particles cm{sup -3}. The identified PAHs have 9-96 carbons, with a concentration-weighted average of 34 carbons. The mean mass is {approx}430 u; the mean area is about 0.53 nm{sup 2}; they are formed by 10-11 rings on average, and about one-third of them contain nitrogen atoms. Recently, benzene together with light aromatic species as well as small concentrations of heavy positive and negative ions have been detected in Titan's upper atmosphere. We suggest that the large concentrations of PAHs found here are the neutral counterpart of those positive and negative ions, which hence supports the theory that the origin of Titan main haze layer is located in the upper atmosphere.

  2. Floristic study of the Upper Frio River, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swihart, Theresa Irene

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    of the floras of North Central Texas, Madison County, Robertson County and the La Copita Research Area. A total of 9 species endemic to Texas were collected along the upper Frio River. Throughout the northern portion of the study area there is exposed bedrock...

  3. Upper Bound on Fidelity of Classical Sagnac Gyroscope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas B. Bahder

    2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerous quantum mechanical schemes have been proposed that are intended to improve the sensitivity to rotation provided by the classical Sagnac effect in gyroscopes. A general metric is needed that can compare the performance of the new quantum systems with the classical systems. The fidelity (Shannon mutual information between the measurement and the rotation rate) is proposed as a metric that is capable of this comparison. A theoretical upper bound is derived for the fidelity of an ideal classical Sagnac gyroscope. This upper bound for the classical Sagnac gyroscope should be used as a benchmark to compare the performance of proposed enhanced classical and quantum rotation sensors. In fact, the fidelity is general enough to compare the quality of two different apparatuses (two different experiments) that attempt to measure the same quantity.

  4. Diversity in the upper management of leading Texas contractors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Anne Nicole

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commission the power to go to the courts for implementation of the laws. The 1972 act extended an individual's right to sue in private actions to the right to sue against state and local governments as well. Previously, in 1963, the Equal Pay Act of 1963..., prejudice plus power, and discrimination (2000). It is upper management's responsibility to ensure that their company is diversified. "CEOs must be proactive [in] initiating and taking on the challenges inherent in managing a diverse workforce" (Work...

  5. EIS-0408: Upper Great Plains Wind Energy Programmatic EIS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS, being prepared jointly by DOE's Western Area Power Administration and the Department of the Interior’s Fish and Wildlife Service, will evaluate the environmental impacts of wind energy development in Iowa, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota – Western’s Upper Great Plains customer service region. Western will use the EIS to implement a comprehensive regional program to manage interconnection requests for wind energy projects.

  6. High upper critical field in disordered niobium nitride superconductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baskaran, R., E-mail: baskaran@igcar.gov.in; Thanikai Arasu, A. V.; Amaladass, E. P.; Janawadkar, M. P. [Materials Science Group, IGCAR, Kalpakkam-603102 (India)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconducting Niobium Nitride thin films have been deposited on glass, aluminum nitride buffered glass, and oxidized silicon substrates by reactive DC magnetron sputtering at ambient substrate temperatures. The crystal structure of these thin films has been determined to be cubic fcc B1 structure by Glancing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction analysis. The superconducting transition temperatures of the thin films were measured to be greater than 11.6?K with a maximum of 13.4?K. The negative temperature coefficient of resistance observed in these thin films indicates the presence of disorder. Magneto-resistance measurements have been carried out on these thin films patterned into standard four probe geometry upto a maximum magnetic field of 12?T for two films and upto 15?T for the other two films. The dependence of transition temperature on the applied field is analyzed to estimate the upper critical field. The upper critical field for most of the films was estimated to exceed 35?T, while one of the most disordered films had an estimated upper critical field greater than 70?T.

  7. Cognitive Issues in Upper-Division Electricity & Magnetism Steven J. Pollock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    interventions ­at the upper division. Keywords: physics education research, course reform, electricityCognitive Issues in Upper-Division Electricity & Magnetism Steven J. Pollock and Stephanie V. Chasteen* * Science Education Initiative, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA Department

  8. Upper Adjoints for Fast Interprocedural Variable Markus MullerOlm 1 and Helmut Seidl 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller-Olm, Markus

    Upper Adjoints for Fast Inter­procedural Variable Equalities Markus MË?uller­Olm 1 and Helmut Seidl

  9. Training Session: Frederick, MD

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This 3.5-hour training provides builders with a comprehensive review of zero net-energy-ready home construction including the business case, detailed specifications, and opportunities to be...

  10. citation: Natio Hyattsville, MD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    Reform 75 Monitoring Health Care Reform: SelfReports of Health Insurance Premium Assistance & Program SESSION 1 SUMMARY 71 KAREN CYBULSKI, ANNE CIEMNECKI, AND KAREN BOGEN SESSION 2: Monitoring Health Care Survey 101 MARC W. ZODET, STEVEN C. HILL, AND SAMUEL H. ZUVEKAS The RWJF Health Care Public

  11. SECTION 34 Table of Contents 34 Upper Columbia Management Plan..............................................................2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and formation of the Subbasin Work Teams and the process used to develop and adopt the management plan can34-1 SECTION 34 ­ Table of Contents 34 Upper Columbia Management Plan .........................................................................25 #12;34-2 34 Upper Columbia Management Plan The Upper Columbia Subbasin Management Plan

  12. Upper Digestive Disorders Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee 02/2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    Upper Digestive Disorders Approved by the UHS Patient Education Committee 02/2012 Revised 02/08/12 Page 1 of 2 Upper Digestive Tract Anatomy Esophagus: A long muscular tube in the chest area occurs in the duodenum. Upper Digestive Disorders Reflux with Esophagitis: The flowing back (or reflux

  13. CHEMICAL AND HYDROLOGIC DATA FROM THE CEMENT CREEK AND UPPER ANIMAS RIVER CONFLUENCE AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHEMICAL AND HYDROLOGIC DATA FROM THE CEMENT CREEK AND UPPER ANIMAS RIVER CONFLUENCE AND MIXING.S. Geological Survey #12;CHEMICAL AND HYDROLOGIC DATA FROM THE CEMENT CREEK AND UPPER ANIMAS RIVER CONFLUENCE.H., Schemel, L.E., 2007, Chemical and hydrologic data form the Cement Creek and upper Animas River confluence

  14. Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Zhongping

    Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal waters in the upper ocean, the vertical distribution of solar radiation (ESR) in the shortwave domain plays (2005), Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal

  15. New code upper bounds from the Terwilliger algebra and semidefinite programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Alexander

    1 New code upper bounds from the Terwilliger algebra and semidefinite programming Alexander n and minimum distance at least d. It is based on block­diagonalising the Terwilliger alge­ bra, Terwilliger algebra, upper bounds. I. DESCRIPTION OF THE METHOD We present a new upper bound on A(n, d

  16. New code upper bounds from the Terwilliger algebra and semidefinite programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Alexander

    1 New code upper bounds from the Terwilliger algebra and semidefinite programming Alexander and minimum distance at least d. It is based on block-diagonalising the Terwilliger alge- bra of the Hamming, Terwilliger algebra, upper bounds. I. DESCRIPTION OF THE METHOD We present a new upper bound on A(n, d

  17. Testing upper motor neuron function in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: the most difficult

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooper, Robin L.

    Testing upper motor neuron function in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: the most difficult task of neurophysiology Clinical signs of upper motor neuron involvement are an essential observation to support the diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral scler- osis. However, clinical signs of upper motor neuron can be difficult

  18. Mima mound grasslands of the upper coastal prairie of Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, Arlene Camille

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    21 28 31 34 44 47 49 52 55 57 71 74 76 79 87 94 LlST OF TABLES Table Physical and chemical soil characteristics for topographic variations within 3 soil complexes of the upper Coastal Prairie, Texas Page 27 Average absolute... ~ ' ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ O O 8 z z O V) CO iU CC LU O D IZ 31 The landscape had less slope than on Aris-like stands. Intermounds on Crowley/Edna-like soils appear nearly level. Results of physical and chemical analysis were very similar to Aris-like soils...

  19. Biostratigraphy of the upper cretaceous Austin Group, Travis County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, William Maurice

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Formation is on the San Gabriel River at the Jonah-Hutto roadcrossing in Williamson County. At the type locality, the upper 35 feet of the Jonah is exposed; the lower 50 feet is exposed two-thirds of a mile upstream. 1he Jonah Formation ranges fr om 120... Forma- tion at Vinson Creek is 25 feet thick and the limestone beds are skeletal packstones. The thinning of the Jonah Formation is caused by the positive influence of the San Marcos Arch during deposition. 20 The contact between the Jonah Formation...

  20. Upper limits on stray force noise for LISA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Carbone; A. Cavalleri; R. Dolesi; C. D. Hoyle; M. Hueller; S. Vitale; W. J. Weber

    2003-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a torsion pendulum facility for LISA gravitational reference sensor ground testing that allows us to put significant upper limits on residual stray forces exerted by LISA-like position sensors on a representative test mass and to characterize specific sources of disturbances for LISA. We present here the details of the facility, the experimental procedures used to maximize its sensitivity, and the techniques used to characterize the pendulum itself that allowed us to reach a torque sensitivity below 20 fNm /sqrt{Hz} from 0.3 to 10 mHz. We also discuss the implications of the obtained results for LISA.

  1. Sandia Energy - Upper Rio Grande Simulation Model (URGSiM)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol Home DistributionTransportation Safety Home StationaryUpper Rio Grande

  2. Upper Arlington, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtleCooperativeCROSS-VALIDATION OF SWERA'sUpper Arlington,

  3. Upper Division Hot Spring Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtleCooperativeCROSS-VALIDATION OF SWERA'sUpper

  4. Upper bound on the cutoff in the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veselov, A I

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this presentation is to point out that the Upper bound on the cutoff in lattice Electroweak theory is still unknown. The consideration of the continuum theory is based on the perturbation expansion around trivial vacuum. The internal structure of the lattice Weinberg - Salam model may appear to be more complicated especially in the region of the phase diagram close to the phase transition between the physical Higgs phase and the unphysical symmetric phase of the lattice model, where the continuum physics is to be approached. We represent the results of our numerical investigation of the quenched model at infinite bare scalar self coupling $\\lambda$. These results demonstrate that at $\\lambda = \\infty$ the upper bound on the cutoff is around $\\frac{\\pi}{a} = 1.4$ Tev. The preliminary results for finite $\\lambda$ are also presented. Basing on these results we cannot yet make a definite conclusion on the maximal value of the cutoff admitted in the lattice model, although we have found that ...

  5. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 3): Patuxent River Naval Air Station, St. Mary`s County, MD, July 29, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The decision document presents the selected interim remedial action for Operable Unit 1 (OU1) of the Former Sanitary Landfill site, at the U.S. Naval Air Station Patuxent River, MD. The interim remedy will reduce the potential of human exposure to wastes remaining at the landfill, precipitation filtering through landfill waste, and the potential risk posed by inhalation and ingestion of contaminated surficial soil at the landfill. The interim action will allow for the continued investigation of the landfill while evaluating final remedial options for groundwater, surface water, and sediment at the site.

  6. Depositional environments of Pennsylvanian Upper Strawn Group in McCulloch and San Saba Counties, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamieson, W.H. Jr.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Upper Strawn Group (Desmoinesean) represents a transition to fluvial facies from progradational deltaic facies. The lower part of the upper Strawn is composed mostly of horizontally bedded, fine-grained sandstones and shales of a distal delta-front origin. These sandstones and shales exhibit foreset bed dips of up to 15/sup 0/. In addition to the dipping foreset beds, the delta-front facies on occasion contain small listric normal faults, resulting from periodic higher rates of sedimentation. The middle parts of the upper Strawn consist predominantly of massive, fine to medium-grained, mature sandstones which represent distributary-mouth-bar deposits, as well as other proximal delta-front deposits such as distributary channels. The upper part of the upper Strawn consists of fluvial trough cross-bedded sandstones and chert-pebble conglomerates. These overlie the deltaic facies and indicate the final stages of upper Strawn deposition. The upper Strawn is overlain by the Adams Branch limestone and shales which represent marine transgression and subsequent shallow-marine deposition. The upper Strawn Group in McCulloch and San Saba Counties, Texas, represents continued filling of the Fort Worth basin during Desmoinesean time. The upper Strawn overlies the lower Strawn, an older, deeper water facies, in most parts of the study area. The upper Strawn overlies the Atokan age Marble Falls Limestone in an isolated section of the study area due to its position there on the Concho arch.

  7. Free Energies of Dilute Bose gases: upper bound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun Yin

    2010-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive a upper bound on the free energy of a Bose gas system at density $\\rho$ and temperature $T$. In combination with the lower bound derived previously by Seiringer \\cite{RS1}, our result proves that in the low density limit, i.e., when $a^3\\rho\\ll 1$, where $a$ denotes the scattering length of the pair-interaction potential, the leading term of $\\Delta f$ the free energy difference per volume between interacting and ideal Bose gases is equal to $4\\pi a (2\\rho^2-[\\rho-\\rhoc]^2_+)$. Here, $\\rhoc(T)$ denotes the critical density for Bose-Einstein condensation (for the ideal gas), and $[\\cdot ]_+$ $=$ $\\max\\{\\cdot, 0\\}$ denotes the positive part.

  8. Possible Upper limits on Lorentz Factors in High Energy Astrophysical Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Sivaram; Kenath Arun

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma ray bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous physical phenomena in the universe. The relativistic effect on the blast wave associated with the GRB introduces the gamma factor. Here we put an upper limit on the gamma factor via constraints on maximal power allowed by general relativity and hence set upper limits on other observable quantities such as deceleration distance. Also upper limits are set on the high energy particle radiation due to constraints set by cosmic microwave background radiation.

  9. Klee-Minty's LP and Upper Bounds for Dantzig's Simplex Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomonari Kitahara

    2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Jan 4, 2011 ... Klee-Minty's LP and Upper Bounds for Dantzig's Simplex Method. Tomonari ... Citation: This article will appear in Operations Research Letters.

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - anisotropic upper critical Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    30 A two-dimensional hybrid method for modeling seismic wave propagation in anisotropic media Summary: upper mantle. We calculated the synthetics for a series of laterally...

  11. Stratigraphic cyclicity and reservoir heterogeneity within upper San Andres and Grayburg strata (upper Permian-Guadalupian), Maljamar field, Se New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modica, Christopher James

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of upper San Andres strata. Cavernous porosity was later plugged with massive anhydrite, resulting in the degradation of reservoir quality. In the overlying Grayburg Formation, cycles consist of mixed sandstone and shallowwater carbonate facies...

  12. Thermionic converters for an Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, W.G.; Horner-Richardson, K. [Thermacore, Inc., Lancaster, PA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) is a solar bimodal system which combines thermal propulsion and electric power generation in a single integrated system. A thermionic converter was designed and fabricated for the ISUS system. The ISUS thermionic energy converters differ from previous designs, due to the significant changes in operating temperature prior to and during an eclipse, with the emitter temperature increasing from 1,900 K to 2,200 K, and then back again. A complete thermal and electrical model was developed for a planar diode to determine optimum operating dimensions and parameters. The model includes an overall energy balance for the diode, and changes the interelectrode gap spacing due to thermal expansion of the parts as the emitter and/or collector temperatures change. Cesium pressure can be chosen from an external liquid reservoir, an integral reservoir using cesium intercalated into graphite attached to the collector heat pipe, or optimum cesium pressure. With optimum cesium pressure, the maximum efficiency increases from 14% to 16% as the emitter temperature increases from 1,900 K to 2,200 K. The improvement in efficiency is only 2% as the emitter temperature is increased. Optimum efficiency requires an external, actively controlled liquid reservoir.

  13. Bitumen accumulation in Grosmont platform complex, Upper Devonian, Alberta, Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffmann, C.F.; Strausz, O.P.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Upper Devonian Grosmont Formation, a broad carbonate platform complex in Alberta, Canada, contains an estimated 300 billion bbl of bitumen. It has been suggested that these vast reserves are related to Lower Cretaceous Athabasca oil sands. Detailed gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric studies of a wide range of biologic marker compounds confirm this suggestion. The Grosmont Formation contains bitumen of similar maturity and source to the Athabasca deposit, but it has been subjected to a greater degree of biodegradation and water washing, possibly as a result of its reservoir rock characteristics. The difference in the degree of biodegradation is manifested by the absence of bicyclic terpanes and by the reduced concentrations of the C/sub 30/ and the 22R epimers of the extended hopanes in the Grosmont bitumen. Also, the greater degree of water washing of the Grosmont bitumen is inferred from the observed distribution of the bicyclic, tricyclic, and tetracyclic terpenoid sulfides, which shows a characteristic loss of the lower molecular weight members in the carbonate bitumen. The correlation established here between the two deposits suggests that if the precursor oil has indeed undergone long-distance migration, the Paleozoic carbonates could have acted as a path for migration. Finally, the observed distribution of steranes in the Grosmont bitumen corresponds to the suggestion that the Mannville Group shales were not the major source rocks of the oil-sand and carbonate bitumen accumulations of northern Alberta. 11 figures, 6 tables.

  14. Upper Jurassic depositional systems and hydrocarbon potential of southeast Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meendsen, F.C.; Moore, C.H.; Heydari, E.; Sassen, R.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Upper Jurassic sedimentation in southeast Mississippi was controlled by eustatic sea level fluctuations and locally modified by salt tectonism and basement structure. This study, using conventional core data and geophysical logs, indicates that a stable carbonate platform developed along the updip margin of the Mississippi interior salt basin. The basin was partially barred from the main Gulf of Mexico water mass by the Wiggins uplift, and became evaporitic during the Late Jurassic. Moldic, intercrystalline, and vuggy dolomite porosity is developed on the crests of intermediate and high-amplitude salt highs and on the Wiggins uplift. Jurassic source rocks are lower Smackover laminated lime mudstones. Migration into adjacent reservoirs postdated formation of porosity and the growth of salt anticlines, the most common trap type. A large potential Norphlet-Smackover gas play extends along the southern flank of the Wiggins uplift. Salt anticlines within the interior basin remain viable targets. Small oil discoveries should continue in stratigraphic traps, subtle salt structures, and basement blocks on the platform.

  15. Opportunistic Routing in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks: Upper Bounds for the Packet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mans, Bernard

    routing, in a realistic network model where link conditions are variable. We analyze the performance1 Opportunistic Routing in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks: Upper Bounds for the Packet Propagation Speed to the destination. In this paper, we provide upper bounds on the packet propaga- tion speed for opportunistic

  16. Effects of ozone cooling in the tropical lower stratosphere and upper troposphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effects of ozone cooling in the tropical lower stratosphere and upper troposphere Piers M. Forster lower stratosphere and upper troposphere and elucidate the key role of ozone changes in driving of tropical ozone decreases at 70 hPa and lower pressures can lead to significant cooling not only

  17. Global empirical wind model for the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere. I. Prevailing wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Global empirical wind model for the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere. I. Prevailing wind Y. I. An updated empirical climatic zonally aver- aged prevailing wind model for the upper mesosphere/ lower of monthly mean winds from meteor radar and MF radar measurements at more than 40 stations, well distributed

  18. Mechanisms of summertime upper Arctic Ocean warming and the effect on sea ice melt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    but occurs over a much broader area of the ice pack. Citation: Steele, M., J. Zhang, and W. Ermold (2010Mechanisms of summertime upper Arctic Ocean warming and the effect on sea ice melt Michael Steele,1 summertime upper ocean warming and sea ice melt during the 21st century in the Arctic Ocean. Our first

  19. Observations on student difficulties with mathematics in upper-division electricity and magnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Observations on student difficulties with mathematics in upper-division electricity and magnetism Rachel E. Pepper, Stephanie V. Chasteen, Steven J. Pollock, and Katherine K. Perkins Science Education 2011; published 27 March 2012) We discuss common difficulties in upper-division electricity

  20. Earth Planets Space, 64, 113120, 2012 Upper ionosphere of Mars is not axially symmetrical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    Earth Planets Space, 64, 113­120, 2012 Upper ionosphere of Mars is not axially symmetrical E to the ionosphere providing momentum and energy transfer to the upper layers of the ionospheric plasma. While dependence rather closely follow the Chapman model (Gurnett et al., 2008; Morgan et al., 2008; Withers, 2009

  1. Variation of the Thermohaline Structure in the Western Equatorial Pacific Upper Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    Variation of the Thermohaline Structure in the Western Equatorial Pacific Upper Ocean;Abstract Processes which control the upper ocean thermohaline structure in the western equa- torial Pacific forcing data have indicated that the thick isothermal layer in the western equatorial Pacific is found

  2. Reduced Order Modeling of the Upper Tropical Pacific Ocean Model Using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluffi, Paolo

    Reduced Order Modeling of the Upper Tropical Pacific Ocean Model Using Proper Orthogonal of a large-scale upper ocean circulation in the tropic Pacific domain. We construct different POD models-scale seasonal variability of the tropic Pacific obtained by the original model is well captured by a low

  3. Studio optics: Adapting interactive engagement pedagogy to upper-division physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zollman, Dean

    Studio optics: Adapting interactive engagement pedagogy to upper-division physics Christopher M describe the development and implementation of a Studio Optics course for upper-division physics majors course in optics at the junior-senior and first year graduate student level that incorporates the methods

  4. Impacts of Land Management on Agroecosystem Carbon Fluxes in the Upper Midwest, United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Impacts of Land Management on Agroecosystem Carbon Fluxes in the Upper Midwest, United States Investigators: T.J. Griffis and J.M. Baker Funding Source: United States Department of Energy, Office-soybean rotation systems located in the Upper Midwest. The management strategies will include: 1) Conventional corn

  5. Upper mantle structure beneath the Caribbean-South American plate boundary from surface wave tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Fenglin

    Upper mantle structure beneath the Caribbean-South American plate boundary from surface wave velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle of the Caribbean-South American boundary region American continental lithosphere, the Venezuelan archipelago, and the Caribbean oceanic lithosphere

  6. Simulations of water isotope abundances in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere and implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gettelman, Andrew

    fractionation processes. The results indicate that water substance in the upper troposphere does not follow a Rayleigh distillation model due to the presence of condensed phase water. Stratospheric abundances and climate of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS). It is broadly known that most of the air

  7. Cooperator Report: Habitat Requirements of Steelhead in the Upper Salinas River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Lisa C.

    Cooperator Report: Habitat Requirements of Steelhead in the Upper Salinas River Watershed Jenna L the abundance, distribution, and habitat requirements of steelhead in the upper Salinas River watershed. We, and reproduce (Thompson & Larsen 2004). The Salinas River and its tributaries have been designated

  8. PID Admittance Control for an Upper Limb Exoskeleton Wen Yu, Jacob Rosen, Xiaoou Li

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Jacob

    PID Admittance Control for an Upper Limb Exoskeleton Wen Yu, Jacob Rosen, Xiaoou Li Abstract PID control. Three force sensors in the upper-level send desired trajectories to the lower, a model-free PID type admittance control is applied, whose parameters can be designed by human impedance

  9. FLUCTUATION IN TRAP-NET CATCHES IN THE UPPER MISSISSIPPI RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FLUCTUATION IN TRAP-NET CATCHES IN THE UPPER MISSISSIPPI RIVER if; Marine Biological LabofdiuryKay, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Albert M. Day, Director FLUCTUATION IN TRAP NET CATCHES IN THE UPPER Gear used 3 Methods 5 Statistical considerations 5 Season trends in catch of trap nets 6 Black crappie

  10. viscosity in the upper mantle, the result of an ancient, failed rift in the region.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, David A.

    penetration in the upper ocean, and can be related to phy- toplankton abundance. Along with measure- ments biomass is a crucial measure of the health of ocean ecosystems. An impressive synthesis of the relevant of the upper-ocean concentration of chlorophyll, which is found in all phytoplank- ton, Secchi-disk depths

  11. Upper mantle flow beneath and around the Hangay dome, Central Mongolia Guilhem Barruol a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Déverchère, Jacques

    Upper mantle flow beneath and around the Hangay dome, Central Mongolia Guilhem Barruol a, , Anne Academy of Sciences (RCAG), P.O. Box 51, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f o-wave splitting upper mantle Mongolia Hangay dome Siberian craton Bogd fault Mongolia represents the northernmost

  12. MODELLING GROUNDWATER FLOW ON THE REGIONAL SCALE IN THE UPPER DANUBE CATCHMENT (GERMANY)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    MODELLING GROUNDWATER FLOW ON THE REGIONAL SCALE IN THE UPPER DANUBE CATCHMENT (GERMANY) Roland.barthel@iws.uni-stuttgart.de Abstract. A groundwater flow model for the Upper Danube catchment (A=77,000km2 at gauge Passau, Germany coupled models. Modelling of groundwater flow, using coupled deterministic and hydrological approaches

  13. GAISUS-1 thermionic converter for the integrated solar upper stage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Begg, L.L.; Heffernan, T.F.; Horner, M.H. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) system is a compact orbital transfer vehicle which generates thrust to boost payloads from LEO to higher orbits. It does this by collecting and concentrating solar flux into a sensible thermal storage, graphite receiver which is used to heat hydrogen propellant to temperatures of up to 2500 K. The ISUS receiver also radiates heat into an array of thermionic converters which produce electrical power. The GAISUS-1 thermionic converter is a first generation planar converter designed to produce electrical power when coupled with the ISUS receiver. GAISUS-1 will deliver over 31 W{sub e} at 1900 K. A wrought Re hotshoe accepts radiant heat from the receiver. The back side of the hotshoe forms the emitting surface of the converter. Special attention was paid to optimize the electrical and thermal losses experienced through the sleeve. Triple and single sleeve geometries were thermally modeled and evaluated, resulting in the selection of a single sleeve design. A high temperature metal/ceramic seal isolates the emitter sleeve from the collector. A Nb collector is used and is an integral part of a Nb/Na heat pipe. The heat pipe transports reject heat from the collector surface to a thermal radiator (condenser) portion of the heat pipe. The converter utilizes an integral graphite Cs reservoir. This type of reservoir automatically produces a rise in Cs pressure in response to a rise in emitter/collector temperatures. This Cs pressure feedback mechanism insures adequate Cs coverage of the emitter over a broad range of operating conditions (temperatures).

  14. Evaluating Radiative Closure in the Middle-to-Upper Troposhere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin, David C; Turner, David D; Knuteson, Robert O

    2013-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This project had two general objectives. The first is the characterization and improvement of the radiative transfer parameterization in strongly absorbing water vapor bands, as these strongly absorbing bands dictate the clear sky radiative heating rate. The second is the characterization and improvement of the radiative transfer in cirrus clouds, with emphasis on ensuring that the parameterization of the radiative transfer is consistent and accurate across the spectrum. Both of these objectives are important for understanding the radiative processes in the mid-to-upper troposphere. The research on this project primarily involved analysis of data from the First and Second Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaigns, RHUBC-I and II. This included a climate model sensitivity study using results from RHUBC-I. The RHUBC experiments are ARM-funded activities that directly address the objectives of this research project. A secondary effort was also conducted that investigated the trends in the long-term (~14 year) dataset collected by the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) at the ARM Southern Great Plains site. This work, which was primarily done by a post-doc at the University of Wisconsin �������¢���������������� Madison under Dr. Turner�������¢����������������s direction, uses the only NIST-traceable instrument at the ARM site that has a well-documented calibration and uncertainty performance to investigate long-term trends in the downwelling longwave radiance above this site.

  15. Stratigraphy of Smackover formation (Upper Jurassic), Southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrett, M.L.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The modeled eustatic sea level rise during Smackover deposition is recorded in rocks along the Wiggins Arch--Conecuh Ridge areas of the Manila embayment as a ''large-scale'' transgressive-regressive carbonate package. Transgression of Smackover carbonates in the Conecuh Ridge area was associated with the end of pronounced fault-block movement characteristic of earlier Norphlet deposits. Underlying Louann and Norphlet strata created a ramplike surface of transgression in the Wiggins arch area, whereas the Louann pinch-out and confinement or Norphlet coarse clastics between basement blocks in the far eastern Manila embayment resulted in a rapidly changing paleotopographic surface. The subdued paleotopographic (ramp) setting was dominated by lateral progradation of sedimentary environments; in contrast, carbonates to the east over basement features responded to the same eustatic changes by vertical upbuilding (aggradation) of facies-a ''tectonic dictator'' existed that controlled depositional relief and localized environments through time. Direct evidence for meter-scale relative sea level oscillations is from multiple exposure surfaces within upper Smackover grainstones. These diagenetic caps (up to four zones recognized in the Chunchula field area) at the top of coarsening-upward sequences are characterized by chemically coated grains, gravitational vadose cements, multiple dissolution-reprecipitation features, and localized radial-fibrous cements. Stacked sedimentary packages indicate that repeated relative sea level rises again initiated carbonate deposition after exposure. Correlation of exposure caps in four wells in Chunchula field reflect internal time lines generally parallel with the Norphlet-Smackover contact, and indicate lateral equivalence of grainstones with updip anhydrite.

  16. Fatal self-poisoning with lithium carbonate M.R. Achong, b sc, mb; P.G. Fernandez, mrcp, frcp[c]; P.J. McLeod, md, frcp[c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    Fatal self-poisoning with lithium carbonate M.R. Achong, b sc, mb; P.G. Fernandez, mrcp, frcp[c]; P.J. McLeod, md, frcp[c] Summary: In a fatal case of self- poisoning with lithium carbonate

  17. Heart DiseaseHeart Disease--Learn to Love YourLearn to Love Your Michael McKee, M.D.Michael McKee, M.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Steven A.

    Heart DiseaseHeart Disease-- Learn to Love YourLearn to Love Your HeartHeart Michael McKee, M.D.Michael McKee, M.D. March 19, 2010March 19, 2010 #12;GoalsGoals ·· Learn more about heart disease for yourself andLearn more about heart disease for yourself and for your studentsfor your students ·· Learn

  18. Reduce Building Energy Consumption by Improving the Supply Air Temperature Schedule and Recommissioning the Terminal Boxes, Submitted to the Energy Management and Operations Division at the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, M.; Athar, A.; Zhu, Y.; Claridge, D. E.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the request of the Energy Management and Operations Department at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, the Energy Systems Laboratory of Texas A&M University performed a study of optimizing the HVAC operation at its Basic Research Building. The Basic...

  19. M.D. Lemmon, Xiaojun Yang and P. J. Antsaklis, "Inductive Inference of Logical DES Controllers using the L* Algorithm," Technical Report of the ISIS (Interdisciplinary Studies of Intelligent Systems)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antsaklis, Panos

    using the L* Algorithm," Technical Report of the ISIS (Interdisciplinary Studies of Intelligent Systems) Group, No. ISIS-94-010, Univ of Notre Dame, September 1994. #12;M.D. Lemmon, Xiaojun Yang and P. J of the ISIS (Interdisciplinary Studies of Intelligent Systems) Group, No. ISIS-94-010, Univ of Notre Dame

  20. Upper Higgs boson mass bounds from a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Gerhold; K. Jansen

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We establish the cutoff-dependent upper Higgs boson mass bound by means of direct lattice computations in the framework of a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model emulating the same chiral Yukawa coupling structure as in the Higgs-fermion sector of the Standard Model. As expected from the triviality picture of the Higgs sector, we observe the upper mass bound to decrease with rising cutoff parameter $\\Lambda$. Moreover, the strength of the fermionic contribution to the upper mass bound is explored by comparing to the corresponding analysis in the pure $\\Phi^4$-theory.

  1. The edited version has been published in 2004 in N. Hopkins & R. Saad (eds), Upper Egypt, Identity and Change, Cairo,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The edited version has been published in 2004 in N. Hopkins & R. Saad (eds), Upper Egypt, Identity tendency, at least since the early 20th c., to describe Upper Egypt (hereafter as-Sa'îd) as a specific these questions and were always stressing "How unknown and unfamiliar and neglected Upper Egypt was for the State

  2. Improving simulations of the upper ocean by inclusion of surface waves in the MellorYamada turbulence scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ezer,Tal

    mixing. Surface waves can enhance turbulence kinetic energy and mixing of the upper ocean via wave interaction on the MellorYamada scheme and upper ocean thermal structure are examined and compared with each scheme. The behaviors of the MellorYamada scheme, as well as the simulated upper ocean thermal structure

  3. Implementation Study of Energy Conservation Recommendations in the Upper Midwest Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heisinger, K. P.; Bassett, K.; Twedt, M. P.

    The South Dakota State University (SDSU) Industrial Energy Optimization Program (IEOP) and Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Center (EADC) program perform energy audits for industrial companies in the Upper Midwest region of the United States. Each...

  4. Improved age control on early Homo fossils from the upper Burgi Member at Koobi Fora, Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Improved age control on early Homo fossils from the upper Burgi Member at Koobi Fora, Kenya in Areas 105 and 131 on the Karari Ridge in the eastern Turkana Basin (Kenya). We identify the base

  5. Improved age control on early Homo fossils from the upper Burgi Member at Koobi Fora, Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Improved age control on early Homo fossils from the upper Burgi Member at Koobi Fora, Kenya in Areas 105 and 131 on the Karari Ridge in the eastern Turkana Basin (Kenya). We identify the base

  6. INDIANA UNIVERSITY COMPUTER SCIENCE DEPARTMENT PROFESSIONAL MASTER'S DEGREE: UPPER LEVEL GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS WORKSHEET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    INDIANA UNIVERSITY COMPUTER SCIENCE DEPARTMENT PROFESSIONAL MASTER'S DEGREE: UPPER LEVEL GRADUATION790) Q: (Qualifying exam + 2 approved graduate-level courses (1, 2 above)) Qualifying exam: _______________________ Date:_____ Grade:____ R, S, TH: (Master's research project, Master's software project, University

  7. A Survey of Biological Underwater Noises Off the Coast of California and in Upper Puget Sound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Martin W

    1943-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF CALIFORNIA AND IN UPPER PUGET SOUND by Martin W Johnson iin noise conditions in the Puget Sound area. ii CONFIDENTIALin background noises in the Puget Sound area which had been

  8. Upper limits on electric dipole moments of tau-lepton, heavy quarks, and W-boson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. G. Grozin; I. B. Khriplovich; A. S. Rudenko

    2009-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss upper limits on the electric dipole moments (EDM) of the tau-lepton, heavy quarks, and W-boson, which follow from the precision measurements of the electron and neutron EDM.

  9. Upper limits on electric dipole moments of tau-lepton, heavy quarks, and W-boson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grozin, A G; Rudenko, A S

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss upper limits on the electric dipole moments (EDM) of the tau-lepton, heavy quarks, and W-boson, which follow from the precision measurements of the electron and neutron EDM.

  10. Demonstration Sites of Best Management Practices: A Manual for the Upper Etowah River Alliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosemond, Amy Daum

    Demonstration Sites of Best Management Practices: A Manual for the Upper Etowah River Alliance and the Institute of Ecology #12;UERA BMPs Demonstation Sites Manual 2 of 2 Demonstration Sites of Best Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 iii. Best Management Practices

  11. Planktonic Foraminifera Record of the Mid Albian Sea Level Rise, Upper Magdalena Valley, Colombia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukop, Mike

    Planktonic Foraminifera Record of the Mid Albian Sea Level Rise, Upper Magdalena Valley, Colombia Cretaceous unit in southern Colombia named "Tetuán Limestone", have allowed the comparison between planktic foraminifera interval zones in Colombia: Ticinella primula and Biticinella breggiensis, with late

  12. The oceanic and cratonic upper mantle: Clues from joint interpretation of global velocity and attenuation models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asthenosphere Seismic attenuation Seismic velocity Anelasticity Partial melt Combined interpretation of seismicThe oceanic and cratonic upper mantle: Clues from joint interpretation of global velocity anelastic dispersion (Karato and Jung, 1998; Karato, 2003). A unique interpretation of seismological models

  13. Microsoft Word - Upper Jocko River Final Draft CX 7-15-2013.docx

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Upper Jocko River Property funding Fish and Wildlife Project No. and Contract No.: 2002-003-00, BPA-007168 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021):...

  14. Development of a Robotic Device for the Physical Training of Human Upper Extremity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramos, Jorge Adrian

    2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focuses on the development of a robotic device to be used in parallel with observational learning techniques for facilitating the recovery of the upper limb in post-stroke patients. It has been shown in the existing observational...

  15. Enhanced Doppler Effect in the Upper Hybrid Resonance Microwave Backscattering Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Enhanced Doppler Effect in the Upper Hybrid Resonance Microwave Backscattering Experiment A, Politekhnicheskaya 26, 194021 St.Petersburg, Russia Observations of enhanced Doppler frequency shift effect based on this effect is proposed. 1. INTRODUCTION Investigation of tokamak plasma poloidal rotation

  16. Pressure solution and microfracturing in primary oil migration, upper cretaceous Austin Chalk, Texas Gulf Coast 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chanchani, Jitesh

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Upper Cretaceous Austin Chalk is a well known source rock and fractured reservoir. Production is mainly from fractures, and the mechanism by which oil migrates from the matrix into the fractures is not well understood. Microfracturing due...

  17. Concurrent tectonic and climatic changes recorded in upper Tortonian sediments from the Eastern Mediterranean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    evolution in the eastern Mediterranean region. Concurrent tectonic and climatic changes in the MetochiaConcurrent tectonic and climatic changes recorded in upper Tortonian sediments from the Eastern climatic reconstructions reveal substantial changes, especially on the North African continent which

  18. Geochemical and rheological constraints on the dynamics of the oceanic upper mantle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Jessica Mendelsohn

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I provide constraints on mantle convection through observations of the rheology and composition of the oceanic upper mantle. Convection cannot be directly observed, yet is a fundamental part of the plate tectonic cycle. ...

  19. Mineralogical analysis and uranium distribution of the sediments from the upper Jackson formation, Karnes County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fishman, Paul Harold

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the reouirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject: Geology MINERALOGICAL ANALYSIS AND URANIUM DISTRIBUTION OF THE SEDIMENTS FROM THE UPPER JACKSON FORMATION KARNES COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by PAUL HAROLD FISHMAN Approved... as to style and content by: Chairman o Commrttee ea o Department lf (/ ~ s Member Member December 1978 ABSTRACT Mineralogical Analysis and Uranium Distribution of the Sediments from the Upper Jackson Formation Karnes County, Texas (December 1978...

  20. Terry sandstone member of the Pierre Shale, Upper Cretaceous, Spindle field, Denver Basin, Colorado 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helsley, Robert James

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TERRY SANDSTONE MEMBER OF THE PIERRE SHALE, UPPER CRETACEOUS, SPINDLE FIELD, DENVER BASIN, COLORADO A Thesis by ROBERT JAMES HELSLEY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1985 Major Subject: Geology TERRY SANDSTONE MEMBER OF THE PIERRE SHALE, UPPER CRETACEOUS, SPINDLE FIELD, DENVER BASIN, COLORADO A Thesis by ROBERT JAMES HELSLEY Approved as to style and content by: R. R. Berg...

  1. Depositional environment and reservoir characteristics of the upper Frio sandstones, Willamar field, Willacy County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caram, Hector Luis

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DEEGSITICNAL ENVIRONMENT AND ~IR CHABACZERISIICS OF THE UPPER FRIO SANDBKNES, WILIAMAR FIEID, WILZACY COUNTY, TEXAS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial ~fillment of the reguirements for the degree of MASZER... OF SCIENCE December 1988 Major Subject: Geology DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRCINNENZ AND RESERVOIR CHARACIKRISTICS OF THE UPPER FRIO SANDSTONES, WI~ FIEID WILIACY ~, TEXAS A Thesis HECIOR IIJIS CARAM Approved as to style and content by: ~ R. Berg (Chair...

  2. Depositional environment of Upper Devonian gas producing sandstones, Westmoreland County, southwestern Pennsylvania 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Work, Rebecca Miller

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT OF UPPER DEVONIAN GAS PRODUCING SANDSTONES, WESTMORELAND COUNTY, SOUTHWESTERN PENNSYLVANIA A Thesis by REBECCA MILLER WORK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1988 Major Subject: Geology DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT OF UPPER DEVONIAN GAS PRODUCING SANDSTONES, WESTMORELAND COUNTY, SOUTHWESTERN PENNSYLVANIA A Thesis REBECCA MILLER WORK Approved as to style...

  3. Depositional environment of upper Wilcox sandstones, Northeast Thompsonville field, Jim Hogg and Webb Counties, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tedford, Fredrick John

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT OF UPPER WILCOX SANDSTONES, NORTHEAST THOMPSONVILLE FIELD, JIM HOGG AND WEBB COUNTIES, TEXAS A Thesis by FREDERICK JOHN TEDFORD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1977 Major Subject: Geology DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT OF UPPER WILCOX SANDSTONES, NORTHEAST THOMPSONVILLE FIELD, JIM HOGG AND WEBB COUNTIES, TEXAS A Thesis by FREDERICK JOHN TEDFORD Approved...

  4. Upper bound on the secret key rate distillable from effective quantum correlations with imperfect detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moroder, Tobias; Curty, Marcos; Luetkenhaus, Norbert [Quantum Information Theory Group, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik I, and Max-Planck Research Group, Institute of Optics, Information and Photonics, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Staudtstrasse 7/B2, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a simple method to obtain an upper bound on the secret key rate that is particularly suited to analyze practical realizations of quantum key distribution protocols with imperfect devices. We consider the so-called trusted device scenario where Eve cannot modify the actual detection devices employed by Alice and Bob. The upper bound obtained is based on the available measurements results, but it includes the effect of the noise and losses present in the detectors of the legitimate users.

  5. The Impact of Tenure Arrangements and Crop Rotations on Upper Gulf Coast Rice Farms.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Gregory M.; Rister, M. Edward; Richardson, James W.; Grant, Warren R.; Sij, John W. Jr

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I ____J - TDOC Z TA245 .7 8873 N0.1530 The Impact Of Tenure Arrangements And Crop Rotations On Upper Gulf Coast Rice Farms The Texas Agricultural Experiment Station/ Neville P. Clarke, Director/ The Texas A&M University System/ College... .. . .. . . .................. . . . . . .. . ... .. .... ... 88 PREFACE This bulletin reports economic analyses of the effects of important variables affecting the viability of rice-soybean farming operations in the Texas Upper Gulf Coast region. The study attempts to recognize many factors that affect...

  6. Trace fossils of Fort Hays Limestone Member of Niobrara Chalk (Upper Cretaceous), west-central Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, R. W.

    1970-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS PALEONTOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTIONS ARTICLE 53 (CRETACEOUS 2) TRACE FOSSILS OF FORT HAYS LIMESTONE MEMBER OF NIOBRARA CHALK (UPPER CRETACEOUS), WEST-CENTRAL KANSAS ROBERT W. FREY University of Georgia Marine Institute, Sapelo... Figures, 10 Plates, 4 Tables TRACE FOSSILS OF FORT HAYS LIMESTONE MEMBER OF NIOBRARA CHALK (UPPER CRETACEOUS), WEST-CENTRAL KANSAS' ROBERT W. FREY University of Georgia Marine Institute, Sapelo Island, Georgia CONTENTS PAGE PAGE ABSTRACT 5 Thalassinoides...

  7. Upper arun hydroelectric project feasibility study (phase 1). Volume 2. Appendix. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report was prepared for Nepal Electricity Authority (NEA). The primary objective of the study was to compare several alternative development schemes to drive an optimum development plan for exploiting the hydroelectric potential of the Upper Arun River, to be further investigated in phase 2 of the feasibility study. The report presents the result of the phase I studies investigations recommends the alternatives to be pursued to develop the Upper Arun River. Volume 2 contains tables, figures and other supporting materials.

  8. PHASE SEPARATION IN InGaN/GaN MULTIPLE QUANTUM WELLS M.D. MCCLUSKEY *, L.T. ROMANO *, B.S. KRUSOR *, D.P. BOUR *, C. CHUA *, N.M.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCluskey, Matthew

    985 PHASE SEPARATION IN InGaN/GaN MULTIPLE QUANTUM WELLS M.D. MCCLUSKEY *, L.T. ROMANO *, B0.27Ga0.73N/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQW's). After annealing for 4 min at a temperature of 1100 o is attributed to the formation of In- rich InGaN phases in the active region. X-ray diffraction measurements

  9. DISORDERING OF InGaN/GaN SUPERLATTICES AFTER HIGH-PRESSURE M.D. McCluskey*, L.T. Romano**, B.S. Krusor**, D. Hofstetter**, D.P. Bour**, M. Kneissl**,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCluskey, Matthew

    DISORDERING OF InGaN/GaN SUPERLATTICES AFTER HIGH-PRESSURE ANNEALING M.D. McCluskey*, L.T. Romano Internet J. Nitride Semicond. Res. 4S1, G3.42 (1999) ABSTRACT Interdiffusion of In and Ga is observed in InGaN of up to 15 kbar were applied during the annealing treatments to prevent decomposition of the InGaN

  10. Metals in fish from the Upper Benue River and lakes Geriyo and Njuwa in northeastern Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eromosele, C.O.; Eromosele, I.C.; Muktar, S.L.M.; Birdling, S.A. [Federal Univ. of Technology, Yola (Nigeria)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lakes Geriyo and Njuwa occupy natural depressions near the upper Benue River in northeastern Nigeria. The lakes are flooded by the river during the rainy season spanning the months of May to September. Fishing activities on the lakes and river provide fish for consumption by the local communities. Industrial activity around the upper Benue River and the lakes is low and there is no information on other activities with the potential for polluting the Benue River as it flows from neighboring Cameroon. However, an unconfirmed report indicated high levels of lead in the upper Benue River, generally speculated as arising from biogeometrical factors. Trace elements, some of which are toxic, may accumulate in edible marine organisms to levels which may be deleterious to human health. For the upper Benue River and its associate lakes, Geriyo and Njuwa, there is yet no report of a systematic study to assess the levels of metals in fish found in these waters. This paper presents the results of a study on metal levels in fish collected from Lakes Geriyo and Njuwa and upper Benue River in northeastern Nigeria. 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  11. Effects of upper-plenum steam condensation phenomena on heat transfer in a rod bundle. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chon, W.Y.; Addabbo, C.; Liao, N.S.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    System performance and thermohydraulic response to simultaneous bottom and top water injection were investigated in a 3 x 3 rod bundle Reflood Test Facility. An extensive series of tests, encompassing both simple bottom and combined injection reflooding, were carried out. A number of phenomenological events governing the thermodynamic coupling between the bottom reflood updraft and the top deluge were identified. Due to the countercurrent motion of the upflowing steam and water injected in the upper plenum counter current flow limiting phenomena hindered the penetration of water from inventory in the upper plenum into the bundle section. Consequently, condensation phenomena in the upper plenum and in the venting pipework characterized the thermohydraulic response of the bundle to simultaneous bottom and top water injection.

  12. Upper limit of the total cross section for the pn --> pn eta' reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Klaja; P. Moskal; S. D. Bass; E. Czerwinski; R. Czyzykiewicz; D. Gil; D. Grzonka; T. Johansson; B. Kamys; A. Khoukaz; P. Klaja; W. Krzemien; W. Oelert; B. Rejdych; J. Ritman; T. Sefzick; M. Siemaszko; M. Silarski; J. Smyrski; A. Taschner; M. Wolke; P. Wustner; J. Zdebik; M. Zielinski; W. Zipper

    2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The upper limit of the total cross section for the pn --> pn eta' reaction has been determined near the kinematical threshold in the excess energy range from 0 to 24 MeV. The measurement was performed using the COSY-11 detector setup, a deuteron cluster target, and the proton beam of COSY with a momentum of 3.35 GeV/c. The energy dependence of the upper limit of the cross section was extracted exploiting the Fermi momenta of nucleons inside the deuteron. Comparison of the determined upper limit of the ratio R_eta' = sigma(pn --> pn eta') / sigma(pp --> pp eta') with the corresponding ratio for eta-meson production does not favor the dominance of the N*(1535) resonance in the production process of the eta' meson and suggests nonidentical production mechanisms for eta and eta' mesons.

  13. Hydrochemistry and hydrogeologic conditions within the Hanford Site upper basalt confined aquifer system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spane, F.A. Jr.; Webber, W.D.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Hanford Site Ground-Water Surveillance Project, Flow System Characterization Task. Pacific Northwest Laboratory examines the potential for offsite migration of contamination within the upper basalt confined aquifer system for the US Department of Energy (DOE). As part of this activity, groundwater samples were collected over the past 2 years from selected wells completed in the upper Saddle Mountains Basalt. The hydrochemical and isotopic information obtained from these groundwater samples provides hydrologic information concerning the aquifer-flow system. Ideally, when combined with other hydrologic property information, hydrochemical and isotopic data can be used to evaluate the origin and source of groundwater, areal groundwater-flow patterns, residence and groundwater travel time, rock/groundwater reactions, and aquifer intercommunication for the upper basalt confined aquifer system. This report presents the first comprehensive Hanford Site-wide summary of hydrochemical properties for the upper basalt confined aquifer system. This report provides the hydrogeologic characteristics (Section 2.0) and hydrochemical properties (Section 3.0) for groundwater within this system. A detailed description of the range of the identified hydrochemical parameter subgroups for groundwater in the upper basalt confined aquifer system is also presented in Section 3.0. Evidence that is indicative of aquifer contamination/aquifer intercommunication and an assessment of the potential for offsite migration of contaminants in groundwater within the upper basalt aquifer is provided in Section 4.0. The references cited throughout the report are given in Section 5.0. Tables that summarize groundwater sample analysis results for individual test interval/well sites are included in the Appendix.

  14. Upper Devonian and Lower Mississippian conodont zones in Montana, Wyoming, and South Dakota

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klapper, G.

    1966-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Cheiloceras-Stufe in New York are the same as HASS ' lower Gassaway faunal zone in its New York occurrence, with the exception of the South Wales Member of the Perrysburg Formation. The upper Gassaway fau- nal zone of the Chattanooga Shale (51, p. 22... of the Cheiloceras-Stufe in New York are the same as HASS ' lower Gassaway faunal zone in its New York occurrence, with the exception of the South Wales Member of the Perrysburg Formation. The upper Gassaway fau- nal zone of the Chattanooga Shale (51, p. 22...

  15. A preliminary study of the distribution of some copepods in upper Laguna Madre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, John C

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LIBRARY a a at cniiEr~ nF TExas A PRELIMINARY STUDY OF THE DISTRIBUTION OF SOME COPEPODS IN UPPER LAGUNA MADRE John C. Henderson A Thesis Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Mlny, io(R Ma/or Sub)ect: Oceanography A PRELIMINARY STUDY OF THE DISTRIBUTION OF SOME COPEPODS IN UPPER LAGUNA MADRE A Thesis John C. Henderson Approved as to style and content by: C...

  16. Mechanical characteristics of folds in Upper Cretaceous strata in the Disturbed Belt of northwestern Montana 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Pat Kader

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -shape. The trough in S3 (see unit 23, Plate 2) is hi. ghly fractured in the sandstone and shows considerable flowage in the shale. From the air, it is readily apparent that these folds of the upper Two Medicine are much smaller in lateral extent along strike than... Formation (mostly shale), the Virgelle Sandstone, and the Two Medi. cine Formation (mostly shale), Montana Group, Upper Cretaceous. The Virgelle Sand- stone, about 54 meters thick, lies between the shales and behaved as the most competent member...

  17. Insect community structure and function in Upper Three Runs, Savannah River Site, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morse, J.C.; English, W.R. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Entomology; Looney, B.B. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1993-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A project to document the insect species in the upper reaches of Upper Three Runs at the Savannah River site was recently completed. This research was supported by the US Department of Energy under the National Environmental Research Park Program. The work was performed by the Department of Entomology at Clemson University in clemson, SC, by John C. Morse (principal investigator), William R. English and their colleagues. The major output from this study was the dissertation of Dr. William R. English entitled ``Ecosystem Dynamics of a South Carolina Sandhills Stream.`` He investigated selected environmental resources and determined their dynamics and the dynamics of the aquatic invertebrate community structure in response to them.

  18. Raman shifted third harmonic generation of upper hybrid radiation in a plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magesh Kumar, K.K.; Singh, Ranjeet; Tripathi, V. K. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi-110016 (India)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Raman shifted third harmonic generation of upper hybrid radiation is proposed and studied. In the presence of ambient magnetic field, the plasma wave present in the system produces electron density ripple (perturbation) which couples with the velocity imparted by the nonlinear ponderomotive force at twice the laser frequency producing the Raman shifted third harmonic field. The wave vector of the plasma wave provides the uncompensated momentum necessary for phase matching condition. The applied magnetic field can be adjusted to have the phase matching for the given plasma frequency. The energy conversion ratio from pump to the Raman shifted third harmonic generation of upper hybrid radiation is analyzed.

  19. Characteristics of the upper crust and magma chambers along the spreading centers of the Lau back-arc basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dingler, Allison Maria Jacobs

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    G. , 1990. Origin of petrology and geochemistry of submarinerate, morphology, and petrology. Upper crustal refractione.g. , morphology, petrology, seismicity, and hydrothermal

  20. Stochastic Models Applied to Operation of Reservoirs in the Upper Colorado River Basin in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, R. A.; O'Connor, G. E.; Curry, G. L.; Helm, J. C.

    TR-47 1973 Stochastic Models Applied to Operation of Reservoirs in the Upper Colorado River Basin in Texas R.A. Clark G.E. O?Connor G.L. Curry J.C. Helm Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A...

  1. FINANCE MAJOR UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS FOR 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009 & 2010 CATALOG YEARS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponce, V. Miguel

    FINANCE MAJOR UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS FOR 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009 & 2010 CATALOG YEARS Course of Finance Minimum grade of C required for Finance majors IDS 302: Intro to Operations Management MGT 350 Financial Accounting FIN 321: Managerial Economics FIN 325: Intermediate Finance FIN 323 with a C FIN 327

  2. FINANCE MAJOR UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS FOR 2011/12 CATALOG YEAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponce, V. Miguel

    FINANCE MAJOR UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS FOR 2011/12 CATALOG YEAR Course Grade Prerequisites/Notes BA 300 Ethical Decision Making in Business (1 unit) FIN 323: Fundamentals of Finance Minimum grade of C required for Finance majors MIS 302: Intro to Operations Management MGT 350: Management

  3. NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS HYDRO 39 PROBABLE MAXIMUM PRECIPITATION FOR THE UPPER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS HYDRO 39 PROBABLE MAXIMUM PRECIPITATION FOR THE UPPER DEERFIELD RIVER The Office of Hydrology (HYDRO) of the National Weather Service (NWS) develops procedures for making river agencies, and conducts pertinent research and development. NOAA Technical Memorandums in the NWS HYDRO

  4. Investigating Upper Bounds on Network Lifetime Extension for Cell-Based Energy Conservation Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santi, Paolo

    Investigating Upper Bounds on Network Lifetime Extension for Cell-Based Energy Conservation either for a base network (one without any energy conservation technique) or for one using cooperative energy conservation strategies. In this paper, we investigate the lifetime/density tradeoff under

  5. Multi-fractal thermal characteristics of the southwestern GIN sea upper layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Peter C.

    Multi-fractal thermal characteristics of the southwestern GIN sea upper layer Peter C. Chu Naval describes a multi-fractal analysis on a high-resolution temperature dataset to obtain the nonstationarity matter Published by Elsevier Ltd. doi:10.1016/S0960-0779(03)00041-9 Chaos, Solitons and Fractals 19 (2004

  6. COMPASS: AN UPPER LIMIT ON COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION AT AN ANGULAR SCALE OF 200

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timbie, Peter

    COMPASS: AN UPPER LIMIT ON COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION AT AN ANGULAR SCALE OF 200, 11 and Peter T. Timbie6 Receivved 2003 Auggust 19; accepted 2004 April 12 ABSTRACT COMPASS is an on with the Cosmic Microwave Polari- zation at Small Scales (COMPASS) telescope. Although this limit is about

  7. Use of SF6 to estimate anthropogenic CO2 in the upper ocean Toste Tanhua,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waugh, Darryn W.

    Use of SF6 to estimate anthropogenic CO2 in the upper ocean Toste Tanhua,1 Darryn W. Waugh,2s. Here we apply SF6, a tracer that continues to increase in the atmosphere, as a basis for the Cant water mass transit time distributions (TTDs) calculated with SF6 are compared to those based on CFC-12

  8. But Does It Last? Sustaining a Research-Based Curriculum in Upper-Division Electricity & Magnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    But Does It Last? Sustaining a Research-Based Curriculum in Upper-Division Electricity & Magnetism Stephanie V. Chasteen, Rachel E. Pepper, Steven J. Pollock, Katherine K. Perkins Science Education course approach in junior-level electricity and magnetism (E&M). Almost all developed materials (i

  9. The Upper Bound of Capacity for A Concurrent-transmission-based Ad-hoc Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tseng, Yu-Chee

    1 The Upper Bound of Capacity for A Concurrent-transmission-based Ad-hoc Network with Single National Chiao-Tung University, Hsin-Chu, 30010 Taiwan Department of Communication Engineering National Chiao-Tung University, Hsin-Chu, 30010 Taiwan Department of Information and Computer Engineering Chung

  10. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING (EE)/COMPUTER ENGINEERING (CMPE) UPPER DIVISION HONORS PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Shengli

    ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING (EE)/COMPUTER ENGINEERING (CMPE) UPPER DIVISION HONORS PROGRAM Deadlines the website at http://www.honors.uconn.edu. EE/CMPE Honors Program The Electrical/Computer Engineering 4950 Electrical and Computer Engineering Design I (2 credits; Fall, Senior Year) and ECE 4099

  11. Natural Arsenic in Groundwater and Alkaline Lakes at the upper Paraguay basin, Pantanal, Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Natural Arsenic in Groundwater and Alkaline Lakes at the upper Paraguay basin, Pantanal, Brazil L, Brazil d Université de Provence, Aix Marseille 1, France e Departamento de Geografia, Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso do Sul, Três Lagoas, Brazil f Laboratoire de Géomophologie Appliquée, Université de

  12. Safe Upper-bounds Inference of Energy Consumption for Java Bytecode Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politécnica de Madrid, Universidad

    Safe Upper-bounds Inference of Energy Consumption for Java Bytecode Applications (Extended Abstract relying on autonomous on-board data analysis. Intermediate Representation Resource Usage Analysis Energy- mize energy consumption. Several approaches have been developed for estimating the en- ergy consumption

  13. Upper Permian vertebrates and their sedimentological context in the South Urals, Russia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benton, Michael

    and Kutulukskaya svitas, of equivalent age). This succession documents major climatic changes, with increasing aridity through the Late Permian. The climate changes are manifested in changing sedimentationUpper Permian vertebrates and their sedimentological context in the South Urals, Russia Valentin P

  14. Stream Restoration in the Upper Midwest, U.S.A. Gretchen G. Alexander1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, David

    Stream Restoration in the Upper Midwest, U.S.A. Gretchen G. Alexander1 and J. David Allan1,2 Abstract Restoration activities intended to improve the condition of streams and rivers are widespread types of activities and their effectiveness. We developed a database of 1,345 stream restoration

  15. PENMAN Upper Model Building a LargeScale Knowledge Base for Machine Translation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knight, Kevin

    f g et al. Abstract PENMAN Upper Model Building a Large­Scale Knowledge Base for Machine­ gineer to build up an index to a KB in a second language, such as Spanish or Japanese. USC is a three­site collabora­ tive effort to build a large­scale knowledge­based ma­ chine translation system

  16. E.2. Electronic Appendix -Food Web Elements of the Fraser River Upper River (above rkm 210)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 E.2. Electronic Appendix - Food Web Elements of the Fraser River Basin Upper River (above rkm 210) Food webs: Microbenthic algae (periphyton), detritus from riparian vegetation and littoral insects tributaries. Collector-gatherers (invertebrates feeding on fine particulate organic material) are the most

  17. Helium Isotopic Textures in Earth's Upper Mantle David W. Graham a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, David W.

    Helium Isotopic Textures in Earth's Upper Mantle David W. Graham a , Barry B. Hanan b , Christophe of variability represent a description of helium isotopic texture. We utilize four complementary methods (~100 km) mantle flow, and by sampling during the partial melting process (~30 km). Keywords: helium

  18. Coupling between upper-hybrid waves and electron holes in Earth's magnetotail

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jovanovic, D.; Shukla, P.K.; Morfill, G. [Institute of Physics, P. O. Box 57, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik IV, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum, Germany and Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, D-85740 Garching (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, D-85740 Garching (Germany)

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytic theory of the nonlinear interaction between electrostatic high-frequency upper-hybrid waves and the low-frequency electron holes in a magnetized plasma is presented. It provides an explanation for the simultaneous occurrence of upper-hybrid bursts and electron holes, observed recently by the WIND and CLUSTER spacecrafts in the vicinity of the X point during the collisionless reconnection in Earth's deep magnetotail. Using a fluid description for the high-frequency mode and a drift-kinetic description for the low-frequency mode, a Zakharov-type system of equations is obtained that describes the interaction between the upper-hybrid and lower-hybrid waves in the presence of an oblique Buneman instability and resonant electrons. The saturation of the linear and explosive parametric instabilities is shown to result from the electron trapping in the combined low-frequency and ponderomotive potentials, yielding an oblique lower-hybrid hole. The presence of an electron hole produces the localization of the upper-hybrid waves, yielding either a bright nonlinear Schroedinger soliton trapped inside the hole or a dark soliton driven by the defocusing nonlinear Schroedinger nonlinearity, which is trapped outside of the hole.

  19. Plant biodiversity and ethnobotany inside the projected impact area of the Upper Seti Hydropower Project,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asselin, Hugo

    Plant biodiversity and ethnobotany inside the projected impact area of the Upper Seti Hydropower hydropower project, currently under feasibility study. The objective of the study was to document plant the construction of major hydropower infrastructure (Pokharel 2001; Bartle 2002). However, potential impacts

  20. Evolution of the Upper Rhone River discharge and suspended sediment load during the last 80 years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Versoix, Switzerland Key words: Sediment rating curve, sediment load, dam, deep water lake. ABSTRACTEvolution of the Upper Rhone River discharge and suspended sediment load during the last 80 years in amplitude and frequency. From the available literature data, sediment rating curves have been calculated

  1. Evaluation of shrub encroachment and brush control on water availability in the Upper Guadalupe River watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afinowicz, Jason David

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    ............................................................................................... 99 VITA ........................................................................................................... 102 x LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE Page 2-1 A comparison of the same area as viewed from (a) a 30-m spatial resolution..., and light brush in the Upper Guadalupe River watershed as determined by remote sensing shown by dark regions?.. ................................................................................... 21 3-1 The location and stream network...

  2. New upper bounds for nonbinary codes Dion Gijswijt , Alexander Schrijver y , Hajime Tanaka z

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Alexander

    - diagonalizing the Terwilliger algebra of the nonbinary Hamming scheme, the bound can be calculated in time bounds for binary codes. Keywords: codes, nonbinary codes, upper bounds, Delsarte bound, Terwilliger alge with the Terwilliger algebra [7] of H(n; q). In section 3 it is shown how the algebra A q;n can be used to obtain a new

  3. Model simulation of Greenland Sea upper-ocean variability S. Hakkinen,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    Model simulation of Greenland Sea upper-ocean variability S. Ha¨kkinen,1 F. Dupont,2 M. Karcher,3-ocean water masses coincides with periods of intense deep-water formation in the Greenland Sea. This paper-ocean properties observed in the Greenland Sea, including very dense, saline water masses in the 1950s, 1960s

  4. Upper-air temperatures around Greenland: 19642005 Jason E. Box1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    Upper-air temperatures around Greenland: 1964­2005 Jason E. Box1,2 and Ariel E. Cohen2 Received 15 of 12h balloon soundings from six sites surrounding Greenland reveal distinct patterns of tropospheric-air temperatures around Greenland: 1964­ 2005, Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L12706, doi:10.1029/ 2006GL025723. 1

  5. Upper ocean T-S variations in the Greenland Sea and their association to climatic conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Upper ocean T-S variations in the Greenland Sea and their association to climatic conditions Sirpa that the salinity variability in the central Greenland Gyre follows closely the sea level pressure (SLP) fluctuations found along the Greenland Coast, e.g., at Angmagssalik. Corresponding large-scale SLP field

  6. Experimental Results on Upper Bounds for Vertex Pi-Lights Victoria Brumberg1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramaswami, Suneeta

    Experimental Results on Upper Bounds for Vertex Pi-Lights Victoria Brumberg1 Suneeta Ramaswami2 Diane Souvaine3 Abstract The problem of illuminating a simple n-gon with cn, c lights is open, whereas a lower bound of 3 5 n is known. We provide an algorithm for placing -lights, and experimental

  7. Neural PID Control of Robot Manipulators with Application to an Upper Limb Exoskeleton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Jacob

    1 Neural PID Control of Robot Manipulators with Application to an Upper Limb Exoskeleton Wen Yu to uncertainties in robot control, PID control needs a big integral gain, or a neural compensator is added of the robot control. In this paper, we extend the popular neural PD control into neural PID control

  8. A Novel Linear PID Controller for an Upper Limb Exoskeleton Wen Yu and Jacob Rosen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Jacob

    A Novel Linear PID Controller for an Upper Limb Exoskeleton Wen Yu and Jacob Rosen Abstract. The stability of such a system is critical given the proximity of its human operator. A new PID controller [25]. Given the complexity of the of the exoskeleton as 7 DOF system a PID controller may

  9. TP53 gene mutations of lung cancer patients in upper northern Thailand and environmental risk factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TP53 gene mutations of lung cancer patients in upper northern Thailand and environmental risk mutations are observed in about 40e70% of lung cancer tissues, and the hot spot codon mu- tations factors that influence TP53 gene mutation in lung cancer patients residing areas with high lung cancer

  10. ORIGINAL PAPER Mapping the phases of Glacial Lake Algonquin in the upper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaetzl, Randall

    . M. Shortridge Á R. J. Schaetzl Department of Geography, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI of ice was removed (Gilbert 1898; Clark et al. 1994; Lewis et al. 2005). Locations in northern Michigan the Main and two ``Upper Group'' phases in northern Michigan and nearby Ontario, reports their spatial

  11. CDF Note 9674 Combined Upper Limit on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production for Winter 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermilab

    CDF Note 9674 Combined Upper Limit on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production for Winter 2009 The CDF of searches for the Standard Model Higgs boson at CDF. The six major analyses combined are the WH bV/c2 in steps of 5 GeV/c2 , assuming Standard Model decay branching fractions of the Higgs boson

  12. CDF Note 9999 Combined Upper Limit on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermilab

    CDF Note 9999 Combined Upper Limit on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production The CDF Collaboration for the Standard Model Higgs boson at CDF. The six major analyses combined are the WH b¯b channels, the WH + ZH E Model decay branching fractions of the Higgs boson and that the ratios of the rates for the WH, ZH, gg

  13. Thin, pedoturbated, and locally sourced loess in the western Upper Peninsula of Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaetzl, Randall

    Thin, pedoturbated, and locally sourced loess in the western Upper Peninsula of Michigan Michael D. Luehmann , Randall J. Schaetzl, Bradley A. Miller, Michael E. Bigsby Department of Geography, Michigan November 2012 Available online 1 February 2013 Keywords: Loess Michigan Particle size filtering Bimodal

  14. RURAL POVERTY AND DIVERSIFICATION OF FARMING SYSTEMS IN UPPER NORTHEAST THAILAND.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    RURAL POVERTY AND DIVERSIFICATION OF FARMING SYSTEMS IN UPPER NORTHEAST THAILAND. C. BARNAUD 1 , G and government support to help them catch-up is still needed. INTRODUCTION Unacceptable levels of poverty the seriousness of the situation. But a fundamental question remains: How can we reduce poverty, particularly

  15. Computing flux upper-limits for non-detections F. Masci, 10/25/2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masci, Frank

    to "real" detections (e.g., in a spectrum), the quoted upper limits often lack probabilistic power. One in the first place, i.e., has flux measurement > some threshold set according to some maximum tolerable interval) that probably contains the true flux can then be assigned using the uncertainties. If a source

  16. Evaluating the effect of interannual variations of surface chlorophyll on upper ocean temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of interactions between ocean biology, ocean dynamics, and irradiance penetration. The bulk of the essential]. The biota, in turn, modulate the penetration of solar radia- tion in the upper ocean and control, to some that the SST differences are not the result of the direct effect of ocean biota on light penetration. Rather

  17. A very reduced upper limit on the interstellar abundance of beryllium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillaume Hébrard; Martin Lemoine; Roger Ferlet; Alfred Vidal-Madjar

    1997-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of observations of the $\\lambda 3130.4$ \\AA interstellar absorption line of Be II in the direction of zeta Per. The data were obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii 3.6m Telescope using the Coud\\'e f/4 Gecko spectrograph at a resolving power $\\simeq 1.1 \\times 10^5$, and a signal-to-noise ratio S/N $\\simeq$ 2000. The Be II line is not detected, and we obtain an upper limit on the equivalent width $W_{3130.4}\\leq30$ $\\mu$\\AA. This upper limit is 7 times below the lowest upper limit ever reported hitherto. The derived interstellar abundance is ($^9$Be/H) $\\leq 7 \\times 10^{-13}$, not corrected for the depletion of Be onto interstellar grains; it corresponds to an upper limit $\\delta_{Be} \\leq -1.5$ dex on the depletion factor of Be. As such, it argues in favour of models of formation of dust grains in stellar atmospheres.

  18. Thermal maturity of the Upper Triassic-Middle Jurassic Shemshak Group (Alborz Range, Northern Iran)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Iran) based on organic petrography, geochemistry and basin modelling: implications for source rock1 Thermal maturity of the Upper Triassic-Middle Jurassic Shemshak Group (Alborz Range, Northern Iran. Organic matter (OM) has been investigated using Rock-Eval pyrolysis, elemental analysis

  19. Lake Level Controlled Sedimentological I Heterogenity of Oil Shale, Upper Green River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gani, M. Royhan

    Chapter 3 Lake Level Controlled Sedimentological 1:'_i 'I I Heterogenity of Oil Shale, Upper Green email: mgani@uno.edu t",. The Green River Formation comprises the world's largest deposit of oil-shale characterization of these lacustrine oil-shale deposits in the subsurface is lacking. This study analyzed ~300 m

  20. Towards a Wireless Building Management System Requiring no Change to Upper-layer Protocols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Dan

    communications to support transmission, design protocols for sensor networking and conduct application that converts existing wired sensor network into wireless without changing upper layer protocols decent understanding on the design within a wireless sensor network, e.g., OS, programming languages

  1. The role of pressure solution creep in the ductility of the Earth's upper crust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    theoretical creep laws. Laboratory experiments are implemented in order to test the models and to measure1 The role of pressure solution creep in the ductility of the Earth's upper crust Jean, France The aim of this review is to characterize the role of pressure solution creep in the ductility

  2. Bio-Climatic Analysis and Thermal Performance of Upper Egypt A Case Study Kharga Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khalil, M. H.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Upper Egypt. In the recent century the most attentions of the government is the creation of new wadi parallel to Nile wadi in the west desert. Kharga Oasis is 25 degrees 26'56?North latitude and 30 degrees 32'24?East longitude. This oasis, is the largest...

  3. FY 2007 Progress Report for Upper Columbia United Tribes' Regional Coordination.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michel, D.R.

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of activities conducted over the fiscal year 2007 contract period to fulfill requirements to coordinate Upper Columbia United Tribes (UCUT) interests within the Columbia River Basin. This coordination was specific to the implementation of portions of the Integrated Fish and Wildlife Program within the purview of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council and Bonneville Power Administration.

  4. A New Technique To Determine The Upper Threshold for Finite Length Turbo Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaturvedi, A K

    A New Technique To Determine The Upper Threshold for Finite Length Turbo Codes A.Rajeshand A in finite frame length turbo codes. These thresholds depend on the component encoder as well as the frame to indecisive and unequivocal fixed points respectively, for finiteframe length turbo codes. Concurrently, Gamal

  5. A Cavity-backed Slot Antenna with High Upper Hemisphere Efficiency for Sewer Sensor Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tentzeris, Manos

    the sensor network, an antenna needs to be robust, low-cost, low-profile, and easy to be integrated, a woven fiberglass composite was designed and fabricated as a RF transparent material for a manhole cover can be advantageous to improve the antenna efficiency toward upper hemisphere since it reflects

  6. Sequence stratigraphy of middle and upper Jurassic strata of Southwestern Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wade, W.J.; Moore, C.H. Jr. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Middle and Upper Jurassic systems tracts of southwestern Alabama differ from those of the western Gulf rim, showing: (1) profound influence of antecedent topography; (2) low early subsidence rates; and (3) greater clastic influx from adjacent uplands. Werner Anhydrite and Louann Salt represent the earliest marine incursion onto the Gulf rim following initial rifting; they onlap upper Paleozoic basement and garben-filling Eagle Mills red beds. Because basin-wide evaporative drawdowns overprint even higher order eustatic sea level changes, transgressive systems tracts (TST) and highstand systems tracts (HST) are indistinguishable. Anhydrite and shale caps accumulated via interstratal halite dissolution. Oxfordian Norphlet siliciclastics form a continental lowstand systems tract as illustrated by abrupt contact with underlying marine evaporites without intervening progradational marginal marine facies. Marine-reworked uppermost Norphlet sandstone marks the base of a subsequent TST, which includes overstepping lower Smackover lithofacies (laminated mudstone, algal-laminated mudstone, and pellet wackestone). The upper Smackover HST is characterized by formation of rimmed shelves upon which algal mounds and aggrading ooid grainstone parasequences accumulated. Shallow lagoonal carbonate and evaporite saltern deposition occurred behind ooid shoals; fine-grained siliciclastics accumulated in updip areas. Equivalents of Smackover A, Smackover B, Bossier, and Gilmer sequences are largely masked by influx of Haynesville and Cotton Valley continental clastics. Lack of biostratigraphic data, a consequence of restricted fauna, precludes useful age assignments for these sequences in Alabama. Middle and Upper Jurassic systems tracts of southwestern Alabama are regionally atypical and cannot serve as a model for Gulf-wide sequences.

  7. Developing a Successful Riparian-Wetland Grazing Management Plan for the Upper Ruby River Cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . In 1990 the Beaverhead National Forest started to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the allotment. The draft EIS became a focal point for the various groups. The major concern with the Upper Ruby Statement (EIS) for the Allotment. The draft EIS became a focal point for the various groups. All sides

  8. A Groundwater Dynamic Simulation Model: Application to the Upper San Pedro Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    A Groundwater Dynamic Simulation Model: Application to the Upper San Pedro Basin Report Prepared by using tools such as tracers to determine groundwater travel times and this dynamic simulation modeling Initiative Fund, Water Sustainability Graduate Fellowship Program 2004/2005 #12;2 Introduction Located

  9. Upper Middle Mainstem Columbia River Subbasin Focal Species Information, Red-winged Blackbird

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix C Upper Middle Mainstem Columbia River Subbasin Focal Species Information, Red-winged Blackbird Introduction The red-winged black bird is one of the most abundant birds in North America (Marshall et al. 2003). Red-winged Blackbirds are extremely adaptable; successfully colonizing many small

  10. About the Upper Bound of the Chiral Index of Multivariate Distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petitjean, Michel [DSV/iBiTec-S/SB2SM (CNRS URA 2096), CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2008-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A family of distributions in R{sup d} having a chiral index greater or equal to a constant arbitrarily close to 1/2 is exhibited. It is deduced that the upper bound of the chiral index lies in the interval [1/2; 1], for any dimension d.

  11. Biologically-Inspired Control Architecture for an Upper Limb, Intelligent Robotic Orthosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to activate the human muscles. The humanoid robot's muscles, actuated by pressure control, are controlled human motion and will facilitate a more human-friendly human-robot interaction. This leads to our illustration of applying the architecture to a proposed upper limb, robotic orthosis. Such an orthosis

  12. Abstract--This paper presents the preliminary design of a new dexterous upper-limb prosthesis provided with a novel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arleo, Angelo

    Abstract-- This paper presents the preliminary design of a new dexterous upper-limb prosthesis replaced a missing limb with a prosthesis for cosmetic, vocational, or personal autonomy reasons. The upper) of the hand are crucial [2]. The objective of this work is to develop a bio-inspired dexterous hand prosthesis

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF A 3D GRID, FRACTURE AND PROPERTY MODELS FOR THE UPPER FREEPORT COAL AND OVERBURDEN USING 3D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Thomas H.

    in unminable coal seams. The pilot test is being conducted by CONSOL Energy Inc. Several site characterization of the Upper Freeport coal seam in southeastern Marshall Co. The site lies within a1km2 area that is outlined dimension. Grid cell thickness in the Pittsburgh and Upper Freeport coal seams was set at 8 feet and 5 feet

  14. Shear wave splitting in SE Brazil: an eect of active or fossil upper mantle ow, or both?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barruol, Guilhem

    Shear wave splitting in SE Brazil: an e¡ect of active or fossil upper mantle £ow, or both?§ Maggy, Brazil c Universidade de SaBrazil Received 26 the structure of the upper mantle beneath southeastern Brazil using teleseismic shear wave splitting

  15. Computer simulations for direct conversion of the HF electromagnetic wave into the upper hybrid wave in ionospheric heating experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Computer simulations for direct conversion of the HF electromagnetic wave into the upper hybrid emissions (SEE). A direct conversion process is proposed as an excitation mech- anism of the upper hybrid, 1996) The electrostatic waves at the UH resonance were assumed to be excited via ``direct conversion

  16. Analyses and simulations of the upper ocean's response to Hurricane Felix at the Bermuda Testbed Mooring site: 1323 August 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, Sara Irina

    Analyses and simulations of the upper ocean's response to Hurricane Felix at the Bermuda Testbed; 31°440 N, 64°100 W) site on 15 August 1995. Data collected in the upper ocean from the BTM during. The MY2 model predicted more sea surface cooling and greater depth penetration of kinetic energy than

  17. Upper Snake Provincial Assessment May 2004 APPENDIX 3-1--OVERVIEW OF THE MAJOR CAUSES LIMITING THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Upper Snake­Rock, Portneuf, Blackfoot, Willow, Teton, Beaver­Camas, and the Upper and Lower Henrys Fork province. (Source: ICBEMP 1997.) Major Hydrologic Unit (Watershed)a Snake Headwaters Subbasin Relative province. (Source GAP II, Scott et al. 2002) Focal Habitat Type High Low Medium Very High Very Low Riparian

  18. The upper Lyapunov exponent of S1(2,R) cocycles: Discontinuity and the problem of positivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knill, Oliver

    The upper Lyapunov exponent of S1(2,R) cocycles: Discontinuity and the problem of positivity Oliver of a standard probability space (X,m). Let V be the subset ofA= L°°(X% 5/(2, R)) where the upper Lyapunov points inAwhere the Lyapunov exponents are discontinuous. We show further that the decision whether

  19. 1348 IEEE COMMUNICATIONS LETTERS, VOL. 17, NO. 7, JULY 2013 An Upper Bound on the Capacity Loss Due to Imprecise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Candan, Cagatay

    1348 IEEE COMMUNICATIONS LETTERS, VOL. 17, NO. 7, JULY 2013 An Upper Bound on the Capacity Loss Due, IEEE Abstract--A remarkably simple upper bound on the capacity loss due to imprecise channel state, (Capacity Loss) log(1 + var(h - h)SNR) where var(h - h) represents the variance of channel estimation error

  20. Effects of a potential fourth fermion generation on the upper and lower Higgs boson mass bounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philipp Gerhold; Karl Jansen; Jim Kallarackal

    2010-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effect of a potential fourth fermion generation on the upper and lower Higgs boson mass bounds. This investigation is based on the numerical evaluation of a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model emulating the same Higgs-fermion coupling structure as in the Higgs sector of the electroweak Standard Model. In particular, the considered model obeys a Ginsparg-Wilson version of the underlying ${SU}(2)_L\\times {U}(1)_Y$ symmetry, being a global symmetry here due to the neglection of gauge fields in this model. We present our results on the modification of the upper and lower Higgs boson mass bounds induced by the presence of a hypothetical very heavy fourth quark doublet. Finally, we compare these findings to the standard scenario of three fermion generations.

  1. Beta-dependent upper bound on ion temperature anisotropy in a laboratory plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keiter, Paul A. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)] [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Scime, Earl E. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)] [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Balkey, Matthew M. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)] [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Boivin, Robert [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)] [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Kline, John L. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)] [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Gary, S. Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser induced fluorescence measurements of ion temperatures, parallel and perpendicular to the local magnetic field, in the Large Experiment on Instabilities and Anisotropies space simulation chamber (a steady-state, high beta, argon plasma) display an inverse correlation between the upper bound on the ion temperature anisotropy and the parallel ion beta ({beta}=8{pi}nkT/B{sup 2}). These observations are consistent with in situ spacecraft measurements in the Earth's magnetosheath and with a theoretical/computational model that predicts that such an upper bound is imposed by scattering from enhanced fluctuations due to growth of the ion cyclotron anisotropy instability (the Alfven ion cyclotron instability). (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  2. Biological monitoring of Upper Three Runs Creek, Savannah River Plant, Aiken County, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Specht, W.L.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In anticipation of the fall 1988 start up of effluent discharges into Upper Three Creek by the F/H Area Effluent Treatment Facility of the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC, a two and one half year biological study was initiated in June 1987. Upper Three Runs Creek is an intensively studied fourth order stream known for its high species richness. Designed to assess the potential impact of F H area effluent on the creek, the study includes qualitative and quantitative macroinvertebrate stream surveys at five sites, chronic toxicity testing of the effluent, water chemistry and bioaccumulation analysis. This final report presents the results of both pre-operational and post-operational qualitative and quantitative (artificial substrate) macroinvertebrate studies. Six quantitative and three qualitative studies were conducted prior to the initial release of the F/H ETF effluent and five quantitative and two qualitative studies were conducted post-operationally.

  3. Upper limit on spontaneous supercurrents in Sr2RuO4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Suk Bum

    2010-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    It is widely believed that the perovskite Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} is an unconventional superconductor with broken time reversal symmetry. It has been predicted that superconductors with broken time reversal symmetry should have spontaneously generated supercurrents at edges and domain walls. We have done careful imaging of the magnetic fields above Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} single crystals using scanning Hall bar and SQUID microscopies, and see no evidence for such spontaneously generated supercurrents. We use the results from our magnetic imaging to place upper limits on the spontaneously generated supercurrents at edges and domain walls as a function of domain size. For a single domain, this upper limit is below the predicted signal by two orders of magnitude. We speculate on the causes and implications of the lack of large spontaneous supercurrents in this very interesting superconducting system.

  4. Upper Limits on Electric and Weak Dipole Moments of W-Boson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. E. Blinov; A. S. Rudenko

    2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The total cross-sections of the reaction e+e- --> W+W-, as measured at LEP-II at centre-of-mass energies between 183 and 207 GeV are used to derive the upper limits on the parameters of CP-violating (P-odd and C-even) triple gauge-boson couplings WW\\gamma and WWZ. The 95% CL limits |\\widetilde{\\kappa}_Z|<0.13 and |\\widetilde{\\lambda}_Z|<0.31 are obtained assuming local SU(2)_L x U(1)_Y gauge invariance. Our results are comparable with the previous ones obtained through the analysis of the W decay products. We also discuss the upper limits on the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the W-boson, which follow from the precision measurements of the electron and neutron EDM.

  5. One-way quantum key distribution: Simple upper bound on the secret key rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moroder, Tobias; Luetkenhaus, Norbert [Institute of Theoretical Physics I and Max-Planck Research Group, Institute of Optics, Information and Photonics, University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Staudtstrasse 7, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Institute for Quantum Computing, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Curty, Marcos [Institute of Theoretical Physics I and Max-Planck Research Group, Institute of Optics, Information and Photonics, University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Staudtstrasse 7, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a simple method to obtain an upper bound on the achievable secret key rate in quantum key distribution (QKD) protocols that use only unidirectional classical communication during the public-discussion phase. This method is based on a necessary precondition for one-way secret key distillation; the legitimate users need to prove that there exists no quantum state having a symmetric extension that is compatible with the available measurements results. The main advantage of the obtained upper bound is that it can be formulated as a semidefinite program, which can be efficiently solved. We illustrate our results by analyzing two well-known qubit-based QKD protocols: the four-state protocol and the six-state protocol.

  6. A Review of Student Difficulties in Upper-Level Quantum Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Chandralekha

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Learning advanced physics, in general, is challenging not only due to the increased mathematical sophistication but also because one must continue to build on all of the prior knowledge acquired at the introductory and intermediate levels. In addition, learning quantum mechanics can be especially challenging because the paradigms of classical mechanics and quantum mechanics are very different. Here, we review research on student reasoning difficulties in learning upper-level quantum mechanics and research on students' problem-solving and metacognitive skills in these courses. Some of these studies were multi-university investigations. The investigations suggest that there is large diversity in student performance in upper-level quantum mechanics regardless of the university, textbook, or instructor and many students in these courses have not acquired a functional understanding of the fundamental concepts. The nature of reasoning difficulties in learning quantum mechanics is analogous to reasoning difficulties...

  7. Depositional environment and reservoir morphology of the Upper Wilcox sandstones, Katy gas field, Waller County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DePaul, Gilbert John

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and structural characteristics of the field. The Upper Wilcox is divided into the following units, in ascending order, "First Lower Massive" sandstones and "D", "C", "B", "A", "Second Wilcox" and "First Wilcox" interbedded sandstones and shales. The reservoir... and are generally abruptly overla1n by sandstones with sharp or erosional bases. The sandstones change laterally to thin sandstones interlaminated with thick shales. The thick sandstones are submarine, constructional- channel deposits with associated thin...

  8. Upper limit on the primary photon fraction from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Risse, Markus; /Karlsruhe, Forschungszentrum

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on observations of the depth of shower maximum performed with the hybrid detector of the Auger Observatory, an upper limit on the cosmic-ray photon fraction of 26% (at 95% confidence level) is derived for primary energies above 10{sup 19} eV. Additional observables recorded with the surface detector array, available for a sub-set of the data sample, support the conclusion that a photon origin of the observed events is not favoured.

  9. Faunal studies of the type Chesteran, Upper Mississippian of southwestern Illinois

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furnish, W. M.; Saunders, W. B.; Burdick, D. W.; Strimple, H. L.

    1971-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS PALEONTOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTIONS January 8, 1971 Paper 51 FAUNAL STUDIES OF THE TYPE CHESTERAN, UPPER MISSISSIPPIAN OF SOUTHWESTERN ILLINOIS W. M. FURNISH, W. BRUCE SAUNDERS, D. W. BURDICK, and H. L. STRIMPLE The University... of Iowa, Iowa City Present address of W. BRUCE SAUNDERS, Department of Geology, Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania PART 1 AMMONOIDS FROM THE MIDDLE CHESTER BEECH CREEK LIMESTONE, ST. CLAIR COUNTY W. M. FURNISH and W. BRUCE SAUNDERS ABSTRACT...

  10. An analysis of industrial composition and growth in the Upper Rio Grande State Planning Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeghidi, Khaled

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Jones The purpose of this study was to describe in detail the indus- trial composition and past growth of a six-county area of the Upper Rio Grande State Planning Region, and identify the industries in which each county had a comparative advantage.... Knowledge of the historical changes, the composition of in- dustries and industries for which an area has comparative advantages is important in regional economic development efforts. The measure- ment of industrial mix and competitive-share of a given...

  11. EFFECT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON WATERSHED RUNOFF FLOW - UPPER COOSA RIVER BASIN UPSTREAM FROM PLANT HAMMOND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, K.

    2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability of water managers to maintain adequate supplies in the coming decades depends on future weather conditions, as climate change has the potential to reduce stream flows from their current values due to potentially less precipitation and higher temperatures, and possibly rendering them unable to meet demand. The upper Coosa River basin, located in northwest Georgia, plays an important role in supplying water for industry and domestic use in northern Georgia, and has been involved in water disputes in recent times. The seven-day ten-year low flow (7Q10 flow) is the lowest average flow for seven consecutive days that has an average recurrence interval of 10 years. The 7Q10 flow is statistically derived from the observed historical flow data, and represents the low flow (drought) condition for a basin. The upper Coosa River basin also supplies cooling water for the 935MW coal-fired Hammond plant, which draws about 65% of the 7Q10 flow of the upper Coosa River to dissipate waste heat. The water is drawn through once and returned to the river directly from the generator (i.e., no cooling tower is used). Record low flows in 2007 led to use of portable cooling towers to meet temperature limits. Disruption of the Plant Hammond operation may trigger closure of area industrial facilities (e.g. paper mill). The population in Georgia is expected to double from 9 million to 18 million residents in the next 25 years, mostly in the metropolitan Atlanta area. Therefore, there will be an even greater demand for potable water and for waste assimilation. Climate change in the form of persistent droughts (causing low flows) and high ambient temperatures create regulatory compliance challenges for Plant Hammond operating with a once-through cooling system. Therefore, the Upper Coosa River basin was selected to study the effect of potential future weather change on the watershed runoff flow.

  12. Depositional environment of upper cretaceous Lewis sandstones, Sand Wash Basin, Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reinarts, Mary Susan

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the three types of turbidite channels. After Berg (1978) 44 47 49 50 LIST OF FIGURES - Continued Figure Page lg Idealized depositional model for turbi dite constructional channels. After Berg (1978) 51 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 Regional... (1962) from turbidity current deposits . Bouma 's complete turbi di te is defined as follows: pelitic shale upper unit of parallel laminae D current ripple unit lower unit of parallel laminae 8 massive graded unit In terms of flow regime...

  13. Confirmatory Survey Results for the Reactor Building Dome Upper Surfaces, Rancho Saco Nuclear Generating Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wade C. Adams

    2006-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Results from a confirmatory survey of the upper structural surfaces of the Reactor Building Dome at the Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station (RSNGS) performed by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education for the NRC. Also includes results of interlaboratory comparison analyses on several archived soil samples that would be provided by RSNGS personnel. The confirmatory surveys were performed on June 7 and 8, 2006.

  14. Depositional environment and reservoir morphology of the Upper Wilcox sandstones, Katy gas field, Waller County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DePaul, Gilbert John

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    overbank sandstones. Sandstones become thinner and less frequent upward in the section. Thin sand- stones 1n the predominantly shale section are widespread and exhibit sedimentary structures commonly observed in turbidity-current deposits (ABCDE, ABDE... feet of depth. Production in the Upper Wilcox section is from multiple sandstone units within a shale section on a local structural closure (Fig. 2). The properties of these sandstone units and the local stratigraphic variation determine...

  15. Mechanical characteristics of folds in Upper Cretaceous strata in the Disturbed Belt of northwestern Montana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Pat Kader

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    controlled cross section through a wave trai. n of these folds, The citations on these pages follow the style of the U. S. Geological Survey Bulletin. other field observations, laboratory analysis of collected samples, and theoretical considerations...MECHANICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF FOLDS IN UPPER CRETACEOUS STRATA IN THE DISTURBED BELT OF NORTHWESTERN MONTANA A Thesis by PAT KADER GILBERT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  16. Upper limits for PH3 and H2S in Titan's Atmosphere from Cassini CIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nixon, Conor A; Irwin, Patrick G J; Horst, Sarah M; 10.1016/j.icarus.2013.02.024

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have searched for the presence of simple P and S-bearing molecules in Titan's atmosphere, by looking for the characteristic signatures of phosphine and hydrogen sulfide in infrared spectra obtained by Cassini CIRS. As a result we have placed the first upper limits on the stratospheric abundances, which are 1 ppb (PH3) and 330 ppb (H2S), at the 2-sigma significance level.

  17. Depositional environment of upper cretaceous Lewis sandstones, Sand Wash Basin, Colorado 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reinarts, Mary Susan

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    areas, Moffat County, Colorado. Structure contours are top of Mesaverde. Contour interval is 1, 000 ft ( 305 m). Modified from Whi tley (1962) Generalized subsurface section of the Upper Cretaceous formations in the Sand Wash basin depicting gross... Correlation section parallel to depositional dip, North Craig field area, showing inclined time- stratigraphic units in the Lewis shale which con- tain thick sandstone intervals. Location of section shown in Fig. 23 Strike correlation section, North Craig...

  18. Depositional environment of Upper Devonian sandstones in Westmoreland County, southwestern Pennsylvania 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGee, Patricia Ann

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    into interbedded shales and siltstones not far to the west of Westmoreland County. To the east, they pass into continental red beds near the southeastern border of Westmoreland County which also coincides with the Laurel Hill anticline. In the cross sections... for natural gas was completed in 1821. It was located in Chautauqua County, New York and produced from Devonian black shales. In 1859, the first oil well, the famous Drake discovery well, was drilled in Titusville, Pennsylvania and produced from the Upper...

  19. Beam driven upper-hybrid-wave instability in quantized semiconductor plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamil, M. [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan)] [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Rasheed, A. [Department of Physics, Government College University, Faisalabad 38000 (Pakistan)] [Department of Physics, Government College University, Faisalabad 38000 (Pakistan); Rozina, Ch. [Department of Physics, Government M.A.O. College, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan)] [Department of Physics, Government M.A.O. College, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Moslem, W. M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said 42521 (Egypt) [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said 42521 (Egypt); Centre for Theoretical Physics, The British University in Egypt (BUE), El-Shorouk City, Cairo (Egypt); Salimullah, M. [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka 1342 (Bangladesh)] [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka 1342 (Bangladesh)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The excitation of Upper-Hybrid waves (UHWs) induced by electron beam in semiconductor plasma is examined using quantum hydrodynamic model. Various quantum effects are taken into account including recoil effect, Fermi degenerate pressure, and exchange-correlation potential. The bandwidth of the UHWs spectrum shows that the system supports purely growing unstable mode. The latter has been studied for diversified parameters of nano-sized GaAs semiconductor.

  20. D Note 6229-CONF Combined Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigg, Chris

    D� Note 6229-CONF Combined Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production from the D�) Searches for standard model Higgs boson production in p¯p collisions at s = 1.96 TeV are carried out for Higgs boson masses (mH) in the range 100 mH 200 GeV/c2 . The contributing production processes include

  1. Victims of child abuse and predicted abusive disciplinary styles in a middle to upper class population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brannon, Anna Margaret

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lenhard (Chairperson of Committee) dida . Lutes (Member) lannes H. Hope (Member) MAY 1%5 Stephen H rebel (Head of Department) Victims of Child Abuse and Predicted Abusive Disciplinary Styles in a Middle to Upper Class Population (May 1985) Anna... siblings. 18. 5X of the participants were classified as victims of child abuse; 14. 2X were raised in families where husband-wife abuse existed; and 69. 5X experienced abusive interactions with their siblings. Path analyses performed indicated a strong...

  2. An examination of Plesiosauria (Diapsida: Sauropterygia) from the Niobrara Formation (Upper Cretaceous) of central North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Storrs, G. W.

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS PALEONTOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTIONS August 1999 Number 11 AN EXAMINATION OF PLESIOSAURIA (DIAPSIDA: SAUROPTERYGIA) FROM THE NIOBRARA CHALK (UPPER CRETACEOUS) OF CENTRAL NORTH AMERICA Glenn W. Storrs Cincinnati Museum... Center, Geier Collections and Research Center, 1720 Gilbert Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45202, storrsgwatemail.tic.edu Abstract.—Detailed examination of the holotypes of all described plesiosaurs from the Niobrara Chalk reveals that only three of the nine...

  3. Upper arun hydroelectric project feasibility study (phase 1). Volume 1. Report. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report was prepared for Nepal Electricity Authority (NEA). The primary objective of the study was to compare several alternative development schemes to drive an optimum development plan for exploiting the hydroelectric potential of the Upper Arun River, to be further investigated in phase 2 of the feasibility study. The scope of work included reviewing the original project concepts establishing development alternatives investigations in the following fields: Toposurvey Mapping; Geology Geotechnics; Hydrology; Power Market; and Plan formulations.

  4. The environment of deposition of the Dalton Coal (Upper Pennsylvanian), Palo Pinto Co., TX.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lowenstein, Glenn Robert

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alkane analysis for coal, overburden and underburden shales, and oil. 56 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Previous workers have classified coals by deter- mining whether they are al 1ochthnous (transported) or autochthonous (in situ) accumul ations (Oe...THE ENVIRONMENT OF DEPOSITION OF THE DALTON COAL (UPPER PENNSYI. VANIAN), PALO PINTO CO. , TX. A Thesis by GLENN ROBERT LOWENSTEIN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for tne...

  5. Presumed Pulmonary Embolism Following Power-Pulse Spray Thrombectomy of Upper Extremity Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, Jason; Georgiades, Christos S.; Hong, Kelvin; Kim, Hyun S. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science (United States)], E-mail: sikhkim@jhmi.edu

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To achieve more effective thrombolysis in a shorter treatment time, percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy has been increasingly used in the treatment of deep venous thrombosis (DVT). The power-pulse spray is a new technique to combine chemical and rheolytic effects on clots. We present a case of presumed pulmonary embolism following power-pulse spray treatment for upper extremity DVT which necessitated resuscitation and intubation. The power-pulse spray technique should be used with caution when treating DVT.

  6. Anadronous Fish Habitat Enhancement for the Middle Fork and Upper Salmon River, 1988 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, John ( US Forest Service, Intermountain Region, Boise, ID)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wild and natural salmon and steelhead populations in the Middle Fork and Upper Salmon River are at a critical low. Habitat enhancement through decreasing sediment loads, increasing vegetative cover, removing passage barriers, and providing habitat diversity is imperative to the survival of these specially adapted fish, until passage problems over the Columbia River dams are solved. Personnel from the Boise and Sawtooth National Forests completed all construction work planned for 1988. In Bear Valley, 1573 feet of juniper revetment was constructed at eleven sites, cattle were excluded from 1291 feet of streambanks to prevent bank breakdown, and a small ephemeral gully was filled with juniper trees. Work in the Upper Salmon Drainage consisted of constructing nine rock sills/weirs, two rock deflectors, placing riprap along forty feet of streambank, construction of 2.1 miles of fence on private lands, and opening up the original Valley Creek channel to provide spring chinook passage to the upper watershed. A detailed stream survey of anadromous fish habitat covering 72.0 miles of streams in the Middle Fork Sub-basin was completed.

  7. Mode conversion and electron heating near the upper hybrid resonance frequency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, B.L.; Okuda, H.; Abe, H.

    1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mode conversion near the upper hybrid resonance frequency and electron heating are studied using a one-dimensional electromagnetic relativistic particle code. It is found that for a sufficiently small pump field E/sub 0/, E/sub 0//sup 2//4..pi..nT/sub e/ less than or equal to 0.01, electron heating is localized in a region near the electron cyclotron layer where the pump frequency is equal to the local electron gyrofrequency. For stronger pump fields, electron heating takes place more or less uniformly across a region between the upper hybrid resonance layer and the cyclotron layer. In addition, a significant fraction of electromagnetic energy associated with the pump is found to be reflected back into the vacuum from a region in the plasma near the upper hybrid resonance layer for both strong (E/sub 0//sup 2//4..pi..nT/sub e/ approx. = 1) and weak pumps (E/sub 0//sup 2//4..pi..nT/sub e/ << 1).

  8. Improving simulations of the upper-ocean by inclusion of4 surface waves in the Mellor-Yamada turbulence scheme5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ezer,Tal

    kinetic energy and mixing of the upper ocean33 via wave breaking and non-breaking wave35 upper-ocean thermal structure are examined and compared with each other using36 one. The behaviors of the Mellor-Yamada39 scheme, as well as the simulated upper-ocean thermal structure

  9. Reservoir characterization of the upper Merecure and lower Oficina Formations sands in the Leona Este Field, Eastern Venezuela Basin 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flores Millan, Maria Carolina

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The "S5", "T" and "U1" sands, traditionally described as part of the lower section of the "Oficina" Formation, and the "U2" sand, as part of the upper interval of the "Merecure" Formation, contain the largest oil remaining ...

  10. Stratification of anisotropy in the Pacific upper mantle Daniel B. Smith, Michael H. Ritzwoller, and Nikolai M. Shapiro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Nikolai

    Stratification of anisotropy in the Pacific upper mantle Daniel B. Smith, Michael H. Ritzwoller: surface waves, azimuthal anisotropy, Pacific Citation: Smith, D. B., M. H. Ritzwoller, and N. M. Shapiro

  11. ARCHAEOLOGY, LATE-QUATERNARY LANDSCAPE EVOLUTION, AND ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE IN THE UPPER DRIFTWOOD CREEK BASIN, BARBER COUNTY, KANSAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kessler, Nicholas Victor

    2010-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This study focused on valley fills in the upper Driftwood Creek basin, a 3rd order drainage network in south-central Kansas to determine the geologic potential for stratified cultural material and to reconstruct a record of Late...

  12. Design of a wrist and gripping mechanism for an upper limb prosthesis specifically for the game of golf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoder, Michael D

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An upper limb prosthesis used for the game of golf was designed. More specifically, the wrist and gripping mechanism was designed. The motivating factor behind his project was to improve a player's ability to make a smooth, ...

  13. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Diurnal variability of upper ocean temperatures from1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gille, Sarah T.

    . Infrared satellite sensors measure34 the very surface of the ocean, the "skin", while microwave sensors is to evaluate30 the character of diurnal variability of the upper ocean. The analysis makes use of Argo31

  14. Influence Of Upper Air Conditions On The Patagonia Icefields L. A. Rasmussen, H. Conway, C. F. Raymond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasmussen, L.A.

    Influence Of Upper Air Conditions On The Patagonia Icefields L. A. Rasmussen, H. Conway, C. F to investigate changes in precipitation and snowfall over the Patagonia ice- fields during 1960-99. Apparently

  15. Sequence stratigraphy of the upper San Andres and Grayburg formations, Waddell Field, Crane County, Texas: implications for hydrocarbon reservoir distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinsonnault, Scott Michael

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The upper San Andres and Grayburg formations (Guadalupian) were deposited on carbonate platforms around the Permian Basin region and are extensive hydrocarbon reservoirs in the region. The Waddell Field (East Waddell Ranch) on the eastern margin...

  16. The depositional environments, diagenetic history, and porosity development of the Upper Smackover Member at Eustace Field, Henderson County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sequeira, Jose J.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENTS, DIAGENETIC HISTORY, AND POROSITY DEVELOPMENT OF THE UPPER SMACKOVER MEMBER AT EUSTACE FIELD, HENDERSON COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by JOSE J. SEQUEIRA, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AIM University... in partial fulfillment of the requirement, for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1987 Major Subject: Geology THE DEPOSlTIONAL ENVIRONMENTS& DIAGENETIC HISTORY, AND POROSITY DEVELOPMENT OF THE UPPER SMACKOVER MEMBER AT EUSTACE FIELD, HENDERSON...

  17. BETTY ANN TITTLE TATTLE REPRODUCES THE UPPER CLASS: GENDER AND BOUNDARY WORK IN KANSAS CITY, 1924-1934

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Nicole Kristin

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    than they did men's, reflecting power inequalities within Kansas City's upper class. Theory As I will argue, upper-class women drew moral boundaries against people from other classes in order to justify the exclusivity of elite organizations... through these networks; (3) economic capital, or wealth; and (4) symbolic capital, or "the power to 5 define the worth and legitimacy of various kinds of capital" (Beisel 1997: 214). Individuals and families attempt to maximize their holdings...

  18. Sequence stratigraphic and sedimentologic analysis of the Permian San Andres Formation (upper Leonardian-lower Guadalupian), Northwest Shelf, Permian Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beserra, Troy Brett

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SEQUENCE STRATIGRAPHIC AND SEDIMENTOLOGIC ANALYSIS OF THE PERMIAN SAN ANDRES FORMATION (UPPER LEONARDIAN-LOWER GUADALUPIAN), NORTHWEST SHELF, PERMIAN BASIN A Thesis by TROY BRETT BESERRA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A...&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1994 Major Subject: Geology SEQUENCE STRATIGRAPHIC AND SEDIMENTOLOGIC ANALYSIS OF THE PERMIAN SAN ANDRES FORMATION (UPPER LEONARDIAN-LOWER GUADALUPIANl...

  19. Intra-arterial Autologous Bone Marrow Cell Transplantation in a Patient with Upper-extremity Critical Limb Ischemia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madaric, Juraj, E-mail: jurmad@hotmail.com [National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases (NUSCH) and Slovak Medical University, Department of Cardiology and Angiology (Slovakia)] [National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases (NUSCH) and Slovak Medical University, Department of Cardiology and Angiology (Slovakia); Klepanec, Andrej [National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Slovakia)] [National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Slovakia); Mistrik, Martin [Clinic of Hematology and Transfusiology, Faculty Hospital (Slovakia)] [Clinic of Hematology and Transfusiology, Faculty Hospital (Slovakia); Altaner, Cestmir [Slovak Academy of Science, Institute of Experimental Oncology (Slovakia)] [Slovak Academy of Science, Institute of Experimental Oncology (Slovakia); Vulev, Ivan [National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Slovakia)] [National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Slovakia)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Induction of therapeutic angiogenesis by autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell transplantation has been identified as a potential new option in patients with advanced lower-limb ischemia. There is little evidence of the benefit of intra-arterial cell application in upper-limb critical ischemia. We describe a patient with upper-extremity critical limb ischemia with digital gangrene resulting from hypothenar hammer syndrome successfully treated by intra-arterial autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell transplantation.

  20. A Preliminary Look at the Crust and Upper Mantle of North Africa Using Libyan Seismic Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasyanos, M

    2005-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, LLNL has been developing methods to jointly invert both surface wave dispersion data and teleseismic receiver functions. The technique holds great promise in accurately estimating seismic structure, including important tectonic parameters such as basin thickness, crustal thickness, upper mantle velocity, etc. We proposed applying this method to some recently available data from several Libyan stations, as we believe the technique has not been applied to any stations in Libya. The technique holds the promise of improving our understanding of the crust and upper mantle in Libya and North Africa. We recently requested seismic data from stations GHAR (Gharyan) and MARJ (Al Marj) in Libya for about 20 events. The events were large events at regional distances suitable for making dispersion measurements. An example of waveforms recorded at the two stations from an earthquake in Italy is shown in Figure 1. The paths traverse the Ionian Sea. Notice the slow short period group velocities of the surface waves across the Mediterranean, particularly to the easternmost station MARJ. However, because of data availability, signal-to-noise ratio, etc. we were unable to make measurements for every one of these events at both stations. Figure 2 shows a map of paths for 20 sec Rayleigh waves in the eastern Mediterranean region. Paths measured at the two Libyan stations are shown in green. Rayleigh wave dispersion measurements at 20 sec period are sensitive to velocities in the upper 20 km or so, and reveal sediment thickness, crustal velocity, and crustal thickness. Tomographic inversions reveal the sharp group velocity contrast between regions with deep sedimentary basins and those without. Figure 3, the result of an inversion made before adding the new dispersion measurements, shows slow group velocities in the Black Sea, Adriatic Sea, and Eastern Mediterranean. In general, these features correspond well with the sediment thickness model from Laske, shown in Figure 4. Details in and around the Sirt (Sirte) Basin in northern Libya, however, are poorly defined.

  1. Lower Cretaceous and Upper Jurassic oil reservoirs of the updip basement structure play: Southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mink, R.M.; Mancini, E.A. [Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exploration for Lower Cretaceous and Upper Jurassic reservoirs associated with updip basement structures currently is the most active exploratory oil play in Alabama. High initial flow rates, on the order of hundreds to thousands of barrels of oil per day, are commonly encountered at depths between 8,200 and 14,500 feet. Fifty-one fields have been established and 25 million barrels of oil have been produced from these fields developed in Lower Cretaceous Hosston and Upper Jurassic Haynesville, Smackover, and Norphlet reservoirs. Production from Smackover carbonates began at Toxey field in 1967 and from Haynesville sandstones at Frisco City field in 1986. As of September 1994, Smackover wells averaged 88 barrels of oil per day and Haynesville wells averaged 284 barrels of oil per day. In 1994, production was established in the Norphlet at North Excel field and in the Hosston at Pleasant Home field. Reservoirs in the updip basement structure play cluster in three distinct areas; (1) a western area on the Choctaw ridge complex, (2) a central area on the Conecuh ridge complex, and (3) an eastern area in the Conecuh embayment. Reservoir lithologies include Smackover limestones and dolostones and Hosston, Haynesville, Smackover, and Norphlet sandstones. Hydrocarbon traps are structural or combination traps where reservoirs occur on the flanks or over the crests of basement palohighs. An understanding of the complex reservoir properties and trap relationships is the key to successful discovery and development of Lower Cretaceous and Upper Jurassic oil reservoirs of the updip basement structure play of southwest Alabama.

  2. Aerodynamic Models for Hurricanes II. Model of the upper hurricane layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonov, Arkady I

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This second paper of the series (see the first one in [1]) models the dynamics and structure of upper hurricane layer in adiabatic approximation. Formulation of simplified aerodynamic model allows analytically express the radial istributions of pressure and wind speed components. The vertical evolution of these distributions and hurricane structure in the layer are described by a coupled set of equations for the vertical mass flux and vertical momentum balance, averaged over the eye wall cross section. Several realistic predictions of the model are demonstrated, including the change of directions for the component of radial wind speed and angular velocity of hurricane with altitude.

  3. The shallow geologic features of the upper continental slope, northern Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buck, Arvo Viktor

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    region of the upper continental slope in the Gulf of Mexico lying immediately west of the Mississippi Trough (Fig. 1). water depths range from 150 m (500 ft) to a maximum of 1200 m (4000 ft). The area is centered on 28 00'N, 90'30'W, with the eastern... extremity being the western margin of the Mississippi Trough. The area is approximately 155 km by 55 km (96 mi by 33 mi) in size. The seismic data within the region were collected along lines of a 6. 4 km by 6. 4 km grid. +30~ 88' 0/I, ' oo goo ooo...

  4. Experimental study of upper sd shell nuclei and evolution of sd-fp shell gap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkar, M. Saha [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata - 700064 (India)

    2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The intruder orbitals from the fp shell play important role in the structure of nuclei around the line of stability in the upper sd shell. Experimentally we have studied {sup 35}Cl, {sup 30}P, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 37}Ar and {sup 34}Cl in this mass region using the INGA setup. Large basis cross-shell shell model calculations have indicated the need for change of the sd-fp energy gap for reliable reproduction of negative parity and high spin positive parity states. Indication of population of states of large deformation has been found in our data. Theoretical interpretation of these states has been discussed.

  5. The shallow geologic features of the upper continental slope, northern Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buck, Arvo Viktor

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    region of the upper continental slope in the Gulf of Mexico lying immediately west of the Mississippi Trough (Fig. 1). water depths range from 150 m (500 ft) to a maximum of 1200 m (4000 ft). The area is centered on 28 00'N, 90'30'W, with the eastern... extremity being the western margin of the Mississippi Trough. The area is approximately 155 km by 55 km (96 mi by 33 mi) in size. The seismic data within the region were collected along lines of a 6. 4 km by 6. 4 km grid. +30~ 88' 0/I, ' oo goo ooo...

  6. A study of uranium distribution in an upper Jackson lignite-sandstone ore body, South Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatham, James Randall

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -central Wyoming (Denson, 1959). Since then similar discoveries have been made in North and South Dakota, Montana, Idaho, New Mexico, and most recently, in Texas. Porous, organic-r1ch sediments have repeatedly been proven to be favorable sites for uranium...A STUDY OF URANIUM DISTRIBUTION IN AN UPPER JACKSON LIGNITE-SANDSTONE ORE BODY, SOUTH TEXAS A Thesis James Randall Chatham Subnitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in Partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree...

  7. Cantor sets and their relation to upper semi-continuous collections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granberry, Verland Lee

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . In the next ten years many famous topologists including Alexandroff, Kuratowski, and Moore studied them in the setting of a general topological space. Moore proved a significant theorem in [5j showing that an upper semi- 2 continuous decomposition of E...2. Thus pe UPI/) -1 -1 (C- lJF ). The point p was arbitrarily chosen in f (A), so f (A)C UFI fl(C- +F2). By the same argument starting with a point in f (B) we can show that f (B)( UF2 f](C- gFI). Conversely, 1st A and B be nonvoid subsets of X...

  8. Effect of wind speed on the growth of the upper convective zone in a solar pond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMinn, Steven Lee

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    [2]. The distance which the wind has to act on the surface of a pond is commonly called fetch, or fetch length. The purpose of the nets or other devices used in wind suppression is to reduce the fetch and transmit some of the energy in the waves... to the sides of the pond. Wind mixing of the upper convective zone can be thought of as converting some of the kinetic energy in the wind to potential energy in the fluid by a process called entrainment. Entrainment is defined in detail in Chapter V...

  9. Effect of wind speed on the growth of the upper convective zone in a solar pond 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMinn, Steven Lee

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    [2]. The distance which the wind has to act on the surface of a pond is commonly called fetch, or fetch length. The purpose of the nets or other devices used in wind suppression is to reduce the fetch and transmit some of the energy in the waves... to the sides of the pond. Wind mixing of the upper convective zone can be thought of as converting some of the kinetic energy in the wind to potential energy in the fluid by a process called entrainment. Entrainment is defined in detail in Chapter V...

  10. Paleoenvironment of an upper Cotton Valley (Knowles limestone) patch reef, Milam County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cregg, Allen Kent

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (Head of' Department) ( Mem'her ) (Member) May 198Z ABSTRACT Paleoenvironment of an Upper Cotton Valley (Knowles Limestone) Patch Reef, Milam County, Texas (May 1982) Allen Kent Cregg, B. S. , University of New Orleans Chairman of Advisory.... Depth in kilo- meters (km) and thousands of feet (kft). Two-way time in seconds {sec). (Seismic section courtesy of Mohil Producing Texas and New Mexico Incorporated-United Geo- physical). - NW 1? 5 2? SR I A 1 SA 2 1 'I S ? 10 4? 15'-' 5? Z...

  11. Depositional environment of upper Wilcox sandstones, Northeast Thompsonville field, Jim Hogg and Webb Counties, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tedford, Fredrick John

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to 200 ft thick at depths of 9, 390 to 13, 700 ft. The sandstones occur in a rapidly thickening section of black marine shale and are located some 20 mi downdip from upper Wilcox rocks that have been interpreted as a marine shelf facies. Cores from.... Funds were provided by General Crude Oil Company in the form of a fellowship grant. Mr. Dick Moore of General Crude supplied elec- tric logs and provided me with several valuable suggestions. Cores and core analyses were provided by Shell Oil Company...

  12. Upper limits for the photoproduction cross section for the ???(1860) pentaquark state off the deuteron

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Egiyan, H.; Langheinrich, J.; Gothe, R. W.; Graham, L.; Holtrop, M.; Lu, H.; Mattione, P.; Mutchler, G.; Park, K.; Smith, E. S.; Stepanyan, S.; Zhao, Z. W.; Adhikari, K. P.; Aghasyan, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bennett, R. P.; Biselli, A. S.; Bookwalter, C.; Branford, D.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Contalbrigo, M.; D’Angelo, A.; Daniel, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Dey, B.; Dickson, R.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fradi, A.; Gabrielyan, M. Y.; Gevorgyan, N.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guler, N.; Guo, L.; Gyurjyan, V.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Khetarpal, P.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Livingston, K.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Mao, Y.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Mokeev, V.; Munevar, E.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Ni, A.; Niculescu, G.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Pappalardo, L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Phelps, E.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Raue, B. A.; Ricco, G.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Seraydaryan, H.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Taylor, C. E.; Tedeschi, D. J.; Ungaro, M.; Voutier, E.; Watts, D. P.; Weinstein, L. B.; Weygand, D. P.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhao, B.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We searched for the ???(1860) pentaquark in the photoproduction process off the deuteron in the ????-decay channel using CLAS. The invariant-mass spectrum of the ???? system does not indicate any statistically significant enhancement near the reported mass M=1.860 GeV. The statistical analysis of the sideband-subtracted mass spectrum yields a 90%-confidence-level upper limit of 0.7 nb for the photoproduction cross section of ???(1860) with a consecutive decay into???? in the photon-energy range 4.5GeV?<5.5GeV.

  13. EIS-0408: Upper Great Plains Wind Energy Programmatic EIS | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised FindingDepartment of EnergyEnergy DraftEnergy 8: Upper Great

  14. Diagenesis of Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation, Mobile and Baldwin Counties and offshore Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaughan, R.L. Jr.; Benson, D.J.

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation is an important deep gas reservoir in Mobile and Baldwin Counties and offshore Alabama. The producing reservoir consists of a well-sorted fine-grained subarkose to arkose. Sedimentological studies indicate this unit was deposited on a broad desert plain in environments ranging from eolian dune and interdune to wadi and beach-shoreface. Diagenetic minerals comprise from 5 to 20% of the bulk volume of the sandstone. Porosity ranges from less than 3% to more than 25% and averages around 10%. Most of the porosity consists of hybrid solution-enlarged intergranular and intragranular pores resulting from the dissolution of cements, framework grains, and grain replacements.

  15. Upper quantum Lyapunov Exponent and Anosov relations for quantum systems driven by a classical flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Sapin; H. R. Jauslin; S. Weigert

    2005-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We generalize the definition of quantum Anosov properties and the related Lyapunov exponents to the case of quantum systems driven by a classical flow, i.e. skew-product systems. We show that the skew Anosov properties can be interpreted as regular Anosov properties in an enlarged Hilbert space, in the framework of a generalized Floquet theory. This extension allows us to describe the hyperbolicity properties of almost-periodic quantum parametric oscillators and we show that their upper Lyapunov exponents are positive and equal to the Lyapunov exponent of the corresponding classical parametric oscillators. As second example, we show that the configurational quantum cat system satisfies quantum Anosov properties.

  16. Upper Missouri G&T El Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmwelt Management AG UMaAGUnitilMichigan JumpWaterlooUpper

  17. Reclamation of abandoned mined lands along th Upper Illinois Waterway using dredged material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Luik, A; Harrison, W

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sediments were sampled and characterized from 28 actual or proposed maintenance-dredging locations in the Upper Illinois Waterway, that is, the Calumet-Sag Channel, the Des Plaines River downstream of its confluence with the Calumet-Sag Channel, and the Illinois River from the confluence of the Kankakee and Des Plaines rivers to Havana, Illinois. Sufficient data on chemical constituents and physical sediments were obtained to allow the classification of these sediments by currently applicable criteria of the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency for the identification of hazardous, persistent, and potentially hazardous wastes. By these criteria, the potential dredged materials studied were not hazardous, persistent, or potentially hazardous; they are a suitable topsoil/ reclamation medium. A study of problem abandoned surface-mined land sites (problem lands are defined as being acidic and/or sparsely vegetated) along the Illinois River showed that three sites were particularly well suited to the needs of the Corps of Engineers (COE) for a dredged material disposal/reclamation site. Thes sites were a pair of municipally owned sites in Morris, Illinois, and a small corporately owned site east of Ottawa, Illinois, and adjacent to the Illinois River. Other sites were also ranked as to suitability for COE involvement in their reclamation. Reclamation disposal was found to be an economically competitive alternative to near-source confined disposal for Upper Illinois Waterway dredged material.

  18. An Upper Bound on Neutron Star Masses from Models of Short Gamma-ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Scott; Bedaque, Paulo F; Miller, M Coleman

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery of two neutron stars with gravitational masses $\\approx 2~M_\\odot$ has placed a strong lower limit on the maximum mass of a slowly rotating neutron star, and with it a strong constraint on the properties of cold matter beyond nuclear density. Current upper mass limits are much looser. Here we note that, if most short gamma-ray bursts are produced by the coalescence of two neutron stars, and if the merger remnant collapses quickly, then the upper mass limit is constrained tightly. We find that if the rotation of the merger remnant is limited only by mass-shedding (which seems plausible based on current numerical studies), then the maximum gravitational mass of a slowly rotating neutron star is between $\\approx 2~M_\\odot$ and $\\approx 2.2~M_\\odot$ if the masses of neutron stars that coalesce to produce gamma-ray bursts are in the range seen in Galactic double neutron star systems. These limits are increased by $\\sim 4$% if the rotation is slowed by $\\sim 30$%, and by $\\sim 15$% if the merger remna...

  19. Quality-Controlled Upper-Air Sounding Dataset for DYNAMO/CINDY/AMIE: Development and Corrections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciesielski, Paul; Yu, Hungjui; Johnson, Richard; Yoneyama, Kunio; Katsumata, Masaki; Long, Charles N.; Wang, Junhong; Loehrer, Scot; Young, Kate; Williams, S.; Brown, William; Braun, John; Van Hove, Terese

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The upper-air sounding network for DYNAMO (Dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation or MJO) has provided an unprecedented set of observations for studying the MJO over the Indian Ocean (IO) where coupling of this oscillation with deep convection first occurs. With 72 sounding sites and dropsonde data from 13 aircraft mission, the sonde network covers the tropics from Eastern African to the West Pacific. In total nearly 26,000 sondes were collected from this network during the experiment’s 6-month extended observing period (from October 2011 to March 2012). Slightly more than half of the sondes, collected from 33 sites, are at high vertical resolution. Rigorous post-field phase processing of the sonde data included several levels of quality checks and a variety of corrections which address a number of issues (e.g., daytime dry bias, baseline surface data errors, ship deck-heating effects, artificial dry spikes in slow ascent sondes). Because of the importance of an accurate description of the moisture field in meeting the scientific goals of the experiments, particular attention is given to humidity correction and its validation. The humidity corrections, though small relative to some previous field campaigns, produced high fidelity moisture analyses in which sonde precipitable water compared well with independent estimates. An assessment of model operational analyses moisture using corrected sonde data shows an overall good agreement with the exception at upper-levels where model moisture and clouds are more abundant than the sounding data would indicate.

  20. Petroleum geology of Carter sandstone (upper Mississippian), Black Warrior Basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bearden, B.L.; Mancini, E.A.

    1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of combination petroleum traps makes the Black Warrior basin of northwestern Alabama an attractive area for continued hydrocarbon exploration. More than 1,500 wells have been drilled, and more than 90 separate petroleum pools have been discovered. The primary hydrocarbon reservoirs are Upper Mississippian sandstones. The Carter sandstone is the most productive petroleum reservoir in the basin. Productivity of the Carter sandstone is directly related to its environment of deposition. The Carter accumulated within a high constructive elongate to lobate delta, which prograded into the basin from the northwest to the southeast. Carter bar-finger and distal-bar lithofacies constitute the primary hydrocarbon reservoirs. Primary porosity in the Carter sandstone has been reduced by quartz overgrowths and calcite cementation. Petroleum traps in the Carter sandstone in central Fayette and Lamar Counties, Alabama, are primarily stratigraphic and combination (structural-stratigraphic) traps. The potential is excellent for future development of hydrocarbon reservoirs in the Upper Mississippian Carter sandstone. Frontier regions south and east of the known productive limits of the Black Warrior basin are ideal areas for continued exploration.

  1. Upper atmospheric effects of the hf active auroral research program ionospheric research instrument (HAARP IRI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eccles, V.; Armstrong, R.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The earth's ozone layer occurs in the stratosphere, primarily between 10 and 30 miles altitude. The amount of ozone, O3, present is the result of a balance between production and destruction processes. Experiments have shown that natural processes such as auroras create molecules that destroy O. One family of such molecules is called odd nitrogen of which nitric oxide (NO) is an example. Because the HAARP (HF Active Auroral Research Program) facility is designed to mimic and investigate certain natural processes, a study of possible effects of HAARP on the ozone layer was conducted. The study used a detailed model of the thermal and chemical effects of the high power HF beam, which interacts with free electrons in the upper atmosphere above 50 miles altitude. It was found only a small fraction of the beam energy goes into the production of odd nitrogen molecules, whereas odd nitrogen is efficiently produced by auroras. Since the total energy emitted by HAARP in the year is some 200,000 times less than the energy deposited in the upper atmosphere by auroras, the study demonstrates that HAARP HF beam experiments will cause no measurable depletion of the earth's ozone layer.... Ozone, Ozone depletion, Ozone layer, Odd nitrogen, Nitric oxide, HAARP Emitter characteristics.

  2. Open upper plenum of LOF thermal hydraulics and inherent control rod insertion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sienicki, J.J.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In liquid-metal reactor (LMR) hypothetical transients for which normal scram is postulated not to occur, the thermal expansion of the control rod drivelines (CRDs) as they are washed by the hotter core effluent tends to insert the control assemblies (CAs) further into the core, thereby providing negative reactivity. A number of concepts to enhance the heatup-induced elongation of drivelines is being proposed involving both design features of the drivelines as well as flow control features of the drivelines and the upper internals structure (UIS). Reported here are the results of an analysis in which the COMMIX-1A computer code was used to investigate the three-dimensional thermal-hydraulic behavior in the upper plenum of a 425-MW(t) pool-type LMR during a loss-of-flow (LOF) transient and its influence on the driveline heatup and expansion. The calculations consider an open plenum geometry, which does not incorporate a UIS or CRD shroud tubes such that the drivelines are directly exposed to the multidimensional plenum flow. The objective of the present work is to define reference cases for inherent CRD insertion in which thermal-hydraulic features that might enhance the driveline heatup but, on the other hand, whose effects may be quantitatively sensitive to design details are completely absent.

  3. Results from simulated upper-plenum aerosol transport and aerosol resuspension experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, A.L.; Pattison, W.L.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent calculational results published as part of the Battelle-Columbus BMI-2104 source term study indicate that, for some LWR accident sequences, aerosol deposition in the reactor primary coolant system (PCS) can lead to significant reductions in the radionuclide source term. Aerosol transport and deposition in the PCS have been calculated in this study using the TRAP-MELT 2 computer code, which was developed at Battelle-Columbus; the status of validation of the TRAP-MELT 2 code has been described in an Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) report. The objective of the ORNL TRAP-MELT Validation Project, which is sponsored by the Fuel Systems Behavior Research Branch of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, is to conduct simulated reactor-vessel upper-plenum aerosol deposition and transport tests. The results from these tests will be used in the ongoing effort to validate TRAP-MELT 2. The TRAP-MELT Validation Project includes two experimental subtasks. In the Aerosol Transport Tests, aerosol transport in a vertical pipe is being studied; this geometry was chosen to simulate aerosol deposition and transport in the reactor-vessel upper-plenum. To date, four experiments have been performed; the results from these tests are presented in this paper. 7 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Response of the upper ocean to a large summertime injection of smoke in the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mettlach, T.R.; Haney, R.L.; Garwood R.W. Jr.; Ghan, S.J.

    1987-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A one-dimensional oceanic planetary boundary layer model is used to investigate the response of the upper ocean to the atmospheric conditions which are predicted to develop following a hypothetical nuclear exchange. The ocean model is driven by the surface heat and momentum fluxes predicted by an atmospheric general circulation model following a summertime injection of 1.5 x 10/sup 14/ g of smoke from postwar fires over Europe, Asia, and North America. Although the specific response of the upper ocean is highly dependent on the geographic location, the mid-latitude summertime mixed layer typically cools 3/sup 0/ to 5/sup 0/C and deepens 25 m during the first 30 days following the smoke injection. Moreover, a large fraction of this response is found to take place during a short 2- to 3-day period of very intense winds and falling air temperatures, which occurs during the first week or two after the smoke injection. copyrightAmerican Geophysical Union 1987

  5. Sequence stratigraphic framework of the Upper Jurassic Smackover and related units, western Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, C.H.; Druckman, Y. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge (United States))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Post-Norphlet Upper Jurassic subsurface rocks of the western Gulf may be divided into four sequences encompassing some 12 million years (Lower Zuni A-4). The transgressive systems tract of the lower sequence (Smackover) consists of laminated muddy carbonate rocks and is the source for upper Jurassic hydrocarbons. The highstand systems tract of the Smackover consists of blanket ooid grainstones deposited on a platform. The Buckner 'B' begins with a siliciclastic lowstand fan ('C' sand). Highstand deposits of the 'B' consist of subaqueous lagoonal evaporites and an ooid grainstone prograding barrier system. Reflux of Buckner brines into Smackover grainstones resulted in regional dolomitization. The Buckner 'A' is similar to the 'B' except that the lagoon is dominated by siliciclastics. The Gray Sands of northern Louisiana may represent a lowstand fan initiating the 'A' sequence. The last sequence (Gilmer) is dominated by siliciclastics in Arkansas and Louisiana and limestones in east Texas. Its highstand systems tract in Texas is ooid dominated and is similar to the Buckner 'B' and 'A.' The regionally extensive Bossier Shale represents the transgressive systems tract of the next major sequence (Cotton Valley). Jurassic hydrocarbon production is controlled by sequence architecture: porosity of Smackover highstand deposits are dominantly secondary, developed by exposure during sea level fall and by dolomitization during the subsequent Buckner 'B' highstand, while Buckner and Gilmer highstand porosity is primary; Smackover traps are structural because of the blanket nature of the highstand system, while Buckner traps are stratigraphic developed in progradational highstand wedges.

  6. Upper Jurassic carbonate/evaporite shelf, south Alabama and west Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, B.R.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The association of Upper Jurassic carbonates and evaporites in south Alabama and west Florida defines a brining upward and inward sequence that is indicative of deposition on an increasingly evaporitic marine shelf. Structural features that bound this evaporitic shelf were the Pensacola arch, the South Mississippi platform, and the State Line flexure. Paleo-drainage of the surrounding highlands also affected shelf salinities as fresh waters were funneled into the Covington and Manila Embayments. During the Late Jurassic, marine carbonates and evaporites of the Smackover and Lower Haynesville (Buckner) Formations were deposited over Middle Jurassic Norphlet clastics that accumulated in arid continental and marginal-marine environments. Initially, Smackover carbonate deposition was pervasive across the shallow shelf. Later, as a result of increasing water salinities, contemporaneous precipitation of central-shelf evaporites and basin-edge carbonates occurred. Maximum restriction of the basin and the culmination of subaqueous deposition resulted in the formation of a basin-wide lower Haynesville salt unit. The overlying upper Haynesville strata represents a shift to subaerial environments. Application of a shelf-basin evaporite model explains the spatial and temporal lithologic relationships observed within the study area. Onlap of evaporites over porous carbonates, due to brining-upward processes, suggest that large-scale stratigraphic traps exist within the Smackover Formation in a sparsely explored part of the basin.

  7. Tank 241-AX-104 upper vadose zone cone penetrometer demonstration sampling and analysis plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FIELD, J.G.

    1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) is the primary document describing field and laboratory activities and requirements for the tank 241-AX-104 upper vadose zone cone penetrometer (CP) demonstration. It is written in accordance with Hanford Tank Initiative Tank 241-AX-104 Upper Vadose Zone Demonstration Data Quality Objective (Banning 1999). This technology demonstration, to be conducted at tank 241-AX-104, is being performed by the Hanford Tanks Initiative (HTI) Project as a part of Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Retrieval Program (EM-30) and the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50) Tanks Focus Area. Sample results obtained as part of this demonstration will provide additional information for subsequent revisions to the Retrieval Performance Evaluation (RPE) report (Jacobs 1998). The RPE Report is the result of an evaluation of a single tank farm (AX Tank Farm) used as the basis for demonstrating a methodology for developing the data and analyses necessary to support making tank waste retrieval decisions within the context of tank farm closure requirements. The RPE includes a study of vadose zone contaminant transport mechanisms, including analysis of projected tank leak characteristics, hydrogeologic characteristics of tank farm soils, and the observed distribution of contaminants in the vadose zone in the tank farms. With limited characterization information available, large uncertainties exist as to the nature and extent of contaminants that may exist in the upper vadose zone in the AX Tank Farm. Traditionally, data has been collected from soils in the vadose zone through the installation of boreholes and wells. Soil samples are collected as the bore hole is advanced and samples are screened on site and/or sent to a laboratory for analysis. Some in-situ geophysical methods of contaminant analysis can be used to evaluate radionuclide levels in the soils adjacent to an existing borehole. However, geophysical methods require compensation for well casing interference and soil moisture content and may not be successful in some conditions. In some cases the level of interference must be estimated due to uncertainties regarding the materials used in well construction and soil conditions, Well casing deployment used for many in-situ geophysical methods is relatively expensive and geophysical methods do not generally provide real time values for contaminants. In addition, some of these methods are not practical within the boundaries of the tank farm due to physical constraints, such as underground piping and other hardware. The CP technologies could facilitate future characterization of vadose zone soils by providing vadose zone data in near real-time, reducing the number of soil samples and boreholes required, and reducing characterization costs.

  8. Chronological refinement of an ice core record at Upper Fremont Glacier in south central North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuster, Paul F. [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Boulder, Colorado (United States)] [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Boulder, Colorado (United States); White, David E. [Golden Software, Golden, Colorado (United States)] [Golden Software, Golden, Colorado (United States); Naftz, David L. [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States)] [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Cecil, L. DeWayne [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Idaho Falls, Idaho (United States)] [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Idaho Falls, Idaho (United States)

    2000-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential to use ice cores from alpine glaciers in the midlatitudes to reconstruct paleoclimatic records has not been widely recognized. Although excellent paleoclimatic records exist for the polar regions, paleoclimatic ice core records are not common from midlatitude locations. An ice core removed from the Upper Fremont Glacier in Wyoming provides evidence for abrupt climate change during the mid-1800s. Volcanic events (Krakatau and Tambora) identified from electrical conductivity measurements (ECM) and isotopic and chemical data from the Upper Fremont Glacier were reexamined to confirm and refine previous chronological estimates of the ice core. At a depth of 152 m the refined age-depth profile shows good agreement (1736{+-}10 A.D.) with the {sup 14}C age date (1729{+-}95 A.D.). The {delta}{sup 18}O profile of the Upper Fremont Glacier (UFG) ice core indicates a change in climate known as the Little Ice Age (LIA). However, the sampling interval for {delta}{sup 18}O is sufficiently large (20 cm) such that it is difficult to pinpoint the LIA termination on the basis of {delta}{sup 18}O data alone. Other research has shown that changes in the {delta}{sup 18}O variance are generally coincident with changes in ECM variance. The ECM data set contains over 125,000 data points at a resolution of 1 data point per millimeter of ice core. A 999-point running average of the ECM data set and results from f tests indicates that the variance of the ECM data decreases significantly at about 108 m. At this depth, the age-depth profile predicts an age of 1845 A.D. Results indicate the termination of the LIA was abrupt with a major climatic shift to warmer temperatures around 1845 A.D. and continuing to present day. Prediction limits (error bars) calculated for the profile ages are {+-}10 years (90% confidence level). Thus a conservative estimate for the time taken to complete the LIA climatic shift to present-day climate is about 10 years, suggesting the LIA termination in alpine regions of central North America may have occurred on a relatively short (decadal) timescale. (c) 2000 American Geophysical Union.

  9. Coal metamorphism in the upper portion of the Pennsylvanian Sturgis Formation in Western Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C.

    1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coals from the Pennsylvanian upper Sturgis Formation (Mississippian and Virginian) were sampled from a borehole in Union County, western Kentucky. The coals exhibited two discrete levels of metamorphism. The lower rank coals of high-volatile C bituminous rank were assumed to represent the normal level of metamorphism. A second set of coals of high-volatile A bituminous rank was found to be associated with sphalerite, chlorite, and twinned calcite. The latter mineral assemblages indicate that hydrothermal metamorphism was responsible for the anomalous high rank. Consideration of the sphalerite fluid-inclusion temperatures from nearby ores and coals and the time - temperature aspects of the coal metamorphism suggests that the hydrothermal metamorphic event was in the 150 to 200 C range for a brief time (10/sup 5/-10/sup 5/and yr), as opposed to the longer term (25-50m yr) 60 to 75 C ambient metamorphism.

  10. Upper bound on parity-violating neutron spin rotation in {sup 4}He

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snow, W. M.; Luo, D.; Walbridge, S. B. [Indiana University/CEEM, 2401 Milo B. Sampson Lane, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States); Bass, C. D.; Bass, T. D.; Mumm, H. P.; Nico, J. S. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Crawford, B. E. [Gettysburg College, 300 North Washington Street, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania 17325 (United States); Gan, K.; Micherdzinska, A. M.; Opper, A. K. [The George Washington University, 725 21st Street NW, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Heckel, B. R.; Swanson, H. E. [University of Washington/CENPA, Box 354290, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Markoff, D. M. [North Carolina Central University/TUNL, 1801 Fayetteville Street, Durham, North Carolina 27707 (United States); Sarsour, M. [Georgia State University, 29 Peachtree Center Avenue, Atlanta, Georgia 30303-4106 (United States); Sharapov, E. I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Zhumabekova, V. [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Al-Farabi Ave. 71, 050038 Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report an upper bound on parity-violating neutron spin rotation in {sup 4}He. This experiment is the most sensitive search for neutron-weak optical activity yet performed and represents a significant advance in precision in comparison to past measurements in heavy nuclei. The experiment was performed at the NG-6 slow-neutron beamline at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Center for Neutron Research. Our result for the neutron spin rotation angle per unit length in {sup 4}He is d{phi}/dz=[+1.7{+-}9.1(stat.){+-}1.4(sys.)]x10{sup -7} rad/m. The statistical uncertainty is smaller than current estimates of the range of possible values of d{phi}/dz in n+{sup 4}He.

  11. Analyzing propagation of low-frequency dissipative oscillations in the upper atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudenko, G V

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At a horizontally homogeneous isothermal atmosphere approximation, we derive an ordinary six-order differential equation describing linear disturbances with consideration for heat conductivity and viscosity of medium. The wave problem may be solved analytically by representing the solution through generalized hypergeometric functions only at a nonviscous heat-conducting isothermal atmosphere approximation. The analytical solution may be used to qualitatively analyze propagation of acoustic and internal gravity waves (AGWs) in the real atmosphere: a) to classify waves of different frequencies and horizontal scales according to a degree of attenuation and thus according to their ability to appear in observations and in general dynamics of the upper atmosphere; b) to describe variations in amplitude and phase characteristics of disturbances propagating in a height region with dominant dissipation; c) to analyze applicability of quasi-classical wave description to a medium with exponentially growing dissipation. ...

  12. Upper bound on the packing density of regular tetrahedra and octahedra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gravel, Simon; Kallus, Yoav

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We obtain an upper bound to the packing density of regular tetrahedra. The bound is obtained by showing the existence, in any packing of regular tetrahedra, of a set of disjoint spheres centered on tetrahedron edges, so that each sphere is not fully covered by the packing. The bound on the amount of space that is not covered in each sphere is obtained in a recursive way by building on the observation that non-overlapping regular tetrahedra cannot subtend a solid angle of $4\\pi$ around a point if this point lies on a tetrahedron edge. The proof can be readily modified to apply to other polyhedra with the same property. The resulting lower bound on the fraction of empty space in a packing of regular tetrahedra is $2.6\\ldots\\times 10^{-25}$ and reaches $1.4\\ldots\\times 10^{-12}$ for regular octahedra.

  13. Upper bound on the packing density of regular tetrahedra and octahedra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon Gravel; Veit Elser; Yoav Kallus

    2010-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We obtain an upper bound to the packing density of regular tetrahedra. The bound is obtained by showing the existence, in any packing of regular tetrahedra, of a set of disjoint spheres centered on tetrahedron edges, so that each sphere is not fully covered by the packing. The bound on the amount of space that is not covered in each sphere is obtained in a recursive way by building on the observation that non-overlapping regular tetrahedra cannot subtend a solid angle of $4\\pi$ around a point if this point lies on a tetrahedron edge. The proof can be readily modified to apply to other polyhedra with the same property. The resulting lower bound on the fraction of empty space in a packing of regular tetrahedra is $2.6\\ldots\\times 10^{-25}$ and reaches $1.4\\ldots\\times 10^{-12}$ for regular octahedra.

  14. Effect of equatorial line nodes on the upper critical field and London penetration depth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kogan, V G [Ames Laboratory; Prozorov, R [Ames Laboratory

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The upper critical field Hc2 and its anisotropy are calculated for order parameters with line nodes at the equators, kz=0, of the Fermi surface of uniaxial superconductors. It is shown that characteristic features found in Fe-based materials (a nearly linear Hc2(T) in a broad T domain, a low and increasing on warming anisotropy ?H=Hc2,ab/Hc2,c) can be caused by competing effects of the equatorial nodes and of the Fermi surface anisotropy. For certain material parameters, ?H(T)?1 may change sign upon warming, in agreement with the recorded behavior of FeTeS systems. It is also shown that the anisotropy of the penetration depth ??=?c/?ab decreases upon warming to reach ?H at Tc, in agreement with data available. For some materials ??(T) may change upon warming, from ??>1 at low Ts to ??<1 at high Ts.

  15. Upper limits for the photoproduction cross section for the Phi--(1860) pentaquark state off the deuteron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hovanes Egiyan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We searched for the {Phi}{sup --}(1860) pentaquark in the photoproduction process off the deuteron in the {Xi}{sup -} {pi}{sup -} decay channel using CLAS. The invariant mass spectrum of the {Xi}{sup -} {pi}{sup -} system does not indicate any statistically significant enhancement near the reported mass M = 1.860 GeV. The statistical analysis of the sideband-subtracted mass spectrum yields a 90% confidence level upper limit of 0.7 nb for the photoproduction cross section of {Phi}{sup --}(1860) with a consecutive decay into {Xi}{sup -} {pi}{sup -} in the photon energy range 4.5 GeV < E{sub {gamma}} < 5.5 GeV.

  16. Bimodal Distribution of Sulfuric Acid Aerosols in the Upper Haze of Venus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Peter; Crisp, David; Bardeen, Charles G; Yung, Yuk L

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The upper haze (UH) of Venus is variable on the order of days and it is populated by two particle modes. We use a 1D microphysics and vertical transport model based on the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres to evaluate whether interaction of upwelled cloud particles and sulfuric acid particles nucleated in situ on meteoric dust are able to generate the two size modes and whether their observed variability are due to cloud top vertical transient winds. Nucleation of photochemically produced sulfuric acid onto polysulfur condensation nuclei generates mode 1 cloud droplets that then diffuse upwards into the UH. Droplets generated in the UH from nucleation of sulfuric acid onto meteoric dust coagulate with the upwelled cloud particles and cannot reproduce the observed bimodal size distribution. The mass transport enabled by cloud top transient winds are able to generate a bimodal size distribution in a time scale consistent with observations. Sedimentation and convection in the middle and lower...

  17. Upper limits for undetected trace species in the stratosphere of Titan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nixon, Connor A.; Achterberg, Richard K.; Teanby, Nicholas A.; Irwin, Patrick G.; Flaud, Jean Marie; Kleiner, I.; Dehayem-kamadjeu, A.; Brown, Linda R.; Sams, Robert L.; Bezard, Bruno; Coustenis, Athena; Ansty, Todd M.; Mamoutkine, Andrei; Vinatier, Sandrine; Bjoraker, Gordon L.; Jennings, Donald E.; Romani, Paul N.; Flasar, F. M.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we describe a first quantitative search for several molecules in Titans stratosphere ni Cassini CIRS infrared spectra. These are: ammonia (NH3), methanol (CH3OH), formaldehyde (H2CO), and acetonitrile (CH3CN), all of which are predicted by photochemical models but only the last of which observed, and not in the infrared,. We find non-detections in all cases, but derive upper limits on the abundances from low-noise observations at 25 degreesS and 75 degreesN. Comparing these constraints to model predictions, we conclude that CIRS is highly unlikely to see NH3 or CH3OH emissions. However, CH3CN and H2CO are closer to CIRS detectability, and we suggest ways in which the sensitivity threshold may be lowered towards this goal.

  18. Detection of $^{133}$Xe from the Fukushima nuclear power plant in the upper troposphere above Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simgen, Hardy; Aufmhoff, Heinfried; Baumann, Robert; Kaether, Florian; Lindemann, Sebastian; Rauch, Ludwig; Schlager, Hans; Schlosser, Clemens; Schumann, Ulrich

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After the accident in the Japanese Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 large amounts of radioactivity were released and distributed in the atmosphere. Among them were also radioactive noble gas isotopes which can be used as tracers to probe global atmospheric circulation models. This work presents unique measurements of the radionuclide $^{133}$Xe from Fukushima in the upper troposphere above Germany. The measurements involve air sampling in a research jet aircraft followed by chromatographic xenon extraction and ultra-low background gas counting with miniaturized proportional counters. With this technique a detection limit of the order of 100 $^{133}$Xe atoms in liter-scale air samples (corresponding to about 100 mBq/m$^3$) is achievable. Our results proof that the $^{133}$Xe-rich ground level air layer from Fukushima was lifted up to the tropopause and distributed hemispherically. Moreover, comparisons with ground level air measurements indicate that the arrival of the radioactive plume in ...

  19. Petroleum geology of the Norphlet formation (Upper Jurassic), S. W. and offshore Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, E.A.; Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L.

    1984-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent successful gas test in the Norphlet formation (up to 26 million CF/day) at depths exceeding 20,500 ft in the Mobile Bay area demonstrate a high potential for hydrocarbon production in the Alabama offshore area. In addition, wells drilled in the upper Mobile Bay area could encounter gas condensate in the Norphlet formation; gas condensate is being produced from wells in Hatter's Pond field about 14 miles north of Mobile Bay and 45 miles north of the Lower Mobile Bay-Mary Ann field. With continued petroleum exploration, additional Norphlet petroleum fields should be discovered in southwestern and offshore Alabama in the years ahead. In light of the recent discoveries in Escambia County and in the lower Mobile Bay area, Mobile, Baldwin, and Escambia counties and Mobile Bay appear to be the most prospective hydrocarbon areas.

  20. Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis for Treatment of Deep Venous Thrombosis in the Upper Extremities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vik, Anders, E-mail: anders.vik@unn.n [University Hospital of North Norway, Department of Medicine (Norway); Holme, Pal Andre [Rikshospitalet University Hospital, Division of Haematology, Medical Department (Norway); Singh, Kulbir [University Hospital of North Norway, Department of Radiology (Norway); Dorenberg, Eric [Rikshospitalet University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Norway); Nordhus, Kare Christian; Kumar, Satish [University Hospital of North Norway, Department of Radiology (Norway); Hansen, John-Bjarne [University Hospital of North Norway, Department of Medicine (Norway)

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditional anticoagulant treatment of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in the upper extremities (UEDVT) is associated with a relatively high incidence of postthrombotic syndrome (PTS). Catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) for UEDVT would provide efficient thrombolysis with less subsequent PTS than during traditional anticoagulation. Primary efficacy, complications, and long-term results after CDT are reported in a retrospective cohort (2002-2007) of patients (n = 30) with DVT in the upper extremities. PTS was assessed by a modified Villalta scale. UEDVT was unprovoked in 11 (37%) cases and effort related in 9 (30%) cases. The median duration of symptoms prior to CDT was 7.0 days (range, 1-30); median duration of thrombolysis treatment, 70 h (range, 24-264 h); and the median amount of rt-PA infused during CDT, 52 mg (range, 19-225 mg). Major bleeding was registered in three (9%) patients, and CDT was stopped prematurely in three patients due to local hematoma. No intracerebral bleeding, clinical pulmonary embolism, or deaths occurred during treatment. Grade II (>50%) or III (>90%) lysis was present in 29 patients (97%) at the end of CDT. Bleeding complications increased by each day of delay from the debut of symptoms to the start of treatment (OR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.01-1.42). At follow-up (n = 29; median, 21 months; range, 5-58 months), 11 (38%) patients had occluded veins, whereas 18 (62%) had patent veins. However, stenosis of varying severity was present in eight of those with a patent vein. No patients had severe PTS, whereas six (21%) experienced mild PTS. In conclusion, our retrospective cohort study of patients with UEDVT showed that treatment restored venous drainage, with a subsequent low frequency of mild PTS at follow-up. Early intervention with CDT prevented bleeding complications.

  1. Tidal channel deposits in Upper Cretaceous of northern Kaiparowits Plateau, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, J.D.; McCabe, P.J.

    1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seven coarsening-upward sequences have been recognized in the 300 to 400-m thick John Henry Member of the Straight Cliffs Formation. These sequences have abundant hummocky cross-stratification and are interpreted as having formed by the progradation of wave-dominated shorelines. A detailed study of these sequences showed that in many cases channel deposits are incised into upper shoreface deposits. These channels are up t 15 m deep. Mudclasts, Ostrea and Inoceramus fragments, and pebbles are present at the base of many channels. Some channel lag deposits also contain logs with Teredolites borings. Thin units of flaser, wavy and lenticular bedding may be present at any position within the channel deposits but are most common higher in the sequences. The channels are, however, infilled predominantly with trough cross-bedded, fine to medium-grained sandstones. Some cross-beds show multiple reactivation surfaces and the bimodal nature of the paleocurrents suggests that the cross-beds were deposited by tidal currents. The presence of tidal bundles with double mud drapes in a few cross-beds confirms the interpretation of the sandstones as tidal channel deposits. At least 22 tidal bundles are present in one tidal bundle sequence, suggesting a semi-diurnal tidal cycle. Although, there is convincing evidence of tides within the channel deposits, the shoreface deposits show little evidence of reworking by tidal currents. Possible beach or intertidal mudflat deposits have a maximum thickness of 1.5 m. The Kaiparowits region during the Upper Cretaceous probably experienced, therefore, a microtidal regime with significant tidal currents being restricted to tidal inlets or estuaries.

  2. Tidal channel deposits in Upper Cretaceous of northern Kaiparowits Plateau, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, J.D.; McCabe, P.J.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seven coarsening-upward sequences have been recognized in the 300 to 400-m thick John Henry Member of the Straight Cliffs Formation. These sequences have abundant hummocky cross-stratification and are interpreted as having formed by the progradation of wave-dominated shorelines. A detailed study of these sequences showed that in many cases channel deposits are incised into upper shoreface deposits. These channels are up to 15 m deep. Mudclasts, Ostrea and Inoceramus fragments, and pebbles are present at the base of many channels. Some channel lag deposits also contain logs with Teredolites borings. Thin units of flaser, wavy and lenticular bedding may be present at any position within the channel deposits but are most common higher in the sequences. The channels are, however, infilled predominantly with trough cross-bedded, fine to medium-grained sandstones. Some crossbeds show multiple reactivation surfaces and the bimodal nature of the paleocurrents suggests that the cross-beds were deposited by tidal currents. The presence of tidal bundles with double mud drapes in a few cross-beds confirms the interpretation of the sandstones as tidal channel deposits. At least 22 tidal bundles are present in one tidal bundle sequence, suggesting a semi-diurnal tidal cycle. Although there is convincing evidence of tides within the channel deposits, the shoreface deposits show little evidence of reworking by tidal currents. Possible beach or intertidal mudflat deposits have a maximum thickness of 1.5 m. The Kaiparowits region during the Upper Cretaceous probably experience, therefore, a microtidal regime with significant tidal currents being restricted to tidal inlets or estuaries.

  3. Upper bounds on the error probabilities and asymptotic error exponents in quantum multiple state discrimination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Audenaert, Koenraad M. R., E-mail: koenraad.audenaert@rhul.ac.uk [Department of Mathematics, Royal Holloway University of London, Egham TW20 0EX (United Kingdom); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Ghent, S9, Krijgslaan 281, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Mosonyi, Milán, E-mail: milan.mosonyi@gmail.com [Física Teòrica: Informació i Fenomens Quàntics, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, ES-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Mathematical Institute, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Egry József u 1., Budapest 1111 (Hungary)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the multiple hypothesis testing problem for symmetric quantum state discrimination between r given states ?{sub 1}, …, ?{sub r}. By splitting up the overall test into multiple binary tests in various ways we obtain a number of upper bounds on the optimal error probability in terms of the binary error probabilities. These upper bounds allow us to deduce various bounds on the asymptotic error rate, for which it has been hypothesized that it is given by the multi-hypothesis quantum Chernoff bound (or Chernoff divergence) C(?{sub 1}, …, ?{sub r}), as recently introduced by Nussbaum and Szko?a in analogy with Salikhov's classical multi-hypothesis Chernoff bound. This quantity is defined as the minimum of the pairwise binary Chernoff divergences min{sub j

  4. Phase mixing of upper hybrid oscillations in a cold inhomogeneous plasma placed in an inhomogeneous magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkar, Anwesa; Maity, Chandan; Chakrabarti, Nikhil [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)] [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study phase mixing/wave breaking phenomena of upper hybrid modes in a cold inhomogeneous plasma placed in an inhomogeneous magnetic field. Inhomogeneities both in the background ion density and magnetic field profile are treated as periodic in space but independent in time. The Lagrangian fluid description is employed to obtain an exact solution of this fully nonlinear problem. It is demonstrated that the upper hybrid modes, excited by an initial local charge imbalance, break via phase mixing, induced by the inhomogeneities. It is also shown that it is possible to avoid phase mixing in excited upper hybrid oscillations in an inhomogeneous plasma containing a finite amplitude ion density fluctuation. The choice of external magnetic field is shown to have a key role in avoiding phase mixing in such oscillations. The relevance of our investigation regarding the particle acceleration in an inhomogeneous plasma has also been discussed.

  5. Technical Report: Impacts of Land Management and Climate on Agroecosystem Greenhouse Gas Exchange in the Upper Midwest United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy J. Griffis; John M. Baker

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our research is designed to improve the scientific understanding of how carbon is cycled between the land and atmosphere within a heavily managed landscape that is characteristic of the Upper Midwest. The Objectives are: 1) Quantify the seasonal and interannual variation of net ecosystem CO2 exchange of agricultural ecosystems in the Upper Midwest grown under different management strategies; 2) Partition net ecosystem CO2 exchange into photosynthesis and ecosystem respiration by combining micrometeorological and stable isotope techniques; 3) Examine the seasonal variation in canopy-scale photosynthetic discrimination and the isotope ratios of ecosystem respiration and photosynthesis.

  6. Upper bounds on the relative energy difference of pure and mixed Gaussian states with a fixed fidelity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Dodonov

    2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Exact and approximate formulas for the upper bound of the relative energy difference of two Gaussian states with the fixed fidelity between them are derived. The reciprocal formulas for the upper bound of the fidelity for the fixed value of the relative energy difference are obtained as well. The bounds appear higher for pure states than for mixed ones, and their maximal values correspond to squeezed vacuum states. In particular, to guarantee the relative energy difference less than 10%, for quite arbitrary Gaussian states, the fidelity between them must exceed the level 0.998866.

  7. Radiative Heating of the ISCCP Upper Level Cloud Regimes and its Impact on the Large-scale Tropical Circulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Wei; Schumacher, Courtney; McFarlane, Sally A.

    2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiative heating profiles of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) cloud regimes (or weather states) were estimated by matching ISCCP observations with radiative properties derived from cloud radar and lidar measurements from the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) sites at Manus, Papua New Guinea, and Darwin, Australia. Focus was placed on the ISCCP cloud regimes containing the majority of upper level clouds in the tropics, i.e., mesoscale convective systems (MCSs), deep cumulonimbus with cirrus, mixed shallow and deep convection, and thin cirrus. At upper levels, these regimes have average maximum cloud occurrences ranging from 30% to 55% near 12 km with variations depending on the location and cloud regime. The resulting radiative heating profiles have maxima of approximately 1 K/day near 12 km, with equal heating contributions from the longwave and shortwave components. Upper level minima occur near 15 km, with the MCS regime showing the strongest cooling of 0.2 K/day and the thin cirrus showing no cooling. The gradient of upper level heating ranges from 0.2 to 0.4 K/(day?km), with the most convectively active regimes (i.e., MCSs and deep cumulonimbus with cirrus) having the largest gradient. When the above heating profiles were applied to the 25-year ISCCP data set, the tropics-wide average profile has a radiative heating maximum of 0.45Kday-1 near 250 hPa. Column-integrated radiative heating of upper level cloud accounts for about 20% of the latent heating estimated by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR). The ISCCP radiative heating of tropical upper level cloud only slightly modifies the response of an idealized primitive equation model forced with the tropics-wide TRMM PR latent heating, which suggests that the impact of upper level cloud is more important to large-scale tropical circulation variations because of convective feedbacks rather than direct forcing by the cloud radiative heating profiles. However, the height of the radiative heating maxima and gradient of the heating profiles are important to determine the sign and patterns of the horizontal circulation anomaly driven by radiative heating at upper levels.

  8. An upper bound on the second order asymptotic expansion for the quantum communication cost of state redistribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nilanjana Datta; Min-Hsiu Hsieh; Jonathan Oppenheim

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    State redistribution is the protocol in which, given an arbitrary tripartite quantum state, with two of the subsystems initially being with Alice and one being with Bob, the goal is for Alice to send one of her subsystems to Bob, possibly with the help of prior shared entanglement. We derive an upper bound on the second order asymptotic expansion for the quantum communication cost of achieving state redistribution with a given finite accuracy. In proving our result, we also obtain an upper bound on the quantum communication cost of this protocol in the one-shot setting, by using the protocol of coherent state merging as a primitive.

  9. A normal-faulting seismic sequence triggered by the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake: Wholesale stress regime changes in the upper plate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kato, Aitaro

    : Wholesale stress regime changes in the upper plate Aitaro Kato*1 , Shin'ichi Sakai1 , and Kazushige Obara1 1

  10. Final Report - Inspection Limit Confirmation for Upper Head Penetration Nozzle Cracking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Michael T.; Rudland, David L.; Zhang, Tao; Wilkowski, Gery M.

    2008-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The ASME Code Case N-729-1 defines alternative examination requirements for the Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM) upper head penetration nozzle welds. The basis for these examination requirements was developed as part of an Industry program conducted by the Materials Reliability Program (MRP) through the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The results of this program were published in MRP-95 Rev. 1 and document a set of finite element weld residual stress analyses conducted on a variety of upper head penetration nozzles. The inspection zone selected by the industry was based on the stress where it was assumed that primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) would not initiate. As explained in MRP-95 Rev. 1, it has been illustrated that PWSCC does not occur in the Alloy 600 tube when the stresses are below the yield strength of that tube. Typical yield strengths at operating conditions for Alloy 600 range from 35 ksi to 65 ksi. A stress less than 20-ksi tension was chosen as a conservative range where PWSCC would not initiate. Over the last several years, Engineering Mechanics Corporation of Columbus (Emc2) has conducted welding residual stress analyses on upper head penetration J-welds made from Alloy 182 weld metal for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. These efforts were performed as a confirmatory evaluation of the industry’s analyses conducted as part of their MRP-95 Rev. 1 effort. To this point, the analyses conducted by Emc2 have not been compared to the MRP-95 Rev. 1 results or the examination zones defined in the Code Case. Therefore, this report summarizes the past Emc2 CRDM welding analyses and investigates the regions where the welding stresses may be sufficiently high to promote stress corrosion cracking (SCC). In all, 90 welding residual stress analyses were conducted by Emc2 and the largest distance below the weld where the stress drops below 20 ksi was 5 inches for the uphill weld of the 53-degree nozzle case. For the largest distance above the weld where stress drops below 20 ksi, the worst case was 1.5 inches above the downhill side of the 25-degree nozzle case. The inspection zones described in both MRP-95 Rev. 1 and Code Case N-729-1 were set at 1.0 inch for nozzle angles greater than 30 degrees or 1.5 inches for nozzle angles less than 30 degrees, above the highest or below the lowest point on the weld. In all cases analyzed by Emc2 in this effort, there was only one case where the stress was above 20 ksi outside of this inspection zone. For that case, the stresses were very close to 20 ksi at the inspection zone limit and were considered acceptable.

  11. Career Options for MBA Graduates An MBA graduate typically works in upper management positions with small and large corporations or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    Career Options for MBA Graduates An MBA graduate typically works in upper management positions with small and large corporations or nonprofit organizations. Managers are needed in all businesses. The type of job often depends on prior work experience and elective courses taken in the MBA program. Popular job

  12. Reservoir characterization of the upper Merecure and lower Oficina Formations sands in the Leona Este Field, Eastern Venezuela Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flores Millan, Maria Carolina

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The "S5", "T" and "U1" sands, traditionally described as part of the lower section of the "Oficina" Formation, and the "U2" sand, as part of the upper interval of the "Merecure" Formation, contain the largest oil remaining reserves of the Leona Este...

  13. Towards application of a climate-index for Case study in the Citarum upper river basin Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    Indonesia Ramon van Bruggen De Bilt, 2013 | Internal report; IR-2013-06 #12;#12;Towards application of a climate-index for dengue incidence Case study in the Citarum upper river basin Indonesia Master Thesis during this work and for their warm welcome during my stay in Indonesia. At last my thanks go

  14. 263ESTUARINE MICROFOSSILS AND CRETACEOUS COAL-BEARING STRATA RECOGNITION OF RELATIVE SEA-LEVEL CHANGE IN UPPER CRETACEOUS COAL-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leckie, Mark

    263ESTUARINE MICROFOSSILS AND CRETACEOUS COAL-BEARING STRATA RECOGNITION OF RELATIVE SEA-LEVEL CHANGE IN UPPER CRETACEOUS COAL- BEARING STRATA: A PALEOECOLOGICAL APPROACH USING AGGLUTINATED, Holyoke, Massachusetts 01040, U.S.A. ABSTRACT: Microfossils from Cretaceous coal-bearing strata can

  15. Glacier inventory of the upper Huasco valley, Norte Chico, Chile: glacier characteristics, glacier change and comparison with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabatel, Antoine

    Glacier inventory of the upper Huasco valley, Norte Chico, Chile: glacier characteristics, glacier Chile, Portugal 84, Casilla 3387, Santiago, Chile ABSTRACT. Results of a new glacier inventory and is not classical mountain glaciation, which poses difficulties in completing standard inventory attribute tables

  16. FEASIBILITY OF WIND TO SERVE UPPER SKAGIT'S BOW HILL TRIBAL LANDS AND FEASIBILITY UPDATE FOR RESIDENTIAL RENEWABLE ENERGY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RICH, LAUREN

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A two year wind resource assessment was conducted to determine the feasibility of developing a community scale wind generation system for the Upper Skagit Indian Tribe?s Bow Hill land base, and the project researched residential wind resource technologies to determine the feasibility of contributing renewable wind resource to the mix of energy options for our single and multi-family residential units.

  17. Drilling deep through the ocean crust into the upper mantle Benot Ildefonse (1) and Mission Moho proponents (2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    Drilling deep through the ocean crust into the upper mantle Benoît Ildefonse (1) and Mission Moho the inventory of global thermal, chemical and associated biological fluxes. Drilling an ultra-deep hole, and into the uppermost mantle is a long-standing goal of scientific ocean drilling; it remains critical to answer many

  18. Radiative heating of the ISCCP upper level cloud regimes and its impact on the large-scale tropical circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radiative heating of the ISCCP upper level cloud regimes and its impact on the large-scale tropical 2012; accepted 14 December 2012; published 31 January 2013. [1] Radiative heating profiles. The resulting radiative heating profiles have maxima of approximately 1 K/day near 12 km, with equal heating

  19. Facies architecture of the upper Calvert Bluff Formation exposed in the highwall of Big Brown Mine, Fairfield, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sturdy, Michael Dale

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The facies architecture and geometry of stratigraphic surfaces within a lignite bearing interval of the Paleocene upper Calvert Bluff Formation is mapped on a photomosaic of the 150 ft (50 m) high and 12,000 ft (4km) long �C� area highwall...

  20. Development of a Physics-based Target Shooting Game to Train Amputee Users of Multijoint Upper Limb Prostheses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loeb, Gerald E.

    For upper limb amputees, learning the control of myoelectric prostheses is difficult and challenging movements of the residual limbs can be used to control the movement of a simulated prosthesis to point virtual training applications. Introduction Compared to the human arm, the mechanical design and control

  1. Dynamics of the Upper Oceanic Layers in Terms of Surface Quasigeostrophy Theory G. LAPEYRE AND P. KLEIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lapeyre, Guillaume

    Dynamics of the Upper Oceanic Layers in Terms of Surface Quasigeostrophy Theory G. LAPEYRE AND P dynamics for nonlinear baroclinically unstable flows is examined using the concepts of potential vorticity density anomalies. Then, using the invertibility of potential vorticity, the dynamics are decomposed

  2. Fluvial facies architecture in small-scale river systems in the Upper Dupi Tila Formation, northeast Bengal Basin, Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulp, Mark

    Fluvial facies architecture in small-scale river systems in the Upper Dupi Tila Formation small-scale fining-upward cycles (average 4.5 m thick). Facies architectural elements include channel. Understanding of facies architecture and sand body geometry of this Formation is crucial in examining the issue

  3. Patterns of fish and macro-invertebrate distribution in the upper Laguna Madre: bag seines 1985-2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larimer, Amy Beth

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    . The Laguna Madre extends southward from Corpus Christi Bay, Texas, into Mexico. In Texas, it is divided into upper and lower sections by an area of sand dunes and mudflats known as the Land Cut, about 80 km southwest of the Laguna?s juncture with Corpus...

  4. Comparative assessment of three approaches for deriving stream power plots along long profiles in the upper Hunter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comparative assessment of three approaches for deriving stream power plots along long profiles in the upper Hunter River catchment, New South Wales, Australia Vikrant Jain a,*, Nicholas Preston b , Kirstie, Australia b School of Earth Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, P.O. Box 600, Wellington, New

  5. Endovascular Embolization of Bronchial Artery Originating from the Upper Portion of Aortic Arch in Patients with Massive Hemoptysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Sen, E-mail: jasfly77@vip.163.com; Sun, Xi-Wen, E-mail: xwsun@citiz.net; Yu, Dong, E-mail: yudong_mail@126.com; Jie, Bing, E-mail: jbshh@163.com [Tongji University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Shanghai Pulmonary Hospital (China)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    PurposeOur experience with endovascular embolization (EVE) of the bronchial artery (BA) originating from the upper portion of the aortic arch (AA) in six patients is described.MethodsAltogether, 818 patients with hemoptysis underwent multidetector row computed tomography angiography (MDCTA) before EVE or AA angiography during EVE. Aberrant BAs originating from the upper portion of the AA were the source of massive hemoptysis in six patients (0.73 %). MDCT angiograms and/or Digital subtraction angiograms were retrospectively reviewed. Selective catheterization and embolization were performed.ResultsThe ostia of the BAs were located on the superior surface of the AA between the brachiocephalic trunk and left common carotid artery in three patients, the junction of the aorta and medial surface of the left subclavian artery in two, and the posterior wall of the upper portion of the AA in one. The six BAs comprised two common trunks, three single right sides, and one single left side. The targeted vessels were successfully catheterized and embolized by a coaxial microcatheter system using polyvinyl alcohol particles. Other pathologic BAs and nonbronchial systemic arteries also were embolized. Bleeding was immediately controlled in all patients with no recurrence of hemoptysis. No procedure-related complications occurred.ConclusionsApplication of EVE of anomalous origin of BAs in patients with hemoptysis is important, as demonstrated in the six reported patients. MDCTA before EVE or AA angiography during EVE is critical to avoid missing a rare aberrant BA originating from the upper portion of the AA.

  6. Cyclostratigraphy of the Upper Cretaceous Niobrara Formation, Western Interior, U.S.A.: A ConiacianSantonian orbital timescale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sageman, Brad

    Cyclostratigraphy of the Upper Cretaceous Niobrara Formation, Western Interior, U.S.A.: A Coniacian Niobrara formation spectral analysis orbital timescale The Turonian­Campanian Niobrara Formation in Colorado (40° 17 N, 104° 38 W; 40° 14 N, 104° 41 W). The study utilized high-resolution time series

  7. The Carnot efficiencybetween these temperatures is: This provides an absolute upper limit to the Rankine cycle effi-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Y. A.

    to the Rankine cycle effi- ciency. Heat Absorbed from Stream 3 Power Produced by Steam Turbine Required Power a steam cycle alongsidethe gas turbine cycle. LITERATURE CITED Christodoulou,K., Diploma Thesis, N Output of Gas Turbine For the Gas Turbine Cycle Calculated for Case 2, Upper Exhaust Temperature T6

  8. Influence of upper-ocean stratification on tropical cyclone-induced surface cooling in the Bay of Bengal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in oceanic stratification rather than to differences in TC wind energy input. During the postmonsoon season, a deeper thermal stratification combined with a considerable upper-ocean freshening strongly inhibits that TCs primarily draw their energy from evaporation at the ocean surface [Riehl, 1950]. TCs generally

  9. On the Loss of Wind-Induced Near-Inertial Energy to Turbulent Mixing in the Upper Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    On the Loss of Wind-Induced Near-Inertial Energy to Turbulent Mixing in the Upper Ocean XIAOMING-inertial energy available for ocean mixing at depth is, at most, 0.1 TW. This confirms a recent suggestion energy source for the diapycnal mixing in the ocean required to maintain the meridional over- turning

  10. E. Guilyardi G. Madec L. Terray The role of lateral ocean physics in the upper ocean thermal balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guilyardi, Eric

    inertia and to its opacity, the ocean stores vast amounts of energy, away from a direct contactE. Guilyardi á G. Madec á L. Terray The role of lateral ocean physics in the upper ocean thermal balance of a coupled ocean-atmosphere GCM Received: 24 January 2000 / Accepted: 11 September 2000 Abstract

  11. On the existence of energetic atoms in the upper atmosphere of exoplanet HD209458b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-Jaffel, Lotfi

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stellar irradiation and particles forcing strongly affect the immediate environment of extrasolar giant planets orbiting near their parent stars. Here, we use Far Ultraviolet (FUV) emission spectra from HD209458 in the wavelength range (1180-1710)A to bring new insight to the composition and energetic processes in play in the gas nebula around the transiting planetary companion. In that frame, we consider up-to-date atmospheric models of the giant exoplanet where we implement non-thermal line broadening to simulate the impact on the transit absorption of superthermal atoms (HI, OI, and CII) populating the upper layers of the nebula. Our sensitivity study shows that for all existing models, a significant line broadening is required for OI and probably for CII lines in order to fit the observed transit absorptions. In that frame, we show that OI and CII are preferentially heated compared to the background gas with effective temperatures as large as T_{OI}/T_B~10 for OI and T_{CII}/T_B~5 for CII. By contrast, th...

  12. High temperature energy conversion for the Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramalingam, M.L. [UES, Inc., Dayton, OH (United States); Lamp, T.R. [Wright Lab., Wright Patterson AFB, OH (United States); Jacox, M.; Kennedy, F. [Phillips Lab., Kirtland AFB, NM (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary studies were conducted to assess the benefits of the Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) concept and key components including high temperature thermionic converters, have been tested and evaluated. Advanced radiatively coupled heat pipe cooled thermionic converters with rhenium and tungsten emitters were characterized individually for integration in a modular power unit. The converter with the tungsten emitter was performance mapped in the temperature range of 1,750 K to 2,400 K in order to conform to the ISUS requirements. Higher off-design temperatures yielded power densities as high as 12 watts/sq. cm. in the cesium pressure range of 4 to 9 torr. The converter with the rhenium emitter was tested in the temperature range of 1,575 K to 1,950 K and produced 10.5 watts/sq. cm. at the highest temperature. Dynamic switching characteristics were also measured to evaluate the possibility of interfacing a pulse width modulated (PWM) power regulator directly to a thermionic source.

  13. Combined upper limit on Standard Model Higgs boson production at CDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buzatu Adrian

    2012-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Higgs boson is the only elementary particle predicted by the Standard Model (SM) that has neither been confirmed nor refuted. The CDF collaboration has performed SM Higgs searches in many channels using $p\\pbar$ collisions at a centre-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}=1.96\\tev$. We present the latest combined Higgs boson search at CDF. Since the previous year's combination, the sensitivity is increased through the addition of new channels, the improvement of existing channels and the addition of new data samples. We also use the latest parton distribution functions and $gg \\rightarrow H$ theoretical cross sections when modelling the signal event yields. Using integrated luminosities of up to 8.2 $\\invfb$, we observe a good agreement between data and the background prediction. Since we do not see a Higgs boson excess, we set 95% CL upper limits on the Higgs boson cross section in the range between 100 and 200 $\\gevcc$, with 5 $\\gevcc$ increments. The observed (expected) limits for a 115 and a 165 $\\gevcc$ Higgs boson are 1.55 (1.49) and 0.75 (0.79) $\\times$ SM, respectively. Since last year, the Higgs boson excluded range by CDF is extended to 156.5 - 173.7 and 100 - 104.5 $\\gevcc$.

  14. Practices and Processes of Leading High Performance Home Builders in the Upper Midwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Von Thoma, E.; Ojczyk, C.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership team proposed this study to gain insight into the business, sales, and construction processes of successful high performance builders. The knowledge gained by understanding the high performance strategies used by individual builders, as well as the process each followed to move from traditional builder to high performance builder, will be beneficial in proposing more in-depth research to yield specific action items to assist the industry at large transform to high performance new home construction. This investigation identified the best practices of three successful high performance builders in the upper Midwest. In-depth field analysis of the performance levels of their homes, their business models, and their strategies for market acceptance were explored. All three builders commonly seek ENERGY STAR certification on their homes and implement strategies that would allow them to meet the requirements for the Building America Builders Challenge program. Their desire for continuous improvement, willingness to seek outside assistance, and ambition to be leaders in their field are common themes. Problem solving to overcome challenges was accepted as part of doing business. It was concluded that crossing the gap from code-based building to high performance based building was a natural evolution for these leading builders.

  15. Upper Bounds on the Noise Threshold for Fault-tolerant Quantum Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julia Kempe; Oded Regev; Falk Unger; Ronald de Wolf

    2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove new upper bounds on the tolerable level of noise in a quantum circuit. We consider circuits consisting of unitary k-qubit gates each of whose input wires is subject to depolarizing noise of strength p, as well as arbitrary one-qubit gates that are essentially noise-free. We assume that the output of the circuit is the result of measuring some designated qubit in the final state. Our main result is that for p>1-\\Theta(1/\\sqrt{k}), the output of any such circuit of large enough depth is essentially independent of its input, thereby making the circuit useless. For the important special case of k=2, our bound is p>35.7%. Moreover, if the only allowed gate on more than one qubit is the two-qubit CNOT gate, then our bound becomes 29.3%. These bounds on p are notably better than previous bounds, yet are incomparable because of the somewhat different circuit model that we are using. Our main technique is the use of a Pauli basis decomposition, which we believe should lead to further progress in deriving such bounds.

  16. Upper-hybrid wave-driven Alfvenic turbulence in magnetized dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misra, A. P. [Department of Physics, Umeaa University, SE-901 87 Umeaa (Sweden); Banerjee, S. [Department of Mathematics, Politecnico di Torino, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The nonlinear dynamics of coupled electrostatic upper-hybrid (UH) and Alfven waves (AWs) is revisited in a magnetized electron-ion plasma with charged dust impurities. A pair of nonlinear equations that describe the interaction of UH wave envelopes (including the relativistic electron mass increase) and the density as well as the compressional magnetic field perturbations associated with the AWs are solved numerically to show that many coherent solitary patterns can be excited and saturated due to modulational instability of unstable UH waves. The evolution of these solitary patterns is also shown to appear in the states of spatiotemporal coherence, temporal as well as spatiotemporal chaos, due to collision and fusion among the patterns in stochastic motion. Furthermore, these spatiotemporal features are demonstrated by the analysis of wavelet power spectra. It is found that a redistribution of wave energy takes place to higher harmonic modes with small wavelengths, which, in turn, results in the onset of Alfvenic turbulence in dusty magnetoplasmas. Such a scenario can occur in the vicinity of Saturn's magnetosphere as many electrostatic solitary structures have been observed there by the Cassini spacecraft.

  17. Upper and lower Higgs boson mass bounds from a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Gerhold

    2010-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by the advent of the Large Hadron Collider the aim of the present work is the non-perturbative determination of the cutoff-dependent upper and lower mass bounds of the Standard Model Higgs boson based on first principle calculations, in particular not relying on additional information such as the triviality property of the Higgs-Yukawa sector or indirect arguments like vacuum stability considerations. For that purpose the lattice approach is employed to allow for a non-perturbative investigation of a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model, serving here as a reasonable simplification of the full Standard Model, containing only those fields and interactions which are most essential for the intended Higgs boson mass determination. These are the complex Higgs doublet as well as the top and bottom quark fields and their mutual interactions. To maintain the chiral character of the Standard Model Higgs-fermion coupling also on the lattice, the latter model is constructed on the basis of the Neuberger overlap operator, obeying then an exact global lattice chiral symmetry.

  18. Upper limit on the cross section for reactor antineutrinos changing 22Na decay rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. J. de Meijer; S. W. Steyn

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present results of a long-term observation of the decay of 22Na in the presence of a nuclear fission reactor. The measurements were made outside the containment wall of and underneath the Koeberg nuclear power plant near Cape Town, South Africa. Antineutrino fluxes ranged from ~5*10^11 to 1.6*10^13 cm^-2 s^-1 during this period. We show that the coincidence summing technique provides a sensitive tool to measure a change in the total decay constant as well as the branching ratio between EC and beta+ decay of 22Na to the first excited state in 22Ne. We observe a relative change in count rate between reactor-ON and reactor-OFF equal to (-0.51+/-0.11)*10^-4. After evaluating possible systematic uncertainties we conclude that the effect is either due to a hidden instrumental cause or due to an interaction between antineutrinos and the 22Na nucleus. An upper limit of ~0.03 barn has been deduced for observing any change in the decay rate of 22Na due to antineutrino interactions.

  19. Detection of $^{133}$Xe from the Fukushima nuclear power plant in the upper troposphere above Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy Simgen; Frank Arnold; Heinfried Aufmhoff; Robert Baumann; Florian Kaether; Sebastian Lindemann; Ludwig Rauch; Hans Schlager; Clemens Schlosser; Ulrich Schumann

    2014-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    After the accident in the Japanese Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 large amounts of radioactivity were released and distributed in the atmosphere. Among them were also radioactive noble gas isotopes which can be used as tracers to test global atmospheric circulation models. This work presents unique measurements of the radionuclide $^{133}$Xe from Fukushima in the upper troposphere above Germany. The measurements involve air sampling in a research jet aircraft followed by chromatographic xenon extraction and ultra-low background gas counting with miniaturized proportional counters. With this technique a detection limit of the order of 100 $^{133}$Xe atoms in litre-scale air samples (corresponding to about 100 mBq/m$^3$) is achievable. Our results provide proof that the $^{133}$Xe-rich ground level air layer from Fukushima was lifted up to the tropopause and distributed hemispherically. Moreover, comparisons with ground level air measurements indicate that the arrival of the radioactive plume at high altitude over Germany occurred several days before the ground level plume.

  20. TWO WIDE PLANETARY-MASS COMPANIONS TO SOLAR-TYPE STARS IN UPPER SCORPIUS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ireland, M. J. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy (SIfA), School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Kraus, A. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Martinache, F. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Subaru Telescope, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Law, N. [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto M5S 3H4, Ontario (Canada); Hillenbrand, L. A. [Department of Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MC 105-24, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    At wide separations, planetary-mass and brown dwarf companions to solar-type stars occupy a curious region of parameter space not obviously linked to binary star formation or solar system scale planet formation. These companions provide insight into the extreme case of companion formation (either binary or planetary), and due to their relative ease of observation when compared to close companions, they offer a useful template for our expectations of more typical planets. We present the results from an adaptive optics imaging survey for wide ({approx}50-500 AU) companions to solar-type stars in Upper Scorpius. We report one new discovery of a {approx}14 M{sub J} companion around GSC 06214-00210and confirm that the candidate planetary-mass companion 1RXS J160929.1-210524 detected by Lafreniere et al. is in fact comoving with its primary star. In our survey, these two detections correspond to {approx}4% of solar-type stars having companions in the 6-20 M{sub J} mass and {approx}200-500 AU separation range. This figure is higher than would be expected if brown dwarfs and planetary-mass companions were drawn from an extrapolation of the binary mass function. Finally, we discuss implications for the formation of these objects.

  1. Evaluation of the upper shelf energy for ferritic steels from miniaturized Charpy specimen data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurishita, Hiroaki; Narui, Minoru; Kayano, Hideo [Tohoku Univ., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. for Materials Research; Shibahara, Itaru; Mizuta, Syunji [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The small specimen technology is required in mechanical testing of irradiated materials because of very limited irradiation volume in currently available high flux reactors and future accelerator-based high energy neutron sources. In order to develop the methodology to evaluate the upper shelf energy (USE) for full size Charpy specimens of ferritic steels from miniaturized specimen data, the effects of specimen size and notch dimensions (notch root radius and notch depth) on the USE were studied for high strength ferritic steels with relatively low USE values of 135 and 107 J. The USE for miniaturized specimens, normalized by Bb{sup 2} or (Bb){sup 3/2} (B is the specimen thickness, b is the ligament size), was essentially independent of specimen size and tended to decrease with increasing the elastic stress concentration factor, K{sub t}, but the K{sub t} dependence was not significant. The normalized USE for full size specimens was considerably lower than that for miniaturized specimens. A general relationship was found that allows to determine the USE of full size specimens of ferritic steels directly from miniaturized specimen data.

  2. Influence of anticlinal growth on upper Miocene turbidite deposits, Elk Hills field, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, S.A. (Bechtel Petroleum Operations, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)); McJannet, G.S. (Dept. of Energy, Tupman, CA (United States))

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Growth of subsea anticlines during deposition of the upper Miocene 24Z and 26R sandstones at Elk Hills caused the development of several sinuous, lenticular sand bodies. later structural growth enhanced the trap characteristics of these sandstones. Both sandstones are in the uppermost portion of the Elk Hills Shale Member of the Monterey Formation and contain channel-fill and overbank deposits of sand-rich turbidite systems. At the onset of turbidite deposition, low relief subsea anticlines separated broad basins which progressively deepened to the northeast. Channel-fill deposits of coarse-grained sand generally followed the axes of these northwest-southeast-trending basins. At several sites, channel-fill deposits also spilled north across anticlinal axes into the next lower basins. Wide bands of overbank sand and mud were deposited at sand body edges on the flat basin floors. Midway through turbidite deposition, a period of anticlinal growth substantially raised subsea relief. Channel-fill deposits continued in narrower basins but passed north into deeper basin only around well-defined sites at the anticlines' downplunge termini. Narrow basin shapes and higher anticline relief prevented significant overbank deposition. With Pliocene to Holocene uplift of the late Miocene structural trends, stratigraphic mounding of the north-directed channel-fill deposits helped create structural domes at 24Z, 2B and Northwest Stevens pools. In sand bodies lacking significant overbank deposits prevented oil entrapment in sand bodies deposited at times of low anticlinal relief.

  3. GeV Gamma-ray Flux Upper Limits from Clusters of Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    al., M Ackermann et

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The detection of diffuse radio emission associated with clusters of galaxies indicates populations of relativistic leptons infusing the intracluster medium. Those electrons and positrons are either injected into and accelerated directly in the intracluster medium, or produced as secondary pairs by cosmic-ray ions scattering on ambient protons. Radiation mechanisms involving the energetic leptons together with decay of neutral pions produced by hadronic interactions have the potential to produce abundant GeV photons. Here, we report on the search for GeV emission from clusters of galaxies using data collected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) from August 2008 to February 2010. Thirty-three galaxy clusters have been selected according to their proximity and high mass, X-ray flux and temperature, and indications of non-thermal activity for this study. We report upper limits on the photon flux in the range 0.2-100 GeV towards a sample of observed clusters (typical va...

  4. Combined upper limit on Standard Model Higgs boson production at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adrian, Buzatu; /McGill U.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Higgs boson is the only elementary particle predicted by the Standard Model (SM) that has neither been confirmed nor refuted. The CDF collaboration has performed SM Higgs searches in many channels using p{bar p} collisions at a centre-of-mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. We present the latest combined Higgs boson search at CDF. Since the previous year's combination, the sensitivity is increased through the addition of new channels, the improvement of existing channels and the addition of new data samples. We also use the latest parton distribution functions and gg {yields} H theoretical cross sections when modelling the signal event yields. Using integrated luminosities of up to 8.2 fb{sup -1}, we observe a good agreement between data and the background prediction. Since we do not see a Higgs boson excess, we set 95% CL upper limits on the Higgs boson cross section in the range between 100 and 200 GeV/c{sup 2}, with 5 GeV/c{sup 2} increments. The observed (expected) limits for a 115 and a 165 GeV/c{sup 2} Higgs boson are 1.55 (1.49) and 0.75 (0.79) x SM, respectively. Since last year, the Higgs boson excluded range by CDF is extended to 156.5 - 173.7 and 100 - 104.5 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  5. ON THE COMBINATION OF IMAGING-POLARIMETRY WITH SPECTROPOLARIMETRY OF UPPER SOLAR ATMOSPHERES DURING SOLAR ECLIPSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qu, Z. Q.; Deng, L. H.; Dun, G. T.; Chang, L.; Zhang, X. Y.; Cheng, X. M.; Qu, Z. N.; Xue, Z. K.; Ma, L. [Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650011 (China); Allington-Smith, J.; Murray, G. [Center for Advanced Instrumentation, University of Durham (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from imaging polarimetry (IP) of upper solar atmospheres during a total solar eclipse on 2012 November 13 and spectropolarimetry of an annular solar eclipse on 2010 January 15. This combination of techniques provides both the synoptic spatial distribution of polarization above the solar limb and spectral information on the physical mechanism producing the polarization. Using these techniques together we demonstrate that even in the transition region, the linear polarization increases with height and can exceed 20%. IP shows a relatively smooth background distribution in terms of the amplitude and direction modified by solar structures above the limb. A map of a new quantity that reflects direction departure from the background polarization supplies an effective technique to improve the contrast of this fine structure. Spectral polarimetry shows that the relative contribution to the integrated polarization over the observed passband from the spectral lines decreases with height while the contribution from the continuum increases as a general trend. We conclude that both imaging and spectral polarimetry obtained simultaneously over matched spatial and spectral domains will be fruitful for future eclipse observations.

  6. Magnetic stratigraphy and biostratigraphy of the Piacenzian (Upper Pliocene) at Monte San Nicola (Sicily)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Channell, J.E.T.; Sprovieri, R.; Di Stefano, E.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the Neogene, the Mediterranean was a rather unique biogeographic province. For this reason, first and last occurrences of Neogene species recorded in the Mediterranean region may not be synchronous with those recorded in the open oceans. This has important implications as most of the Neogene stage boundaries are defined on the basis of Mediterranean type sections. The most direct way to determine the relative timing of Mediterranean and open ocean datums is through correlation with the polarity time scale. Such correlations are not available for the Mediterranean Pliocene. The Trubi pelagic limestones and Monte narbone marls which characterize the SicilianPliocene are not ideal for magnetic stratigraphy due to weak remnant intensities and an ubiquitous normal polarity overprint. However, at Monte San Nicola, a magnetic stratigraphy has been resolved by stepwise demagnetization in small temperature increments. The upper and lower bounds of the Gauss Epoch, and the Mammoth and Kaena polarity events can be correlated to well defined planktonic foraminiferal and calcareous nannofossil datums. Hence the synchronism of these datums between the Mediterranean and the open ocean can be tested. The most notable discrepancy is in the last occurrence of G. margaritae which occurs at the base of the Gauss in most open marine sections, but is found at the top of the Gilbert at Monte San Nicola.

  7. Norphlet formation (Upper Jurassic) of southwestern and offshore Alabama: environments of deposition and petroleum geology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, E.A.; Bearden, B.L.; Mink, R.M.; Wilkerson, R.P.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Upper Jurassic Norphlet sediments in southwestern and offshore Alabama accumulated under arid climatic conditions. The Appalachian Mountains of the eastern United States extended into southwestern Alabama to provide a barrier for air and water circulation during the deposition of the Norphlet Formation. These mountains produced topographic conditions that contributed to the arid climate, and they affected sedimentation. Norphlet paleogeography in southwestern Alabama was dominated by a broad desert plain, rimmed to the north and east by the Appalachians and to the south by a developing shallow sea. The desert plain extended westward into eastern and central Mississippi. Norphlet hydrocarbon potential in southwestern and offshore Alabama is excellent; six oil and gas fields already have been established. Petroleum traps discovered to date are primarily structural traps involving salt anticlines, faulted salt anticlines, and extensional fault traps associated with salt movement. Reservoir rocks consist primarily of quartz-rich sandstones that are eolian, wadi, and marine in origin. Porosity is principally secondary (dissolution) with some intergranular porosity. Smackover algal carbonate mudstones were probably the source for the Norphlet hydrocarbons. Jurassic oil generation and migration probably were initiated in the Early Cretaceous.

  8. Diagenesis of fluvial sands in Norphlet Formation (Upper Jurassic), Escambia County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keighin, C.W.; Schenk, C.J.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation is an important hydrocarbon reservoir in Baldwin and Mobile Counties and offshore in Mobile Bay, Alabama. The formation is not productive in the Little Escambia Creek field, Escambia County, but underlies the productive Smackover Formation at a depth of approximately 15,500 ft (4725 m). The Norphlet sandstones examined in cores from two drill holes are largely fluvial in origin and consist of moderately to well-sorted, very fine to coarse-grained feldspathic sandstones extensively altered by a complex sequence of diagenetic reactions. Visible evidence of chemical and mechanical compaction is relatively minor in the sandstones. Paucity of compaction suggests that extensive early cementation by anhydrite and/or calcite reduced compaction; these cements were subsequently removed by migrating fluids. Porosity, both intergranular and intragranular, is generally well developed. Intergranular pores are due primarily to partial to complete dissolution of cements and mineral grains, especially feldspar. Intragranular pores are largely the result of partial leaching of rock fragments and of microporosity formed by precipitation of clay minerals in earlier dissolution pores.

  9. Endoscopic Ultrasound of the Upper Gastrointestinal Tract and Mediastinum: Diagnosis and Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prasad, Priyajit [Medical University of South Carolina, Digestive Disease Center (United States); Wittmann, Johannes; Pereira, Stephen P. [Royal Free and University College London Medical School, UCL Institute of Hepatology (United Kingdom)], E-mail: stephen.pereira@ucl.ac.uk

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has developed significantly over the last two decades and has had a considerable impact on the imaging and staging of mass lesions within or in close proximity to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In conjunction with conventional imaging such as helical computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, the indications for EUS include (1) differentiating between benign and malignant lesions of the mediastinum and upper GI tract, (2) staging malignant tumors of the lung, esophagus, stomach, and pancreas prior to surgery or oncological treatment, (3) excluding common bile duct stones before laparoscopic cholecystectomy, thereby avoiding the need for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in some patients, and (4) assessing suspected lesions that are either equivocal or not seen on conventional imaging. In recent years, EUS has charted a course similar to that taken by ERCP, evolving from a purely diagnostic modality to one that is interventional and therapeutic. These indications include (5) obtaining a tissue diagnosis by EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration or trucut-type needle biopsy and (6) providing therapy such as coeliac plexus neurolysis and pancreatic pseudocyst drainage-in many cases, more accurately and safely than conventional techniques. Emerging investigational techniques include EUS-guided enteric anastomosis formation and fine-needle injection therapy for malignant disease.

  10. Development of a forestry plan for the upper catchment of the South Esk to provide options for socio-economic benefits and taking account of stakeholder participation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lew, Siew Yan

    for landowners and land managers within the upper catchment, as well as develop a preliminary forestry plan with suggestions about appropriate planting models to be applied in different areas within the upper catchment of the South Esk river, and to study...

  11. Samples of the Abstract, the Title Page, the Copyright Page, and the Approval Page The Title of the Dissertation in Upper and Lower Case Letters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holsinger, Kent

    of the Dissertation in Upper and Lower Case Letters Jane Mary Doe, PhD University of Connecticut, [year of graduation quality for the abstract are the same as those for the dissertation. If the abstract extends onto a second of graduation] The abstract is not paginated. #12;The Title of the Dissertation in Upper and Lower Case Letters

  12. Upper mantle seismic velocity variations beneath northern Tanza-nia coupled with the structure of the 410 and 660 km discontinuities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritsema, Jeroen

    of the litho- sphere or by a broad thermal upwelling extending from the lower mantle into the upper mantle: plume, rift, eastAfrica, craton. INTRODUCTION Although eastAfrica has long been regarded as a classic. 1). In the first study, relative traveltimes from P and S waves were inverted for upper mantle

  13. Evidence for an eolian origin for the silt-enriched soil mantles on the glaciated uplands of eastern Upper Michigan, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaetzl, Randall

    of eastern Upper Michigan, USA Randall J. Schaetzl a,, Walter L. Loope b,1 a Department of Geography, 128 Geography Building, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1117, USA b U.S. Geological Survey, P uplands in the eastern Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Previous research on this deposit, which we

  14. Rating curves and estimation of average water depth at the upper Negro River based on satellite altimeter data and modeled discharges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Rating curves and estimation of average water depth at the upper Negro River based on satellite for 21 ``virtual gauge stations'' located at the upper Negro River (Amazon Basin, Brazil). A virtual station can be defined as any crossing of water body surface (i.e., large rivers) by radar altimeter

  15. A New Upper Limit on the Polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher O'Dell

    2002-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMB) is an invaluable probe of the conditions of the early universe. Recent measurements of its spatial anisotropy have allowed accurate determinations of several fundamental cosmological parameters, such as the curvature of the universe, the shape of the spectrum of primordial density fluctuations, and the contribution of baryons, dark matter, and dark energy to the overall energy density of the universe. In addition to being spatially non-uniform, the CMB is theorized to be slightly polarized. Measurements of this polarization, particularly at large angular scales, have the potential to provide information on primordial gravitational waves, theories of inflation, and the ionization history of the universe, as well as help further constrain cosmological parameters. Polarization has not yet been detected in the CMB. This thesis describes a recent search for CMB polarization at large angular scales, conducted in the spring of 2000 at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. After a general introduction on both CMB polarization and general microwave polarimetry, details of the experiment itself are given, as well as a full description of the data selection and analysis techniques. Using these techniques, our data lead to a new upper limit on CMB polarization at large angular scales of 10 $\\mu$K in both E- and B-type polarization at 95% confidence. If B-polarization is assumed to be zero, the limit for E-type polarization is lowered to 8 $\\mu$K. This experiment is the first of a new breed of highly-sensitive instruments that will one day map out this interesting property of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation.

  16. Subsidence and infilling patterns during deposition of Upper Cretaceous Mancos Shale, northwest Colorado and northeast Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.C. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Upper Cretaceous Mancos Shale of northwest Colorado and northeast Utah was deposited during the Coniacian through the late Campanian in an offshore environment within a broad U-shaped embayment along the western margin of the Cretaceous epeiric seaway. A detailed study of the Mancos using geophysical logs and surface observations reveals several major and minor shifts in source direction. The Coniacian and Santonian part of the Mancos consists of overlapping lobate shale wedges that generally thin and grade to the east and southeast into calcareous shales equivalent to the Niobrara Formation. The shoreline during this period was about 100 to 150 mi west and northwest of the study area. A southern source was a major influence during the early Campanian, when silty and sandy shale sediments, which formed the highly gas-productive Mancos B interval prograded to the north across the study area. The Mancos B interval contains well-developed clinoforms having 400-600 ft of relief, and this unit may represent a prograding shelf edge contemporaneous with the Point Lookout regression occurring about 100 mi to the south. The Mancos B ends abruptly in the northwest part of the study area against a nonprograding, northwest-thickening shale buildup, which may represent the stationary shelf edge along the northwest margin of the embayment. The sandiest part of the Mancos B occurs adjacent to this shale buildup. The supply of southerly derived sediment decreased near the end of the early Campanian, and the younger Mancos section was apparently derived largely from the northwest. This source area shift corresponds roughly to the onset of the Iles regression along the northwest margin of the embayment and the onset of the Lewis transgression along the southwest margin.

  17. Sedimentary facies and history of Upper Jurassic (Oxfordian) Smackover Formation in Conecuh embayment of south Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esposito, R.A.; King, D.T. Jr.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Upper Jurassic (Oxfordian) Smackover Formation is an important petroleum-bearing unit in the deep subsurface of the gulf rim. The authors studied the sedimentary facies and sedimentary history of the Smackover in Escambia County, Alabama. The wells studied form an east-west strike section across the Conecuh embayment in south Alabama. In the central part of the embayment, the Smackover is 350 ft (107 m) thick and consists of a vertical sequence of the following correlative sedimentary facies. In stratigraphic order, they are: (1) basal, shallow-water facies that rests conformably on the underlying Norphlet and forms a discontinuous interval a few feet thick, consisting of algal-laminated mudstones, sandy packstones and grainstones, and clast horizons; (2) basinal, deep-water facies, 175 ft (53 m) thick, consisting of resedimented debris beds (oolitic-pisolitic-graded beds, 8 in or 24 cm thick) intercalated with laminated, very argillaceous mudstone and wackestone; (3) parallel and wavy-laminated, sparsely fossiliferous packstone and wackestone, 80 ft (24 m) thick, interpreted as a carbonate slope deposit that accumulated below storm wave base; (4) bioturbated oolitic, pelletal, and fossiliferous packstone with faint relict laminations, 45 ft (14 m) thick, containing abundant Thalassinoides and Zoophycus traces and interpreted as below normal wave base deposits; and (5) oolitic and fossiliferous grainstone, 50 ft (15 m) thick, interpreted as deposits formed above wave base (shelf-platform deposits). The above sequence suggests progradation of a carbonate shelf. This progradation probably followed the rapid eustatic sea-level rise of the Oxfordian.

  18. Stem cubic-foot volume tables for tree species in the upper coastal plain. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, A.; Souter, R.A.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steamwood cubic-foot volume inside bark tables are presented for 11 species and 8 species groups based on equations used to estimate timber sale volumes on national forests in the Upper Coastal Plain. Tables are based on form class measurement data for 521 trees sampled in the Upper Coastal Plain and taper data collected across the South. A series of tables is presented for each species based on diameter at breast height (d.b.h.) in combination with total height and height to a 4-inch diameter outside bark (d.o.b.) top. Volume tables are also presented based on d.b.h. in combination with height to a 7-inch d.o.b. top for softwoods and height to a 9-inch d.o.b. top for hardwoods.

  19. Response of the upper ocean to a large summertime injection of smoke in the atmosphere. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mettlach, T.R.; Haney, R.L.; Garwood, R.W.; Ghan, S.J.

    1987-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A one-dimensional oceanic planetary boundary-layer model is used to investigate the response of the upper ocean to the atmospheric conditions predicted to develop following a hypothetical nuclear exchange. The ocean model is driven by the surface heat and momentum fluxes predicted by an atmospheric general circulation model following a summertime injection of 1.5 X 10/sup 14/ g of smoke from postwar fires over Europe, Asia, and North America. Although the specific response of the upper ocean is highly dependent on the geographic location, the mid-latitude summertime mixed layer typically cools 3 to 5/degree/C and deepens 25 m during the first 30 days following the smoke injection. Moreover, a large fraction of this response is found to take place during a short 2- to 3-day period of very intense winds and falling air temperatures, which occurs during the first week or two after the smoke injection.

  20. Depositional environment of the Caballos Formation, San Francisco field, Neiva sub-basin, Upper Magdalena Valley, Colombia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sneider, John Scott

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ft. Both the sandstones are capped by marine shales. The Caballos Formation was deposited during a world- wide transgression, and rests nonconformably on Jurassic volcanics. The Lower Caballos is composed of braided stream deposits.... The Middle Caballos consists of shale and sandy shale deposited in restricted to open- marine and bay environments. The Upper Caballos was deposited in a fluvial-deltaic environment, and individual sandstone units, which are separated by shale, have a...

  1. Stratal architecture and sedimentology of a portion of the Upper Cambrian Hickory Sandstone, central Texas, U.S.A. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez Teran, Isaac Antonio

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ?????????????????????...31 13 Representative photographs of bioturbation???????...???????39 14 Bedding diagram of HIC03 showing examples of bedset types A and D???..43 15 Bedding diagram of HIC07 showing examples of bedset types A and B?...?..45 16... (Barnes and Schofield 1964; Barnes and Bell 1977). The Upper Hickory is typically 15 to 30 meters thick (Barnes and Bell 1977) and is characterized by coarse grained, moderately well sorted, well rounded quartz sandstone with iron-oxide ooids and cement...

  2. A sharp upper bound for the first eigenvalue of the Laplacian of compact hypersurfaces in rank-1 symmetric spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santhanam, G

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Let $M$ be a closed hypersurface in a simply connected rank-1 symmetric space $\\olm$. In this paper, we give an upper bound for the first eigenvalue of the Laplacian of $M$ in terms of the Ricci curvature of $\\olm$ and the square of the length of the second fundamental form of the geodesic spheres with center at the center-of-mass of $M$.

  3. Upper limits on the solar-neutron flux at the Yangbajing neutron monitor from BATSE-detected solar flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Tsuchiya; H. Miyasaka; E. Takahashi; S. Shimoda; Y. Yamada; I. Kondo; K. Makishima; F. Zhu; Y. Tan; H. Hu; Y. Tang; J. Zhang; H. Lu; X. Meng

    2007-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is to search the Yangbajing neutron monitor data obtained between 1998 October and 2000 June for solar neutrons associated with solar flares. Using the onset times of 166 BATSE-detected flares with the GOES peak flux (1 -- 8 \\AA) higher than $1.0 \\times 10^{-5}$ $\\mathrm{Wm^{-2}}$, we prepare for each flare a light curve of the Yangbajing neutron monitor, spanning $\\pm$ 1.5 hours from the BATSE onset time. Based on the light curves, a systematic search for solar neutrons in energies above 100 MeV from the 166 flares was performed. No statistically significant signals due to solar neutrons were found in the present work. Therefore, we put upper limits on the $>$ 100 MeV solar-neutron flux for 18 events consisting of 2 X and 16 M class flares. The calculation assumed a power-law shaped neutron energy spectrum and three types of neutron emission profiles at the Sun. Compared with the other positive neutron detections associated with X-class flares, typical 95% confidence level upper limits for the two X-class flares are found to be comparable to the lowest and second lowest neutron fluxes at the top of the atmosphere.In addition, the upper limits for M-class flares scatter in the range of $10^{-2}$ to 1 neutrons $\\mathrm{cm^{-2}s^{-1}}$. This provides the first upper limits on the solar-neutron flux from M-class solar flares, using space observatories as well as ground-based neutron monitors.

  4. Upper and lower Higgs boson mass bounds from a lattice Higgs-Yukawa model with dynamical overlap fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Gerhold; K. Jansen

    2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a lattice Higgs-Yukawa model emulating the same Higgs-fermion coupling structure as in the Higgs sector of the electroweak Standard Model, in particular, obeying a Ginsparg-Wilson version of the underlying SU(2) x U(1) symmetry, being a global symmetry here due to the neglection of gauge fields in this model. In this paper we present our results on the cutoff-dependent upper Higgs boson mass bound at several selected values of the cutoff parameter.

  5. Depositional environment of the Caballos Formation, San Francisco field, Neiva sub-basin, Upper Magdalena Valley, Colombia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sneider, John Scott

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ft. Both the sandstones are capped by marine shales. The Caballos Formation was deposited during a world- wide transgression, and rests nonconformably on Jurassic volcanics. The Lower Caballos is composed of braided stream deposits.... The Middle Caballos consists of shale and sandy shale deposited in restricted to open- marine and bay environments. The Upper Caballos was deposited in a fluvial-deltaic environment, and individual sandstone units, which are separated by shale, have a...

  6. Biological monitoring of Upper Three Runs Creek, Savannah River Site, Aiken County, South Carolina, March 1990--July 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In anticipation of the fall 1988 start up of effluent discharges into Upper Three Runs Creek by the F/H Area Effluent Treatment Facility of the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC, a two and one half year biological study was initiated in June 1987. Upper Three Runs Creek is an intensively studied fourth order stream known for its high species richness. Designed to assess the potential impact of F/H area effluent on the creek, the study included qualitative and quantitative macroinvertebrate stream surveys at five sites (see map), chronic toxicity testing of the effluent, water chemistry and bioaccumulation analysis. In a March 1990 study of the potential impact of F/H Area effluent on the macroinvertebrate communities of Upper Three Runs Creek was extended, with reductions in the number of sites to be sampled and in the frequency of water chemistry sampling. This report presents the results of macroinvertebrate stream surveys at three sites, chronic toxicity testing of the effluent and water chemistry analysis of the three stream sites and the effluent from March 1990 to July 1991.

  7. Exploration of the Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dick Benoit; David Blackwell

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Upper Hot Creek Ranch (UHCR) geothermal system had seen no significant exploration activity prior to initiation of this GRED III project. Geochemical geothermometers calculated from previously available but questionable quality analyses of the UHCR hot spring waters indicated possible subsurface temperatures of +320 oF. A complex Quaternary and Holocene faulting pattern associated with a six mile step over of the Hot Creek Range near the UHCR also indicated that this area was worthy of some exploration activity. Permitting activities began in Dec. 2004 for the temperature-gradient holes but took much longer than expected with all drilling permits finally being received in early August 2005. The drilling and geochemical sampling occurred in August 2005. Ten temperature gradient holes up to 500’ deep were initially planned but higher than anticipated drilling and permitting costs within a fixed budget reduced the number of holes to five. Four of the five holes drilled to depths of 300 to 400’ encountered temperatures close to the expected regional thermal background conditions. These four holes failed to find any evidence of a large thermal anomaly surrounding the UHCR hot springs. The fifth hole, located within a narrow part of Hot Creek Canyon, encountered a maximum temperature of 81 oF at a depth of 105’ but had cooler temperatures at greater depth. Temperature data from this hole can not be extrapolated to greater depths. Any thermal anomaly associated with the UHCR geothermal system is apparently confined to the immediate vicinity of Hot Creek Canyon where challenges such as topography, a wilderness study area, and wetlands issues will make further exploration time consuming and costly. Ten water samples were collected for chemical analysis and interpretation. Analyses of three samples of the UHCR thermal give predicted subsurface temperatures ranging from 317 to 334 oF from the Na-K-Ca, silica (quartz), and Na-Li geothermometers. The fact that all three thermometers closely agree gives the predictions added credibility. Unfortunately, the final result of this exploration is that a moderate temperature geothermal resource has been clearly identified but it appears to be restricted to a relatively small area that would be difficult to develop.

  8. Application of reservoir geology of enhanced oil recovery from upper Devonian Nisku Reefs, Alberta, Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watts, N.R. (AEC Oil and Gas Company, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)); Coppold, M.P. (Imperial Oil Resources Limited (Esso), Calgary, Alberta (Canada)); Douglas, J.L. (Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia))

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Upper Devonian West Pembina reef trend of west-central Alberta contains recoverable reserves of over 79 x 10[sup 6] m[sup 3] (500 million bbl) of oil and 1.4 x 10[sup 10] m[sup 3] (500 billion ft[sup 3]) of gas within approximately 50 pinnacle reefs in the Nisku Formation. Although the oil is saturated with gas at original reservoir pressure, primary depletion would soon lower the reservoir pressure below the bubble point, decreasing recovery. Thus, pressure maintenance is applied early in the producing life of the pools through waterflood or miscible flood schemes. Selection of the appropriate enhanced recovery scheme depends upon the internal flow-unit geometry of the reefs. The Bigoray Nisku C pool and the Pembina Nisku L pool form end members of the reservoir spectrum. They can be used as flow-unit models in the geological input for reservoir simulation studies. The Bigoray Nisku C pool is dominantly limestone. The primary textures, well perserved in this reef, provide the key to interpreting the relict textures in fully dolomitized reefs. Due to the presence of horizontal permeability barriers associated with the limestone lithology, the pool is developed with a waterflood displacement scheme. Ultimate recovery is estimated to be on the order of 0.55 x 10[sup 6] m[sup 3] (3.5 million bbl) or 46% or original oil in place (OOIP). The Pembina Nisku L pool is a completely dolomitized reef. In contrast to the Bigoray Nisku C pool, the complete dolomitization reduces the number of generic reservoir flow units observed in the L pool reef from six to three. Due to the excellent reservoir quality and absence of horizontal permeability barriers, it is being exploited by a vertical miscible flood. The Nisku L pool is one of the largest pinnacle reefs discovered in the Nisku reef fairway and contains an estimated 5 x 10[sup 6] m[sup 3] (31 million bbl) OOIP. Ultimate recovery is estimated to be approximately 4.1 x 10[sup 6] m[sup 3] (25.8 million bbl) or 82% of OOIP.

  9. OHSU MD Candidate 2017 Jiangsu University, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    infusion under local clinical settings. We realized that high traffic hospitals (3rd tier) might been visiting the hospital for almost two weeks. On daily visits, my first stop is the infusion room, where I sit next to patients receiving IV infusion and, at the appropriate moment, introduce myself

  10. Systems thinking conference 2011 Sahar Hashmi, MD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    )? · Social Distancing · Self IsolaEon · Increased hand washing · Coughing and sneezing · Do not shake hands during greeEngs with colleagues · Cough or sneeze

  11. The John Aure Buesseler, MD, MSBA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westfall, Peter H.

    's contributions to healthcare in West Texas and to recognize his profound impact at both Texas Tech Uni- versity and the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Cen- ter. During his tenure with the Texas Tech University System at the Texas Tech Health Sciences Cen- ter and the Rawls College of Business at Texas Tech University. Dr. John

  12. Scott Shreeve, MD Chief Executive Officer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    is currently serving as chief executive office of Crossover Health, a next generation health care delivery, state wide health systems, and networks of primary care clinics. Dr. Shreeve is also founding member of the Health 2.0 technology and reform movement, serving as an advisor to the conference and spokesperson

  13. Heart Valve Disease James S. Gammie, MD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, David J.

    in the United States: Results from the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Database #12;Summary of Maryland School of Medicine University of Maryland Mini Med School October 2, 2013 #12;#12;Causes of Death #12;History 1945 Charles Bailey (Philadelphia) Closed mitral commissurotomies: 4 deaths Case 2

  14. Community Academic Profile Nancy Plauth, MD, MPH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, James

    maintenance organization: Preventive services and resource use. Journal of General Internal Medicine (Abstract SD. Non ­users of primary care within a health maintenance organization: preventive services Publications Plauth AE, Pearson SD. Non-users of primary care within a health maintenance organization

  15. Department of Energy Germantown, MD 20874

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and as a Final Report. Mission and Role of the PCAST Machine The Scientific Mission of the "PCAST Machine Davies `Associate Director for Fusion Energy SUBJECT: Technical and Cost Assessment of the "PCAST Machine" Attached for your information is the Executive Summary of the subject report which describes the results

  16. MD/HD Advanced Technology Evaluations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of new technology vs conventional * 6-12 month, on-road evaluations * Obtain and analyze data such as: - Operating costmile - Fuel economy - Unscheduled maintenance - Scheduled...

  17. Jacques Kestelyn, M.D. Office Building 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raiford Stripling Associates, Inc.; Stripling, Raiford L.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    displacement experiments to evaluate the performance of COz addition to steam on the recovery of 24'API, 12'API and 10. 6'API oils. ' The 1D tests indicated that the oil recovery increased with increasing COz/steam ratios until an optimum value was reached... Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: DaulatD. Mamora (Chair of Committee) Richard A. Startzman (Member) ( gtCKLt L c T. Ikelle (Member...

  18. Alfred L. Frechette, M.D. COYYISIIONE~

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -KWatertown Arsenal'.I Y.it !D;rC.

  19. Polarimetric Observations of the Masers in NGC 4258: An Upper Limit on the Large-Scale Magnetic Field 0.2 pc from the Central Engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. R. Herrnstein; J. M. Moran; L. J. Greenhill; E. G. Blackman; P. J. Diamond

    1998-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We report VLA 1 sigma upper limits of 1.5% and 3% on the intrinsic circular and linear fractional polarizations, respectively, of the water vapor maser emission 0.2 pc from the central engine of NGC 4258. A corresponding 0.5% upper limit on any Zeeman-splitting-induced circular polarization translates to a 1 sigma upper limit on the parallel, or toroidal, component of the magnetic field of 300 mG. Assuming magnetic and thermal pressure balance in the disk, this magnetic field upper limit corresponds to a model-dependent estimate of the accretion rate through the molecular disk of 10^-1.9 alpha solar masses per year for the case where the magnetic field lies along the line of sight.

  20. Genetic and Phenotypic Catalog of Native Resident Trout of the Interior Columbia River Basin; Populations of the Upper Yakima Basin, 1997-1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trotter, Patrick C. (Fishery Science Consultant, Seattle, WA); McMillan, Bill; Gayeski, Nick (Washington Trout, Duvall, WA)

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to photo-document upper Columbia Basin native resident trout populations in Washington, and to ascertain their species or subspecies identity and relative genetic purity using a nonlethal DNA technique.

  1. Reservoir Simulation and Evaluation of the Upper Jurassic Smackover Microbial Carbonate and Grainstone-Packstone Reservoirs in Little Cedar Creek Field, Conecuh County, Alabama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mostafa, Moetaz Y

    2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents an integrated study of mature carbonate oil reservoirs (Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation) undergoing gas injection in the Little Cedar Creek Field located in Conecuh County, Alabama. This field produces from two reservoirs...

  2. Stratigraphy and Reservoir-analog Modeling of Upper Miocene Shallow-water and Deep-water Carbonate Deposits: Agua Amarga Basin, Southeast Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dvoretsky, Rachel Ana

    2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This study documents the basin-wide stratigraphic characterization and 3-D reservoir-analog modeling of upper Miocene carbonate deposits in the Agua Amarga basin, southeast Spain. Paleotopography and relative fluctuations in sea level were primary...

  3. Density anomalies in the crust and upper mantle below the Tonga-Kermadec trench and below the Rio Grande Rift: implied magnitude and orientation of maximum shear stress 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mecham, Brent Bradshaw

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DENSITY ANOMALIES IN THE CRUST AND UPPER MANTLE BELOW THE TONGA ? KERMADEC TRENCH AND BELOW THE RIO GRANDE RIFT: IMPLIED MAGNITUDE AND ORIENTATION OF MAXIMUM SHEAR STRESS A Thesis by BRENT BRADSHAW MECHAM Submitted to the Graduate College... of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1986 Major Subject: Geophysics DENSITY ANOMALIES IN THE CRUST AND UPPER MANTLE BELOW THE TONGA ? KERMADEC TRENCH AND BELOW THE RIO GRANDE...

  4. Testing Stratigraphic Integrity of Upper and Middle Paleolithic Deposits in Vindija Cave (Croatia): A Chipped Stone Refitting Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruner, Kale

    2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    : the wide-ranging Aurignacian techno-complex (Brantingham et al 2004a, Hays and Thacker 2001). The stratigraphic integrity and interpretation of the cultural materials and human skeletal remains from Level G1 at Vindija is a source of debate (d?Erico et... al 1998, Zilh?o and d?Erico 1999a, Karavani? and Smith 2000, Straus 1999). Artifacts from Level G1 include both Middle and Upper Paleolithic stone tool types (Karavani? 1995, Karavani? and Smith 1998) including a bifacial foliate point of possible...

  5. Robust upper limit on the neutron single-particle energy of the $i_{13/2}$ orbit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Lei; H. Jiang

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The boundary of the neutron $i_{13/2}$ single-particle energy is investigated with exact shell-model calculations, where random two-body interactions are adopted to overcome the bias from effective interactions. Excitation energies of $3^-_1$ state in $^{134}$Te and $^{136}$Xe, as well as those of $13/2^+_1$ states in $^{135}$Te and $^{137}$Xe, are taken as touchstones of our samplings. A robust upper limit of $\\varepsilon_{i13/2}mixing of $i_{13/2}$ single-neutron configuration and $f_{7/2}\\otimes 3^-$ configuration in $13/2^+_1$ states of $N=83$ isotones.

  6. Placement of a Retrievable Guenther Tulip Filter in the Superior Vena Cava for Upper Extremity Deep Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nadkarni, Sanjay; Macdonald, Sumaira; Cleveland, Trevor J.; Gaines, Peter A. [Sheffield Vascular Institute, Firth 4, Northern General Hospital, Herries Road, Sheffield S5 7AU (United Kingdom)

    2002-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A retrievable Guenther Tulip caval filter(William Cook, Europe) was successfully placed and retrieved in the superior vena cava for upper extremity deep venous thrombosis in a 56-year-old woman. Bilateral subclavian and internal jugular venous thromboses thought secondary to placement of multiple central venous catheters were present. There have been reports of the use of permanent Greenfield filters and a single case report of a temporary filter in the superior vena cava. As far as we are aware this is the first reported placement and successful retrieval of a filter in these circumstances.

  7. Allometric biomass estimators for aspen-dominated ecosystems in the upper Great Lakes. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perala, D.A.; Alban, D.H.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors recently described the climate, geology, soils, and the biotic structure and dynamics of four contrasting ecosystems dominated by quaking and bigtooth aspen (Populus tremuloides and P. grandidentata). Other papers describe how those ecosystems responded to perturbation. Common to most of those papers were biomass estimates for the tree and shrub layers. The authors derived the estimators from weight and dimensional analysis of a subsample of stems measured on sample plots. They found much variability among sites that could not be adequately explained by stand or soils data. These equations should be useful in estimating woody plant components of similar forests on upland soils in the Upper Great Lakes region.

  8. The Doha deadlock: intellectual property and climate change https://theconversation.edu.au/the-doha-deadlock-intellectual-property-and-climate-change-11244[11/12/2012 4:48:06 PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botea, Adi

    and copyright law: the case of 3D printing 18 October 2012 The High Court and the Marlboro Man: the plain

  9. RELAP-5/MOD 3.2 Assessment Using an 11% Upper Plenum Break Experiment in the PSB Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul D. Bayless

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The RELAP/MOD3.2 computer code has been assessed using an 11% upper plenum break experiment in the PSB test facility at the Electrogorsk Research and Engineering Center. This work was performed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's International Nuclear Safety Program, and is part of the effort addressing the capability of the RELAP5/MOD3.2 code to model transients in Soviet-designed reactors. Designated VVER Standard Problem PSBV1, the test addressed several important phenomena related to VVER behavior that the code needs to simulate well. The code was judged to reasonably model the phenomena of two-phase flow natural circulation in the primary coolant system, asymmetric loop behavior, leak flow, loop seal clearance in the cold legs, heat transfer in a covered core, heat transfer in a partially covered core, pressurizer thermal-hydraulics, and integral system effects. The code was judged to be in minimal agreement with the experiment data for the mixture level and entrainment in the core, leading to a user recommendation to assess the sensitivity of transient calculations to the interphase drag modeling in the core. No judgments were made for the phenomena of phase separation without mixture level formation, mixture level and entrainment in the steam generators, pool formation in the upper plenum, or flow stratification in horizontal pipes because either the phenomenon did not occur in the test or there were insufficient measurements to characterize the behavior.

  10. RELAP/MOD3.2 Assessment Using an 11% Upper Plenum Break Experiment in the PSB Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayless, P.D.

    2003-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The RELAP/MOD3.2 computer code has been assessed using an 11% upper plenum break experiment in the PSB test facility at the Electrogorsk Research and Engineering Center. This work was performed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's International Nuclear Safety Program, and is part of the effort addressing the capability of the RELAP5/MOD3.2 code to model transients in Soviet-designed reactors. Designated VVER Standard Problem PSBV1, the test addressed several important phenomena related to VVER behavior that the code needs to simulate well. The code was judged to reasonably model the phenomena of two-phase flow natural circulation in the primary coolant system, asymmetric loop behavior, leak flow, loop seal clearance in the cold legs, heat transfer in a covered core, heat transfer in a partially covered core, pressurizer thermal-hydraulics, and integral system effects. The code was judged to be in minimal agreement with the experiment data for the mixture level and entrainment in the core, leading to a user recommendation to assess the sensitivity of transient calculations to the interphase drag modeling in the core. No judgments were made for the phenomena of phase separation without mixture level formation, mixture level and entrainment in the steam generators, pool formation in the upper plenum, or flow stratification in horizontal pipes because either the phenomenon did not occur in the test or there were insufficient measurements to characterize the behavior.

  11. A depositional model in the Arabian Intrashelf basin: The Upper Jurassic Hanifa reservoir of Abqaiq field, Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, D.L. (Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abqaiq field is a northeast-trending anticline approximately 60 km long and 12 km wide and contains several reservoirs. The 100 m thick Hanifa Reservoir interval consists of interlayered peloidal packstone and wackestone with subordinate dolomite and anhydrite. During an Upper Jurassic relative sea level lowstand, paleotopography within the Arabian Intrashelf basin localized fine-grained packstone into isolated mounds over the Abqaiq South Dome area, while muddier facies were being deposited over the North Nose. The Abqaiq Hanifa carbonate mound was zoned using sequence stratigraphy as a conceptual framework to ensure that chronostratigraphic relationships were honored, and that the subsequent computer model would therefore accurately reflect spatial porosity continuity within the reservoir. The Hanifa Reservoir was subdivided into five widely correlative zones that approximate separate parasequences, each beginning with tight mudstone-wackestone and grading upward into porous wackestone-packstone. Sequence stratigraphy interpretations are based on regional wireline log correlations combined with core descriptions and show the Abqaiq Hanifa to be time equivalent to only the upper few meters of the Hanifa Reservoir in fields to the north. In addition to reservoir modeling utility, these two general intrashelf basin settings have potential for stratigraphic traps. Wherever reservoir-quality rock can be found, proximity to the Hanifa/Hadriya source rocks-the source for much of Saudi Arabia's vast reserves-makes the Hanifa a favorable exploration target.

  12. XUV exposed, non-hydrostatic hydrogen-rich upper atmospheres of terrestrial planets II: Hydrogen coronae and ion escape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kislyakova, K G; Holmström, M; Panchenko, M; Odert, P; Erkaev, N V; Leitzinger, M; Khodachenko, M L; Kulikov, Yu N; Güdel, M; Hanslmeier, A

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interactions between the stellar wind plasma flow of a typical M star such as GJ 436 and hydrogen-rich upper atmospheres of an Earth-like planet and a "super-Earth" with the radius of 2 R_Earth and a mass of 10 M_Earth, located within the habitable zone at ~0.24 AU are studied. The formation of extended atomic hydrogen coronae under the influence of such factors as the stellar XUV flux (soft X-rays and EUV), stellar wind density and velocity, shape of a planetary obstacle (e.g., magnetosphere, ionopause) and the heating efficiency on the evolution of the hydrogen-rich upper atmospheres is investigated. XUV fluxes which are 1, 10, 50 and 100 times higher compared to that of the present Sun are considered and the formation of the high-energy neutral hydrogen clouds around the planets due to charge-exchange reaction under various stellar conditions have been modeled. Charge-exchange between stellar wind protons with the planetary hydrogen atoms and photoionization leads to the production of initially cold io...

  13. Seismic Tomography Of Pg And Sg/lg And Its Use For Average Upper Crust Structure In Eurasia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steck, Lee K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Phillips, W Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rowe, C A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stead, R J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Begnaud, M L [MSU

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tomographic inversion oftravel times from first arriving compressional and shear waves for velocity structure has been applied with great success at all length scales, ranging from the laboratory bench-top to the entire Earth. Inversion of later arriving phases has seen a much more limited application. In this paper we present inversion results for regional Pg and Sg for the Eurasian continent to explore its use for understanding average upper crustal velocity structure. Inversion is performed using a damped, smoothed LSQR implementation that solves for site and event terms as well as for velocity along great circle paths between the source and receiver. Results are broadly consistent with published upper crustal velocities for the region. A spotcomparison of Vp/Vs from local and regional studies also compares well with the ratio of observed Pg to Sg velocities from our study where resolution is high. Resolution is determined through the use of checkerboard tests, and these suggest that in regions where data density is high we can resolve features down to at least 2 deg, with 4 deg possible over broader areas. RMS residual reductions are on the order of25% for Sg and 30% for Pg.

  14. On the filling factor of emitting material in the upper atmosphere of Epsilon Eri (K2 V)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. A. Sim; C. Jordan

    2003-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The emission measure distribution in the upper transition region and corona of Epsilon Eri is derived from observed emission line fluxes. Theoretical emission measure distributions are calculated assuming that the radiation losses are balanced by the net conductive flux. We discuss how the area factor of the emitting regions as a function of temperature can be derived from a comparison between these emission measure distributions. It is found that the filling factor varies from ~0.2 in the mid transition region to ~1.0 in the inner corona. The sensitivity of these results to the adopted ion fractions, the iron abundance and other parameters is discussed. The area factors found are qualitatively similar to the observed structure of the solar atmosphere, and can be used to constrain two-component models of the chromosphere. Given further observations, the method could be applied to investigate the trends in filling factors with indicators of stellar activity.

  15. Upper limits on a stochastic gravitational-wave background using LIGO and Virgo interferometers at 600-1000 Hz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; K. Agatsuma; P. Ajith; B. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. A. Arain; M. C. Araya; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; J. C. B. Barayoga; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; D. Beck; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; A. Belletoile; I. Belopolski; M. Benacquista; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet--Castell; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglià; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; T. Chalermsongsak; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chelkowski; W. Chen; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; S. Chung; G. Ciani; D. E. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; R. M. Cutler; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; R. Dannenberg; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Díaz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; G. Endr\\Hoczi; R. Engel; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; B. F. Farr; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; F. Feroz; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; M. Flanigan; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. J. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; M. E. Gáspár; G. Gemme; R. Geng; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Á. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. González; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; N. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Greverie; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; R. Gupta; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; T. Ha; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. -F. Hayau; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; V. Herrera; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; M. Holtrop; T. Hong; S. Hooper; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; E. Jesse; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; D. Kelley; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; Z. Keresztes; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; B. Kim; C. Kim; H. Kim; K. Kim; N. Kim; Y. -M. Kim; P. J. King; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; S. Koranda; W. Z. Korth; I. Kowalska; D. Kozak; O. Kranz; V. Kringel; S. Krishnamurthy; B. Krishnan; A. Królak; G. Kuehn; R. Kumar; P. Kwee; P. K. Lam

    2012-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A stochastic background of gravitational waves is expected to arise from a superposition of many incoherent sources of gravitational waves, of either cosmological or astrophysical origin. This background is a target for the current generation of ground-based detectors. In this article we present the first joint search for a stochastic background using data from the LIGO and Virgo interferometers. In a frequency band of 600-1000 Hz, we obtained a 95% upper limit on the amplitude of $\\Omega_{\\rm GW}(f) = \\Omega_3 (f/900 \\mathrm{Hz})^3$, of $\\Omega_3 < 0.33$, assuming a value of the Hubble parameter of $h_{100}=0.72$. These new limits are a factor of seven better than the previous best in this frequency band.

  16. Upper Limits on Electric and Weak Dipole Moments of Tau-Lepton and Heavy Quarks from e+e- Annihilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. E. Blinov; A. S. Rudenko

    2009-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The total cross-sections measured at LEP for e+e- annihilation into tau+tau-, c\\bar{c} and b\\bar{b} at 2E ~ 200 GeV are used to derive the upper limits 3*10^{-17}, 5*10^{-17}, 2*10^{-17} e*cm for the electric dipole moments and 4*10^{-17}, 7*10^{-17}, 2.5*10^{-17} e*cm for the weak dipole moments of the tau-lepton, c-, and b-quarks, respectively. Some of the existing limits on these moments are improved and for the b-quark the improvement is rather significant.

  17. Stratigraphic cross sections of Upper Cretaceous rocks across San Juan basin, northwestern New Mexico and southwestern Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molenaar, C.M.; Baird, J.K. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Upper Cretaceous rocks of the San Juan basin, which are as much as 6,500 ft (1,980 m) thick, comprise a classic sequence of intertonguing marine and nonmarine facies. Geophysical logs from closely spaced drill holes throughout most of the basin provide data for detailed correlations of the rock units, which can be made by using numerous time marker beds within the marine shale sections. These marker beds provide a time framework for construction of cross sections that show (1) diachronism and stratigraphic rise of shoreface sandstone bodies associated with the four major transgressions and regressions of the Western Interior seaway within the basin, (2) shelf to very low-angle slope (< 0.25{degree}) to basinal topography, (3) Coniacian (basal Niobrara) unconformity, (4) low-amplitude paleostructural features, and (5) low-relief differential compaction features associated with lateral heterogeneities in sand-shale sections.

  18. Sedimentology, petrology, and gas potential of the Brallier Formation: upper Devonian turbidite facies of the Central and Southern Appalachians

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundegard, P.D.; Samuels, N.D.; Pryor, W.A.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Upper Devonian Brallier Formation of the central and southern Appalachian basin is a regressive sequence of siltstone turbidites interbedded with mudstones, claystones, and shales. It reaches 1000 meters in thickness and overlies basinal mudrocks and underlies deltaic sandstones and mudrocks. Facies and paleocurrent analyses indicate differences between the depositional system of the Brallier Formation and those of modern submarine fans and ancient Alpine flysch-type sequences. The Brallier system is of finer grain size and lower flow intensity. In addition, the stratigraphic transition from turbidites to deltaic sediments is gradual and differs in its facies succession from the deposits of the proximal parts of modern submarine fans. Such features as massive and pebbly sandstones, conglomerates, debris flows, and massive slump structures are absent from this transition. Paleocurrents are uniformly to the west at right angles to basin isopach, which is atypical of ancient turbidite systems. This suggests that turbidity currents had multiple point sources. The petrography and paleocurrents of the Brallier Formation indicate an eastern source of sedimentary and low-grade metasedimentary rocks with modern relief and rainfall. The depositional system of the Brallier Formation is interpreted as a series of small ephemeral turbidite lobes of low flow intensity which coalesced in time to produce a laterally extensive wedge. The lobes were fed by deltas rather than submarine canyons or upper fan channel systems. This study shows that the present-day turbidite facies model, based mainly on modern submarine fans and ancient Alpine flysch-type sequences, does not adequately describe prodeltaic turbidite systems such as the Brallier Formation. Thickly bedded siltstone bundles are common features of the Brallier Formation and are probably its best gas reservoir facies, especially when fracture porosity is well developed.

  19. Potential radiological impacts of upper-bound operational accidents during proposed waste disposal alternatives for Hanford defense waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishima, J.; Sutter, S.L.; Hawley, K.A.; Jenkins, C.E.; Napier, B.A.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Geologic Disposal Alternative, the In-Place Stabilization and Disposal Alternative, and the Reference Disposal Alternative are being evaluated for disposal of Hanford defense high-level, transuranic, and tank wastes. Environmental impacts associated with disposal of these wastes according to the alternatives listed above include potential doses to the downwind population from operation during the application of the handling and processing techniques comprising each disposal alternative. Scenarios for operational accident and abnormal operational events are postulated, on the basis of the currently available information, for the application of the techniques employed for each waste class for each disposal alternative. From these scenarios, an upper-bound airborne release of radioactive material was postulated for each waste class and disposal alternative. Potential downwind radiologic impacts were calculated from these upper-bound events. In all three alternatives, the single postulated event with the largest calculated radiologic impact for any waste class is an explosion of a mixture of ferri/ferro cyanide precipitates during the mechanical retrieval or microwave drying of the salt cake in single shell waste tanks. The anticipated downwind dose (70-year dose commitment) to the maximally exposed individual is 3 rem with a total population dose of 7000 man-rem. The same individual would receive 7 rem from natural background radiation during the same time period, and the same population would receive 3,000,000 man-rem. Radiological impacts to the public from all other postulated accidents would be less than that from this accident; furthermore, the radiological impacts resulting from this accident would be less than one-half that from the natural background radiation dose.

  20. Improved Upper Limits on the Stochastic Gravitational-Wave Background from 2009-2010 LIGO and Virgo Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; J. Aasi; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; K. Ackley; C. Adams; T. Adams; P. Addesso; R. X. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; A. Ain; P. Ajith; A. Alemic; B. Allen; A. Allocca; D. Amariutei; M. Andersen; R. Anderson; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. Arceneaux; J. Areeda; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; L. Austin; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; M. Barbet; B. C. Barish; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. C. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; C. Belczynski; A. S. Bell; C. Bell; G. Bergmann; D. Bersanetti; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; S. Biscans; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; S. Bloemen; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; G. Bogaert; C. Bogan; C. Bond; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; Sukanta Bose; L. Bosi; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. D. Brown; F. Brückner; S. Buchman; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; R. Burman; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Calderón Bustillo; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; K. C. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; A. Castiglia; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglià; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; C. Celerier; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. J. Chamberlin; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. S. Y. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; C. Collette; M. Colombini; L. Cominsky; M. Constancio Jr.; A. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corpuz; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; S. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; R. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; K. Dahl; T. Dal Canton; M. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; S. Deléglise; W. Del Pozzo; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. De Rosa; R. T. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. Díaz; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; A. Donath; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; S. Dossa; R. Douglas; T. P. Downes; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; T. Edo; M. Edwards; A. Effler; H. Eggenstein; P. Ehrens; J. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; G. Endr?czi; R. Essick; T. Etzel; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Q. Fang; S. Farinon; B. Farr; W. M. Farr; M. Favata; H. Fehrmann; M. M. Fejer; D. Feldbaum; F. Feroz; I. Ferrante; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; J. -D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; S. Gaonkar; F. Garufi; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. Gondan; G. González; N. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossan; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Gräf; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; P. Groot; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; K. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. Hart; M. T. Hartman; C. -J. Haster; K. Haughian; A. Heidmann; M. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; S. Hooper; P. Hopkins; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; Y. Hu; E. Huerta; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; M. Huynh; T. Huynh-Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; B. R. Iyer; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; H. Jang; P. Jaranowski; Y. Ji; F. Jiménez-Forteza; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; Haris K; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; J. Karlen; M. Kasprzack; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; F. Kawazoe; F. Kéfélian; G. M. Keiser; D. Keitel; D. B. Kelley; W. Kells; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravitational waves from a variety of sources are predicted to superpose to create a stochastic background. This background is expected to contain unique information from throughout the history of the universe that is unavailable through standard electromagnetic observations, making its study of fundamental importance to understanding the evolution of the universe. We carry out a search for the stochastic background with the latest data from LIGO and Virgo. Consistent with predictions from most stochastic gravitational-wave background models, the data display no evidence of a stochastic gravitational-wave signal. Assuming a gravitational-wave spectrum of Omega_GW(f)=Omega_alpha*(f/f_ref)^alpha, we place 95% confidence level upper limits on the energy density of the background in each of four frequency bands spanning 41.5-1726 Hz. In the frequency band of 41.5-169.25 Hz for a spectral index of alpha=0, we constrain the energy density of the stochastic background to be Omega_GW(f)<5.6x10^-6. For the 600-1000 Hz band, Omega_GW(f)<0.14*(f/900 Hz)^3, a factor of 2.5 lower than the best previously reported upper limits. We find Omega_GW(f)<1.8x10^-4 using a spectral index of zero for 170-600 Hz and Omega_GW(f)<1.0*(f/1300 Hz)^3 for 1000-1726 Hz, bands in which no previous direct limits have been placed. The limits in these four bands are the lowest direct measurements to date on the stochastic background. We discuss the implications of these results in light of the recent claim by the BICEP2 experiment of the possible evidence for inflationary gravitational waves.

  1. Increasing the upper-limit intensity and temperature range for thermal self-focusing of a laser beam by using plasma density ramp-up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bokaei, B.; Niknam, A. R., E-mail: a-niknam@sbu.ac.ir [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This work is devoted to improving relativistic and ponderomotive thermal self-focusing of the intense laser beam in an underdense plasma. It is shown that the ponderomotive nonlinearity induces a saturation mechanism for thermal self-focusing. Therefore, in addition to the well-known lower-limit critical intensity, there is an upper-limit intensity for thermal self-focusing above which the laser beam starts to experience ponderomotive defocusing. It is indicated that the upper-limit intensity value is dependent on plasma and laser parameters such as the plasma electron temperature, plasma density, and laser spot size. Furthermore, the effect of the upward plasma density ramp profile on the thermal self-focusing is studied. Results show that by using the plasma density ramp-up, the upper-limit intensity increases and the self-focusing temperature range expands.

  2. Programme MD / MD Program Coordonnes des Responsables d'units et des Experts de contenu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petriu, Emil M.

    Courriel / E-mail # téléphone / Phone # Responsable de l'unité D r Ali Jalali ajalali@uottawa.ca 613 # Responsable de l'unité D r Kendal Noel kendall.noel@mail.mcgill.ca N/A Unit Leader Dr. Karen Visser karen

  3. Shoulder Pain in Parkinson's Disease William Stamey, MD, Joseph Jankovic, MD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lichtarge, Olivier

    Rating Scale (UPDRS) part three (motor) scores and Hoehn and Yahr staging was obtained from the chart.40 (4.07) 0 ­ 15 Hoehn and Yahr Score 2.38 (0.85) 1 ­ 5 Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale ­ Part

  4. An upper limit to the photon fraction in cosmic rays above 10**19-eV from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham, J.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allison, P.; Alvarez, C.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Anjos, J.C.; /Centro Atomico Bariloche /Buenos Aires, CONICET /La Plata U. /Pierre Auger Observ. /CNEA, San Martin /Adelaide U. /Catholic U. of Bolivia, La Paz /Bolivia U. /Sao Paulo U. /Campinas State U. /UEFS, Feira de Santana; ,

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An upper limit of 16% (at 95% c.l.) is derived for the photon fraction in cosmic rays with energies above 10{sup 19} eV, based on observations of the depth of shower maximum performed with the hybrid detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory. This is the first such limit on photons obtained by observing the fluorescence light profile of air showers. This upper limit confirms and improves on previous results from the Haverah Park and AGASA surface arrays. Additional data recorded with the Auger surface detectors for a subset of the event sample, support the conclusion that a photon origin of the observed events is not favored.

  5. Lower and upper bounds for the absolute free energy by the hypothetical scanning Monte Carlo method: Application to liquid argon and water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meirovitch, Hagai

    Lower and upper bounds for the absolute free energy by the hypothetical scanning Monte Carlo method The hypothetical scanning HS method is a general approach for calculating the absolute entropy S and free energy F to provide the free energy through the analysis of a single configuration. © 2004 American Institute

  6. Deformation fabrics of olivine in Val Malenco peridotite found in Italy and implications for the seismic anisotropy in the upper mantle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Haemyeong

    for the interpretation of seismic data. Seismic polarization anisotropy in the upper mantle has been observed in many, seismic data (i.e., seismic anisotropy) have been interpreted on the basis of the type-A LPO of olivine al., 2004; Katayama and Karato, 2006); this has led to a new era for the interpretation of seismic

  7. DAILY SYNOPTIC U P P E R -A I R REPORTS The upper-air reports are derived in the same general

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of pressure, comonly known as the "second transmission." Many stations outs-ide North America indicate). Method of Presentation: 8 - Surface The upper-air data are presented in the same general way. To the right of each line of the listed observations is 9 - 200 meters 0 - 500 meters I - 1000 meters 2 - 2000

  8. Simulating the connections of ENSO and the rainfall regime of East Africa and the upper Blue Nile region using a climate model of the Tropics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaroug, M. A. H.

    We simulate the observed statistical relationship between ENSO and the rainfall regime of the upper Blue Nile using the tropical-band version of the regional climate model RegCM4 (or Reg-TB). An ensemble of nine simulations ...

  9. The impacts of climate change on the groundwater system of the upper Danube catchment derived from piezometric head and groundwater quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    . Keywords: Groundwater levels, groundwater quality, time series analysis 1. Introduction Understanding results, a concept for modeling changes in groundwater and chemistry coupled with regional climate change1 The impacts of climate change on the groundwater system of the upper Danube catchment derived

  10. Characterization of a geothermal system in the Upper Arkansas Valley, CO Thomas Blum*, Kasper van Wijk and Lee Liberty, Boise State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Characterization of a geothermal system in the Upper Arkansas Valley, CO Thomas Blum*, Kasper van a geothermal system in the Mt. Princeton area. We conclude that a shallow orthogonal fault system in this area appears to be responsible for the local geothermal signature at and near the surface. The extent to which

  11. An upper limit on the ratio between the Extreme Ultraviolet and the bolometric luminosities of stars hosting habitable planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sengupta, Sujan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large number of terrestrial planets in the classical habitable zone of stars of different spectral types has already been discovered and many are expected to be discovered in near future. However, owing to the lack of knowledge on the atmospheric properties, the ambient environment of such planets are unknown. It is known that sufficient amount of Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) radiation from the star can drive hydrodynamic outflow of hydrogen that may drag heavier species from the atmosphere of the planet. If the rate of mass loss is sufficiently high then substantial amount of volatiles would escape causing the planet to become uninhabitable. Considering energy-limited hydrodynamical mass loss with an escape rate that causes oxygen to escape along with hydrogen, I present an upper limit for the ratio between the EUV and the bolometric luminosities of stars which constrains the habitability of planets around them. Application of the limit to planet-hosting stars with known EUV luminosities implies that many M-t...

  12. 870 micron Imaging of a Transitional Disk in Upper Scorpius: Holdover from the Era of Giant Planet Formation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathews, Geoffrey S; Menard, Francois

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present 880 micron images of the transition disk around the star [PZ99] J160421.7-213028, a solar-mass star in the nearby Upper Scorpius association. With a resolution down to 0.34 arcsec, we resolve the inner hole in this disk, and via model fitting to the visibilities and spectral energy distribution we determine both the structure of the outer region and the presence of sparse dust within the cavity. The disk contains about 0.1 Jupiter masses of mm-emitting grains, with an inner disk edge of about 70 AU. The inner cavity contains a small amount of dust with a depleted surface density in a region extending from about 20-70 AU. Taking into account prior observations indicating little to no stellar accretion, the lack of a binary companion, and the presence of dust near 0.1 AU, we determine that the most likely mechanism for the formation of this inner hole is the presence of one or more giant planets.

  13. XUV exposed non-hydrostatic hydrogen-rich upper atmospheres of terrestrial planets. Part I: Atmospheric expansion and thermal escape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erkaev, N V; Odert, P; Kulikov, Yu N; Kislyakova, K G; Khodachenko, M L; Güdel, M; Hanslmeier, A; Biernat, H

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recently discovered low-density "super-Earths" Kepler-11b, Kepler-11f, Kepler-11d, Kepler-11e, and planets such as GJ 1214b represent most likely planets which are surrounded by dense H/He envelopes or contain deep H2O oceans also surrounded by dense hydrogen envelopes. Although these "super-Earths" are orbiting relatively close to their host stars, they have not lost their captured nebula-based hydrogen-rich or degassed steam protoatmospheres. Thus it is interesting to estimate the maximum possible amount of atmospheric hydrogen loss from a terrestrial planet orbiting within the habitable zone of a Sun-like G-type host star. For studying the thermosphere structure and escape we apply a 1-D hydrodynamic upper atmosphere model which solves the equations of mass, momentum and energy conservation for a planet with the mass and size of the Earth and for a "super-Earth" with a size of 2 R_Earth and a mass of 10 M_Earth. We calculate heating rates by the stellar soft X-rays and EUV radiation and expansion of th...

  14. Contaminant concentrations and biomarker response in great blue heron eggs from 10 colonies on the upper Mississippi River, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Custer, T.W.; Hines, R.K. [National Biological Service, LaCrosse, WI (United States). Upper Mississippi Science Center; Melancon, M.J.; Hoffman, D.J. [National Biological Service, Laurel, MD (United States). Patuxent Wildlife Research Center; Wickliffe, J.K.; Bickham, J.W. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Wildlife and Fisheries; Martin, J.W.; Henshel, D.S. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). School of Public and Environmental Affairs

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1993, great blue heron (Ardea herodias; GBH) eggs were collected from 10 colonies on the upper Mississippi River (UMR). They were then artificially incubated until pipping and analyzed for mercury, selenium, and organochlorines. Livers of embryos were analyzed for hepatic microsomal ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase (EROS) activity and four measures of oxidative stress. Brains were measured for asymmetry and blood was measured for the coefficient of variation of DNA (DNA CV). Organochlorine concentrations were generally low (geometric mean DDE = 1.3 {micro}g/g wet weight; polychlorinated biphenyl [PCB] = 3.0 {micro}g/g; 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin [TCDD] = 11.5 pg/g). Eggshell thickness was negatively correlated with DDE concentrations. Mercury (geometric mean = 0.8 {micro}g/g dry weight) and selenium (3.1 {micro}g/g dry weight) concentrations in GBH eggs were within background levels. EROD activity was not correlated with total PCBs, TCDD, or toxic equivalents (TEQs), based on the relative contribution of individual PCB congeners, dibenzodioxins (PCDDs), and dibenzofurans (PCDFs) to total calculated TEQs. Three of the four measures of oxidative stress were correlated with mercury concentrations. Twenty of 43 (47%) embryo brains were asymmetrical and the embryos with asymmetrical brains had higher EROD concentrations in the liver and higher DNA CV in the blood than embryos with symmetrical brains.

  15. Potential for future development of salt cavern storage in the upper Silurian Syracuse Formation of south-central New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bass, J.P.; Sarwar, G.; Guo, B. [Brooklyn College of the City Univ. of New York, Troy, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although depleted reservoirs remain the dominant structures used for storage fulfilling the demand for base load gas supply during the heating season, the current general surge in storage projects, nationwide, takes advantage of opportunities in Order 636, and makes greater use of salt caverns for gas storage. This reflects the increasing need by gas users, local distribution companies in particular, to quickly cycle a storage facility`s gas supply for services such as peak shaving, emergency supply, and system balancing to meet hourly swings. Occurrence of thick deposits of bedded salt deposits provides New York the capability to develop high deliverability salt cavern storage facilities. Furthermore, New York is uniquely positioned at the gateway to major northeastern markets to provide peak load storage services of natural gas supply. The thickest units of bedded salt in New York occur in the {open_quotes}F{close_quotes} horizon of the Upper Silurian Syracuse Formation. Three bedded salt cavern storage facilities have been recently proposed in New York. Two of these projects is much larger (with 5 Bcfg ultimate capacity), is under construction, and will provide valuable storage service to the Ellisburg-Leidy market center hub in Pennsylvania. Identification of possible sites for future salt cavern storage projects has been achieved chiefly by defining areas of thick beds of salt at sufficient depths close to gas transmission lines, with access to a freshwater supply for leaching, and possessing an acceptable method of brine disposal.

  16. Norphlet Formation (Upper Jurassic) sand erg: depositional model for northeastern De Soto salt basin, eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kemmer, D.A.; Reagan, R.L.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Available well control, seismic reflection geometries, and seismic modeling suggest the interpretation of a Norphlet Formation (Upper Jurassic) sand erg in the northeastern De Soto salt basin. Ranging in thickness from less than 100 ft to nearly 1000 ft, the Norphlet erg encompasses an area of approximately 700 mi/sup 2/. Separated from the major gas accumulation in the Norphlet in the Mobile Bay area by the offshore extension of the Pensacola arch, the Norphlet erg appears to be oriented transverse to the axis of the De Soto salt basin. Seismic signatures for the Smackover carbonate, Norphlet sand, and Louann Salt intervals are investigated using synthetic seismograms generated from six wells in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. General characteristics about the reflection coefficients from the major units in the interval are noted. The reflection coefficient information and synthetic seismograms are used to interpret seismic data on a regional basis. Two-dimensional, vertical-incidence, ray-trace modeling of the seismic data is done to aid the interpretation on a detailed basis. Interpreted Norphlet sandstone thicknesses and Louann Salt structures are combined to support the Norphlet Formation sand erg hypothesis.

  17. Paleoenvironments and hydrocarbon potential of Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation of southwestern Alabama and adjacent coastal water area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, E.A.; Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Upper Jurassic Norphlet sediments in southwestern Alabama and the adjacent coastal water area accumulated under arid climatic conditions. The Appalachian Mountains of the eastern United States extended into southwestern Alabama, providing a barrier for air and water circulation during Norphlet deposition. Norphlet paleogeography was dominated by a broad desert plain rimmed to the north and east by the Appalachians and to the south by a developing shallow sea. Initiation of Norphlet sedimentation was a result of erosion of the southern Appalachians. Norphlet conglomerates were deposited in coalescing alluvial fans in proximity to an Appalachian source. The conglomeratic sandstones grade downdip into red-bed lithofacies that accumulated in distal portions of alluvial fan and wadi systems. Quartzose sandstones (Denkman Member) were deposited as dune and interdune sediments on a broad desert plain. The source of the sand was the updip and adjacent alluvial fan, plain, and wadi deposits. A marine transgression was initiated late in Denkman deposition, resulting in the reworking of previously deposited Norphlet sediments. Norphlet hydrocarbon potential in southwestern and offshore Alabama is excellent with four oil and gas fields already established. Petroleum traps discovered to date are primarily structural traps involving salt anticlines, faulted salt anticlines, and extensional fault traps associated with salt movement. Reservoir rocks consist of quartzose sandstones, which are principally eolian in origin. Smackover algal carbonate mudstones were probably the source for the Norphlet hydrocarbons.

  18. Upper Jurassic Norphlet formation: new frontier for hydrocarbon prospecting in the central and eastern Gulf of Mexico regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, E.A.; Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the discovery of oil in 1967 from the Smackover Formation at Toxey field, Choctaw County, Alabama, and of condensate in 1968 from the Norphlet Formation at Flomaton field, Escambia County, Alabama, the Upper Jurassic has become the primary exploration target in southwestern Alabama. Norphlet petroleum traps in the region are principally combination traps involving favorable stratigraphy and salt anticlines (Copeland field), extensional fault traps associated with salt movement (Flomaton field), and faulted salt anticlines (Hatter's Pond and Lower Mobile Bay-Mary Ann fields). Reservoir rocks include marine, dune, and fluvial sandstone lithofacies. Sandstone porosity involves both primary intergranular and secondary dissolution and fracture. Smackover algal carbonate mudstone is probably the source for much of the Norphlet hydrocarbon, but downdip Norphlet marine shales may also be source rocks. The central and eastern Gulf of Mexico regions should continue to be excellent areas to explore for hydrocarbons in the years ahead. Successful Norphlet petroleum prospecting in the area has involved the identification of favorable sandstone lithofacies and structural hydrocarbon traps by using geologic and geophysical methods. Future Norphlet discoveries will require the delineation of stratigraphic and structural/stratigraphic combination hydrocarbon traps using seismic-stratigraphic techniques.

  19. Upper Jurassic Norphlet formation: new frontier for hydrocarbon prospecting in the central and eastern Gulf of Mexico regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, E.A.; Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the discovery of oil in 1967 from the Smackover Formation at Toxey field, Choctaw County, Alabama, and of condensate in 1968 from the Norphlet Formation at Flomaton field, Escambia County, Alabama, the Upper Jurassic has become the primary exploration target in southwestern Alabama. Norphlet petroleum traps in the region are principally combination traps involving favorable stratigraphy and salt anticlines (Copeland field), exensional fault traps associated with salt movement (Flomaton field), and faulted salt anticlines (Hatter's Pond and Lower Mobile Bay-Mary Ann fields). Reservoir rocks include marine, dune, and fluvial sandstone lithofacies. Sandstone porosity involves both primary intergranular and secondary dissolution and fracture. Smackover algal carbonate mudstone is probably the source for much of the Norphlet hydrocarbon, but downdip Norphlet marine shales may also be source rocks. The central and eastern Gulf of Mexico regions should continue to be excellent areas to explore for hydrocarbons in the years ahead. Successful Norphlet petroleum prospecting in the area has involved the identification of favorable sandstone lithofacies and structural hydrocarbon traps by using geologic and geophysical methods. Future Norphlet discoveries will require the delineation of stratigraphic and structural/stratigraphic combination hydrocarbon traps using seismic-stratigraphic techniques.

  20. Improved Upper Limits on the Stochastic Gravitational-Wave Background from 2009-2010 LIGO and Virgo Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aasi, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Alemic, A; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D; Andersen, M; Anderson, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barbet, M; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Bergmann, G; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Buchman, S; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burman, R; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Celerier, C; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C; Colombini, M; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corpuz, A; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Donath, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dossa, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edo, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endr?czi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Gräf, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gushwa, K; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hart, M; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hooper, S; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Huerta, E; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karlen, J; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keiser, G M; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, N G; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Koehlenbeck, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravitational waves from a variety of sources are predicted to superpose to create a stochastic background. This background is expected to contain unique information from throughout the history of the universe that is unavailable through standard electromagnetic observations, making its study of fundamental importance to understanding the evolution of the universe. We carry out a search for the stochastic background with the latest data from LIGO and Virgo. Consistent with predictions from most stochastic gravitational-wave background models, the data display no evidence of a stochastic gravitational-wave signal. Assuming a gravitational-wave spectrum of Omega_GW(f)=Omega_alpha*(f/f_ref)^alpha, we place 95% confidence level upper limits on the energy density of the background in each of four frequency bands spanning 41.5-1726 Hz. In the frequency band of 41.5-169.25 Hz for a spectral index of alpha=0, we constrain the energy density of the stochastic background to be Omega_GW(f)<5.6x10^-6. For the 600-1000...

  1. Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis with Percutaneous Rheolytic Thrombectomy Versus Thrombolysis Alone in Upper and Lower Extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Hyun S., E-mail: sikhkim@jhmi.edu; Patra, Ajanta; Paxton, Ben E.; Khan, Jawad [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science (United States); Streiff, Michael B. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Medicine (United States)

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose. To compare the efficacy of catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) alone versus CDT with rheolytic percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy (PMT) for upper and lower extremity deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Methods. A retrospective cohort of consecutive patients with acute iliofemoral or brachiosubclavian DVT treated with urokinase CDT was identified, and a chart review was conducted. Demographic characteristics, treatment duration, total lytic dose, clot lysis rates and complications were compared in patients treated with urokinase CDT alone or combined CDT and rheolytic PMT. Results. Forty limbs in 36 patients were treated with urokinase CDT alone. Twenty-seven limbs in 21 patients were treated with urokinase CDT and rheolytic PMT. The mean treatment duration for urokinase CDT alone was 48.0 {+-} 27.1 hr compared with 26.3 {+-} 16.6 hr for urokinase CDT and rheolytic PMT (p = 0.0004). The mean urokinase dose required for CDT alone was 5.6 {+-} 5.3 million units compared with 2.7 {+-} 1.8 million units for urokinase CDT with rheolytic PMT (p = 0.008). Complete clot lysis was achieved in 73% (29/40) of DVT treated with urokinase CDT alone compared with 82% (22/27) treated with urokinase CDT with rheolytic PMT. Conclusion. Percutaneous CDT with rheolytic PMT is as effective as CDT alone for acute proximal extremity DVT but requires significantly shorter treatment duration and lower lytic doses. Randomized studies to confirm the benefits of pharmacomechanical thrombolysis in the treatment of acute proximal extremity DVT are warranted.

  2. Upper Atmospheric Density Profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withers, Paul

    · Uncertainties in aerodynamics, problems with signals from shaking solar panel, rotation of instrument about · Change in latitude per unit change in longitude along profile set by orbit inclination and latitude (not engineering) instrument, very high sensitivity, unseen part of 11-yr solar cycle · Current science

  3. Pressurizer tank upper support

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Tod H. (O'Hara Township, Allegheny County, PA); Ott, Howard L. (Kiski Township, Armstrong County, PA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pressurizer tank in a pressurized water nuclear reactor is mounted between structural walls of the reactor on a substructure of the reactor, the tank extending upwardly from the substructure. For bearing lateral loads such as seismic shocks, a girder substantially encircles the pressurizer tank at a space above the substructure and is coupled to the structural walls via opposed sway struts. Each sway strut is attached at one end to the girder and at an opposite end to one of the structural walls, and the sway struts are oriented substantially horizontally in pairs aligned substantially along tangents to the wall of the circular tank. Preferably, eight sway struts attach to the girder at 90.degree. intervals. A compartment encloses the pressurizer tank and forms the structural wall. The sway struts attach to corners of the compartment for maximum stiffness and load bearing capacity. A valve support frame carrying the relief/discharge piping and valves of an automatic depressurization arrangement is fixed to the girder, whereby lateral loads on the relief/discharge piping are coupled directly to the compartment rather than through any portion of the pressurizer tank. Thermal insulation for the valve support frame prevents thermal loading of the piping and valves. The girder is shimmed to define a gap for reducing thermal transfer, and the girder is free to move vertically relative to the compartment walls, for accommodating dimensional variation of the pressurizer tank with changes in temperature and pressure.

  4. Pressurizer tank upper support

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, T.H.; Ott, H.L.

    1994-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A pressurizer tank in a pressurized water nuclear reactor is mounted between structural walls of the reactor on a substructure of the reactor, the tank extending upwardly from the substructure. For bearing lateral loads such as seismic shocks, a girder substantially encircles the pressurizer tank at a space above the substructure and is coupled to the structural walls via opposed sway struts. Each sway strut is attached at one end to the girder and at an opposite end to one of the structural walls, and the sway struts are oriented substantially horizontally in pairs aligned substantially along tangents to the wall of the circular tank. Preferably, eight sway struts attach to the girder at 90[degree] intervals. A compartment encloses the pressurizer tank and forms the structural wall. The sway struts attach to corners of the compartment for maximum stiffness and load bearing capacity. A valve support frame carrying the relief/discharge piping and valves of an automatic depressurization arrangement is fixed to the girder, whereby lateral loads on the relief/discharge piping are coupled directly to the compartment rather than through any portion of the pressurizer tank. Thermal insulation for the valve support frame prevents thermal loading of the piping and valves. The girder is shimmed to define a gap for reducing thermal transfer, and the girder is free to move vertically relative to the compartment walls, for accommodating dimensional variation of the pressurizer tank with changes in temperature and pressure. 10 figures.

  5. Application of the ELOHA Framework to Regulated Rivers in the Upper Tennessee River Basin: A Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL; Orth, Dr. Donald J [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Dolloff, Dr. Charles A [USDA Forest Service, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences, Virginia Tech; Mathews, David C [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order for habitat restoration in regulated rivers to be effective at large scales, broadly applicable frameworks are needed that provide measurable objectives and contexts for management. The Ecological Limits of Hydrologic Alteration (ELOHA) framework was created as a template to assess hydrologic alterations, develop relationships between altered streamflow and ecology, and establish environmental flow standards. We tested the utility of ELOHA in informing flow restoration applications for fish and riparian communities in regulated rivers in the Upper Tennessee River Basin (UTRB). We followed the steps of ELOHA to generate flow alteration-ecological response relationships and then determined whether those relationships could predict fish and riparian responses to flow restoration in the Cheoah River, a regulated system within the UTRB. Although ELOHA provided a robust template to construct hydrologic information and predict hydrology for ungaged locations, our results do not support the assertion that over-generalized univariate relationships between flow and ecology can produce results sufficient to guide management in regulated rivers. After constructing multivariate models, we successfully developed predictive relationships between flow alterations and fish/riparian responses. In accordance with model predictions, riparian encroachment displayed consistent decreases with increases in flow magnitude in the Cheoah River; however, fish richness did not increase as predicted four years post- restoration. Our results suggest that altered temperature and substrate and the current disturbance regime may have reduced opportunities for fish species colonization. Our case study highlights the need for interdisciplinary science in defining environmental flows for regulated rivers and the need for adaptive management approaches once flows are restored.

  6. The Upper Asymptotic Giant Branch of the Elliptical Galaxy Maffei 1, and Comparisons with M32 and NGC 5128

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. J. Davidge

    2002-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep near-infrared images obtained with adaptive optics systems on the Gemini North and Canada-France-Hawaii telescopes are used to investigate the bright stellar content and central regions of the nearby elliptical galaxy Maffei 1. Stars evolving on the upper asymptotic giant branch (AGB) are resolved in a field 3 arcmin from the center of the galaxy. The locus of bright giants on the (K, H-K) color-magnitude diagram is consistent with a population of stars like those in Baade's Window reddened by E(H-K) = 0.28 +/- 0.05 mag. This corresponds to A_V = 4.5 +/- 0.8 mag, and is consistent with previous estimates of the line of sight extinction computed from the integrated properties of Maffei 1. The AGB-tip occurs at K = 20.0, which correponds to M_K = -8.7; hence, the AGB-tip brightness in Maffei 1 is comparable to that in M32, NGC 5128, and the bulges of M31 and the Milky-Way. The near-infrared luminosity functions (LFs) of bright AGB stars in Maffei 1, M32, and NGC 5128 are also in excellent agreement, both in terms of overall shape and the relative density of infrared-bright stars with respect to the fainter stars that dominate the light at visible and red wavelengths. It is concluded that the brightest AGB stars in Maffei 1, NGC 5128, M32, and the bulge of M31 trace an old, metal-rich population, rather than an intermediate age population. It is also demonstrated that Maffei 1 contains a distinct red nucleus, and this is likely the optical signature of low-level nuclear activity and/or a distinct central stellar population. Finally, there is an absence of globular clusters brighter than the peak of the globular cluster LF in the central 700 x 700 parsecs of Maffei 1.

  7. Climatic implications of correlated upper Pleistocene glacial and fluvial deposits on the Cinca and Gallego rivers, NE Spain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Claudia J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcdonald, Eric [NON LANL; Sancho, Carlos [NON LANL; Pena, Jose- Luis [NON LANL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We correlate Upper Pleistocene glacial and fluvial deposits of the Cinca and Gallego River valleys (south central Pyrenees and Ebro basin, Spain) using geomorphic position, luminescence dates, and time-related trends in soil development. The ages obtained from glacial deposits indicate glacial periods at 85 {+-} 5 ka, 64 {+-} 11 ka, and 36 {+-} 3 ka (from glacial till) and 20 {+-} 3 ka (from loess). The fluvial drainage system, fed by glaciers in the headwaters, developed extensive terrace systems in the Cinca River valley at 178 {+-} 21 ka, 97 {+-} 16 ka, 61 {+-} 4 ka, 47 {+-} 4 ka, and 11 {+-} 1 ka, and in the Gallego River valley at 151 {+-} 11 ka, 68 {+-} 7 ka, and 45 {+-} 3 ka. The times of maximum geomorphic activity related to cold phases coincide with Late Pleistocene marine isotope stages and heinrich events. The maximum extent of glaciers during the last glacial occurred at 64 {+-} 11 ka, and the terraces correlated with this glacial phase are the most extensive in both the Cinca (61 {+-} 4 ka) and Gallego (68 {+-} 7 ka) valleys, indicating a strong increase in fluvial discharge and availability of sediments related to the transition to deglaciation. The global Last Glacial Maximum is scarcely represented in the south central Pyrenees owing to dominantly dry conditions at that time. Precipitation must be controlled by the position of the Iberian Peninsula with respect to the North Atlantic atmospheric circulation system. The glacial systems and the associated fluvial dynamic seem sensitive to (1) global climate changes controlled by insolation, (2) North Atlantic thermohaline circulation influenced by freshwater pulses into the North Atlantic, and (3) anomalies in atmospheric circulation in the North Atlantic controlling precipitation on the Iberian peninsula. The model of glacial and fluvial evolution during the Late Pleistocene in northern Spain could be extrapolated to other glaciated mountainous areas in southern Europe.

  8. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Lorazepam to Reduce Liver Motion in Patients Receiving Upper Abdominal Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsang, Derek S.; Voncken, Francine E.M.; Tse, Regina V. [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Sykes, Jenna [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Wong, Rebecca K.S.; Dinniwell, Rob E.; Kim, John; Ringash, Jolie; Brierley, James D.; Cummings, Bernard J.; Brade, Anthony [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Dawson, Laura A., E-mail: laura.dawson@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Reduction of respiratory motion is desirable to reduce the volume of normal tissues irradiated, to improve concordance of planned and delivered doses, and to improve image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). We hypothesized that pretreatment lorazepam would lead to a measurable reduction of liver motion. Methods and Materials: Thirty-three patients receiving upper abdominal IGRT were recruited to a double-blinded randomized controlled crossover trial. Patients were randomized to 1 of 2 study arms: arm 1 received lorazepam 2 mg by mouth on day 1, followed by placebo 4 to 8 days later; arm 2 received placebo on day 1, followed by lorazepam 4 to 8 days later. After tablet ingestion and daily radiation therapy, amplitude of liver motion was measured on both study days. The primary outcomes were reduction in craniocaudal (CC) liver motion using 4-dimensional kV cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and the proportion of patients with liver motion ?5 mm. Secondary endpoints included motion measured with cine magnetic resonance imaging and kV fluoroscopy. Results: Mean relative and absolute reduction in CC amplitude with lorazepam was 21% and 2.5 mm respectively (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-3.9, P=.001), as assessed with CBCT. Reduction in CC amplitude to ?5 mm residual liver motion was seen in 13% (95% CI 1%-25%) of patients receiving lorazepam (vs 10% receiving placebo, P=NS); 65% (95% CI 48%-81%) had reduction in residual CC liver motion to ?10 mm (vs 52% with placebo, P=NS). Patients with large respiratory movement and patients who took lorazepam ?60 minutes before imaging had greater reductions in liver CC motion. Mean reductions in liver CC amplitude on magnetic resonance imaging and fluoroscopy were nonsignificant. Conclusions: Lorazepam reduces liver motion in the CC direction; however, average magnitude of reduction is small, and most patients have residual motion >5 mm.

  9. Modeling Storm Water Runoff and Soil Interflow in a Managed Forest, Upper Coastal Plain of the Southeast US.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callahan, T.J.; Cook, J.D.; Coleman, Mark D.; Amatya, Devendra M.; Trettin, Carl C.

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Forest Service-Savannah River is conducting a hectare-scale monitoring and modeling study on forest productivity in a Short Rotation Woody Crop plantation at the Savannah River Site, which is on Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina. Detailed surveys, i.e., topography, soils, vegetation, and dainage network, of small (2-5 ha) plots have been completed in a 2 square-km watershed draining to Fourmile Creek, a tributary of the Savannah River. We wish to experimentally determine the relative importance of interflow on water yield and water quality at this site. Interflow (shallow subsurface lateral flow) can short-circuit rainfall infiltration, preventing deep seepage and resulting in water and chemical residence times in the watershed much shorter than that if deep seepage were the sole component of infiltration. The soil series at the site (Wagram, Dothan, Fuquay, Ogeechee, and Vaucluse) each have a clay-rich B horizon of decimeter-scale thickness at depths of 1-2 m below surface. As interflow is affected by rainfall intensity and duration and soil properties such as porosity, permeability, and antecedent soil moisture, our calculations made using the Green and Ampt equation show that the intensity and duration of a storm event must be greater than about 3 cm per hour and 2 hours, respectively, in order to initiate interflow for the least permeable soils series (Vaucluse). Tabulated values of soil properties were used in these preliminary calculations. Simulations of the largest rainfall events from 1972-2002 data using the Green and Ampt equation provide an interflow: rainfall ratio of 0 for the permeable Wagram soil series (no interflow) compared to 0.46 for the less permeable Vaucluse soil series. These initial predictions will be compared to storm water hydrographs of interflow collected at the outflow point of each plot and refined using more detailed soil property measurements.

  10. Positivity of the virial coefficients in lattice dimer models and upper bounds on the number of matchings on graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Butera; P. Federbush; M. Pernici

    2015-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a relation between the virial expansion coefficients of the pressure and the entropy expansion coefficients in the case of the monomer-dimer model on infinite regular lattices, we have shown that, on hypercubic lattices of any dimension, the virial coefficients are positive through the 20th order. We have observed that all virial coefficients so far known for this system are positive also on infinite regular lattices with different structure. We are thus led to conjecture that the virial expansion coefficients $m_k $ are always positive. These considerations can be extended to the study of related bounds on finite graphs generalizing the infinite regular lattices, namely the finite grids and the regular biconnected graphs. The validity of the bounds $\\Delta^k {\\rm ln}(i! N(i)) \\le 0$ for $k \\ge 2$, where $N(i)$ is the number of configurations of $i$ dimers on the graph and $\\Delta$ is the forward difference operator, is shown to correspond to the positivity of the virial coefficients. Our tests on many finite lattice graphs indicate that on large lattices these bounds are satisfied, giving support to the conjecture on the positivity of the virial coefficients. An exhaustive survey of some classes of regular biconnected graphs with a not too large number $v$ of vertices shows only few violations of these bounds. We conjecture that the frequency of the violations vanishes as $v \\to \\infty$. We find rigorous upper bounds on $N(i)$ valid for arbitrary graphs and for regular graphs. The similarity between the Heilman-Lieb inequality and the one conjectured above suggests that one study the stricter inequality $m_k \\ge \\frac{1}{2k}$ for the virial coefficients, which is valid for all the known coefficients of the infinite regular lattice models.

  11. Petrographic characterization of Kentucky coal. Final report. Part III. Petrographic characterization of the Upper Elkhorn No. 2 coal zone of eastern Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raione, R.P.; Hower, J.C.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the study of the Upper Elkhorn No. 2 coal zone in the Big Sandy Reserve District and the surrounding area of eastern Kentucky. The seams were analyzed using megascopic and microscopic petrography and chemical methods. The Upper Elkhorn No. 2 consists predominantly of clarain. A fair degree of correlation of fusain bands and clay partings between data sites is apparent. Microscopically, the vitrinite group of macerals are dominant. A rank increase from high volatile B to high volatile A bituminous to the southwest was noted. Pseudovitrinite is associated negatively with vitrinite and has a higher reflectance and microhardness than vitrinite. Both factors may indicate source material and/or environmental differences in the respective origins of the maceral. High inertinite and lipinite areas, low ash and sulfur contents, and the distribution of thin coals may be indicative of paleotopographic highs. 62 references, 26 figures, 8 tables.

  12. version 17.0 FERMILAB-PUB-10-???-E CDF Note 10101, D0 Note 6039 Combined Tevatron upper limit on gg H W +

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermilab

    ,82 D. Brown ,22 E. Brubaker ,83 X.B. Bu ,8 D. Buchholz ,86 J. Budagov ,53 H.S. Budd ,115 S. Budd ,87. Campanelli ,68 M. Campbell ,104 F. Canelli ,82, 83 A. Canepa ,123 B. Carls ,87 D. Carlsmith ,134 R. Carosiversion 17.0 FERMILAB-PUB-10-???-E CDF Note 10101, D0 Note 6039 Combined Tevatron upper limit on gg

  13. Upper limit of the energy of the photon and the phase change of photon to material particles at the Scwartzschild radius

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Radhakrishnan Nair

    2005-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of Scwartzschild radius is extended to the photon and the upper limit imposed on the energy of a photon as a result of the three characteristics of the photon--the constancy of the velocity of light, the spin value of $1\\hslash$ and the zero rest mass of the photon--is shown. Further the phase change that occurs to the photon at the Scwartzschild radius, from energy to matter as a result of vacuum fluctuations is indicated.

  14. The lithology, environment of deposition, and reservoir evaluation of sandstones in the Upper Queen Formation (Guadalupian, Permian) at Concho Bluff North and Jennifer Fields, Upton and Ector Counties, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harper, James Broox

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to sandstone and then back to a mudstone, and each cycle records the progradation and retreat of fluvial- deltaic sandflats and mudflats in and out of the back-reef playa. The two fields are considered to be stratigraphic traps on a broad regional.... The playa and mudflats are the non-reservoir facies, and have porosities less than 10% and permeabilities less than 1 md. The North Concho Bluff Field was discovered in 1956, and has produced 7, 515, 218 bbls of oil through 1987. The laterally...

  15. Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocial Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin, 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, Brenda B.; Pearsons, Todd N.; McMichael, Geoffrey A. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Select ecological interactions and spring chinook salmon residual/precocial abundance were monitored in 1998 as part of the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project's supplementation monitoring program. Monitoring these variables is part of an effort to help evaluate the factors that contribute to, or limit supplementation success. The ecological interactions that were monitored were prey consumption, competition for food, and competition for space. The abundance of spring chinook salmon life-history forms that have the potential to be influenced by supplementation and that have important ecological and genetic roles were monitored (residuals and precocials). Residual spring chinook salmon do not migrate to the ocean during the normal emigration period and continue to rear in freshwater. Precocials are those salmon that precocially mature in freshwater. The purpose of sampling during 1998 was to collect baseline data one year prior to the release of hatchery spring chinook salmon which occurred during the spring of 1999. All sampling that the authors report on here was conducted in upper Yakima River during summer and fall 1998. The stomach fullness of juvenile spring chinook salmon during the summer and fall averaged 12%. The food competition index suggested that mountain whitefish (0.59), rainbow trout (0.55), and redside shiner (0.55) were competing for food with spring chinook salmon. The space competition index suggested that rainbow trout (0.31) and redside shiner (0.39) were competing for space with spring chinook salmon but mountain whitefish (0.05) were not. Age-0 spring chinook salmon selected a fairly narrow range of microhabitat parameters in the summer and fall relative to what was available. Mean focal depths and velocities for age 0 spring chinook salmon during the summer were 0.5 m {+-} 0.2 m and 0.26 m/s {+-} 0.19 m/s, and during the fall 0.5 m {+-} 0.2 m and 0.24 m/s {+-} 0.18 m/s. Among potential competitors, age 1+ rainbow trout exhibited the greatest degree of microhabitat overlap with spring chinook salmon. Abundance of naturally occurring spring chinook salmon residuals (age 1+ during the summer) was low (< 0.007/m), representing less than 2% of the naturally produced spring chinook salmon (age 0+ and age 1+ during the summer). Abundance of naturally occurring spring chinook salmon that complete their life cycle in freshwater was high relative to anadromous adults. The authors observed an average of 9.5 precocially mature spring chinook salmon on redds with anadromous adults. In addition, 87% of the redds with anadromous adults present also had precocial males attending. All findings in this report should be considered preliminary and subject to further revision as more data and analytical results become available.

  16. The impact of upper tropospheric friction and Gill-type heating on the location and strength of the Tropical Easterly Jet: Idealized physics in a dry Atmospheric General Circulation Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rao, Samrat

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) with idealized and complete physics has been used to evaluate the Tropical Easterly Jet (TEJ) jet. In idealized physics, the role of upper tropospheric friction has been found to be important in getting realistic upper tropospheric zonal wind patterns in response to heating. In idealized physics, the location and strength of the TEJ as a response to Gill heating has been studied. Though the Gill model is considered to be widely successful in capturing the lower tropospheric response, it is found to be inadequate in explaining the location and strength of the upper level TEJ. Heating from the Gill model and realistic upper tropospheric friction does not lead to the formation of a TEJ.

  17. Separating snow, clean and debris covered ice in the Upper Indus Basin, Hindukush-Karakoram-Himalayas, using Landsat images between 1998 and 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan,Asif,; Naz, Bibi S.; Bowling,Laura C.

    1 Separating snow, clean and debris covered ice in the Upper 1 Indus Basin, Hindukush-Karakoram-Himalayas, using Landsat 2 images between 1998-2002 3 Asif Khan1,*, Bibi S. Naz2,3 and, Laura C. Bowling2 4 1Department of Engineering... and 2002 were selected at the end of 172 the melting season (i.e. July, August and September), however, to cover the whole UIB an image 173 8 from 2009 has also been included. Furthermore, to maintain consistency in the identification of 174 glacier...

  18. An insoluble residue study of the upper Walnut Formation, Comanche Peak Limestone, and Edwards Limestone, Bosque and western McLennan counties, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simpson, Jimmie Darrell

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    R' ERECERICKSBURG CROUP I &AHKH&HHwAT VVVVVV VvVV LINE AA' NORTHERN LIMIT OF CHERT LINE BBI SOUTHERN LIMIT OF KIAMICHI LINE CC' SOUTHERN LIMIT OF BIOHERMS SCALE WI IAIISOR' 25 50 . . : ~ :. ;: 0 GEORGETONN C ~ , ', 'T CI MILES Fig. 2... x Main Street Pawpaw Weno Denton Fort Worth Duck Creek Kiamichi 0-15& Edwards 15'-125' Comanche Peak 70'-125' Upper Marl Member Walnut 125'-175' Paluxy 0-25' g 5 Glen Rose Fig. 3. Columnar section of Early Cretaceous formation...

  19. CO mass upper limits in the Fomalhaut ring - the importance of NLTE excitation in debris discs and future prospects with ALMA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matrà, L; Wyatt, M C; Dent, W R F

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, gas has been observed in an increasing number of debris discs, though its nature remains to be determined. Here, we analyse CO molecular excitation in optically thin debris discs, and search ALMA Cycle-0 data for CO J=3-2 emission in the Fomalhaut ring. No significant line emission is observed; we set a 3-$\\sigma$ upper limit on the integrated line flux of 0.16 Jy km s$^{-1}$. We show a significant dependency of the CO excitation on the density of collisional partners $n$, on the gas kinetic temperature $T_k$ and on the ambient radiation field $J$, suggesting that assumptions widely used for protoplanetary discs (e.g. LTE) do not necessarily apply to their low density debris counterparts. When applied to the Fomalhaut ring, we consider a primordial origin scenario where H$_2$ dominates collisional excitation of CO, and a secondary origin scenario dominated by e$^-$ and H$_2$O. In either scenario, we obtain a strict upper limit on the CO mass of 4.9 $\\times$ 10$^{-4}$ M$_{\\oplus}$. This arises...

  20. Characterization of Low-mass, Wide-separation Substellar Companions to Stars in Upper Scorpius: Near-infrared Photometry and Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lachapelle, François-René; Gagné, Jonathan; Jayawardhana, Ray; Janson, Markus; Helling, Christiane; Witte, Soeren

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new 0.9-2.45 $\\mu$m spectroscopy ($R \\sim 1000$), and $Y$, $J$, $H$, $K_s$, $L^\\prime$ photometry, obtained at Gemini North, of three low-mass brown dwarf companions on wide orbits around young stars of the Upper Scorpius OB association: HIP 78530 B, [PGZ2001] J161031.9-191305 B, and GSC 06214-00210 B. We use these data to assess the companions' spectral type, temperature, surface gravity and mass, as well as the ability of the BT-Settl and Drift-Phoenix atmosphere models to reproduce the spectral features of young substellar objects. For completeness, we also analyze the archival spectroscopy and photometry of the Upper Scorpius planetary mass companion 1RXS J160929.1-210524 b. Based on a comparison with model spectra we find that the companions, in the above order, have effective temperatures of 2700, 2500, 2300 and 1700 K. These temperatures are consistent with our inferred spectral types, respectively M7 $\\beta$, M9 $\\gamma$, M9 $\\gamma$, and L4 $\\gamma$. From bolometric luminosities estimated ...